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Sample records for adaptive cellular stress

  1. Mitochondrial Stress Signaling Promotes Cellular Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of many complex diseases, as well as the ageing process. Much of the research on mitochondrial dysfunction has focused on how mitochondrial damage may potentiate pathological phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the less well-studied mechanisms by which the cell adapts to mitochondrial perturbations. This involves communication of stress to the cell and successful induction of quality control responses, which include mitophagy, unfolded protein response, upregulation of antioxidant and DNA repair enzymes, morphological changes, and if all else fails apoptosis. The mitochondrion is an inherently stressful environment and we speculate that dysregulation of stress signaling or an inability to switch on these adaptations during times of mitochondrial stress may underpin mitochondrial dysfunction and hence amount to pathological states over time. PMID:24587804

  2. Adaptive cellular response to osmotic stress in pig articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, P; Della Salda, L; De Angelis, E; Maltarello, M C; Petronini, P G; Cabassi, E; Marcato, P S; Maraldi, N M; Borghetti, A F

    1995-04-01

    The authors studied the effects of a wide range of medium osmolarities (from 0.28 osM (physiological osmolarity of plasma and synovial fluid) to 0.58 osM) by altering Na+ concentration in high density cultures of pig articular chondrocytes in order to analyze the behaviour of some functional and structural parameters during cell adaptation to these imposed changes in the ionic environment. Biochemical and morphological results indicated that, even if isolated from the tissue matrix and cultured in vitro, chondrocytes maintained active osmoregulation systems which are present in living conditions. They showed a similar biochemical and morphological behavior when cultured at 0.28 osM and 0.38 osM but they were able, with regard to protein synthesis, aminoacid transport and proliferation rates, to respond quickly and to adapt to 0.48 osM medium as well. On the contrary, the treatment at the highest osmolarity (0.58 osM) early altered these biochemical parameters and was detrimental or even gave rise to lethal damage during long-term treatment. Furthermore, while chondrocytes cultured in 0.28-0.38 osM medium maintained phenotypic characteristics in culture, the higher osmolarities (0.48-0.58 osM) caused morphological changes in cell populations resulting in loss of phenotypic cell stability as demonstrated by their taking on a fibroblast-like shape as well as a lack of ability to assembly matrix proteoglycans. PMID:7778094

  3. Adaptive Cellular Stress Pathways as Therapeutic Targets of Dietary Phytochemicals: Focus on the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Daeui; Chung, Hae Young

    2014-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, it has been widely promulgated that the chemicals in plants that are good for health act as direct scavengers of free radicals. Here we review evidence that favors a different hypothesis for the health benefits of plant consumption, namely, that some phytochemicals exert disease-preventive and therapeutic actions by engaging one or more adaptive cellular response pathways in cells. The evolutionary basis for the latter mechanism is grounded in the fact that plants produce natural antifeedant/noxious chemicals that discourage insects and other organisms from eating them. However, in the amounts typically consumed by humans, the phytochemicals activate one or more conserved adaptive cellular stress response pathways and thereby enhance the ability of cells to resist injury and disease. Examplesof such pathways include those involving the transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and forkhead box subgroup O, as well as the production and action of trophic factors and hormones. Translational research to develop interventions that target these pathways may lead to new classes of therapeutic agents that act by stimulating adaptive stress response pathways to bolster endogenous defenses against tissue injury and disease. Because neurons are particularly sensitive to potentially noxious phytochemicals, we focus on the nervous system but also include findings from other cell types in which actions of phytochemicals on specific signal transduction pathways have been more thoroughly studied. PMID:24958636

  4. Adaptive cellular stress pathways as therapeutic targets of dietary phytochemicals: focus on the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Daeui; Chung, Hae Young; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    During the past 5 decades, it has been widely promulgated that the chemicals in plants that are good for health act as direct scavengers of free radicals. Here we review evidence that favors a different hypothesis for the health benefits of plant consumption, namely, that some phytochemicals exert disease-preventive and therapeutic actions by engaging one or more adaptive cellular response pathways in cells. The evolutionary basis for the latter mechanism is grounded in the fact that plants produce natural antifeedant/noxious chemicals that discourage insects and other organisms from eating them. However, in the amounts typically consumed by humans, the phytochemicals activate one or more conserved adaptive cellular stress response pathways and thereby enhance the ability of cells to resist injury and disease. Examplesof such pathways include those involving the transcription factors nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and forkhead box subgroup O, as well as the production and action of trophic factors and hormones. Translational research to develop interventions that target these pathways may lead to new classes of therapeutic agents that act by stimulating adaptive stress response pathways to bolster endogenous defenses against tissue injury and disease. Because neurons are particularly sensitive to potentially noxious phytochemicals, we focus on the nervous system but also include findings from other cell types in which actions of phytochemicals on specific signal transduction pathways have been more thoroughly studied. PMID:24958636

  5. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  6. Ecological comparison of cellular stress responses among populations – normalizing RT-qPCR values to investigate differential environmental adaptations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising temperatures and other environmental factors influenced by global climate change can cause increased physiological stress for many species and lead to range shifts or regional population extinctions. To advance the understanding of species’ response to change and establish links between individual and ecosystem adaptations, physiological reactions have to be compared between populations living in different environments. Although changes in expression of stress genes are relatively easy to quantify, methods for reliable comparison of the data remain a contentious issue. Using normalization algorithms and further methodological considerations, we compare cellular stress response gene expression levels measured by RT-qPCR after air exposure experiments among different subpopulations of three species of the intertidal limpet Nacella. Results Reference gene assessment algorithms reveal that stable reference genes can differ among investigated populations and / or treatment groups. Normalized expression values point to differential defense strategies to air exposure in the investigated populations, which either employ a pronounced cellular stress response in the inducible Hsp70 forms, or exhibit a comparatively high constitutive expression of Hsps (heat shock proteins) while showing only little response in terms of Hsp induction. Conclusions This study serves as a case study to explore the methodological prerequisites of physiological stress response comparisons among ecologically and phylogenetically different organisms. To improve the reliability of gene expression data and compare the stress responses of subpopulations under potential genetic divergence, reference gene stability algorithms are valuable and necessary tools. As the Hsp70 isoforms have been shown to play different roles in the acute stress responses and increased constitutive defenses of populations in their different habitats, these comparative studies can yield insight into

  7. Hsp90 Stress Potentiates Rapid Cellular Adaptation through Induction of Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangbo; Bradford, William D.; Seidel, Chris W.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Aneuploidy, a state of having uneven numbers of chromosomes, is a form of large-effect mutation able to confer adaptive phenotypes under diverse stress conditions1,2. Here we investigate whether pleiotropic stress could in turn induce aneuploidy in budding yeast. We show that while diverse stresses can induce an increase in chromosome instability (CIN), proteotoxic stress, caused by transient Hsp90 inhibition or heat-shock, drastically elevated CIN to produce karyotypically mosaic cell population. The latter effect is linked to an evolutionarily conserved role for Hsp90 chaperon complexes in kinetochore assembly3,4. Continued growth in the presence of Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in emergence of drug-resistant colonies with chromosome XV gain. This drug-resistance phenotype is a quantitative trait involving copy number increases of at least two genes located on chromosome XV. Short-term exposure to Hsp90 stress potentiated fast adaptation to unrelated cyto-toxic compounds through different aneuploid chromosome stoichiometries. These findings demonstrate that aneuploidy is a form of stress-inducible mutation in eukaryotes, capable of fueling rapid phenotypic evolution and drug resistance, and reveal a new role for Hsp90 in regulating the emergence of adaptive traits under stress. PMID:22286062

  8. Induction of osmoadaptive mechanisms and modulation of cellular physiology help Bacillus licheniformis strain SSA 61 adapt to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sangeeta; Aggarwal, Chetana; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Bandeppa, G S; Khan, Md Aslam; Pearson, Lauren M; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Giometti, Carol S; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis strain SSA 61, originally isolated from Sambhar salt lake, was observed to grow even in the presence of 25 % salt stress. Osmoadaptive mechanisms of this halotolerant B. licheniformis strain SSA 61, for long-term survival and growth under salt stress, were determined. Proline was the preferentially accumulated compatible osmolyte. There was also increased accumulation of antioxidants ascorbic acid and glutathione. Among the different antioxidative enzymes assayed, superoxide dismutase played the most crucial role in defense against salt-induced stress in the organism. Adaptation to stress by the organism involved modulation of cellular physiology at various levels. There was enhanced expression of known proteins playing essential roles in stress adaptation, such as chaperones DnaK and GroEL, and general stress protein YfkM and polynucleotide phosphorylase/polyadenylase. Proteins involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathway, ribosome structure, and peptide elongation were also overexpressed. Salt stress-induced modulation of expression of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism was observed. There was up-regulation of a number of enzymes involved in generation of NADH and NADPH, indicating increased cellular demand for both energy and reducing power. PMID:25561404

  9. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  10. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  11. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis. PMID:27048813

  12. Regulation of autophagy in oxygen-dependent cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by supraphysiological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), can cause cellular injury associated with protein and lipid oxidation, DNA damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The cellular responses triggered by oxidative stress include the altered regulation of signaling pathways that culminate in the regulation of cell survival or cell death pathways. Recent studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process that governs the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins, may represent a general cellular and tissue response to oxidative stress. The autophagic pathway involves the encapsulation of substrates in double-membraned vesicles, which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for enzymatic degradation and recycling of metabolic precursors. Autophagy may play multifunctional roles in cellular adaptation to stress, by maintaining mitochondrial integrity, and removing damaged proteins. Additionally, autophagy may play important roles in the regulation of inflammation and immune function. Modulation of the autophagic pathway has been reported in cell culture models of oxidative stress, including altered states of oxygen tension (i.e., hypoxia, hyperoxia), and exposure to oxidants. Furthermore, proteins that regulate autophagy may be subject to redox regulation. The heme oxygenase- 1 (HO)-1 enzyme system may have a role in the regulation of autophagy. Recent studies suggest that carbon monoxide (CO), a reaction product of HO activity which can alter mitochondrial function, may induce autophagy in cultured epithelial cells. In conclusion, current research suggests a central role for autophagy as a mammalian oxidative stress response and its interrelationship to other stress defense systems. PMID:23092322

  13. Adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of cellular priming.

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, D R; Cleveland, J C; Moore, E E; Partrick, D A; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mechanisms of cellular priming resulting in both adaptive and maladaptive responses to subsequent injury and strategies for manipulating this priming to constructive therapeutic advantage are explored. BACKGROUND DATA: A cell is prepared or educated by an initial insult (priming stimulus). Investigations in both laboratory animals and humans indicate that cells, organs, and perhaps even whole patients respond differently to a proximal second insult ("second hit") by virtue of this prior environmental history. The opportunity to achieve the primed state appears to be conserved across almost all cell types. The initial stimulus transmits a message to the cellular machinery that influences the cell's response to a subsequent challenge. This response may result in an exaggerated inflammatory response in the case of the neutrophil (an often maladaptive process) or an improved tolerance to injury by the myocyte (adaptive response). Our global hypothesis is that cellular priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process that invokes common intracellular targets across multiple cell types. We further postulate that these targets create a language based on the transient phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular enzymes that is therapeutically accessible. CONCLUSIONS: Priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process transduced by means of intracellular targets across multiple cell types. The potential therapeutic strategies outlined involve the receptor-mediated manipulation of cellular events. These events are transmitted through an intracellular language that instructs the cell regarding its behavior in response to subsequent stimulation. Understanding these intracellular events represents a realistic goal of priming and preconditioning biology and will likely lead to clinical control of the primed state. PMID:9389392

  14. Plant adaptation to drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Supratim; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Kumar, Anuj; Pereira, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Plants in their natural habitats adapt to drought stress in the environment through a variety of mechanisms, ranging from transient responses to low soil moisture to major survival mechanisms of escape by early flowering in absence of seasonal rainfall. However, crop plants selected by humans to yield products such as grain, vegetable, or fruit in favorable environments with high inputs of water and fertilizer are expected to yield an economic product in response to inputs. Crop plants selected for their economic yield need to survive drought stress through mechanisms that maintain crop yield. Studies on model plants for their survival under stress do not, therefore, always translate to yield of crop plants under stress, and different aspects of drought stress response need to be emphasized. The crop plant model rice ( Oryza sativa) is used here as an example to highlight mechanisms and genes for adaptation of crop plants to drought stress. PMID:27441087

  15. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  16. A DNA-dependent stress response involving DNA-PK occurs in hypoxic cells and contributes to cellular adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bouquet, Fanny; Ousset, Marielle; Biard, Denis; Fallone, Frédérique; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Frit, Philippe; Salles, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) signalling and repair. We report that DNA-PK is activated by mild hypoxia conditions (0.1-1% O₂) as shown by (1) its autophosphorylation on Ser2056, and (2) its mobilisation from a soluble nucleoplasmic compartment to a less extractable nuclear fraction. The recruitment of DNA-PK was not followed by activation and recruitment of the XRCC4-DNA-ligase-IV complex, suggesting that DSBs are not responsible for activation of DNA-PK. To unravel the mechanism of DNA-PK activation, we show that exposure of cells to trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, leads to DNA-PK autophosphorylation and relocalisation to DNA. Histone acetylation (mainly H3K14) is increased in hypoxic cells and treatment with anacardic acid, an inhibitor of histone acetyl transferase, prevented both histone modifications and DNA-PK activation in hypoxic conditions. Importantly, in using either silenced DNA-PK cells or cells exposed to a specific DNA-PK inhibitor (NU7026), we demonstrated that hypoxic DNA-PK activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 and one subsequent target gene, GLUT1. Our results show that hypoxia initiates chromatin modification and consequently DNA-PK activation, which positively regulate cellular oxygen-sensing and oxygen-signalling pathways. PMID:21576354

  17. Hormesis and adaptive cellular control systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hormetic dose response occurs for many endpoints associated with exposures of biological organisms to environmental stressors. Cell-based U- or inverted U-shaped responses may derive from common processes involved in activation of adaptive responses required to protect cells from...

  18. Cellular modes of adaptation to environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckle, William R.

    2001-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells are remarkably adaptable entities. Whether embedded in solid tissues or freely suspended in blood or other fluids, cells principally exist in an aqueous environment but maintain a hydrophobic barrier, the plasma membrane, across which changes in the environment are detected. Utilizing specialized macromolecular components, cells can sense changes in temperature, hydrostatic pressure, oxygen tension, shear, shape, osmolarity, pH, electrical potential, electromagnetic radiation, and the concentrations of specific chemical compounds. Modes of response are equally varied, ranging from rapid secretion of stored substances to irreversible functional differentiation to self-destruction. Recent research has elucidated many of the enzymatic and genetic programs that accomplish these adaptations and suggests novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. DAMPs and autophagy: cellular adaptation to injury and unscheduled cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuhong; Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated catabolic process involving the degradation of intracellular contents (e.g., proteins and organelles) as well as invading microbes (e.g., parasites, bacteria and viruses). Multiple forms of cellular stress can stimulate this pathway, including nutritional imbalances, oxygen deprivation, immunological response, genetic defects, chromosomal anomalies and cytotoxic stress. Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are released by stressed cells undergoing autophagy or injury, and act as endogenous danger signals to regulate the subsequent inflammatory and immune response. A complex relationship exists between DAMPs and autophagy in cellular adaption to injury and unscheduled cell death. Since both autophagy and DAMPs are important for pathogenesis of human disease, it is crucial to understand how they interplay to sustain homeostasis in stressful or dangerous environments. PMID:23388380

  20. Kir6.2 is required for adaptation to stress.

    PubMed

    Zingman, Leonid V; Hodgson, Denice M; Bast, Peter H; Kane, Garvan C; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Gumina, Richard J; Pucar, Darko; Bienengraeber, Martin; Dzeja, Petras P; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Alekseev, Alexey E; Terzic, Andre

    2002-10-01

    Reaction to stress requires feedback adaptation of cellular functions to secure a response without distress, but the molecular order of this process is only partially understood. Here, we report a previously unrecognized regulatory element in the general adaptation syndrome. Kir6.2, the ion-conducting subunit of the metabolically responsive ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel, was mandatory for optimal adaptation capacity under stress. Genetic deletion of Kir6.2 disrupted K(ATP) channel-dependent adjustment of membrane excitability and calcium handling, compromising the enhancement of cardiac performance driven by sympathetic stimulation, a key mediator of the adaptation response. In the absence of Kir6.2, vigorous sympathetic challenge caused arrhythmia and sudden death, preventable by calcium-channel blockade. Thus, this vital function identifies a physiological role for K(ATP) channels in the heart. PMID:12271142

  1. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  2. Adaptation and Sensitization to Proteotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Leak, Rehana K.

    2014-01-01

    Although severe stress can elicit toxicity, mild stress often elicits adaptations. Here we review the literature on stress-induced adaptations versus stress sensitization in models of neurodegenerative diseases. We also describe our recent findings that chronic proteotoxic stress can elicit adaptations if the dose is low but that high-dose proteotoxic stress sensitizes cells to subsequent challenges. In these experiments, long-term, low-dose proteasome inhibition elicited protection in a superoxide dismutase-dependent manner. In contrast, acute, high-dose proteotoxic stress sensitized cells to subsequent proteotoxic challenges by eliciting catastrophic loss of glutathione. However, even in the latter model of synergistic toxicity, several defensive proteins were upregulated by severe proteotoxicity. This led us to wonder whether high-dose proteotoxic stress can elicit protection against subsequent challenges in astrocytes, a cell type well known for their resilience. In support of this new hypothesis, we found that the astrocytes that survived severe proteotoxicity became harder to kill. The adaptive mechanism was glutathione dependent. If these findings can be generalized to the human brain, similar endogenous adaptations may help explain why neurodegenerative diseases are so delayed in appearance and so slow to progress. In contrast, sensitization to severe stress may explain why defenses eventually collapse in vulnerable neurons. PMID:24659932

  3. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    EPA Science Inventory

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  4. Dynamic involvement of ATG5 in cellular stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H H; Lin, S-M; Chung, Y; Vonderfecht, S; Camden, J M; Flodby, P; Borok, Z; Limesand, K H; Mizushima, N; Ann, D K

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy maintains cell and tissue homeostasis through catabolic degradation. To better delineate the in vivo function for autophagy in adaptive responses to tissue injury, we examined the impact of compromised autophagy in mouse submandibular glands (SMGs) subjected to main excretory duct ligation. Blocking outflow from exocrine glands causes glandular atrophy by increased ductal pressure. Atg5f/−;Aqp5-Cre mice with salivary acinar-specific knockout (KO) of autophagy essential gene Atg5 were generated. While duct ligation induced autophagy and the expression of inflammatory mediators, SMGs in Atg5f/−;Aqp5-Cre mice, before ligation, already expressed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokine and Cdkn1a/p21 messages. Extended ligation period resulted in the caspase-3 activation and acinar cell death, which was delayed by Atg5 knockout. Moreover, expression of a set of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors was elevated in the post-ligated glands. Dysregulation of cell-cycle inhibitor CDKN1A/p21 and activation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase were detected in the stressed SMG duct cells. These senescence markers peaked at day 3 after ligation and partially resolved by day 7 in post-ligated SMGs of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in KO mice. The role of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5)-dependent autophagy in regulating the tempo, duration and magnitude of cellular stress responses in vivo was corroborated by in vitro studies using MEFs lacking ATG5 or autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) and autophagy inhibitors. Collectively, our results highlight the role of ATG5 in the dynamic regulation of ligation-induced cellular senescence and apoptosis, and suggest the involvement of autophagy resolution in salivary repair. PMID:25341032

  5. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity. PMID:25126585

  6. Cellular Stress Responses Elicited by Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being incorporated continuously into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigation of underlying pathwa...

  7. Mitoplasticity: adaptation biology of the mitochondrion to the cellular redox state in physiology and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jose, Caroline; Melser, Su; Benard, Giovanni; Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2013-03-01

    Adaptation and transformation biology of the mitochondrion to redox status is an emerging domain of physiology and pathophysiology. Mitochondrial adaptations occur in response to accidental changes in cellular energy demand or supply while mitochondrial transformations are a part of greater program of cell metamorphosis. The possible role of mitochondrial adaptations and transformations in pathogenesis remains unexplored, and it has become critical to decipher the stimuli and the underlying molecular pathways. Immediate activation of mitochondrial function was described during acute exercise, respiratory chain injury, Endoplasmic Reticulum stress, genotoxic stress, or environmental toxic insults. Delayed adaptations of mitochondrial form, composition, and functions were evidenced for persistent changes in redox status as observed in endurance training, in fibroblasts grown in presence of respiratory chain inhibitors or in absence of glucose, in the smooth muscle of patients with severe asthma, or in the skeletal muscle of patients with a mitochondrial disease. Besides, mitochondrial transformations were observed in the course of human cell differentiation, during immune response activation, or in cells undergoing carcinogenesis. Little is known on the signals and downstream pathways that govern mitochondrial adaptations and transformations. Few adaptative loops, including redox sensors, kinases, and transcription factors were deciphered, but their implication in physiology and pathology remains elusive. Mitoplasticity could play a protective role against aging, diabetes, cancer, or neurodegenerative diseases. Research on adaptation and transformation could allow the design of innovative therapies, notably in cancer. PMID:22989324

  8. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response. PMID:18851081

  9. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  10. Kinetic Adaptations of Myosins for Their Diverse Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-08-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are involved in all aspects of eukaryotic life. Their function ranges from the transport of organelles and cargos to the generation of membrane tension, and the contraction of muscle. The diversity of physiological functions is remarkable, given that all enzymatically active myosins follow a conserved mechanoenzymatic cycle in which the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate is coupled to either actin-based transport or tethering of actin to defined cellular compartments. Kinetic capacities and limitations of a myosin are determined by the extent to which actin can accelerate the hydrolysis of ATP and the release of the hydrolysis products and are indispensably linked to its physiological tasks. This review focuses on kinetic competencies that - together with structural adaptations - result in myosins with unique mechanoenzymatic properties targeted to their diverse cellular functions. PMID:26929436

  11. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  12. Adaptation or Malignant Transformation: The Two Faces of Epigenetically Mediated Response to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation—the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  13. Adaptation or malignant transformation: the two faces of epigenetically mediated response to stress.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive response to stress is a fundamental property of living systems. At the cellular level, many different types of stress elicit an essentially limited repertoire of adaptive responses. Epigenetic changes are the main mechanism for medium- to long-term adaptation to accumulated (intense, long-term, or repeated) stress. We propose the adaptive deregulation of the epigenome in response to stress (ADERS) hypothesis which assumes that the unspecific adaptive stress response grows stronger with the increasing stress level, epigenetically activating response gene clusters while progressively deregulating other cellular processes. The balance between the unspecific adaptive response and the general epigenetic deregulation is critical because a strong response can lead to pathology, particularly to malignant transformation. The main idea of our hypothesis is the continuum traversed by a cell subjected to accumulated stress, which lies between an unspecific adaptive response and pathological deregulation--the two extremes sharing the same underlying cause, which is a manifestation of a unified epigenetically mediated adaptive response to stress. The evolutionary potential of epigenetic regulation in multigenerational adaptation is speculatively discussed in the light of neo-Lamarckism. Finally, an approach to testing the proposed hypothesis is presented, relying on either the publicly available datasets or on conducting new experiments. PMID:24187667

  14. Stress, genomic adaptation, and the evolutionary trade-off

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Steven D.; Chowdhury, Saroj K.; Heng, Henry H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to various internal and external stresses. The importance of cellular stress and its implication to disease conditions have become popular research topics. Many ongoing investigations focus on the sources of stress, their specific molecular mechanisms and interactions, especially regarding their contributions to many common and complex diseases through defined molecular pathways. Numerous molecular mechanisms have been linked to endoplasmic reticulum stress along with many unexpected findings, drastically increasing the complexity of our molecular understanding and challenging how to apply individual mechanism-based knowledge in the clinic. A newly emergent genome theory searches for the synthesis of a general evolutionary mechanism that unifies different types of stress and functional relationships from a genome-defined system point of view. Herein, we discuss the evolutionary relationship between stress and somatic cell adaptation under physiological, pathological, and somatic cell survival conditions, the multiple meanings to achieve adaptation and its potential trade-off. In particular, we purposely defocus from specific stresses and mechanisms by redirecting attention toward studying underlying general mechanisms. PMID:24795754

  15. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  16. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation. PMID:26277753

  17. Chronic pain, perceived stress, and cellular aging: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic pain conditions are characterized by significant individual variability complicating the identification of pathophysiological markers. Leukocyte telomere length (TL), a measure of cellular aging, is associated with age-related disease onset, psychosocial stress, and health-related functional decline. Psychosocial stress has been associated with the onset of chronic pain and chronic pain is experienced as a physical and psychosocial stressor. However, the utility of TL as a biological marker reflecting the burden of chronic pain and psychosocial stress has not yet been explored. Findings The relationship between chronic pain, stress, and TL was analyzed in 36 ethnically diverse, older adults, half of whom reported no chronic pain and the other half had chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Subjects completed a physical exam, radiographs, health history, and psychosocial questionnaires. Blood samples were collected and TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Four groups were identified characterized by pain status and the Perceived Stress Scale scores: 1) no pain/low stress, 2) no pain/high stress, chronic pain/low stress, and 4) chronic pain/high stress. TL differed between the pain/stress groups (p = 0.01), controlling for relevant covariates. Specifically, the chronic pain/high stress group had significantly shorter TL compared to the no pain/low stress group. Age was negatively correlated with TL, particularly in the chronic pain/high stress group (p = 0.03). Conclusions Although preliminary in nature and based on a modest sample size, these findings indicate that cellular aging may be more pronounced in older adults experiencing high levels of perceived stress and chronic pain. PMID:22325162

  18. Reversible and Noisy Progression towards a Commitment Point Enables Adaptable and Reliable Cellular Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Süel, Gürol M.

    2011-01-01

    Cells must make reliable decisions under fluctuating extracellular conditions, but also be flexible enough to adapt to such changes. How cells reconcile these seemingly contradictory requirements through the dynamics of cellular decision-making is poorly understood. To study this issue we quantitatively measured gene expression and protein localization in single cells of the model organism Bacillus subtilis during the progression to spore formation. We found that sporulation proceeded through noisy and reversible steps towards an irreversible, all-or-none commitment point. Specifically, we observed cell-autonomous and spontaneous bursts of gene expression and transient protein localization events during sporulation. Based on these measurements we developed mathematical population models to investigate how the degree of reversibility affects cellular decision-making. In particular, we evaluated the effect of reversibility on the 1) reliability in the progression to sporulation, and 2) adaptability under changing extracellular stress conditions. Results show that reversible progression allows cells to remain responsive to long-term environmental fluctuations. In contrast, the irreversible commitment point supports reliable execution of cell fate choice that is robust against short-term reductions in stress. This combination of opposite dynamic behaviors (reversible and irreversible) thus maximizes both adaptable and reliable decision-making over a broad range of changes in environmental conditions. These results suggest that decision-making systems might employ a general hybrid strategy to cope with unpredictably fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:22102806

  19. Neural control of chronic stress adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Stress initiates adaptive processes that allow the organism to physiologically cope with prolonged or intermittent exposure to real or perceived threats. A major component of this response is repeated activation of glucocorticoid secretion by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, which promotes redistribution of energy in a wide range of organ systems, including the brain. Prolonged or cumulative increases in glucocorticoid secretion can reduce benefits afforded by enhanced stress reactivity and eventually become maladaptive. The long-term impact of stress is kept in check by the process of habituation, which reduces HPA axis responses upon repeated exposure to homotypic stressors and likely limits deleterious actions of prolonged glucocorticoid secretion. Habituation is regulated by limbic stress-regulatory sites, and is at least in part glucocorticoid feedback-dependent. Chronic stress also sensitizes reactivity to new stimuli. While sensitization may be important in maintaining response flexibility in response to new threats, it may also add to the cumulative impact of glucocorticoids on the brain and body. Finally, unpredictable or severe stress exposure may cause long-term and lasting dysregulation of the HPA axis, likely due to altered limbic control of stress effector pathways. Stress-related disorders, such as depression and PTSD, are accompanied by glucocorticoid imbalances and structural/ functional alterations in limbic circuits that resemble those seen following chronic stress, suggesting that inappropriate processing of stressful information may be part of the pathological process. PMID:23964212

  20. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Erica S; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard P; Zink, Erika M; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Waters, Katrina M; Metz, Thomas O; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Polyak, Stephen J

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin, a characterized extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), suppresses cellular inflammation. To define how this occurs, transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies were performed in human liver and T cell lines. Cellular stress and metabolic pathways were modulated within 4 h of silymarin treatment: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed silymarin suppression of glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Anti-inflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e., 24 h) silymarin exposure, with suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory mRNAs and signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO). Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that silymarin inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, whereas silymarin inhibition of mTOR required DDIT4. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Thus, natural products activate stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory cellular phenotype. Natural products like silymarin may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation. PMID:26186142

  1. Interplay between Inflammation and Cellular Stress Triggered by Flaviviridae Viruses.

    PubMed

    Valadão, Ana L C; Aguiar, Renato S; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis viruses, and Hepatitis C Virus. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, which replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5) and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR), inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, unfolded protein response pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response. PMID:27610098

  2. Interplay between Inflammation and Cellular Stress Triggered by Flaviviridae Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Valadão, Ana L. C.; Aguiar, Renato S.; de Arruda, Luciana B.

    2016-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family comprises several human pathogens, including Dengue, Zika, Yellow Fever, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis viruses, and Hepatitis C Virus. Those are enveloped, single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses, which replicate mostly in intracellular compartments associated to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi complex. Virus replication results in abundant viral RNAs and proteins, which are recognized by cellular mechanisms evolved to prevent virus infection, resulting in inflammation and stress responses. Virus RNA molecules are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RIG-I and MDA5) and RNA-dependent protein kinases (PKR), inducing the production of inflammatory mediators and interferons. Simultaneously, the synthesis of virus RNA and proteins are distinguished in different compartments such as mitochondria, ER and cytoplasmic granules, triggering intracellular stress pathways, including oxidative stress, unfolded protein response pathway, and stress granules assembly. Here, we review the new findings that connect the inflammatory pathways to cellular stress sensors and the strategies of Flaviviridae members to counteract these cellular mechanisms and escape immune response. PMID:27610098

  3. tRNA modifications regulate translation during cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chen; Begley, Thomas J.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to stress is an essential cellular protection mechanism. Recent advances in tRNA modification analysis and genome-based codon bias analytics have facilitated studies that lead to a novel model for translational control, with translation elongation dynamically regulated during stress responses. Stress-induced increases in specific anticodon wobble bases are required for the optimal translation of stress response transcripts that are significantly biased in the use of degenerate codons keyed to these modified tRNA bases. These findings led us to introduce the notion of tRNA modification tunable transcripts (MoTTs – transcripts whose translation is regulated by tRNA modifications), which are identifiable using genome-wide codon counting algorithms. In support of this general model of translational control of stress response, studies making use of detailed measures of translation, tRNA methyltransferase mutants, and computational and mass spectrometry approaches reveal that stress reprograms tRNA modifications to translationally regulate MoTTs linked to arginine and leucine codons, which helps cells survive insults by damaging agents. These studies highlight how tRNA methyltransferase activities and MoTTs are key components of the cellular stress response. PMID:25304425

  4. Model of cellular mechanotransduction via actin stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Gouget, Cecile L M; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical stresses due to blood flow regulate vascular endothelial cell structure and function and play a key role in arterial physiology and pathology. In particular, the development of atherosclerosis has been shown to correlate with regions of disturbed blood flow where endothelial cells are round and have a randomly organized cytoskeleton. Thus, deciphering the relation between the mechanical environment, cell structure, and cell function is a key step toward understanding the early development of atherosclerosis. Recent experiments have demonstrated very rapid ([Formula: see text]100 ms) and long-distance ([Formula: see text]10 [Formula: see text]m) cellular mechanotransduction in which prestressed actin stress fibers play a critical role. Here, we develop a model of mechanical signal transmission within a cell by describing strains in a network of prestressed viscoelastic stress fibers following the application of a force to the cell surface. We find force transmission dynamics that are consistent with experimental results. We also show that the extent of stress fiber alignment and the direction of the applied force relative to this alignment are key determinants of the efficiency of mechanical signal transmission. These results are consistent with the link observed experimentally between cytoskeletal organization, mechanical stress, and cellular responsiveness to stress. Based on these results, we suggest that mechanical strain of actin stress fibers under force constitutes a key link in the mechanotransduction chain. PMID:26081725

  5. Psychological stress may induce increased humoral and decreased cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Paik, I H; Toh, K Y; Lee, C; Kim, J J; Lee, S J

    2000-01-01

    Stress alters immune function and affects different immune cell populations in different ways. The authors examined whether psychological stress has different effects on the production of macrophage, T-helper 1(Th1) cell, and T-helper 2(Th2) cell-derived cytokines. Forty-two college students were recruited and their blood was sampled on the day they were to take a stressful academic examination and again 4 weeks after the examination. The stress from the academic examination significantly increased IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-10 and decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that examination stress may increase Th2 cell-mediated humoral immunity and macrophage activities and may decrease Th1 cell-mediated cellular immunity. PMID:11209594

  6. Aneuploidy-induced cellular stresses limit autophagic degradation

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vasile, Eliza; White, Eileen; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced karyotype, a condition known as aneuploidy, has a profound impact on cellular physiology and is a hallmark of cancer. Aneuploid cells experience a number of stresses that are caused by aneuploidy-induced proteomic changes. How the aneuploidy-associated stresses affect cells and whether cells respond to them are only beginning to be understood. Here we show that autophagosomal cargo such as protein aggregates accumulate within lysosomes in aneuploid cells. This causes a lysosomal stress response. Aneuploid cells activate the transcription factor TFEB, a master regulator of autophagic and lysosomal gene expression, thereby increasing the expression of genes needed for autophagy-mediated protein degradation. Accumulation of autophagic cargo within the lysosome and activation of TFEB-responsive genes are also observed in cells in which proteasome function is inhibited, suggesting that proteotoxic stress causes TFEB activation. Our results reveal a TFEB-mediated lysosomal stress response as a universal feature of the aneuploid state. PMID:26404941

  7. Systemic Cold Stress Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  8. [A mechanism conjugating cellular and individual adaptations could be produced from space biology].

    PubMed

    Atomi, Y

    2001-03-01

    To know a basic mechanism of biological organism on the earth, we can have a standard point to space. An example is hindlimb suspension model that could induce muscle atrophy. This model mimics adaptational changes under zero gravity; in turn the effect of gravity on the biological system developing on the earth. We can understand gravity is a stress from the specific changes of stress protein induced by mechanical stimuli depending on gravity. Recent development of fluorescent microscopy and time-lapse visual system brought us a possibility of analysis to see visualization of dynamic properties of molecular and cellular events in living cells. Especially dynamic fluctuation of cytoskeleton may include new ideas of biological strategy of living organism on the earth and possibly may suggest subtle changes in space. PMID:12101374

  9. Cellular stress response and innate immune signaling: integrating pathways in host defense and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has identified innate immune recognition receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in inflammatory responses. Besides its role in cytoprotection, the importance of cell stress in inflammation and host defense against pathogens is emerging. Recent studies have shown that proteins in cellular stress responses, including the heat shock response, ER stress response, and DNA damage response, interact with and regulate signaling intermediates involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The effect of such regulation by cell stress proteins may dictate the inflammatory profile of the immune response during infection and disease. In this review, we describe the regulation of innate immune cell activation by cell stress pathways, present detailed descriptions of the types of stress response proteins and their crosstalk with immune signaling intermediates that are essential in host defense, and illustrate the relevance of these interactions in diseases characteristic of aberrant immune responses, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Understanding the crosstalk between cellular stress proteins and immune signaling may have translational implications for designing more effective regimens to treat immune disorders. PMID:23990626

  10. Engineering stress tolerance of Escherichia coli by stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM)-based adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linjiang; Cai, Zhen; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Microbial tolerance to toxic products and biomass hydrolysates is a challenge for the production of fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. To improve cellular tolerance to these environmental stresses, a novel adaptive evolutionary strategy based on stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) was developed using non-dividing cells. The concept of this method was proved using Escherichia coli FC40 as a model strain, which was used to quantitatively evaluate the rate of SIM. By deleting either the mutL or mutS gene to disturb the mismatch repair activity of the host cells, the SIM rate under stressful conditions increased by 92- and 57-fold, respectively. A periodic SIMbased adaptive evolution procedure, which synchronized the mutagenesis and the selection process in a single plate-incubation step, was then developed using the mutL-deleted mutant. E. coli mutants tolerant to high concentrations of butanol (13 g/L), NaCl (95 g/L), and high temperature (50°C) were obtained. These results indicate that stress-induced adaptive evolution in non-dividing cells is an effective approach that can improve microbial tolerance against various stresses and generate robust microbial strains suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. PMID:24106039

  11. Proteasome inhibition and oxidative reactions disrupt cellular homeostasis during heme stress

    PubMed Central

    Vallelian, F; Deuel, J W; Opitz, L; Schaer, C A; Puglia, M; Lönn, M; Engelsberger, W; Schauer, S; Karnaukhova, E; Spahn, D R; Stocker, R; Buehler, P W; Schaer, D J

    2015-01-01

    Dual control of cellular heme levels by extracellular scavenger proteins and degradation by heme oxygenases is essential in diseases associated with increased heme release. During severe hemolysis or rhabdomyolysis, uncontrolled heme exposure can cause acute kidney injury and endothelial cell damage. The toxicity of heme was primarily attributed to its pro-oxidant effects; however additional mechanisms of heme toxicity have not been studied systematically. In addition to redox reactivity, heme may adversely alter cellular functions by binding to essential proteins and impairing their function. We studied inducible heme oxygenase (Hmox1)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblast cell lines as a model to systematically explore adaptive and disruptive responses that were triggered by intracellular heme levels exceeding the homeostatic range. We extensively characterized the proteome phenotype of the cellular heme stress responses by quantitative mass spectrometry of stable isotope-labeled cells that covered more than 2000 individual proteins. The most significant signals specific to heme toxicity were consistent with oxidative stress and impaired protein degradation by the proteasome. This ultimately led to an activation of the response to unfolded proteins. These observations were explained mechanistically by demonstrating binding of heme to the proteasome that was linked to impaired proteasome function. Oxidative heme reactions and proteasome inhibition could be differentiated as synergistic activities of the porphyrin. Based on the present data a novel model of cellular heme toxicity is proposed, whereby proteasome inhibition by heme sustains a cycle of oxidative stress, protein modification, accumulation of damaged proteins and cell death. PMID:25301065

  12. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  13. Plant sphingolipids: Their importance in cellular organization and adaption.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, Louise V; Napier, Johnathan A; Molino, Diana; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2016-09-01

    Sphingolipids and their phosphorylated derivatives are ubiquitous bio-active components of cells. They are structural elements in the lipid bilayer and contribute to the dynamic nature of the membrane. They have been implicated in many cellular processes in yeast and animal cells, including aspects of signaling, apoptosis, and senescence. Although sphingolipids have a better defined role in animal systems, they have been shown to be central to many essential processes in plants including but not limited to, pollen development, signal transduction and in the response to biotic and abiotic stress. A fuller understanding of the roles of sphingolipids within plants has been facilitated by classical biochemical studies and the identification of mutants of model species. Recently the development of powerful mass spectrometry techniques hailed the advent of the emerging field of lipidomics enabling more accurate sphingolipid detection and quantitation. This review will consider plant sphingolipid biosynthesis and function in the context of these new developments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27086144

  14. Platinum nanozymes recover cellular ROS homeostasis in an oxidative stress-mediated disease model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglianetti, Mauro; de Luca, Elisa; Pedone, Deborah; Marotta, Roberto; Catelani, Tiziano; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase enzymes, with similar or even superior performance than natural enzymes, along with higher adaptability to the changes in environmental conditions. We then exploited their potent activity as radical scavenging materials in a cellular model of an oxidative stress-related disorder, namely human Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) disease, which is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Noteworthily, we found that Pt nanozymes can efficiently reduce ROS levels, completely restoring the cellular physiological homeostasis.In recent years, the use of nanomaterials as biomimetic enzymes has attracted great interest. In this work, we show the potential of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) as antioxidant nanozymes, which combine abundant cellular internalization and efficient scavenging activity of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus simultaneously integrating the functions of nanocarriers and antioxidant drugs. Careful toxicity assessment and intracellular tracking of Pt NPs proved their cytocompatibility and high cellular uptake, with compartmentalization within the endo/lysosomal vesicles. We have demonstrated that Pt NPs possess strong and broad antioxidant properties, acting as superoxide

  15. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  16. Cellular adaptation to hypoxia and p53 transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Chen, Xue-qun; Du, Ji-zeng

    2009-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Meanwhile, under stress conditions, p53 also acts as a transcription factor, regulating the expression of a series of target genes to maintain the integrity of genome. The target genes of p53 can be classified into genes regulating cell cycle arrest, genes involved in apoptosis, and genes inhibiting angiogenesis. p53 protein contains a transactivation domain, a sequence-specific DNA binding domain, a tetramerization domain, a non-specific DNA binding domain that recognizes damaged DNA, and a later identified proline-rich domain. Under stress, p53 proteins accumulate and are activated through two mechanisms. One, involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM), is that the interaction between p53 and its down-regulation factor murine double minute 2 (MDM2) decreases, leading to p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, as determined by the post-translational mechanism; the other holds that p53 increases and is activated through the binding of ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) or nucleolin to p53 mRNA 5( untranslated region (UTR), regulating p53 translation. Under hypoxia, p53 decreases transactivation and increases transrepression. The mutations outside the DNA binding domain of p53 also contribute to tumor progress, so further studies on p53 should also be focused on this direction. The subterranean blind mole rat Spalax in Israel is a good model for hypoxia-adaptation. The p53 of Spalax mutated in residue 172 and residue 207 from arginine to lysine, conferring it the ability to survive hypoxic conditions. This model indicates that p53 acts as a master gene of diversity formation during evolution. PMID:19434769

  17. The role of time delay in adaptive cellular negative feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation in cellular systems is often mediated by negative feedbacks, which usually come with certain time delays causing several characteristic response patterns including an overdamped response, damped or sustained oscillations. Here, we analyse generic two-dimensional delay differential equations with delayed negative feedback describing the dynamics of biochemical adaptive signal-response networks. We derive explicit thresholds and boundaries showing how time delay determines characteristic response patterns of these networks. Applying our theoretical analyses to concrete data we show that adaptation to osmotic stress in yeast is optimal in the sense of minimizing adaptation time without causing oscillatory behaviour, i.e., a critically damped response. In addition, our framework demonstrates that a slight increase of time delay in the NF-κB system might induce a switch from damped to sustained oscillatory behaviour. Thus, we demonstrate how delay differential equations can be used to explicitly study the delay in biochemical negative feedback systems. Our analysis also provides insight into how time delay may tune biological signal-response patterns and control the systems behaviour. PMID:26995333

  18. Cellular deformation and intracellular stress propagation during optical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Soo-Kng; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Parker, Kim H.; Chiam, K.-H.

    2010-05-01

    Experiments have shown that mechanical stress can regulate many cellular processes. However, in most cases, the exact regulatory mechanisms are still not well understood. One approach in improving our understanding of such mechanically induced regulation is the quantitative study of cell deformation under an externally applied stress. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite-element model is developed and used to study the deformation of single, suspended fibroblasts in an optical stretcher in which a stretching force is applied onto the surface of the cell. A feature of our physical model is a viscoelastic material equation whose parameters vary spatially to mimic the experimentally observed spatial heterogeneity of cellular material properties. Our model suggests that cell size is a more important factor in determining the maximal strain of the optically stretched fibroblasts compared to the thickness of the actin cortical region. This result could explain the higher deformability observed experimentally for malignant fibroblasts in the optical stretcher. Our model also shows that maximal stress propagates into the nuclear region for malignant fibroblasts whereas for normal fibroblasts, it does not. We discuss how this may impact the transduction of cancer signaling pathways.

  19. Regulation of myokine expression: Role of exercise and cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Ost, Mario; Coleman, Verena; Kasch, Juliane; Klaus, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    Exercise training is well known to improve physical fitness and to combat chronic diseases and aging related disorders. Part of this is thought to be mediated by myokines, muscle derived secretory proteins (mainly cytokines) that elicit auto/paracrine but also endocrine effects on organs such as liver, adipose tissue, and bone. Today, several hundred potential myokines have been identified most of them not exclusive to muscle cells. Strenuous exercise is associated with increased production of free radicals and reactive oxidant species (ROS) as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress which at an excessive level can lead to muscle damage and cell death. On the other hand, transient elevations in oxidative and ER-stress are thought to be necessary for adaptive improvements by regular exercise through a hormesis action termed mitohormesis since mitochondria are essential for the generation of energy and tightly connected to ER- and oxidative stress. Exercise induced myokines have been identified by various in vivo and in vitro approaches and accumulating evidence suggests that ROS and ER-stress linked pathways are involved in myokine induction. For example, interleukin (IL)-6, the prototypic exercise myokine is also induced by oxidative and ER-stress. Exercise induced expression of some myokines such as irisin and meteorin-like is linked to the transcription factor PGC-1α and apparently not related to ER-stress whereas typical ER-stress induced cytokines such as FGF-21 and GDF-15 are not exercise myokines under normal physiological conditions. Recent technological advances have led to the identification of numerous potential new myokines but for most of them regulation by oxidative and ER-stress still needs to be unraveled. PMID:26898145

  20. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  1. Cellular acidosis inhibits assembly, disassembly, and motility of stress granules.

    PubMed

    Chudinova, E M; Nadezhdina, E S; Ivanov, P A

    2012-11-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are large ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-containing particles that form in cytoplasm in response to a variety of acute changes in the cellular environment. One of the general parameters of the cell environment is pH. In some diseases, as well as in muscle fatigue, tissue acidosis occurs, leading to decrease in intracellular pH. Here we studied whether decrease in pH causes the formation of SGs in cultured animal cells, whether it affects the formation of the SGs under the action of arsenite and, if such effects occur, what are the mechanisms of the influence of acidosis. Acidosis was simulated by decreasing the pH of the culture medium, which acidified the cytoplasm. We found that medium acidification to pH 6.0 in itself did not cause formation of SGs in cells. Moreover, acidification prevented the formation of SGs under treatment with sodium arsenite or sodium arsenite together with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, and it inhibited the dissociation of preformed SGs under the influence of cycloheximide. We established that pH decrease did not affect the phosphorylation of eIF2α that occurs under the action of sodium arsenite, and even caused such phosphorylation by itself. We also found that the velocity of SG motion in cytoplasm at acidic pH was very low, and the mobile fraction of SG-incorporated PABP protein revealed by FRAP was decreased. We suppose that acidic pH impairs biochemical processes favoring assembly of RNPs in stress conditions and RNP dissociation on the termination of stress. Thus, in acidosis the reaction of the cellular translation apparatus to stress is modified. PMID:23240565

  2. Thresholds for cellular disruption and activation of the stress response in renal epithelia.

    PubMed

    van Why, S K; Kim, S; Geibel, J; Seebach, F A; Kashgarian, M; Siegel, N J

    1999-08-01

    Renal ischemia causes a rapid fall in cellular ATP, increased intracellular calcium (Ca(i)), and dissociation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase from the cytoskeleton along with initiation of a stress response. We examined changes in Ca(i), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase detergent solubility, and activation of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) in relation to graded reduction of ATP in LLC-PK(1) cells to determine whether initiation of the stress response was related to any one of these perturbations alone. Ca(i) increased first at 75% of control ATP. Triton X-100 solubility of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase increased below 70% control ATP. Reducing cellular ATP below 50% control consistently activated HSF. Stepped decrements in cellular ATP below the respective thresholds caused incremental increases in Ca(i), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase solubility, and HSF activation. ATP depletion activated both HSF1 and HSF2. Proteasome inhibition caused activation of HSF1 and HSF2 in a pattern similar to ATP depletion. Lactate dehydrogenase release remained at control levels irrespective of the degree of ATP depletion. Progressive accumulation of nonnative proteins may be the critical signal for the adaptive induction of the stress response in renal epithelia. PMID:10444577

  3. Microtubules and Their Role in Cellular Stress in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Amelia L.; Kavallaris, Maria; McCarroll, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are highly dynamic structures, which consist of α- and β-tubulin heterodimers, and are involved in cell movement, intracellular trafficking, and mitosis. In the context of cancer, the tubulin family of proteins is recognized as the target of the tubulin-binding chemotherapeutics, which suppress the dynamics of the mitotic spindle to cause mitotic arrest and cell death. Importantly, changes in microtubule stability and the expression of different tubulin isotypes as well as altered post-translational modifications have been reported for a range of cancers. These changes have been correlated with poor prognosis and chemotherapy resistance in solid and hematological cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying these observations have remained poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins may play a role in a range of cellular stress responses, thus conferring survival advantage to cancer cells. This review will focus on the importance of the microtubule–protein network in regulating critical cellular processes in response to stress. Understanding the role of microtubules in this context may offer novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer. PMID:24995158

  4. Cellular respiration: the nexus of stress, condition, and ornamentation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey E

    2014-10-01

    A fundamental hypothesis for the evolution and maintenance of ornamental traits is that ornaments convey information to choosing females about the quality of prospective mates. A diverse array of ornaments (e.g., colors, morphological features, and behaviors) has been associated with a wide range of measures of individual quality, but decades of study of such indicator traits have failed to produce general mechanisms of honest signaling. Here, I propose that efficiency of cellular respiration, as a product of mitochondrial function, underlies the associations between ornamentation and performance for a broad range of traits across taxa. A large biomedical literature documents the fundamental biochemical links between oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the process of metabolism, the function of the immune system, the synthesis of proteins, and the development and function of the nervous system. The production of virtually all ornaments whose expressions have been demonstrated to be condition-dependent is directly affected by the efficiency of cellular respiration, suggesting that the signaling of respiratory efficiency may be the primary function of such traits. Furthermore, the production of ornaments links to stress-response systems, including particularly the neuroendocrine system, through mitochondrial function, thereby makes ornamental traits effective signals of the capacity to withstand environmental perturbations. The identification of a unifying mechanism of honest signaling holds the potential to connect many heretofore-disparate fields of study related to stress and ornamentation, including neuroendocrinology, respiratory physiology, metabolic physiology, and immunology. PMID:24791751

  5. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Allen

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Substrate proteins of the canonical UPP are first tagged by multiple ubiquitin molecules and then degraded by the 26S proteasome. However, in non-canonical UPP, proteins can be degraded by the 26S or the 20S proteasome without being ubiquitinated. It is clear that a proteasome is responsible for selective degradation of oxidized proteins, but the extent to which ubiquitination is involved in this process remains a subject of debate. While many publications suggest that the 20S proteasome degrades oxidized proteins independent of ubiquitin, there is also solid evidence indicating that ubiquitin and ubiquitination are involved in degradation of some forms of oxidized proteins. A fully functional UPP is required for cells to cope with oxidative stress and the activity of the UPP is also modulated by cellular redox status. Mild or transient oxidative stress up-regulates the ubiquitination system and proteasome activity in cells and tissues and transiently enhances intracellular proteolysis. Severe or sustained oxidative stress impairs the function of the UPP and decreases intracellular proteolysis. Both the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the proteasome can be inactivated by sustained oxidative stress, especially the 26S proteasome. Differential susceptibilities of the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the 26S proteasome to oxidative damage lead to an accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates in cells in response to mild oxidative stress. Thus, increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates in cells appear to be an indicator of mild oxidative stress. PMID:21530648

  6. Adoptive cellular therapy of cancer: exploring innate and adaptive cellular crosstalk to improve anti-tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Payne, Kyle K; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian immune system has evolved to produce multi-tiered responses consisting of both innate and adaptive immune cells collaborating to elicit a functional response to a pathogen or neoplasm. Immune cells possess a shared ancestry, suggestive of a degree of coevolution that has resulted in optimal functionality as an orchestrated and highly collaborative unit. Therefore, the development of therapeutic modalities that harness the immune system should consider the crosstalk between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems in order to elicit the most effective response. In this review, the authors will discuss the success achieved using adoptive cellular therapy in the treatment of cancer, recent trends that focus on purified T cells, T cells with genetically modified T-cell receptors and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors, as well as the use of unfractionated immune cell reprogramming to achieve optimal cellular crosstalk upon infusion for adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:25303057

  7. Adaptive array antenna for satellite cellular and direct broadcast communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Charles R.; Abend, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive phased-array antennas provide cost-effective implementation of large, light weight apertures with high directivity and precise beamshape control. Adaptive self-calibration allows for relaxation of all mechanical tolerances across the aperture and electrical component tolerances, providing high performance with a low-cost, lightweight array, even in the presence of large physical distortions. Beam-shape is programmable and adaptable to changes in technical and operational requirements. Adaptive digital beam-forming eliminates uplink contention by allowing a single electronically steerable antenna to service a large number of receivers with beams which adaptively focus on one source while eliminating interference from others. A large, adaptively calibrated and fully programmable aperture can also provide precise beam shape control for power-efficient direct broadcast from space. Advanced adaptive digital beamforming technologies are described for: (1) electronic compensation of aperture distortion, (2) multiple receiver adaptive space-time processing, and (3) downlink beam-shape control. Cost considerations for space-based array applications are also discussed.

  8. Pairing of heterochromatin in response to cellular stress

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Halim, H.I.; Mullenders, L.H.F. . E-mail: L.Mullenders@lumc.nl; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    2006-07-01

    We previously reported that exposure of human cells to DNA-damaging agents (X-rays and mitomycin C (MMC)) induces pairing of the homologous paracentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 (9q12-13). Here, we show that UV irradiation and also heat shock treatment of human cells lead to similar effects. Since the various agents induce very different types and frequencies of damage to cellular constituents, the data suggest a general stress response as the underlying mechanism. Moreover, local UV irradiation experiments revealed that pairing of heterochromatin is an event that can be triggered without induction of DNA damage in the heterochromatic sequences. The repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group F) previously shown to fail pairing after MMC displayed elevated pairing after heat shock treatment but not after UV exposure. Taken together, the present results indicate that pairing of heterochromatin following exposure to DNA-damaging agents is initiated by a general stress response and that the sensing of stress or the maintenance of the paired status of the heterochromatin might be dependent on DNA repair.

  9. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  10. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors. PMID:26801872

  11. Tumor suppressor BTG1 promotes PRMT1-mediated ATF4 function in response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; van Emst, Liesbeth; Levers, Marloes; Palit, Sander A.L.; Rodenbach, Caroline; Poelmans, Geert; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently exposed to physiological stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient limitation. Escape from stress-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms used by malignant cells to survive unfavorable conditions. B-cell Translocation Gene 1 (BTG1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and recurrently mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Moreover, low BTG1 expression levels have been linked to poor outcome in several solid tumors. How loss of BTG1 function contributes to tumor progression is not well understood. Here, using Btg1 knockout mice, we demonstrate that loss of Btg1 provides a survival advantage to primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) under stress conditions. This pro-survival effect involves regulation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a key mediator of cellular stress responses. We show that BTG1 interacts with ATF4 and positively modulates its activity by recruiting the protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT1 to methylate ATF4 on arginine residue 239. We further extend these findings to B-cell progenitors, by showing that loss of Btg1 expression enhances stress adaptation of mouse bone marrow-derived B cell progenitors. In conclusion, we have identified the BTG1/PRMT1 complex as a new modifier of ATF4 mediated stress responses. PMID:26657730

  12. Cellular Stress Responses, The Hormesis Paradigm, and Vitagenes: Novel Targets for Therapeutic Intervention in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Calabrese, Edward J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the capacity of chaperones and other homeostatic components to restore folding equilibrium, cells appear poorly adapted for chronic oxidative stress that increases in cancer and in metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Modulation of endogenous cellular defense mechanisms represents an innovative approach to therapeutic intervention in diseases causing chronic tissue damage, such as in neurodegeneration. This article introduces the concept of hormesis and its applications to the field of neuroprotection. It is argued that the hormetic dose response provides the central underpinning of neuroprotective responses, providing a framework for explaining the common quantitative features of their dose–response relationships, their mechanistic foundations, and their relationship to the concept of biological plasticity, as well as providing a key insight for improving the accuracy of the therapeutic dose of pharmaceutical agents within the highly heterogeneous human population. This article describes in mechanistic detail how hormetic dose responses are mediated for endogenous cellular defense pathways, including sirtuin and Nrf2 and related pathways that integrate adaptive stress responses in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. Particular attention is given to the emerging role of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide gases in hormetic-based neuroprotection and their relationship to membrane radical dynamics and mitochondrial redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1763–1811. PMID:20446769

  13. Mitochondria, cellular stress resistance, somatic cell depletion and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-03-01

    The causes of aging and determinants of maximum lifespan in animal species are multifaceted and complex. However, a wealth of experimental data suggests that mitochondria are involved both in the aging process and in regulating lifespan. Here we outline a somatic cell depletion (SCD) model to account for correlations between: (1) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lifespan; (2) mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and lifespan; (3) mitochondrial DNA mutation and lifespan and (4) cellular stress resistance and lifespan. We examine the available data from within the framework of the SCD model, in which mitochondrial dysfunction leading to cell death and gradual loss of essential somatic cells eventually contributes to the decline in physiological performance that limits lifespan. This model is useful in explaining many of the mitochondrial manipulations that alter maximum lifespan in a variety of animal species; however, there are a number of caveats and critical experiments outstanding, and these are outlined in this review. PMID:20021396

  14. Oxidative Stress, Redox Regulation and Diseases of Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within cells, there is a narrow concentration threshold that governs whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce toxicity or act as second messengers. Scope of review We discuss current understanding of how ROS arise, facilitate cell signaling, cause toxicities and disease related to abnormal cell differentiation and those (primarily) sulfur based pathways that provide nucleophilicity to offset these effects. Primary conclusions Cellular redox homeostasis mediates a plethora of cellular pathways that determine life and death events. For example, ROS intersect with GSH based enzyme pathways to influence cell differentiation, a process integral to normal hematopoiesis, but also affecting a number of diverse cell differentiation related human diseases. Recent attempts to manage such pathologies have focused on intervening in some of these pathways, with the consequence that differentiation therapy targeting redox homeostasis has provided a platform for drug discovery and development. General Significance The balance between electrophilic oxidative stress and protective biomolecular nucleophiles predisposes the evolution of modern life forms. Imbalances of the two can produce aberrant redox homeostasis with resultant pathologies. Understanding the pathways involved provides opportunities to consider interventional strategies. PMID:25445706

  15. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. PMID:26233704

  16. Adaptation of photosynthetic processes to stress.

    PubMed

    Berry, J A

    1975-05-01

    I have focused on examples of plant adaptations to environmental conditions that range from adjustments in the allocation of metabolic resources and modification of structural components to entirely separate mechanisms. The result of these modifications is more efficient performance under the stresses typically encountered in the plants' native habitats. Such adaptations, for reasons which are not entirely clear, often lead to poorer performance in other environmental conditions. This situation may be a fundamental basis for the tendency toward specialization among plants native to specific niches or habitats. The evolutionary mechanisms that have resulted in these specializations are very large-scale processes. It seems reasonable to suppose that the plants native to particular habitats are relatively efficient in terms of the limitations imposed by those habitats, and that the adaptive mechanisms these plants possess are, compared to those which have evolved in competing organisms, the most succesful biological means of coping with the environmental stresses encountered. I believe that we can learn from nature and utilize the adaptive mechanisms of these plants in agriculture to replace in part our present reliance on resources and energy to modify the environment for plant growth. By analogy with natural systems, improved resource utilization will require specialization and greater knowledge of the limitations of a particular environment and plant genotype. For example, the cultural conditions, plant architecture, and physiological responses necessary to achieve high water use efficiency from our crop species with C(4) photosynthesis probably differ from those required to achieve maximum total growth. Also, efforts to control water application to eliminate waste carry with them the risk that the crop could be injured by inadequate water. Thus, greater demands would be placed on the crop physiologist, the plant breeder, and the farmer. Planting and appropriate

  17. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  18. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina using optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Jones, S M; Chen, D C; Zawadzki, R J; Choi, S S; Laut, S P; Werner, J S

    2006-01-05

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) sees the human retina sharply with adaptive optics. In vivo cellular visualization of the human retina at micrometer-scale resolution is possible by enhancing Fourier-domain optical-coherence tomography with adaptive optics, which compensate for the eye's optical aberrations.

  19. Exposure to stressful environments - Strategy of adaptive responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Stresses such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure can produce strains in more than a single organ system, in turn stimulating the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups: (1) conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, (2) stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products such as CO2 and heat, and (3) environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of microenvironment, is often favored by the animal.

  20. Functional and cellular adaptations of rodent skeletal muscle to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Haddad, Fadia; Baker, Michael J.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the affects of microgravity upon three key cellular levels (functional, protein, and mRNA) that are linked to one another. It is clear that at each of these levels, microgravity produces rapid and substantial alterations. One of the key challenges facing the life science community is the development of effective countermeasures that prevent the loss of muscle function as described in this paper. The development of optimal countermeasures, however, awaits a clearer understanding of events occurring at the levels of transcription, translation, and degradation.

  1. Finite element error estimation and adaptivity based on projected stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.

    1990-08-01

    This report investigates the behavior of a family of finite element error estimators based on projected stresses, i.e., continuous stresses that are a least squared error fit to the conventional Gauss point stresses. An error estimate based on element force equilibrium appears to be quite effective. Examples of adaptive mesh refinement for a one-dimensional problem are presented. Plans for two-dimensional adaptivity are discussed. 12 refs., 82 figs.

  2. Molecular and cellular neurocardiology: development, and cellular and molecular adaptations to heart disease.

    PubMed

    Habecker, Beth A; Anderson, Mark E; Birren, Susan J; Fukuda, Keiichi; Herring, Neil; Hoover, Donald B; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Paterson, David J; Ripplinger, Crystal M

    2016-07-15

    The nervous system and cardiovascular system develop in concert and are functionally interconnected in both health and disease. This white paper focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie neural-cardiac interactions during development, during normal physiological function in the mature system, and during pathological remodelling in cardiovascular disease. The content on each subject was contributed by experts, and we hope that this will provide a useful resource for newcomers to neurocardiology as well as aficionados. PMID:27060296

  3. Cellular stress conditions are reflected in the protein and RNA content of endothelial cell-derived exosomes

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Olivier G.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Chen, Yong; Vader, Pieter; Gremmels, Hendrik; Posthuma, George; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Gucek, Marjan; van Balkom, Bas W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The healthy vascular endothelium, which forms the barrier between blood and the surrounding tissues, is known to efficiently respond to stress signals like hypoxia and inflammation by adaptation of cellular physiology and the secretion of (soluble) growth factors and cytokines. Exosomes are potent mediators of intercellular communication. Their content consists of RNA and proteins from the cell of origin, and thus depends on the condition of these cells at the time of exosome biogenesis. It has been suggested that exosomes protect their target cells from cellular stress through the transfer of RNA and proteins. We hypothesized that endothelium-derived exosomes are involved in the endothelial response to cellular stress, and that exosome RNA and protein content reflect the effects of cellular stress induced by hypoxia, inflammation or hyperglycemia. Methods We exposed cultured endothelial cells to different types of cellular stress (hypoxia, TNF-α-induced activation, high glucose and mannose concentrations) and compared mRNA and protein content of exosomes produced by these cells by microarray analysis and a quantitative proteomics approach. Results We identified 1,354 proteins and 1,992 mRNAs in endothelial cell-derived exosomes. Several proteins and mRNAs showed altered abundances after exposure of their producing cells to cellular stress, which were confirmed by immunoblot or qPCR analysis. Conclusion Our data show that hypoxia and endothelial activation are reflected in RNA and protein exosome composition, and that exposure to high sugar concentrations alters exosome protein composition only to a minor extend, and does not affect exosome RNA composition. PMID:24009886

  4. Cellular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress in human exercise.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Malcolm J; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; McArdle, Anne

    2016-09-01

    A relative increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA has been recognised to occur in the circulation and tissues of exercising humans and animals since the late 1970s and throughout the ensuing 40 years a great deal of work has been undertaken to elucidate the potential source(s) of this exercise-induced "oxidative stress". Specific aspects of physical exercise (e.g. contractile activity, relative hypoxia, hyperaemia) may theoretically induce increased generation of reactive oxygen species in a number of potential tissues, but data strongly indicate that contractile activity of skeletal muscle predominates as the source of oxidants and contributes to local oxidation and that of extracellular biomaterials. Taken together with the relatively large mass of muscle compared with other tissues and cells it appears that muscle fibres are the major contributor to the relative increase in whole body "oxidative stress" during some forms of exercise. The sub-cellular sources of this increased oxidation have also been the subject of considerable research with early studies predominantly indicating that muscle mitochondria were the likely increased source of oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, but assessments of the relative concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in skeletal muscle fibres at rest and during contractile activity do not support this possibility. In contrast, several recent studies have identified NADPH oxidase enzymes in skeletal muscle that appear to play a signalling role in physiological responses exercise and together with xanthine oxidase enzymes may contribute to the relative increase in whole body oxidation. A fuller understanding of the relative roles of these sources and the function(s) of the species generated appears increasingly important in attempts to harness the beneficial effects of exercise for maintenance of health in aging and a variety of chronic conditions. PMID:26912036

  5. Adaptation to different types of stress converge on mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Kumar, Rahul; Hallström, Björn M; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Yeast cell factories encounter physical and chemical stresses when used for industrial production of fuels and chemicals. These stresses reduce productivity and increase bioprocess costs. Understanding the mechanisms of the stress response is essential for improving cellular robustness in platform strains. We investigated the three most commonly encountered industrial stresses for yeast (ethanol, salt, and temperature) to identify the mechanisms of general and stress-specific responses under chemostat conditions in which specific growth rate-dependent changes are eliminated. By applying systems-level analysis, we found that most stress responses converge on mitochondrial processes. Our analysis revealed that stress-specific factors differ between applied stresses; however, they are underpinned by an increased ATP demand. We found that when ATP demand increases to high levels, respiration cannot provide sufficient ATP, leading to onset of respirofermentative metabolism. Although stress-specific factors increase ATP demand for cellular growth under stressful conditions, increased ATP demand for cellular maintenance underpins a general stress response and is responsible for the onset of overflow metabolism. PMID:27307591

  6. An Asynchronous Cellular Automata-Based Adaptive Illumination Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandini, Stefania; Bonomi, Andrea; Vizzari, Giuseppe; Acconci, Vito

    The term Ambient Intelligence refers to electronic environments that are sensitive and responsive to the presence of people; in the described scenario the environment itself is endowed with a set of sensors (to perceive humans or other physical entities such as dogs, bicycles, etc.), interacting with a set of actuators (lights) that choose their actions (i.e. state of illumination) in an attempt improve the overall experience of these users. The model for the interaction and action of sensors and actuators is an asynchronous Cellular Automata (CA) with memory, supporting a self-organization of the system as a response to the presence and movements of people inside it. The paper will introduce the model, as well as an ad hoc user interface for the specification of the relevant parameters of the CA transition rule that determines the overall system behaviour.

  7. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  8. Extraocular muscle: cellular adaptations for a diverse functional repertoire.

    PubMed

    Porter, John D

    2002-04-01

    Oculomotor control systems are considerably more complex and diverse than are spinal skeletomotor systems. Moreover, individual skeletal muscles are frequently functional role-specific, while all extraocular muscles operate across a very wide dynamic range. We contend that the novel phenotype of the extraocular muscles is a direct consequence of the functional demands imposed upon this muscle group by the central eye movement controllers. This review highlights five basic themes of extraocular muscle biology that set them apart from more typical skeletal muscles, specifically, the (a) novel innervation pattern, (b) heterogeneity in contractile proteins, (c) structural and functional compartmentalization of the rectus and oblique muscles, (d) diversity of extraocular muscle fiber types, and (e) relationship between the novel muscle phenotype and the differential response of these muscles in neuromuscular and endocrine disease. Finally, new data from broad genome-wide profiling studies are reviewed, with global gene expression patterns lending substantial support to the notion that the extraocular muscles are fundamentally different from traditional skeletal muscle. This novel eye muscle phenotype represents an adaptation that exploits the full range of variability in skeletal muscle to meet the needs of visuomotor systems. PMID:11960789

  9. Plastid Osmotic Stress Activates Cellular Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Margaret E.; Basu, Meera R.; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Verslues, Paul E.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about cytoplasmic osmoregulatory mechanisms in plants, and even less is understood about how the osmotic properties of the cytoplasm and organelles are coordinately regulated. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants lacking functional versions of the plastid-localized mechanosensitive ion channels Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance-Like2 (MSL2) and MSL3 contain leaf epidermal plastids under hypoosmotic stress, even during normal growth and development. Here, we use the msl2 msl3 mutant as a model to investigate the cellular response to constitutive plastid osmotic stress. Under unstressed conditions, msl2 msl3 seedlings exhibited several hallmarks of drought or environmental osmotic stress, including solute accumulation, elevated levels of the compatible osmolyte proline (Pro), and accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, msl2 msl3 mutants expressed Pro and ABA metabolism genes in a pattern normally seen under drought or osmotic stress. Pro accumulation in the msl2 msl3 mutant was suppressed by conditions that reduce plastid osmotic stress or inhibition of ABA biosynthesis. Finally, treatment of unstressed msl2 msl3 plants with exogenous ABA elicited a much greater Pro accumulation response than in the wild type, similar to that observed in plants under drought or osmotic stress. These results suggest that osmotic imbalance across the plastid envelope can elicit a response similar to that elicited by osmotic imbalance across the plasma membrane and provide evidence for the integration of the osmotic state of an organelle into that of the cell in which it resides. PMID:24676856

  10. Global Rebalancing of Cellular Resources by Pleiotropic Point Mutations Illustrates a Multi-scale Mechanism of Adaptive Evolution.

    PubMed

    Utrilla, Jose; O'Brien, Edward J; Chen, Ke; McCloskey, Douglas; Cheung, Jacky; Wang, Harris; Armenta-Medina, Dagoberto; Feist, Adam M; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-04-27

    Pleiotropic regulatory mutations affect diverse cellular processes, posing a challenge to our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships across multiple biological scales. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) allows for such mutations to be found and characterized in the context of clear selection pressures. Here, several ALE-selected single-mutation variants in RNA polymerase (RNAP) of Escherichia coli are detailed using an integrated multi-scale experimental and computational approach. While these mutations increase cellular growth rates in steady environments, they reduce tolerance to stress and environmental fluctuations. We detail structural changes in the RNAP that rewire the transcriptional machinery to rebalance proteome and energy allocation toward growth and away from several hedging and stress functions. We find that while these mutations occur in diverse locations in the RNAP, they share a common adaptive mechanism. In turn, these findings highlight the resource allocation trade-offs organisms face and suggest how the structure of the regulatory network enhances evolvability. PMID:27135538

  11. Stress adaptation in a pathogenic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alistair J. P.; Budge, Susan; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Yin, Zhikang; Ene, Iuliana V.; Bohovych, Iryna; Sandai, Doblin; Kastora, Stavroula; Potrykus, Joanna; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Childers, Delma S.; Shahana, Shahida; Leach, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans. This yeast is carried by many individuals as a harmless commensal, but when immune defences are perturbed it causes mucosal infections (thrush). Additionally, when the immune system becomes severely compromised, C. albicans often causes life-threatening systemic infections. A battery of virulence factors and fitness attributes promote the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Fitness attributes include robust responses to local environmental stresses, the inactivation of which attenuates virulence. Stress signalling pathways in C. albicans include evolutionarily conserved modules. However, there has been rewiring of some stress regulatory circuitry such that the roles of a number of regulators in C. albicans have diverged relative to the benign model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This reflects the specific evolution of C. albicans as an opportunistic pathogen obligately associated with warm-blooded animals, compared with other yeasts that are found across diverse environmental niches. Our understanding of C. albicans stress signalling is based primarily on the in vitro responses of glucose-grown cells to individual stresses. However, in vivo this pathogen occupies complex and dynamic host niches characterised by alternative carbon sources and simultaneous exposure to combinations of stresses (rather than individual stresses). It has become apparent that changes in carbon source strongly influence stress resistance, and that some combinatorial stresses exert non-additive effects upon C. albicans. These effects, which are relevant to fungus–host interactions during disease progression, are mediated by multiple mechanisms that include signalling and chemical crosstalk, stress pathway interference and a biological transistor. PMID:24353214

  12. Avian renal proximal tubule urate secretion is inhibited by cellular stress-induced AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Amy M; Maffeo, Carla L; Renfro, J Larry

    2011-06-01

    Urate is a potent antioxidant at high concentrations but it has also been associated with a wide variety of health risks. Plasma urate concentration is determined by ingestion, production, and urinary excretion; however, factors that regulate urate excretion remain uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine whether cellular stress, which has been shown to affect other renal transport properties, modulates urate secretion in the avian renal proximal tubule. Chick kidney proximal tubule epithelial cell primary culture monolayers were used to study the transepithelial transport of radiolabeled urate. This model allowed examination of the processes, such as multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4, Abcc4), which subserve urate secretion in a functional, intact, homologous system. Our results show that the recently implicated urate efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), does not significantly contribute to urate secretion in this system. Exposure to a high concentration of zinc for 6 h induced a cellular stress response and a striking decrease in transepithelial urate secretion. Acute exposure to zinc had no effect on transepithelial urate secretion or isolated membrane vesicle urate transport, suggesting involvement of a cellular stress adaptation. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a candidate modulator of ATP-dependent urate efflux, by 5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribo-furanoside caused a decrease in urate secretion similar to that seen with zinc-induced cellular stress. This effect was prevented with the AMPK inhibitor compound C. Notably, the decrease in urate secretion seen with zinc-induced cellular stress was also prevented by compound C, implicating AMPK in regulation of renal uric acid excretion. PMID:21429974

  13. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates adaptation mechanism against chronic stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of continuous life stress (chronic stress) often causes gastric symptoms. Although central oxytocin has antistress effects, the role of central oxytocin in stress-induced gastric dysmotility remains unknown. Solid gastric emptying was measured in rats receiving acute restraint stress, 5 consecutive days of repeated restraint stress (chronic homotypic stress), and 7 consecutive days of varying types of stress (chronic heterotypic stress). Oxytocin and oxytocin receptor antagonist were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and oxytocin mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. The changes of oxytocinergic neurons in the PVN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Acute stress delayed gastric emptying, and the delayed gastric emptying was completely restored after 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, delayed gastric emptying persisted following chronic heterotypic stress. The restored gastric emptying following chronic homotypic stress was antagonized by icv injection of an oxytocin antagonist. Icv injection of oxytocin restored delayed gastric emptying induced by chronic heterotypic stress. CRF mRNA expression, which was significantly increased in response to acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress, returned to the basal levels following chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, oxytocin mRNA expression was significantly increased following chronic homotypic stress. The number of oxytocin-immunoreactive cells was increased following chronic homotypic stress at the magnocellular part of the PVN. Icv injection of oxytocin reduced CRF mRNA expression induced by acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress. It is suggested that the adaptation mechanism to chronic stress may involve the upregulation of oxytocin expression in the hypothalamus, which in turn attenuates CRF expression. PMID:20689056

  14. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates adaptation mechanism against chronic stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of continuous life stress (chronic stress) often causes gastric symptoms. Although central oxytocin has antistress effects, the role of central oxytocin in stress-induced gastric dysmotility remains unknown. Solid gastric emptying was measured in rats receiving acute restraint stress, 5 consecutive days of repeated restraint stress (chronic homotypic stress), and 7 consecutive days of varying types of stress (chronic heterotypic stress). Oxytocin and oxytocin receptor antagonist were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and oxytocin mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. The changes of oxytocinergic neurons in the PVN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Acute stress delayed gastric emptying, and the delayed gastric emptying was completely restored after 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, delayed gastric emptying persisted following chronic heterotypic stress. The restored gastric emptying following chronic homotypic stress was antagonized by icv injection of an oxytocin antagonist. Icv injection of oxytocin restored delayed gastric emptying induced by chronic heterotypic stress. CRF mRNA expression, which was significantly increased in response to acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress, returned to the basal levels following chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, oxytocin mRNA expression was significantly increased following chronic homotypic stress. The number of oxytocin-immunoreactive cells was increased following chronic homotypic stress at the magnocellular part of the PVN. Icv injection of oxytocin reduced CRF mRNA expression induced by acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress. It is suggested that the adaptation mechanism to chronic stress may involve the upregulation of oxytocin expression in the hypothalamus, which in turn attenuates CRF expression. PMID:20689056

  15. Exposure to Stressful Environments: Strategy of Adaptive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Leon E.

    1991-01-01

    Any new natural environment may generate a number of stresses (such as hypoxia, water lack, and heat exposure), each of which can produce strains in more than a single organ system. Every strain may in turn stimulate the body to adapt in multiple ways. Nevertheless, a general strategy of the various adaptive responses emerges when the challenges are divided into three groups. The first category includes conditions that affect the supply of essential molecules, while the second is made up by those stresses that prevent the body from regulating properly the output of waste products, such as CO2 and heat. In both classes, there is a small number of responses, similar in principle, regardless of the specific situation. The third unit is created by environments that disrupt body transport systems. Problems may arise when there is a conflict between two stresses requiring conflicting adaptive changes. An alternative to adaptation, creation of micro-environment, is often favored by the animal.

  16. How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating the Effects of Stress on Cellular Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vodopich, Darrell S.; Moore, Randy

    1989-01-01

    Describes two simple procedures allowing students to experiment with living membranes and to relate their results to fundamental membrane structure. Provides instructions for determining the effects of temperature and organic solvent stress on cellular membranes, and spectrophotometric analysis. (RT)

  17. Osmotic stress stimulates phosphorylation and cellular expression of heat shock proteins in rhesus macaque sperm.

    PubMed

    Cole, Julie A; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The cryosurvival of sperm requires cell signaling mechanisms to adapt to anisotonic conditions during the freezing and thawing process. Chaperone proteins heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90; recently renamed HSPA and HSPC, respectively) facilitate some of these cell signaling events in somatic cells. Sperm were evaluated for their cellular expression and levels of phosphorylation of both HSP 70 and HSP 90 under anisotonic conditions as a potential model for cell signaling during the cryopreservation of macaque spermatozoa. In order to monitor the level of stress, the motility and viability parameters were evaluated at various time points. Cells were then either prepared for phosphoprotein enrichment or indirect immunocytochemistry. As controls, the phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine levels were measured under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions and were compared with the phosphoprotein levels expressed under osmotic conditions. As expected, there was an increase in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions. There was also a significant increase in the level of all phosphoproteins under hyperosmotic conditions. There was no change in the level of expression of HSP 70 or 90 under osmotic stress conditions as measured by Western blot. The enrichment of phosphoproteins followed by Western immunoblotting revealed an increase in the phosphorylation of HSP 70 but not HSP 90 under osmotic stress conditions. Indirect immunofluorescence localized HSP 70 to the postacrosomal region of sperm, and the level of membrane expression of HSP 70 was significantly affected by anisotonic conditions, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results suggest a differential role for HSP 70 and HSP 90 during osmotic stress conditions in rhesus macaque sperm. PMID:21088232

  18. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  19. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  20. Cellular differentiation hierarchies in normal and culture-adapted human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Enver, Tariq; Soneji, Shamit; Joshi, Chirag; Brown, John; Iborra, Francisco; Orntoft, Torben; Thykjaer, Thomas; Maltby, Edna; Smith, Kath; Abu Dawud, Raed; Jones, Mark; Matin, Maryam; Gokhale, Paul; Draper, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) lines vary in their characteristics and behaviour not only because they are derived from genetically outbred populations, but also because they may undergo progressive adaptation upon long-term culture in vitro. Such adaptation may reflect selection of variants with altered propensity for survival and retention of an undifferentiated phenotype. Elucidating the mechanisms involved will be important for understanding normal self-renewal and commitment to differentiation and for validating the safety of HESC-based therapy. We have investigated this process of adaptation at the cellular and molecular levels through a comparison of early passage (normal) and late passage (adapted) sublines of a single HESC line, H7. To account for spontaneous differentiation that occurs in HESC cultures, we sorted cells for SSEA3, which marks undifferentiated HESC. We show that the gene expression programmes of the adapted cells partially reflected their aberrant karyotype, but also resulted from a failure in X-inactivation, emphasizing the importance in adaptation of karyotypically silent epigenetic changes. On the basis of growth potential, ability to re-initiate ES cultures and global transcription profiles, we propose a cellular differentiation hierarchy for maintenance cultures of HESC: normal SSEA3+ cells represent pluripotent stem cells. Normal SSEA3- cells have exited this compartment, but retain multilineage differentiation potential. However, adapted SSEA3+ and SSEA3- cells co-segregate within the stem cell territory, implying that adaptation reflects an alteration in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. As this balance is also an essential feature of cancer, the mechanisms of culture adaptation may mirror those of oncogenesis and tumour progression. PMID:16159889

  1. FBXW7 modulates cellular stress response and metastatic potential via HSF1 post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lui, Kevin; Aydin, Iraz T.; Trimarchi, Thomas; Darvishian, Farbod; Salvaggio, Christine; Zhong, Judy; Bhatt, Kamala; Chen, Emily I.; Celebi, Julide T.; Lazaris, Charalampos; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Osman, Iman; Hernando, Eva; Aifantis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) orchestrates the heat-shock response in eukaryotes. Although this pathway has been evolved to help cells adapt in the presence of challenging conditions, it is co-opted in cancer to support malignancy. However, the mechanisms that regulate HSF1 and thus cellular stress response are poorly understood. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase FBXW7 α interacts with HSF1 through a conserved motif phosphorylated by GSK3β and ERK1. FBXW7α ubiquitylates HSF1 and loss of FBXW7α results in impaired degradation of nuclear HSF1 and defective heat-shock response attenuation. FBXW7α is either mutated or transcriptionally downregulated in melanoma and HSF1 nuclear stabilization correlates with increased metastatic potential and disease progression. FBXW7α deficiency and subsequent HSF1 accumulation activates an invasion-supportive transcriptional program and enhances the metastatic potential of human melanoma cells. These findings identify a post-translational mechanism of regulation of the HSF1 transcriptional program both in the presence of exogenous stress and in cancer. PMID:25720964

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  3. Heat stress effects on livestock: molecular, cellular and metabolic aspects, a review.

    PubMed

    Belhadj Slimen, I; Najar, T; Ghram, A; Abdrrabba, M

    2016-06-01

    Elevated ambient temperatures affect animal production and welfare. Animal's reduced production performances during heat stress were traditionally thought to result from the decreased feed intake. However, it has recently been shown that heat stress disturbs the steady state concentrations of free radicals, resulting in both cellular and mitochondrial oxidative damage. Indeed, heat stress reorganizes the use of the body resources including fat, protein and energy. Heat stress reduces the metabolic rates and alters post-absorptive metabolism, regardless of the decreased feed intake. Consequently, growth, production, reproduction and health are not priorities any more in the metabolism of heat-stressed animals. The drastic effects of heat stress depend on its duration and severity. This review clearly describes about biochemical, cellular and metabolic changes that occur during thermal stress in farm animals. PMID:26250521

  4. Acid stress mediated adaptive divergence in ion channel function during embryogenesis in Rana arvalis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Longfei; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels and pumps are responsible for ion flux in cells, and are key mechanisms mediating cellular function. Many environmental stressors, such as salinity and acidification, are known to severely disrupt ionic balance of organisms thereby challenging fitness of natural populations. Although ion channels can have several vital functions during early life-stages (e.g. embryogenesis), it is currently not known i) how developing embryos maintain proper intracellular conditions when exposed to environmental stress and ii) to what extent environmental stress can drive intra-specific divergence in ion channels. Here we studied the moor frog, Rana arvalis, from three divergent populations to investigate the role of different ion channels and pumps for embryonic survival under acid stress (pH 4 vs 7.5) and whether populations adapted to contrasting acidities differ in the relative role of different ion channel/pumps. We found that ion channels that mediate Ca2+ influx are essential for embryonic survival under acidic pH, and, intriguingly, that populations differ in calcium channel function. Our results suggest that adaptive divergence in embryonic acid stress tolerance of amphibians may in part be mediated by Ca2+ balance. We suggest that ion flux may mediate adaptive divergence of natural populations at early life-stages in the face of environmental stress. PMID:26381453

  5. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  6. Anisotropic optical flow algorithm based on self-adaptive cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congxuan; Chen, Zhen; Li, Ming; Sun, Kaiqiong

    2013-01-01

    An anisotropic optical flow estimation method based on self-adaptive cellular neural networks (CNN) is proposed. First, a novel optical flow energy function which contains a robust data term and an anisotropic smoothing term is projected. Next, the CNN model which has the self-adaptive feedback operator and threshold is presented according to the Euler-Lagrange partial differential equations of the proposed optical flow energy function. Finally, the elaborate evaluation experiments indicate the significant effects of the various proposed strategies for optical flow estimation, and the comparison results with the other methods show that the proposed algorithm has better performance in computing accuracy and efficiency.

  7. Cellular protection during oxidative stress: a potential role for D-ribose and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Addis, Paul; Shecterle, Linda M; St Cyr, John A

    2012-09-01

    A healthy cellular system involves the maintenance of an intracellular metabolic balance. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced as a normal product of cellular metabolism; however, during situations of cellular stress, these levels can increase dramatically with the potential to cause deleterious cellular structural and/or functional consequences. There is a significant elevation in these ROS following stressful situations, such as ischemia, hypoxia, high-intensity exercise, and in many diseases. To combat these ROS, neutralizing endogenous enzymes, as well as exogenous antioxidants, can aid in minimizing their potential untoward cellular effects. Exogenous reducing antioxidant agents, such as vitamin C and/or E, play a role in addressing these formed species; however, recent research has suggested that fruit seed extracts may provide additional cellular benefits beyond their antioxidant features. Furthermore, supplemental D-ribose enhances the recovery of high-energy phosphates following stress and appears to potentially offer additional benefits by reducing radical formation. Specifically, during periods of hypoxia/ischemia, supplemental D-ribose may play an inhibitory role in the breakdown of adenine nucleotides, influencing the subsequent formation of xanthine and uric acid compounds; and thereby affecting the release of superoxide anion radicals. The combination of D-ribose with reducing antioxidants may provide a more optimal state of cellular protection during and following times of oxidative stress. PMID:22891990

  8. Direct detection of cellular adaptation to local cyclic stretching at the single cell level by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Machida, Shin-ichi; Harada, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    The cellular response to external mechanical forces has important effects on numerous biological phenomena. The sequences of molecular events that underlie the observed changes in cellular properties have yet to be elucidated in detail. Here we have detected the responses of a cultured cell against locally applied cyclic stretching and compressive forces, after creating an artificial focal adhesion under a glass bead attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope. The cell tension initially increased in response to the tensile stress and then decreased within ∼1 min as a result of viscoelastic properties of the cell. This relaxation was followed by a gradual increase in tension extending over several minutes. The slow recovery of tension ceased after several cycles of force application. This tension-recovering activity was inhibited when cells were treated with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, or with (-)-blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, suggesting that the activity was driven by actin-myosin interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative analysis of cellular mechanical properties during the process of adaptation to locally applied cyclic external force. PMID:21281570

  9. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment. PMID:26064422

  10. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment. PMID:26064422

  11. Discovery of biomarkers for oxidative stress based on cellular metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningli; Wei, Jianteng; Liu, Yewei; Pei, Dong; Hu, Qingping; Wang, Yu; Di, Duolong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has a close relationship with various pathologic physiology phenomena and the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide evidence for clinical diagnosis or disease prevention. Metabolomics was employed to identify the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector, mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminate analysis were used in this study. The 10, 15 and 13 metabolites were considered to discriminate the model group, vitamin E-treated group and l-glutathione-treated group, respectively. Some of them have been identified, namely, malic acid, vitamin C, reduced glutathione and tryptophan. Identification of other potential biomarkers should be conducted and their physiological significance also needs to be elaborated. PMID:27168482

  12. The cellular response to curvature-induced stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biton, Y. Y.; Safran, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to explain recent observations of the orientational response of cells to unidirectional curvature. Experiments show that some cell types when plated on a rigid cylindrical surface tend to reorient their shape and stress fibers along the axis of the cylinder, while others align their stress fibers perpendicular to that axis. Our model focuses on the competition of the shear stress—that results from cell adhesion and active contractility—and the anisotropic bending stiffness of the stress fibers. We predict the cell orientation angle that results from the balance of these two forces in a mechanical equilibrium. The conditions under which the different experimental observations can be obtained are discussed in terms of the theory.

  13. Identifying core features of adaptive metabolic mechanisms for chronic heat stress attenuation contributing to systems robustness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jenny; Weber, Katrin; Klemp, Elisabeth; Winters, Gidon; Franssen, Susanne U; Wienpahl, Isabell; Huylmans, Ann-Kathrin; Zecher, Karsten; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Weber, Andreas P M

    2012-05-01

    The contribution of metabolism to heat stress may play a significant role in defining robustness and recovery of systems; either by providing the energy and metabolites required for cellular homeostasis, or through the generation of protective osmolytes. However, the mechanisms by which heat stress attenuation could be adapted through metabolic processes as a stabilizing strategy against thermal stress are still largely unclear. We address this issue through metabolomic and transcriptomic profiles for populations along a thermal cline where two seagrass species, Zostera marina and Zostera noltii, were found in close proximity. Significant changes captured by these profile comparisons could be detected, with a larger response magnitude observed in northern populations to heat stress. Sucrose, fructose, and myo-inositol were identified to be the most responsive of the 29 analyzed organic metabolites. Many key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways also showed significant differential expression. The reported comparison suggests that adaptive mechanisms are involved through metabolic pathways to dampen the impacts of heat stress, and interactions between the metabolome and proteome should be further investigated in systems biology to understand robust design features against abiotic stress. PMID:22402787

  14. Beyond Adapting to Climate Change: Embedding Adaptation in Responses to Multiple Threats and Stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J; Kates, Dr. Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change impacts are already being experienced in every region of the United States and every part of the world most severely in Arctic regions and adaptation is needed now. Although climate change adaptation research is still in its infancy, significant adaptation planning in the United States has already begun in a number of localities. This article seeks to broaden the adaptation effort by integrating it with broader frameworks of hazards research, sustainability science, and community and regional resilience. To extend the range of experience, we draw from ongoing case studies in the Southeastern United States and the environmental history of New Orleans to consider the multiple threats and stresses that all communities and regions experience. Embedding climate adaptation in responses to multiple threats and stresses helps us to understand climate change impacts, themselves often products of multiple stresses, to achieve community acceptance of needed adaptations as co-benefits of addressing multiple threats, and to mainstream the process of climate adaptation through the larger envelope of social relationships, communication channels, and broad-based awareness of needs for risk management that accompany community resilience.

  15. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  16. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern…

  17. Increased Service Delivery and Adaptation to Occupational Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnabel, John F.; Simoni, Joseph J.

    Effective response by community service agencies to clientele needs is an essential part of community development. A personnel screening instrument, a model for predicting different types of adaptation to occupational stress, is suggested as a means of increasing the responsiveness of service agencies to their local communities. Proposing the use…

  18. Plant anaerobic stress I. Metabolic adaptation to oxygen deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment and further development of a novel branch of science in the field of ecological physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, dedicated to plant life under hypoxic and anoxic stresses, is considered in the present review focusing upon strategies of adaptation and injury exhibited...

  19. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Ladan; Xie, Yufen; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies. PMID:24710551

  20. Preferential Osmolyte Accumulation: a Mechanism of Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Diazotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Magdy A.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Smith, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    A common cellular mechanism of osmotic-stress adaptation is the intracellular accumulation of organic solutes (osmolytes). We investigated the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in the diazotrophic bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are adversely affected by high osmotic strength (i.e., soil salinity and/or drought). We used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify all the osmolytes accumulating in these strains during osmotic stress generated by 0.5 M NaCl. Evidence is presented for the accumulation of trehalose and glutamate in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4, proline and glutamate in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6, and trehalose and proline in K. pneumoniae. Glycine betaine was accumulated in all strains grown in culture media containing yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source. Alternative nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4Cl or casamino acids) in the culture medium did not result in measurable glycine betaine accumulation. We suggest that the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in these organisms entails the accumulation of osmolytes in hyperosmotically stressed cells resulting from either enhanced uptake from the medium (of glycine betaine, proline, and glutamate) or increased net biosynthesis (of trehalose, proline, and glutamate) or both. The preferred osmolyte in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4 shifted from glutamate to trehalose as a consequence of a prolonged osmotic stress. Also, the dominant osmolyte in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6 shifted from glutamate to proline accumulation as the osmotic strength of the medium increased. PMID:16348295

  1. Plant Heat Adaptation: priming in response to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major threat to crop yield stability. Plants can be primed by heat stress, which enables them to subsequently survive temperatures that are lethal to a plant in the naïve state. This is a rapid response that has been known for many years and that is highly conserved across kingdoms. Interestingly, recent studies in Arabidopsis and rice show that this thermo-priming lasts for several days at normal growth temperatures and that it is an active process that is genetically separable from the priming itself. This is referred to as maintenance of acquired thermotolerance or heat stress memory. Such a memory conceivably has adaptive advantages under natural conditions, where heat stress often is chronic or recurring. In this review, I will focus on recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of heat stress memory. PMID:27134736

  2. Osmotic stress adaptation of Paracoccidioides lutzii, Pb01, monitored by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leandro Nascimento da Silva; Brito, Wesley de Almeida; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Weber, Simone Schneider; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Casaletti, Luciana; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2016-10-01

    The ability to respond to stressful conditions is essential for most living organisms. In pathogenic organisms, this response is required for effective transition from a saprophytic lifestyle to the establishment of pathogenic interactions within a susceptible host. Hyperosmotic stress has been used as a model to study signal transduction and seems to cause many cellular adaptations, including the alteration of protein expression and cellular volume as well as size regulation. In this work, we evaluated the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 yeast cells during osmotic stress induced by potassium chloride. We performed a high accuracy proteomic technique (NanoUPLC-MS(E)) to identify differentially expressed proteins during osmotic shock. The data describe an osmoadaptative response of this fungus when subjected to this treatment. Proteins involved in the synthesis of cell wall components were modulated, which suggested cell wall remodeling. In addition, alterations in the energy metabolism were observed. Furthermore, proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and hydrogen peroxide detoxification were modulated during osmotic stress. Our study suggests that P. lutzii Pb01. presents a vast osmoadaptative response that is composed of different proteins that act together to minimize the effects caused by osmotic stress. PMID:27496542

  3. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [(3)H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  4. A threshold of endogenous stress is required to engage cellular response to protect against mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saintigny, Yannick; Chevalier, François; Bravard, Anne; Dardillac, Elodie; Laurent, David; Hem, Sonia; Dépagne, Jordane; Radicella, J. Pablo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous stress represents a major source of genome instability, but is in essence difficult to apprehend. Incorporation of labeled radionuclides into DNA constitutes a tractable model to analyze cellular responses to endogenous attacks. Here we show that incorporation of [3H]thymidine into CHO cells generates oxidative-induced mutagenesis, but, with a peak at low doses. Proteomic analysis showed that the cellular response differs between low and high levels of endogenous stress. In particular, these results confirmed the involvement of proteins implicated in redox homeostasis and DNA damage signaling pathways. Induced-mutagenesis was abolished by the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine and plateaued, at high doses, upon exposure to L-buthionine sulfoximine, which represses cellular detoxification. The [3H]thymidine-induced mutation spectrum revealed mostly base substitutions, exhibiting a signature specific for low doses (GC > CG and AT > CG). Consistently, the enzymatic activity of the base excision repair protein APE-1 is induced at only medium or high doses. Collectively, the data reveal that a threshold of endogenous stress must be reached to trigger cellular detoxification and DNA repair programs; below this threshold, the consequences of endogenous stress escape cellular surveillance, leading to high levels of mutagenesis. Therefore, low doses of endogenous local stress can jeopardize genome integrity more efficiently than higher doses. PMID:27406380

  5. The effect of strength training on muscle cellular stress in prostate cancer patients on ADT

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, L; Kirkegaard, C; Ugelstad, I; Fosså, S D; Raastad, T

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with several side effects, including loss of muscle mass. Muscle atrophy is associated with reduced mitochondrial function and increased muscle cellular stress that may be counteracted by strength training. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of strength training on mitochondrial proteins and indicators of muscle cellular stress in PCa patients on ADT. Methods Men diagnosed with locally advanced PCa receiving ADT were randomised to a strength training group (STG) (n=16) or a control group (CG) (n=15) for 16 weeks. Muscle biopsies were collected pre- and post-intervention from the vastus lateralis muscle, and analysed for mitochondrial proteins (citrate synthase, cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COXIV), HSP60) and indicators of muscle cellular stress (heat shock protein (HSP) 70, alpha B-crystallin, HSP27, free ubiquitin, and total ubiquitinated proteins) using Western blot and ELISA. Results No significant intervention effects were observed in any of the mitochondrial proteins or indicators of muscle cellular stress. However, within-group analysis revealed that the level of HSP70 was reduced in the STG and a tendency towards a reduction in citrate synthase levels was observed in the CG. Levels of total ubiquitinated proteins were unchanged in both groups. Conclusion Although reduced HSP70 levels indicated reduced muscle cellular stress in the STG, the lack of an intervention effect precluded any clear conclusions. PMID:27169606

  6. A Fluorescent Reporter of AMPK activity and Cellular Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Peiling; Zheng, Bin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sasaki, Atsuo T; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated when the AMP/ATP ratio in cells is elevated due to energy stress. Here we describe a biosensor, AMPKAR, which exhibits enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in response to phosphorylation by AMPK, allowing spatio-temporal monitoring of AMPK activity in single cells. We show that this reporter responds to a variety of stimuli that are known to induce energy stress and that the response is dependent on AMPK α1 & α2 and on the upstream kinase, LKB1. Interestingly we found that AMPK activation is confined to the cytosol in response to energy stress but can be observed in both the cytosol and nucleus in response to calcium elevation. Finally, using this probe with U2OS cells in a microfluidics device, we observed a very high cell-to-cell variability in the amplitude and time course of AMPK activation and recovery in response to pulses of glucose deprivation. PMID:21459332

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a novel cellular response to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure.

    PubMed

    Peropadre, Ana; Fernández Freire, Paloma; Pérez Martín, José Manuel; Herrero, Óscar; Hazen, María José

    2015-12-25

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate is a high-production chemical widely used as a plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride products. Due to its ubiquitous presence in environmental compartments and the constant exposure of the general population through ingestion, inhalation, and dermal absorption, this compound has been subjected to extensive in vivo and in vitro toxicological studies. Despite the available information, research on the cytotoxicity of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in mammalian cells is relatively limited.In this paper, an in vitro multi-parametric approach was used to provide further mechanistic data on the toxic activity of this chemical in Vero and HaCaT cells. Our results reveal that a 24 h exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate causes, in both cell lines, an inhibition of cell proliferation that was linked to cell cycle delay at the G1 phase. Concomitantly, the tested compound induces mild endoplasmic reticulum stress which leads to an adaptive rather than a pro-apoptotic response in mammalian cells. These findings demonstrate that there are multiple potential cellular targets of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate-induced toxicity and the need to develop further experimental studies for the risk assessment of this ubiquitous plasticizer. PMID:26514933

  8. The stress response resolution assay. I. Quantitative assessment of environmental agent/condition effects on cellular stress resolution outcomes in epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Dale M; Patrick O'Neill, J; Tyson, Frederick L; Walker, Vernon E

    2013-05-01

    The events or factors that lead from normal cell function to conditions and diseases such as aging or cancer reflect complex interactions between cells and their environment. Cellular stress responses, a group of processes involved in homeostasis and adaptation to environmental change, contribute to cell survival under stress and can be resolved with damage avoidance or damage tolerance outcomes. To investigate the impact of environmental agents/conditions upon cellular stress response outcomes in epithelium, a novel quantitative assay, the "stress response resolution" (SRR) assay, was developed. The SRR assay consists of pretreatment with a test agent or vehicle followed later by a calibrated stress conditions exposure step (here, using 6-thioguanine). Pilot studies conducted with a spontaneously-immortalized murine mammary epithelial cell line pretreated with vehicle or 20 µg N-ethyl-N-nitrososurea/ml medium for 1 hr, or two hTERT-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell lines pretreated with vehicle or 100 µM zidovudine/lamivudine for 12 days, found minimal alterations in cell morphology, survival, or cell function through 2 weeks post-exposure. However, when these pretreatments were followed 2 weeks later by exposure to calibrated stress conditions of limited duration (for 4 days), significant alterations in stress resolution were observed in pretreated cells compared with vehicle-treated control cells, with decreased damage avoidance survival outcomes in all cell lines and increased damage tolerance outcomes in two of three cell lines. These pilot study results suggest that sub-cytotoxic pretreatments with chemical mutagens have long-term adverse impact upon the ability of cells to resolve subsequent exposure to environmental stressors. PMID:23554083

  9. C/EBPγ Is a Critical Regulator of Cellular Stress Response Networks through Heterodimerization with ATF4.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Christopher J; Mayekar, Manasi K; Martin, Nancy; Saylor, Karen L; Gonit, Mesfin; Jailwala, Parthav; Kasoji, Manjula; Haines, Diana C; Quiñones, Octavio A; Johnson, Peter F

    2016-03-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) controls cellular adaptations to nutrient deprivation, redox imbalances, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ISR genes are upregulated in stressed cells, primarily by the bZIP transcription factor ATF4 through its recruitment to cis-regulatory C/EBP:ATF response elements (CAREs) together with a dimeric partner of uncertain identity. Here, we show that C/EBPγ:ATF4 heterodimers, but not C/EBPβ:ATF4 dimers, are the predominant CARE-binding species in stressed cells. C/EBPγ and ATF4 associate with genomic CAREs in a mutually dependent manner and coregulate many ISR genes. In contrast, the C/EBP family members C/EBPβ and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were largely dispensable for induction of stress genes. Cebpg(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) proliferate poorly and exhibit oxidative stress due to reduced glutathione levels and impaired expression of several glutathione biosynthesis pathway genes. Cebpg(-/-) mice (C57BL/6 background) display reduced body size and microphthalmia, similar to ATF4-null animals. In addition, C/EBPγ-deficient newborns die from atelectasis and respiratory failure, which can be mitigated by in utero exposure to the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Cebpg(-/-) mice on a mixed strain background showed improved viability but, upon aging, developed significantly fewer malignant solid tumors than WT animals. Our findings identify C/EBPγ as a novel antioxidant regulator and an obligatory ATF4 partner that controls redox homeostasis in normal and cancerous cells. PMID:26667036

  10. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Belmonte, Rodrigo C.; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  11. Integrative Model of Oxidative Stress Adaptation in the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Komalapriya, Chandrasekaran; Kaloriti, Despoina; Tillmann, Anna T; Yin, Zhikang; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Jacobsen, Mette D; Belmonte, Rodrigo C; Cameron, Gary; Haynes, Ken; Grebogi, Celso; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Gow, Neil A R; Thiel, Marco; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P; Romano, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, mounts robust responses to oxidative stress that are critical for its virulence. These responses counteract the reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated by host immune cells in an attempt to kill the invading fungus. Knowledge of the dynamical processes that instigate C. albicans oxidative stress responses is required for a proper understanding of fungus-host interactions. Therefore, we have adopted an interdisciplinary approach to explore the dynamical responses of C. albicans to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Our deterministic mathematical model integrates two major oxidative stress signalling pathways (Cap1 and Hog1 pathways) with the three major antioxidant systems (catalase, glutathione and thioredoxin systems) and the pentose phosphate pathway, which provides reducing equivalents required for oxidative stress adaptation. The model encapsulates existing knowledge of these systems with new genomic, proteomic, transcriptomic, molecular and cellular datasets. Our integrative approach predicts the existence of alternative states for the key regulators Cap1 and Hog1, thereby suggesting novel regulatory behaviours during oxidative stress. The model reproduces both existing and new experimental observations under a variety of scenarios. Time- and dose-dependent predictions of the oxidative stress responses for both wild type and mutant cells have highlighted the different temporal contributions of the various antioxidant systems during oxidative stress adaptation, indicating that catalase plays a critical role immediately following stress imposition. This is the first model to encapsulate the dynamics of the transcriptional response alongside the redox kinetics of the major antioxidant systems during H2O2 stress in C. albicans. PMID:26368573

  12. Adaptation of chondrocytes to low oxygen tension: relationship between hypoxia and cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, R; Koch, C J; Tao, Z; Teixeira, C M; Shapiro, I M

    1996-08-01

    In endochondral bone, the growth cartilage is the site of rapid growth. Since the vascular supply to the cartilage is limited, it is widely assumed that cells of the cartilage are hypoxic and that limitations in the oxygen supply regulate the energetic state of the maturing cells. In this report, we evaluate the effects of oxygen tension on chondrocyte energy metabolism, thiol status, and expression of transcription elements, HIF and AP-1. Imposition of an hypoxic environment on cultured chondrocytes caused a proportional increase in glucose utilization and elevated levels of lactate synthesis. Although we observed a statistical increase in the activities of phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase after exposure to lowered oxygen concentrations, the effect was small. The cultured cells exhibited a decreased utilization of glutamine, possibly due to down regulation of mitochondrial function and inhibition of oxidative deamination. With respect to total energy generation, we noted that these cells are quite capable of maintaining the energy charge of the cell at low oxygen tensions. Indeed, no changes in the absolute quantity of adenine nucleotides or the energy charge ratio was observed. Hypoxia caused a decrease in the glutathione content of cultured chondrocytes and a concomitant rise in cell and medium cysteine levels. It is likely that the fall in cell glutathione level is due to decreased synthesis of the tripeptide under reduced oxygen stress and the limited supply of glutamate. The observed rise in cellular and medium cysteine levels probably reflects an increase in the rate of degradation of glutathione and a decrease in synthesis of the peptide. To explore how cells transduce these metabolic effects, gel retardation assays were used to study chondrocyte HIF and AP-1 binding activities. Chondrocyte nuclear preparations bound an HIF-oligonucleotide; however, at low oxygen tensions, no increase in HIF binding was

  13. KDM5 interacts with Foxo to modulate cellular levels of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingyin; Greer, Christina; Secombe, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Increased cellular levels of oxidative stress are implicated in a large number of human diseases. Here we describe the transcription co-factor KDM5 (also known as Lid) as a new critical regulator of cellular redox state. Moreover, this occurs through a novel KDM5 activity whereby it alters the ability of the transcription factor Foxo to bind to DNA. Our microarray analyses of kdm5 mutants revealed a striking enrichment for genes required to regulate cellular levels of oxidative stress. Consistent with this, loss of kdm5 results in increased sensitivity to treatment with oxidizers, elevated levels of oxidized proteins, and increased mutation load. KDM5 activates oxidative stress resistance genes by interacting with Foxo to facilitate its recruitment to KDM5-Foxo co-regulated genes. Significantly, this occurs independently of KDM5's well-characterized demethylase activity. Instead, KDM5 interacts with the lysine deacetylase HDAC4 to promote Foxo deacetylation, which affects Foxo DNA binding. PMID:25329053

  14. KDM5 Interacts with Foxo to Modulate Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingyin; Greer, Christina; Secombe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Increased cellular levels of oxidative stress are implicated in a large number of human diseases. Here we describe the transcription co-factor KDM5 (also known as Lid) as a new critical regulator of cellular redox state. Moreover, this occurs through a novel KDM5 activity whereby it alters the ability of the transcription factor Foxo to bind to DNA. Our microarray analyses of kdm5 mutants revealed a striking enrichment for genes required to regulate cellular levels of oxidative stress. Consistent with this, loss of kdm5 results in increased sensitivity to treatment with oxidizers, elevated levels of oxidized proteins, and increased mutation load. KDM5 activates oxidative stress resistance genes by interacting with Foxo to facilitate its recruitment to KDM5-Foxo co-regulated genes. Significantly, this occurs independently of KDM5's well-characterized demethylase activity. Instead, KDM5 interacts with the lysine deacetylase HDAC4 to promote Foxo deacetylation, which affects Foxo DNA binding. PMID:25329053

  15. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone. PMID:26509576

  16. Stress and adaptation responses to repeated acute acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which groups of adult male chickens (single-comb white leghorn) were exposed daily to acceleration (centrifugation) of 2 or 3 G for 10 min, 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hr (continuously), or 0 time (controls). After approximately five months of this intermittent treatment (training), the birds were exposed to continuous accelerations of the same G force (intensity). The degree of stress and adaptation of each bird was determined by survival and relative lymphocyte count criteria. Intermittent training exposures of 2 G developed levels of adaptation in birds directly proportional to the duration of their daily exposure. Intermittent training periods at 3 G, however, produced a physiological deterioration in birds receiving daily exposures of 8 hr or more. Adaptive benefits were found only in the 1- and 4-hr-daily intermittent 3-G exposure groups. Exposure to 3 G produced an immediate stress response as indicated by a low relative lymphocyte count which returned to control (preexposed) values prior to the next daily acceleration period in the 10-min, 1-hr, and 4-hr groups. This daily recovery period from stress appeared to be necessary for adaptation as opposed to deterioration for the more severe environmental (3 G) alteration.

  17. Learning about stress: neural, endocrine and behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Richard

    2016-09-01

    In this review, nonassociative learning is advanced as an organizing principle to draw together findings from both sympathetic-adrenal medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses to chronic intermittent exposure to a variety of stressors. Studies of habituation, facilitation and sensitization of stress effector systems are reviewed and linked to an animal's prior experience with a given stressor, the intensity of the stressor and the appraisal by the animal of its ability to mobilize physiological systems to adapt to the stressor. Brain pathways that regulate physiological and behavioral responses to stress are discussed, especially in light of their regulation of nonassociative processes in chronic intermittent stress. These findings may have special relevance to various psychiatric diseases, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:27294884

  18. Oxidative stress in the haematopoietic niche regulates the cellular immune response in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sinenko, Sergey A; Shim, Jiwon; Banerjee, Utpal

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with the development of different pathological conditions, including cancers and autoimmune diseases. We analysed whether oxidatively challenged tissue can have systemic effects on the development of cellular immune responses using Drosophila as a model system. Indeed, the haematopoietic niche that normally maintains blood progenitors can sense oxidative stress and regulate the cellular immune response. Pathogen infection induces ROS in the niche cells, resulting in the secretion of an epidermal growth factor-like cytokine signal that leads to the differentiation of specialized cells involved in innate immune responses. PMID:22134547

  19. Can meditation slow rate of cellular aging? Cognitive stress, mindfulness, and telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa; Daubenmier, Jennifer; Moskowitz, Judith T.; Folkman, Susan; Blackburn, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the malleable determinants of cellular aging is critical to understanding human longevity. Telomeres may provide a pathway for exploring this question. Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes. The length of telomeres offers insight into mitotic cell and possibly organismal longevity. Telomere length has now been linked to chronic stress exposure and depression. This raises the question of how might cellular aging be modulated by psychological functioning. We consider two psychological processes or states that are in opposition to one another--threat cognition and mindfulness--and their effects on cellular aging. Psychological stress cognitions, particularly appraisals of threat and ruminative thoughts, can lead to prolonged states of reactivity. In contrast, mindfulness meditation techniques appear to shift cognitive appraisals from threat to challenge, decrease ruminative thought, and reduce stress arousal. Mindfulness may also directly increase positive arousal states. We review data linking telomere length to cognitive stress and stress arousal and present new data linking cognitive appraisal to telomere length. Given the pattern of associations revealed so far, we propose that some forms of meditation may have salutary effects on telomere length by reducing cognitive stress and stress arousal and increasing positive states of mind and hormonal factors that may promote telomere maintenance. Aspects of this model are currently being tested in ongoing trials of mindfulness meditation. PMID:19735238

  20. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Cellular Stress Responses: Impact on Replication and Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Ortiz, Sandra L.; Zamorano Cuervo, Natalia; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised adults. Despite decades of research, a complete integrated picture of RSV-host interaction is still missing. Several cellular responses to stress are involved in the host-response to many virus infections. The endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function leads to activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) to restore homeostasis. Formation of cytoplasmic stress granules containing translationally stalled mRNAs is a means to control protein translation. Production of reactive oxygen species is balanced by an antioxidant response to prevent oxidative stress and the resulting damages. In recent years, ongoing research has started to unveil specific regulatory interactions of RSV with these host cellular stress responses. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms evolved by RSV to induce, subvert or manipulate the ER stress, the stress granule and oxidative stress responses. We summarize the evidence linking these stress responses with the regulation of RSV replication and the associated pathogenesis. PMID:27187445

  1. Scolopendin 2 leads to cellular stress response in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2016-07-01

    Centipedes, a kind of arthropod, have been reported to produce antimicrobial peptides as part of an innate immune response. Scolopendin 2 (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) is a novel antimicrobial peptide derived from the body of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by using RNA sequencing. To investigate the intracellular responses induced by scolopendin 2, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione accumulation and lipid peroxidation were monitored over sublethal and lethal doses. Intracellular ROS and antioxidant molecule levels were elevated and lipids were peroxidized at sublethal concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated in the cytosol and mitochondria. These stress responses were considered to be associated with yeast apoptosis. Candida albicans cells exposed to scolopendin 2 were identified using diagnostic markers of apoptotic response. Various responses such as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation were exhibited. Scolopendin 2 disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential and activated metacaspase, which was mediated by cytochrome c release. In conclusion, treatment of C. albicans with scolopendin 2 induced the apoptotic response at sublethal doses, which in turn led to mitochondrial dysfunction, metacaspase activation, and cell death. The cationic antimicrobial peptide scolopendin 2 from the centipede is a potential antifungal peptide, triggering the apoptotic response. PMID:27207682

  2. Mechanisms of Adaptation to Nitrosative Stress in Bacillus subtilis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rogstam, Annika; Larsson, Jonas T.; Kjelgaard, Peter; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria use a number of mechanisms for coping with the toxic effects exerted by nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives. Here we show that the flavohemoglobin encoded by the hmp gene has a vital role in an adaptive response to protect the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis from nitrosative stress. We further show that nitrosative stress induced by the nitrosonium cation donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) leads to deactivation of the transcriptional repressor NsrR, resulting in derepression of hmp. Nitrosative stress induces the sigma B-controlled general stress regulon. However, a sigB null mutant did not show increased sensitivity to SNP, suggesting that the sigma B-dependent stress proteins are involved in a nonspecific protection against stress whereas the Hmp flavohemoglobin plays a central role in detoxification. Mutations in the yjbIH operon, which encodes a truncated hemoglobin (YjbI) and a predicted 34-kDa cytosolic protein of unknown function (YjbH), rendered B. subtilis hypersensitive to SNP, suggesting roles in nitrosative stress management. PMID:17293416

  3. REM Sleep Rebound as an Adaptive Response to Stressful Situations.

    PubMed

    Suchecki, Deborah; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Machado, Ricardo Borges

    2012-01-01

    Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral, and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a way to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic, as opposed to acute, stress impairs sleep and has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, conferring even more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the rapid eye movement phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22485105

  4. REM Sleep Rebound as an Adaptive Response to Stressful Situations

    PubMed Central

    Suchecki, Deborah; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Machado, Ricardo Borges

    2011-01-01

    Stress and sleep are related to each other in a bidirectional way. If on one hand poor or inadequate sleep exacerbates emotional, behavioral, and stress-related responses, on the other hand acute stress induces sleep rebound, most likely as a way to cope with the adverse stimuli. Chronic, as opposed to acute, stress impairs sleep and has been claimed to be one of the triggering factors of emotional-related sleep disorders, such as insomnia, depressive- and anxiety-disorders. These outcomes are dependent on individual psychobiological characteristics, conferring even more complexity to the stress-sleep relationship. Its neurobiology has only recently begun to be explored, through animal models, which are also valuable for the development of potential therapeutic agents and preventive actions. This review seeks to present data on the effects of stress on sleep and the different approaches used to study this relationship as well as possible neurobiological underpinnings and mechanisms involved. The results of numerous studies in humans and animals indicate that increased sleep, especially the rapid eye movement phase, following a stressful situation is an important adaptive behavior for recovery. However, this endogenous advantage appears to be impaired in human beings and rodent strains that exhibit high levels of anxiety and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22485105

  5. The imperative for controlled mechanical stresses in unraveling cellular mechanisms of mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Eric J; Falls, Thomas D; Sorkin, Adam M; Tate, Melissa L Knothe

    2006-01-01

    Background In vitro mechanotransduction studies are designed to elucidate cell behavior in response to a well-defined mechanical signal that is imparted to cultured cells, e.g. through fluid flow. Typically, flow rates are calculated based on a parallel plate flow assumption, to achieve a targeted cellular shear stress. This study evaluates the performance of specific flow/perfusion chambers in imparting the targeted stress at the cellular level. Methods To evaluate how well actual flow chambers meet their target stresses (set for 1 and 10 dyn/cm2 for this study) at a cellular level, computational models were developed to calculate flow velocity components and imparted shear stresses for a given pressure gradient. Computational predictions were validated with micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) experiments. Results Based on these computational and experimental studies, as few as 66% of cells seeded along the midplane of commonly implemented flow/perfusion chambers are subjected to stresses within ±10% of the target stress. In addition, flow velocities and shear stresses imparted through fluid drag vary as a function of location within each chamber. Hence, not only a limited number of cells are exposed to target stress levels within each chamber, but also neighboring cells may experience different flow regimes. Finally, flow regimes are highly dependent on flow chamber geometry, resulting in significant variation in magnitudes and spatial distributions of stress between chambers. Conclusion The results of this study challenge the basic premise of in vitro mechanotransduction studies, i.e. that a controlled flow regime is applied to impart a defined mechanical stimulus to cells. These results also underscore the fact that data from studies in which different chambers are utilized can not be compared, even if the target stress regimes are comparable. PMID:16672051

  6. Integrated physiological mechanisms of exercise performance, adaptation, and maladaptation to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Leon, Lisa R; Montain, Scott J; Sonna, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    This article emphasizes significant recent advances regarding heat stress and its impact on exercise performance, adaptations, fluid electrolyte imbalances, and pathophysiology. During exercise-heat stress, the physiological burden of supporting high skin blood flow and high sweating rates can impose considerable cardiovascular strain and initiate a cascade of pathophysiological events leading to heat stroke. We examine the association between heat stress, particularly high skin temperature, on diminishing cardiovascular/aerobic reserves as well as increasing relative intensity and perceptual cues that degrade aerobic exercise performance. We discuss novel systemic (heat acclimation) and cellular (acquired thermal tolerance) adaptations that improve performance in hot and temperate environments and protect organs from heat stroke as well as other dissimilar stresses. We delineate how heat stroke evolves from gut underperfusion/ischemia causing endotoxin release or the release of mitochondrial DNA fragments in response to cell necrosis, to mediate a systemic inflammatory syndrome inducing coagulopathies, immune dysfunction, cytokine modulation, and multiorgan damage and failure. We discuss how an inflammatory response that induces simultaneous fever and/or prior exposure to a pathogen (e.g., viral infection) that deactivates molecular protective mechanisms interacts synergistically with the hyperthermia of exercise to perhaps explain heat stroke cases reported in low-risk populations performing routine activities. Importantly, we question the "traditional" notion that high core temperature is the critical mediator of exercise performance degradation and heat stroke. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:23733692

  7. Mammalian phospholipid homeostasis: evidence that membrane curvature elastic stress drives homeoviscous adaptation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dymond, Marcus K

    2016-08-01

    Several theories of phospholipid homeostasis have postulated that cells regulate the molecular composition of their bilayer membranes, such that a common biophysical membrane parameter is under homeostatic control. Two commonly cited theories are the intrinsic curvature hypothesis, which states that cells control membrane curvature elastic stress, and the theory of homeoviscous adaptation, which postulates cells control acyl chain packing order (membrane order). In this paper, we present evidence from data-driven modelling studies that these two theories correlate in vivo. We estimate the curvature elastic stress of mammalian cells to be 4-7 × 10(-12) N, a value high enough to suggest that in mammalian cells the preservation of membrane order arises through a mechanism where membrane curvature elastic stress is controlled. These results emerge from analysing the molecular contribution of individual phospholipids to both membrane order and curvature elastic stress in nearly 500 cellular compositionally diverse lipidomes. Our model suggests that the de novo synthesis of lipids is the dominant mechanism by which cells control curvature elastic stress and hence membrane order in vivo These results also suggest that cells can increase membrane curvature elastic stress disproportionately to membrane order by incorporating polyunsaturated fatty acids into lipids. PMID:27534697

  8. Oxidative Stress in the Healthy and Wounded Hepatocyte: A Cellular Organelles Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Tommaso; Zanieri, Francesca; Ceni, Elisabetta; Galli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Accurate control of the cell redox state is mandatory for maintaining the structural integrity and physiological functions. This control is achieved both by a fine-tuned balance between prooxidant and anti-oxidant molecules and by spatial and temporal confinement of the oxidative species. The diverse cellular compartments each, although structurally and functionally related, actively maintain their own redox balance, which is necessary to fulfill specialized tasks. Many fundamental cellular processes such as insulin signaling, cell proliferation and differentiation and cell migration and adhesion, rely on localized changes in the redox state of signal transducers, which is mainly mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Therefore, oxidative stress can also occur long before direct structural damage to cellular components, by disruption of the redox circuits that regulate the cellular organelles homeostasis. The hepatocyte is a systemic hub integrating the whole body metabolic demand, iron homeostasis and detoxification processes, all of which are redox-regulated processes. Imbalance of the hepatocyte's organelles redox homeostasis underlies virtually any liver disease and is a field of intense research activity. This review recapitulates the evolving concept of oxidative stress in the diverse cellular compartments, highlighting the principle mechanisms of oxidative stress occurring in the healthy and wounded hepatocyte. PMID:26788252

  9. Oxidative Stress in the Healthy and Wounded Hepatocyte: A Cellular Organelles Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mello, Tommaso; Zanieri, Francesca; Ceni, Elisabetta; Galli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Accurate control of the cell redox state is mandatory for maintaining the structural integrity and physiological functions. This control is achieved both by a fine-tuned balance between prooxidant and anti-oxidant molecules and by spatial and temporal confinement of the oxidative species. The diverse cellular compartments each, although structurally and functionally related, actively maintain their own redox balance, which is necessary to fulfill specialized tasks. Many fundamental cellular processes such as insulin signaling, cell proliferation and differentiation and cell migration and adhesion, rely on localized changes in the redox state of signal transducers, which is mainly mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Therefore, oxidative stress can also occur long before direct structural damage to cellular components, by disruption of the redox circuits that regulate the cellular organelles homeostasis. The hepatocyte is a systemic hub integrating the whole body metabolic demand, iron homeostasis and detoxification processes, all of which are redox-regulated processes. Imbalance of the hepatocyte's organelles redox homeostasis underlies virtually any liver disease and is a field of intense research activity. This review recapitulates the evolving concept of oxidative stress in the diverse cellular compartments, highlighting the principle mechanisms of oxidative stress occurring in the healthy and wounded hepatocyte. PMID:26788252

  10. Cellular stress responses, mitostress and carnitine insufficiencies as critical determinants in aging and neurodegenerative disorders: role of hormesis and vitagenes.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Stella, Anna Maria Giuffrida; Calabrese, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    The widely accepted oxidative stress theory of aging postulates that aging results from accumulation of oxidative damage. A prediction of this theory is that, among species, differential rates of aging may be apparent on the basis of intrinsic differences in oxidative damage accrual. Although widely accepted, there is a growing number of exceptions to this theory, most contingently related to genetic model organism investigations. Proteins are one of the prime targets for oxidative damage and cysteine residues are particularly sensitive to reversible and irreversible oxidation. The adaptation and survival of cells and organisms requires the ability to sense proteotoxic insults and to coordinate protective cellular stress response pathways and chaperone networks related to protein quality control and stability. The toxic effects that stem from the misassembly or aggregation of proteins or peptides, in any cell type, are collectively termed proteotoxicity. Despite the abundance and apparent capacity of chaperones and other components of homeostasis to restore folding equilibrium, the cell appears poorly adapted for chronic proteotoxic stress which increases in cancer, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Pharmacological modulation of cellular stress response pathways has emerging implications for the treatment of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. A critical key to successful medical intervention is getting the dose right. Achieving this goal can be extremely challenging due to human inter-individual variation as affected by age, gender, diet, exercise, genetic factors and health status. The nature of the dose response in and adjacent to the therapeutic zones, over the past decade has received considerable advances. The hormetic dose-response, challenging long-standing beliefs about the nature of the dose-response in a lowdose zone, has the potential to affect significantly the design of pre

  11. The cellular adaptations to hypoxia as novel therapeutic targets in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Adamski, J K; Estlin, E J; Makin, G W J

    2008-05-01

    Exposure of tumour cells to reduced levels of oxygen (hypoxia) is a common finding in adult tumours. Hypoxia induces a myriad of adaptive changes within tumour cells which result in increased anaerobic glycolysis, new blood vessel formation, genetic instability and a decreased responsiveness to both radio and chemotherapy. Hypoxia correlates with disease stage and outcome in adult epithelial tumours and increasingly it is becoming apparent that hypoxia is also important in paediatric tumours. Despite its adverse effects upon tumour response to treatment hypoxia offers several avenues for new drug development. Bioreductive agents already exist, which are preferentially activated in areas of hypoxia, and thus have less toxicity for normal tissue. Additionally the adaptive cellular response to hypoxia offers several novel targets, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), carbonic anhydrase, and the central regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). Novel agents have emerged against all of these targets and are at various stages of clinical and pre-clinical development. Hypoxia offers an exciting opportunity for new drug development that can include paediatric tumours at an early stage. PMID:18207646

  12. Reciprocal Degradation of YME1L and OMA1 Adapts Mitochondrial Proteolytic Activity During Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rainbolt, T. Kelly; Lebeau, Justine; Puchades, Cristina; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitochondrial inner membrane proteases YME1L and OMA1 are critical regulators of essential mitochondrial functions including inner membrane proteostasis maintenance and mitochondrial dynamics. Here, we show that YME1L and OMA1 are reciprocally degraded in response to distinct types of cellular stress. OMA1 is degraded through a YME1L-dependent mechanism in response to toxic insults that depolarize the mitochondrial membrane. Alternatively, insults that depolarize mitochondria and deplete cellular ATP stabilize active OMA1 and promote YME1L degradation. We show that the differential degradation of YME1L and OMA1 alters their proteolytic processing of the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1, a critical regulator of mitochondrial inner membrane morphology, which influences the recovery of tubular mitochondria following membrane depolarization-induced fragmentation. Our results reveal the differential stress-induced degradation of YME1L and OMA1 as a mechanism to sensitively adapt mitochondrial inner membrane protease activity and function in response to distinct types of cellular insults. PMID:26923599

  13. Adaptive Patterns of Stress Responsivity: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, Marco; Hinnant, J. Benjamin; Ellis, Bruce J.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is an evolutionary–developmental theory of individual differences in stress responsivity. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a middle childhood sample (N = 256). Measures of autonomic nervous system activity across the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches validated the 4-pattern taxonomy of the ACM via finite mixture modeling. Moreover, the 4 patterns of responsivity showed the predicted associations with family stress levels but no association with measures of ecological stress. Our hypotheses concerning sex differences in responsivity were only partly confirmed. This preliminary study provides initial support for the key predictions of the ACM and highlights some of the methodological challenges that will need to be considered in future research on this topic. PMID:22148947

  14. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  15. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  16. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    PubMed

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  17. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  18. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) and its role in stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liang; Zou, Wenquan; Wang, Gongxian

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the physiological function of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been developed by the generation of transgenic mice, however, the pathological mechanisms related to PrPC in prion diseases such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are still abstruse. Regardless of some differences, most studies describe the neuroprotective role of PrPC in environmental stresses. In this review, we will update the current knowledge on the responses of PrPC to various stresses, especially those correlated with cell signaling and neural degeneration, including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation and autophagy. PMID:26221369

  19. A signature microRNA expression profile for the cellular response to thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ketchum, Norma; Ibey, Bennett L.; Waterworth, Angela; Suarez, Maria; Roach, William P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, an extensive layer of intra-cellular signals was discovered that was previously undetected by genetic radar. It is now known that this layer consists primarily of a class of short noncoding RNA species that are referred to as microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs regulate protein synthesis at the post-transcriptional level, and studies have shown that they are involved in many fundamental cellular processes. In this study, we hypothesized that miRNAs may be involved in cellular stress response mechanisms, and that cells exposed to thermal stress may exhibit a signature miRNA expression profile indicative of their functional involvement in such mechanisms. To test our hypothesis, human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to an established hyperthermic protocol, and the ensuing miRNA expression levels were evaluated 4 hr post-exposure using microRNA microarray gene chips. The microarray data shows that 123 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells exposed to thermal stress. We collectively refer to these miRNAs as thermalregulated microRNAs (TRMs). Since miRNA research is in its infancy, it is interesting to note that only 27 of the 123 TRMs are currently annotated in the Sanger miRNA registry. Prior to publication, we plan to submit the remaining novel 96 miRNA gene sequences for proper naming. Computational and thermodynamic modeling algorithms were employed to identify putative mRNA targets for the TRMs, and these studies predict that TRMs regulate the mRNA expression of various proteins that are involved in the cellular stress response. Future empirical studies will be conducted to validate these theoretical predictions, and to further examine the specific role that TRMs play in the cellular stress response.

  20. Cellular accumulation of Cys326-OGG1 protein complexes under conditions of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, M.P.; Guggenheim, E.J.; Pulisciano, C.; Akbar, S.; Kershaw, R.M.; Hodges, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    The common Ser326Cys polymorphism in the base excision repair protein 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 is associated with a reduced capacity to repair oxidative DNA damage particularly under conditions of intracellular oxidative stress and there is evidence that Cys326-OGG1 homozygous individuals have increased susceptibility to specific cancer types. Indirect biochemical studies have shown that reduced repair capacity is related to OGG1 redox modification and also possibly OGG1 dimer formation. In the current study we have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation to study for the first time a component of the base excision repair pathway and applied it to visualise accumulation of Cys326-OGG1 protein complexes in the native cellular environment. Fluorescence was observed both within and around the cell nucleus, was shown to be specific to cells expressing Cys326-OGG1 and only occurred in cells under conditions of cellular oxidative stress following depletion of intracellular glutathione levels by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine. Furthermore, OGG1 complex formation was inhibited by incubation of cells with the thiol reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol and the antioxidant dimethylsulfoxide indicating a causative role for oxidative stress in the formation of OGG1 cellular complexes. In conclusion, this study has provided for the first time evidence of redox sensitive Cys326-OGG1 protein accumulation in cells under conditions of intracellular oxidative stress that may be related to the previously reported reduced repair capacity of Cys326-OGG1 specifically under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:24680828

  1. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains.

    PubMed

    Jason Gao, Guo-Jie; Holcomb, Michael C; Thomas, Jeffrey H; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-19

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena. PMID:27545101

  2. On PAR with PARP: cellular stress signaling through poly(ADP-ribose) and PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Kraus, W. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are mediated through a series of regulatory processes that occur at the genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. These responses require a complex network of sensors and effectors from multiple signaling pathways, including the abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 functions at the center of cellular stress responses, where it processes diverse signals and, in response, directs cells to specific fates (e.g., DNA repair vs. cell death) based on the type and strength of the stress stimulus. Many of PARP-1's functions in stress response pathways are mediated by its regulated synthesis of PAR, a negatively charged polymer, using NAD+ as a donor of ADP-ribose units. Thus, PARP-1's functions are intimately tied to nuclear NAD+ metabolism and the broader metabolic profile of the cell. Recent studies in cell and animal models have highlighted the roles of PARP-1 and PAR in the response to a wide variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stress signals, including those initiated by oxidative, nitrosative, genotoxic, oncogenic, thermal, inflammatory, and metabolic stresses. These responses underlie pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation-related diseases, and metabolic dysregulation. The development of PARP inhibitors is being pursued as a therapeutic approach to these conditions. In this review, we highlight the newest findings about PARP-1's role in stress responses in the context of the historical data. PMID:22391446

  3. Adaptive mutation and amplification in Escherichia coli: two pathways of genome adaptation under stress.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Megan N; Ponder, Rebecca G; Hastings, P J; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2004-06-01

    The neo-Darwinists suggested that evolution is constant and gradual, and thus that genetic changes that drive evolution should be too. However, more recent understanding of phenomena called adaptive mutation in microbes indicates that mutation rates can be elevated in response to stress, producing beneficial and other mutations. We review evidence that, in Escherichia coli, two separate mechanisms of stress-induced genetic change occur that revert a lac frameshift allele allowing growth on lactose medium. First, compensatory frameshift ("point") mutations occur by a mechanism that includes DNA double-strand breaks and (we have suggested) their error-prone repair. Point mutation requires induction of the RpoS-dependent general stress response, and the SOS DNA damage response leading to upregulation of the error-prone DNA polymerase DinB (Pol IV), and occurs during a transient limitation of post-replicative mismatch repair activity. A second mechanism, adaptive amplification, entails amplification of the leaky lac allele to 20-50 tandem repeats. These provide sufficient beta-galactosidase activity for growth, thereby apparently deflecting cells from the point mutation pathway. Unlike point mutation, amplification neither occurs in hypermutating cells nor requires SOS or DinB, but like point mutation, amplification requires the RpoS-dependent stress response. Similar processes are being found in other bacterial systems and yeast. Stress-induced genetic changes may underlie much of microbial evolution, pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance, and also cancer formation, progression and drug resistance. PMID:15207867

  4. Plasma. beta. -endorphin and stress hormone levels during adaptation and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lishmanov, Yu.B.; Trifonova, Zh.V.; Tsibin, A.N.; Maslova, L.V.; Dement'eva, L.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of ..beta..-endorphin and stress hormone levels in the blood plasma of rats during stress and adaptation. Immunoreactive ..beta..-endorphin in the blood plasma was assayed by means of a kit after preliminary isolation of the ..beta..-endorphin fraction by affinity chromatography on sepharose; ACTH was assayed with a kit and cortisol, insulin, thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine by means of kits from Izotop. Determination of plasma levels of ..beta..-endorphin and other opioids could evidently be an important method of assessing the state of resistance of the organism to stress.

  5. Adaptive stress signaling in targeted therapy resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Bivona, Trever G.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of specific genetic alterations that drive the initiation and progression of cancer and the development of targeted drugs that act against these driver alterations has revolutionized the treatment of many human cancers. While substantial progress has been achieved with the use of such targeted cancer therapies, resistance remains a major challenge that limits the overall clinical impact. Hence, despite progress, new strategies are needed to enhance response and eliminate resistance to targeted cancer therapies in order to achieve durable or curative responses in patients. To date, efforts to characterize mechanisms of resistance have primarily focused on molecular events that mediate primary or secondary resistance in patients. Less is known about the initial molecular response and adaptation that may occur in tumor cells early upon exposure to a targeted agent. Although understudied, emerging evidence indicates that the early adaptive changes by which tumor cells respond to the stress of a targeted therapy may be crucial for tumor cell survival during treatment and the development of resistance. Here, we review recent data illuminating the molecular architecture underlying adaptive stress signaling in tumor cells. We highlight how leveraging this knowledge could catalyze novel strategies to minimize or eliminate targeted therapy resistance, thereby unleashing the full potential of targeted therapies to transform many cancers from lethal to chronic or curable conditions. PMID:25703329

  6. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress. PMID:27350002

  7. Adaptive Benefits of Storage Strategy and Dual AMPK/TOR Signaling in Metabolic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism must ensure that supply of nutrient meets the biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs. Cells have therefore developed sophisticated signaling and regulatory pathways in order to cope with dynamic fluctuations of both resource and demand and to regulate accordingly diverse anabolic and catabolic processes. Intriguingly, these pathways are organized around a relatively small number of regulatory hubs, such as the highly conserved AMPK and TOR kinase families in eukaryotic cells. Here, the global metabolic adaptations upon dynamic environment are investigated using a prototypical model of regulated metabolism. In this model, the optimal enzyme profiles as well as the underlying regulatory architecture are identified by combining perturbation and evolutionary methods. The results reveal the existence of distinct classes of adaptive strategies, which differ in the management of storage reserve depending on the intensity of the stress and in the regulation of ATP-producing reaction depending on the nature of the stress. The regulatory architecture that optimally implements these adaptive features is characterized by a crosstalk between two specialized signaling pathways, which bears close similarities with the sensing and regulatory properties of AMPK and TOR pathways. PMID:27505075

  8. Adaptive Benefits of Storage Strategy and Dual AMPK/TOR Signaling in Metabolic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism must ensure that supply of nutrient meets the biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs. Cells have therefore developed sophisticated signaling and regulatory pathways in order to cope with dynamic fluctuations of both resource and demand and to regulate accordingly diverse anabolic and catabolic processes. Intriguingly, these pathways are organized around a relatively small number of regulatory hubs, such as the highly conserved AMPK and TOR kinase families in eukaryotic cells. Here, the global metabolic adaptations upon dynamic environment are investigated using a prototypical model of regulated metabolism. In this model, the optimal enzyme profiles as well as the underlying regulatory architecture are identified by combining perturbation and evolutionary methods. The results reveal the existence of distinct classes of adaptive strategies, which differ in the management of storage reserve depending on the intensity of the stress and in the regulation of ATP-producing reaction depending on the nature of the stress. The regulatory architecture that optimally implements these adaptive features is characterized by a crosstalk between two specialized signaling pathways, which bears close similarities with the sensing and regulatory properties of AMPK and TOR pathways. PMID:27505075

  9. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Huber, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature TW, is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. TW never exceeds 31 °C. Any exceedence of 35 °C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 °C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11–12 °C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 °C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  10. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven C; Huber, Matthew

    2010-05-25

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature T(W), is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. T(W) never exceeds 31 degrees C. Any exceedence of 35 degrees C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 degrees C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11-12 degrees C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 degrees C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  11. Stress tolerance in plants via habitat-adapted symbiosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Henson, J.; Van Volkenburgh, E.; Hoy, M.; Wright, L.; Beckwith, F.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that native grass species from coastal and geothermal habitats require symbiotic fungal endophytes for salt and heat tolerance, respectively. Symbiotically conferred stress tolerance is a habitat-specific phenomenon with geothermal endophytes conferring heat but not salt tolerance, and coastal endophytes conferring salt but not heat tolerance. The same fungal species isolated from plants in habitats devoid of salt or heat stress did not confer these stress tolerances. Moreover, fungal endophytes from agricultural crops conferred disease resistance and not salt or heat tolerance. We define habitat-specific, symbiotically-conferred stress tolerance as habitat-adapted symbiosis and hypothesize that it is responsible for the establishment of plants in high-stress habitats. The agricultural, coastal and geothermal plant endophytes also colonized tomato (a model eudicot) and conferred disease, salt and heat tolerance, respectively. In addition, the coastal plant endophyte colonized rice (a model monocot) and conferred salt tolerance. These endophytes have a broad host range encompassing both monocots and eudicots. Interestingly, the endophytes also conferred drought tolerance to plants regardless of the habitat of origin. Abiotic stress tolerance correlated either with a decrease in water consumption or reactive oxygen sensitivity/generation but not to increased osmolyte production. The ability of fungal endophytes to confer stress tolerance to plants may provide a novel strategy for mitigating the impacts of global climate change on agricultural and native plant communities.The ISME Journal (2008) 2, 404-416; doi:10.1038/ismej.2007.106; published online 7 February 2008. ?? 2008 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  12. SIRT1 associates with eIF2-alpha and regulates the cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Hiyaa Singhee; Reizis, Boris; Robbins, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 is a NAD+ dependent protein deacetylase known to increase longevity in model organisms. SIRT1 regulates cellular response to oxidative and/or genotoxic stress by regulating proteins such as p53 and FOXO. The eukaryotic initiation factor-2, eIF2, plays a critical role in the integrated stress response pathway. Under cellular stress, phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eIF2 is essential for immediate shut-off of translation and activation of stress response genes. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 interacts with eIF2α. Loss of SIRT1 results in increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. However, the downstream stress induced signaling pathway is compromised in SIRT1-deficient cells, indicated by delayed expression of the downstream target genes CHOP and GADD34 and a slower post-stress translation recovery. Finally, SIRT1 co-immunoprecipitates with mediators of eIF2α dephosphorylation, GADD34 and CreP, suggesting a role for SIRT1 in the negative feedback regulation of eIF2α phosphorylation. PMID:22355666

  13. Cellular Response upon Stress: p57 Contribution to the Final Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marianna Nicoletta; Antonangeli, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is one of the most important decisions during the life of a cell and several kinds of stress are able to influence this choice. p57 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor belonging to the CIP/KIP family and is a well-known regulator of the cell cycle during embryogenesis and tissue differentiation. p57 loss has been reported in a variety of cancers and great effort has been spent during the past years studying the mechanisms of p57 regulation and the effects of p57 reexpression on tumor growth. Recently, growing amount of evidence points out that p57 has a specific function in cell cycle regulation upon cellular stress that is only partially shared by the other CIP/KIP inhibitors p21 and p27. Furthermore, it is nowadays emerging that p57 plays a role in the induction of apoptosis and senescence after cellular stress independently of its cell cycle related functions. This review focuses on the contribution that p57 holds in regulating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence after cellular stress with particular attention to the response of cancer cells. PMID:26491224

  14. Monitoring protein phosphatase 1 isoform levels as a marker for cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Amador, Fátima Camões; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; da Cruz E Silva, Edgar F

    2004-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism regulating many biological functions, and abnormal protein phosphorylation can have a devastating impact on cellular control mechanisms, including a contributing role in neurodegenerative processes. Hence, many promising novel drug development strategies involve targeting protein phosphorylation systems. In this study, we demonstrate that various cellular stresses relevant to neurodegeneration can specifically affect the protein expression levels of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). PP1 levels were altered upon exposure of PC12 and COS-1 cells to aluminium, Abeta peptides, sodium azide, and even heat shock. Particularly interesting, given PP1's involvement in aging and neurodegeneration, was the consistent decrease in PP1gamma(1) levels in response to stress agents. In fact, alterations in the expression levels of PP1 appear to correspond to an early response of stress induction, that is, before alterations in heat shock proteins can be detected. Our data suggest that monitoring PP1 isoform expression could constitute a useful diagnostic tool for cellular stress, possibly even neurodegeneration. Additionally, our results strengthen the rationale for signal transduction therapeutics and indicate that altering the specific activity of PP1 either directly or by targeting its regulatory proteins may be a useful therapeutic development strategy for the future. PMID:15113600

  15. Adaptation of maize source leaf metabolism to stress related disturbances in carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus balance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Abiotic stress causes disturbances in the cellular homeostasis. Re-adjustment of balance in carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism therefore plays a central role in stress adaptation. However, it is currently unknown which parts of the primary cell metabolism follow common patterns under different stress conditions and which represent specific responses. Results To address these questions, changes in transcriptome, metabolome and ionome were analyzed in maize source leaves from plants suffering low temperature, low nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) stress. The selection of maize as study object provided data directly from an important crop species and the so far underexplored C4 metabolism. Growth retardation was comparable under all tested stress conditions. The only primary metabolic pathway responding similar to all stresses was nitrate assimilation, which was down-regulated. The largest group of commonly regulated transcripts followed the expression pattern: down under low temperature and low N, but up under low P. Several members of this transcript cluster could be connected to P metabolism and correlated negatively to different phosphate concentration in the leaf tissue. Accumulation of starch under low temperature and low N stress, but decrease in starch levels under low P conditions indicated that only low P treated leaves suffered carbon starvation. Conclusions Maize employs very different strategies to manage N and P metabolism under stress. While nitrate assimilation was regulated depending on demand by growth processes, phosphate concentrations changed depending on availability, thus building up reserves under excess conditions. Carbon and energy metabolism of the C4 maize leaves were particularly sensitive to P starvation. PMID:23822863

  16. Restraint stress delays endometrial adaptive remodeling during mouse embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    In mice, previously, we showed that restraint stress reduces the number of embryo implantation sites in the endometrium. Here, we hypothesized that the uterine microenvironment is altered by restraint stress and consequently is suboptimal for embryo implantation. On embryonic day 1 (E1), 60 of 154 pregnant CD1 mice underwent restraint stress (4 h), repeated daily to E3, E5 or E7 (n = 10 mice per group). Restraint stress decreased food intake and suppressed body weight gain on E3, E5 and E7. Restraint stress decreased the actual and relative weight (percent body weight) of uterus and ovary on E5 (by 14.9%, p = 0.03; 16.1%, p = 0.004) and E7 (by 16.8%, p = 0.03; 20.0%, p = 0.01). Morphologically, restraint stress decreased relative endometrial area (by 8.94-18.8%, p = 0.003-0.021) and uterine gland area (by 30.6%, p < 0.01 on E3 and 44.5%, p < 0.01 on E5). Immunohistochemistry showed that restraint stress decreased microvessel density (by 12.9-70.5%, p < 0.01) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (by 14.6-45.9%, p = 0.007-0.02). Restraint stress decreased by 32.4-39.8% (p = 0.002-0.01) the mean optical density ratio for proliferating cell nuclear antigen/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay showed a dose-dependent decrease in proliferative activity of endometrial stromal cells (from 52 of 154 pregnant E5 control mice) incubated with H2O2 (100-1000 μM) in vitro. These findings supported the hypothesis that restraint stress negatively influences endometrial adaptive remodeling via an oxidative stress pathway, which resulted in fewer implantation sites. PMID:26365550

  17. Cocaine-induced adaptations in cellular redox balance contributes to enduring behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine-glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine-glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  18. Cocaine-Induced Adaptations in Cellular Redox Balance Contributes to Enduring Behavioral Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D; Knackstedt, Lori; Hurt, Phelipe; Tew, Kenneth D; Manevich, Yefim; Hutchens, Steven; Townsend, Danyelle M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-01-01

    Impaired glutamate homeostasis in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to cocaine relapse in animal models, and results in part from cocaine-induced downregulation of the cystine–glutamate exchanger. In addition to regulating extracellular glutamate, the uptake of cystine by the exchanger is a rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH). GSH is critical for balancing cellular redox in response to oxidative stress. Cocaine administration induces oxidative stress, and we first determined if downregulated cystine–glutamate exchange alters redox homeostasis in rats withdrawn from daily cocaine injections and then challenged with acute cocaine. Among the daily cocaine-induced changes in redox homeostasis were an increase in protein S-glutathionylation and a decrease in expression of GSH-S-transferase pi (GSTpi). To mimic reduced GSTpi, a genetic mouse model of GSTpi deletion or pharmacological inhibition of GSTpi by administering ketoprofen during daily cocaine administration was used. The capacity of cocaine to induce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization was augmented, indicating that reducing GSTpi may contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral neuroplasticity. Conversely, an acute cocaine challenge after withdrawal from daily cocaine elicited a marked increase in accumbens GSTpi, and the expression of behavioral sensitization to a cocaine challenge injection was inhibited by ketoprofen pretreatment; supporting a protective effect by the acute cocaine-induced rise in GSTpi. Together, these data indicate that cocaine-induced oxidative stress induces changes in GSTpi that contribute to cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity. PMID:21796101

  19. Mitochondrial Mg2+ homeostasis decides cellular energy metabolism and vulnerability to stress

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Ryu; Tabata, Sho; Shindo, Yutaka; Hotta, Kohji; Suzuki, Koji; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy production processes are composed of many Mg2+ dependent enzymatic reactions. In fact, dysregulation of Mg2+ homeostasis is involved in various cellular malfunctions and diseases. Recently, mitochondria, energy-producing organelles, have been known as major intracellular Mg2+ stores. Several biological stimuli alter mitochondrial Mg2+ concentration by intracellular redistribution. However, in living cells, whether mitochondrial Mg2+ alteration affect cellular energy metabolism remains unclear. Mg2+ transporter of mitochondrial inner membrane MRS2 is an essential component of mitochondrial Mg2+ uptake system. Here, we comprehensively analyzed intracellular Mg2+ levels and energy metabolism in Mrs2 knockdown (KD) cells using fluorescence imaging and metabolome analysis. Dysregulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ homeostasis disrupted ATP production via shift of mitochondrial energy metabolism and morphology. Moreover, Mrs2 KD sensitized cellular tolerance against cellular stress. These results indicate regulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ via MRS2 critically decides cellular energy status and cell vulnerability via regulation of mitochondrial Mg2+ level in response to physiological stimuli. PMID:27458051

  20. Mitochondrial Mg(2+) homeostasis decides cellular energy metabolism and vulnerability to stress.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryu; Tabata, Sho; Shindo, Yutaka; Hotta, Kohji; Suzuki, Koji; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy production processes are composed of many Mg(2+) dependent enzymatic reactions. In fact, dysregulation of Mg(2+) homeostasis is involved in various cellular malfunctions and diseases. Recently, mitochondria, energy-producing organelles, have been known as major intracellular Mg(2+) stores. Several biological stimuli alter mitochondrial Mg(2+) concentration by intracellular redistribution. However, in living cells, whether mitochondrial Mg(2+) alteration affect cellular energy metabolism remains unclear. Mg(2+) transporter of mitochondrial inner membrane MRS2 is an essential component of mitochondrial Mg(2+) uptake system. Here, we comprehensively analyzed intracellular Mg(2+) levels and energy metabolism in Mrs2 knockdown (KD) cells using fluorescence imaging and metabolome analysis. Dysregulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) homeostasis disrupted ATP production via shift of mitochondrial energy metabolism and morphology. Moreover, Mrs2 KD sensitized cellular tolerance against cellular stress. These results indicate regulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) via MRS2 critically decides cellular energy status and cell vulnerability via regulation of mitochondrial Mg(2+) level in response to physiological stimuli. PMID:27458051

  1. Motion Adaptive Vertical Handoff in Cellular/WLAN Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  2. Motion adaptive vertical handoff in cellular/WLAN heterogeneous wireless network.

    PubMed

    Li, Limin; Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  3. Integrated Stress Response Modulates Cellular Redox State via Induction of Cystathionine γ-Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Dickhout, Jeffrey G.; Carlisle, Rachel E.; Jerome, Danielle E.; Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Guangdong; Mani, Sarathi; Garg, Sanjay K.; Banerjee, Ruma; Kaufman, Randal J.; Maclean, Kenneth N.; Wang, Rui; Austin, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    The integrated stress response mediated by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) phosphorylation maintains cellular homeostasis under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. eIF2α phosphorylation induces activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes responsible for amino acid metabolism, cellular redox state, and anti-stress responses. Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine β-synthase are critical enzymes in the transsulfuration pathway, which also regulate cellular redox status by modulating glutathione (GSH) levels. To determine the link between the integrated stress response and the transsulfuration pathway, we used homocysteine (Hcy) as an inducer of eIF2α phosphorylation and ATF4 gene induction. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking ATF4 (ATF4−/−) had reduced GSH levels and increased reactive oxygen species and were susceptible to apoptotic cell death under normal culture conditions. Further, ATF4−/− MEFs were more sensitive to Hcy-induced cytotoxicity and showed significantly reduced intracellular GSH levels associated with apoptosis. ATF4−/− MEFs could be rescued from l-Hcy-induced apoptosis by β-mercaptoethanol medium supplementation that increases cysteine levels and restores GSH synthesis. ATF4−/− MEFs showed little or no CSE protein but did express cystathionine β-synthase. Further, ER stress-inducing agents, including tunicamycin and thapsigargin, induced the expression of CSE in ATF4+/+ MEFs. Consistent with ATF4−/− MEFs, CSE−/− MEFs showed significantly greater apoptosis when treated with tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and l-Hcy, compared with CSE+/+ MEFs. Liver and kidney GSH levels were also reduced in CSE−/− mice, suggesting that CSE is a critical factor in GSH synthesis and may act to protect the liver and kidney from a variety of conditions that cause ER stress. PMID:22215680

  4. Mechanism of heat stress-induced cellular senescence elucidates the exclusive vulnerability of early S-phase cells to mild genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Velichko, Artem K.; Petrova, Nadezhda V.; Razin, Sergey V.; Kantidze, Omar L.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the best-studied cellular stress factors; however, little is known about its delayed effects. Here, we demonstrate that heat stress induces p21-dependent cellular senescence-like cell cycle arrest. Notably, only early S-phase cells undergo such an arrest in response to heat stress. The encounter of DNA replication forks with topoisomerase I-generated single-stranded DNA breaks resulted in the generation of persistent double-stranded DNA breaks was found to be a primary cause of heat stress-induced cellular senescence in these cells. This investigation of heat stress-induced cellular senescence elucidates the mechanisms underlying the exclusive sensitivity of early S-phase cells to ultra-low doses of agents that induce single-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:26032771

  5. Interactions between HIF-1α and AMPK in the regulation of cellular hypoxia adaptation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Satriano, Joseph; Thomas, Joanna L; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Sharma, Kumar; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Singh, Prabhleen

    2015-09-01

    Renal hypoxia contributes to chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression, as validated in experimental and human CKD. In the early stages, increased oxygen consumption causes oxygen demand/supply mismatch, leading to hypoxia. Hence, early targeting of the determinants and regulators of oxygen consumption in CKD may alter the disease course before permanent damage ensues. Here, we focus on hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and on the mechanisms by which they may facilitate cellular hypoxia adaptation. We found that HIF-1α activation in the subtotal nephrectomy (STN) model of CKD limits protein synthesis, inhibits apoptosis, and activates autophagy, presumably for improved cell survival. AMPK activation was diminished in the STN kidney and was remarkably restored by HIF-1α activation, demonstrating a novel role for HIF-1α in the regulation of AMPK activity. We also investigated the independent and combined effects of HIF-1α and AMPK on cell survival and death pathways by utilizing pharmacological and knockdown approaches in cell culture models. We found that the effect of HIF-1α activation on autophagy is independent of AMPK, but on apoptosis it is partially AMPK dependent. The effects of HIF-1α and AMPK activation on inhibiting protein synthesis via the mTOR pathway appear to be additive. These various effects were also observed under hypoxic conditions. In conclusion, HIF-1α and AMPK appear to be linked at a molecular level and may act as components of a concerted cellular response to hypoxic stress in the pathophysiology of CKD. PMID:26136559

  6. Proteomic and cellular views of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 adaptation to nitrogen depletion.

    PubMed

    Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Facchini, Raphaël; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Zhang, C-C; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that play a crucial role in the Earth's nitrogen and carbon cycles. Nitrogen availability is one of the most important factors in cyanobacterial growth. Interestingly, filamentous non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, such as Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005, have developed survival strategies that enable them to adapt to nitrogen deprivation. Metabolic studies recently demonstrated a substantial synthesis and accumulation of glycogen derived from amino acids during nitrogen starvation. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanism of this adaptation is poorly understood. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first proteomic and cellular analysis of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 under nitrogen depletion. Label-free differential proteomic analysis indicated the global carbon and nitrogen reprogramming of the cells during nitrogen depletion as characterized by an upregulation of glycogen synthesis and the use of endogenous nitrogen sources. The degradation of proteins and cyanophycin provided endogenous nitrogen when exogenous nitrogen was limited. Moreover, formamides, cyanates and urea were also potential endogenous nitrogen sources. The transporters of some amino acids and alternative nitrogen sources such as ammonium permease 1 were induced under nitrogen depletion. Intriguingly, although Arthrospira is a non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium, we observed the upregulation of HetR and HglK proteins, which are involved in heterocyst differentiation. Moreover, after a long period without nitrate, only a few highly fluorescent cells in each trichome were observed, and they might be involved in the long-term survival mechanism of this non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation. PMID:24648480

  7. Actin-Based Transport Adapts Polarity Domain Size to Local Cellular Curvature.

    PubMed

    Bonazzi, Daria; Haupt, Armin; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Delacour, Delphine; Salort, Delphine; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-10-19

    Intracellular structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the centrosome, or the mitotic spindle typically scale their size to cell size [1]. Similarly, cortical polarity domains built around the active form of conserved Rho-GTPases, such as Cdc42p, exhibit widths that may range over two orders of magnitudes in cells with different sizes and shapes [2-6]. The establishment of such domains typically involves positive feedback loops based on reaction-diffusion and/or actin-mediated vesicle transport [3, 7, 8]. How these elements may adapt polarity domain size to cellular geometry is not known. Here, by tracking the width of successive oscillating Cdc42-GTP domains in fission yeast spores [9], we find that domain width scales with local cell-surface radii of curvature over an 8-fold range, independently of absolute cell volume, surface, or Cdc42-GTP concentration. This local scaling requires formin-nucleated cortical actin cables and the fusion of secretory vesicles transported along these cables with the membrane. These data suggest that reaction-diffusion may set a minimal domain size and that secretory vesicle transport along actin cables may dilute and extend polarity domains to adapt their size to local cell-surface curvature. This work reveals that actin networks may act as micrometric curvature sensors and uncovers a generic morphogenetic principle for how polarity domains define their size according to cell morphologies. PMID:26441355

  8. Nitric oxide-induced cellular stress and p53 activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.; Saito, Shin'ichi; Hussain, S. Perwez; Espey, Michael G.; Miranda, Katrina M.; Araki, Yuzuru; Jhappan, Chamelli; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; He, Peijun; Linke, Steven P.; Quezado, Martha M.; Zurer, Irit; Rotter, Varda; Wink, David A.; Appella, Ettore; Harris, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    Free radical-induced cellular stress contributes to cancer during chronic inflammation. Here, we investigated mechanisms of p53 activation by the free radical, NO. NO from donor drugs induced both ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related-dependent p53 posttranslational modifications, leading to an increase in p53 transcriptional targets and a G2/M cell cycle checkpoint. Such modifications were also identified in cells cocultured with NO-releasing macrophages. In noncancerous colon tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis (a cancer-prone chronic inflammatory disease), inducible NO synthase protein levels were positively correlated with p53 serine 15 phosphorylation levels. Immunostaining of HDM-2 and p21WAF1 was consistent with transcriptionally active p53. Our study highlights a pivotal role of NO in the induction of cellular stress and the activation of a p53 response pathway during chronic inflammation. PMID:12518062

  9. Induction of the cellular stress response by Mytilus edulis upon contaminant exposure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, H.; Sanders, B.; Steinert, S.

    1995-12-31

    The cellular stress response entails the induction of a suite of stress proteins which protect and repair vulnerable intracellular proteins from environmentally-induced damage. Since the induction of stress proteins reflects damage to proteins at a cellular level, the authors hypothesized that the tissue-level stress response would depend upon the mode of uptake, accumulation and mechanisms of toxicity for each contaminant. Here they examine the expression of the heat shock proteins hsp70 and cpn60 by the bay mussel, Mytilus edulis, in gill and mantle tissue at six stations in San Diego Bay which exhibit a range of PAH concentrations. After 30 days the mussels were retrieved, and gill and mantle tissues dissected. Western blotting techniques were used to measure the abundance of hsp70 and cpn60 in the two tissues. In contrast to induction by trace metals, both the basal and inducable levels of induction of stress proteins were greater in mantle than gill tissue. Relative abundance of hsp70 ranged from approximately one- to two-fold of the time 0 controls in both tissues, whereas cpn60 in mantle increased up to 5-fold for the most contaminated site. These data will be discussed in relation to the concentrations of contaminants in the sediments, contaminant bioaccumulation and mussel growth. This study will provide insight into the utility of using the stress response to identify vulnerable target tissues and modes of action of specific contaminants. It will also examine the extent to which tissue level expression of the stress response might help identify the types of contaminants that induce the stress response in mussels exposed to contaminants in situ.

  10. A Novel Mathematical Model Describing Adaptive Cellular Drug Metabolism and Toxicity in the Chemoimmune System

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Attila; Brózik, Anna; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Cells cope with the threat of xenobiotic stress by activating a complex molecular network that recognizes and eliminates chemically diverse toxic compounds. This “chemoimmune system” consists of cellular Phase I and Phase II metabolic enzymes, Phase 0 and Phase III ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) membrane transporters, and nuclear receptors regulating these components. In order to provide a systems biology characterization of the chemoimmune network, we designed a reaction kinetic model based on differential equations describing Phase 0–III participants and regulatory elements, and characterized cellular fitness to evaluate toxicity. In spite of the simplifications, the model recapitulates changes associated with acquired drug resistance and allows toxicity predictions under variable protein expression and xenobiotic exposure conditions. Our simulations suggest that multidrug ABC transporters at Phase 0 significantly facilitate the defense function of successive network members by lowering intracellular drug concentrations. The model was extended with a novel toxicity framework which opened the possibility of performing in silico cytotoxicity assays. The alterations of the in silico cytotoxicity curves show good agreement with in vitro cell killing experiments. The behavior of the simplified kinetic model suggests that it can serve as a basis for more complex models to efficiently predict xenobiotic and drug metabolism for human medical applications. PMID:25699998

  11. A computable cellular stress network model for non-diseased pulmonary and cardiovascular tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Humans and other organisms are equipped with a set of responses that can prevent damage from exposure to a multitude of endogenous and environmental stressors. If these stress responses are overwhelmed, this can result in pathogenesis of diseases, which is reflected by an increased development of, e.g., pulmonary and cardiac diseases in humans exposed to chronic levels of environmental stress, including inhaled cigarette smoke (CS). Systems biology data sets (e.g., transcriptomics, phosphoproteomics, metabolomics) could enable comprehensive investigation of the biological impact of these stressors. However, detailed mechanistic networks are needed to determine which specific pathways are activated in response to different stressors and to drive the qualitative and eventually quantitative assessment of these data. A current limiting step in this process is the availability of detailed mechanistic networks that can be used as an analytical substrate. Results We have built a detailed network model that captures the biology underlying the physiological cellular response to endogenous and exogenous stressors in non-diseased mammalian pulmonary and cardiovascular cells. The contents of the network model reflect several diverse areas of signaling, including oxidative stress, hypoxia, shear stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and xenobiotic stress, that are elicited in response to common pulmonary and cardiovascular stressors. We then tested the ability of the network model to identify the mechanisms that are activated in response to CS, a broad inducer of cellular stress. Using transcriptomic data from the lungs of mice exposed to CS, the network model identified a robust increase in the oxidative stress response, largely mediated by the anti-oxidant NRF2 pathways, consistent with previous reports on the impact of CS exposure in the mammalian lung. Conclusions The results presented here describe the construction of a cellular stress network model and its

  12. Endothelial AMPK activation induces mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation via eNOS-dependent mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Reif, Michaella M; Craige, Siobhan M; Kant, Shashi; Keaney, John F

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic stress sensors like AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are known to confer stress adaptation and promote longevity in lower organisms. This study demonstrates that activating the metabolic stress sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in endothelial cells helps maintain normal cellular function by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation. To better define the mechanisms whereby AMPK promotes endothelial stress resistance, we used 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) to chronically activate AMPK and observed stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in wild type mouse endothelium, but not in endothelium from endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS-null) mice. Interestingly, AICAR-enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis was blocked by pretreatment with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor, rapamycin. Further, AICAR stimulated mTORC1 as determined by phosphorylation of its known downstream effectors in wild type, but not eNOS-null, endothelial cells. Together these data indicate that eNOS is needed to couple AMPK activation to mTORC1 and thus promote mitochondrial biogenesis and stress adaptation in the endothelium. These data suggest a novel mechanism for mTORC1 activation that is significant for investigations in vascular dysfunction. PMID:26989010

  13. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  14. Polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity are linked to the cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Cowan, K J; Diamond, M I; Welch, W J

    2003-06-15

    Chronic exposure of cells to expanded polyglutamine proteins results in eventual cell demise. We constructed mouse cell lines expressing either the full-length androgen receptor (AR), or truncated forms of AR containing 25 or 65 glutamines to study the cellular consequences of chronic low-level exposure to these proteins. Expression of the polyglutamine-expanded truncated AR protein, but not the full-length expanded protein, resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates and eventual cell death. Nuclear aggregates preferentially stained positive for heat shock protein (hsp)72, a sensitive indicator of a cellular stress response. Biochemical studies revealed that the presence of nuclear aggregates correlated with activation of the c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Different metabolic insults, including heat shock treatment, and exposure to sodium arsenite or menadione, proved more toxic to those cells expressing the polyglutamine-expanded truncated protein than to cells expressing the non-expanded form. Cells containing cytoplasmic polyglutamine-protein aggregates exhibited a delayed expression of hsp72 after heat shock. Once expressed, hsp72 failed to localize normally and instead was sequestered within the protein aggregates. This was accompanied by an inability of the aggregate-containing cells to cease their stress response as evidenced by the continued presence of activated JNK. Finally, activation of the cellular stress response increased the overall extent of polyglutamine protein aggregation, especially within the nucleus. Inclusion of a JNK inhibitor reduced this stress-dependent increase in nuclear aggregates. Abnormal stress responses may contribute to enhanced cell vulnerability in cells expressing polyglutamine-expanded proteins and may increase the propensity of such cells to form cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions. PMID:12783846

  15. Hexokinase 2 controls cellular stress response through localization of an RNA-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Courteau, L; Crasto, J; Hassanzadeh, G; Baird, S D; Hodgins, J; Liwak-Muir, U; Fung, G; Luo, H; Stojdl, D F; Screaton, R A; Holcik, M

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular localization of RNA-binding proteins is a key determinant of their ability to control RNA metabolism and cellular stress response. Using an RNAi-based kinome-wide screen, we identified hexokinase 2 (HK2) as a regulator of the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in response to hypertonic stress and human rhinovirus infection (HRV). We show that inhibition of HK2 expression or pharmacological inhibition of HK2 activity blocks the cytoplasmic accumulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), restores expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL), and protects cells against hypertonic stress-induced apoptosis. Reduction of HK2 protein levels by knockdown results in decreased HRV replication, a delay in HRV-induced cell death, and a reduced number of infected cells, all of which can be rescued by forced expression of a cytoplasm-restricted hnRNP A1. Our data elucidate a novel role for HK2 in cellular stress response and viral infection that could be exploited for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26247723

  16. Lysosomal recruitment of TSC2 is a universal response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Demetriades, Constantinos; Plescher, Monika; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2016-01-01

    mTORC1 promotes cell growth and is therefore inactivated upon unfavourable growth conditions. Signalling pathways downstream of most cellular stresses converge on TSC1/2, which serves as an integration point that inhibits mTORC1. The TSC1/2 complex was shown to translocate to lysosomes to inactivate mTORC1 in response to two stresses: amino-acid starvation and growth factor removal. Whether other stresses also regulate TSC2 localization is not known. How TSC2 localization responds to combinations of stresses and other stimuli is also unknown. We show that both amino acids and growth factors are required simultaneously to maintain TSC2 cytoplasmic; when one of the two is missing, TSC2 relocalizes to lysosomes. Furthermore, multiple different stresses that inhibit mTORC1 also drive TSC2 lysosomal accumulation. Our findings indicate that lysosomal recruitment of TSC2 is a universal response to stimuli that inactivate mTORC1, and that the presence of any single stress is sufficient to cause TSC2 lysosomal localization. PMID:26868506

  17. Stress adaptation and low-frequency impedance of rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Peslin, R; Duvivier, C; Bekkari, H; Reichart, E; Gallina, C

    1990-09-01

    At transpulmonary pressures (Ptp) of 7-12 cmH2O, pressure-volume hysteresis of isolated cat lungs has been found to be 20-50% larger than predicted from their amount of stress adaptation (J. Hildebrandt, J. Appl. Physiol. 28: 365-372, 1970). This behavior is inconsistent with linear viscoelasticity and has been interpreted in terms of plastoelasticity. We have reinvestigated this phenomenon in isolated lungs from 12 Wistar rats by measuring 1) the changes in Ptp after 0.5-ml step volume changes (initial Ptp of 5 cmH2O) and 2) their response to sinusoidal pressure forcing from 0.01 to 0.67 Hz (2 cmH2O peak to peak, mean Ptp of 6 cmH2O). Stress adaptation curves were found to fit approximately Hildebrandt's logarithmic model [delta Ptp/delta V = A - B.log(t)] from 0.2 to 100 s, where delta V is the step volume change, A and B are coefficients, and t is time. A and B averaged 1.06 +/- 0.11 and 0.173 +/- 0.019 cmH2O/ml, respectively, with minor differences between stress relaxation and stress recovery curves. The response to sinusoidal forcing was characterized by the effective resistance (Re) and elastance (EL). Re decreased from 2.48 +/- 0.41 cmH2O.ml-1.s at 0.01 Hz to 0.18 +/- 0.03 cmH2O.ml-1.s at 0.5 Hz, and EL increased from 0.99 +/- 0.10 to 1.26 +/- 0.20 cmH2O/ml on the same frequency range. These data were analyzed with the frequency-domain version of the same model, complemented by a Newtonian resistance (R) to account for airway resistance: Re = R + B/ (9.2f) and EL = A + 0.25B + B . log 2 pi f, where f is the frequency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2246156

  18. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    PubMed

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  19. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  20. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  1. Early-life stress impacts the developing hippocampus and primes seizure occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed. PMID:24574961

  2. Functional genomics and proteomics of the cellular osmotic stress response in 'non-model' organisms.

    PubMed

    Kültz, Dietmar; Fiol, Diego; Valkova, Nelly; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia; Chan, Stephanie Y; Lee, Jinoo

    2007-05-01

    All organisms are adapted to well-defined extracellular salinity ranges. Osmoregulatory mechanisms spanning all levels of biological organization, from molecules to behavior, are central to salinity adaptation. Functional genomics and proteomics approaches represent powerful tools for gaining insight into the molecular basis of salinity adaptation and euryhalinity in animals. In this review, we discuss our experience in applying such tools to so-called 'non-model' species, including euryhaline animals that are well-suited for studies of salinity adaptation. Suppression subtractive hybridization, RACE-PCR and mass spectrometry-driven proteomics can be used to identify genes and proteins involved in salinity adaptation or other environmental stress responses in tilapia, sharks and sponges. For protein identification in non-model species, algorithms based on sequence homology searches such as MSBLASTP2 are most powerful. Subsequent gene ontology and pathway analysis can then utilize sets of identified genes and proteins for modeling molecular mechanisms of environmental adaptation. Current limitations for proteomics in non-model species can be overcome by improving sequence coverage, N- and C-terminal sequencing and analysis of intact proteins. Dependence on information about biochemical pathways and gene ontology databases for model species represents a more severe barrier for work with non-model species. To minimize such dependence, focusing on a single biological process (rather than attempting to describe the system as a whole) is key when applying 'omics' approaches to non-model organisms. PMID:17449824

  3. PACS—Realization of an adaptive concept using pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Boblenz, J.; Hühne, C.

    2014-10-01

    A biologically inspired concept is investigated which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and applicational flexible adaptive structures. Building a real life morphing unit is an ambitious task as the numerous works in the particular field show. Summarizing fundamental demands and barriers regarding shape changing structures, the basic challenges of designing morphing structures are listed. The concept of Pressure Actuated Cellular Structures (PACS) is arranged within the recent morphing activities and it is shown that it complies with the underlying demands. Systematically divided into energy-related and structural subcomponents the working principle is illuminated and relationships between basic design parameters are expressed. The analytical background describing the physical mechanisms of PACS is presented in concentrated manner. This work focuses on the procedure of dimensioning, realizing and experimental testing of a single cell and a single row cantilever made of PACS. The experimental outcomes as well as the results from the FEM computations are used for evaluating the analytical methods. The functionality of the basic principle is thus validated and open issues are determined pointing the way ahead.

  4. Ethylene-promoted Elongation: an Adaptation to Submergence Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Background A sizeable minority of taxa is successful in areas prone to submergence. Many such plants elongate with increased vigour when underwater. This helps to restore contact with the aerial environment by shortening the duration of inundation. Poorly adapted species are usually incapable of this underwater escape. Scope Evidence implicating ethylene as the principal factor initiating fast underwater elongation by leaves or stems is evaluated comprehensively along with its interactions with other hormones and gases. These interactions make up a sequence of events that link the perception of submergence to a prompt acceleration of extension. The review encompasses whole plant physiology, cell biology and molecular genetics. It includes assessments of how submergence threatens plant life and of the extent to which the submergence escape demonstrably improves the likelihood of survival. Conclusions Experimental testing over many years establishes ethylene-promoted underwater extension as one of the most convincing examples of hormone-mediated stress adaptation by plants. The research has utilized a wide range of species that includes numerous angiosperms, a fern and a liverwort. It has also benefited from detailed physiological and molecular studies of underwater elongation by rice (Oryza sativa) and the marsh dock (Rumex palustris). Despite complexities and interactions, the work reveals that the signal transduction pathway is initiated by the simple expediency of physical entrapment of ethylene within growing cells by a covering of water. PMID:17956854

  5. Cellular and subcellular oxidative stress parameters following severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Patel, Samir P; VanRooyen, Jenna L; Sullivan, Patrick G; Rabchevsky, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    The present study undertook a comprehensive assessment of the acute biochemical oxidative stress parameters in both cellular and, notably, mitochondrial isolates following severe upper lumbar contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult female Sprague Dawley rats. At 24h post-injury, spinal cord tissue homogenate and mitochondrial fractions were isolated concurrently and assessed for glutathione (GSH) content and production of nitric oxide (NO(•)), in addition to the presence of oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), protein carbonyl (PC), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Moreover, we assessed production of superoxide (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mitochondrial fractions. Quantitative biochemical analyses showed that compared to sham, SCI significantly lowered GSH content accompanied by increased NO(•) production in both cellular and mitochondrial fractions. SCI also resulted in increased O2(•-) and H2O2 levels in mitochondrial fractions. Western blot analysis further showed that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) mediated PC and 3-NT production were significantly higher in both fractions after SCI. Conversely, neither 4-HNE levels nor LPO formation were increased at 24h after injury in either tissue homogenate or mitochondrial fractions. These results indicate that by 24h post-injury ROS-induced protein oxidation is more prominent compared to lipid oxidation, indicating a critical temporal distinction in secondary pathophysiology that is critical in designing therapeutic approaches to mitigate consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:26760911

  6. Cellular and subcellular oxidative stress parameters following severe spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Visavadiya, Nishant P.; Patel, Samir P.; VanRooyen, Jenna L.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study undertook a comprehensive assessment of the acute biochemical oxidative stress parameters in both cellular and, notably, mitochondrial isolates following severe upper lumbar contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in adult female Sprague Dawley rats. At 24 h post-injury, spinal cord tissue homogenate and mitochondrial fractions were isolated concurrently and assessed for glutathione (GSH) content and production of nitric oxide (NO•), in addition to the presence of oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), protein carbonyl (PC), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Moreover, we assessed production of superoxide (O2•-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mitochondrial fractions. Quantitative biochemical analyses showed that compared to sham, SCI significantly lowered GSH content accompanied by increased NO• production in both cellular and mitochondrial fractions. SCI also resulted in increased O2•- and H2O2 levels in mitochondrial fractions. Western blot analysis further showed that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) mediated PC and 3-NT production were significantly higher in both fractions after SCI. Conversely, neither 4-HNE levels nor LPO formation were increased at 24 h after injury in either tissue homogenate or mitochondrial fractions. These results indicate that by 24 h post-injury ROS-induced protein oxidation is more prominent compared to lipid oxidation, indicating a critical temporal distinction in secondary pathophysiology that is critical in designing therapeutic approaches to mitigate consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:26760911

  7. Carbohydrate-based inducers of cellular stress for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ndombera, Fidelis T; VanHecke, Garrett C; Nagi, Shima; Ahn, Young-Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Small molecules that block the altered metabolism in cancer or increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as potential anti-cancer agents. Considering that various carbohydrates can be used for cellular energetics or protein N-glycosylation of which interruption can lead to cellular stress, we have synthesized and evaluated a library of N-aryl glycosides for induction of ROS and cytotoxicity in H1299 cancer cell line. Two N-aryl glycosides (K8 and H8) were identified that induce about 2-fold induction of ROS and cytotoxicity in H1299 cells. We further showed that the acetylated form of K8 (K8A) activates AMPK, and stabilizes p53 in HEK293 cells, and induce a higher cytotoxicity than 2-deoxy-d-glucose in H1299 cell line. PMID:26832785

  8. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  9. Cellular energy stress induces AMPK-mediated regulation of YAP and the Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jung-Soon; Meng, Zhipeng; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Hyun Woo; Hansen, Carsten Gram; Kim, Soohyun; Lim, Dae-Sik; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a transcription co-activator in the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and controls cell growth, tissue homeostasis, and organ size. YAP is inhibited by the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates YAP to induce its cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation. YAP induces gene expression by binding to the TEAD family transcription factors. Dysregulation of the Hippo-YAP pathway is frequently observed in human cancers. Here we show that cellular energy stress induces YAP phosphorylation, in part due to AMPK-dependent Lats activation, thereby inhibiting YAP activity. Moreover, AMPK directly phosphorylates YAP S94, a residue essential for the interaction with TEAD, thus disrupting the YAP-TEAD interaction. AMPK-induced YAP inhibition can suppress oncogenic transformation of Lats-null cells with high YAP activity. Our study establishes a molecular mechanism and functional significance of AMPK in linking cellular energy status to the Hippo-YAP pathway. PMID:25751140

  10. Conserved cellular function and stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Alfonso, Julieta; Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C

    2010-05-01

    Chronic stress causes morphological alterations in the hippocampus of rodents and tree shrews, including atrophy of CA3 dendrites and loss of synapses. The molecular mechanisms underlying these structural changes remain largely unknown. We have previously identified M6a as a stress responsive gene and shown that M6a is involved in filopodium/spine outgrowth and, likely, synapse formation. M6a belongs to the proteolipid protein (PLP) family, all of their members having four transmembrane domains that allow their localization at the plasma membrane. In the present work, we analyzed other members of this family, the closely related M6b as well as PLP and its splice variant DM20. We found that chronic restraint stress in mice reduces M6b and DM20, but not PLP, mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, M6b and DM20, but again not PLP, induce filopodium formation in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Several M6b protein isoforms were studied, all of them having similar effects except for the one lacking the transmembrane domains. Our results reveal a conserved cellular function and a stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family, suggesting an involvement of proteolipid proteins in the stress response. PMID:19937804

  11. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:24476337

  12. Disruption of cellular homeostasis induces organelle stress and triggers apoptosis like cell-death pathways in malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, S; Datta, G; Kaur, I; Malhotra, P; Mohmmed, A

    2015-01-01

    A regulated protein turnover machinery in the cell is essential for effective cellular homeostasis; any interference with this system induces cellular stress and alters the normal functioning of proteins important for cell survival. In this study, we show that persistent cellular stress and organelle dysfunction because of disruption of cellular homeostasis in human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, leads to apoptosis-like cell death. Quantitative global proteomic analysis of the stressed parasites before onset of cell death, showed upregulation of a number of proteins involved in cellular homeostasis; protein network analyses identified upregulated metabolic pathways that may be associated with stress tolerance and pro-survival mechanism. However, persistent stress on parasites cause structural abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, subsequently a cascade of reactions are initiated in parasites including rise in cytosolic calcium levels, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of VAD-FMK-binding proteases. We further show that activation of VAD-FMK-binding proteases in the parasites leads to degradation of phylogenetically conserved protein, TSN (Tudor staphylococcal nuclease), a known target of metacaspases, as well as degradation of other components of spliceosomal complex. Loss of spliceosomal machinery impairs the mRNA splicing, leading to accumulation of unprocessed RNAs in the parasite and thus dysregulate vital cellular functions, which in turn leads to execution of apoptosis-like cell death. Our results establish one of the possible mechanisms of instigation of cell death by organelle stress in Plasmodium. PMID:26136076

  13. Microchip Electrophoresis with Amperometric Detection Method for Profiling Cellular Nitrosative Stress Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gunasekara, Dulan B.; Siegel, Joseph M.; Caruso, Giuseppe; Hulvey, Matthew K.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) in cells results in nitrosative stress due to the generation of highly reactive species such as peroxynitrite and N2O3. These species disrupt the cellular redox processes through the oxidation, nitration, and nitrosylation of important biomolecules. Microchip electrophoresis (ME) is a fast separation method that can be used to profile cellular nitrosative stress through the separation of NO and nitrite from other redox-active intracellular components such as cellular antioxidants. This paper describes a ME method with electrochemical detection (ME-EC) for the separation of intracellular nitrosative stress markers in macrophage cells. The separation of nitrite, azide (interference), iodide (internal standard), tyrosine, glutathione, and hydrogen peroxide (neutral marker) was achieved in under 40 s using a run buffer consisting of 7.5 to 10 mM NaCl, 10 mM boric acid, and 2 mM TTAC at pH 10.3 to 10.7. Initially, NO production was monitored by the detection of nitrite (NO2−) in cell lysates. There was a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in NO2− production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells. The concentration of NO2− inside a single unstimulated macrophage cell was estimatedto be 1.41 mM using the method of standard additions. ME-EC was then used for the direct detection of NO and glutathione in stimulated and native macrophage cell lysates. NO was identified in these studies based on its migration time and rapid degradation kinetics. The intracellular levels of glutathione in native and stimulated macrophages were also compared, and no significant difference was observed between the two conditions. PMID:24728039

  14. c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of Stathmin Confers Protection against Cellular Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Dominic C. H.; Zhao, Teresa T.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Ngoei, Kevin R.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.

    2010-01-01

    The cell stress response encompasses the range of intracellular events required for adaptation to stimuli detrimental to cell survival. Although the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is a stress-activated kinase that can promote either cell survival or death in response to detrimental stimuli, the JNK-regulated mechanisms involved in survival are not fully characterized. Here we show that in response to hyperosmotic stress, JNK phosphorylates a key cytoplasmic microtubule regulatory protein, stathmin (STMN), on conserved Ser-25 and Ser-38 residues. In in vitro biochemical studies, we identified STMN Ser-38 as the critical residue required for efficient phosphorylation by JNK and identified a novel kinase interaction domain in STMN required for recognition by JNK. We revealed that JNK was required for microtubule stabilization in response to hyperosmotic stress. Importantly, we also demonstrated a novel cytoprotective function for STMN, as the knockdown of STMN levels by siRNA was sufficient to augment viability in response to hyperosmotic stress. Our findings show that JNK targeting of STMN represents a novel stress-activated cytoprotective mechanism involving microtubule network changes. PMID:20630875

  15. Lithology intelligent identification using support vector machine and adaptive cellular automata in multispectral remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Niu, Ruiqing; Wu, Ke

    2011-07-01

    Remote sensing provides a new idea and an advanced method for lithology identification, but lithology identification by remote sensing is quite difficult because 1. the disciplines of lithology identification in a concrete region are often quite different from the experts' experience; 2. in the regions with flourishing vegetation, lithology information is poor, so it is very difficult to identify the lithologies by remote sensing images. At present, the studies on lithology identification by remote sensing are primarily conducted on the regions with low vegetation coverage and high rock bareness. And there is no mature method of lithology identification in the regions with flourishing vegetation. Traditional methods lacking in the mining and extraction of the various complicated lithology information from a remote sensing image, often need much manual intervention and possess poor intelligence and accuracy. An intelligent method proposed in this paper for lithology identification based on support vector machine (SVM) and adaptive cellular automata (ACA) is expected to solve the above problems. The method adopted Landsat-7 ETM+ images and 1:50000 geological map as the data origins. It first derived the lithology identification factors on three aspects: 1. spectra, 2. texture and 3. vegetation cover. Second, it plied the remote sensing images with the geological map and established the SVM to obtain the transition rules according to the factor values of the samples. Finally, it established an ACA model to intelligently identify the lithologies according to the transition and neighborhood rules. In this paper an ACA model is proposed and compared with the traditional one. Results of 2 real-world examples show that: 1. The SVM-ACA method obtains a good result of lithology identification in the regions with flourishing vegetation; 2. it possesses high accuracies of lithology identification (with the overall accuracies of 92.29% and 85.54%, respectively, in the two

  16. Hydrogen sulfide modulates sub-cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress induced by myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shakila Banu; Kurian, Gino A

    2016-05-25

    In this study, we compared the impact of H2S pre (HIPC) and post-conditioning (HPOC) on oxidative stress, the prime reason for myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (I/R), in different compartments of the myocardium, such as the mitochondria beside its subpopulations (interfibrillar (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria) and microsomal fractions in I/R injured rat heart. The results demonstrated that compared to I/R rat heart, HIPC and HPOC treated hearts shows reduced myocardial injury, enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities and reduced the level of TBARS in different cellular compartments. The extent of recovery (measured by TBARS and GSH levels) in subcellular fractions, were in the following descending order: microsome > SSM > IFM in both HIPC and HPOC. In summary, oxidative stress mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, one of the primary causes for I/R injury, was partly recovered by HIPC and HPOC treatment, with significant improvement in SSM fraction compared to the IFM. PMID:27041072

  17. The importance of the cellular stress response in the pathogenesis and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Philip L; Balogh, Gabor; Rivas, Eric; Kavanagh, Kylie; Vigh, Laszlo

    2014-07-01

    Organisms have evolved to survive rigorous environments and are not prepared to thrive in a world of caloric excess and sedentary behavior. A realization that physical exercise (or lack of it) plays a pivotal role in both the pathogenesis and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus (t2DM) has led to the provocative concept of therapeutic exercise mimetics. A decade ago, we attempted to simulate the beneficial effects of exercise by treating t2DM patients with 3 weeks of daily hyperthermia, induced by hot tub immersion. The short-term intervention had remarkable success, with a 1 % drop in HbA1, a trend toward weight loss, and improvement in diabetic neuropathic symptoms. An explanation for the beneficial effects of exercise and hyperthermia centers upon their ability to induce the cellular stress response (the heat shock response) and restore cellular homeostasis. Impaired stress response precedes major metabolic defects associated with t2DM and may be a near seminal event in the pathogenesis of the disease, tipping the balance from health into disease. Heat shock protein inducers share metabolic pathways associated with exercise with activation of AMPK, PGC1-a, and sirtuins. Diabetic therapies that induce the stress response, whether via heat, bioactive compounds, or genetic manipulation, improve or prevent all of the morbidities and comorbidities associated with the disease. The agents reduce insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokines, visceral adiposity, and body weight while increasing mitochondrial activity, normalizing membrane structure and lipid composition, and preserving organ function. Therapies restoring the stress response can re-tip the balance from disease into health and address the multifaceted defects associated with the disease. PMID:24523032

  18. Electrochemical Potential Gradient as a Quantitative in Vitro Test Platform for Cellular Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Carson; Atha, Donald; Reipa, Vytas

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress in a biological system is often defined as a redox imbalance within cells or groups of cells within an organism. Reductive-oxidative (redox) imbalances in cellular systems have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer. To better understand the redox environment within cellular systems, it is important to be able to characterize the relationship between the intensity of the oxidative environment, characterized by redox potential, and the biomolecular consequences of oxidative damage. In this study, we show that an in situ electrochemical potential gradient can serve as a tool to simulate exogenous oxidative stress in surface-attached mammalian cells. A culture plate design, which permits direct imaging and analysis of the cell viability, following exposure to a range of solution redox potentials, was developed. The in vitro oxidative stress test vessel consists of a cell growth flask fitted with two platinum electrodes that support a direct current along the flask bottom. The applied potential span and gradient slope can be controlled by adjusting the constant current magnitude across the vessel with spatially localized media potentials measured with a sliding reference electrode. For example, the viability of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells under a gradient of redox potentials indicated that cell death was initiated at approximately 0.4 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) media potential and this potential could be modified with antioxidants. This experimental platform may facilitate studies of oxidative stress characteristics on different types of cells by enabling imaging live cell cultures that have been exposed to a gradient of exogenous redox potentials. PMID:27409641

  19. Curcumin ameliorates high glucose-induced neural tube defects by suppressing cellular stress and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Fang; Reece, E. Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol present in the roots of the Curcuma longa plant (turmeric), which possesses antioxidant, anti-tumorigenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we test whether curcumin treatment reduces high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this occurs via blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. Study Design Embryonic day 8.5 mouse embryos were collected for use in whole embryo culture under normal glucose (100 mg/dl glucose) or high glucose (300 mg/dl glucose) conditions, with or without curcumin treatment. After 24 h in culture, protein levels of oxidative stress makers, nitrosative stress makers, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress makers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8 and the level of lipid peroxides (LPO) were determined in the embryos. After 36 h in culture, embryos were examined for evidence of NTD formation. Results Although 10 μM curcumin did not significantly reduce the rate of NTDs caused by high glucose, 20 μM curcumin significantly ameliorated high glucose-induced NTD formation. Curcumin suppressed oxidative stress in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. Treatment reduced the levels of the lipid peroxidation marker, 4-hydroxynonenal(4-HNE), nitrotyrosine-modified protein, and LPO. Curcumin also blocked ER stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, curcumin abolished caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. Conclusions Curcumin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation, suggesting that curcumin supplements could reduce the negative effects of diabetes on the embryo. Further

  20. How to optimize vitamin D supplementation to prevent cancer, based on cellular adaptation and hydroxylase enzymology.

    PubMed

    Vieth, Reinhold

    2009-09-01

    The question of what makes an 'optimal' vitamin D intake is usually equivalent to, 'what serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] do we need to stay above to minimize risk of disease?'. This is a simplistic question that ignores the evidence that fluctuating concentrations of 25(OH)D may in themselves be a problem, even if concentrations do exceed a minimum desirable level. Vitamin D metabolism poses unique problems for the regulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] concentrations in the tissues outside the kidney that possess 25(OH)D-1-hydroxylase [CYP27B1] and the catabolic enzyme, 1,25(OH)2D-24-hydroxylase [CYP24]. These enzymes behave according to first-order reaction kinetics. When 25(OH)D declines, the ratio of 1-hydroxylase/24-hydroxylase must increase to maintain tissue 1,25(OH)2D at its set-point level. The mechanisms that regulate this paracrine metabolism are poorly understood. I propose that delay in cellular adaptation, or lag time, in response to fluctuating 25(OH)D concentrations can explain why higher 25(OH)D in regions at high latitude or with low environmental ultraviolet light can be associated with the greater risks reported for prostate and pancreatic cancers. At temperate latitudes, higher summertime 25(OH)D levels are followed by sharper declines in 25(OH)D, causing inappropriately low 1-hydroxylase and high 24-hydroxylase, resulting in tissue 1,25(OH)2D below its ideal set-point. This hypothesis can answer concerns raised by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer about vitamin D and cancer risk. It also explains why higher 25(OH)D concentrations are not good if they fluctuate, and that desirable 25(OH)D concentrations are ones that are both high and stable. PMID:19667164

  1. Role of the cellular prion protein in the neuron adaptation strategy to copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Urso, Emanuela; Manno, Daniela; Serra, Antonio; Buccolieri, Alessandro; Rizzello, Antonia; Danieli, Antonio; Acierno, Raffaele; Salvato, Benedetto; Maffia, Michele

    2012-08-01

    Copper transporter 1 (CTR1), cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 2 (NRAMP2) and ATP7A proteins control the cell absorption and efflux of copper (Cu) ions in nervous tissues upon physiological conditions. Little is known about their regulation under reduced Cu availability, a condition underlying the onset of diffused neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, rat neuron-like cells were exposed to Cu starvation for 48 h. The activation of Caspase-3 enzymes and the impairment of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD) activity depicted the initiation of a pro-apoptotic program, preliminary to the appearance of the morphological signs of apoptosis. The transcriptional response related to Cu transport proteins has been investigated. Notably, PrP(C) transcript and protein levels were consistently elevated upon Cu deficiency. The CTR1 protein amount was stable, despite a two-fold increase in the transcript amount, meaning the activation of post-translational regulatory mechanisms. NRAMP2 and ATP7A expressions were unvaried. The up-regulated PrP(C) has been demonstrated to enhance the cell Cu uptake ability by about 50% with respect to the basal transport, and so sustain the Cu delivery to the Cu,Zn SOD cuproenzymes. Conclusively, the study suggests a pivotal role for PrP(C) in the cell adaptation to Cu limitation through a direct activity of ion uptake. In this view, the PrP(C) accumulation observed in several cancer cell lines could be interpreted as a molecular marker of cell Cu deficiency and a potential target of therapeutic interventions against disorders caused by metal imbalances. PMID:22362149

  2. Adaptation of the Black Yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to Ionizing Radiation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A.; Soto, Carissa M.; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F.; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  3. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kelly L; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A; Soto, Carissa M; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  4. Influence of temperature on acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several factors play critical roles in controlling the induction of acid-stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. Our findings show that temperature plays a significant role in the induction of acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and two distinct patterns were observed: (I) Presence of su...

  5. Students Under Stress. A Study in the Social Psychology of Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechanic, David

    Students' reactions to preliminary Ph.D. examinations are investigated in this study examining responses to stress and techniques of adaptation. The applications of stress in a social science context are discussed and elements of successful social adaptation are examined. A study of 20 graduate students taking departmental written examinations…

  6. Aberrant methylation of tRNAs links cellular stress to neuro-developmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Sandra; Dietmann, Sabine; Flores, Joana V; Hussain, Shobbir; Kutter, Claudia; Humphreys, Peter; Lukk, Margus; Lombard, Patrick; Treps, Lucas; Popis, Martyna; Kellner, Stefanie; Hölter, Sabine M; Garrett, Lillian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T; Helm, Mark; Ule, Jernej; Gleeson, Joseph G; Odom, Duncan T; Frye, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the cytosine-5 RNA methyltransferase NSun2 cause microcephaly and other neurological abnormalities in mice and human. How post-transcriptional methylation contributes to the human disease is currently unknown. By comparing gene expression data with global cytosine-5 RNA methylomes in patient fibroblasts and NSun2-deficient mice, we find that loss of cytosine-5 RNA methylation increases the angiogenin-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage of transfer RNAs (tRNA) leading to an accumulation of 5′ tRNA-derived small RNA fragments. Accumulation of 5′ tRNA fragments in the absence of NSun2 reduces protein translation rates and activates stress pathways leading to reduced cell size and increased apoptosis of cortical, hippocampal and striatal neurons. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that angiogenin binds with higher affinity to tRNAs lacking site-specific NSun2-mediated methylation and that the presence of 5′ tRNA fragments is sufficient and required to trigger cellular stress responses. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity of NSun2-deficient brains to oxidative stress can be rescued through inhibition of angiogenin during embryogenesis. In conclusion, failure in NSun2-mediated tRNA methylation contributes to human diseases via stress-induced RNA cleavage. PMID:25063673

  7. Accumulation of soluble and nucleolar-associated p53 proteins following cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Klibanov, S A; O'Hagan, H M; Ljungman, M

    2001-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that accumulates in the nucleus of cells exposed to various cellular stresses. One important role of nuclear p53 is to mobilize a stress response by transactivating target genes such as the p21(Waf1) gene. In this study, we investigated more closely the localization of p53 in cells following various stresses. Immunocytochemistry of fixed human fibroblasts treated with either UV light, the kinase and transcription inhibitor DRB or the proteasome inhibitor MG132 revealed abundant p53 localized to the nucleus. When cells treated with UV or DRB were permeabilized prior to fixation to allow soluble proteins to diffuse, the nuclear p53 signal was abolished. However, in cells treated with MG132, residual p53 localized to distinct large foci. Furthermore, nucleolin co-localized with p53 to these foci, suggesting that these foci were nucleolar structures. Interestingly, the MDM2 protein was found to co-localize with p53 to nucleolar structures following proteasome inhibition. Our results suggest that the p53 proteins accumulating in the nucleus following UV-irradiation or blockage of transcription are freely soluble and, thus, should be able to roam the nucleus to ensure high occupancy of p53 binding sites. However, inhibition of proteasome activity may be a unique stress in that it leads to the sequestering of p53 proteins to the nucleolus, thereby blunting the p53-mediated transactivation of target genes. PMID:11329373

  8. Cellular Response to Substrate Rigidity Is Governed by Either Stress or Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Ai Kia; Iwasaki, Katsuhiko; Ursekar, Chaitanya; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Saxena, Mayur; Chen, Huiling; Harada, Ichiro; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Cells sense the rigidity of their substrate; however, little is known about the physical variables that determine their response to this rigidity. Here, we report traction stress measurements carried out using fibroblasts on polyacrylamide gels with Young’s moduli ranging from 6 to 110 kPa. We prepared the substrates by employing a modified method that involves N-acryloyl-6-aminocaproic acid (ACA). ACA allows for covalent binding between proteins and elastomers and thus introduces a more stable immobilization of collagen onto the substrate when compared to the conventional method of using sulfo-succinimidyl-6-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl-amino) hexanoate (sulfo-SANPAH). Cells remove extracellular matrix proteins off the surface of gels coated using sulfo-SANPAH, which corresponds to lower values of traction stress and substrate deformation compared to gels coated using ACA. On soft ACA gels (Young’s modulus <20 kPa), cell-exerted substrate deformation remains constant, independent of the substrate Young’s modulus. In contrast, on stiff substrates (Young’s modulus >20 kPa), traction stress plateaus at a limiting value and the substrate deformation decreases with increasing substrate rigidity. Sustained substrate strain on soft substrates and sustained traction stress on stiff substrates suggest these may be factors governing cellular responses to substrate rigidity. PMID:23332055

  9. Mapping the crossroads of immune activation and cellular stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cláudio, Nuno; Dalet, Alexandre; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune cell network detects specific microbes and damages to cell integrity in order to coordinate and polarize the immune response against invading pathogens. In recent years, a cross-talk between microbial-sensing pathways and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis has been discovered and have attracted the attention of many researchers from the inflammation field. Abnormal accumulation of proteins in the ER can be seen as a sign of cellular malfunction and triggers a collection of conserved emergency rescue pathways. These signalling cascades, which increase ER homeostasis and favour cell survival, are collectively known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The induction or activation by microbial stimuli of several molecules linked to the ER stress response pathway have led to the conclusion that microbe sensing by immunocytes is generally associated with an UPR, which serves as a signal amplification cascade favouring inflammatory cytokines production. Induction of the UPR alone was shown to promote inflammation in different cellular and pathological models. Here we discuss how the innate immune and ER-signalling pathways intersect. Moreover, we propose that the induction of UPR-related molecules by microbial products does not necessarily reflect ER stress, but instead is an integral part of a specific transcription programme controlled by innate immunity receptors. PMID:23584529

  10. Functional characterization of novel genotypes and cellular oxidative stress studies in propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Villar, Lorena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Pérez, Belén; Abia, David; Ugarte, Magdalena; Richard, Eva; Desviat, Lourdes R

    2013-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA), caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial biotin dependent enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) is one of the most frequent organic acidurias in humans. PA is caused by mutations in either the PCCA or PCCB genes encoding the α- and β-subunits of the PCC enzyme which are assembled as an α6β6 dodecamer. In this study we have investigated the molecular basis of the defect in ten fibroblast samples from PA patients. Using homology modeling with the recently solved crystal structure of the PCC holoenzyme and a eukaryotic expression system we have analyzed the structural and functional effect of novel point mutations, also revealing a novel splice defect by minigene analysis. In addition, we have investigated the contribution of oxidative stress to cellular damage measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and apoptosis parameters in patient fibroblasts, as recent studies point to a secondary mitochondrial dysfunction as pathophysiological mechanism in this disorder. The results show an increase in intracellular ROS content compared to controls, correlating with the activation of the JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Highest ROS levels were present in cells harboring functionally null mutations, including one severe missense mutation. This work provides molecular insight into the pathogenicity of PA variants and indicates that oxidative stress may be a major contributing factor to the cellular damage, supporting the proposal of antioxidant strategies as novel supplementary therapy in this rare disease. PMID:23053474

  11. Translational and fluctuating asymmetry as tools to detect stress in stress-adapted and nonadapted plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Navarro, T.; Escos, J.; Cabezudo, B.; Emlen, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Plants having experienced previous exposure to a stress are expected to be more resistant to further stress than those not having been exposed. While the assessment of stress in plants is a difficult task, particularly for stress-adapted plants, developmental instability has proven a useful tool for assessing stress in organisms. We examined the effect of water availability on developmental instability (translational asymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry) and growth of Anthyllis cytisoides L. under a precipitation gradient. We compared A. cytisoides in very xeric (Almeri??a, 256 mm of average rainfall) and subhumid (Ma??laga, 613 mm of average rainfall) areas, from north- and south-facing slopes, after both a period of extreme drought (1995) and a humid period (1997). Translational symmetry varied between north- and south-exposed plants but differently for the Almeri??a and Ma??laga populations. We observed that developmental stability was enhanced in south-exposed plants in the population from the more xeric habitat (Almeri??a) after both dry and humid periods. In contrast, A. cytisoides living in a subhumid habitat did not alter their developmental stability in response to exposure after a humid period but exhibited a decline in stability in south-exposed slopes after a dry period. That is interpreted as a consequence of the adaptation of A. cytisoides to aridity. Growth patterns were also investigated. By reducing growth, plants can mitigate stress through a reduction of water and nutrient demands, allowing the maintenance of a steady supply of nutrients for developmental stability. This strategy was followed by plants acclimated to drought. But in mild weather, such as that of Montes de Ma??laga, a high growth rate cannot be supported when water is scarce. We also observed that floral fluctuating asymmetry was greatest on north-facing slopes at both the Almeri??a and Ma??laga sites. That is, southern exposure enhanced floral homeostasis during development

  12. Adaptation of the myoglobin knockout mouse to hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Schlieper, Georg; Kim, Jie-Hoon; Molojavyi, Andrei; Jacoby, Christoph; Laussmann, Tim; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    Myoglobin knockout (myo-/-) mice were previously reported to show no obvious phenotype but revealed several compensatory mechanisms that include increases in cardiac capillary density, coronary flow, and hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe hypoxic stress can exhaust these compensatory mechanisms and whether this can be monitored on the gene and protein level. Myo-/- and wild-type (WT) mice we e exposed to hypoxia (10% O(2)) fo 2 wk. Thereafter hemodynamic parameters were investigated by invasive measurement combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiac gene and protein expression were analyzed using cDNA arrays and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis plus mass spectrometry, respectively. Hematocrit levels increased from 44% (WT) and 48% (myo-/-) to 72% in both groups. Similar to WT controls, hypoxic myo-/- animals maintained stable cardiovascular function (mean arterial blood pressure 82.4 mmHg, ejection fraction 72.5%). Cardiac gene expression of hypoxic myo-/- mice differed significantly from WT controls in 17 genes (e.g., keratinocyte lipid binding protein +202%, cytochrome c oxidase Vb +41%). Interestingly, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha remained unchanged in both groups. Proteome analysis revealed reduced levels of heart fatty acid-binding protein and heat shock protein 27 both in hypoxic myo-/- and WT mice. Our data thus demonstrate that myo-/- mice do not decompensate du ing hypoxic st ess but a e surprisingly well adapted. Changes in ene gy metabolism of fatty acids may contribute to the robustness of myoglobin-deficient mice. PMID:14656764

  13. Hydroxylation and translational adaptation to stress: some answers lie beyond the STOP codon.

    PubMed

    Katz, M J; Gándara, L; De Lella Ezcurra, A L; Wappner, P

    2016-05-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis contributes to maintenance of homeostasis and adaptation to environmental changes. mRNA translation is controlled at various levels including initiation, elongation and termination, through post-transcriptional/translational modifications of components of the protein synthesis machinery. Recently, protein and RNA hydroxylation have emerged as important enzymatic modifications of tRNAs, elongation and termination factors, as well as ribosomal proteins. These modifications enable a correct STOP codon recognition, ensuring translational fidelity. Recent studies are starting to show that STOP codon read-through is related to the ability of the cell to cope with different types of stress, such as oxidative and chemical insults, while correlations between defects in hydroxylation of protein synthesis components and STOP codon read-through are beginning to emerge. In this review we will discuss our current knowledge of protein synthesis regulation through hydroxylation of components of the translation machinery, with special focus on STOP codon recognition. We speculate on the possibility that programmed STOP codon read-through, modulated by hydroxylation of components of the protein synthesis machinery, is part of a concerted cellular response to stress. PMID:26874685

  14. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs. PMID:26453010

  15. The role of fungal symbiosis in the adaptation of plants to high stress environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Russell J.; Redman, Regina S.; Henson, Joan M.

    2004-01-01

    All plants studied in natural ecosystemsare symbiotic with fungi that either resideentirely (endophytes) or partially(mycorrhizae) within plants. Thesesymbioses appear to adapt to biotic andabiotic stresses and may be responsible forthe survival of both plant hosts and fungalsymbionts in high stress habitats. Here wedescribe the role of symbiotic fungi inplant stress tolerance and present astrategy based on adaptive symbiosis topotentially mitigate the impacts of globalchange on plant communities.

  16. Influence of temperature on acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Our findings show that temperature plays a significant role in the induction of acid-stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes, and two distinct patterns were observed: (1) Presence of sublethal acid at 37°C or 22°C significantly induced acid-stress adaptation; and (2) Presence of sublethal acid at 4°C did not induce any acid-stress adaptation. Both patterns were confirmed by two experimental models: (1) L. monocytogenes cells were first grown at 37°C and then exposed to sublethal acid at 37°C, 22°C, and 4°C prior to lethal acid challenge; (2) Alternatively, L. monocytogenes cells were first grown at 4°C for 20 days before pre-exposure to sublethal acid and then challenged with lethal acid. Regardless of whether L. monocytogenes cells were simultaneously exposed with both cold stress and sublethal acid stress, or subjected to cold growth first before exposure to sublethal acid, no acid-stress adaptation was induced at 4°C. We also found that acid-stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes did not occur in acidic whey at 4°C. Bead beating treatment prior to mild acid pre-exposure at 4°C partially induced acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes. Our findings suggest that cold temperature can prevent the risk of acid-stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24102079

  17. Characterizing early molecular biomarkers of zinc-induced adaptive and adverseoxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure. A pharmacokinetic...

  18. The response of the heart to stress: a biological view of myocardial adaptation and failure.

    PubMed

    Alpert, N R; Mulieri, L A

    1987-01-01

    The response of the myocardium to persistent stress involves an increase in mass and a restructuring of the cellular and subcellular elements. The experiments described in this article are designed to test the hypothesis that the restructuring of the various systems (contractile, excitation-contraction coupling, recovery, etc.) that occurs in adaptive hypertrophy is a coordinated (matched) process. When the restructuring of the systems in response to stress occurs in an uncoordinated fashion, congestive heart failure results. In addition to controls, three heart models with normal pump performance are used (control, C; pressure overload, P; thyrotoxic, T; and pressure overload plus thyrotoxic, PT4) and one with inadequate pump performance (pressure overload plus thyrotoxic, PT2). In this analysis the contractile and excitation-contraction coupling systems are evaluated. The former is assessed by sensitive myothermal measurement of tension dependent heat (TDH) normalized for the isometric tension time integral (integral of Pdt). The latter is assessed from measurement of the time to peak isometric tension (TPT). The TDH/integral of Pdt (mu cal/g.cm.s) and TPT (ms) for the C, P, T, PT4, and PT2 hearts are 2.4, 1.8, 5.2, 5.1, and 0.1, mu cal/g.cm.s and 627, 816, 352, 484, and 465 ms, respectively. According to the coordination or matching hypothesis, if TDH/integral of Pdt is low, then TPT should be increased, or if TDH/integral of Pdt is high, then TPT should be decreased. Relative to control hearts, matched restructuring of the contractile and excitation-contraction coupling systems occurred for the P, T, and PT4 preparations. In these animals the hypertrophy has been adaptive and the pump performance is adequate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2485028

  19. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016. PMID:25448404

  20. Cellular stress induces Bax-regulated nuclear bubble budding and rupture followed by nuclear protein release.

    PubMed

    Lindenboim, Liora; Sasson, Tiki; Worman, Howard J; Borner, Christoph; Stein, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    Cellular stress triggers many pathways including nuclear protein redistribution. We previously discovered that this process is regulated by Bax but the underlying mechanism has not yet been studied. Here we define this mechanism by showing that apoptotic stimuli cause Bax-regulated disturbances in lamin A/C and nuclear envelope (NE)-associated proteins which results in the generation and subsequent rupture of nuclear protein-containing bubbles. The bubbles do not contain DNA and are encapsulated by impaired nuclear pore-depleted NE. Stress-induced generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles ultimately leads to the discharge of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This process precedes morphological changes of apoptosis and occurs independently of caspases. Rescue experiments revealed that this Bax effect is non-canonical, i.e. it requires the BH3 domain and α-helices 5 and 6 but it is not inhibited by Bcl(-)xL. Targeting Bax to the NE by the Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) domain effectively triggers the generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a novel stress-response, which is regulated by a non-canonical action of Bax on the NE. PMID:25482068

  1. Mitochondrial proteomics on human fibroblasts for identification of metabolic imbalance and cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Vang, Søren; Stenbroen, Vibeke; Pedersen, Christina B; Christensen, Jane H; Bross, Peter; Gregersen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial proteins are central to various metabolic activities and are key regulators of apoptosis. Disturbance of mitochondrial proteins is therefore often associated with disease. Large scale protein data are required to capture the mitochondrial protein levels and mass spectrometry based proteomics is suitable for generating such data. To study the relative quantities of mitochondrial proteins in cells from cultivated human skin fibroblasts we applied a proteomic method based on nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of iTRAQ-labeled peptides. Results When fibroblast cultures were exposed to mild metabolic stress – by cultivation in galactose medium- the amount of mitochondria appeared to be maintained whereas the levels of individual proteins were altered. Proteins of respiratory chain complex I and IV were increased together with NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of the citric acid cycle illustrating cellular strategies to cope with altered energy metabolism. Furthermore, quantitative protein data, with a median standard error below 6%, were obtained for the following mitochondrial pathways: fatty acid oxidation, citric acid cycle, respiratory chain, antioxidant systems, amino acid metabolism, mitochondrial translation, protein quality control, mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis. Conclusion The robust analytical platform in combination with a well-defined compendium of mitochondrial proteins allowed quantification of single proteins as well as mapping of entire pathways. This enabled characterization of the interplay between metabolism and stress response in human cells exposed to mild stress. PMID:19476632

  2. Using a Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation Framework to Predict Physical Aggression Trajectories in Newlywed Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Amie; Lawrence, Erika; Barry, Robin A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a vulnerability-stress-adaptation framework to examine personality traits and chronic stress as predictors of the developmental course of physical aggression in the early years of marriage. Additionally, personality traits and physical aggression were examined as predictors of the developmental course of chronic stress. Data from…

  3. GAMT, a p53-Inducible Modulator of Apoptosis, Is Critical for the Adaptive Response to Nutrient Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Takao; Brown-Endres, Lauren; Chu, Kiki; Ongusaha, Pat P.; Ohtsuka, Takao; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Lee, Sam W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The p53 tumor suppressor protein has a well-established role in cell fate decision-making processes. However, recent discoveries indicate that p53 has a non-tumor-suppressive role. Here, we identify GAMT (guanidinoacetate methyltransferase), an enzyme involved in creatine synthesis, as a p53 target gene and a key downstream effector of adaptive response to nutrient stress. We show that GAMT is not only involved in p53-dependent apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress but is important for apoptosis induced by glucose deprivation. Additionally, p53→GAMT up-regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) induced by glucose starvation, utilizing this pathway as an alternate ATP-generating energy source. These results highlight that p53-dependent regulation of GAMT allows cells to maintain energy levels sufficient to undergo apoptosis or survival under conditions of nutrient stress. p53→GAMT pathway represents a new link between cellular stress responses and processes of creatine synthesis and FAO, demonstrating a further role of p53 in cellular metabolism. PMID:19917247

  4. ADAPTATION OF AQUATIC MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES TO HG(2+) STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism of adaptation to Hg(2+) in four aquatic habitats was studied by correlating microbially mediated Hg(2+) volatilization with the adaptive state of the exposed communities. Structural and functional parameters indicated that adaptation of all four communities was stim...

  5. Signaling pathways for stress responses and adaptation in Aspergillus species: stress biology in the post-genomic era.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Kazutoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi in terms of industrial use and because of their pathogenic or toxin-producing features. The genomes of several Aspergillus species have become publicly available in this decade, and genomic analyses have contributed to an integrated understanding of fungal biology. Stress responses and adaptation mechanisms have been intensively investigated using the accessible genome infrastructure. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have been highlighted as being fundamentally important in fungal adaptation to a wide range of stress conditions. Reverse genetics analyses have uncovered the roles of MAPK pathways in osmotic stress, cell wall stress, development, secondary metabolite production, and conidia stress resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the stress biology of Aspergillus species, illuminating what we have learned from the genomic data in this "post-genomic era." PMID:27007956

  6. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2012-02-15

    The adaptation of vascular endothelial cells to shear stress alteration induced by global hemodynamic changes, such as those accompanying exercise or digestion, is an essential component of normal endothelial physiology in vivo. An understanding of the transient regulation of endothelial phenotype during adaptation to changes in mural shear will advance our understanding of endothelial biology and may yield new insights into the mechanism of atherogenesis. In this study, we characterized the adaptive response of arterial endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude in well-defined in vitro settings. Porcine endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal level shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz for 24 h, after which an acute increase in shear stress to 30 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) was applied. Endothelial permeability nearly doubled after 40-min exposure to the elevated shear stress and then decreased gradually. Transcriptomics studies using microarray techniques identified 86 genes that were sensitive to the elevated shear. The acute increase in shear stress promoted the expression of a group of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. The adaptive response of the global gene expression profile is triphasic, consisting of an induction period, an early adaptive response (ca. 45 min) and a late remodeling response. Our results suggest that endothelial cells exhibit a specific phenotype during the adaptive response to changes in shear stress; this phenotype is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. PMID:22140046

  7. Development of Maladaptive Coping: A Functional Adaptation to Chronic, Uncontrollable Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, Martha E.

    2015-01-01

    Health disparities are rooted in childhood and stem from adverse early environments that damage physiologic stress-response systems. Developmental psychobiological models of the effects of chronic stress account for both the negative effects of a stress-response system calibrated to a dangerous and unpredictable environment from a health perspective, and the positive effects of such an adaptively calibrated stress response from a functional perspective. Our research suggests that contexts that produce functionally adapted physiologic responses to stress also encourage a functionally adapted coping response—coping that can result in maladjustment in physical and mental health, but enables children to grow and develop within those contexts. In this article, I highlight the value of reframing maladaptive coping as functional adaptation to understand more completely the development of children’s coping in different contexts, and the value of such a conceptual shift for coping-based theory, research, and intervention. PMID:26019717

  8. Stress inoculation training supported by physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation.

    PubMed

    Popović, Sinisa; Horvat, Marko; Kukolja, Davor; Dropuljić, Branimir; Cosić, Kresimir

    2009-01-01

    Significant proportion of psychological problems related to combat stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores importance of effective methods for strengthening the stress resistance of military personnel. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation, based on estimation of the subject's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Therefore, following an overview of SIT and its applications in the military setting, generic concept of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation is presented in the paper. Toward the end of the paper, closed-loop adaptive control strategy applicable to SIT is outlined. PMID:19592729

  9. Propranolol affects stress-induced leukocytosis and cellular adhesion molecule expression.

    PubMed

    Kühlwein, E C; Irwin, M R; Ziegler, M G; Woods, V L; Kennedy, B; Mills, P J

    2001-12-01

    In this study, the impact of the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol on resting and acute psychological- and physical-stress-induced circulating leukocyte numbers and the density of cellular adhesion molecules was investigated. In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 45 healthy volunteers performed a 15-min public speaking task and 21 subjects performed a 16-min bicycle exercise after 5 days of ingesting a placebo and after 5 days of ingesting 100 mg/day propranolol. One week of ingesting propranolol modestly elevated the numbers of CD62L+ (P<0.019) but not CD62L- T-lymphocytes. Moreover, propranolol preferentially blunted-psychological stress-induced increases in naïve T-helper (CD4+CD62L+; P<0.049) and naïve T-cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8+CD62L+; P<0.003), as well as activated T-cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8+CD29+; P<0.005). However, exercise-induced increases in leukocyte numbers were enhanced following propranolol treatment (P<0.04). In contrast to the effect on the numbers of adhesion-molecule-bearing cells, there was only a modest effect of propranolol on stress-induced alterations of the density of CD62L, CD54 and CD11a. In this study, propranolol treatment interfered with the adrenergic regulation of circulating leukocyte numbers by blunting psychological stress effects but enhancing exercise effects. Propranolol affected the cell activation status to a lesser extent, as reflected by the density of adhesion molecules. PMID:11822472

  10. Simulated microgravity promotes cellular senescence via oxidant stress in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghua; Zhang, Jifei; Bai, Shasha; Wang, Guangyou; Mu, Lili; Sun, Bo; Wang, Dandan; Kong, Qingfei; Liu, Yumei; Yao, Xiuhua; Xu, Ying; Li, Hulun

    2009-12-01

    Microgravity has a unique effect on biological organisms. Organs exposed to microgravity display cellular senescence, a change that resembles the aging process. To directly investigate the influence of simulated microgravity on neuronal original rat PC12 cells, we used a rotary cell culture system that simulates the microgravity environment on the earth. We found that simulated microgravity induced partial G1 phase arrest, upregulated senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal) activity, and activated both p53 and p16 protein pathways linked to cell senescence. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also increased. The activity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT), was all significantly increased at 12h after the microgravity onset, yet decreased at 96h. Furthermore, concomitant block of ROS by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited the microgravity-induced upregulation of SA-beta-gal activity. These results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity induces cellular senescence in PC12 cells via an increased oxidant stress. PMID:19616052

  11. Adaptive Stress Response in Segmental Progeria Resembles Long-Lived Dwarfism and Calorie Restriction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Valerie B; von Lindern, Marieke; Jong, Willeke M. C; Zeeuw, Chris I. De; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-01-01

    How congenital defects causing genome instability can result in the pleiotropic symptoms reminiscent of aging but in a segmental and accelerated fashion remains largely unknown. Most segmental progerias are associated with accelerated fibroblast senescence, suggesting that cellular senescence is a likely contributing mechanism. Contrary to expectations, neither accelerated senescence nor acute oxidative stress hypersensitivity was detected in primary fibroblast or erythroblast cultures from multiple progeroid mouse models for defects in the nucleotide excision DNA repair pathway, which share premature aging features including postnatal growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and death before weaning. Instead, we report a prominent phenotypic overlap with long-lived dwarfism and calorie restriction during postnatal development (2 wk of age), including reduced size, reduced body temperature, hypoglycemia, and perturbation of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 neuroendocrine axis. These symptoms were also present at 2 wk of age in a novel progeroid nucleotide excision repair-deficient mouse model (XPDG602D/R722W/XPA−/−) that survived weaning with high penetrance. However, despite persistent cachectic dwarfism, blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels returned to normal by 10 wk, with hypoglycemia reappearing near premature death at 5 mo of age. These data strongly suggest changes in energy metabolism as part of an adaptive response during the stressful period of postnatal growth. Interestingly, a similar perturbation of the postnatal growth axis was not detected in another progeroid mouse model, the double-strand DNA break repair deficient Ku80−/− mouse. Specific (but not all) types of genome instability may thus engage a conserved response to stress that evolved to cope with environmental pressures such as food shortage. PMID:17173483

  12. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  13. Topology optimization of adaptive fluid-actuated cellular structures with arbitrary polygonal motor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jun; Tang, Liang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-05-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the fast and efficient design method for plant bioinspired fluidic cellular materials and structures composed of polygonal motor cells. Here we developed a novel structural optimization method with arbitrary polygonal coarse-grid elements based on multiscale finite element frameworks. The fluidic cellular structures are meshed with irregular polygonal coarse-grid elements according to their natural size and the shape of the imbedded motor cells. The multiscale base functions of solid displacement and hydraulic pressure are then constructed to bring the small-scale information of the irregular motor cells to the large-scale simulations on the polygonal coarse-grid elements. On this basis, a new topology optimization method based on the resulting polygonal coarse-grid elements is proposed to determine the optimal distributions or number of motor cells in the smart cellular structures. Three types of optimization problems are solved according to the usages of the fluidic cellular structures. Firstly, the proposed optimization method is utilized to minimize the system compliance of the load-bearing fluidic cellular structures. Second, the method is further extended to design biomimetic compliant actuators of the fluidic cellular materials due to the fact that non-uniform volume expansions of fluid in the cells can induce elastic action. Third, the optimization problem focuses on the weight minimization of the cellular structure under the constraints for the compliance of the whole system. Several representative examples are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed polygon-based topology optimization method of the smart materials.

  14. Interplay between Ubiquitin, SUMO, and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in the Cellular Response to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cells employ a complex network of molecular pathways to cope with endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. This multilayered response ensures that genomic lesions are efficiently detected and faithfully repaired in order to safeguard genome integrity. The molecular choreography at sites of DNA damage relies heavily on post-translational modifications (PTMs). Protein modifications with ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO have recently emerged as important regulatory means to coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair. Both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation can lead to extensive chain-like protein modifications, a feature that is shared with yet another DNA damage-induced PTM, the modification of proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Chains of ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR all contribute to the multi-protein assemblies found at sites of DNA damage and regulate their spatio-temporal dynamics. Here, we review recent advancements in our understanding of how ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR coordinate the DNA damage response and highlight emerging examples of an intricate interplay between these chain-like modifications during the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27148359

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in young and old cells: response to cellular stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy, R.W.; Sims, J.L.; Cini, J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the effect of several cellular stresses on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in human fibroblasts of low passage number derived from young and old donors. Poly(ADP-ribose) was synthesized in response to alkylation of DNA caused by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroguanidine and by hyperthermic treatment at 43 /sup 0/C or 45 /sup 0/C. Ethanol is able to potentiate poly(ADP-ribose) accumulation following these treatments. There was little if any difference in the response of young and old cells to these stresses. Amino acid analogs are thought to induce a response in mammalian cells similar to that caused by hyperthermia and ethanol. However, amino acid analogs such as L-azetidine did not produce effects on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism like those produced by ethanol or hyperthermia. The authors have also examined the poly(ADP-ribose) content of bovine eye lens. Each eye lens contains populations of young and old cells that are distributed in a fixed graduated manner. Thus, the eye lens allows the study of aging cells with identical genetic backgrounds without the complications of serial passage of young cultures in in vitro aging systems.

  16. Mitochondrial stress induces cellular senescence in an mTORC1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nacarelli, Timothy; Azar, Ashley; Sell, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although mitochondrial stress is a key determinant of cellular homeostasis, the intracellular mechanisms by which this stress is communicated to the nucleus and its impact on cell fate decisions are not well defined. In this study, we report that activation of mTORC1 signaling triggered by mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) results in activation of the senescence program. We show that exposure of human fibroblasts to nucleoside analogs commonly used in antiretroviral therapies, and known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, increases mitochondrial ROS and leads to a rise in intracellular ROS concomitant with activation of mTORC1. In this setting, it appears that mTORC1 activates senescence through HDM2 phosphorylation, facilitating a p53-mediated response. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin decreases HDM2 phosphorylation and blocks activation of the senescence program in human cells. In addition, decreasing mitochondrial ROS directly blocks mTORC1 signaling and prevents the onset of senescence. Consistent with these results, both total and mitochondrial-specific ROS increased in cells undergoing replicative senescence along with ribosomal p70 phosphorylation. The results reveal a novel link between mitochondrial dysfunction, mTORC1 signaling, and the senescence program. PMID:27016071

  17. Chronic stress and brain plasticity: Mechanisms underlying adaptive and maladaptive changes and implications for stress-related CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Radley, Jason; Morilak, David; Viau, Victor; Campeau, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Stress responses entail neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral changes to promote effective coping with real or perceived threats to one's safety. While these responses are critical for the survival of the individual, adverse effects of repeated exposure to stress are widely known to have deleterious effects on health. Thus, a considerable effort in the search for treatments to stress-related CNS disorders necessitates unraveling the brain mechanisms responsible for adaptation under acute conditions and their perturbations following chronic stress exposure. This paper is based upon a symposium from the 2014 International Behavioral Neuroscience Meeting, summarizing some recent advances in understanding the effects of stress on adaptive and maladaptive responses subserved by limbic forebrain networks. An important theme highlighted in this review is that the same networks mediating neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral processes during adaptive coping also comprise targets of the effects of repeated stress exposure in the development of maladaptive states. Where possible, reference is made to the similarity of neurobiological substrates and effects observed following repeated exposure to stress in laboratory animals and the clinical features of stress-related disorders in humans. PMID:26116544

  18. Endogenous progesterone and its cellular binding sites in wheat exposed to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Janeczko, Anna; Oklešťková, Jana; Siwek, Agata; Dziurka, Michał; Pociecha, Ewa; Kocurek, Maciej; Novák, Ondřej

    2013-11-01

    Progesterone is a basic hormone that regulates the metabolism in mammals. The presence of this compound has also been found in certain plants. It is believed that progesterone can regulate growth processes and resistance to stress, however, its precise role in plants remains unknown. The research conducted in this study was aimed at analyzing the content of endogenous progesterone and its cellular binding sites in the leaves of spring wheat exposed to drought. Changes were studied in two cultivars of wheat - a cultivar sensitive to drought (Katoda) and tolerant cultivar (Monsun). Plants had undergone periodic droughts during the seedling stage or in the phase of heading. The occurrence of free progesterone as well as its conjugated forms was observed in wheat studied. The amount of progesterone ranged from 0.2 to 5.8pmolgFW(-1) and was dependent on the cultivar, age of the plants, stage of development and fluctuated as a result of the exposure to drought. Cv. Katoda responded to a water deficit by lowering the amount of progesterone and cv. Monsun by increasing its level. Progesterone in plants grown in limited water conditions occurred primarily in a free form. While in the optimal watering conditions, some of its pool was found in the form of conjugates. In the spring wheat the occurrence of binding sites for progesterone was detected in cell membranes, cytoplasm and nuclei in the range of 10-36fmol/mg of protein. The wheat cultivars tested, Monsun and Katoda, differ in their concentration of cellular binding sites for progesterone. This number varied in the individual fractions during different stages of plant development and due to the effect of drought stress. The number of binding sites for progesterone located in the membrane fraction of seedlings and flag leaves increased significantly under drought in the cv. Katoda (35-46%), but did not change in the cv. Monsun. Whereas the number of cytoplasmic progesterone binding sites increased during the drought in

  19. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    welfare can be very good when it is occurring. Other adaptation is difficult and may involve lower or higher level emergency physiological responses or abnormal behaviour, often with bad feelings such as pain or fear. In that case, welfare is poor or very poor even if complete adaptation eventually occurs and there is no long-term threat to the life of the individual. In some circumstances, adaptation may be unsuccessful, the individual is not able to cope, stress occurs and welfare is ultimately very poor. PMID:16450701

  20. Fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization reveals complexity and heterogeneity of cellular genotoxic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Amundson, S A; Bittner, M; Chen, Y; Trent, J; Meltzer, P; Fornace, A J

    1999-06-17

    The fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) may depend greatly on changes in gene expression, so that an improved view of gene induction profiles is important for understanding mechanisms of checkpoint control, repair and cell death following such exposures. We have used a quantitative fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization approach to identify genes regulated in response to 7-irradiation in the p53 wild-type ML-1 human myeloid cell line. Hybridization of the array to fluorescently-labeled RNA from treated and untreated cells was followed by computer analysis to derive relative changes in expression levels of the genes present in the array, which agreed well with actual quantitative changes in expression. Forty-eight sequences, 30 not previously identified as IR-responsive, were significantly regulated by IR. Induction by IR and other stresses of a subset of these genes, including the previously characterized CIP1/ WAF1, MDM2 and BAX genes, as well as nine genes not previously reported to be IR-responsive, was examined in a panel of 12 human cell lines. Responses varied widely in cell lines with different tissues of origin and different genetic backgrounds, highlighting the importance of cellular context to genotoxic stress responses. Two of the newly identified IR-responsive genes, FRA-1 and ATF3, showed a p53-associated component to their IR-induction, and this was confirmed both in isogenic human cell lines and in mouse thymus. The majority of the IR-responsive genes, however, showed no indication of p53-dependent regulation, representing a potentially important class of stress-responsive genes in leukemic cells. PMID:10380890

  1. Transglutaminase type 2-dependent selective recruitment of proteins into exosomes under stressful cellular conditions.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Altuntas, Sara; Rossin, Federica; D'Eletto, Manuela; Marsella, Claudia; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Falasca, Laura; Antonioli, Manuela; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies are revealing a role of exosomes in intercellular communication, and growing evidence indicates an important function for these vesicles in the progression and pathogenesis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the biogenesis process of exosomes is still unclear. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional enzyme with different subcellular localizations. Particularly, under stressful conditions, the enzyme has been also detected in the extracellular matrix, but the mechanism(s) by which TG2 is released outside the cells requires further investigation. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to determine whether exosomes might be a vehicle for TG2 to reach the extracellular space, and whether TG2 could be involved in exosomes biogenesis. To address this issue, we isolated and characterized exosomes derived from cells either expressing or not TG2, under stressful conditions (i.e. proteasome impairment or expressing a mutated form of huntingtin (mHtt) containing 84 polyglutamine repeats). Our results show that TG2 is present in the exosomes only upon proteasome blockade, a condition in which TG2 interacts with TSG101 and ALIX, two key proteins involved in exosome biogenesis. Interestingly, we found that TG2 favours the assembly of a protein complex including mHtt, ALIX, TSG101 and BAG3, a co-chaperone involved in the clearance of mHtt. The formation of this complex is paralleled by the selective recruitment of mHtt and BAG3 in the exosomes derived from TG2 proficient cells only. Overall, our data indicate that TG2 is an important player in the biogenesis of exosomes controlling the selectivity of their cargo under stressful cellular conditions. In addition, these vesicles represent the way by which cells can release TG2 into the extracellular space under proteostasis impairment. PMID:27169926

  2. Tissue adaptations to gravitational stress - Newborn versus adult giraffes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R; Gershuni, David H.; Danzig, Larry A.; Millard, Ronald W.; Pettersson, Knut

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on developmental alterations in load-bearing tissues of newborn and adult giraffes are presented. Attention is focused on vascular wall thickness in relation to local blood pressure, and on meniscal adaptations to increased load bearing in the developing giraffe. It is believed that the developing giraffe provides an excellent model for investigations of adaptive mechanisms of increased weight bearing.

  3. Adaptation to hot climate and strategies to alleviate heat stress in livestock production.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Collin, A; Yahav, S; de Basilio, V; Gourdine, J L; Collier, R J

    2012-05-01

    Despite many challenges faced by animal producers, including environmental problems, diseases, economic pressure, and feed availability, it is still predicted that animal production in developing countries will continue to sustain the future growth of the world's meat production. In these areas, livestock performance is generally lower than those obtained in Western Europe and North America. Although many factors can be involved, climatic factors are among the first and crucial limiting factors of the development of animal production in warm regions. In addition, global warming will further accentuate heat stress-related problems. The objective of this paper was to review the effective strategies to alleviate heat stress in the context of tropical livestock production systems. These strategies can be classified into three groups: those increasing feed intake or decreasing metabolic heat production, those enhancing heat-loss capacities, and those involving genetic selection for heat tolerance. Under heat stress, improved production should be possible through modifications of diet composition that either promotes a higher intake or compensates the low feed consumption. In addition, altering feeding management such as a change in feeding time and/or frequency, are efficient tools to avoid excessive heat load and improve survival rate, especially in poultry. Methods to enhance heat exchange between the environment and the animal and those changing the environment to prevent or limit heat stress can be used to improve performance under hot climatic conditions. Although differences in thermal tolerance exist between livestock species (ruminants > monogastrics), there are also large differences between breeds of a species and within each breed. Consequently, the opportunity may exist to improve thermal tolerance of the animals using genetic tools. However, further research is required to quantify the genetic antagonism between adaptation and production traits to evaluate

  4. Innate and adaptive cellular phenotypes contributing to pulmonary disease in mice after respiratory syncytial virus immunization and infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Youri; Kwon, Young-Man; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major leading cause of infantile viral bronchiolitis. However, cellular phenotypes contributing to the RSV protection and vaccine-enhanced disease remain largely unknown. Upon RSV challenge, we analyzed phenotypes and cellularity in the lung of mice that were naïve, immunized with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV), or re-infected with RSV. In comparison with naïve and live RSV re-infected mice, the high levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, plasmacytoid and CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IL-4(+) CD4(+) T cells were found to be contributing to pulmonary inflammation in FI-RSV immune mice despite lung viral clearance. Alveolar macrophages appeared to play differential roles in protection and inflammation upon RSV infection of different RSV immune mice. These results suggest that multiple innate and adaptive immune components differentially contribute to RSV disease and inflammation. PMID:26196232

  5. The contribution of transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in elucidating stress adaptation responses of Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The foodborne transmission of Listeria monocytogenes requires physiological adaptation to various conditions, including the cold, osmotic, heat, acid, alkaline, and oxidative stresses, associated with food hygiene, processing, and preservation measures. We review the current knowledge on the molecul...

  6. Stress Recovery Based h-Adaptive Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohd.; Singh, Devinder

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, stress recovery techniques based adaptive finite element analysis of sheet forming operations is presented. An adaptive two dimensional finite element computer code allows the analysis of sheet forming operations and results in distribution of adaptively refined mesh, effective strain, and punch load, stress and strain rate tensor in the domain that has been developed. The recovery scheme for determining more accurate stress field is based on the least squares fitting of the computed stresses in an element patch surrounding and including a particular node. The solution error is estimated on the basis of an energy norm. It is shown with the help of an illustrative example of axi-symmetric stretching of a metal blank by a hemispherical punch that the adaptive analysis may be usefully employed to predict accurately deformation process, the seats of large deformations and locations of possible instability.

  7. Stress Recovery Based h-Adaptive Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohd.; Singh, Devinder

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, stress recovery techniques based adaptive finite element analysis of sheet forming operations is presented. An adaptive two dimensional finite element computer code allows the analysis of sheet forming operations and results in distribution of adaptively refined mesh, effective strain, and punch load, stress and strain rate tensor in the domain that has been developed. The recovery scheme for determining more accurate stress field is based on the least squares fitting of the computed stresses in an element patch surrounding and including a particular node. The solution error is estimated on the basis of an energy norm. It is shown with the help of an illustrative example of axi-symmetric stretching of a metal blank by a hemispherical punch that the adaptive analysis may be usefully employed to predict accurately deformation process, the seats of large deformations and locations of possible instability.

  8. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  9. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  10. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  11. Physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation for prevention and treatment of stress related disorders.

    PubMed

    Cosić, Kresimir; Popović, Sinisa; Kukolja, Davor; Horvat, Marko; Dropuljić, Branimir

    2010-02-01

    The significant proportion of severe psychological problems related to intensive stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores the importance of effective methods for strengthening the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation presented in this work, based on estimation of the person's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Following an overview of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation, its major functional subsystems are described in more detail. A specific algorithm of stimuli delivery applicable to SIT is outlined. PMID:20528296

  12. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-06-20

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  13. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  14. Adaptive Skills, Behavior Problems, and Parenting Stress in Mothers of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarimski, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The relationship of temperament, atypical behaviors, and adaptive behavior of young boys with Fragile X syndrome on mothers' parenting stress was analyzed. Twenty-six boys with Fragile X syndrome (30-88 months of age) participated. The overall development of the participants was significantly delayed with a specific profile of adaptive behaviors…

  15. Soldiers Working Internationally: Impacts of Masculinity, Military Culture, and Operational Stress on Cross-Cultural Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Patrice A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the ramifications of masculinized military culture and operational stress on cross-cultural adaptation. The author examines how characteristics of military culture may obstruct effective cross-cultural adaptation by promoting a hypermasculinity that tends to oppose effective management of trauma, and thereby suppresses skills…

  16. The unfolded protein response and cellular senescence. A review in the theme: cellular mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pluquet, Olivier; Pourtier, Albin; Abbadie, Corinne

    2015-03-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle critical for the proper folding and assembly of secreted and transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of ER functions cause ER stress, which activates a coordinated system of transcriptional and translational controls called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to cope with accumulation of misfolded proteins and proteotoxicity. It results in ER homeostasis restoration or in cell death. Senescence is a complex cell phenotype induced by several stresses such as telomere attrition, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and activation of some oncogenes. It is mainly characterized by a cell enlargement, a permanent cell-cycle arrest, and the production of a secretome enriched in proinflammatory cytokines and components of the extracellular matrix. Senescent cells accumulate with age in tissues and are suspected to play a role in age-associated diseases. Since senescence is a stress response, the question arises of whether an ER stress could occur concomitantly with senescence and participate in the onset or maintenance of the senescent features. Here, we described the interconnections between the UPR signaling and the different aspects of the cellular senescence programs and discuss the implication of UPR modulations in this context. PMID:25540175

  17. Dynamic regulation of PGC-1α localization and turnover implicates mitochondrial adaptation in calorie restriction and the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rozalyn M; Barger, Jamie L; Edwards, Michael G; Braun, Kristina H; O’Connor, Clare E; Prolla, Tomas A; Weindruch, Richard

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that longevity and stress resistance are connected, but the mechanism is unclear. We report that mitochondria are regulated in response to oxidative stress and calorie restriction through a shared mechanism involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α). We demonstrate that PGC-1α subcellular distribution is regulated, and its transcriptional activity is promoted through SIRT1-dependent nuclear accumulation. In addition, the duration of PGC-1α activity is regulated by glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β), which targets PGC-1α for intranuclear proteasomal degradation. This mechanism of regulation permits the rapidity and persistence of PGC-1α activation to be independently controlled. We provide evidence that this pathway of PGC-1α regulation occurs in vivo in mice, both in the oxidative stress response and with calorie restriction. Our data show how mitochondrial function may be adapted in response to external stimuli, and support the concept that such adaptation is critically involved in cellular survival and in lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:18031569

  18. The “Goldilocks Zone” from a redox perspective—Adaptive vs. deleterious responses to oxidative stress in striated muscle

    PubMed Central

    Alleman, Rick J.; Katunga, Lalage A.; Nelson, Margaret A. M.; Brown, David A.; Anderson, Ethan J.

    2014-01-01

    Consequences of oxidative stress may be beneficial or detrimental in physiological systems. An organ system's position on the “hormetic curve” is governed by the source and temporality of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, proximity of ROS to moieties most susceptible to damage, and the capacity of the endogenous cellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. Most importantly, the resilience of the tissue (the capacity to recover from damage) is a decisive factor, and this is reflected in the disparate response to ROS in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In myocytes, a high oxidative capacity invariably results in a significant ROS burden which in homeostasis, is rapidly neutralized by the robust antioxidant network. The up-regulation of key pathways in the antioxidant network is a central component of the hormetic response to ROS. Despite such adaptations, persistent oxidative stress over an extended time-frame (e.g., months to years) inevitably leads to cumulative damages, maladaptation and ultimately the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Indeed, persistent oxidative stress in heart and skeletal muscle has been repeatedly demonstrated to have causal roles in the etiology of heart disease and insulin resistance, respectively. Deciphering the mechanisms that underlie the divergence between adaptive and maladaptive responses to oxidative stress remains an active area of research for basic scientists and clinicians alike, as this would undoubtedly lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we provide an overview of major types of ROS in striated muscle and the divergent adaptations that occur in response to them. Emphasis is placed on highlighting newly uncovered areas of research on this topic, with particular focus on the mitochondria, and the diverging roles that ROS play in muscle health (e.g., exercise or preconditioning) and disease (e.g., cardiomyopathy, ischemia, metabolic syndrome). PMID:25278906

  19. Melatonin alleviates cadmium-induced cellular stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Hua; Meng, Can; Zhao, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that melatonin has an anti-apoptotic effect in somatic cells. However, whether melatonin can protect against germ cell apoptosis remains obscure. Cadmium (Cd) is a testicular toxicant and induces germ cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of melatonin on Cd-evoked germ cell apoptosis in testes. Male ICR mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with melatonin (5 mg/kg) every 8 hr, beginning at 8 hr before CdCl(2) (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.). As expected, acute Cd exposure resulted in germ cell apoptosis in testes, as determined by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Melatonin significantly alleviated Cd-induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. An additional experiment showed that spliced form of XBP-1, the target of the IRE-1 pathway, was significantly increased in testes of mice injected with CdCl(2). GRP78, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, and CHOP, a downstream target of the PERK pathway, were upregulated in testes of Cd-treated mice. In addition, acute Cd exposure significantly increased testicular eIF2α and JNK phosphorylation, indicating that the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway was activated by CdCl(2). Interestingly, melatonin almost completely inhibited Cd-induced ER stress and the UPR in testes. In addition, melatonin obviously attenuated Cd-induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression and protein nitration in testes. Taken together, these results suggest that melatonin alleviates Cd-induced cellular stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. Melatonin may be useful as pharmacological agents to protect against Cd-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:21793897

  20. Propofol ameliorates doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and cellular apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.C.; Yeh, Y.C.; Wang, L.C.; Ting, C.T.; Lee, W.L.; Lee, H.W.; Wang, K.Y.; Wu, A.; Su, C.S.; Liu, T.J.

    2011-12-15

    Background: Propofol is an anesthetic with pluripotent cytoprotective properties against various extrinsic insults. This study was designed to examine whether this agent could also ameliorate the infamous toxicity of doxorubicin, a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent against a variety of cancer diseases, on myocardial cells. Methods: Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were administrated with vehicle, doxorubicin (1 {mu}M), propofol (1 {mu}M), or propofol plus doxorubicin (given 1 h post propofol). After 24 h, cells were harvested and specific analyses regarding oxidative/nitrative stress and cellular apoptosis were conducted. Results: Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays disclosed that viability of cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced by doxorubicin. Contents of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were increased and antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, and GPx were decreased in these doxorubicin-treated cells. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity and membrane potential were also depressed, along with activation of key effectors downstream of mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic signaling. Besides, abundance of p53 was elevated and cleavage of PKC-{delta} was induced in these myocardial cells. In contrast, all of the above oxidative, nitrative and pro-apoptotic events could be suppressed by propofol pretreatment. Conclusions: Propofol could extensively counteract oxidative/nitrative and multiple apoptotic effects of doxorubicin in the heart; hence, this anesthetic may serve as an adjuvant agent to assuage the untoward cardiac effects of doxorubicin in clinical application. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate how propofol prevents doxorubicin-induced toxicity in cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol reduces doxorubicin-imposed nitrative and oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol suppresses mitochondrion-, p53- and PKC-related apoptotic signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Propofol ameliorates apoptosis and

  1. Plant Adaptation to Multiple Stresses during Submergence and Following Desubmergence

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Bishal Gole; Fukao, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Plants require water for growth and development, but excessive water negatively affects their productivity and viability. Flash floods occasionally result in complete submergence of plants in agricultural and natural ecosystems. When immersed in water, plants encounter multiple stresses including low oxygen, low light, nutrient deficiency, and high risk of infection. As floodwaters subside, submerged plants are abruptly exposed to higher oxygen concentration and greater light intensity, which can induce post-submergence injury caused by oxidative stress, high light, and dehydration. Recent studies have emphasized the significance of multiple stress tolerance in the survival of submergence and prompt recovery following desubmergence. A mechanistic understanding of acclimation responses to submergence at molecular and physiological levels can contribute to the deciphering of the regulatory networks governing tolerance to other environmental stresses that occur simultaneously or sequentially in the natural progress of a flood event. PMID:26694376

  2. Plant Adaptation to Multiple Stresses during Submergence and Following Desubmergence.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Bishal Gole; Fukao, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Plants require water for growth and development, but excessive water negatively affects their productivity and viability. Flash floods occasionally result in complete submergence of plants in agricultural and natural ecosystems. When immersed in water, plants encounter multiple stresses including low oxygen, low light, nutrient deficiency, and high risk of infection. As floodwaters subside, submerged plants are abruptly exposed to higher oxygen concentration and greater light intensity, which can induce post-submergence injury caused by oxidative stress, high light, and dehydration. Recent studies have emphasized the significance of multiple stress tolerance in the survival of submergence and prompt recovery following desubmergence. A mechanistic understanding of acclimation responses to submergence at molecular and physiological levels can contribute to the deciphering of the regulatory networks governing tolerance to other environmental stresses that occur simultaneously or sequentially in the natural progress of a flood event. PMID:26694376

  3. Dream Content and Adaptation to a Stressful Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Koninck, Joseph M.; Koulack, David

    1975-01-01

    The present study considered whether it is better to dream about a stressful presleep experience and have anxious dreams, or is it better to dream about something else and have pleasant dreams. (Author/RK)

  4. Multiplexed Fluid Flow Device to Study Cellular Response to Tunable Shear Stress Gradients.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maggie A; Huang, Eva Y; Surya, Vinay N; Poplawski, Charlotte; Barakat, Joseph M; Lin, Gigi L; Fuller, Gerald G; Dunn, Alexander R

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) line the interior of blood and lymphatic vessels and experience spatially varying wall shear stress (WSS) as an intrinsic part of their physiological function. How ECs, and mammalian cells generally, sense spatially varying WSS remains poorly understood, due in part to a lack of convenient tools for exposing cells to spatially varying flow patterns. We built a multiplexed device, termed a 6-well impinging flow chamber, that imparts controlled WSS gradients to a six-well tissue culture plate. Using this device, we investigated the migratory response of lymphatic microvascular ECs, umbilical vein ECs, primary fibroblasts, and epithelial cells to WSS gradients on hours to days timescales. We observed that lymphatic microvascular ECs migrate upstream, against the direction of flow, a response that was unique among all the cells types investigated here. Time-lapse, live cell imaging revealed that the microtubule organizing center relocated to the upstream side of the nucleus in response to the applied WSS gradient. To further demonstrate the utility of our device, we screened for the involvement of canonical signaling pathways in mediating this upstream migratory response. These data highlight the importance of WSS magnitude and WSS spatial gradients in dictating the cellular response to fluid flow. PMID:26589597

  5. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation. PMID:25750419

  6. A computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism linking cellular adaptations induced by altered loading states to metabolic responses during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan K; DiBella, John A; Cabrera, Marco E

    2007-01-01

    Background The alterations in skeletal muscle structure and function after prolonged periods of unloading are initiated by the chronic lack of mechanical stimulus of sufficient intensity, which is the result of a series of biochemical and metabolic interactions spanning from cellular to tissue/organ level. Reduced activation of skeletal muscle alters the gene expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms to meet the functional demands of reduced mechanical load, which results in muscle atrophy and reduced capacity to process fatty acids. In contrast, chronic loading results in the opposite pattern of adaptations. Methods To quantify interactions among cellular and skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations, and to predict metabolic responses to exercise after periods of altered loading states, we develop a computational model of skeletal muscle metabolism. The governing model equations – with parameters characterizing chronic loading/unloading states- were solved numerically to simulate metabolic responses to moderate intensity exercise (WR ≤ 40% VO2 max). Results Model simulations showed that carbohydrate oxidation was 8.5% greater in chronically unloaded muscle compared with the loaded muscle (0.69 vs. 0.63 mmol/min), while fat oxidation was 7% higher in chronically loaded muscle (0.14 vs. 0.13 mmol/min), during exercise. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood flow (Q) response times were 29% and 44% shorter in chronically loaded muscle (0.4 vs. 0.56 min for VO2 and 0.25 vs. 0.45 min for Q). Conclusion The present model can be applied to test complex hypotheses during exercise involving the integration and control of metabolic processes at various organizational levels (cellular to tissue) in individuals who have undergone periods of chronic loading or unloading. PMID:17448235

  7. Evolution and Adaptation of Wild Emmer Wheat Populations to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Raats, Dina; Sela, Hanan; Klymiuk, Valentina; Lidzbarsky, Gabriel; Feng, Lihua; Krugman, Tamar; Fahima, Tzion

    2016-08-01

    The genetic bottlenecks associated with plant domestication and subsequent selection in man-made agroecosystems have limited the genetic diversity of modern crops and increased their vulnerability to environmental stresses. Wild emmer wheat, the tetraploid progenitor of domesticated wheat, distributed along a wide range of ecogeographical conditions in the Fertile Crescent, has valuable "left behind" adaptive diversity to multiple diseases and environmental stresses. The biotic and abiotic stress responses are conferred by series of genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control complex resistance pathways. The study of genetic diversity, genomic organization, expression profiles, protein structure and function of biotic and abiotic stress-resistance genes, and QTLs could shed light on the evolutionary history and adaptation mechanisms of wild emmer populations for their natural habitats. The continuous evolution and adaptation of wild emmer to the changing environment provide novel solutions that can contribute to safeguarding food for the rapidly growing human population. PMID:27296141

  8. Stress avoidance in a common annual: reproductive timing is important for local adaptation and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, T M; Watson, M A

    2005-11-01

    Adaptation to local environments may be an important determinant of species' geographic range. However, little is known about which traits contribute to adaptation or whether their further evolution would facilitate range expansion. In this study, we assessed the adaptive value of stress avoidance traits in the common annual Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) by performing a reciprocal transplant across a broad latitudinal gradient extending to the species' northern border. Populations were locally adapted and stress avoidance traits accounted for most fitness differences between populations. At the northern border where growing seasons are cooler and shorter, native populations had evolved to reproduce earlier than native populations in the lower latitude gardens. This clinal pattern in reproductive timing corresponded to a shift in selection from favouring later to earlier reproduction. Thus, earlier reproduction is an important adaptation to northern latitudes and constraint on the further evolution of this trait in marginal populations could potentially limit distribution. PMID:16313471

  9. [Role of micro-organisms in adapting plants to environmental stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Heribert

    2012-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants have always been confronted to various abiotic and biotic stresses in their immediate environment. As a consequence, the survival of plants depended on their ability to adjust rapidly their physiology, development and growth to escape or mitigate the impacts of stress. All plants are known to perceive and respond to stress signals such as drought, heat, salinity, attacks by herbivores and pathogens. Some biochemical processes are common to all plant stress responses including the production of certain stress proteins and metabolites, as well as the modification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Although there has been extensive research in the plant stress response field, it is not yet known which factors are responsible for conferring to some plant species the capacity to colonize extreme habitats. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of plant stress physiology, the contribution of the plant-associated microbial community in the soil, commonly called the rhizosphere, has only recently received enhanced attention. Recent studies showed that some plant species in natural habitats require microbial associations for stress tolerance and survival. Since plants have colonized land, they have evolved mechanisms to respond to changing environmental conditions and settle in extreme habitats. Although many plants lack the adaptive capability to adapt to stress conditions, the ability of a variety of plants to adapt to stress conditions appears to depend on the association with microbes, raising a number of questions: can all plants improve stress tolerance when associated with their appropriate microbial partners? Did we miss identifying the right partners for a given plant species or variety? What distinguishes the microbes and plants that are adapted to extreme environmental conditions from those living in temperate zones? Answers to these questions are likely to revolutionize plant biology

  10. Biological Stress Response Terminology: Integrating the Concepts of Adaptive Response and Preconditioning Stress Within a Hormetic Dose-Response Framework

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stres...

  11. Exercise before and after SCUBA diving and the role of cellular microparticles in decompression stress.

    PubMed

    Madden, Dennis; Thom, Stephen R; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    Risk in SCUBA diving is often associated with the presence of gas bubbles in the venous circulation formed during decompression. Although it has been demonstrated time-after-time that, while venous gas emboli (VGE) often accompany decompression sickness (DCS), they are also frequently observed in high quantities in asymptomatic divers following even mild recreational dive profiles. Despite this VGE are commonly utilized as a quantifiable marker of the potential for an individual to develop DCS. Certain interventions such as exercise, antioxidant supplements, vibration, and hydration appear to impact VGE production and the decompression process. However promising these procedures may seem, the data are not yet conclusive enough to warrant changes in decompression procedure, possibly suggesting a component of individual response. We hypothesize that the impact of exercise varies widely in individuals and once tested, recommendations can be made that will reduce individual decompression stress and possibly the incidence of DCS. The understanding of physiological adaptations to diving stress can be applied in different diseases that include endothelial dysfunction and microparticle (MP) production. Exercise before diving is viewed by some as a protective form of preconditioning because some studies have shown that it reduces VGE quantity. We propose that MP production and clearance might be a part of this mechanism. Exercise after diving appears to impact the risk of adverse events as well. Research suggests that the arterialization of VGE presents a greater risk for DCS than when emboli are eliminated by the pulmonary circuit before they have a chance to crossover. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that exercise increases the incidence of crossover likely through extra-cardiac mechanisms such as intrapulmonary arterial-venous anastomoses (IPAVAs). This effect of exercise has been repeated in the field with divers demonstrating a direct relationship between exercise

  12. Cardiac hypertrophy, arrhythmogenicity and the new myocardial phenotype. II. The cellular adaptational process.

    PubMed

    Swynghedauw, B; Chevalier, B; Charlemagne, D; Mansier, P; Carré, F

    1997-07-01

    Ventricular fibrosis is not the only structural determinant of arrhythmias in left ventricular hypertrophy. In an experimental model of compensatory cardiac hypertrophy (CCH) the degree of cardiac hypertrophy is also independently linked to ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac hypertrophy reflects the level of adaptation, and matches the adaptational modifications of the myocardial phenotype. We suggest that these modifications have detrimental aspects. The increased action potential (AP) and QT duration and the prolonged calcium transient both favour spontaneous calcium oscillations, and both are potentially arrhythmogenic and linked to phenotypic changes in membrane proteins. To date, only two ionic currents have been studied in detail: Ito is depressed (likely the main determinant in AP durations), and If, the pacemaker current, is induced in the overloaded ventricular myocytes. In rat CCH, the two components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, namely Ca(2+)-ATPase and ryanodine receptors, are down-regulated in parallel. Nevertheless, while the inward calcium current is unchanged, the functionally linked duo composed of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanged and (Na+, K+)-ATPase, is less active. Such an imbalance may explain the prolonged calcium transient. The changes in heart rate variability provide information about the state of the autonomic nervous system and has prognostic value even in CCH. Transgenic studies have demonstrated that the myocardial adrenergic and muscarinic receptor content is also a determining factor. During CCH, several phenotypic membrane changes participate in the slowing of contraction velocity and are thus adaptational. They also have a detrimental counterpart and, together with fibrosis, favour arrhythmias. PMID:9302342

  13. Cellular Stress Induced by Resazurin Leads to Autophagy and Cell Death Via Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Erikstein, Bjarte Skoe; Hagland, Hanne Røland; Nikolaisen, Julie; Kulawiec, Mariola; Singh, Keshav K.; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Tronstad, Karl Johan

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species (ROS) often play important roles in cellular stress mechanisms. In this study we investigated how these factors are involved in the stress response triggered by resazurin (Alamar Blue) in cultured cancer cells. Resazurin is a redox reactive compound widely used as reporter agent in assays of cell biology (e.g. cell viability and metabolic activity) due to its colorimetric and fluorimetric properties. In order to investigate resazurin-induced stress mechanisms we employed cells affording different metabolic and regulatory phenotypes. In HL-60 and Jurkat leukemia cells resazurin caused mitochondrial disintegration, respiratory dysfunction, reduced proliferation, and cell death. These effects were preceded by a burst of ROS, especially in HL-60 cells which also were more sensitive and contained autophagic vesicles. Studies in Rho0 cells (devoid of mitochondrial DNA) indicated that the stress response does not depend on the rates of mitochondrial respiration. The anti-proliferative effect of resazurin was confirmed in native acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. In conclusion, the data suggest that resazurin triggers cellular ROS production and thereby initiates a stress response leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced proliferation, autophagy and cell degradation. The ability of cells to tolerate this type of stress may be important in toxicity and chemoresistance. PMID:20568117

  14. A Shape Memory Polymer Dialysis Needle Adapter for the Reduction of Hemodynamic Stress within Arteriovenous Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M; Small, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W; Loge, J; Maitland, D J

    2006-08-16

    A deployable, shape memory polymer adapter is investigated for reducing the hemodynamic stress caused by a dialysis needle flow within an arteriovenous graft. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of dialysis sessions with and without the adapter demonstrate that the adapter provides a significant decrease in the wall shear stress. In vitro flow visualization measurements are made within a graft model following delivery and actuation of a prototype shape memory polymer adapter. Vascular access complications resulting from arteriovenous (AV) graft failures account for over $1 billion per year in the health care costs of dialysis patients in the U.S.[1] The primary mode of failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF's) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts is the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, resulting in a graft flow decline. The hemodynamic stresses arising within AVF's and PTFE grafts play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH. Studies have shown that vascular damage can occur in regions where there is flow separation, oscillation, or extreme values of wall shear stress (WSS).[2] Nevaril et al.[3] show that exposure of red blood cells to WSS's on the order of 1500 dynes/cm2 can result in hemolysis. Hemodynamic stress from dialysis needle flow has recently been investigated for the role it plays in graft failure. Using laser Doppler velocimetry measurements, Unnikrishnan et al.[4] show that turbulence intensities are 5-6 times greater in the AV flow when the needle flow is present and that increased levels of turbulence exist for approximately 7-8cm downstream of the needle. Since the AVF or PTFE graft is exposed to these high levels of hemodynamic stress several hours each week during dialysis sessions, it is quite possible that needle flow is an important contributor to vascular access occlusion.[4] We present a method for reducing the hemodynamic stress in an AV graft by tailoring the fluid

  15. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses. PMID:24212283

  16. Enhanced cellular oxidant stress by the interaction of advanced glycation end products with their receptors/binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, S D; Schmidt, A M; Anderson, G M; Zhang, J; Brett, J; Zou, Y S; Pinsky, D; Stern, D

    1994-04-01

    Attack by reactive oxygen intermediates, common to many kinds of cell/tissue injury, has been implicated in the development of diabetic and other vascular diseases. Such oxygen-free radicals can be generated by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are nonenzymatically glycated and oxidized proteins. Since cellular interactions of AGEs are mediated by specific cellular binding proteins, receptor for AGE (RAGE) and the lactoferrin-like polypeptide (LF-L), we tested the hypothesis that AGE ligands tethered to the complex of RAGE and LF-L could induce oxidant stress. AGE albumin or AGEs immunoisolated from diabetic plasma resulted in induction of endothelial cell (EC) oxidant stress, including the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and resulted in the activation of NF-kappa B, each of which was blocked by antibodies to AGE receptor polypeptides and by antioxidants. Infusion of AGE albumin into normal animals led to the appearance of malondialdehyde determinants in the vessel wall and increased TBARS in the tissues, activation of NF-kappa B, and induction of heme oxygenase mRNA. AGE-induced oxidant stress was inhibited by pretreatment of animals with either antibodies to the AGE receptor/binding proteins or antioxidants. These data indicate that interaction of AGEs with cellular targets, such as ECs, leads to oxidant stress resulting in changes in gene expression and other cellular properties, potentially contributing to the development of vascular lesions. Further studies will be required to dissect whether oxidant stress occurs on the cell surface or at an intracellular locus. PMID:8144582

  17. MicroRNA-mediated mechanisms of the cellular stress response in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schober, Andreas; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Weber, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterised by the accumulation of lipid-laden macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions and occurs preferentially at arterial branching points, which are prone to inflammation during hyperlipidaemic stress. The increased susceptibility at branching sites of arteries is attributable to poor adaptation of arterial endothelial cells to disturbed blood flow. In the past 5 years, several studies have provided mechanistic insights into the regulatory roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in inflammatory activation, proliferation, and regeneration of endothelial cells during this maladaptive process. The intercellular transfer of vesicle-bound miRNAs contributes to arterial homeostasis, and the combinatorial effect of multiple miRNAs controls the unresolved inflammation orchestrated by macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions. In this Review, we highlight the miRNA-dependent regulation of the endothelial phenotype and the proliferative reserve that occurs in response to altered haemodynamic conditions as a prerequisite for atherogenic inflammation. In particular, we discuss the regulation of transcriptional modules by miRNAs and the protective role of complementary strand pairs, which encompasses remote miRNA signalling. In addition, we review the roles of miRNA tandems and describe the relevance of RNA target selection and competition to the behaviour of lesional macrophages. Elucidating miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms can aid the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis. PMID:25855604

  18. Temperature stress: reacting and adapting: lessons from poikilotherms.

    PubMed

    Harwood, John L

    2007-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) is a common soil- or water-borne protozoon that feeds on bacteria by phagocytosis. A. castellanii can grow between 4 and 32 degrees C and has to adapt quickly to chilling in order to survive. We have identified a Delta12-fatty acid desaturase as key to low temperature adaptation. The activity of this enzyme is mainly increased through gene expression and new protein synthesis. Interestingly, the activity can also be altered independently by dissolved oxygen levels. In addition, we have identified a gene for the Delta12-desaturase, which, when expressed in yeast, catalyses Delta15-desaturation also. Moreover, it is also capable of producing very unusual n-1 polyunsaturated products. PMID:17584990

  19. Normal adaptations to exercise despite protection against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Holloszy, John O.

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that supplementation with the antioxidant vitamins C and E prevents the adaptive increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression induced by endurance exercise. We reevaluated the effects of these antioxidants on the adaptive responses of rat skeletal muscle to swimming in a short-term study consisting of 9 days of vitamins C and E with exercise during the last 3 days and a longer-term study consisting of 8 wk of antioxidant vitamins with exercise during the last 3 wk. The rats in the antioxidant groups were given 750 mg·kg body wt−1·day−1 vitamin C and 150 mg·kg body wt−1·day−1 vitamin E. In rats euthanized immediately after exercise, plasma TBARs were elevated in the control rats but not in the antioxidant-supplemented rats, providing evidence for an antioxidant effect. In rats euthanized 18 h after exercise there were large increases in insulin responsiveness of glucose transport in epitrochlearis muscles mediated by an approximately twofold increase in GLUT4 expression in both the short- and long-term treatment groups. The protein levels of a number of mitochondrial marker enzymes were also increased about twofold. Superoxide dismutases (SOD) 1 and 2 were increased about twofold in triceps muscle after 3 days of exercise, but only SOD2 was increased after 3 wk of exercise. There were no differences in the magnitudes of any of these adaptive responses between the control and antioxidant groups. These results show that very large doses of antioxidant vitamins do not prevent the exercise-induced adaptive responses of muscle mitochondria, GLUT4, and insulin action to exercise and have no effect on the level of these proteins in sedentary rats. PMID:21750271

  20. Adaptive cellular structures and devices with internal features for enhanced structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael Eugene

    This dissertation aims to develop a family of cellular and repeatable devices that exhibit a variety of force-displacement behaviors. It is envisioned that these cellular structures might be used either as stand-alone elements, or combined and repeated to create multiple types of structures (i.e. buildings, ship hulls, vehicle subfloors, etc.) with the ability to passively or actively perform multiple functions (harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, modulus change) over a range of loading types, amplitudes, and frequencies. To accomplish this goal, this work combines repeatable structural frameworks, such as that provided by a hexagonal cellular structure, with internal structural elements such as springs, viscous dampers, buckling plates, bi-stable von Mises trusses (VMTs), and pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). The repeatable framework serves to position damping and load carrying elements throughout the structure, and the configuration of the internal elements allow each cell to be tuned to exhibit a desired force-displacement response. Therefore, gradient structures or structures with variable load paths can be created for an optimal global response to a range of loads. This dissertation focuses on the development of cellular structures for three functions: combined load-carrying capability with harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, and cell modulus variation. One or more conceptual designs are presented for devices that can perform each of these functions, and both experimental measurements and simulations are used to gain a fundamental understanding of each device. Chapter 2 begins with a presentation of a VMT model that is the basis for many of the elements. The equations of motion for the VMT are derived and the static and dynamic behavior of the VMT are discussed in detail. Next, two metrics for the energy dissipation of the VMT - hysteresis loop area and loss factor - are presented. The responses of the VMT to harmonic displacement

  1. A cellular automaton model adapted to sandboxes to simulate the transport of solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Boris; Donado, Leonardo; Castro, Eduardo; Bayuelo, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The increasingly use of groundwater sources for human consumption and the growth of the levels of these hydric sources contamination make imperative to reach a deeper understanding how the contaminants are transported by the water, in particular through a heterogeneous porous medium. Accordingly, the present research aims to design a model, which simulates the transport of solutes through a heterogeneous porous medium, using cellular automata. Cellular automata (CA) are a class of spatially (pixels) and temporally discrete mathematical systems characterized by local interaction (neighborhoods). The pixel size and the CA neighborhood were determined in order to reproduce accurately the solute behavior (Ilachinski, 2001). For the design and corresponding validation of the CA model were developed different conservative tracer tests using a sandbox packed heterogeneously with a coarse sand (size # 20 grain diameter 0,85 to 0,6 mm) and clay. We use Uranine and a saline solution with NaCl as a tracer which were measured taking snapshots each 20 seconds. A calibration curve (pixel intensity Vs Concentration) was used to obtain concentration maps. The sandbox was constructed of acrylic (caliber 0,8 cms) with 70 x 45 x 4 cms of dimensions. The "sandbox" had a grid of 35 transversal holes with a diameter of 4 mm each and an uniform separation from one to another of 10 cms. To validate the CA-model it was used a metric consisting in rating the number of correctly predicted pixels over the total per image throughout the entire test run. The CA-model shows that calibrations of pixels and neighborhoods allow reaching results over the 60 % of correctly predictions usually. This makes possible to think that the application of the CA- model could be useful in further researches regarding the transport of contaminants in hydrogeology.

  2. Cellular resolution volumetric in vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography◊

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Choi, Stacey S.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Evans, Julia W.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution adaptive optics–optical coherence tomography (UHR-AO-OCT) instrumentation allowing monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction was used for volumetric in vivo retinal imaging of various retinal structures including the macula and optic nerve head (ONH). Novel visualization methods that simplify AO-OCT data viewing are presented, and include co-registration of AO-OCT volumes with fundus photography and stitching of multiple AO-OCT sub-volumes to create a large field of view (FOV) high-resolution volume. Additionally, we explored the utility of Interactive Science Publishing by linking all presented AO-OCT datasets with the OSA ISP software. PMID:19259248

  3. Uncoupling of increased cellular oxidative stress and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury by directed sarcolemma stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Martindale, Joshua J.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major clinical problem leading to cardiac dysfunction and myocyte death. It is widely held that I/R causes damage to membrane phospholipids, and is a significant mechanism of cardiac I/R injury. Molecular dissection of sarcolemmal damage in I/R, however, has been difficult to address experimentally. We studied here cardiac I/R injury under conditions targeting gain- or loss-of sarcolemma integrity. To implement gain-in-sarcolemma integrity during I/R, synthetic copolymer-based sarcolemmal stabilizers (CSS), including Poloxamer 188 (P188), were used as a tool to directly stabilize the sarcolemma. Consistent with the hypothesis of sarcolemmal stabilization, cellular markers of necrosis and apoptosis evident in untreated myocytes were fully blocked in sarcolemma stabilized myocytes. Unexpectedly, sarcolemmal stabilization of adult cardiac myocytes did not affect the status of myocyte-generated oxidants or lipid peroxidation in two independent assays. We also investigated the loss of sarcolemmal integrity using two independent genetic mouse models, dystrophin-deficient mdx or dysferlin knockout (Dysf KO) mice. Both models of sarcolemmal loss-of-function were severely affected by I/R injury ex vivo, and this was lessened by CSS. In vivo studies also showed that infarct size was significantly reduced in CSS-treated hearts. Mechanistically, these findings support a model whereby I/R-mediated increased myocyte oxidative stress is uncoupled from myocyte injury. Because the sarcolemma stabilizers used here do not transit across the myocyte membrane this is evidence that intracellular targets of oxidants are not sufficiently altered to affect cell death when sarcolemma integrity is preserved by synthetic stabilizers. These findings, in turn, suggest that sarcolemma destabilization, and consequent Ca2+ mishandling, as a focal initiating mechanism underlying myocardial I/R injury. PMID:24362314

  4. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials.

  5. The adaptive potential of maternal stress exposure in regulating population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Ecologists, evolutionary biologists and biomedical researchers are investing great effort in understanding the impact maternal stress may have on offspring phenotypes. Bian et al. advance this field by providing evidence that density-induced maternal stress programs offspring phenotypes, resulting in direct consequences on their fitness and population dynamics, but doing so in a context-dependent manner. They suggest that intrinsic state alterations induced by maternal stress may be one ecological factor generating delayed density-dependent effects. This research highlights the connection between maternal stress and population dynamics, and the importance of understanding the adaptive potential of such effects in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26247815

  6. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, P; Destrade, M; Gower, A L

    2016-01-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials. PMID:27113413

  7. On residual stresses and homeostasis: an elastic theory of functional adaptation in living matter

    PubMed Central

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Living matter can functionally adapt to external physical factors by developing internal tensions, easily revealed by cutting experiments. Nonetheless, residual stresses intrinsically have a complex spatial distribution, and destructive techniques cannot be used to identify a natural stress-free configuration. This work proposes a novel elastic theory of pre-stressed materials. Imposing physical compatibility and symmetry arguments, we define a new class of free energies explicitly depending on the internal stresses. This theory is finally applied to the study of arterial remodelling, proving its potential for the non-destructive determination of the residual tensions within biological materials. PMID:27113413

  8. KAT2B Is Required for Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Metabolic Stress by Controlling the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Nabil; Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Gromada, Xavier; Hannou, Sarah Anissa; Zhang, Hongbo; Rashid, Talha; Salas, Elisabet; Durand, Emmanuelle; Sand, Olivier; Bonnefond, Amélie; Yengo, Loic; Chavey, Carine; Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Abderrahmani, Amar; Auwerx, Johan; Fajas, Lluis; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR(er)) pathway plays an important role in helping pancreatic β cells to adapt their cellular responses to environmental cues and metabolic stress. Although altered UPR(er) gene expression appears in rodent and human type 2 diabetic (T2D) islets, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We show here that germline and β cell-specific disruption of the lysine acetyltransferase 2B (Kat2b) gene in mice leads to impaired insulin secretion and glucose intolerance. Genome-wide analysis of Kat2b-regulated genes and functional assays reveal a critical role for Kat2b in maintaining UPR(er) gene expression and subsequent β cell function. Importantly, Kat2b expression is decreased in mouse and human diabetic β cells and correlates with UPR(er) gene expression in normal human islets. In conclusion, Kat2b is a crucial transcriptional regulator for adaptive β cell function during metabolic stress by controlling UPR(er) and represents a promising target for T2D prevention and treatment. PMID:27117420

  9. The primary cilium is a self-adaptable, integrating nexus for mechanical stimuli and cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, An M.; Young, Y.-N.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanosensation is crucial for cells to sense and respond to mechanical signals within their local environment. While adaptation allows a sensor to be conditioned by stimuli within the environment and enables its operation in a wide range of stimuli intensities, the mechanisms behind adaptation remain controversial in even the most extensively studied mechanosensor, bacterial mechanosensitive channels. Primary cilia are ubiquitous sensory organelles. They have emerged as mechanosensors across diverse tissues, including kidney, liver and the embryonic node, and deflect with mechanical stimuli. Here, we show that both mechanical and chemical stimuli can alter cilium stiffness. We found that exposure to flow stiffens the cilium, which deflects less in response to subsequent exposures to flow. We also found that through a process involving acetylation, the cell can biochemically regulate cilium stiffness. Finally, we show that this altered stiffness directly affects the responsiveness of the cell to mechanical signals. These results demonstrate a potential mechanism through which the cell can regulate its mechanosensing apparatus. PMID:26603473

  10. Chronic autophagy is a cellular adaptation to tumor acidic pH microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Rothberg, Jennifer M; Kumar, Virendra; Schramm, Karla J; Haller, Edward; Proemsey, Joshua B; Lloyd, Mark C; Sloane, Bonnie F; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-08-15

    Tumor cell survival relies upon adaptation to the acidic conditions of the tumor microenvironment. To investigate potential acidosis survival mechanisms, we examined the effect of low pH (6.7) on human breast carcinoma cells. Acute low pH exposure reduced proliferation rate, induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, and increased cytoplasmic vacuolization. Gene expression analysis revealed elevated levels of ATG5 and BNIP3 in acid-conditioned cells, suggesting cells exposed to low pH may utilize autophagy as a survival mechanism. In support of this hypothesis, we found that acute low pH stimulated autophagy as defined by an increase in LC3-positive punctate vesicles, double-membrane vacuoles, and decreased phosphorylation of AKT and ribosomal protein S6. Notably, cells exposed to low pH for approximately 3 months restored their proliferative capacity while maintaining the cytoplasmic vacuolated phenotype. Although autophagy is typically transient, elevated autophagy markers were maintained chronically in low pH conditioned cells as visualized by increased protein expression of LC3-II and double-membrane vacuoles. Furthermore, these cells exhibited elevated sensitivity to PI3K-class III inhibition by 3-methyladenine. In mouse tumors, LC3 expression was reduced by systemic treatment with sodium bicarbonate, which raises intratumoral pH. Taken together, these results argue that acidic conditions in the tumor microenvironment promote autophagy, and that chronic autophagy occurs as a survival adaptation in this setting. PMID:22719070

  11. Deficiency of methionine sulfoxide reductase A causes cellular dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in cardiac myocytes under physical and oxidative stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Changlong; Li, Yuejin; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Guozhen; Kreymerman, Alexander; Prentice, Howard; Weissbach, Herbert; Huang, Xupei

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Deficiency of MsrA in the heart renders myocardial cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. {yields} Mitochondrial damage happens in the heart lacking MsrA. {yields} More protein oxidation in myocardial cells lacking MsrA. {yields} MsrA protects the heart against oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an enzyme that reverses oxidation of methionine in proteins. Using a MsrA gene knockout (MsrA{sup -/-}) mouse model, we have investigated the role of MsrA in the heart. Our data indicate that cellular contractility and cardiac function are not significantly changed in MsrA{sup -/-} mice if the hearts are not stressed. However, the cellular contractility, when stressed using a higher stimulation frequency (2 Hz), is significantly reduced in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes. MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes also show a significant decrease in contractility after oxidative stress using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Corresponding changes in Ca{sup 2+} transients are observed in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiomyocytes treated with 2 Hz stimulation or with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Electron microscope analyses reveal a dramatic morphological change of mitochondria in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts. Further biochemical measurements indicate that protein oxidation levels in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts are significantly higher than those in wild type controls. Our study demonstrates that the lack of MsrA in cardiac myocytes reduces myocardial cell's capability against stress stimulations resulting in a cellular dysfunction in the heart.

  12. The Nrf2 Activator Vinylsulfone Reduces High Glucose-Induced Neural Tube Defects by Suppressing Cellular Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway is one of the primary pathways responsible for the cellular defense system against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a causal event in diabetic embryopathy. Thus, the Nrf2 pathway may play an important role in the induction of diabetic embryopathy. In the present study, we investigated the potentially protective effect of the Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, on high glucose-induced cellular stress, apoptosis, and neural tube defects (NTDs). Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) whole mouse embryos were cultured in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (16.7 mmol/L) glucose conditions, with or without vinylsulfone. At a concentration of 10 μmol/L, vinylsulfone had an inhibitory effect on high glucose-induced NTD formation, but it was not significant. At a concentration of 20 μmol/L, vinylsulfone significantly reduced high glucose-induced NTDs. In addition, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abrogated the high glucose-induced oxidative stress markers lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and nitrotyrosine-modified proteins. The high glucose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarkers were also suppressed by 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone through the inhibition of phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1a), eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2a), upregulated C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) messenger RNA splicing. Furthermore, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abolished caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage, markers of apoptosis, in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. The Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, is protective against high glucose-induced cellular stress, caspase activation, and subsequent NTD formation. Our data suggest that vinylsulfone supplementation is a potential therapy for diabetes-associated neurodevelopmental defects. PMID:26802109

  13. Cardiovascular reactivity and adaptation to recurrent psychological stress: the moderating effects of evaluative observation.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, R M; Blascovich, J; Leitten, C L; Schneider, T R; Tomaka, J; Wiens, S

    2000-11-01

    The impact of evaluative observation on cardiovascular reactivity and adaptation to recurrent psychological stress was evaluated in 162 undergraduate men and women. All participants performed three mental arithmetic tasks with or without evaluative observation. Impedance cardiographic, blood pressure, task performance, and stress appraisal measures were recorded for each task. Evaluative observation moderated the effects of task repetition on cardiac reactivity but not vascular reactivity. The introduction of evaluative observation disrupted cardiac adaptation, resulting in a resurgence of beta-adrenergic cardiac reactivity (p < .005), whereas the removal of evaluative observation promoted cardiac adaptation. Evaluative observation also increased stress appraisals and slowed task performance. The results support the dual process theory of habituation, rather than stimulus comparator theory, but only partially support cognitive appraisal theory. PMID:11117455

  14. Central role of the brain in stress and adaptation: Links to socioeconomic status, health, and disease

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Gianaros, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The brain is the key organ of stress reactivity, coping, and recovery processes. Within the brain, a distributed neural circuitry determines what is threatening and thus stressful to the individual. Instrumental brain systems of this circuitry include the hippocampus, amygdala, and areas of the prefrontal cortex. Together, these systems regulate physiological and behavioral stress processes, which can be adaptive in the short-term and maladaptive in the long-term. Importantly, such stress processes arise from bidirectional patterns of communication between the brain and the autonomic, cardiovascular, and immune systems via neural and endocrine mechanisms underpinning cognition, experience, and behavior. In one respect, these bidirectional stress mechanisms are protective in that they promote short-term adaptation (allostasis). In another respect, however, these stress mechanisms can lead to a long-term dysregulation of allostasis in that they promote maladaptive wear-and-tear on the body and brain under chronically stressful conditions (allostatic load), compromising stress resiliency and health. This review focuses specifically on the links between stress-related processes embedded within the social environment and embodied within the brain, which is viewed as the central mediator and target of allostasis and allostatic load. PMID:20201874

  15. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Amit K; Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  16. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  17. Persistent adaptation by chronic alcohol is facilitated by neuroimmune activation linked to stress and CRF.

    PubMed

    Breese, George R; Knapp, Darin J

    2016-05-01

    This review updates the conceptual basis for the association of alcohol abuse with an insidious adaptation that facilitates negative affect during withdrawal from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure - a change that later supports sensitization of stress-induced anxiety following alcohol abstinence. The finding that a CRF1-receptor antagonist (CRF1RA) minimized CIA withdrawal-induced negative affect supported an association of alcohol withdrawal with a stress mechanism. The finding that repeated stresses or multiple CRF injections into selected brain sites prior to a single 5-day chronic alcohol (CA) exposure induced anxiety during withdrawal provided critical support for a linkage of CIA withdrawal with stress. The determination that CRF1RA injection into positive CRF-sensitive brain sites prevented CIA withdrawal-induced anxiety provided support that neural path integration maintains the persistent CIA adaptation. Based upon reports that stress increases neuroimmune function, an effort was undertaken to test whether cytokines would support the adaptation induced by stress/CA exposure. Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from CIA, cytokine mRNAs were found to be increased in cortex as well as other sites in brain. Further, repeated cytokine injections into previously identified brain sites substituted for stress and CRF induction of anxiety during CA withdrawal. Discovery that a CRF1RA prevented the brain cytokine mRNA increase induced by CA withdrawal provided critical evidence for CRF involvement in this neuroimmune induction after CA withdrawal. However, the CRF1RA did not block the stress increase in cytokine mRNA increases in controls. The latter data supported the hypothesis that distinct mechanisms linked to stress and CA withdrawal can support common neuroimmune functions within a brain site. As evidence evolves concerning neural involvement in brain neuroimmune function, a better understanding of the progressive adaptation associated with CIA

  18. A cellular and metabolic assessment of the thermal stress responses in the endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis from Lake Baikal.

    PubMed

    Axenov-Gribanov, Denis V; Bedulina, Daria S; Shatilina, Zhanna M; Lubyaga, Yulia A; Vereshchagina, Kseniya P; Timofeyev, Maxim A

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the Lake Baikal endemic gastropod Benedictia limnaeoides ongurensis, which inhabits in stable cold waters expresses a thermal stress response. We hypothesized that the evolution of this species in the stable cold waters of Lake Baikal resulted in a reduction of its thermal stress-response mechanisms at the biochemical and cellular levels. Contrary to our hypothesis, our results show that exposure to a thermal challenge activates the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of thermal resistance, such as heat shock proteins and antioxidative enzymes, and alters energetic metabolism in B. limnaeoides ongurensis. Thermal stress caused the elevation of heat shock protein 70 and the products of anaerobic glycolysis together with the depletion of glucose and phosphagens in the studied species. Thus, a temperature increase activates the complex biochemical system of stress response and alters the energetic metabolism in this endemic Baikal gastropod. It is concluded that the deepwater Lake Baikal endemic gastropod B. limnaeoides ongurensis retains the ability to activate well-developed biochemical stress-response mechanisms when exposed to a thermal challenge. PMID:24076104

  19. Novel metastasis-related gene CIM functions in the regulation of multiple cellular stress-response pathways.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Chinatsu; Tomida, Shuta; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Yukako; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Osada, Hirotaka; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Various stresses of the tumor microenvironment produced by insufficient nutrients, pH, and oxygen can contribute to the generation of altered metabolic and proliferative states that promote the survival of metastatic cells. Among many cellular stress-response pathways activated under such conditions are the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is elicited as a response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this study, we report the identification of a novel cancer invasion and metastasis-related gene (hereafter referred to as CIM, also called ERLEC1), which influences both of these stress-response pathways to promote metastasis. CIM was identified by comparing the gene expression profile of a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line with its weakly metastatic parental clone. We showed that CIM is critical for metastatic properties in this system. Proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed that CIM has multifaceted roles in controlling the response to hypoxia and ER stress. Specifically, CIM sequestered OS-9 from the HIF-1α complex and PHD2, permitting HIF-1α accumulation by preventing its degradation. Ectopic expression of CIM in lung cancer cells increased their tolerance to hypoxia. CIM also modulated UPR through interaction with the key ER stress protein BiP, influencing cell proliferation under ER stress conditions. Our findings shed light on how tolerance to multiple cellular stresses at a metastatic site can be evoked by an integrated mechanism involving CIM, which can function to coordinate those responses in a manner that promotes metastatic cell survival. PMID:21118962

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis accompanies enhanced expression of multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase 1 (Minpp1): a possible role for Minpp1 in cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Kilaparty, Surya P; Agarwal, Rakhee; Singh, Pooja; Kannan, Krishnaswamy; Ali, Nawab

    2016-07-01

    Inositol polyphosphates represent a group of differentially phosphorylated inositol metabolites, many of which are implicated to regulate diverse cellular processes such as calcium mobilization, vesicular trafficking, differentiation, apoptosis, etc. The metabolic network of these compounds is complex and tightly regulated by various kinases and phosphatases present predominantly in the cytosol. Multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase 1 (Minpp1) is the only known endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal enzyme that hydrolyzes various inositol polyphosphates in vitro as well as in vivo conditions. However, access of the Minpp1 to cytosolic substrates has not yet been demonstrated clearly and hence its physiological function. In this study, we examined a potential role for Minpp1 in ER stress-induced apoptosis. We generated a custom antibody and characterized its specificity to study the expression of Minpp1 protein in multiple mammalian cells under experimentally induced cellular stress conditions. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in the expression of Minpp1 in response to a variety of cellular stress conditions. The protein expression was corroborated with the expression of its mRNA and enzymatic activity. Further, in an attempt to link the role of Minpp1 to apoptotic stress, we studied the effect of Minpp1 expression on apoptosis following silencing of the Minpp1 gene by its specific siRNA. Our results suggest an attenuation of apoptotic parameters following knockdown of Minpp1. Thus, in addition to its known role in inositol polyphosphate metabolism, we have identified a novel role for Minpp1 as a stress-responsive protein. In summary, our results provide, for the first time, a probable link between ER stress-induced apoptosis and Minpp1 expression. PMID:27038811

  1. Switch from cap- to factorless IRES-dependent 0 and +1 frame translation during cellular stress and dicistrovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing S; Jan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) are utilized by a subset of cellular and viral mRNAs to initiate translation during cellular stress and virus infection when canonical cap-dependent translation is compromised. The intergenic region (IGR) IRES of the Dicistroviridae uses a streamlined mechanism in which it can directly recruit the ribosome in the absence of initiation factors and initiates translation using a non-AUG codon. A subset of IGR IRESs including that from the honey bee viruses can also direct translation of an overlapping +1 frame gene. In this study, we systematically examined cellular conditions that lead to IGR IRES-mediated 0 and +1 frame translation in Drosophila S2 cells. Towards this, a novel bicistronic reporter that exploits the 2A "stop-go" peptide was developed to allow the detection of IRES-mediated translation in vivo. Both 0 and +1 frame translation by the IGR IRES are stimulated under a number of cellular stresses and in S2 cells infected by cricket paralysis virus, demonstrating a switch from cap-dependent to IRES-dependent translation. The regulation of the IGR IRES mechanism ensures that both 0 frame viral structural proteins and +1 frame ORFx protein are optimally expressed during virus infection. PMID:25089704

  2. Knowledge-Based Intelligent Software Support of Cellular Adaptation to Microgravity Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groleau, Nick; Grymes, Rosalind A.; Alizadeh, Babak; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One of the most significant new opportunities that the Space Station affords cell biologists is the ability to do long-term cultivation of cells in the space environment. This facility is essential for investigations that are primarily focused on effects requiring a longer timeline of observation than that provided by the STS (Space Transportation System) platform. Such work requires both very strong laboratory skills to properly and quickly interact with the hardware hosting the culture and deep knowledge of the cell biology domain in order to optimally react to unanticipated scientific developments. Such work can be enabled by advanced automation techniques that have recently been used in the STS-based Spacelab, and that are being readied for the Space Station. In this paper, we describe the adaptation of PI-in-a-Box, the first interactive space science assistant system, to the study of the effects of space flight on cell cycle progression and proliferation.

  3. Translation of HLA-HIV associations to the cellular level: HIV adapts to inflate CD8 T cell responses against Nef and HLA-adapted variant epitopes.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Coral-Ann M; Bronke, Corine; Roberts, Steven G; McKinnon, Elizabeth; Keane, Niamh M; Chopra, Abha; Kadie, Carl; Carlson, Jonathan; Haas, David W; Riddler, Sharon A; Haubrich, Richard; Heckerman, David; Mallal, Simon; John, Mina

    2011-09-01

    Strong statistical associations between polymorphisms in HIV-1 population sequences and carriage of HLA class I alleles have been widely used to identify possible sites of CD8 T cell immune selection in vivo. However, there have been few attempts to prospectively and systematically test these genetic hypotheses arising from population-based studies at a cellular, functional level. We assayed CD8 T cell epitope-specific IFN-γ responses in 290 individuals from the same cohort, which gave rise to 874 HLA-HIV associations in genetic analyses, taking into account autologous viral sequences and individual HLA genotypes. We found immunological evidence for 58% of 374 associations tested as sites of primary immune selection and identified up to 50 novel HIV-1 epitopes using this reverse-genomics approach. Many HLA-adapted epitopes elicited equivalent or higher-magnitude IFN-γ responses than did the nonadapted epitopes, particularly in Nef. At a population level, inclusion of all of the immunoreactive variant CD8 T cell epitopes in Gag, Pol, Nef, and Env suggested that HIV adaptation leads to an inflation of Nef-directed immune responses relative to other proteins. We concluded that HLA-HIV associations mark viral epitopes subject to CD8 T cell selection. These results can be used to guide functional studies of specific epitopes and escape mutations, as well as to test, train, and evaluate analytical models of viral escape and fitness. The inflation of Nef and HLA-adapted variant responses may have negative effects on natural and vaccine immunity against HIV and, therefore, has implications for diversity coverage approaches in HIV vaccine design. PMID:21821798

  4. In-vivo imaging of inner retinal cellular morphology with adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography: challenges and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Jones, Steven M.; Kim, Dae Yu; Poyneer, Lisa; Capps, Arlie G.; Hamann, Bernd; Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.

    2012-03-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the outer layers of the human retina. Despite the significant progress in imaging cone and rod photoreceptor mosaics, visualization of cellular structures in the inner retina has been achieved only with extrinsic contrast agents that have not been approved for use with humans. In this paper we describe the main limiting factors in visualizing inner retinal cells and the methods we implemented to reduce their effects on images acquired with AO-OCT. These include improving the system point spread function (AO performance), monitoring of motion artifacts (retinal motion tracking), and speckle pattern reduction (temporal and spatial averaging). Results of imaging inner retinal morphology and the improvement offered by the new UC Davis AOOCT system with spatio-temporal image averaging are presented.

  5. Complex dynamics of selection and cellular memory in adaptation to a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussell, Edo; Lin, Wei-Hsiang

    We study a synthetic evolutionary system in bacteria in which an antibiotic resistance gene is controlled by a stochastic on/off switching promoter. At the population level, this system displays all the basic ingredients for evolutionary selection, including diversity, fitness differences, and heritability. At the single cell level, physiological processes can modulate the ability of selection to act. We expose the stochastic switching strains to pulses of antibiotics of different durations in periodically changing environments using microfluidics. Small populations are tracked over a large number of periods at single cell resolution, allowing the visualization and quantification of selective sweeps and counter-sweeps at the population level, as well as detailed single cell analysis. A simple model is introduced to predict long-term population growth rates from single cell measurements, and reveals unexpected aspects of population dynamics, including cellular memory that acts on a fast timescale to modulate growth rates. This work is supported by NIH Grant No. R01-GM097356.

  6. Adaptive cellular structures and devices with internal features for enhanced structural performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontecorvo, Michael Eugene

    This dissertation aims to develop a family of cellular and repeatable devices that exhibit a variety of force-displacement behaviors. It is envisioned that these cellular structures might be used either as stand-alone elements, or combined and repeated to create multiple types of structures (i.e. buildings, ship hulls, vehicle subfloors, etc.) with the ability to passively or actively perform multiple functions (harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, modulus change) over a range of loading types, amplitudes, and frequencies. To accomplish this goal, this work combines repeatable structural frameworks, such as that provided by a hexagonal cellular structure, with internal structural elements such as springs, viscous dampers, buckling plates, bi-stable von Mises trusses (VMTs), and pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs). The repeatable framework serves to position damping and load carrying elements throughout the structure, and the configuration of the internal elements allow each cell to be tuned to exhibit a desired force-displacement response. Therefore, gradient structures or structures with variable load paths can be created for an optimal global response to a range of loads. This dissertation focuses on the development of cellular structures for three functions: combined load-carrying capability with harmonic energy dissipation, impact mitigation, and cell modulus variation. One or more conceptual designs are presented for devices that can perform each of these functions, and both experimental measurements and simulations are used to gain a fundamental understanding of each device. Chapter 2 begins with a presentation of a VMT model that is the basis for many of the elements. The equations of motion for the VMT are derived and the static and dynamic behavior of the VMT are discussed in detail. Next, two metrics for the energy dissipation of the VMT - hysteresis loop area and loss factor - are presented. The responses of the VMT to harmonic displacement

  7. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A major challenge for the production of ethanol from biomass-derived feedstocks is to develop yeasts that can sustain growth under the variety of inhibitory conditions present in the production process, e.g., high osmolality, high ethanol titers, and/or elevated temperatures (≥40°C). Using adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40°C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses. Thermotolerant yeast strains showed horizontal displacement of their thermal reaction norms to higher temperatures. Hence, their optimal and maximum growth temperatures increased by about 3°C, whereas they showed a growth trade-off at temperatures below 34°C. Computational analysis of the physical properties of proteins showed that the lethal temperature for yeast is around 49°C, as a large fraction of the yeast proteins denature above this temperature. Our analysis also indicated that the number of functions involved in controlling the growth rate decreased in the thermotolerant strains compared with the number in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures. In combination with altered sterol composition of cellular membranes, glycerol overproduction was also associated with yeast osmotolerance and improved tolerance of high concentrations of glucose and ethanol. Our study shows that thermal adaptation of yeast is suitable for improving yeast resistance to inhibitory conditions found in industrial ethanol production processes. PMID:26199325

  8. Effect of certain psychopharmacological preparations on adaptation under stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanishevskaya, A. V.; Mezentseva, L. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments staged on rats demonstrated that the formation of pathological states caused by stress and accompanied by the development of ulcerative lesion of the gastric mucosa are associated with the degree of the catecholamines level drop in the mesencephalon and hypothalamus. The application of seduxen and also of combinations consisting of L-DOPA with seduxen, or with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan tends to reduce the frequency of developing alcerative lesions of the stomach. The protective effect produced by the combination of L-DOPA with an L-adrenoblocking agent pyroxan is barred by an additional administration of an B-adrenoblocking agent, inderal.

  9. Actions of Prolactin in the Brain: From Physiological Adaptations to Stress and Neurogenesis to Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Torner, Luz

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is one of the most versatile hormones known. It is considered an adaptive hormone due to the key roles it plays in the modulation of the stress response and during pregnancy and lactation. Within the brain, PRL acts as a neuropeptide to promote physiological responses related to reproduction, stress adaptation, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection. The action of PRL on the nervous system contributes to the wide array of changes that occur in the female brain during pregnancy and result in the attenuation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. Together, all these changes promote behavioral and physiological adaptations of the new mother to enable reproductive success. Brain adaptations driven by PRL are also important for the regulation of maternal emotionality and well-being. PRL also affects the male brain during the stress response, but its effects have been less studied. PRL regulates neurogenesis both in the subventricular zone and in the hippocampus. Therefore, alterations in the PRL system due to stress or exposure to substances that reduce neurogenesis or other conditions, could contribute to maladaptive responses and pathological behavioral outcomes. Here, we review the PRL system and the role it plays in the modulation of stress response and emotion regulation. We discuss the effects of PRL on neurogenesis and neuroprotection, the putative neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects, and their contribution to the onset of psychopathological states such as depression. PMID:27065946

  10. Actions of Prolactin in the Brain: From Physiological Adaptations to Stress and Neurogenesis to Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Torner, Luz

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is one of the most versatile hormones known. It is considered an adaptive hormone due to the key roles it plays in the modulation of the stress response and during pregnancy and lactation. Within the brain, PRL acts as a neuropeptide to promote physiological responses related to reproduction, stress adaptation, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection. The action of PRL on the nervous system contributes to the wide array of changes that occur in the female brain during pregnancy and result in the attenuation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Together, all these changes promote behavioral and physiological adaptations of the new mother to enable reproductive success. Brain adaptations driven by PRL are also important for the regulation of maternal emotionality and well-being. PRL also affects the male brain during the stress response, but its effects have been less studied. PRL regulates neurogenesis both in the subventricular zone and in the hippocampus. Therefore, alterations in the PRL system due to stress or exposure to substances that reduce neurogenesis or other conditions, could contribute to maladaptive responses and pathological behavioral outcomes. Here, we review the PRL system and the role it plays in the modulation of stress response and emotion regulation. We discuss the effects of PRL on neurogenesis and neuroprotection, the putative neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects, and their contribution to the onset of psychopathological states such as depression. PMID:27065946

  11. Stress-induced adaptive islet cell identity changes.

    PubMed

    Cigliola, V; Thorel, F; Chera, S; Herrera, P L

    2016-09-01

    The different forms of diabetes mellitus differ in their pathogenesis but, ultimately, they are all characterized by progressive islet β-cell loss. Restoring the β-cell mass is therefore a major goal for future therapeutic approaches. The number of β-cells found at birth is determined by proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells, and it has been considered to remain mostly unchanged throughout adult life. Recent studies in mice have revealed an unexpected plasticity in islet endocrine cells in response to stress; under certain conditions, islet non-β-cells have the potential to reprogram into insulin producers, thus contributing to restore the β-cell mass. Here, we discuss the latest findings on pancreas and islet cell plasticity upon physiological, pathological and experimental conditions of stress. Understanding the mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming in these models will allow the development of new strategies for the treatment of diabetes, by exploiting the intrinsic regeneration capacity of the pancreas. PMID:27615136

  12. Endogenous nitric oxide mediates He-Ne laser-induced adaptive responses in salt stressed-tall fescue leaves.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endogenous nitric oxide in protective effects of He-Ne laser on salt stressed-tall fescue leaves. Salt stress resulted in significant increases of membrane injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, polyamine accumulation, and activities of SOD, POD, and APX, while pronounced decreases of antioxidant contents, CAT activity and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in seedlings leaves. He-Ne laser illumination caused a distinct alleviation of cellular injury that was reflected by the lower MDA amounts, polyamine accumulation and ROS levels at the stress period. In contrast, the laser treatment displayed a higher Ca(2+) concentration, antioxidant amounts, NO release, antioxidant enzyme, and NOS activities. These responses could be blocked due to the inhibition of NO biosynthesis by PTIO (NO scavenger) or LNNA (NOS inhibitor). The presented results demonstrated that endogenous NO might be involved in the progress of He-Ne laser-induced plant antioxidant system activation and ROS degradation in order to enhance adaptive responses of tall fescue to prolonged saline conditions. PMID:27309569

  13. Deriving urban dynamic evolution rules from self-adaptive cellular automata with multi-temporal remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yingqing; Ai, Bin; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Fajun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular automata (CA) have proven to be very effective for simulating and predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of complex geographical phenomena. Traditional methods generally pose problems in determining the structure and parameters of CA for a large, complex region or a long-term simulation. This study presents a self-adaptive CA model integrated with an artificial immune system to discover dynamic transition rules automatically. The model's parameters are allowed to be self-modified with the application of multi-temporal remote sensing images: that is, the CA can adapt itself to the changed and complex environment. Therefore, urban dynamic evolution rules over time can be efficiently retrieved by using this integrated model. The proposed AIS-based CA model was then used to simulate the rural-urban land conversion of Guangzhou city, located in the core of China's Pearl River Delta. The initial urban land was directly classified from TM satellite image in the year 1990. Urban land in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012 was correspondingly used as the observed data to calibrate the model's parameters. With the quantitative index figure of merit (FoM) and pattern similarity, the comparison was further performed between the AIS-based model and a Logistic CA model. The results indicate that the AIS-based CA model can perform better and with higher precision in simulating urban evolution, and the simulated spatial pattern is closer to the actual development situation.

  14. Adaptive Subframe Partitioning and Efficient Packet Scheduling in OFDMA Cellular System with Fixed Decode-and-Forward Relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liping; Ji, Yusheng; Liu, Fuqiang

    The integration of multihop relays with orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) cellular infrastructures can meet the growing demands for better coverage and higher throughput. Resource allocation in the OFDMA two-hop relay system is more complex than that in the conventional single-hop OFDMA system. With time division between transmissions from the base station (BS) and those from relay stations (RSs), fixed partitioning of the BS subframe and RS subframes can not adapt to various traffic demands. Moreover, single-hop scheduling algorithms can not be used directly in the two-hop system. Therefore, we propose a semi-distributed algorithm called ASP to adjust the length of every subframe adaptively, and suggest two ways to extend single-hop scheduling algorithms into multihop scenarios: link-based and end-to-end approaches. Simulation results indicate that the ASP algorithm increases system utilization and fairness. The max carrier-to-interference ratio (Max C/I) and proportional fairness (PF) scheduling algorithms extended using the end-to-end approach obtain higher throughput than those using the link-based approach, but at the expense of more overhead for information exchange between the BS and RSs. The resource allocation scheme using ASP and end-to-end PF scheduling achieves a tradeoff between system throughput maximization and fairness.

  15. Analysis of the cellular stress response in MCF10A cells exposed to combined radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Na; Han, Na-Kyung; Hong, Mi-Na; Chi, Sung-Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Taehong; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Nam; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to environmental stressors can be measured by monitoring the cellular stress response in target cells. Here, we used the cellular stress response to investigate whether single or combined radio frequency (RF) radiation could induce stress response in human cells. Cellular stress responses in MCF10A human breast epithelial cells were characterized after exposure to 4 h of RF radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA) or CDMA plus wideband CDMA (WCDMA)] or 2 h RF radiation on 3 consecutive days. Specific absorption rate (SAR) was 4.0 W/kg for CDMA signal alone exposure and 2.0 W/kg each, 4.0 W/kg in total for combined CDMA plus WCDMA signals. Expression levels and phosphorylation states of specific heat shock proteins (HSPs) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were analyzed by Western blot. It was found that HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations are the most sensitive markers of the stress response in MCF10A cells exposed to heat shock or ionizing radiation. Using these markers, we demonstrated that neither one-time nor repeated single (CDMA alone) or combined (CDMA plus WCDMA) RF radiation exposure significantly altered HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations in MCF10A cells (p > 0.05). The lack of a statistically significant alteration in HSP27 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations suggests that single or combined RF radiation exposure did not elicit activation of HSP27 and ERK1/2 in MCF10A cells. PMID:22510589

  16. Structural basis of evasion of cellular adaptive immunity by HIV-1 Nef

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Xiaofei; Singh, Rajendra; Homann, Stefanie; Yang, Haitao; Guatelli, John; Xiong, Yong

    2012-10-24

    The HIV-1 protein Nef inhibits antigen presentation by class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I). We determined the mechanism of this activity by solving the crystal structure of a protein complex comprising Nef, the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain (MHC-I CD) and the {mu}1 subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1. A ternary, cooperative interaction clamps the MHC-I CD into a narrow binding groove at the Nef-{mu}1 interface, which encompasses the cargo-recognition site of {mu}1 and the proline-rich strand of Nef. The Nef C terminus induces a previously unobserved conformational change in {mu}1, whereas the N terminus binds the Nef core to position it optimally for complex formation. Positively charged patches on {mu}1 recognize acidic clusters in Nef and MHC-I. The structure shows how Nef functions as a clathrin-associated sorting protein to alter the specificity of host membrane trafficking and enable viral evasion of adaptive immunity.

  17. Structural Basis of Evasion of Cellular Adaptive Immunity by HIV-1 Nef

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaofei; Singh, Rajendra; Homann, Stefanie; Yang, Haitao; Guatelli, John; Xiong, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 protein Nef inhibits antigen presentation by class I MHC (MHC-I). Here the mechanism of this activity is revealed by the crystal structure of a protein complex consisting of Nef, the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain (MHC-I CD), and the μ1 subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1. A ternary, cooperative interaction clamps the MHC-I CD into a narrow binding groove at the Nef-μ1 interface encompassing the cargo-recognition site of μ1 and the proline rich strand of Nef. The Nef C-terminus induces a novel conformational change in μ1, while the N-terminus binds the Nef core to position it optimally for complex formation. Positively charged patches on μ1 recognize acidic clusters in Nef and MHC-I. The structure shows how Nef functions as a clathrin-associated sorting protein to alter the specificity of host membrane trafficking and enable viral evasion of adaptive immunity. PMID:22705789

  18. Catecholamines of the adrenal medula and their morphological changes during adaptation to repeated immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Mitro, A.; Mikulaj, L.; Hocman, G.

    1980-01-01

    Changes of the adrenal medulla of rats were studied in the course of adaptation to repeated immobilization stress. An increase in the number of cells in the adrenal medulla was found in the adapted animals; this increase was confirmed by weight indices of the medulla and by cell counts per surface unit. Simultaneous karyometric measurements of the nuclei of adrenal medulla cells and an analysis of the catecholamine contents in the adrenals explain the increased activity of the adrenal medulla in the course of adaptation.

  19. Effect of acid adaptation on the environmental stress tolerance of three strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Wu, Chieh; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2014-04-01

    Three strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (690, BCRC 13023, and BCRC 13025), involved in foodborne outbreaks in Taiwan, were subjected to acid adaptation at pH 5.5 for 90 min. The effects of acid adaptation on the tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus to various environmental stresses, including heat (47°C), cold (4°C and -20°C), ethanol (8%), high salt (20% NaCl), and hydrogen peroxide (20 ppm) were examined. Results showed that acid adaptation increased the thermal tolerance of the three test strains of V. parahaemolyticus, while it did not affect their cold tolerance. Acid adaptation also increased the ethanol tolerance in V. parahaemolyticus 690 and BCRC 13025, but not in BCRC 13023. Differences in the tolerance to high salts were noted among the three strains after prior acid adaptation. However, these acid-adapted V. parahaemolyticus strains were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than their nonadapted controls. These findings demonstrated that acid adaption responses of V. parahaemolyticus varied among strains and types of stress challenge. PMID:24410096

  20. Evidence for adaptive evolution of low-temperature stress response genes in a Pooideae grass ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Vigeland, Magnus D; Spannagl, Manuel; Asp, Torben; Paina, Cristiana; Rudi, Heidi; Rognli, Odd-Arne; Fjellheim, Siri; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to temperate environments is common in the grass subfamily Pooideae, suggesting an ancestral origin of cold climate adaptation. Here, we investigated substitution rates of genes involved in low-temperature-induced (LTI) stress responses to test the hypothesis that adaptive molecular evolution of LTI pathway genes was important for Pooideae evolution. Substitution rates and signatures of positive selection were analyzed using 4330 gene trees including three warm climate-adapted species (maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and rice (Oryza sativa)) and five temperate Pooideae species (Brachypodium distachyon, wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), Lolium perenne and Festuca pratensis). Nonsynonymous substitution rate differences between Pooideae and warm habitat-adapted species were elevated in LTI trees compared with all trees. Furthermore, signatures of positive selection were significantly stronger in LTI trees after the rice and Pooideae split but before the Brachypodium divergence (P < 0.05). Genome-wide heterogeneity in substitution rates was also observed, reflecting divergent genome evolution processes within these grasses. Our results provide evidence for a link between adaptation to cold habitats and adaptive evolution of LTI stress responses in early Pooideae evolution and shed light on a poorly understood chapter in the evolutionary history of some of the world's most important temperate crops. PMID:23701123

  1. Adaptive Stress Testing of Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ritchie; Kochenderfer, Mykel J.; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Brat, Guillaume P.; Owen, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a scalable method to efficiently search for the most likely state trajectory leading to an event given only a simulator of a system. Our approach uses a reinforcement learning formulation and solves it using Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS). The approach places very few requirements on the underlying system, requiring only that the simulator provide some basic controls, the ability to evaluate certain conditions, and a mechanism to control the stochasticity in the system. Access to the system state is not required, allowing the method to support systems with hidden state. The method is applied to stress test a prototype aircraft collision avoidance system to identify trajectories that are likely to lead to near mid-air collisions. We present results for both single and multi-threat encounters and discuss their relevance. Compared with direct Monte Carlo search, this MCTS method performs significantly better both in finding events and in maximizing their likelihood.

  2. Biological stress response terminology: Integrating the concepts of adaptive response and preconditioning stress within a hormetic dose-response framework

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu; Bachmann, Kenneth A.; Bailer, A. John; Bolger, P. Michael; Borak, Jonathan; Cai, Lu; Cedergreen, Nina; Cherian, M. George; Chiueh, Chuang C.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Cook, Ralph R.; Diamond, David M.; Doolittle, David J.; Dorato, Michael A.; Duke, Stephen O.; Feinendegen, Ludwig; Gardner, Donald E.; Hart, Ronald W.; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Hayes, A. Wallace; Hoffmann, George R.; Ives, John A.; Jaworowski, Zbigniew; Johnson, Thomas E.; Jonas, Wayne B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2007-07-01

    Many biological subdisciplines that regularly assess dose-response relationships have identified an evolutionarily conserved process in which a low dose of a stressful stimulus activates an adaptive response that increases the resistance of the cell or organism to a moderate to severe level of stress. Due to a lack of frequent interaction among scientists in these many areas, there has emerged a broad range of terms that describe such dose-response relationships. This situation has become problematic because the different terms describe a family of similar biological responses (e.g., adaptive response, preconditioning, hormesis), adversely affecting interdisciplinary communication, and possibly even obscuring generalizable features and central biological concepts. With support from scientists in a broad range of disciplines, this article offers a set of recommendations we believe can achieve greater conceptual harmony in dose-response terminology, as well as better understanding and communication across the broad spectrum of biological disciplines.

  3. Comparative proteomics analysis of global cellular stress responses to hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    You, Chao; Yang, Yanhua; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Huiqing; Chen, Yan; Chen, Keping; Zhou, Yajing

    2016-08-01

    Both environmental agents and spontaneous cellular events cause serious DNA damage, threatening the integrity of the genome. In response to replication stress or genotoxic agents triggered DNA damage, degradation of p12 subunit of DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) results in an inter-conversion between heterotetramer (Pol δ4) and heterotrimer (Pol δ3) forms and plays a significant role in DNA damage response in eukaryotic cells. In this work, we used mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach to identify those cellular stress response protein changes corresponding to the degradation of p12 in DNA-damaged HeLa cells by the treatment with hydroxyurea (HU). A total of 736 ± 13 proteins in non-treated control group and 741 ± 19 protein spots in HU-treated cells were detected, of which 34 proteins (17 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated) exhibited significantly altered protein expression levels. Their physiological roles are mainly associated with cellular components, molecular functions, and biological processes by gene ontology analysis, among which 21 proteins were mapped to KEGG pathways. They are involved in 5 primary pathways with the subsets involving 16 secondary pathways by further KEGG analysis. More interestingly, the up-regulation of translationally controlled tumor protein was further identified to be associated with p12 degradation by Western blot analysis. Our works may enlarge and broaden our view for deeply understanding how global cellular stress responds to DNA damage, which could contribute to the etiology of human cancer or other diseases that can result from loss of genomic stability. PMID:25519465

  4. Mitochondrial role in adaptive response to stress conditions in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakova, Polina A; Volodina, Maria A; Tarasova, Nadezhda V; Marey, Maria V; Tsvirkun, Daria V; Vavina, Olga V; Khodzhaeva, Zulfiya S; Kan, Natalya E; Menon, Ramkumar; Vysokikh, Mikhail Yu; Sukhikh, Gennady T

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome, characterized in general by hypertension with proteinuria or other systemic disturbances. PE is the major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the etiology of PE still remains unclear. Our study involved 38 patients: 14 with uncomplicated pregnancy; 13 with early-onset PE (eoPE); and 11 with late-onset PE (loPE). We characterized the immunophenotype of cells isolated from the placenta and all biopsy samples were stained positive for Cytokeratin 7, SOX2, Nestin, Vimentin, and CD44. We obtained a significant increase in OPA1 mRNA and protein expression in the eoPE placentas. Moreover, TFAM expression was down-regulated in comparison to the control (p < 0.01). Mitochondrial DNA copy number in eoPE placentas was significantly higher than in samples from normal pregnancies. We observed an increase of maximum coupled state 3 respiration rate in mitochondria isolated from the placenta in the presence of complex I substrates in the eoPE group and an increase of P/O ratio, citrate synthase activity and decrease of Ca(2+)-induced depolarization rate in both PE groups. Our results suggest an essential role of mitochondrial activity changes in an adaptive response to the development of PE. PMID:27573305

  5. Mitochondrial role in adaptive response to stress conditions in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Vishnyakova, Polina A.; Volodina, Maria A.; Tarasova, Nadezhda V.; Marey, Maria V.; Tsvirkun, Daria V.; Vavina, Olga V.; Khodzhaeva, Zulfiya S.; Kan, Natalya E.; Menon, Ramkumar; Vysokikh, Mikhail Yu.; Sukhikh, Gennady T.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome, characterized in general by hypertension with proteinuria or other systemic disturbances. PE is the major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, the etiology of PE still remains unclear. Our study involved 38 patients: 14 with uncomplicated pregnancy; 13 with early-onset PE (eoPE); and 11 with late-onset PE (loPE). We characterized the immunophenotype of cells isolated from the placenta and all biopsy samples were stained positive for Cytokeratin 7, SOX2, Nestin, Vimentin, and CD44. We obtained a significant increase in OPA1 mRNA and protein expression in the eoPE placentas. Moreover, TFAM expression was down-regulated in comparison to the control (p < 0.01). Mitochondrial DNA copy number in eoPE placentas was significantly higher than in samples from normal pregnancies. We observed an increase of maximum coupled state 3 respiration rate in mitochondria isolated from the placenta in the presence of complex I substrates in the eoPE group and an increase of P/O ratio, citrate synthase activity and decrease of Ca2+-induced depolarization rate in both PE groups. Our results suggest an essential role of mitochondrial activity changes in an adaptive response to the development of PE. PMID:27573305

  6. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  7. Muscle mitochondrial stress adaptation operates independently of endogenous FGF21 action

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Mario; Coleman, Verena; Voigt, Anja; van Schothorst, Evert M.; Keipert, Susanne; van der Stelt, Inge; Ringel, Sebastian; Graja, Antonia; Ambrosi, Thomas; Kipp, Anna P.; Jastroch, Martin; Schulz, Tim J.; Keijer, Jaap; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) was recently discovered as stress-induced myokine during mitochondrial disease and proposed as key metabolic mediator of the integrated stress response (ISR) presumably causing systemic metabolic improvements. Curiously, the precise cell-non-autonomous and cell-autonomous relevance of endogenous FGF21 action remained poorly understood. Methods We made use of the established UCP1 transgenic (TG) mouse, a model of metabolic perturbations made by a specific decrease in muscle mitochondrial efficiency through increased respiratory uncoupling and robust metabolic adaptation and muscle ISR-driven FGF21 induction. In a cross of TG with Fgf21-knockout (FGF21−/−) mice, we determined the functional role of FGF21 as a muscle stress-induced myokine under low and high fat feeding conditions. Results Here we uncovered that FGF21 signaling is dispensable for metabolic improvements evoked by compromised mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Strikingly, genetic ablation of FGF21 fully counteracted the cell-non-autonomous metabolic remodeling and browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), together with the reduction of circulating triglycerides and cholesterol. Brown adipose tissue activity was similar in all groups. Remarkably, we found that FGF21 played a negligible role in muscle mitochondrial stress-related improved obesity resistance, glycemic control and hepatic lipid homeostasis. Furthermore, the protective cell-autonomous muscle mitohormesis and metabolic stress adaptation, including an increased muscle proteostasis via mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and amino acid biosynthetic pathways did not require the presence of FGF21. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that although FGF21 drives WAT remodeling, the adaptive pseudo-starvation response under elevated muscle mitochondrial stress conditions operates independently of both WAT browning and FGF21 action. Thus, our findings challenge FGF21 as key

  8. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. PMID:26253462

  9. Cortisol Reactivity to Social Stress as a Mediator of Early Adversity on Risk and Adaptive Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conradt, Elisabeth; Abar, Beau; Lester, Barry M.; LaGasse, Linda L.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Bauer, Charles R.; Whitaker, Toni M.; Hammond, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Children chronically exposed to stress early in life are at increased risk for maladaptive outcomes, though the physiological mechanisms driving these effects are unknown. Cortisol reactivity was tested as a mediator of the relation between prenatal substance exposure and/or early adversity on adaptive and maladaptive outcomes. Data were drawn…

  10. Bibliography of Selected Literature in the 1970s Related to Crises, Family Stress, Coping and Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesser, Barbara

    This bibliography of literature from the 1970s related to crises, family stress, coping, and adaptation contains references of particular interest to professionals in the areas of counseling, education, and family social, psychological and health services. The bibliography is divided into 26 categories; references are classified according to major…

  11. Willingness to Communicate and Cross-Cultural Adaptation: L2 Communication and Acculturative Stress as Transaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, H. Colin

    2013-01-01

    Although much research has focused on the influence of second language (L2) proficiency on L2 use and on outcomes of intercultural adaptation, these two strands have remained largely separate. This study examines the impact of willingness to communicate in the L2 (L2 WTC) on the daily hassles and stress of international students, with the aim of…

  12. Evaluation of the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model among Families Reporting Economic Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandsburger, Etty; Biggerstaff, Marilyn A.

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model (double ABCX model) examining the effects resiliency resources on family functioning when families experience economic pressure. Families (N = 128) with incomes at or below the poverty line from a rural area of a southern state completed measures of perceived economic pressure,…

  13. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  14. The importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular response against oxidative/nitrosative stress: current state.

    PubMed

    Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable interest has risen in the idea that oxidative/nitrosative stress is mediated in the etiology of numerous human diseases. Oxidative/Nitrosative stress is the result of an disequilibrium in oxidant/antioxidant which reveals from continuous increase of Reactive Oxygen and Reactive Nitrogen Species production. The aim of this review is to emphasize with current information the importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular responce against oxidative/nitrosative stress, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. Products of lipid peroxidation have commonly been used as biomarkers of oxidative/nitrosative stress damage. Lipid peroxidation generates a variety of relatively stable decomposition end products, mainly α, β-unsaturated reactive aldehydes, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, 2-propenal (acrolein) and isoprostanes, which can be measured in plasma and urine as an indirect index of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Antioxidants are exogenous or endogenous molecules that mitigate any form of oxidative/nitrosative stress or its consequences. They may act from directly scavenging free radicals to increasing antioxidative defences. Antioxidant deficiencies can develop as a result of decreased antioxidant intake, synthesis of endogenous enzymes or increased antioxidant utilization. Antioxidant supplementation has become an increasingly popular practice to maintain optimal body function. However, antoxidants exhibit pro-oxidant activity depending on the specific set of conditions. Of particular importance are their dosage and redox conditions in the cell. PMID:27456681

  15. Broad MICA/B Expression in the Small Bowel Mucosa: A Link between Cellular Stress and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Yessica L.; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Cueto Rua, Eduardo; Chopita, Nestor; Fuertes, Mercedes; Zwirner, Norberto W.; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The MICA/B genes (MHC class I chain related genes A and B) encode for non conventional class I HLA molecules which have no role in antigen presentation. MICA/B are up-regulated by different stress conditions such as heat-shock, oxidative stress, neoplasic transformation and viral infection. Particularly, MICA/B are expressed in enterocytes where they can mediate enterocyte apoptosis when recognised by the activating NKG2D receptor present on intraepithelial lymphocytes. This mechanism was suggested to play a major pathogenic role in active celiac disease (CD). Due to the importance of MICA/B in CD pathogenesis we studied their expression in duodenal tissue from CD patients. By immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and flow cytometry we established that MICA/B was mainly intracellularly located in enterocytes. In addition, we identified MICA/B+ T cells in both the intraepithelial and lamina propria compartments. We also found MICA/B+ B cells, plasma cells and some macrophages in the lamina propria. The pattern of MICA/B staining in mucosal tissue in severe enteropathy was similar to that found in in vitro models of cellular stress. In such models, MICA/B were located in stress granules that are associated to the oxidative and ER stress response observed in active CD enteropathy. Our results suggest that expression of MICA/B in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients is linked to disregulation of mucosa homeostasis in which the stress response plays an active role. PMID:24058482

  16. Osteoporosis and alzheimer pathology: Role of cellular stress response and hormetic redox signaling in aging and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Koverech, Angela; Lodato, Francesca; Scuto, Maria; Salinaro, Angela T.; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders. Increasing evidence shows that osteoporosis and hip fracture are common complication observed in AD patients, although the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include lipoperoxidation and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS generation, which is implicated in the regulation of cellular stress response mechanisms, is an integrated, highly regulated, process under control of redox sensitive genes coding for redox proteins called vitagenes. Vitagenes, encoding for proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin, and the sirtuin protein, represent a systems controlling a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways relevant to life span and involved in the preservation of cellular homeostasis under stress conditions. Consistently, nutritional anti-oxidants have demonstrated their neuroprotective potential through a hormetic-dependent activation of vitagenes. The biological relevance of dose–response affects those strategies pointing to the optimal dosing to patients in the treatment of numerous diseases. Thus, the heat shock response has become an important hormetic target for novel cytoprotective strategies focusing on the pharmacological development of compounds capable of modulating stress response mechanisms. Here we discuss possible signaling mechanisms involved in the activation of vitagenes which, relevant to bone remodeling and through enhancement of cellular stress resistance provide a rationale to limit the deleterious consequences associated to homeostasis disruption with consequent impact on the aging process. PMID:24959146

  17. TGF-β/NF1/Smad4-mediated suppression of ANT2 contributes to oxidative stress in cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Kretova, Miroslava; Sabova, Ludmila; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartek, Jiri; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Nelson, Buck D; Hubackova, Sona; Luciakova, Katarina

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress and persistent activation of DNA damage response (DDR) are causally involved in the development of cellular senescence, a phenomenon implicated in fundamental (patho)physiological processes such as aging, fetal development and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2) is consistently down-regulated in all three major forms of cellular senescence: replicative, oncogene-induced and drug-induced, in both normal and cancerous human cells. We previously reported formation of novel NF1/Smad transcription repressor complexes in growth-arrested fibroblasts. Here we show that such complexes form in senescent cells. Mechanistically, binding of the NF1/Smad complexes to the NF1-dependent repressor elements in the ANT2 gene promoter repressed ANT2 expression. Etoposide-induced formation of these complexes and repression of ANT2 were relatively late events co-incident with production and secretion of, and dependent on, TGF-β. siRNA-mediated knock-down of ANT2 in proliferating cells resulted in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of the DDR. Knock-down of ANT2, together with etoposide treatment, further intensified ROS production and DNA damage signaling, leading to enhanced apoptosis. Together, our data show that TGF-β-mediated suppression of ANT2 through NF1/Smad4 complexes contributes to oxidative stress and DNA damage during induction of cellular senescence. PMID:25220407

  18. Non-canonical roles for caveolin in regulation of membrane repair and mitochondria: implications for stress adaptation with age.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jan M; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-08-15

    Many different theories of ageing have been proposed but none has served the unifying purpose of defining a molecular target that can limit the structural and functional decline associated with age that ultimately leads to the demise of the organism. We propose that the search for a molecule with these unique properties must account for regulation of the signalling efficiency of multiple cellular functions that degrade with age due to a loss of a particular protein. We suggest caveolin as one such molecule that serves as a regulator of key processes in signal transduction. We define a particular distinction between cellular senescence and ageing and propose that caveolin plays a distinct role in each of these processes. Caveolin is traditionally thought of as a membrane-localized protein regulating signal transduction via membrane enrichment of specific signalling molecules. Ultimately we focus on two non-canonical roles for caveolin - membrane repair and regulation of mitochondrial function - which may be novel features of stress adaptation, especially in the setting of ageing. The end result of preserving membrane structure and mitochondrial function is maintenance of homeostatic signalling, preserving barrier function, and regulating energy production for cell survival and resilient ageing. PMID:26333003

  19. Increased rate of response of the pituitary-adrenal system in rats adapted to chronic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakellaris, P. C.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The response and adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal system to chronic stresses was investigated. These included individual caging, confinement, and exposure to cold for varying periods of time. Studies were carried out demonstrating that during the period of adaptation when plasma corticosterone concentrations returned toward their prestress level despite continued exposure to the stressor, the animals responded to additional stimuli of ether for 1 min, a saline injection, or release from confinement with a faster increase (within 2.5 min) in plasma corticosterone than controls (10 min). It is concluded that during adaptation to a chronic stress the pituitary-adrenal system is not inhibited by the circulating steroid level but is actually hypersensitive to additional stimuli.

  20. Do stressful conditions make adaptation difficult? Guppies in the oil-polluted environments of southern Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Rolshausen, Gregor; Phillip, Dawn A T; Beckles, Denise M; Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis; Hamilton, Patrick B; Tyler, Charles R; Scarlett, Alan G; Ramnarine, Indar; Bentzen, Paul; Hendry, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The ability of populations to rapidly adapt to new environments will determine their future in an increasingly human-modified world. Although meta-analyses do frequently uncover signatures of local adaptation, they also reveal many exceptions. We suggest that particular constraints on local adaptation might arise when organisms are exposed to novel stressors, such as anthropogenic pollution. To inform this possibility, we studied the extent to which guppies (Poecilia reticulata) show local adaptation to oil pollution in southern Trinidad. Neutral genetic markers revealed that paired populations in oil-polluted versus not-polluted habitats diverged independently in two different watersheds. Morphometrics revealed some divergence (particularly in head shape) between these environments, some of which was parallel between rivers. Reciprocal transplant experiments in nature, however, found little evidence of local adaptation based on survival and growth. Moreover, subsequent laboratory experiments showed that the two populations from oil-polluted sites showed only weak local adaptation even when compared to guppies from oil-free northern Trinidad. We conclude that guppies show little local adaptation to oil pollution, which might result from the challenges associated with adaptation to particularly stressful environments. It might also reflect genetic drift owing to small population sizes and/or high gene flow between environments. PMID:26495039

  1. Adaptation of Piglets Using Different Methods of Stress Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bekenev, Vitaly; Garcia, Arlene; Hasnulin, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Stressful events play a major negative role in the modern technology of weaned piglets. These events include but are not limited to weaning itself, lack of maternal milk, loss of maternal bonding, mixing of different litters, transportation to growing-finishing farms, and housing conditions. Various additives (phenazepam, aminazine, vitamins E and C, the extract Eleutherococcus senticosus, and ultraviolet irradiation) at different doses and combinations with or without ultraviolet irradiation were used to evaluate their effect on the viability and growth rate of piglets after weaning. Content of lipids in the blood and liver, antioxidant activity (AOA) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) significantly decreased or increased with the use of the additives. Feeding a mixture of additives increased survival rate, average daily gain, and live weight at the end of the experiment. Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the viability and growth rate of piglets after weaning, the content of lipids in the blood and liver, antioxidant activity (AOA) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) when various additives are used in feed. The experiments were performed on two crosses of piglets obtained from Large White breed sows and Landrace breed boars. Twenty to 28 animals were randomly assigned per group. The following additives were tested: the benzodiazepine phenazepam, the neuroleptic aminazine, vitamins E and C, and the extract Eleutherococcus senticosus (Araliaceae). Different doses and combinations of the additives against ultraviolet irradiation were used. The addition of these substances improved the growth rate and viability of piglets. AOA increased under the influence of all factors studied, especially with the addition of extract of Eleutherococcus in feed in combination with aminazine and UV-irradiation (p < 0.01). However, the addition of Eleutherococcus extract and aminazine intensified LPO (p < 0.01), but use of UV irradiation helped to decrease LPO values

  2. The Influence of Metal Stress on the Availability and Redox State of Ascorbate, and Possible Interference with Its Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bielen, An; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, metals have been distributed to excessive levels in the environment due to industrial and agricultural activities. Plants growing on soils contaminated with excess levels of metals experience a disturbance of the cellular redox balance, which leads to an augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Even though the increased ROS levels can cause cellular damage, controlled levels play an important role in modulating signaling networks that control physiological processes and stress responses. Plants control ROS levels using their antioxidative defense system both under non-stress conditions, as well as under stress conditions such as exposure to excess metals. Ascorbate (AsA) is a well-known and important component of the plant’s antioxidative system. As primary antioxidant, it can reduce ROS directly and indirectly via ascorbate peroxidase in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle. Furthermore, AsA fulfills an essential role in physiological processes, some of which are disturbed by excess metals. In this review, known direct effects of excess metals on AsA biosynthesis and functioning will be discussed, as well as the possible interference of metals with the role of AsA in physiological and biochemical processes. PMID:23519107

  3. Heritable variation in heat shock gene expression: a potential mechanism for adaptation to thermal stress in embryos of sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, J N; Kennington, W J; Tomkins, J L; Berry, O; Whiting, S; Meekan, M G; Mitchell, N J

    2016-01-13

    The capacity of species to respond adaptively to warming temperatures will be key to their survival in the Anthropocene. The embryos of egg-laying species such as sea turtles have limited behavioural means for avoiding high nest temperatures, and responses at the physiological level may be critical to coping with predicted global temperature increases. Using the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) as a model, we used quantitative PCR to characterise variation in the expression response of heat-shock genes (hsp60, hsp70 and hsp90; molecular chaperones involved in cellular stress response) to an acute non-lethal heat shock. We show significant variation in gene expression at the clutch and population levels for some, but not all hsp genes. Using pedigree information, we estimated heritabilities of the expression response of hsp genes to heat shock and demonstrated both maternal and additive genetic effects. This is the first evidence that the heat-shock response is heritable in sea turtles and operates at the embryonic stage in any reptile. The presence of heritable variation in the expression of key thermotolerance genes is necessary for sea turtles to adapt at a molecular level to warming incubation environments. PMID:26763709

  4. Functional genomics of adaptation to hypoxic cold-stress in high-altitude deer mice: transcriptomic plasticity and thermogenic performance.

    PubMed

    Cheviron, Zachary A; Connaty, Alex D; McClelland, Grant B; Storz, Jay F

    2014-01-01

    In species that are distributed across steep environmental gradients, adaptive variation in physiological performance may be attributable to transcriptional plasticity in underlying regulatory networks. Here we report the results of common-garden experiments that were designed to elucidate the role of regulatory plasticity in evolutionary adaptation to hypoxic cold-stress in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). We integrated genomic transcriptional profiles with measures of metabolic enzyme activities and whole-animal thermogenic performance under hypoxia in highland (4350 m) and lowland (430 m) mice from three experimental groups: (1) wild-caught mice that were sampled at their native elevations; (2) wild-caught/lab-reared mice that were deacclimated to low-elevation conditions in a common-garden lab environment; and (3) the F(1) progeny of deacclimated mice that were maintained under the same low-elevation common-garden conditions. In each experimental group, highland mice exhibited greater thermogenic capacities than lowland mice, and this enhanced performance was associated with upregulation of transcriptional modules that influence several hierarchical steps in the O(2) cascade, including tissue O(2) diffusion (angiogenesis) and tissue O(2) utilization (metabolic fuel use and cellular oxidative capacity). Most of these performance-related transcriptomic changes occurred over physiological and developmental timescales, suggesting that regulatory plasticity makes important contributions to fitness-related physiological performance in highland deer mice. PMID:24102503

  5. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  6. Transfer RNAs Mediate the Rapid Adaptation of Escherichia coli to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gaofei; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Gong

    2015-01-01

    Translational systems can respond promptly to sudden environmental changes to provide rapid adaptations to environmental stress. Unlike the well-studied translational responses to oxidative stress in eukaryotic systems, little is known regarding how prokaryotes respond rapidly to oxidative stress in terms of translation. In this study, we measured protein synthesis from the entire Escherichia coli proteome and found that protein synthesis was severely slowed down under oxidative stress. With unchanged translation initiation, this slowdown was caused by decreased translation elongation speed. We further confirmed by tRNA sequencing and qRT-PCR that this deceleration was caused by a global, enzymatic downregulation of almost all tRNA species shortly after exposure to oxidative agents. Elevation in tRNA levels accelerated translation and protected E. coli against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide and the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Our results showed that the global regulation of tRNAs mediates the rapid adjustment of the E. coli translation system for prompt adaptation to oxidative stress. PMID:26090660

  7. Designing Microfluidic Devices for Studying Cellular Responses Under Single or Coexisting Chemical/Electrical/Shear Stress Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzu-Yuan; Sun, Yung-Shin; Hou, Hsien-San; Wu, Shang-Ying; Zhu, Yun; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are capable of creating a precise and controllable cellular micro-environment of pH, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. They have been commonly used for in vitro cell studies by providing in vivo like surroundings. Especially, how cells response to chemical gradients, electrical fields, and shear stresses has drawn many interests since these phenomena are important in understanding cellular properties and functions. These microfluidic chips can be made of glass substrates, silicon wafers, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates, or polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) substrates. Out of these materials, PMMA substrates are cheap and can be easily processed using laser ablation and writing. Although a few microfluidic devices have been designed and fabricated for generating multiple, coexisting chemical and electrical stimuli, none of them was considered efficient enough in reducing experimental repeats, particular for screening purposes. In this report, we describe our design and fabrication of two PMMA-based microfluidic chips for investigating cellular responses, in the production of reactive oxygen species and the migration, under single or coexisting chemical/electrical/shear stress stimuli. The first chip generates five relative concentrations of 0, 1/8, 1/2, 7/8, and 1 in the culture regions, together with a shear stress gradient produced inside each of these areas. The second chip generates the same relative concentrations, but with five different electric field strengths created within each culture area. These devices not only provide cells with a precise, controllable micro-environment but also greatly increase the experimental throughput. PMID:27584698

  8. Growth Hormone Effects in Immune Stress: AKT/eNOS Signaling Module in the Cellular Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activation of the constitutive endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) with subsequent nitric oxide production are among the early cellular responses that follow in a systemic exposure of animals to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Growth hormone (GH) has been sh...

  9. Response and adaptation of photosynthesis, respiration, and antioxidant systems to elevated CO2 with environmental stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that plant photosynthesis and respiration are two fundamental and crucial physiological processes, while the critical role of the antioxidant system in response to abiotic factors is still a focus point for investigating physiological stress. Although one key metabolic process and its response to climatic change have already been reported and reviewed, an integrative review, including several biological processes at multiple scales, has not been well reported. The current review will present a synthesis focusing on the underlying mechanisms in the responses to elevated CO2 at multiple scales, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and individual aspects, particularly, for these biological processes under elevated CO2 with other key abiotic stresses, such as heat, drought, and ozone pollution, as well as nitrogen limitation. The present comprehensive review may add timely and substantial information about the topic in recent studies, while it presents what has been well established in previous reviews. First, an outline of the critical biological processes, and an overview of their roles in environmental regulation, is presented. Second, the research advances with regard to the individual subtopics are reviewed, including the response and adaptation of the photosynthetic capacity, respiration, and antioxidant system to CO2 enrichment alone, and its combination with other climatic change factors. Finally, the potential applications for plant responses at various levels to climate change are discussed. The above issue is currently of crucial concern worldwide, and this review may help in a better understanding of how plants deal with elevated CO2 using other mainstream abiotic factors, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and whole individual processes, and the better management of the ecological environment, climate change, and sustainable development. PMID:26442017

  10. Response and adaptation of photosynthesis, respiration, and antioxidant systems to elevated CO2 with environmental stress in plants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Jiang, Yanling; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that plant photosynthesis and respiration are two fundamental and crucial physiological processes, while the critical role of the antioxidant system in response to abiotic factors is still a focus point for investigating physiological stress. Although one key metabolic process and its response to climatic change have already been reported and reviewed, an integrative review, including several biological processes at multiple scales, has not been well reported. The current review will present a synthesis focusing on the underlying mechanisms in the responses to elevated CO2 at multiple scales, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and individual aspects, particularly, for these biological processes under elevated CO2 with other key abiotic stresses, such as heat, drought, and ozone pollution, as well as nitrogen limitation. The present comprehensive review may add timely and substantial information about the topic in recent studies, while it presents what has been well established in previous reviews. First, an outline of the critical biological processes, and an overview of their roles in environmental regulation, is presented. Second, the research advances with regard to the individual subtopics are reviewed, including the response and adaptation of the photosynthetic capacity, respiration, and antioxidant system to CO2 enrichment alone, and its combination with other climatic change factors. Finally, the potential applications for plant responses at various levels to climate change are discussed. The above issue is currently of crucial concern worldwide, and this review may help in a better understanding of how plants deal with elevated CO2 using other mainstream abiotic factors, including molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and whole individual processes, and the better management of the ecological environment, climate change, and sustainable development. PMID:26442017

  11. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  12. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Fernández, Yolanda; Falcón, Ana; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK) as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection. PMID:27094326

  13. Effect of chronic stress on short and long-term plasticity in dentate gyrus; study of recovery and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Radahmadi, M; Hosseini, N; Nasimi, A

    2014-11-01

    Stress dramatically affects synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus, disrupts paired-pulse facilitation and impairs long-term potentiation (LTP). This study was performed to find the effects of chronic restraint stress and recovery period on excitability, paired-pulse response, LTP and to find probable adaptation to very long stress in the dentate gyrus. Thirty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of Control, Rest-Stress (21 days stress), Stress-Rest (recovery) and Stress-Stress (42 days stress: adaptation). Chronic restraint stress was applied 6-h/day. Input-output functions, paired-pulse responses and LTP were recorded from the dentate gyrus while stimulating the perforant pathway. We found that chronic stress attenuated the responsiveness, paired-pulse response and LTP in the dentate gyrus. A 21-day recovery period, after the stress, improved all the three responses toward normal, indicating reversibility of these stress-related hippocampal changes. There was no significant adaptation to very long stress, probably due to severity of stress. PMID:25218805

  14. Global Microarray Analysis of Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 Salt Stress Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    The alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 is often exposed to salt stress in its natural habitats. In this study, we used one-colour microarrays to investigate adaptive responses of Bacillus sp. N16-5 transcriptome to long-term growth at different salinity levels (0%, 2%, 8%, and 15% NaCl) and to a sudden salt increase from 0% to 8% NaCl. The common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow at high salt conditions, such as K+ uptake, Na+ efflux, and the accumulation of organic compatible solutes (glycine betaine and ectoine), were observed in Bacillus sp. N16-5. The genes of SigB regulon involved in general stress responses and chaperone-encoding genes were also induced by high salt concentration. Moreover, the genes regulating swarming ability and the composition of the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall were also differentially expressed. The genes involved in iron uptake were down-regulated, whereas the iron homeostasis regulator Fur was up-regulated, suggesting that Fur may play a role in the salt adaption of Bacillus sp. N16-5. In summary, we present a comprehensive gene expression profiling of alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. N16-5 cells exposed to high salt stress, which would help elucidate the mechanisms underlying alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. survival in and adaptation to salt stress. PMID:26030352

  15. HSP70 Mediates Dissociation and Reassociation of the 26S Proteasome During Adaptation to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Grune, Tilman; Catalgol, Betül; Licht, Anke; Ermak, Gennady; Pickering, Andrew; Ngo, Jenny K.; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report an entirely new role for the HSP70 chaperone in dissociating 26S proteasome complexes (into free 20S proteasomes and bound 19S regulators), preserving 19S regulators, and reconstituting 26S proteasomes in the first 1-3 hours following mild oxidative stress. These responses, coupled with direct 20S proteasome activation by poly-ADP ribose polymerase in the nucleus and by PA28αβ in the cytoplasm, instantly provides cells with increased capacity to degrade oxidatively damaged proteins and to survive the initial effects of stress exposure. Subsequent adaptive (hormetic) processes (3-24 hours following stress exposure), mediated by several signal transduction pathways and involving increased transcription/translation of 20S proteasomes, immunoproteasomes, and PA28αβ, abrogate the need for 26S proteasome dissociation. During this adaptive period, HSP70 releases its bound 19S regulators, 26S proteasomes are reconstituted, and ATP-stimulated proteolysis is restored. The 26S proteasome-dependent, and ATP-stimulated, turnover of ubiquitinylated proteins is essential for normal cell metabolism, and its restoration is required for successful stress-adaptation. PMID:21767633

  16. Global Microarray Analysis of Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 Salt Stress Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    The alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 is often exposed to salt stress in its natural habitats. In this study, we used one-colour microarrays to investigate adaptive responses of Bacillus sp. N16-5 transcriptome to long-term growth at different salinity levels (0%, 2%, 8%, and 15% NaCl) and to a sudden salt increase from 0% to 8% NaCl. The common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow at high salt conditions, such as K+ uptake, Na+ efflux, and the accumulation of organic compatible solutes (glycine betaine and ectoine), were observed in Bacillus sp. N16-5. The genes of SigB regulon involved in general stress responses and chaperone-encoding genes were also induced by high salt concentration. Moreover, the genes regulating swarming ability and the composition of the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall were also differentially expressed. The genes involved in iron uptake were down-regulated, whereas the iron homeostasis regulator Fur was up-regulated, suggesting that Fur may play a role in the salt adaption of Bacillus sp. N16-5. In summary, we present a comprehensive gene expression profiling of alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. N16-5 cells exposed to high salt stress, which would help elucidate the mechanisms underlying alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. survival in and adaptation to salt stress. PMID:26030352

  17. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems.

    PubMed

    Dinakar, Challabathula; Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m(-2) s(-1) at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  18. Alternative Oxidase Pathway Optimizes Photosynthesis During Osmotic and Temperature Stress by Regulating Cellular ROS, Malate Valve and Antioxidative Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Abhaypratap; Raghavendra, Agepati S.; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 μmoles m–2 s–1 at 25°C under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 to 1.0 M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 to 10°C to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25°C), the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation), under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol) and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10°C), while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA) related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG) related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Further, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD) and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP) stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), the observed changes in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(P)H/NAD(P) and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the results indicated

  19. The effect of fluid mechanical stress on cellular arachidonic acid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Rhee, B. G.; Eskin, S. G.; Hall, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of sublytic levels of mechanical perturations of cells on cell metabolism were investigated by analyzing the products of arachidonic acid (used as a marker metabolite) in blood platelets, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and cultured umbilical-vein endothelial cells after the suspensions of these cells were subjected to a shear stress in a modified viscometer. It is shown that the sublytic levels of mechanical stress stimulated the arachidonic acid metabolism in all these cell types. Possible biological implications of this stress-metabolism coupling are discussed.

  20. Replicate altitudinal clines reveal that evolutionary flexibility underlies adaptation to drought stress in annual Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Kooyers, Nicholas J; Greenlee, Anna B; Colicchio, Jack M; Oh, Morgan; Blackman, Benjamin K

    2015-04-01

    Examining how morphology, life history and physiology vary along environmental clines can reveal functional insight into adaptations to climate and thus inform predictions about evolutionary responses to global change. Widespread species occurring over latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in seasonal water availability are excellent systems for investigating multivariate adaptation to drought stress. Under common garden conditions, we characterized variation in 27 traits for 52 annual populations of Mimulus guttatus sampled from 10 altitudinal transects. We also assessed variation in the critical photoperiod for flowering and surveyed neutral genetic markers to control for demography when analyzing clinal patterns. Many drought escape (e.g. flowering time) and drought avoidance (e.g. specific leaf area, succulence) traits exhibited geographic or climatic clines, which often remained significant after accounting for population structure. Critical photoperiod and flowering time in glasshouse conditions followed distinct clinal patterns, indicating different aspects of seasonal phenology confer adaptation to unique agents of selection. Although escape and avoidance traits were negatively correlated range-wide, populations from sites with short growing seasons produced both early flowering and dehydration avoidance phenotypes. Our results highlight how abundant genetic variation in the component traits that build multivariate adaptations to drought stress provides flexibility for intraspecific adaptation to diverse climates. PMID:25407964

  1. Stress Responses, Adaptation, and Virulence of Bacterial Pathogens During Host Gastrointestinal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Flint, Annika; Butcher, James; Stintzi, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Invading pathogens are exposed to a multitude of harmful conditions imposed by the host gastrointestinal tract and immune system. Bacterial defenses against these physical and chemical stresses are pivotal for successful host colonization and pathogenesis. Enteric pathogens, which are encountered due to the ingestion of or contact with contaminated foods or materials, are highly successful at surviving harsh conditions to colonize and cause the onset of host illness and disease. Pathogens such as Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Salmonella, Listeria, and virulent strains of Escherichia have evolved elaborate defense mechanisms to adapt to the diverse range of stresses present along the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, these pathogens contain a multitude of defenses to help survive and escape from immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. This chapter focuses on characterized bacterial defenses against pH, osmotic, oxidative, and nitrosative stresses with emphasis on both the direct and indirect mechanisms that contribute to the survival of each respective stress response. PMID:27227312

  2. Potential of Radiation-Induced Cellular Stress for Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 and Killing of Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-02-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV-1 for last two decades has reduced mortality of patients through extension of nonsymptomatic phase of infection. However, HIV-1 can be preserved in long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals, and potentially in macrophages and astrocytes. Reactivation of viral replication is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus (shock and kill strategy). In this opinion piece, we consider potential application of therapeutic doses of irradiation, the well-known and effective stress signal that induces DNA damage and activates cellular stress response, to resolve two problems: activate HIV-1 replication and virion production in persistent reservoirs under cART and deplete infected cells through selective cell killing using DNA damage responses. PMID:26765533

  3. Host homeostatic responses to alcohol-induced cellular stress in animal models of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, He Joe; Murray, Gary J; Jung, Mary Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Humans develop various clinical phenotypes of severe alcoholic liver disease, including alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis, generally after decades of heavy drinking. In such individuals, following each episode of drinking, their livers experience heightened intracellular and extracellular stresses that are closely associated with alcohol consumption and alcohol metabolism. This article focuses on the latest advances made in animal models on evolutionarily conserved homeostatic mechanisms for coping with and resolving these stress conditions. The mechanisms discussed include the stress-activated protein kinase JNK, energy regulator AMPK, autophagy and the inflammatory response. Over time, the host may respond variably to stress with protective mechanisms that are critical in determining an individual's vulnerability to developing severe alcoholic liver disease. A systematic review of these mechanisms and their temporal changes in animal models provides the basis for general conclusions, and raises questions for future studies. The relevance of these data to human conditions is also discussed. PMID:26293978

  4. Time-Course Determination of Cellular Stress Responses Elicited by Engineered Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being incorporated continuously into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigating potential pathways. ...

  5. Adaptive unstructured meshing for thermal stress analysis of built-up structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured meshing technique for mechanical and thermal stress analysis of built-up structures has been developed. A triangular membrane finite element and a new plate bending element are evaluated on a panel with a circular cutout and a frame stiffened panel. The adaptive unstructured meshing technique, without a priori knowledge of the solution to the problem, generates clustered elements only where needed. An improved solution accuracy is obtained at a reduced problem size and analysis computational time as compared to the results produced by the standard finite element procedure.

  6. Stress and strain adaptation in load-dependent remodeling of the embryonic left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Faas, Daniela; Sedmera, David

    2013-01-01

    Altered pressure in the developing left ventricle (LV) results in altered morphology and tissue material properties. Mechanical stress and strain may play a role in the regulating process. This study showed that confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction, and finite element analysis can provide a detailed model of stress and strain in the trabeculated embryonic heart. The method was used to test the hypothesis that end-diastolic strains are normalized after altered loading of the LV during the stages of trabecular compaction and chamber formation. Stage-29 chick LVs subjected to pressure overload and underload at stage 21 were reconstructed with full trabecular morphology from confocal images and analyzed with finite element techniques. Measured material properties and intraventricular pressures were specified in the models. The results show volume-weighted end-diastolic von Mises stress and strain averaging 50–82% higher in the trabecular tissue than in the compact wall. The volume-weighted-average stresses for the entire LV were 115, 64, and 147 Pa in control, underloaded, and overloaded models, while strains were 11, 7, and 4%; thus, neither was normalized in a volume-weighted sense. Localized epicardial strains at mid-longitudinal level were similar among the three groups and to strains measured from high-resolution ultrasound images. Sensitivity analysis showed changes in material properties are more significant than changes in geometry in the overloaded strain adaptation, although resulting stress was similar in both types of adaptation. These results emphasize the importance of appropriate metrics and the role of trabecular tissue in evaluating the evolution of stress and strain in relation to pressure-induced adaptation. PMID:23254562

  7. Testing the Adaptation to Poverty-Related Stress Model: Predicting Psychopathology Symptoms in Families Facing Economic Hardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, Martha E.; Raviv, Tali; Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Etter, Erica M.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the Adaptation to Poverty-related Stress Model and its proposed relations between poverty-related stress, effortful and involuntary stress responses, and symptoms of psychopathology in an ethnically diverse sample of low-income children and their parents. Prospective Hierarchical Linear Modeling analyses conducted with 98…

  8. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Van Aken, Olivier; Schwarzländer, Markus; Belt, Katharina; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements. PMID:27021189

  9. Transcriptome Analysis in Tardigrade Species Reveals Specific Molecular Pathways for Stress Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A.; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O.; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant. PMID:22563243

  10. Metabolic Changes Associated with Adaptation of Plant Cells to Water Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David; Handa, Sangita; Bressan, Ray A.

    1986-01-01

    Suspension cultured cells of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv VFNT Cherry) adapted to water stress induced with polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG), exhibit marked alterations in free amino acid pools (Handa et al. 1983 Plant Physiol 73: 834-843). Using computer simulation models the in vivo rates of synthesis and utilization and compartmentation of free amino acid pools were determined from 15N labeling kinetics after substituting [15N]ammonium and [15N]nitrate for the 14N salts in the culture medium of cell lines adapted to 0% and 25% PEG. The 300-fold elevated proline pool in 25% PEG adapted cells is primarily the consequence of a 10-fold elevated rate of proline synthesis via the glutamate pathway. Ornithine was insufficiently labeled to serve as a major precursor for proline. Our calculations suggest that the rate of proline synthesis only slightly exceeds the rate required to sustain both protein synthesis and proline pool maintenance with growth. Mechanisms must operate to restrict proline oxidation in adapted cells. The kinetics of labeling of proline in 25% PEG adapted cells are consistent with a single, greatly enlarged metabolic pool of proline. The depletion of glutamine in adapted cells appears to be a consequence of a selective depletion of a large, metabolically inactive storage pool present in unadapted cultures. The labeling kinetics of the amino nitrogen groups of glutamine and glutamate are consistent with the operation of the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle in both cell lines. However, we could not conclusively discriminate between the exclusive operation of the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle and a 10 to 20% contribution of the glutamate dehydrogenase pathway of ammonia assimilation. Adaptation to water stress leads to increased nitrogen flux from glutamate into alanine and γ-aminobutyrate, suggesting increased pyruvate availability and increased rates of glutamate decarboxylation. Both alanine and

  11. In vivo cellular imaging of various stress/response pathways using AAV following axonal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kosuke; Nishiguchi, Koji M; Yokoyama, Yu; Tomiyama, Yusuke; Tsuda, Satoru; Yasuda, Masayuki; Maekawa, Shigeto; Nakazawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is instigated by various factors, including axonal injury, which eventually leads to a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). To study various pathways reportedly involved in the pathogenesis of RGC death caused by axonal injury, seven pathways were investigated. Pathway-specific fluorescent protein-coded reporters were each packaged into an adeno-associated virus (AAV). After producing axonal injury in the eye, injected with AAV to induce RGC death, the temporal activity of each stress-related pathway was monitored in vivo through the detection of fluorescent RGCs using confocal ophthalmoscopy. We identified the activation of ATF6 and MCP-1 pathways involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and macrophage recruitment, respectively, as early markers of RGC stress that precede neuronal death. Conversely, inflammatory responses probed by NF-κB and cell-death-related pathway p53 were most prominent in the later phases, when RGC death was already ongoing. AAV-mediated delivery of stress/response reporters followed by in vivo cellular imaging is a powerful strategy to characterize the temporal aspects of complex molecular pathways involved in retinal diseases. The identification of promoter elements that are activated before the death of RGCs enables the development of pre-emptive gene therapy, exclusively targeting the early phases of diseased cells. PMID:26670005

  12. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier–Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. PMID:24664988

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael B; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue: Electrons, water and rice fields: plant response and adaptation to flooding and submergence stress

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Michael B.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2015-01-01

    Flooding and submergence impose widespread and unpredictable environmental stresses on plants and depress the yield of most food crops. The problem is increasing, as is the need for greater food production from an expanding human population. The incompatibility of these opposing trends creates an urgent need to improve crop resilience to flooding in its multifarious forms. This Special Issue brings together research findings from diverse plant species to address the challenge of enhancing adaptation to flooding in major crops and learning from tactics of wetland plants. Here we provide an overview of the articles, with attempts to summarize how recent research results are being used to produce varieties of crop plants with greater flooding tolerance, notably in rice. The progress is considerable and based firmly on molecular and physiological research findings. The article also sets out how next-generation improvements in crop tolerance are likely to be achieved and highlights some of the new research that is guiding the development of improved varieties. The potential for non-model species from the indigenous riparian flora to uncover and explain novel adaptive mechanisms of flooding tolerance that may be introduced into crop species is also explored. The article begins by considering how, despite the essential role of water in sustaining plant life, floodwater can threaten its existence unless appropriate adaptations are present. Central to resolving the contradiction is the distinction between the essential role of cellular water as the source of electrons and protons used to build and operate the plant after combining with CO2 and O2 and the damaging role of extracellular water that, in excess, interferes with the union of these gases with photosynthetic or respiratory electrons and protons. PMID:26174144

  15. Stress-Regulated Translational Attenuation Adapts Mitochondrial Protein Import Through Tim17A Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rainbolt, T. Kelly; Atanassova, Neli; Genereux, Joseph C.; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stress-regulated signaling pathways protect mitochondrial proteostasis, and thus mitochondrial function, from pathologic insults. Despite the importance of stress-regulated signaling pathways in mitochondrial proteome maintenance, the molecular mechanisms by which these pathways maintain mitochondrial proteostasis remain largely unknown. Here, we identify Tim17A as a stress-regulated subunit of the Translocase of the Inner Membrane 23 (TIM23) mitochondrial protein import complex. We show that Tim17A protein levels are decreased downstream of stress-regulated translational attenuation induced by eIF2α phosphorylation through a mechanism dependent on the mitochondrial protease YME1L. Furthermore, we demonstrate that decreasing Tim17A protein levels attenuates TIM23-dependent protein import, promotes the induction of mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response-associated proteostasis genes, and confers stress-resistance in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Thus, our results indicate that Tim17A degradation is a stress-responsive mechanism by which cells adapt mitochondrial protein import efficiency and promote mitochondrial proteostasis in response to the numerous pathologic insults that induce stress-regulated translation attenuation. PMID:24315374

  16. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease—age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network. PMID:26378592

  17. Codon-biased translation can be regulated by wobble-base tRNA modification systems during cellular stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Lauren; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    tRNA (tRNA) is a key molecule used for protein synthesis, with multiple points of stress-induced regulation that can include transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and has the potential to influence specific anticodon-codon interactions and regulate translation. Notably, altered tRNA modification has been linked to mitochondrial diseases and cancer progression. In this review, specific to Eukaryotic systems, we discuss how recent systems-level analyses using a bioanalytical platform have revealed that there is extensive reprogramming of tRNA modifications in response to cellular stress and during cell cycle progression. Combined with genome-wide codon bias analytics and gene expression studies, a model emerges in which stress-induced reprogramming of tRNA drives the translational regulation of critical response proteins whose transcripts display a distinct codon bias. Termed Modification Tunable Transcripts (MoTTs),1 we define them as (1) transcripts that use specific degenerate codons and codon biases to encode critical stress response proteins, and (2) transcripts whose translation is influenced by changes in wobble base tRNA modification. In this review we note that the MoTTs translational model is also applicable to the process of stop-codon recoding for selenocysteine incorporation, as stop-codon recoding involves a selective codon bias and modified tRNA to decode selenocysteine during the translation of a key subset of oxidative stress response proteins. Further, we discuss how in addition to RNA modification analytics, the comprehensive characterization of translational regulation of specific transcripts requires a variety of tools, including high coverage codon-reporters, ribosome profiling and linked genomic and proteomic approaches. Together these tools will yield important new insights into the role of translational

  18. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:27106762

  19. Complex coordination of multi-scale cellular responses to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luís L; Sánchez, Claudia; Santos, Helena; Voit, Eberhard O

    2011-03-01

    Cells and organisms are regularly exposed to a variety of stresses, and effective responses are a matter of survival. The article describes a multi-scale experimental and dynamical modeling analysis that clearly indicates concerted stress control in different temporal and organizational domains, and a strong synergy between the dynamics of genes, proteins and metabolites. Specifically, we show with in vivo NMR measurements of metabolic profiles that baker's yeast responds to a paradigmatic stress, heat, at three organizational levels and in two time regimes. At the metabolic level, an almost immediate response is mounted. However, this response is a "quick fix" in comparison to a much more effective response that had been pre-organized in earlier periods of heat stress and is an order of magnitude stronger. Equipped with the metabolic profile data, our modeling efforts resulted in a crisp, quantitative separation of response actions at the levels of metabolic control and gene regulation. They also led to predictions of necessary changes in protein levels and clearly demonstrated that formerly observed temperature profiles of key enzyme activities are not sufficient to explain the accumulation of trehalose as an immediate response to sudden heat stress. PMID:21088798

  20. Impact of silicon on Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) root traits by regulating growth parameters, cellular antioxidants and stress modulators under arsenic stress.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Chandana; Khan, Ehasanullah; Panthri, Medha; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Gupta, Meetu

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) is an emerging pollutant causing inhibition in growth and development of plants resulting into phytotoxicity. On the other hand, silicon (Si) has been suggested as a modulator in abiotic and biotic stresses that, enhances plant's physiological adaptations in response to several stresses including heavy metal stress. In this study, we used roots of hydroponically grown 14 day old seedlings of Brassica juncea var. Varuna treated with 150 μM As, 1.5 mM Si and both in combination for 96 h duration. Application of Si modulated the effect of As by improving morphological traits of root along with the development of both primary and lateral roots. Changes observed in root traits showed positive correlation with As induced cell death, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and intracellular superoxide radicals (O2(-)). Addition of 1.5 mM Si during As stress increased accumulation of As in roots. Mineral nutrient analysis was done using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique and positively correlated with increased cysteine, proline, MDA, H2O2 and activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and APX). The results obtained from the above biochemical approaches support the protective and active role of Si in the regulation of As stress through the changes in root developmental process. PMID:27038600

  1. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Gøran; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Holden, Geir; Hallén, Jostein; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Sveen, Ole; Skaug, Arne; Paur, Ingvild; Bastani, Nasser E; Østgaard, Hege Nymo; Buer, Charlotte; Midttun, Magnus; Freuchen, Fredrik; Wiig, Håvard; Ulseth, Elisabeth Tallaksen; Garthe, Ina; Blomhoff, Rune; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2014-01-01

    In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, we investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on endurance training adaptations in humans. Fifty-four young men and women were randomly allocated to receive either 1000 mg of vitamin C and 235 mg of vitamin E or a placebo daily for 11 weeks. During supplementation, the participants completed an endurance training programme consisting of three to four sessions per week (primarily of running), divided into high-intensity interval sessions [4–6 × 4–6 min; >90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] and steady state continuous sessions (30–60 min; 70–90% of HRmax). Maximal oxygen uptake (), submaximal running and a 20 m shuttle run test were assessed and blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected, before and after the intervention. Participants in the vitamin C and E group increased their (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5%) and performance in the 20 m shuttle test (10 ± 11%) to the same degree as those in the placebo group (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5% and 14 ± 17%, respectively). However, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX4) and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) increased in the m. vastus lateralis in the placebo group by 59 ± 97% and 19 ± 51%, respectively, but not in the vitamin C and E group (COX4: −13 ± 54%; PGC-1α: −13 ± 29%; P ≤ 0.03, between groups). Furthermore, mRNA levels of CDC42 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) in the trained muscle were lower in the vitamin C and E group than in the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Daily vitamin C and E supplementation attenuated increases in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis following endurance training. However, no clear interactions were detected for improvements in and running performance. Consequently, vitamin C and E supplementation hampered cellular adaptations in the exercised muscles, and although this did not translate to

  2. Stress, ageing and their influence on functional, cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Vitlic, Ana; Lord, Janet M; Phillips, Anna C

    2014-06-01

    The immune response is essential for keeping an organism healthy and for defending it from different types of pathogens. It is a complex system that consists of a large number of components performing different functions. The adequate and controlled interaction between these components is necessary for a robust and strong immune response. There are, however, many factors that interfere with the way the immune response functions. Stress and ageing now consistently appear in the literature as factors that act upon the immune system in the way that is often damaging. This review focuses on the role of stress and ageing in altering the robustness of the immune response first separately, and then simultaneously, discussing the effects that emerge from their interplay. The special focus is on the psychological stress and the impact that it has at different levels, from the whole system to the individual molecules, resulting in consequences for physical health. PMID:24562499

  3. Sexually dimorphic adaptations in basal maternal stress physiology during pregnancy and implications for fetal development.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Campbell, Tavis; Letourneau, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    There is clear evidence of reciprocal exchange of information between the mother and fetus during pregnancy but the majority of research in this area has focussed on the fetus as a recipient of signals from the mother. Specifically, physiological signals produced by the maternal stress systems in response to the environment may carry valuable information about the state of the external world. Prenatal stress produces sex-specific adaptations within fetal physiology that have pervasive and long-lasting effects on development. Little is known, however, about the effects of sex-specific fetal signals on maternal adaptations to pregnancy. The current prospective study examined sexually dimorphic adaptations within maternal stress physiology, including the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and associations with fetal growth. Using diurnal suites of saliva collected in early and late pregnancy, we demonstrate that basal cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) differ by fetal sex. Women carrying female fetuses displayed greater autonomic arousal and flatter (but more elevated) diurnal cortisol patterns compared to women carrying males. Women with flatter daytime cortisol trajectories and more blunted sAA awakening responses also had infants with lower birth weight. These maternal adaptations are consistent with sexually dimorphic fetal developmental/evolutionary adaptation strategies that favor growth for males and conservation of resources for females. The findings provide new evidence to suggest that the fetus contributes to maternal HPA axis and ANS regulation during pregnancy and that these systems also contribute to the regulation of fetal growth. PMID:25827961

  4. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  5. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm2 at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  6. Environmental adaptability and stress tolerance of Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea and it can reside in human, fish, frogs and water. In this study, we performed an in-depth annotation of the genes in its genome related to adaptation to the various environmental niches. Results L. hongkongensis possessed genes for DNA repair and recombination, basal transcription, alternative σ-factors and 109 putative transcription factors, allowing DNA repair and global changes in gene expression in response to different environmental stresses. For acid stress, it possessed a urease gene cassette and two arc gene clusters. For alkaline stress, it possessed six CDSs for transporters of the monovalent cation/proton antiporter-2 and NhaC Na+:H+ antiporter families. For heavy metals acquisition and tolerance, it possessed CDSs for iron and nickel transport and efflux pumps for other metals. For temperature stress, it possessed genes related to chaperones and chaperonins, heat shock proteins and cold shock proteins. For osmotic stress, 25 CDSs were observed, mostly related to regulators for potassium ion, proline and glutamate transport. For oxidative and UV light stress, genes for oxidant-resistant dehydratase, superoxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, exclusion and export of redox-cycling antibiotics, redox balancing, DNA repair, reduction of disulfide bonds, limitation of iron availability and reduction of iron-sulfur clusters are present. For starvation, it possessed phosphorus and, despite being asaccharolytic, carbon starvation-related CDSs. Conclusions The L. hongkongensis genome possessed a high variety of genes for adaptation to acid, alkaline, temperature, osmotic, oxidative, UV light and starvation stresses and acquisition of and tolerance to heavy metals. PMID:21711489

  7. Adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution in rat mandible during bone growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Fujitani, W.; Ishimoto, T.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Biological apatite (BAp) c-axis orientation strongly depends on stress distribution in vivo and tends to align along the principal stress direction in bones. Dentulous mandible is subjected to a complicated stress condition in vivo during chewing but few studies have been carried out on the BAp c-axis orientation; so the adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution was examined in rat dentulous mandible during bone growth and mastication. Female SD rats 4 to 14 weeks old were prepared, and the bone mineral density (BMD) and BAp crystal orientation were analyzed in a cross-section of mandible across the first molar focusing on two positions: separated from and just under the tooth root on the same cross-section perpendicular to the mesiodistal axis. The degree of BAp orientation was analyzed by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer using Cu-Kα radiation equipped with a detector of curved one-dimensional PSPC and two-dimensional PSPC in the reflection and transmission optics, respectively. BMD quickly increased during bone growth up to 14 weeks, although it was independent of the position from the tooth root. In contrast, BAp crystal orientation strongly depended on the age and the position from the tooth root, even in the same cross-section and direction, especially along the mesiodistal and the biting axes. With increased biting stress during bone growth, the degree of BAp orientation increased along the mesiodistal axis in a position separated from the tooth root more than that near the tooth root. In contrast, BAp preferential alignment clearly appeared along the biting axis near the tooth root. We conclude that BAp orientation rather than BMD sensitively adapts to local stress distribution, especially from the chewing stress in vivo in the mandible.

  8. Tualang honey improves human corneal epithelial progenitor cell migration and cellular resistance to oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jun Jie; Azmi, Siti Maisura; Yong, Yoke Keong; Cheah, Hong Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin; Shaharuddin, Bakiah

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells with enhanced resistance to oxidative stress after in vitro expansion have been shown to have improved engraftment and regenerative capacities. Such cells can be generated by preconditioning them with exposure to an antioxidant. In this study we evaluated the effects of Tualang honey (TH), an antioxidant-containing honey, on human corneal epithelial progenitor (HCEP) cells in culture. Cytotoxicity, gene expression, migration, and cellular resistance to oxidative stress were evaluated. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that HCEP cells were holoclonal and expressed epithelial stem cell marker p63 without corneal cytokeratin 3. Cell viability remained unchanged after cells were cultured with 0.004, 0.04, and 0.4% TH in the medium, but it was significantly reduced when the concentration was increased to 3.33%. Cell migration, tested using scratch migration assay, was significantly enhanced when cells were cultured with TH at 0.04% and 0.4%. We also found that TH has hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging ability, although a trace level of H2O2 was detected in the honey in its native form. Preconditioning HCEP cells with 0.4% TH for 48 h showed better survival following H2O2-induced oxidative stress at 50 µM than untreated group, with a significantly lower number of dead cells (15.3 ± 0.4%) were observed compared to the untreated population (20.5 ± 0.9%, p<0.01). Both TH and ascorbic acid improved HCEP viability following induction of 100 µM H2O2, but the benefit was greater with TH treatment than with ascorbic acid. However, no significant advantage was demonstrated using 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde, a compound that was found abundant in TH using GC/MS analysis. This suggests that the cellular anti-oxidative capacity in HCEP cells was augmented by native TH and was attributed to its antioxidant properties. In conclusion, TH possesses antioxidant properties and can improve cell migration and cellular resistance to oxidative stress in HCEP cells

  9. Tualang Honey Improves Human Corneal Epithelial Progenitor Cell Migration and Cellular Resistance to Oxidative Stress In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jun Jie; Azmi, Siti Maisura; Yong, Yoke Keong; Cheah, Hong Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin; Shaharuddin, Bakiah

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells with enhanced resistance to oxidative stress after in vitro expansion have been shown to have improved engraftment and regenerative capacities. Such cells can be generated by preconditioning them with exposure to an antioxidant. In this study we evaluated the effects of Tualang honey (TH), an antioxidant-containing honey, on human corneal epithelial progenitor (HCEP) cells in culture. Cytotoxicity, gene expression, migration, and cellular resistance to oxidative stress were evaluated. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that HCEP cells were holoclonal and expressed epithelial stem cell marker p63 without corneal cytokeratin 3. Cell viability remained unchanged after cells were cultured with 0.004, 0.04, and 0.4% TH in the medium, but it was significantly reduced when the concentration was increased to 3.33%. Cell migration, tested using scratch migration assay, was significantly enhanced when cells were cultured with TH at 0.04% and 0.4%. We also found that TH has hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging ability, although a trace level of H2O2 was detected in the honey in its native form. Preconditioning HCEP cells with 0.4% TH for 48 h showed better survival following H2O2-induced oxidative stress at 50 µM than untreated group, with a significantly lower number of dead cells (15.3±0.4%) were observed compared to the untreated population (20.5±0.9%, p<0.01). Both TH and ascorbic acid improved HCEP viability following induction of 100 µM H2O2, but the benefit was greater with TH treatment than with ascorbic acid. However, no significant advantage was demonstrated using 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furancarboxaldehyde, a compound that was found abundant in TH using GC/MS analysis. This suggests that the cellular anti-oxidative capacity in HCEP cells was augmented by native TH and was attributed to its antioxidant properties. In conclusion, TH possesses antioxidant properties and can improve cell migration and cellular resistance to oxidative stress in HCEP cells in

  10. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  11. The beneficial role of proteolysis in skeletal muscle growth and stress adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan A V; Al-Khalaf, Mohammad; Megeney, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    Muscle atrophy derived from excessive proteolysis is a hallmark of numerous disease conditions. Accordingly, the negative consequences of skeletal muscle protein breakdown often overshadow the critical nature of proteolytic systems in maintaining normal cellular function. Here, we discuss the major cellular proteolysis machinery-the ubiquitin/proteosome system, the autophagy/lysosomal system, and caspase-mediated protein cleavage-and the critical role of these protein machines in establishing and preserving muscle health. We examine how ordered degradation modifies (1) the spatiotemporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors during myoblast differentiation, (2) membrane fusion during myotube formation, (3) sarcomere remodeling and muscle growth following physical stress, and (4) energy homeostasis during nutrient deprivation. Finally, we review the origin and etiology of a number of myopathies and how these devastating conditions arise from inborn errors in proteolysis. PMID:27054028

  12. Genetic Adaptation to Salt Stress in Experimental Evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina; He, Zhili; Joachimiak, Marcin; Zane, Grant; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Stahl, David; Wall, Judy; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Baidoo, Edward; Benke, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    High salinity is one of the most common environmental stressors. In order to understand how environmental organisms adapt to salty environment, an experiment evolution with sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough was conducted. Control lines and salt-stressed lines (6 lines each) grown in minimal medium LS4D or LS4D + 100 mM NaCl were transferred for 1200 generations. The salt tolerance was tested with LS4D supplemented with 250 mM NaCl. Statistical analysis of the growth data suggested that all lines adapted to their evolutionary environment. In addition, the control lines performed better than the ancestor with faster growth rate, higher biomass yield and shorter lag phase under salty environment they did not evolve in. However, the salt-adapted lines performed better than the control lines on measures of growth rate and yield under salty environment, suggesting that the salt?evolved lines acquired mutations specific to having extra salt in LS4D. Growth data and gene transcription data suggested that populations tended to improve till 1000 generations and active mutations tended to be fixed at the stage of 1000 generations. Point mutations and insertion/deletions were identified in isolated colonies from salt-adapted and control lines via whole genome sequencing. Glu, Gln and Ala appears to be the major osmoprotectant in evolved salt-stressed line. Ongoing studies are now characterizing the contribution of specific mutations identified in the salt-evolved D. vulgaris.

  13. Thermotolerant yeasts selected by adaptive evolution express heat stress response at 30 °C

    PubMed Central

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to long-term environmental changes across >100s of generations results in adapted phenotypes, but little is known about how metabolic and transcriptional responses are optimized in these processes. Here, we show that thermotolerant yeast strains selected by adaptive laboratory evolution to grow at increased temperature, activated a constitutive heat stress response when grown at the optimal ancestral temperature, and that this is associated with a reduced growth rate. This preventive response was perfected by additional transcriptional changes activated when the cultivation temperature is increased. Remarkably, the sum of global transcriptional changes activated in the thermotolerant strains when transferred from the optimal to the high temperature, corresponded, in magnitude and direction, to the global changes observed in the ancestral strain exposed to the same transition. This demonstrates robustness of the yeast transcriptional program when exposed to heat, and that the thermotolerant strains streamlined their path to rapidly and optimally reach post-stress transcriptional and metabolic levels. Thus, long-term adaptation to heat improved yeasts ability to rapidly adapt to increased temperatures, but this also causes a trade-off in the growth rate at the optimal ancestral temperature. PMID:27229477

  14. Thermotolerant yeasts selected by adaptive evolution express heat stress response at 30 °C.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to long-term environmental changes across >100s of generations results in adapted phenotypes, but little is known about how metabolic and transcriptional responses are optimized in these processes. Here, we show that thermotolerant yeast strains selected by adaptive laboratory evolution to grow at increased temperature, activated a constitutive heat stress response when grown at the optimal ancestral temperature, and that this is associated with a reduced growth rate. This preventive response was perfected by additional transcriptional changes activated when the cultivation temperature is increased. Remarkably, the sum of global transcriptional changes activated in the thermotolerant strains when transferred from the optimal to the high temperature, corresponded, in magnitude and direction, to the global changes observed in the ancestral strain exposed to the same transition. This demonstrates robustness of the yeast transcriptional program when exposed to heat, and that the thermotolerant strains streamlined their path to rapidly and optimally reach post-stress transcriptional and metabolic levels. Thus, long-term adaptation to heat improved yeasts ability to rapidly adapt to increased temperatures, but this also causes a trade-off in the growth rate at the optimal ancestral temperature. PMID:27229477

  15. Physiological, cellular and biochemical thermal stress response of intertidal shrimps with different vertical distributions: Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Costa, Pedro M; Larguinho, Miguel; Vinagre, Catarina; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-05-01

    The ability to cope with high temperature variations is a critical factor in intertidal communities. Two species of intertidal rocky shore shrimps (Palaemon sp.) with different vertical distributions were collected from the Portuguese coast in order to test if they were differentially sensitive to thermal stress. Three distinct levels of biological organization (organismal, biochemical, and cellular) were surveyed. The shrimp were exposed to a constant rate of temperature increase of 1°C x h(-1), starting at 20°C until reaching the CTMax (critical thermal maximum). During heat stress, two biomarkers of protein damage were quantified in the muscle via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: heat shock proteins HSP70 (hsp70/hsc70) and total ubiquitin. Muscle histopathological alterations caused by temperature were also evaluated. CTMax values were not significantly different between the congeners (P. elegans 33.4 ± 0.5 °C; P. serratus 33.0 ± 0.5 °C). Biomarker levels did not increase along the temperature trial, but P. elegans (higher intertidal) showed higher amounts of HSP70 and total ubiquitin than P. serratus (lower intertidal). HSP70 and total ubiquitin levels showed a positive significant correlation in both species, suggesting that their association is important in thermal tolerance. Histopathological observations of muscle tissue in P. serratus showed no gross alterations due to temperature but did show localized atrophy of muscle fibers at CTMax. In P. elegans, alterations occurred at a larger scale, showing multiple foci of atrophic muscular fascicles caused by necrotic or autolytic processes. In conclusion, Palaemon congeners displayed different responses to stress at a cellular level, with P. elegans having greater biomarker levels and histopathological alterations. PMID:25582544

  16. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  17. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Teresa R; Veri, Amanda O; Polvi, Elizabeth J; Li, Xinliu; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90's functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  18. A study on the cellular structure during stress solicitation induced by BioMEMS.

    PubMed

    Fior, Raffaella; Maggiolino, Stefano; Codan, Barbara; Lazzarino, Marco; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of single cells is a topic in continuous evolution. The complexity of the cellular matrix, the huge variety of cells, the interaction of one cell with the other are all factors that must be taken into consideration in the study of the cellular structure and mechanics. In this project, we developed different types of bioMEMS for cell's stretching, both transparent devices based on silicon nitride and non-transparent silicon based. While the use of silicon devices is limited to reflection microscopes, transparent bioMEMS can be used with transmission and reflection microscopes but can also be easily coupled with other tools such as patch clamp analyzers or atomic force microscope. This improvement will open brand new possibilities in the biological investigation field. We used these two BioMEMS to stretch a single cell in a controlled way and, as a first investigation, we focused on its morphology. We noticed that during a controlled stretch, cells react to the applied deformation. A hysteretic behavior on the ratio between area and perimeter has been highlighted. PMID:22254838

  19. Stress-induced activation of brown adipose tissue prevents obesity in conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Razzoli, Maria; Frontini, Andrea; Gurney, Allison; Mondini, Eleonora; Cubuk, Cankut; Katz, Liora S.; Cero, Cheryl; Bolan, Patrick J.; Dopazo, Joaquin; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Cinti, Saverio; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Stress-associated conditions such as psychoemotional reactivity and depression have been paradoxically linked to either weight gain or weight loss. This bi-directional effect of stress is not understood at the functional level. Here we tested the hypothesis that pre-stress level of adaptive thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue (BAT) functions explain the vulnerability or resilience to stress-induced obesity. Methods We used wt and triple β1,β2,β3−Adrenergic Receptors knockout (β-less) mice exposed to a model of chronic subordination stress (CSS) at either room temperature (22 °C) or murine thermoneutrality (30 °C). A combined behavioral, physiological, molecular, and immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to determine stress-induced modulation of energy balance and BAT structure and function. Immortalized brown adipocytes were used for in vitro assays. Results Departing from our initial observation that βARs are dispensable for cold-induced BAT browning, we demonstrated that under physiological conditions promoting low adaptive thermogenesis and BAT activity (e.g. thermoneutrality or genetic deletion of the βARs), exposure to CSS acted as a stimulus for BAT activation and thermogenesis, resulting in resistance to diet-induced obesity despite the presence of hyperphagia. Conversely, in wt mice acclimatized to room temperature, and therefore characterized by sustained BAT function, exposure to CSS increased vulnerability to obesity. Exposure to CSS enhanced the sympathetic innervation of BAT in wt acclimatized to thermoneutrality and in β-less mice. Despite increased sympathetic innervation suggesting adrenergic-mediated browning, norepinephrine did not promote browning in βARs knockout brown adipocytes, which led us to identify an alternative sympathetic/brown adipocytes purinergic pathway in the BAT. This pathway is downregulated under conditions of low adaptive thermogenesis requirements, is induced by stress, and elicits activation

  20. Dietary lecithin potentiates thermal tolerance and cellular stress protection of milk fish (Chanos Chanos) reared under low dose endosulfan-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Minhas, P S; Ambasankar, K; Krishnani, K K; Rana, R S

    2014-12-01

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide commonly found in aquatic environments that has been found to reduce thermal tolerance of fish. Lipotropes such as the food additive, Lecithin has been shown to improve thermal tolerance in fish species. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of lipotropes (lecithin) for enhancing the thermal tolerance of Chanos chanos reared under sublethal low dose endosulfan-induced stress. Two hundred and twenty-five fish were distributed randomly into five treatments, each with three replicates. Four isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets were prepared with graded levels of lecithin: normal water and fed with control diet (En0/L0), endosulfan-treated water and fed with control diet (En/L0), endosulfan-treated water and fed with 1% (En/L1%), 1.5% (En/L 1.5%) and 2% (En/L 2%) lecithin supplemented feed. The endosulfan in treated water was maintained at the level of 1/40th of LC50 (0.52ppb). At the end of the five weeks, critical temperature maxima (CTmax), lethal temperature maxima (LTmax), critical temperature minima (CTmin) and lethal temperature minima (LTmin) were Determined. There was a significant (P<0.01) effect of dietary lecithin on temperature tolerance (CTmax, LTmax, CTmin and LTmin) of the groups fed with 1, 1.5 and 2% lecithin-supplemented diet compared to control and endosulfan-exposed groups. Positive correlations were observed between CT max and LTmax (R(2)=0.934) as well as between CTmin and LTmin (R(2)=0.9313). At the end of the thermal tolerance study, endosulfan-induced changes in cellular stress enzymes (Catalase, SOD and GST in liver and gill and neurotansmitter enzyme, brain AChE) were significantly (p<0.01) improved by dietary lecithin. We herein report the role of lecithin in enhancing the thermal tolerance and protection against cellular stress in fish exposed to an organochlorine pesticide. PMID:25455939

  1. Neighborhood disorder and telomeres: Connecting children’s exposure to community level stress and cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Theall, Katherine P.; Brett, Zoë H.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Dunn, Erin C.; Drury, Stacy S.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the utility of salivary telomere length (sTL) as an early indicator of neighborhood level social environmental risk during child development. We therefore tested the hypothesis that sTL would be associated with markers of social stress exposure in children. Children age 4–14 from 87 neighborhoods were recruited through five urban schools in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. Data were collected at the level of the child, family/household, and neighborhood. DNA was obtained from saliva using commercially available kits and sTL was determined for 104 children using quantitative PCR. Analysis was performed on 99 children who had complete data including sTL, social environmental stress, and additional covariates. The mean sTL value was 7.4 T/S (telomere signal/single copy signal) ratio units (± 2.4, range=2.5–18.0), and 4.7% of the variance in sTL was attributed to differences across neighborhoods. Children living in neighborhoods characterized by high disorder had an sTL value 3.2 units lower than children not living in high disordered environments (p<0.05) and their odds of having low relative sTL (defined as < 1 standard deviation below standardized z score mean) values was 3.43 times that of children not living in high disorder environments (adjusted OR=3.43, 95% CI=1.22, 9.62). Our findings are consistent with previous studies in adults demonstrating a strong link between psychosocial stress and sTL obtained from peripheral blood, consistent with previous studies in youth demonstrating an association between early life stress and sTL obtained from buccal cell DNA and offer increased support for the hypothesis that sTL represents a non-invasive biological indicator of psychosocial stress exposure (i.e., neighborhood disorder) able to reflect differences in stress exposure levels even in young children. PMID:23540366

  2. Loss of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel leads to alterations in light response modulating system and cellular stress response pathways: a gene expression profiling study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie M; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Frank, Mark Barton; Bebak, Melissa; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2013-10-01

    The cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy. We investigated the gene expression profiles in mouse retina with CNG channel deficiency using whole genome expression microarrays. As cones comprise only 2 to 3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, the mouse lines with CNG channel deficiency on a cone-dominant background, i.e. Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- mice, were used in our study. Comparative data analysis revealed a total of 105 genes altered in Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and 92 in Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- retinas, relative to Nrl-/- retinas, with 27 genes changed in both genotypes. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with cell signaling, cellular function maintenance and gene expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) identified 26 and 9 canonical pathways in Cnga3-/-/Nrl-/- and Cngb3-/-/Nrl-/- retinas, respectively, with 6 pathways being shared. The shared pathways include phototransduction, cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling, endothelin signaling, and EIF2/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, whereas the IL-1, CREB, and purine metabolism signaling were found to specifically associate with Cnga3 deficiency. Thus, CNG channel deficiency differentially regulates genes that affect cell processes such as phototransduction, cellular survival and gene expression, and such regulations play a crucial role(s) in the retinal adaptation to impaired cone phototransduction. Though lack of Cnga3 and Cngb3 shares many common pathways, deficiency of Cnga3 causes more significant alterations in gene expression. This work provides insights into how cones respond to impaired phototransduction at the gene expression levels. PMID:23740940

  3. Loss of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel leads to alterations in light response modulating system and cellular stress response pathways: a gene expression profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie M.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Frank, Mark Barton; Bebak, Melissa; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy. We investigated the gene expression profiles in mouse retina with CNG channel deficiency using whole genome expression microarrays. As cones comprise only 2 to 3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, the mouse lines with CNG channel deficiency on a cone-dominant background, i.e. Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− mice, were used in our study. Comparative data analysis revealed a total of 105 genes altered in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and 92 in Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, relative to Nrl−/− retinas, with 27 genes changed in both genotypes. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with cell signaling, cellular function maintenance and gene expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) identified 26 and 9 canonical pathways in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, respectively, with 6 pathways being shared. The shared pathways include phototransduction, cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling, endothelin signaling, and EIF2/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, whereas the IL-1, CREB, and purine metabolism signaling were found to specifically associate with Cnga3 deficiency. Thus, CNG channel deficiency differentially regulates genes that affect cell processes such as phototransduction, cellular survival and gene expression, and such regulations play a crucial role(s) in the retinal adaptation to impaired cone phototransduction. Though lack of Cnga3 and Cngb3 shares many common pathways, deficiency of Cnga3 causes more significant alterations in gene expression. This work provides insights into how cones respond to impaired phototransduction at the gene expression levels. PMID:23740940

  4. Cellular stress reactions assessed by gender and species in spiders from areas variously polluted with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Babczyńska, Agnieszka; Wilczek, Piotr; Dolezych, Bogdan; Migula, Paweł; Młyńska, Hanna

    2008-05-01

    In the funnel web spider Agelena labyrinthica (Agelenidae; A. l.), sheet web spider Linyphia triangularis (Linyphiidae; L. t.) and wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae; X. n.) from two differently polluted meadow sites in southern Poland, we studied the relations between antioxidant parameters (glutathione, GSH; glutathione peroxidases, GPOX, GSTPx; catalase, CAT; stress proteins-Hsp70, metallothioneins Mts), the intensity of apoptosis and necrosis, and heavy metal burdens of the midgut gland. Cellular reactions against stress caused by pollutants seemed to be sex-dependent. The concentrations of Zn and Cu in the midgut glands of male A. l. and X. n. were more than double that of the females, from both study sites. In male spiders from the heavily polluted site, both negative correlations (activity of caspase-3-like proteins vs Cu, Zn concentration; number of depolarized mitochondria vs Cu concentration) and positive correlations (number of necrotic cells vs Cu concentrations; activity of CAT vs Zn ) were noted. The defense of males against high metal content and its prooxidative effects is based mainly on GSH and CAT. In females the antioxidative reactions are species-specific and depend mainly on high peroxidase activity and on stress protein level. The increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the midgut gland of female spiders from the heavily polluted site suggests the defensive role of this process in maintaining the proper functioning of this organ. PMID:17467054

  5. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  6. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  7. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses. PMID:27325672

  8. Condition-adapted stress and longevity gene regulation by Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1/Nrf

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Riva P.; Porter Abate, Jess; Dilks, Kieran; Landis, Jessica; Ashraf, Jasmine; Murphy, Coleen T.; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Summary Studies in model organisms have identified regulatory processes that profoundly influence aging, many of which modulate resistance against environmental or metabolic stresses. In C. elegans the transcription regulator SKN-1 is important for oxidative stress resistance and acts in multiple longevity pathways. SKN-1 is the ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins, which induce Phase 2 detoxification genes in response to stress. Phase 2 enzymes defend against oxygen radicals and conjugate electrophiles that are produced by Phase 1 detoxification enzymes, which metabolize lipophilic compounds. Here we have used expression profiling to identify genes and processes that are regulated by SKN-1 under normal and stress-response conditions. Under non-stressed conditions SKN-1 upregulates numerous genes involved in detoxification, cellular repair, and other functions, and downregulates a set of genes that reduce stress resistance and lifespan. Many of these genes appear to be direct SKN-1 targets, based upon presence of predicted SKN-binding sites in their promoters. The metalloid sodium arsenite induces skn-1-dependent activation of certain detoxification gene groups, including some that were not SKN-1-upregulated under normal conditions. An organic peroxide also triggers induction of a discrete Phase 2 gene set, but additionally stimulates a broad SKN-1-independent response. We conclude that under normal conditions SKN-1 has a wide range of functions in detoxification and other processes, including modulating mechanisms that reduce lifespan. In response to stress, SKN-1 and other regulators tailor transcription programs to meet the challenge at hand. Our findings reveal striking complexity in SKN-1 functions and the regulation of systemic detoxification defenses. PMID:19575768

  9. Air-Adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans Shows High Methane Production and Develops Resistance against Oxygen Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4–1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens. PMID:25706146

  10. Cellular responses to oxidative stress: the [Ah] gene battery as a paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Nebert, D W; Petersen, D D; Fornace, A J

    1990-01-01

    A major source of oxidative stress in animals is plant stress metabolites, also termed phytoalexins. The aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive [Ah] gene battery is considered here as a model system in which we can study metabolically coordinated enzymes that respond to phytoalexin-induced oxidative stress. In the mouse, the [Ah] battery comprises at least six genes: two Phase I genes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2; and four Phase II genes, Nmo-1, Aldh-1, Ugt-1, and Gt-1. All six genes appear to be regulated positively by inducers such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other ligands of the Ah receptor. In the absence of foreign inducer, the control of Nmo-1 gene expression is independent of the control of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 gene expression. The radiation deletion homozygote c14CoS/c14CoS mouse is lacking about 1.1 centiMorgans of chromosome 7. Although having no detectable CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 activation, the untreated c14CoS/c14CoS mouse exhibits markedly elevated transcripts of the Nmo-1 gene and three growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible (gadd) genes. These data suggest that the missing region on chromosome 7 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse contains a gene(s), which we propose to call Nmo-1n, encoding a trans-acting factor(s) that is a negative effector of the Nmo-1 and gadd genes. The three other [Ah] battery Phase II genes behave similarly to Nmo-1 in the c14CoS/c14CoS mouse. This coordinated response to oxidative stress and DNA damage, by way of the release of a mammalian battery of genes from negative control, bears an interesting resemblance to the SOS response in bacteria. PMID:2272308

  11. On the synthesis of a bio-inspired dual-cellular fluidic flexible matrix composite adaptive structure based on a non-dimensional dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2013-01-01

    A recent study investigated the dynamic characteristics of an adaptive structure concept featuring dual fluidic flexible matrix composite (F2MC) cells inspired by the configuration of plant cells and cell walls. This novel bio-inspired system consists of two F2MC cells with different fiber angles connected through internal fluid circuits. It was discovered that the dual F2MC cellular structure can be characterized as a two degree of freedom damped mass-spring oscillator, and can be utilized as a vibration absorber or an enhanced actuator under different operation conditions. These results demonstrated that the concept is promising and further investigations are needed to develop methodologies for synthesizing future multi-cellular F2MC structural systems. While interesting, the previous study focused on specific case studies and analysis. That is, the outcome did not provide insight that could be generalized, or tools for synthesizing a multiple F2MC cellular structure. This paper attempts to address this important issue by developing a non-dimensional dynamic model, which reveals good physical insights as well as identifying crucial constitutive parameters for F2MC cellular design. Working with these parameters, rather than physical variables, can greatly simplify the mathematics involved in the study. A synthesis tool is then developed for the dual-cellular structure, and it is found that for each set of achievable target poles and zero, there exist multiple F2MC cellular designs, forming a design space. The presented physical insights and synthesis tool for the dual-cellular structure will be the building blocks for future investigation on cellular structures with a larger number of cells.

  12. Cellular stress response, sirtuins and UCP proteins in Alzheimer disease: role of vitagenes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting up to one third of individuals reaching the age of 80. Different integrated responses exist in the brain to detect oxidative stress which is controlled by several genes termed Vitagenes. Vitagenes encode for cytoprotective heat shock proteins (Hsp), as well as thioredoxin, sirtuins and uncouple proteins (UCPs). In the present study we evaluate stress response mechanisms in plasma and lymphocytes of AD patients, as compared to controls, in order to provide evidence of an imbalance of oxidant/antioxidant mechanisms and oxidative damage in AD patients and the possible protective role of vitagenes. We found that the levels of Sirt-1 and Sirt-2 in AD lymphocytes were significantly higher than in control subjects. Interestingly, analysis of plasma showed in AD patients increased expression of Trx, a finding associated with reduced expression of UCP1, as compared to control group. This finding can open up new neuroprotective strategies, as molecules inducing this defense mechanisms can represent a therapeutic target to minimize the deleterious consequences associated to oxidative stress, such as in brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24498895

  13. 1. Morphological Implication on Cellular Response to Mechanical Stress in Bone.

    PubMed

    Amizuka, Norio

    2016-08-01

    In bone, there are 3 distinct cell types: an osteoblast, a bone forming cell; an osteocyte embedded in bone matrix as a consequence of being differentiated from an osteoblast; and an osteoclast, a multinucleated giant cell responsible for bone resorption. Bone is always remodeled by replacing old bone with new bone (bone remodeling), by which bone can maintain its stiffness and flexibility. However, in an osteoporotic state, the disrupted balance between bone resorption and formation results in not only markedly reduced bone mass, but also in disorganized geometry of trabecules, which can often give rise to a bone fracture. Osteocytes located in their lacunae insert their fine cytoplasmic processes into narrow passageways referred to as osteocytic canaliculi. Neighboring osteocytes connect to each other by means of a gap junction in their cytoplasmic processes. Therefore, osteocytes and their lacunae/canaliculi appear to form functional syncytium called osteocytic lacunar canalicular system (OLCS). The geometrical distribution of OLCS is poorly arranged in immature bone, while it appears well-arranged distribution in mature bone (cortical bone), in which molecular transports and sensing mechanical stress seems to be efficient, and therefore, may be able to respond to mechanical stress. In this seminar, I will introduce our recent findings on the morphology and function of OLCS which may respond to mechanical stress. PMID:27441762

  14. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  15. Is the adaptation to UV stress correlated with a higher resistance to other environmental stressors? First results of the space experiment ADAPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; Wassmann, Marko; Rabbow, Elke; Moeller, Ralf; Panitz, Corinna; Horneck, Gerda; Douki, Thierry; Cadet, Jean

    The effects of one of the most important environmental factors that have influenced the biolog-ical evolution on earth, solar UV radiation, was investigated in the space experiment ADAPT in the ESA facility EXPOSE on the European ISS module Columbus. Three highly resistant microorganims from very distinct terrestrial habitats were selected: Bacillus subtilis, a well characterised spore forming soil bacterium, a natural community of cyanobacteria colonising rocks and a species of halophilic archaea isolated from rock salt, Halococcus dombrowskii. The capability of the three different microorganisms to survive in a qualitatively and quantitatively different UV climate like that in space and on Mars was investigated in EXPOSE and its effects as well as its interaction with other environmental parameters were characterised at the cellular and molecular level. In the EXPOSE facility the environmental parameters of space were provided by the exposure of samples in vented sample carriers under MgF2 windows allowing the transmittance of solar UV wavelengths down to 110 nm. In addition, the environmental conditions on the surface of Mars were simulated in earth orbit by using closed sample carriers with martian atmosphere and pressure and a martian UV climate realised by the use of suitable cut-off filters and the extraterrestrial solar UV radiation. Due to the different composition of the martian atmosphere and it's low pressure, the martian UV radiation climate is significantly different from that of today's earth. Energy-rich biologically harmful UVB and UVC radiation can penetrate to the surface of Mars. This UV radiation spectrum resembles that of the early earth before the rise of the atmospheric oxygen concentration. In the experiment ADAPT I the model organism Bacillus subtilis was used to test the hypothesis experimentally whether longer-lasting selective pressure by a mars-like UV radiation spectrum results in a higher UV resistance as well as in a higher

  16. A stress-induced cellular aging model with postnatal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, C-M; Wang, X-L; Wang, G-M; Zhang, W-J; Zhu, L; Gao, S; Yang, D-J; Qin, Y; Liang, Q-J; Chen, Y-L; Deng, H-T; Ning, K; Liang, A-B; Gao, Z-L; Xu, J

    2014-01-01

    Aging refers to the physical and functional decline of the tissues over time that often leads to age-related degenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence implicates that the senescence of neural stem cells (NSCs) is of paramount importance to the aging of central neural system (CNS). However, exploration of the underlying molecular mechanisms has been hindered by the lack of proper aging models to allow the mechanistic examination within a reasonable time window. In the present study, we have utilized a hydroxyurea (HU) treatment protocol and effectively induced postnatal subventricle NSCs to undergo cellular senescence as determined by augmented senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, decreased proliferation and differentiation capacity, increased G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and diminished apoptosis. These phenotypic changes were accompanied by a significant increase in p16, p21 and p53 expression, as well as a decreased expression of key proteins in various DNA repair pathways such as xrcc2, xrcc3 and ku70. Further proteomic analysis suggests that multiple pathways are involved in the HU-induced NSC senescence, including genes related to DNA damage and repair, mitochondrial dysfunction and the increase of ROS level. Intriguingly, compensatory mechanisms may have also been initiated to interfere with apoptotic signaling pathways and to minimize the cell death by downregulating Bcl2-associated X protein (BAX) expression. Taken together, we have successfully established a cellular model that will be of broad utilities to the molecular exploration of NSC senescence and aging. PMID:24625975

  17. Selective nitration of Tyr99 in calmodulin as a marker of cellular conditions of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Heather S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Bartlett, Ryan K; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Williams, Todd D; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Squier, Thomas C

    2003-01-01

    We examined the possible role of methionines as oxidant scavengers that prevent the peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosines within calmodulin (CaM). We used mass spectrometry to investigate the reactivity of peroxynitrite with CaM at physiological pH. The possible role of methionines in scavenging peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was assessed in wild-type CaM and following substitution of all nine methionines in CaM with leucines. We find that peroxynitrite selectively nitrates Tyr99 at physiological pH, resulting in the formation of between 0.05 and 0.25 mol of nitrotyrosine/mol of CaM when the added molar ratio of peroxynitrite per CaM was varied between 2.5 and 1.5. In wild-type CaM there is a corresponding oxidation of between 0.8 and 2.8 mol of methionine to form methionine sulfoxide. However, following site-directed substitution of all nine methionines in wild-type CaM with leucines, the extent of nitration by peroxynitrite was unchanged. These results indicate that Tyr99 is readily nitrated by peroxynitrite and that methionine side chains do not function as an antioxidant in scavenging peroxynitrite. Thus, separate reactive species are involved in the oxidation of methionine and nitration of Tyr99 whose relative concentrations are determined by solution conditions. The sensitivity of Tyr99 in CaM to nitration suggests that CaM-dependent signaling pathways are sensitive to peroxynitrite formation and that nitration of CaM represents a cellular marker of peroxynitrite-induced changes in cellular function. PMID:12693036

  18. Identification of microRNAs dysregulated in cellular senescence driven by endogenous genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nidadavolu, Lolita S.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2013-01-01

    XFE progeroid syndrome, a disease of accelerated aging caused by deficiency in the DNA repair endonuclease XPF-ERCC1, is modeled by Ercc1 knockout and hypomorphic mice. Tissues and primary cells from these mice senesce prematurely, offering a unique opportunity to identify factors that regulate senescence and aging. We compared microRNA (miRNA) expression in Ercc1−/− primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and wild-type (WT) MEFs in different growth conditions to identify miRNAs that drive cellular senescence. Microarray analysis showed three differentially expressed miRNAs in passage 7 (P7) Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 20% O2 compared to Ercc1−/− MEFs grown at 3% O2. Thirty-six differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in Ercc1−/− MEFs at P7 compared to early passage (P3) in 3% O2. Eight of these miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455*, miR-128, miR-497, miR-543, miR-450b-3p, miR-872 and miR-10b) were similarly downregulated in the liver of progeroid Ercc1−/Δ and old WT mice compared to adult WT mice, a tissue that senesces with aging. Three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-455* and miR-128) were also downregulated in Ercc1−/Δ and WT old mice kidneys compared to young WT mice. We also discovered that the miRNA expression regulator Dicer is significantly downregulated in tissues of old mice and late passage cells compared to young controls. Collectively these results support the conclusion that the miRNAs identified may play an important role in staving off cellular senescence and their altered expression could be indicative of aging. PMID:23852002

  19. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Módis, Katalin; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Oxidative stress impairs 3-MST-derived H{sub 2}S production in isolated enzyme and in isolated mitochondria. •This impairs the stimulatory bioenergetic effects of H{sub 2}S in hepatocytes. •This has implications for the pathophysiology of diseases with oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H{sub 2}S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, 100–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50–500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H{sub 2}S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (3–100 μM), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100–300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 μM). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H{sub 2}S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging.

  20. Contrasting cellular stress responses of Baikalian and Palearctic amphipods upon exposure to humic substances: environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Protopopova, Marina V; Pavlichenko, Vasiliy V; Menzel, Ralph; Putschew, Anke; Luckenbach, Till; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2014-12-01

    The species-rich, endemic amphipod fauna of Lake Baikal does not overlap with the common Palearctic fauna; however, the underlying mechanisms for this are poorly understood. Considering that Palearctic lakes have a higher relative input of natural organic compounds with a dominance of humic substances (HSs) than Lake Baikal, we addressed the question whether HSs are candidate factors that affect the different species compositions in these water bodies. We hypothesized that interspecies differences in stress defense might reveal that Baikalian amphipods are inferior to Palearctic amphipods in dealing with HS-mediated stress. In this study, two key mechanisms of general stress response were examined: heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and multixenobiotic resistance-associated transporters (ABCB1). The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that the basal levels (in 3-day acclimated animals) of hsp70 and abcb1 transcripts were lower in Baikalian species (Eulimnogammarus cyaneus, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus, Eulimnogammarus vittatus-the most typical littoral species) than in the Palearctic amphipod (Gammarus lacustris-the only Palearctic species distributed in the Baikalian region). In the amphipods, the stress response was induced using HSs at 10 mg L(-1) dissolved organic carbon, which was higher than in sampling sites of the studied species, but well within the range (3-10 mg L(-1)) in the surrounding water bodies populated by G. lacustris. The results of qPCR and western blotting (n = 5) showed that HS exposure led to increased hsp70/abcb1 transcripts and HSP70 protein levels in G. lacustris, whereas these transcript levels remained constant or decreased in the Baikalian species. The decreased level of stress transcripts is probably not able to confer an effective tolerance to Baikalian species against further environmental stressors in conditions with elevated HS levels. Thus, our results suggest a greater robustness of Palearctic amphipods and

  1. The Arabidopsis Synaptotagmin1 Is Enriched in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites and Confers Cellular Resistance to Mechanical Stresses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sancho, Jessica; Vanneste, Steffen; Lee, Eunkyoung; McFarlane, Heather E.; Esteban del Valle, Alicia; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) contact sites are evolutionarily conserved microdomains that have important roles in specialized metabolic functions such as ER-PM communication, lipid homeostasis, and Ca2+ influx. Despite recent advances in knowledge about ER-PM contact site components and functions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and mammals, relatively little is known about the functional significance of these structures in plants. In this report, we characterize the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phospholipid binding Synaptotagmin1 (SYT1) as a plant ortholog of the mammal extended synaptotagmins and yeast tricalbins families of ER-PM anchors. We propose that SYT1 functions at ER-PM contact sites because it displays a dual ER-PM localization, it is enriched in microtubule-depleted regions at the cell cortex, and it colocalizes with Vesicle-Associated Protein27-1, a known ER-PM marker. Furthermore, biochemical and physiological analyses indicate that SYT1 might function as an electrostatic phospholipid anchor conferring mechanical stability in plant cells. Together, the subcellular localization and functional characterization of SYT1 highlights a putative role of plant ER-PM contact site components in the cellular adaptation to environmental stresses. PMID:25792253

  2. Ploidy plasticity: a rapid and reversible strategy for adaptation to stress.

    PubMed

    Berman, Judith

    2016-05-01

    Organisms must be able to grow in a broad range of conditions found in their normal growth environment and for a species to survive, at least some cells in a population must adapt rapidly to extreme stress conditions that kill the majority of cells.Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans resides as a commensal in a broad range of niches within the human host. Growth conditions in these niches are highly variable and stresses such exposure to antifungal drugs can inhibit population growth abruptly. One of the mechanisms C. albicans uses to adapt rapidly to severe stresses is aneuploidy-a change in the total number of chromosomes such that one or more chromosomes are present in excess or are missing. Aneuploidy is quite common in wild isolates of fungi and other eukaryotic microbes. Aneuploidy can be achieved by chromosome nondisjunction during a simple mitosis, and in stress conditions it begins to appear after two mitotic divisions via a tetraploid intermediate. Aneuploidy usually resolves to euploidy (a balanced number of chromosomes), but not necessarily to diploidy. Aneuploidy of a specific chromosome can confer new phenotypes by virtue of the copy number of specific genes on that chromosome relative to the copies of other genes. Thus, it is not aneuploidy per se, but the relative copy number of specific genes that confers many tested aneuploidy-associated phenotypes. Aneuploidy almost always carries a fitness cost, as cells express most proteins encoded by genes on the aneuploid chromosome in proportion to the number of DNA copies of the gene. This is thought to be due to imbalances in the stoichiometry of different components of large complexes. Despite this, fitness is a relative function-and if stress is severe and population growth has slowed considerably, then even small growth advantages of some aneuploidies can provide a selective advantage. Thus, aneuploidy appears to provide a transient solution to severe and sudden stress

  3. Oxidative stress suppresses the cellular bioenergetic effect of the 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase/hydrogen sulfide pathway.

    PubMed

    Módis, Katalin; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-04-19

    Recent data show that lower concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as well as endogenous, intramitochondrial production of H2S by the 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP)/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) pathway serves as an electron donor and inorganic source of energy to support mitochondrial electron transport and ATP generation in mammalian cells by donating electrons to Complex II. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress on the activity of the 3-MP/3-MST/H2S pathway in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 100-500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the activity of recombinant mouse 3-MST enzyme. In mitochondria isolated from murine hepatoma cells, H2O2 (50-500 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in production of H2S from 3-MP. In cultured murine hepatoma cells H2O2, (3-100 μM), did not result in overall cytotoxicity, but caused a partial decrease in basal oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve rapacity. The positive bioenergetic effect of 3-MP (100-300 nM) was completely abolished by pre-treatment of the cells with H2O2 (50 μM). The current findings demonstrate that oxidative stress inhibits 3-MST activity and interferes with the positive bioenergetic role of the 3-MP/3-MST/H2S pathway. These findings may have implications for the pathophysiology of various conditions associated with increased oxidative stress, such as various forms of critical illness, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or physiological aging. PMID:23537657

  4. Nano-jewels in biology. Gold and platinum on diamond nanoparticles as antioxidant systems against cellular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martín, Roberto; Menchón, Cristina; Apostolova, Nadezda; Victor, Victor M; Alvaro, Mercedes; Herance, José Raúl; García, Hermenegildo

    2010-11-23

    Diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) obtained by explosive detonation have become commercially available. These commercial DNPs can be treated under Fenton conditions (FeSO(4) and H(2)O(2) at acidic pH) to obtain purer DNP samples with a small average particle size (4 nm) and a large population of surface OH groups (HO-DNPs). These Fenton-treated HO-DNPs have been used as a support of gold and platinum nanoparticles (≤2 nm average size). The resulting materials (Au/HO-DNP and Pt/HO-DNP) exhibit a high antioxidant activity against reactive oxygen species induced in a hepatoma cell line. In addition to presenting good biocompatibility, Au/HO- and Pt/HO-DNP exhibit about a two-fold higher antioxidant activity than glutathione, one of the reference antioxidant systems. The most active material against cellular oxidative stress was Au/HO-DNP. PMID:20939514

  5. Effect of Cold Shock (25ºC) and Warming up at 37ºC on Cellular Stress Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neutelings, T.; Mineur, P.; Nusgens, B. V.; Lambert, Ch. A.

    2008-06-01

    Constraints of space experiments often oblige the investigators to keep cells at a low temperature (22-25°C) for several days before launch and re-warming at 37°C. We investigated the effects of maintaining cells at 25°C followed by arising of temperature to 37°C on the expression of a number of genes and on phosphorylation of signalling proteins. The expression of most of the tested genes (IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase-1, α1 chain of collagen type I, HSP70, Bcl-X and VEGF), as well as the phosphorylation of p53, Akt, JNK and γH2AX were significantly modulated. The data indicate that cellular stress and survival pathways as well as DNA integrity are affected. These effects should be considered before designing space experiments as they may lead to misinterpretations of the data.

  6. Partial Protection of PC12 Cells from Cellular Stress by Low-Dose Sodium Nitroprusside Pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Varga, Judit; Bátor, Judit; Nádasdi, Gergő; Árvai, Zita; Schipp, Renáta; Szeberényi, József

    2016-10-01

    The PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell line is an in vitro model system widely used for the investigation of intracellular signaling events contributing to neuronal differentiation and cell death. We found earlier that the nitric oxide donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced apoptosis of PC12 cells if it was applied in high concentration (400 µM). Yoshioka et al. (J Pharmacol Sci 101:126-134, 2006) reported that cell death evoked by cytotoxic concentrations of SNP could be prevented by a 100 µM SNP pre-treatment in a murine macrophage cell line. The apoptosis caused by toxic-dose SNP treatment (400 µM) could be partially overcome in PC12 cells as well by the low-dose SNP pre-treatment. The partial inhibition of apoptosis was accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of certain proteins (such as stress-activated protein kinases, the p53, and the eIF2α proteins), decreased caspase activation, and less intense internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. The 100 µM SNP pre-treatment reduced the pro-apoptotic potential of certain other stress stimuli (serum withdrawal, cisplatin and tunicamycin treatments) as well, although the underlying biochemical changes were not entirely uniform. On the contrary, the 100 µM SNP pre-treatment was unable to prevent cell death caused by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Further clarification of the above-mentioned processes may be important in understanding the mechanisms by which mild nitrosative stress protects cells against certain forms of cellular stress conditions. PMID:26626595

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum polymers impair luminal protein mobility and sensitise to cellular stress in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Adriana; Snapp, Erik L; Tan, Lu; Miranda, Elena; Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2013-01-01

    Point mutants of α1-antitrypsin form ordered polymers that are retained as inclusions within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes in association with neonatal hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. These inclusions cause cell damage and predispose to ER stress in the absence of the classical unfolded protein response (UPR). The pathophysiology underlying this ER stress was explored by generating cell models that conditionally express wildtype α1-antitrypsin, two mutants that cause polymer-mediated inclusions and liver disease (E342K [the Z allele] and H334D) and a truncated mutant (Null Hong Kong, NHK) that induces classical ER stress and is removed by ER associated degradation. Expression of the polymeric mutants resulted in gross changes in the ER luminal environment that recapitulated the changes seen in liver sections from individuals with PI*ZZ α1-antitrypsin deficiency. In contrast expression of NHK α1-antitrypsin caused electron lucent dilatation and expansion of the ER throughout the cell. Photobleaching microscopy in live cells demonstrated a decrease in the mobility of soluble luminal proteins in cells that express E342K and H334D α1-antitrypsin when compared to those that express wildtype and NHK α1-antitrypsin (0.34±0.05, 0.22±0.03, 2.83±0.30 and 2.84±0.55 μm2/s respectively). There was no effect on protein mobility within ER membranes indicating that cisternal connectivity was not disrupted. Polymer expression alone was insufficient to induce the UPR but the resulting protein overload rendered cells hypersensitive to ER stress induced by either tunicamycin or glucose depletion. Conclusion Changes in protein diffusion provide an explanation for the cellular consequences of ER protein overload in mutants that cause inclusion body formation and α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:23197448

  8. Research advances in major cereal crops for adaptation to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Maiti, R K; Satya, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    With devastating increase in population there is a great necessity to increase crop productivity of staple crops but the productivity is greatly affected by various abiotic stress factors such as drought, salinity. An attempt has been made a brief account on abiotic stress resistance of major cereal crops viz. In spite of good successes obtained on physiological and use molecular biology, the benefits of this high cost technology are beyond the reach of developing countries. This review discusses several morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms of major cereal crops related to the adaptation of these crop to abiotic stress factors. It discusses the effect of abiotic stresses on physiological processes such as flowering, grain filling and maturation and plant metabolisms viz. photosynthesis, enzyme activity, mineral nutrition, and respiration. Though significant progress has been attained on the physiological, biochemical basis of resistance to abiotic stress factors, very little progress has been achieved to increase productivity under sustainable agriculture. Therefore, there is a great necessity of inter-disciplinary research to address this issue and to evolve efficient technology and its transfer to the farmers' fields. PMID:25523172

  9. Nutritional and botanical interventions to assist with the adaptation to stress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, G S

    1999-08-01

    Prolonged stress, whether a result of mental/emotional upset or due to physical factors such as malnutrition, surgery, chemical exposure, excessive exercise, sleep deprivation, or a host of other environmental causes, results in predictable systemic effects. The systemic effects of stress include increased levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, a decline in certain aspects of immune system function such as natural killer cell cytotoxicity or secretory-IgA levels, and a disruption of gastrointestinal microflora balance. These systemic changes might be a substantial contributor to many of the stress-associated declines in health. Based on human and animal research, it appears a variety of nutritional and botanical substances - such as adaptogenic herbs, specific vitamins including ascorbic acid, vitamins B1 and B6, the coenzyme forms of vitamin B5 (pantethine) and B12 (methylcobalamin), the amino acid tyrosine, and other nutrients such as lipoic acid, phosphatidylserine, and plant sterol/sterolin combinations - may allow individuals to sustain an adaptive response and minimize some of the systemic effects of stress. PMID:10468649

  10. Impaired adaptation of gastrointestinal motility following chronic stress in maternally separated rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Babygirija, Reji; Cerjak, Diana; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to early life stress causes increased stress responsiveness and permanent changes in the central nervous system. We recently showed that delayed gastric emptying (GE) and accelerated colonic transit (CT) in response to acute restraint stress (ARS) were completely restored following chronic homotypic stress (CHS) in rats via upregulation of hypothalamic oxytocin (OXT) expression. However, it is unknown whether early life stress affects hypothalamic OXT circuits and gastrointestinal motor function. Neonatal rats were subjected to maternal separation (MS) for 180 min/day for 2 wk. Anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated by the elevated-plus-maze test. GE and CT were measured under nonstressed (NS), ARS, and CHS conditions. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and OXT in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. MS increased anxiety-like behaviors. ARS delayed GE and accelerated CT in control and MS rats. After CHS, delayed GE and accelerated CT were restored in control, but not MS, rats. CRF mRNA expression was significantly increased in response to ARS in control and MS rats. Increased CRF mRNA expression was still observed following CHS in MS, but not control, rats. In response to CHS, OXT mRNA expression was significantly increased in control, but not MS, rats. The number of OXT-immunoreactive cells was increased following CHS in the magnocellular part of the PVN in control, but not MS, rats. MS impairs the adaptation response of gastrointestinal motility following CHS. The mechanism of the impaired adaptation involves downregulation of OXT and upregulation of CRF in the hypothalamus in MS rats. PMID:22241856

  11. PHYSIOLOGY AND ENDOCRINOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of heat stress related to bovine ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Roth, Z

    2015-05-01

    In light of the intensive genetic selection for high milk production and the onset of global warming, it seems that the reduced fertility of lactating cows during the summer will worsen in coming years. Although not entirely clear, the mechanism appears to be multifactorial in nature. It includes alterations in follicular development, depression of follicular dominance, and impairment of steroidogenesis and gonadotropin secretion. Heat-induced perturbations in the physiology of the follicle-enclosed oocyte have also been documented, expressed by impaired cleavage rate and reduced developmental competence. With respect to the oocyte, alterations include an increase in PUFA in the membrane, reactive oxygen species, ceramide formation and caspase activity, and induction of apoptosis via the sphingomyelin and/or mitochondrial pathways. New insight into cellular and molecular alterations has revealed that heat induces perturbations in both nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation events, such as resumption of meiosis, metaphase II plate formation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and translocation of cortical granules. Alterations in mitochondrial distribution (i.e., low proportion of category I mitochondria) and function (i.e., low membrane potential) have recently been reported for oocytes collected during the summer. These were associated with impaired expression of both nuclear (succinate dehydrogenase subunit [SDHD], adenosine triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit beta [ATP5B]), mitochondrially NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2), and mitochondiral (cytochrome c oxidase subunit II [MT-CO2] and cytochrome b [MT-CYB]) genes that are crucial in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, season-induced alteration in the stored maternal mRNA has been documented, expressed by reduced transcript levels (oocyte maturation factor MOS [C-MOS], growth differentiation factor 9 [GDF9], POU domain class 5 transcription factor 1 [POU5F1], and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  12. Cellular stress marker alteration and inflammatory response in pigs fed with an ochratoxin contaminated diet.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Chiara; Grilli, Ester; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Zannoni, Augusta; Tugnoli, Benedetta; Gentilini, Fabio; Bertuzzi, Terenzio; Spinozzi, Silvia; Camborata, Cecilia; Bacci, Maria Laura; Piva, Andrea; Forni, Monica

    2014-10-01

    Aim of this study was to characterize the effects of an ochratoxin A (181 ± 34 ng/g) contaminated diet on growth performances, blood parameters, systemic cytokine levels, cell stress markers and reactivity of immune system of weaned pigs. Growth performance was not affected by OTA consumption even if OTA levels increased in plasma, kidney and liver. OTA diminished the protein content in the serum and increased levels of TNF-alpha and IL-10 in plasma. HO-1 mRNA, indicative for cells stress, was decreased in the kidney but increased in the liver. Additionally, whole blood of the animals of the OTA-group showed a decreased capacity to respond with cytokine expression (mRNA and protein) to ex vivo challenge with LPS. In conclusion our findings indicate that chronic ingestion with OTA-contaminated feed, even at low level, is hazardous for the animal and virtually for human health, pig being an excellent model for human. PMID:25151433

  13. Rhizomes Help the Forage Grass Leymus chinensis to Adapt to the Salt and Alkali Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Junfeng; Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Ying; Mu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Leymus chinensis has extensive ecological adaptability and can grow well in saline-alkaline soils. The knowledge about tolerance mechanisms of L. chinensis could be base for utilization of saline-alkaline soils and grassland restoration and rebuilding. Two neutral salts (NaCl : Na2SO4 = 9 : 1) and two alkaline salts (NaHCO3 : Na2CO3 = 9 : 1) with concentration of 0, 100, and 200 mmol/L were used to treat potted 35-day-old seedlings with rhizome growth, respectively. After 10 days, the biomass and number of daughter shoots all decreased, with more reduction in alkali than in salt stress. The rhizome biomass reduced more than other organs. The number of daughter shoots from rhizome was more than from tillers. Under both stresses, Na+ contents increased more in rhizome than in other organs; the reduction of K+ content was more in underground than aerial tissue. Anion ions or organic acids were absorbed to neutralize cations. Na+ content in stem and leaf increased markedly in high alkalinity (200 mmol/L), with accumulation of soluble sugar and organic acids sharply. Rhizomes help L. chinensis to adapt to saline and low alkaline stresses by transferring Na+. However, rhizomes lost the ability to prevent Na+ transport to aerial organs under high alkalinity, which led to severe growth inhibition of L. chinensis. PMID:25121110

  14. Adaptive force produced by stress-induced regulation of random variation intensity.

    PubMed

    Shimansky, Yury P

    2010-08-01

    The Darwinian theory of life evolution is capable of explaining the majority of related phenomena. At the same time, the mechanisms of optimizing traits beneficial to a population as a whole but not directly to an individual remain largely unclear. There are also significant problems with explaining the phenomenon of punctuated equilibrium. From another perspective, multiple mechanisms for the regulation of the rate of genetic mutations according to the environmental stress have been discovered, but their precise functional role is not well understood yet. Here a novel mathematical paradigm called a Kinetic-Force Principle (KFP), which can serve as a general basis for biologically plausible optimization methods, is introduced and its rigorous derivation is provided. Based on this principle, it is shown that, if the rate of random changes in a biological system is proportional, even only roughly, to the amount of environmental