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Sample records for adaptive clothing model

  1. Clothing adaptations: the occupational therapist and the clothing designer collaborate.

    PubMed

    White, L W; Dallas, M J

    1977-02-01

    An occupational therapist and a clothing designer collaborated in solving the dressing problem of a child with multiple amputations. The dressing problems were identified and solutions for clothing adaptations relating to sleeves, closures, fasteners, fit, and design were incorporated into two test garments. Evaluation of the garments was based on ease in dressing and undressing, the effect on movement and mobility, the construction techniques, and their appearance. A description is given of the pattern adjustments, and considerations for clothing adaptations or selection or both are discussed. These clothing adaptations can be generalized to a wider population of handicapped persons.

  2. The UTCI-clothing model.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan; Błazejczyk, Krzysztof; Richards, Mark; Bröde, Peter; Holmér, Ingvar; Rintamaki, Hannu; Benshabat, Yael; Jendritzky, Gerd

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) was conceived as a thermal index covering the whole climate range from heat to cold. This would be impossible without considering clothing as the interface between the person (here, the physiological model of thermoregulation) and the environment. It was decided to develop a clothing model for this application in which the following three factors were considered: (1) typical dressing behaviour in different temperatures, as observed in the field, resulting in a model of the distribution of clothing over the different body segments in relation to the ambient temperature, (2) the changes in clothing insulation and vapour resistance caused by wind and body movement, and (3) the change in wind speed in relation to the height above ground. The outcome was a clothing model that defines in detail the effective clothing insulation and vapour resistance for each of the thermo-physiological model's body segments over a wide range of climatic conditions. This paper details this model's conception and documents its definitions.

  3. The UTCI-clothing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan; Błazejczyk, Krzysztof; Richards, Mark; Bröde, Peter; Holmér, Ingvar; Rintamaki, Hannu; Benshabat, Yael; Jendritzky, Gerd

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) was conceived as a thermal index covering the whole climate range from heat to cold. This would be impossible without considering clothing as the interface between the person (here, the physiological model of thermoregulation) and the environment. It was decided to develop a clothing model for this application in which the following three factors were considered: (1) typical dressing behaviour in different temperatures, as observed in the field, resulting in a model of the distribution of clothing over the different body segments in relation to the ambient temperature, (2) the changes in clothing insulation and vapour resistance caused by wind and body movement, and (3) the change in wind speed in relation to the height above ground. The outcome was a clothing model that defines in detail the effective clothing insulation and vapour resistance for each of the thermo-physiological model's body segments over a wide range of climatic conditions. This paper details this model's conception and documents its definitions.

  4. Modeling Neanderthal clothing using ethnographic analogues.

    PubMed

    Wales, Nathan

    2012-12-01

    Although direct evidence for Neanderthal clothing is essentially nonexistent, information about Paleolithic clothing could provide insights into the biological, technological, and behavioral capabilities of Neanderthals. This paper takes a new approach to understanding Neanderthal clothing through the collection and analysis of clothing data for 245 recent hunter-gatherer groups. These data are tested against environmental factors to infer what clothing humans tend to wear under different conditions. Beta regression is used to predict the proportion of the body covered by clothing according to a location's mean temperature of the coldest month, average wind speed, and annual rainfall. In addition, logistic regression equations predict clothing use on specific parts of the body. Neanderthal clothing patterns are modeled across Europe and over a range of Pleistocene environmental conditions, thereby providing a new appreciation of Paleolithic behavioral variability. After accounting for higher tolerances to cold temperatures, it is predicted that some Neanderthals would have covered up to 80% of their bodies during the winter, probably with non-tailored clothing. It is also likely that some populations covered the hands and feet. In comparison with Neanderthals, Upper Paleolithic modern humans are found to have worn more sophisticated clothing. Importantly, these predictions shed new light on the relationship between Neanderthal extinction and their simple clothing.

  5. Physics model for wringing of wet cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dany Rahmayanti, Handika; Utami, Fisca Dian; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2016-11-01

    One activity that has been performed by human beings for a long time is washing clothes. Before the invention of the washing machine, clothes were washed by hand and then wrung before drying in the open air. When observed carefully, the wringing of cloth presents some interesting phenomena. However, there are no reports on the physical modelling of this very old activity. This paper reports a simple model to explain the discharge of water from clothes when squeezed. A simple tool was also designed to retrieve data to confirm the theory. We found that the theoretical predictions accurately explained the experimental results. The experiments were conducted on two types of cloth: towels and batik cloth. We also obtained a universal curve to which all the data converged.

  6. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  7. A clothing modeling framework for uniform and armor system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Xiaolin; Swan, Colby C.; Rahmatalla, Salam

    2006-05-01

    In the analysis and design of military uniforms and body armor systems it is helpful to quantify the effects of the clothing/armor system on a wearer's physical performance capabilities. Toward this end, a clothing modeling framework for quantifying the mechanical interactions between a given uniform or body armor system design and a specific wearer performing defined physical tasks is proposed. The modeling framework consists of three interacting modules: (1) a macroscale fabric mechanics/dynamics model; (2) a collision detection and contact correction module; and (3) a human motion module. In the proposed framework, the macroscopic fabric model is based on a rigorous large deformation continuum-degenerated shell theory representation. The collision and contact module enforces non-penetration constraints between the fabric and human body and computes the associated contact forces between the two. The human body is represented in the current framework, as an assemblage of overlapping ellipsoids that undergo rigid body motions consistent with human motions while performing actions such as walking, running, or jumping. The transient rigid body motions of each ellipsoidal body segment in time are determined using motion capture technology. The integrated modeling framework is then exercised to quantify the resistance that the clothing exerts on the wearer during the specific activities under consideration. Current results from the framework are presented and its intended applications are discussed along with some of the key challenges remaining in clothing system modeling.

  8. Arcjet Testing of Woven Carbon Cloth for Use on Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; laub, Bernard; Chen, Yih-Kang; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Bittner, M. E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes arcjet testing and analysis that has successfully demonstrated the viability of three dimensional woven carbon cloth for dual use in the Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT). ADEPT is an umbrella-like entry system that is folded for stowage in the launch vehicle s shroud and deployed in space prior to reaching the atmospheric interface. A key feature of the ADEPT concept is its lower ballistic coefficient for delivery of a given payload than those for conventional, rigid body entry systems. The benefits that accrue from the lower ballistic coefficient include factor of ten reductions of deceleration forces and entry heating. The former enables consideration of new classes of scientific instruments for solar system exploration while the latter enables the design of a more efficient thermal protection system. The carbon cloth now base lined for ADEPT has a dual use in that it serves as ADEPT s thermal protection system and as the "skin" that transfers aerodynamic deceleration loads to its umbrella-like substructure. The arcjet testing described in this paper was conducted for some of the higher heating conditions for a future Venus mission using the ADEPT concept, thereby showing that the carbon cloth can perform in a relevant entry environment. The ADEPT project considered the carbon cloth to be mission enabling and was carrying it as a major risk during Fiscal Year 2012. The testing and analysis reported here played a major role in retiring that risk and is highly significant to the success and possible adoption of ADEPT for future NASA missions. Finally, this paper also describes a preliminary engineering level code, based on the arcjet data, that can be used to estimate cloth thickness for future missions using ADEPT and to predict carbon cloth performance in future arcjet tests.

  9. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  10. Aesthetic and Utilitarian Qualities of Clothing: Use of a Multidimensional Clothing Value Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganosky, Michelle

    1984-01-01

    This study investigated consumers' valuation of clothing on the basis of aesthetic and utilitarian qualities. Findings indicated that subjects were willing to pay the most for high aesthetic items regardless of utility and the least for low aesthetic, low utility items. (JB)

  11. A quasi-physical model for predicting the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of clothing.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2009-07-01

    Based on the improved understanding of the effects of wind and walking motion on the thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of clothing induced by air ventilation in the clothing system, a new model has been derived based on fundamental mechanisms of heat and mass transfer, which include conduction, diffusion, radiation and natural convection, wind penetration and air ventilation. The model predicts thermal insulation of clothing under body movement and windy conditions from the thermal insulation of clothing measured when the person is standing in the still air. The effects of clothing characteristics such as fabric air permeability, garment style, garment fitting and construction have been considered in the model through the key prediction parameters. With the new model, an improved prediction accuracy is achieved with a percentage of fit being as high as 0.96.

  12. Integrating a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Weng, Wenguo; Wang, Faming; Song, Guowen

    2017-05-01

    This paper aims to integrate a human thermoregulatory model with a clothing model to predict core and skin temperatures. The human thermoregulatory model, consisting of an active system and a passive system, was used to determine the thermoregulation and heat exchanges within the body. The clothing model simulated heat and moisture transfer from the human skin to the environment through the microenvironment and fabric. In this clothing model, the air gap between skin and clothing, as well as clothing properties such as thickness, thermal conductivity, density, porosity, and tortuosity were taken into consideration. The simulated core and mean skin temperatures were compared to the published experimental results of subject tests at three levels of ambient temperatures of 20 °C, 30 °C, and 40 °C. Although lower signal-to-noise-ratio was observed, the developed model demonstrated positive performance at predicting core temperatures with a maximum difference between the simulations and measurements of no more than 0.43 °C. Generally, the current model predicted the mean skin temperatures with reasonable accuracy. It could be applied to predict human physiological responses and assess thermal comfort and heat stress.

  13. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: Comparison of model to human participant results.

    PubMed

    Morrison, G C; Weschler, C J; Bekö, G

    2016-11-11

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. The model predictions are consistent with the observation that previously exposed clothing can increase dermal uptake over that observed in bare-skin participants for the same exposure air concentrations. The model predicts that dermal uptake from clothing of DnBP is a substantial fraction of total uptake from all sources of exposure. For compounds that have high dermal permeability coefficients, dermal uptake is increased for (i) thinner clothing, (ii) a narrower gap between clothing and skin, and (iii) longer time intervals between laundering and wearing. Enhanced dermal uptake is most pronounced for compounds with clothing-air partition coefficients between 10(4) and 10(7) . In the absence of direct measurements of cotton cloth-air partition coefficients, dermal exposure may be predicted using equilibrium data for compounds in equilibrium with cellulose and water, in combination with computational methods of predicting partition coefficients.

  14. Articles of protective clothing adapted for deflecting chemical permeation and methods there for

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1996-02-27

    Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation. 12 figs.

  15. Articles of protective clothing adapted for deflecting chemical permeation and methods therefor

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation.

  16. Release of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) from Carpet and Clothing in Model Anaerobic Landfill Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lang, Johnsie R; Allred, B McKay; Peaslee, Graham F; Field, Jennifer A; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-05-17

    Discarded carpet and clothing are potential sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in landfill leachate, but little is known about their release when disposed in landfills. The concentrations of 70 PFASs in the aqueous phase of anaerobic model landfill reactors filled with carpet or clothing were monitored under biologically active and abiotic conditions. For carpet, total PFAS release was greater in live than abiotic reactors, with an average of 8.5 nmol/L and 0.62 nmol/L after 552 days, respectively. Release in live carpet reactors was primarily due to 5:3 fluorotelomer carboxylic acid (FTCA - 3.9 nmol/L) and perfluorohexanoic carboxylic acid (PFHxA - 2.9 nmol/L). For clothing, release was more dependent on sample heterogeneity than the presence of biological activity, with 0.63, 21.7, 2.6, and 6.3 nmol/L for two live and two abiotic reactors after 519 days, respectively. Release in the clothing reactors was largely due to perfluorooctatonic carboxylic acid (PFOA), with low relative concentrations of measured biotransformation precursors (FTCAs). For carpet and clothing reactors, the majority of PFAS release was not measured until after day 100. Results demonstrate that carpet and clothing are likely sources of PFASs in landfill leachate.

  17. Local thermal sensation modeling-a review on the necessity and availability of local clothing properties and local metabolic heat production.

    PubMed

    Veselá, S; Kingma, B R M; Frijns, A J H

    2017-03-01

    Local thermal sensation modeling gained importance due to developments in personalized and locally applied heating and cooling systems in office environments. The accuracy of these models depends on skin temperature prediction by thermophysiological models, which in turn rely on accurate environmental and personal input data. Environmental parameters are measured or prescribed, but personal factors such as clothing properties and metabolic rates have to be estimated. Data for estimating the overall values of clothing properties and metabolic rates are available in several papers and standards. However, local values are more difficult to retrieve. For local clothing, this study revealed that full and consistent data sets are not available in the published literature for typical office clothing sets. Furthermore, the values for local heat production were not verified for characteristic office activities, but were adapted empirically. Further analyses showed that variations in input parameters can lead to local skin temperature differences (∆Tskin,loc  = 0.4-4.4°C). These differences can affect the local sensation output, where ∆Tskin,loc  = 1°C is approximately one step on a 9-point thermal sensation scale. In conclusion, future research should include a systematic study of local clothing properties and the development of feasible methods for measuring and validating local heat production.

  18. Adaptive spatio-temporal filtering of disturbed ECGs: a multi-channel approach to heartbeat detection in smart clothing.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, Urban; Karlsson, Marcus; Ostlund, Nils; Berglin, Lena; Lindecrantz, Kaj; Karlsson, Stefan; Sandsjö, Leif

    2007-06-01

    Intermittent disturbances are common in ECG signals recorded with smart clothing: this is mainly because of displacement of the electrodes over the skin. We evaluated a novel adaptive method for spatio-temporal filtering for heartbeat detection in noisy multi-channel ECGs including short signal interruptions in single channels. Using multi-channel database recordings (12-channel ECGs from 10 healthy subjects), the results showed that multi-channel spatio-temporal filtering outperformed regular independent component analysis. We also recorded seven channels of ECG using a T-shirt with textile electrodes. Ten healthy subjects performed different sequences during a 10-min recording: resting, standing, flexing breast muscles, walking and pushups. Using adaptive multi-channel filtering, the sensitivity and precision was above 97% in nine subjects. Adaptive multi-channel spatio-temporal filtering can be used to detect heartbeats in ECGs with high noise levels. One application is heartbeat detection in noisy ECG recordings obtained by integrated textile electrodes in smart clothing.

  19. On the Effect of Thermophysical Properties of Clothing on the Heat Strain Predicted by PHS Model.

    PubMed

    d'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe; Malchaire, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Procedures and equations reported in ISO 9920 for the correction of basic thermophysical clothing properties taking into account pumping effect and air movement are very different from those used by the Predicted Heat Strain (PHS) model in ISO 7933. To study the effect of these differences on the assessment of hot environments using the PHS model, an analysis focusing on the modelling of the dynamic thermal insulation and the vapour resistance of the clothing reported in ISO 9920 and ISO 7933 standards will be discussed in this paper. The results are useful evidence to start a discussion on the best practice for dealing with clothing thermophysical properties and underline the need to harmonize the entire set of standards in the field of the Ergonomics of the Thermal Environment. ISO 7933 is presently under revision.

  20. Modeling thermal insulation of firefighting protective clothing embedded with phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yin; Huang, Dongmei; Qi, Zhengkun; He, Song; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Heping

    2013-04-01

    Experiments and research on heat transport through firefighting protective clothing when exposed to high temperature or intensive radiation are significant. Phase change material (PCM) takes energy when changes from solid to liquid thus reducing heat transmission. A numerical simulation of heat protection of the firefighting protective clothing embedded with PCM was studied. We focused on the temperature variation by comparing different thicknesses and position conditions of PCM combined in the clothing, as well as the melting state of PCM and human irreversible burns through a simplified one-dimensional model. The results showed it was superior to place PCM between water and proof layer and inner layer, in addition, greater thickness increased protection time while might adding extra burden to the firefighter.

  1. Can the PHS model (ISO7933) predict reasonable thermophysiological responses while wearing protective clothing in hot environments?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Kuklane, Kalev; Gao, Chuansi; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the prediction accuracy of the PHS (predicted heat strain) model on human physiological responses while wearing protective clothing ensembles was examined. Six human subjects (aged 29 ± 3 years) underwent three experimental trials in three different protective garments (clothing thermal insulation I(cl) ranges from 0.63 to 2.01 clo) in two hot environments (40 °C, relative humidities: 30% and 45%). The observed and predicted mean skin temperature, core body temperature and sweat rate were presented and statistically compared. A significant difference was found in the metabolic rate between FIRE (firefighting clothing) and HV (high visibility clothing) or MIL (military clothing) (p < 0.001). Also, the development of heart rate demonstrated the significant effects of the exposure time and clothing ensembles. In addition, the predicted evaporation rate during HV, MIL and FIRE was much lower than the experimental values. Hence, the current PHS model is not applicable for protective clothing with intrinsic thermal insulations above 1.0 clo. The results showed that the PHS model generated unreliable predictions on body core temperature when human subjects wore thick protective clothing such as firefighting clothing (I(cl) > 1.0 clo). The predicted mean skin temperatures in three clothing ensembles HV, MIL and FIRE were also outside the expected limits. Thus, there is a need for further extension for the clothing insulation validation range of the PHS model. It is recommended that the PHS model should be amended and validated by individual algorithms, physical or physiological parameters, and further subject studies.

  2. Numerical modelling of transient heat and moisture transport in protective clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łapka, P.; Furmański, P.; Wisniewski, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a complex model of heat and mass transfer in a multi-layer protective clothing exposed to a flash fire and interacting with the human skin. The clothing was made of porous fabric layers separated by air gaps. The fabrics contained bound water in the fibres and moist air in the pores. The moist air was also present in the gaps between fabric layers or internal fabric layer and the skin. Three skin sublayers were considered. The model accounted for coupled heat transfer by conduction, thermal radiation and associated with diffusion of water vapour in the clothing layers and air gaps. Heat exchange due to phase transition of the bound water were also included in the model. Complex thermal and mass transfer conditions at internal or external boundaries between fabric layers and air gaps as well as air gap and skin were assumed. Special attention was paid to modelling of thermal radiation which was coming from the fire, penetrated through protective clothing and absorbed by the skin. For the first time non-grey properties as well as optical phenomena at internal or external boundaries between fabric layers and air gaps as well as air gap and skin were accounted for. A series of numerical simulations were carried out and the risk of heat injures was estimated.

  3. Thermal and Structural Performance of Woven Carbon Cloth For Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith H.; Yount, Bryan C.; Schneider, Nigel; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Arcjet testing and analysis of a three-dimensional (3D) woven carbon fabric has shown that it can be used as a thermal protection system and as a load bearing structural component for a low ballistic coefficient hypersonic decelerator called ADEPT (Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology). Results of arcjet tests proved that the 3D woven carbon fabric can withstand flight-like heating while under flight-like biaxial mechanical loads representative of those encountered during shallow entry flight path angles into the atmosphere of Venus. Importantly, the arcjet test results have been used to extend a preliminary material thermal response model based on previous testing of the same 3D woven carbon fabric under uni-axial mechanical loading.

  4. Measured effects of surface cloth impressions on polar backscatter and comparison with a reflection grating model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Brush, Edwin F., III; Bridal, S. L.; Holland, Mark R.; Miller, James G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the nature of a typical composite surface and its effects on scattering. Utilizing epoxy typical of that in composites and standard composite fabrication methods, a sample with release cloth impressions on its surface is produced. A simple model for the scattering from the surface impressions of this sample is constructed and then polar backscatter measurements are made on the sample and compared with the model predictions.

  5. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  6. FDTD Analysis of Effectiveness of Shielding Clothes in Suppressing Electromagnetic Field in Phantom Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Isamu; Yagitani, Satoshi; Ueno, Tomohiko; Nakayabu, Toshihiro

    In order to prevent cardiac pacemakers from malfunctioning caused by electromagnetic (EM) wave, as one of the solutions to the problem of pacemaker malfunctioning, we can use a shielding material to decrease the EM wave intensity. For the effective suppression of the EM wave including a complicated enclosure or a human body, it is desirable to solve for the EM wave propagation by using numerical analysis. We introduce the transmission coefficient when an EM wave is incident into a multi-layered material with an arbitrary direction into the FDTD method. This realizes three-dimensional numerical analysis of a thin shielding material as a method to solve the EM wave transmission problem, which has been conventionally considered difficult. We use a phantom model, a dummy model of a cardiac pacemaker wearer, to analyze the EM wave shielding effectiveness of the shielding clothes. The analytical result agrees fairly well with the experimental result, which verifies the validity of the developed method. As for the effect of the aperture of the shielding clothes, the EM wave coming around from the apertures is found to be larger in amount than the EM wave transmitted through the clothes, which suggests that the aperture causes the SE to decrease largely.

  7. A Wolff in sheep's clothing: trabecular bone adaptation in response to changes in joint loading orientation.

    PubMed

    Barak, Meir M; Lieberman, Daniel E; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2011-12-01

    This study tests Wolff's law of trabecular bone adaptation by examining if induced changes in joint loading orientation cause corresponding adjustments in trabecular orientation. Two groups of sheep were exercised at a trot, 15 min/day for 34 days on an inclined (7°) or level (0°) treadmills. Incline trotting caused the sheep to extend their tarsal joints by 3-4.5° during peak loading (P<0.01) but has no effect on carpal joint angle (P=0.984). Additionally, tarsal joint angle in the incline group sheep were maintained more extended throughout the day using elevated platform shoes on their forelimbs. A third "sedentary group" group did not run but wore platform shoes throughout the day. As predicted by Wolff's law, trabecular orientation in the distal tibia (tarsal joint) were more obtuse by 2.7 to 4.3° in the incline group compared to the level group; trabecular orientation was not significantly different in the sedentary and level groups. In addition, trabecular orientations in the distal radius (carpal joint) of the sedentary, level and incline groups did not differ between groups, and were aligned almost parallel to the radius long axis, corresponding to the almost straight carpal joint angle at peak loading. Measurements of other trabecular bone parameters revealed additional responses to loading, including significantly higher bone volume fraction (BV/TV), Trabecular number (Tb.N) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), lower trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp), and less rod-shaped trabeculae (higher structure model index, SMI) in the exercised than sedentary sheep. Overall, these results demonstrate that trabecular bone dynamically adjusts and realigns itself in very precise relation to changes in peak loading direction, indicating that Wolff's law is not only accurate but also highly sensitive.

  8. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  9. Viability of 3 D Woven Carbon Cloth and Advanced Carbon-Carbon Ribs for Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) for Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, K. H.; Blosser, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes aerothermodynamic and thermal structural testing that demonstrate the viability of three dimensional woven carbon cloth and advanced carbon-carbon (ACC) ribs for use in the Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT). ADEPT is an umbrella-like entry system that is folded for stowage in the launch vehicle's shroud and deployed prior to reaching the atmeopheric interface. A key feature of the ADEPT concept is a lower ballistic coefficient for delivery of a given payload than seen with conventional, rigid body entry systems. The benefits that accrue from the lower ballistic coefficient incllude factor-of-ten reductions of deceleration forces and entry heating. The former enables consideration of new classes of scientific instruments for solar system exploration while the latter enables the design of a more efficient thermal protection system. The carbon cloth base lined for ADEPT has a dual use in that it serves as the thermal protection system and as the "skin" that transfers aerdynamic deceleration loads to its umbrella-like substructure. Arcjet testing described in this paper was conducted for some of the higher heating conditions for a future Venus mission using the ADEPT concept, thereby showing that the carbon cloth can perform in a relevant entry environment. Recently completed the thermal structural testing of the cloth attached to a representative ACC rib design is also described. Finally, this paper describes a preliminary engineering level code, based on the arcjet data, that can be used to estimate cloth thickness for future ADEPT missions and to predict carbon cloth performance in future arcjet tests.

  10. Modeling aerosol losses and clothing effects in fires. [for aerospace vehicle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    The described modification of a physiochemical fire model predicts physical effects in clothed humans exposed to elevated temperatures as well as gas and aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere of an aerospace vehicle. The modifications involve the reduction in aerosol concentrations caused by settling and some improvements in dealing with mass and heat transfer effects. Predicted skin temperatures are found to be within 2 C of experimental values for the cases studied, and model predictions of total body enthalpy seem to correlate with symptomology observed experimentally.

  11. An investigation of the thermal comfort adaptive model in a tropical upland climate

    SciTech Connect

    Malama, A.; Jitkhajornwanich, K.; Sharples, S.; Pitts, A.C.

    1998-10-01

    The results of two thermal comfort surveys performed in Zambia, which has a tropical upland climate, are presented and analyzed with special reference to the adaptive model. The main forms of adaptation and adjustment analyzed are: clothing, skin moisture, activity level, and environmental controls. Results show that in the cool season the main methods of adaptation used by the subjects were clothing and environmental controls, while in the warm season only environmental controls were used. It proved difficult to establish the impact of the various levels of adaptivity on thermal comfort standards. It would be useful if the adaptive model could be factored into thermal comfort to produce adaptive thermal comfort standards that would allow for differences in culture and climate across the globe.

  12. The development and initial validation of a virtual dripping sweat rate and a clothing wetness ratio for use in predictive heat strain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Kuwabara, K.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-08-01

    This paper applies the heat balance equation (HBE) for clothed subjects as a linear function of mean skin temperature ( t sk ) by a new sweating efficiency ( η sw ) and an approximation for the thermoregulatory sweat rate. The equation predicting t sk in steady state conditions was derived as the solution of the HBE and used for a predictive heat strain scale. The heat loss from the wet clothing (WCL) area was identified with a new variable of `virtual dripping sweat rate VDSR' ( S wdr ). This is a subject's un-evaporated sweat rate in dry clothing from the regional sweat rate exceeding the maximum evaporative capacity, and adds the moisture to the clothing, reducing the intrinsic clothing insulation. The S wdr allowed a mass balance analysis of the wet clothing area identified as clothing wetness ( w cl ). The w cl was derived by combining the HBE at the WCL surface from which the evaporation rate and skin heat loss from WCL region are given. Experimental results on eight young male subjects wearing typical summer clothing, T-shirt and trousers verified the model for predicting t sk with WCL thermal resistance ( R cl,w ) identified as 25 % of dry clothing ( R cl,d ).

  13. The development and initial validation of a virtual dripping sweat rate and a clothing wetness ratio for use in predictive heat strain models.

    PubMed

    Kubota, H; Kuwabara, K; Hamada, Y

    2014-08-01

    This paper applies the heat balance equation (HBE) for clothed subjects as a linear function of mean skin temperature (t sk ) by a new sweating efficiency (η sw ) and an approximation for the thermoregulatory sweat rate. The equation predicting t sk in steady state conditions was derived as the solution of the HBE and used for a predictive heat strain scale. The heat loss from the wet clothing (WCL) area was identified with a new variable of 'virtual dripping sweat rate VDSR' (S wdr ). This is a subject's un-evaporated sweat rate in dry clothing from the regional sweat rate exceeding the maximum evaporative capacity, and adds the moisture to the clothing, reducing the intrinsic clothing insulation. The S wdr allowed a mass balance analysis of the wet clothing area identified as clothing wetness (w cl ). The w cl was derived by combining the HBE at the WCL surface from which the evaporation rate and skin heat loss from WCL region are given. Experimental results on eight young male subjects wearing typical summer clothing, T-shirt and trousers verified the model for predicting t sk with WCL thermal resistance (R cl,w ) identified as 25 % of dry clothing (R cl,d ).

  14. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  15. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  16. An advanced model of heat and mass transfer in the protective clothing - verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łapka, P.; Furmański, P.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents an advanced mathematical and numerical models of heat and mass transfer in the multi-layers protective clothing and in elements of the experimental stand subjected to either high surroundings temperature or high radiative heat flux emitted by hot objects. The model included conductive-radiative heat transfer in the hygroscopic porous fabrics and air gaps as well as conductive heat transfer in components of the stand. Additionally, water vapour diffusion in the pores and air spaces as well as phase transition of the bound water in the fabric fibres (sorption and desorption) were accounted for. The thermal radiation was treated in the rigorous way e.g.: semi-transparent absorbing, emitting and scattering fabrics were assumed a non-grey and all optical phenomena at internal or external walls were modelled. The air was assumed transparent. Complex energy and mass balance as well as optical conditions at internal or external interfaces were formulated in order to find exact values of temperatures, vapour densities and radiation intensities at these interfaces. The obtained highly non-linear coupled system of discrete equation was solve by the in-house iterative algorithm which was based on the Finite Volume Method. The model was then successfully partially verified against the results obtained from commercial software for simplified cases.

  17. Clothing Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for clothing management is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task is…

  18. Model of aircraft noise adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Coates, G. D.; Cawthorn, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Development of an aircraft noise adaptation model, which would account for much of the variability in the responses of subjects participating in human response to noise experiments, was studied. A description of the model development is presented. The principal concept of the model, was the determination of an aircraft adaptation level which represents an annoyance calibration for each individual. Results showed a direct correlation between noise level of the stimuli and annoyance reactions. Attitude-personality variables were found to account for varying annoyance judgements.

  19. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  20. ADAPTIVE EYE MODEL - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetskiy, Sergey O.; Kudryashov, Alexey V.

    2008-01-01

    We propose experimental adaptive eye model based on flexible 18-electrode bimorph mirror reproducing human eye aberrations up to 4th radial order of Zernike polynomials at frequency of 10Hz. The accuracy of aberrations reproduction in most cases is better than λ/10 RMS. The model is introduced to aberrometer for human eye aberrations compensation to improve visual acuity test.

  1. A simple QSPR model for the prediction of the adsorbability of organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Zhu, L; Fang, D; Liu, L; Bai, Z; Wang, L; Xu, W

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model was proposed between the molecular descriptors representing the molecular structure and the Freundlich adsorbability parameter (K) for a set of 55 organic compounds onto activated carbon cloth. The best linear model was composed of three descriptors, which were selected by stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. The statistical parameters provided by the linear model were r² = 0.7744, r²(adj) = 0.7551, s = 0.169 for the training set; and r² = 0.6725, r²(adj) = 0.6316, s = 0.196 for the external test set, respectively. The stability and predictive power of the proposed model were further verified using Y-randomization tests, five-fold cross-validation and leave-many-out cross-validation. The model may give some insight into the main structural features that affect the adsorption of the investigated compounds onto activated carbon cloth.

  2. Origin of clothing lice indicates early clothing use by anatomically modern humans in Africa.

    PubMed

    Toups, Melissa A; Kitchen, Andrew; Light, Jessica E; Reed, David L

    2011-01-01

    Clothing use is an important modern behavior that contributed to the successful expansion of humans into higher latitudes and cold climates. Previous research suggests that clothing use originated anywhere between 40,000 and 3 Ma, though there is little direct archaeological, fossil, or genetic evidence to support more specific estimates. Since clothing lice evolved from head louse ancestors once humans adopted clothing, dating the emergence of clothing lice may provide more specific estimates of the origin of clothing use. Here, we use a Bayesian coalescent modeling approach to estimate that clothing lice diverged from head louse ancestors at least by 83,000 and possibly as early as 170,000 years ago. Our analysis suggests that the use of clothing likely originated with anatomically modern humans in Africa and reinforces a broad trend of modern human developments in Africa during the Middle to Late Pleistocene.

  3. Origin of Clothing Lice Indicates Early Clothing Use by Anatomically Modern Humans in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Melissa A.; Kitchen, Andrew; Light, Jessica E.; Reed, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Clothing use is an important modern behavior that contributed to the successful expansion of humans into higher latitudes and cold climates. Previous research suggests that clothing use originated anywhere between 40,000 and 3 Ma, though there is little direct archaeological, fossil, or genetic evidence to support more specific estimates. Since clothing lice evolved from head louse ancestors once humans adopted clothing, dating the emergence of clothing lice may provide more specific estimates of the origin of clothing use. Here, we use a Bayesian coalescent modeling approach to estimate that clothing lice diverged from head louse ancestors at least by 83,000 and possibly as early as 170,000 years ago. Our analysis suggests that the use of clothing likely originated with anatomically modern humans in Africa and reinforces a broad trend of modern human developments in Africa during the Middle to Late Pleistocene. PMID:20823373

  4. [Clothing and heat disorder].

    PubMed

    Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2012-06-01

    The influence of the clothing material properties(like water absorbency and rapid dryness, water vapor absorption, water vapor permeability and air permeability) and the design factor of the clothing(like opening condition and fitting of clothing), which contributed to prevent heat disorder, was outlined. WBGT(wet-bulb globe temperature) is used to show a guideline for environmental limitation of activities to prevent heat disorder. As the safety function is more important than thermal comfort for some sportswear and protective clothing with high cover area, clothing itself increases the risk of heat disorder. WBGT is corrected by CAF (clothing adjustment factor) in wearing such kind of protective clothing.

  5. Exercise clothing and shoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... layer should also be breathable. In the hot sun, wear light-colored clothing that dries fast. You ... to block out the harmful rays of the sun. These clothes come with a sun protection factor ( ...

  6. Repellent-Treated Clothing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA regulates the pesticide permethrin to pre-treat clothing. We evaluate the safety and effectiveness of such insecticide uses, by exposure scenarios and risk assessment. Read and follow the label directions for use of permethrin-treated clothing.

  7. Why We Wear Clothes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowles, Jib

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of clothing as a means of communicating nonverbally in social situations and urges that a "semantics of clothing communication" be compiled to increase understanding of human life. (RB)

  8. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  9. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-the-shelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  10. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Thilini; Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-theshelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  11. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  12. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals onto activated carbon fiber cloths - Modeling and extrapolation of adsorption isotherms at very low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fallou, Hélène; Cimetière, Nicolas; Giraudet, Sylvain; Wolbert, Dominique; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2016-01-15

    Activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFC) have shown promising results when applied to water treatment, especially for removing organic micropollutants such as pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, further investigations are required, especially considering trace concentrations, which are found in current water treatment. Until now, most studies have been carried out at relatively high concentrations (mg L(-1)), since the experimental and analytical methodologies are more difficult and more expensive when dealing with lower concentrations (ng L(-1)). Therefore, the objective of this study was to validate an extrapolation procedure from high to low concentrations, for four compounds (Carbamazepine, Diclofenac, Caffeine and Acetaminophen). For this purpose, the reliability of the usual adsorption isotherm models, when extrapolated from high (mg L(-1)) to low concentrations (ng L(-1)), was assessed as well as the influence of numerous error functions. Some isotherm models (Freundlich, Toth) and error functions (RSS, ARE) show weaknesses to be used as an adsorption isotherms at low concentrations. However, from these results, the pairing of the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model with Marquardt's percent standard of deviation was evidenced as the best combination model, enabling the extrapolation of adsorption capacities by orders of magnitude.

  13. An Adaptive Critic Approach to Reference Model Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, G.; Gundy-Burlet, K.; Bryant, D.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks have been successfully used for implementing control architectures for different applications. In this work, we examine a neural network augmented adaptive critic as a Level 2 intelligent controller for a C- 17 aircraft. This intelligent control architecture utilizes an adaptive critic to tune the parameters of a reference model, which is then used to define the angular rate command for a Level 1 intelligent controller. The present architecture is implemented on a high-fidelity non-linear model of a C-17 aircraft. The goal of this research is to improve the performance of the C-17 under degraded conditions such as control failures and battle damage. Pilot ratings using a motion based simulation facility are included in this paper. The benefits of using an adaptive critic are documented using time response comparisons for severe damage situations.

  14. Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavretsky, Eugene; Gadient, Ross; Gregory, Irene M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is devoted to robust, Predictor-based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) design. The proposed adaptive system is compared with the now-classical Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) architecture. Simulation examples are presented. Numerical evidence indicates that the proposed PMRAC tracking architecture has better than MRAC transient characteristics. In this paper, we presented a state-predictor based direct adaptive tracking design methodology for multi-input dynamical systems, with partially known dynamics. Efficiency of the design was demonstrated using short period dynamics of an aircraft. Formal proof of the reported PMRAC benefits constitute future research and will be reported elsewhere.

  15. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women.

  16. A diversified portfolio model of adaptability.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Siddharth; Leong, Frederick T L

    2016-12-01

    A new model of adaptability, the diversified portfolio model (DPM) of adaptability, is introduced. In the 1950s, Markowitz developed the financial portfolio model by demonstrating that investors could optimize the ratio of risk and return on their portfolios through risk diversification. The DPM integrates attractive features of a variety of models of adaptability, including Linville's self-complexity model, the risk and resilience model, and Bandura's social cognitive theory. The DPM draws on the concept of portfolio diversification, positing that diversified investment in multiple life experiences, life roles, and relationships promotes positive adaptation to life's challenges. The DPM provides a new integrative model of adaptability across the biopsychosocial levels of functioning. More importantly, the DPM addresses a gap in the literature by illuminating the antecedents of adaptive processes studied in a broad array of psychological models. The DPM is described in relation to the biopsychosocial model and propositions are offered regarding its utility in increasing adaptiveness. Recommendations for future research are also offered. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Dressing with Pride. Volume One: Clothing Changes for Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Evelyn S.

    This book of sewing instructions is designed to solve many clothing problems for the disabled and elderly. Written in lay terms, it contains easy-to-follow, illustrated directions to assist the inexperienced sewer to modify and adapt ready-to-wear clothing for the handicapped. Suggestions for getting started are given in an overview of clothing…

  18. Simulations of densely-packed cloth motion in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz T.

    2005-11-01

    Fluid-structure simulations of densely-packed immersed fabric model the clothes washing process. We have modified the Immersed Boundary Method (Peskin 1977) to handle the known but complex geometry of the washing machine and agitator as well as the unknown cloth structure immersed in the fluid. Extending the technique to three-dimensions has required improved computational efficiency and causes geometric singularities when cloth that is not sufficiently extensible bends in two directions. We present some preliminary comparisons to primarily two-dimensional experiments in the dilute cloth limit. Computational difficulties caused by cloth permeability and bending stiffness will be discussed.

  19. On Fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  20. Laundering Your Baby's Clothes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Laundering Your Baby's Clothes KidsHealth > For Parents > Laundering Your Baby's Clothes Print A A A ...

  1. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Considers computerized adaptive testing from the perspective of graphical modeling (GM). GM provides methods for making inferences about multifaceted skills and knowledge and for extracting data from complex performances. Provides examples from language-proficiency assessment. (SLD)

  2. UV radiation transmittance: regular clothing versus sun-protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Bielinski, Kenneth; Bielinski, Nolan

    2014-09-01

    There are many clothing options available for patients who are interested in limiting their exposure to UV radiation; however, these options can be confusing for patients. For dermatologists, there is limited clinical data regarding the advantages, if any, of sun-protective clothing. In this study, we examined the UV radiation transmittance of regular clothing versus sun-protective clothing. We found that regular clothing may match or even exceed sun-protective clothing in blocking the transmittance of UV radiation. These data will help dermatologists better counsel their patients on clothing options for sun protection.

  3. Out of This World: A University Partnership Model for Functional Clothing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunne, Lucy E.; Simon, Cory

    2013-01-01

    University collaborations with external partners can be difficult to initiate, especially in early-stage or emerging topics. External collaborators may be reluctant to commit the level of funding required to ensure that the topic is given adequate attention, and low-stakes mechanisms are relatively rare. Here, we present a successful model for collaboration between universities and NASA, which uses existing project-based coursework as a vehicle for exploration of emerging topics. This model leverages existing structures, reducing the financial and intellectual commitment of both University and NASA research partners, and facilitating pilot investigations for exploration of potential areas for more in-depth research. We outline the logistical structure and benefits for University and NASA partners over 1.5 years of collaboration.

  4. User Modeling in Adaptive Hypermedia Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Antonio Constantino; Faria, Luiz; Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Carrapatoso, Eurico

    2008-01-01

    This document is a survey in the research area of User Modeling (UM) for the specific field of Adaptive Learning. The aims of this document are: To define what it is a User Model; To present existing and well known User Models; To analyze the existent standards related with UM; To compare existing systems. In the scientific area of User Modeling…

  5. Using of BRDF models for evaluation of properties of personal protective clothes for work with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołebiowski, Wojciech; Grabowiecki, Krzysztof; Wenzel, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    In applications of high power hand lasers, as addition to the standard eyes protection, it is suggested to use protective garment to avoid skin burns. Fabrics used for this kind of garment have to pass respective qualification tests. One of test procedures is optical characterization of the fabric - measurement of its reflectance, transmittance and angular characteristics of reflection of laser radiation. In this article a method for simplified measurement of these features is presented, which uses light reflection models called BRDF (Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Function) and function fitting with numerical optimization. It allows for quantitative estimation of mentioned optical properties with lower effort and shorter time than with classical methods.

  6. Two-temperature and Model-Independent Differential Emission Measure Distributions: The Emperor's New Clothes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.

    2013-04-01

    Ill conditioning of both X-ray lines and continua present a well-known problem, which generally renders it impossible to formally invert observed X-ray spectra into meaningful source distributions. This problem is often addressed by the forward approach of parametrizing the source distribution, and varying the parameters until a best fit is achieved. However, this technique trades the ill conditioning of inversions for ambiguities in the parametrized sources, because a qualitatively different parametrized form might also yield an acceptable fit to the data. The severity of this ambiguity problem is explored in a general way, and it may force the abandonment of the concept of model-independent differential emisson-measure distributions, in favor of intentionally fitting the spectrum within the context of some particular source model, in order to address some specific question. In particular, two-component plasma fits may only be physically meaningful in contexts where the plasma is already assumed to be two components-- the X-ray spectrum will often not be able to establish that structure as an objective fact, forcing researchers to choose more carefully what they wish to learn from the spectrum.

  7. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  8. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Taura, J.C.; Aksit, M.F.; Demiroglu, M.; Predmore, D.R.

    1999-06-29

    A seal assembly is described having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch there between which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal. 7 figs.

  9. Flexible cloth seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumar; Taura, Joseph Charles; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Demiroglu, Mehmet; Predmore, Daniel Ross

    1999-01-01

    A seal assembly having a flexible cloth seal which includes a shim assemblage surrounded by a cloth assemblage. A first tubular end portion, such as a gas turbine combustor, includes a longitudinal axis and has smooth and spaced-apart first and second surface portions defining a notch therebetween which is wider at its top than at its bottom and which extends outward from the axis. The second surface portion is outside curved, and a first edge of the cloth seal is positioned in the bottom of the notch. A second tubular end portion, such as a first stage nozzle, is located near, spaced apart from, and coaxially aligned with, the first tubular end portion. The second tubular end portion has a smooth third surface portion which surrounds at least a portion of the first tubular end portion and which is contacted by the cloth seal.

  10. Nonflammable Clothing Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Richard; Radnofsky, Matthew I.

    1968-01-01

    Protective clothing is of major importance in our space program. The authors discuss the requirements, selection, and testing of materials considered for use in the program. The various types of garments worn by astronauts and support personnel are briefly described.

  11. Physiological effects of a modification of the construction of impermeable protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Anna; Bartkowiak, Grazyna; Lezak, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to improve the construction of impermeable clothing protecting against liquid chemical agents in order to lower the thermal strain caused by the clothing during work. Previous studies indicated that light work in a hot environment in this kind of clothing could last 30 min only. We propose a modification of the construction; new models of protective clothing were tested in wear trials. Then the results were compared with a basic model of impermeable protective clothing. Results indicated that all new models of protective clothing allowed workers to work 39-64% longer than in a basic model of protective clothing. Thus new clothing significantly improved comfort of work in impermeable protective clothing because of the lower thermal strain that it imposed on the user.

  12. Clean room wiping cloths

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    The suitability of various fabrics for use as clean room wiping cloths was investigated. These fabrics included knit polyester, knit nylon, urethane foam, woven cotton, nonwoven polyester, nonwoven rayon, nonwoven polyethylene and polypropylene, and woven nylon. These materials were tested for detachable lint and fibers, deterioration, and oil content which could leave contaminating films on wiped surfaces. Well-laundered nylon and polyester cloths knitted from filamentary yarn, with hems, were found to be suitable. (LCL)

  13. Clothing and personal hygiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finogenov, A. M.; Azhayev, A. N.; Kaliberdin, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    The biomedical maintenance of astronauts is discussed in terms of personal hygiene. Principal characteristics and general requirements are described which must be followed in perfecting a system of hygienic practices and in devising means to maintain personal hygiene, flight clothing, underwear, bedding, and medical-domestic equipment for manned space flights of varying durations. Factors discussed include: disposable clothing, thermal protection, oral hygiene, cleansing of the skin, and grooming of the hair.

  14. A heuristic model of sensory adaptation.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Donald H; Balaban, Carey D

    2009-11-01

    Adaptation is a universal process in organisms as diverse as bacteria and humans, and across the various senses. This article proposes a simple, heuristic, mathematical model containing tonic and phasic processes. The model demonstrates properties not commonly associated with adaptation, such as increased sensitivity to changes, range shifting, and phase lead. Changes in only four parameters permit the model to predict empirical psychophysical data from different senses. The relatively prolonged time courses of responses to oral and topical capsaicin are used to illustrate and validate this mathematical modeling approach for different stimulus profiles. Other examples of phenomena elucidated by this modeling approach include the time courses of taste sensation, brightness perception, loudness perception, cross-adaptation to oral irritants, and cutaneous mechanoreception. It also predicts such apparently unrelated phenomena as perceived alcohol intoxication, habituation, and drug tolerance. Because the integration of phasic and tonic components is a conservative, highly efficacious solution to a ubiquitous biological challenge, sensory adaptation is seen as an evolutionary adaptation, and as a prominent feature of Mother Nature's small bag of tricks.

  15. Adaptive Modeling Language and Its Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chemaly, Adel

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) is the underlying language of an object-oriented, multidisciplinary, knowledge-based engineering framework. AML offers an advanced modeling paradigm with an open architecture, enabling the automation of the entire product development cycle, integrating product configuration, design, analysis, visualization, production planning, inspection, and cost estimation.

  16. Methods of Evaluating Protective Clothing Relative to Heat and Cold Stress: Thermal Manikin, Biomedical Modeling, and Human Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    code) 2011 Journal Article-Journal of Occup and Env Hygiene Methods of Evaluating Protective Clothing Relative to Heat and cold Stress: Thermal...of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene , 8: 588–599 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online DOI: 10.1080/15459624.2011.613291 Methods of...increases insulation and reduces water vapor permeability, both of which 588 Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene October 2011 D ow nl oa de

  17. Hybrid Surface Mesh Adaptation for Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed Khamayseh; Valmor de Almeida; Glen Hansen

    2008-10-01

    Solution-driven mesh adaptation is becoming quite popular for spatial error control in the numerical simulation of complex computational physics applications, such as climate modeling. Typically, spatial adaptation is achieved by element subdivision (h adaptation) with a primary goal of resolving the local length scales of interest. A second, less-popular method of spatial adaptivity is called “mesh motion” (r adaptation); the smooth repositioning of mesh node points aimed at resizing existing elements to capture the local length scales. This paper proposes an adaptation method based on a combination of both element subdivision and node point repositioning (rh adaptation). By combining these two methods using the notion of a mobility function, the proposed approach seeks to increase the flexibility and extensibility of mesh motion algorithms while providing a somewhat smoother transition between refined regions than is produced by element subdivision alone. Further, in an attempt to support the requirements of a very general class of climate simulation applications, the proposed method is designed to accommodate unstructured, polygonal mesh topologies in addition to the most popular mesh types.

  18. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  19. Optimizing the protection against the physiological burden of CBRN clothing.

    PubMed

    Brasser, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Soldiers can wear chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) protective clothing to be protected against warfare agents. The disadvantage of that clothing is that higher protection introduces higher physiological burden. Therefore an optimum between comfort and protection must be found. Models of all relevant processes were created to find this optimum. The airflow profile around a cylinder with clothing-representing a dressed human body part-was modelled. This flow profile was used for calculating the agent vapour breakthrough through the clothing and for calculating the deposition of agents onto the skin (as indicators for protection). The flow profile was also used for calculating the temperature profile around the body part and the relative humidity underneath and in the clothing (as representative for physiological burden). As a result a tool was created, which can be used to identify the optimum properties of CBRN protective clothing, depending on the intended mission of the soldiers.

  20. Adaptive approximation models in optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A.N.

    1995-05-01

    The paper proposes a method for optimization of functions of several variables that substantially reduces the number of objective function evaluations compared to traditional methods. The method is based on the property of iterative refinement of approximation models of the optimand function in approximation domains that contract to the extremum point. It does not require subjective specification of the starting point, step length, or other parameters of the search procedure. The method is designed for efficient optimization of unimodal functions of several (not more than 10-15) variables and can be applied to find the global extremum of polymodal functions and also for optimization of scalarized forms of vector objective functions.

  1. Numerical simulation of the influence of fabric's motion on protective clothing performance during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2013-06-01

    The motion of a person wearing protective clothing induces the clothing to move periodically towards the skin causing a cyclic variation in the air gap between the fabric and the skin. At the same time, the clothing movement causes cooling air to periodically flow into the air gap between the fabric and the skin. This paper uses a finite volume model to investigate these two effects and the resultant effect of the protective clothing movement on its performance during flash fire exposure. Special attention is drawn to the air gap model since it responds directly to the clothing movement. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the influence of a wider range of clothing movement. Specifically, the effect of the variation in the periodic movement frequency and amplitude on the clothing performance was investigated. The results show that increasing the movement frequency improves the clothing protective performance, while increasing the movement amplitude worsens the clothing performance.

  2. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  3. A Model for Optimal Constrained Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Reese, Lynda M.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a model for constrained computerized adaptive testing in which the information in the test at the trait level (theta) estimate is maximized subject to the number of possible constraints on the content of the test. Test assembly relies on a linear-programming approach. Illustrates the approach through simulation with items from the Law…

  4. Automated adaptive inference of phenomenological dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dynamics of complex systems is often driven by large and intricate networks of microscopic interactions, whose sheer size obfuscates understanding. With limited experimental data, many parameters of such dynamics are unknown, and thus detailed, mechanistic models risk overfitting and making faulty predictions. At the other extreme, simple ad hoc models often miss defining features of the underlying systems. Here we develop an approach that instead constructs phenomenological, coarse-grained models of network dynamics that automatically adapt their complexity to the available data. Such adaptive models produce accurate predictions even when microscopic details are unknown. The approach is computationally tractable, even for a relatively large number of dynamical variables. Using simulated data, it correctly infers the phase space structure for planetary motion, avoids overfitting in a biological signalling system and produces accurate predictions for yeast glycolysis with tens of data points and over half of the interacting species unobserved.

  5. Automated adaptive inference of phenomenological dynamical models

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of complex systems is often driven by large and intricate networks of microscopic interactions, whose sheer size obfuscates understanding. With limited experimental data, many parameters of such dynamics are unknown, and thus detailed, mechanistic models risk overfitting and making faulty predictions. At the other extreme, simple ad hoc models often miss defining features of the underlying systems. Here we develop an approach that instead constructs phenomenological, coarse-grained models of network dynamics that automatically adapt their complexity to the available data. Such adaptive models produce accurate predictions even when microscopic details are unknown. The approach is computationally tractable, even for a relatively large number of dynamical variables. Using simulated data, it correctly infers the phase space structure for planetary motion, avoids overfitting in a biological signalling system and produces accurate predictions for yeast glycolysis with tens of data points and over half of the interacting species unobserved. PMID:26293508

  6. Photoprotection: clothing and glass.

    PubMed

    Almutawa, Fahad; Buabbas, Hanan

    2014-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UVR) has well-known adverse effects on the skin and eyes. Little attention is given to physical means of photoprotection, namely glass, window films, sunglasses, and clothing. In general, all types of glass block UV-B. For UV-A, the degree of transmission depends on the type, thickness, and color of the glass. Adding window films to glass can greatly decrease the transmission of UV-A. Factors that can affect the transmission of UVR through cloth include tightness of weave, thickness, weight, type of fabrics, laundering, hydration, stretch, fabric processing, UV absorbers, color, and fabric-to-skin distance.

  7. Cloth destruction and haemolysis with totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schottenfeld, M.; Wisheart, J. D.; Ross, J. K.; Lincoln, J. C. R.; Ross, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Four cases are described in which totally cloth-covered Starr-Edwards valves (model 2300) had to be removed. All were causing significant haemolysis, two in the absence of a peripheral leak. The principal operative finding was destruction of the Dacron covering the struts. Following replacement of these prostheses there was complete resolution of signs and symptoms. The possible causes of haemolysis and consequences of cloth destruction are discussed. Images PMID:5576531

  8. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  9. Clothing and Textile Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    Forty-seven performance-based instructional modules on six major topics are provided for the home economics content area of clothing and textiles. The six topics are (1) planning basics (psychological, physical, social, and behavioral aspects of clothing; elements of design; principles of design; and style and fashion in clothing), (2) buyership…

  10. Clothing and exercise. I: Biophysics of heat transfer between the individual, clothing and environment.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, D D; Shanley, L A; Smith, E W

    1994-07-01

    Despite large environmental variations, the human body maintains a tightly regulated core temperature. Effective thermoregulation must balance the interaction between skin surface, clothing and ambient air. Indices of thermal stress (wet bulb globe temperature, heat stress index, maximum evaporation rate, required evaporative rate and wind chill) provide valuable information concerning the heat exchange between the individual and the environment, and serve as protective guidelines while working in environmental extremes. The role of clothing, as an interactive barrier, greatly affects thermal balance. Clothing is varied according to prevailing environmental conditions, metabolic heat production, gender and age differences, fabric thermal properties, garment design and intended use. Models (static, dynamic and human) have investigated the biophysical transfer of heat between the skin surface area, clothing and ambient air. Additionally, the role of metabolic heat production during exercise can greatly influence tolerance to thermal stress during a variety of environmental conditions.

  11. The effects of videotape modeling and daily feedback on residential electricity conservation, home temperature and humidity, perceived comfort, and clothing worn: Winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Winett, R A; Hatcher, J W; Fort, T R; Leckliter, I N; Love, S Q; Riley, A W; Fishback, J F

    1982-01-01

    Two studies were conducted in all-electric townhouses and apartments in the winter (N = 83) and summer (N = 54) to ascertain how energy conservation strategies focusing on thermostat change and set-backs and other low-cost/no-cost approaches would affect overall electricity use and electricity used for heating and cooling, the home thermal environment, the perceived comfort of participants, and clothing that was worn. The studies assessed the effectiveness of videotape modeling programs that demonstrated these conservation strategies when used alone or combined with daily feedback on electricity use. In the winter, the results indicated that videotape modeling and/or feedback were effective relative to baseline and to a control group in reducing overall electricity use by about 15% and electricity used for heating by about 25%. Hygrothermographs, which accurately and continuously recorded temperature and humidity in the homes, indicated that participants were able to live with no reported loss in comfort and no change in attire at a mean temperature of about 62 degrees F when home and about 59 degrees F when asleep. The results were highly discrepant with prior laboratory studies indicating comfort at 75 degrees F with the insulation value of the clothing worn by participants in this study. In the summer, a combination of strategies designed to keep a home cool with minimal or no air conditioning, in conjunction with videotape modeling and/or daily feedback, resulted in overall electricity reductions of about 15% with reductions on electricity for cooling of about 34%, but with feedback, and feedback and modeling more effective than modeling alone. Despite these electricity savings, hygrothermograph recordings indicated minimal temperature change in the homes, with no change in perceived comfort or clothing worn. The results are discussed in terms of discrepancies with laboratory studies, optimal combinations of video-media and personal contact to promote behavior

  12. The effects of videotape modeling and daily feedback on residential electricity conservation, home temperature and humidity, perceived comfort, and clothing worn: Winter and summer

    PubMed Central

    Winett, Richard A.; Hatcher, Joseph W.; Fort, T. Richard; Leckliter, Ingrid N.; Love, Susan Q.; Riley, Anne W.; Fishback, James F.

    1982-01-01

    Two studies were conducted in all-electric townhouses and apartments in the winter (N = 83) and summer (N = 54) to ascertain how energy conservation strategies focusing on thermostat change and set-backs and other low-cost/no-cost approaches would affect overall electricity use and electricity used for heating and cooling, the home thermal environment, the perceived comfort of participants, and clothing that was worn. The studies assessed the effectiveness of videotape modeling programs that demonstrated these conservation strategies when used alone or combined with daily feedback on electricity use. In the winter, the results indicated that videotape modeling and/or feedback were effective relative to baseline and to a control group in reducing overall electricity use by about 15% and electricity used for heating by about 25%. Hygrothermographs, which accurately and continuously recorded temperature and humidity in the homes, indicated that participants were able to live with no reported loss in comfort and no change in attire at a mean temperature of about 62°F when home and about 59°F when asleep. The results were highly discrepant with prior laboratory studies indicating comfort at 75°F with the insulation value of the clothing worn by participants in this study. In the summer, a combination of strategies designed to keep a home cool with minimal or no air conditioning, in conjunction with videotape modeling and/or daily feedback, resulted in overall electricity reductions of about 15% with reductions on electricity for cooling of about 34%, but with feedback, and feedback and modeling more effective than modeling alone. Despite these electricity savings, hygrothermograph recordings indicated minimal temperature change in the homes, with no change in perceived comfort or clothing worn. The results are discussed in terms of discrepancies with laboratory studies, optimal combinations of video-media and personal contact to promote behavior change, and energy

  13. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  14. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  15. Painting Cloth with Crayons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asch, Rosalie L.

    1979-01-01

    Painting cloth with crayons is suggested as a challenging art project, especially for students who have difficulty with the complex tools and processes typical of more advanced textile work. Instructions are given for creating decorative banners with this technique. One of seven articles in this issue on fiber arts. (Author/SJL)

  16. Chiang Xiong: Story Cloth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappetta, Ann; Fitzgerald, Donna

    1989-01-01

    Describes a lesson plan that introduces students in grades 10-12 to the decorative arts as a vehicle for exploring the cultural framework as a means of communicating various aspects of the human experience. Students design a story cloth based on a visual symbol they have developed to represent a human issue such as famine or war. (LS)

  17. Carbon cloth supported electrode

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.; Ammon, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    A flow-by anode is disclosed made by preparing a liquid suspension of about to about 18% by weight solids, the solids comprising about 3.5 to about 8% of a powdered catalyst of platinum, palladium, palladium oxide, or mixtures thereof; about 60 to about 76% carbon powder (support) having a particle size less than about 20 m.mu.m and about 20 to about 33% of an inert binder having a particle size of less than about 500 m.mu.m. A sufficient amount of the suspension is poured over a carbon cloth to form a layer of solids about 0.01 to about 0.05 cm thick on the carbon cloth when the electrode is completed. A vacuum was applied to the opposite side of the carbon cloth to remove the liquid and the catalyst layer/cloth assembly is dried and compressed at about 10 to about 50 MPa's. The binder is then sintered in an inert atmosphere to complete the electrode. The electrode is used for the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in a sulfur based hybrid cycle for the decomposition of water.

  18. Sex and Clothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stember, Charles H.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    This roundtable discussion focusos on fashion which may be indicative of the prevailing social climate. Clothing may be a reflection of ambivalence toward the body, used to cover it from shame" while also displaying it to advantage. A discussion of historical changes in dress, together with psychological implications, is presented. (Author/CJ)

  19. Men's Clothing Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margerum, B. Jean; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An informal consumer interview study, using 187 men, was conducted to highlight directions that clothing and textiles education and research might take. Mentioned most often were problems of fabric durability and garment construction as well as size and fit. Suggestions for curbing economic waste in the male fashion industry and implications for…

  20. Hmong Story Cloths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a brief history of Hmong and traces the origin of Hmong story cloths. The Hmong, a nomadic and agrarian people, may date back 5000 years. Today they live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos, where during the Vietnam War and its aftermath, many Hmong were killed or persecuted for siding with the American…

  1. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  2. Adaptive Control with Reference Model Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the conventional model reference adaptive control (MRAC) architecture in order to improve transient performance of the input and output signals of uncertain systems. A simple modification of the reference model is proposed by feeding back the tracking error signal. It is shown that the proposed approach guarantees tracking of the given reference command and the reference control signal (one that would be designed if the system were known) not only asymptotically but also in transient. Moreover, it prevents generation of high frequency oscillations, which are unavoidable in conventional MRAC systems for large adaptation rates. The provided design guideline makes it possible to track a reference commands of any magnitude from any initial position without re-tuning. The benefits of the method are demonstrated with a simulation example

  3. Adaptive cyber-attack modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Paul G.; Dougherty, Edward T.

    2006-05-01

    The pervasiveness of software and networked information systems is evident across a broad spectrum of business and government sectors. Such reliance provides an ample opportunity not only for the nefarious exploits of lone wolf computer hackers, but for more systematic software attacks from organized entities. Much effort and focus has been placed on preventing and ameliorating network and OS attacks, a concomitant emphasis is required to address protection of mission critical software. Typical software protection technique and methodology evaluation and verification and validation (V&V) involves the use of a team of subject matter experts (SMEs) to mimic potential attackers or hackers. This manpower intensive, time-consuming, and potentially cost-prohibitive approach is not amenable to performing the necessary multiple non-subjective analyses required to support quantifying software protection levels. To facilitate the evaluation and V&V of software protection solutions, we have designed and developed a prototype adaptive cyber attack modeling system. Our approach integrates an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of Bayesian belief network (BN) attack models with an on-line model instantiation, adaptation and knowledge acquisition scheme. Off-line model construction is supported via a knowledge elicitation approach for identifying key domain requirements and a process for translating these requirements into a library of BN-based cyber-attack models. On-line attack modeling and knowledge acquisition is supported via BN evidence propagation and model parameter learning.

  4. Adaptive human behavior in epidemiological models

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Ceddia, M. G.; Chowell, Gerardo; Parra, Paula A. Gonzalez; Hickling, Graham J.; Holloway, Garth; Horan, Richard; Morin, Benjamin; Perrings, Charles; Springborn, Michael; Velazquez, Leticia; Villalobos, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The science and management of infectious disease are entering a new stage. Increasingly public policy to manage epidemics focuses on motivating people, through social distancing policies, to alter their behavior to reduce contacts and reduce public disease risk. Person-to-person contacts drive human disease dynamics. People value such contacts and are willing to accept some disease risk to gain contact-related benefits. The cost–benefit trade-offs that shape contact behavior, and hence the course of epidemics, are often only implicitly incorporated in epidemiological models. This approach creates difficulty in parsing out the effects of adaptive behavior. We use an epidemiological–economic model of disease dynamics to explicitly model the trade-offs that drive person-to-person contact decisions. Results indicate that including adaptive human behavior significantly changes the predicted course of epidemics and that this inclusion has implications for parameter estimation and interpretation and for the development of social distancing policies. Acknowledging adaptive behavior requires a shift in thinking about epidemiological processes and parameters. PMID:21444809

  5. Adaptive human behavior in epidemiological models.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos; Ceddia, M G; Chowell, Gerardo; Parra, Paula A Gonzalez; Hickling, Graham J; Holloway, Garth; Horan, Richard; Morin, Benjamin; Perrings, Charles; Springborn, Michael; Velazquez, Leticia; Villalobos, Cristina

    2011-04-12

    The science and management of infectious disease are entering a new stage. Increasingly public policy to manage epidemics focuses on motivating people, through social distancing policies, to alter their behavior to reduce contacts and reduce public disease risk. Person-to-person contacts drive human disease dynamics. People value such contacts and are willing to accept some disease risk to gain contact-related benefits. The cost-benefit trade-offs that shape contact behavior, and hence the course of epidemics, are often only implicitly incorporated in epidemiological models. This approach creates difficulty in parsing out the effects of adaptive behavior. We use an epidemiological-economic model of disease dynamics to explicitly model the trade-offs that drive person-to-person contact decisions. Results indicate that including adaptive human behavior significantly changes the predicted course of epidemics and that this inclusion has implications for parameter estimation and interpretation and for the development of social distancing policies. Acknowledging adaptive behavior requires a shift in thinking about epidemiological processes and parameters.

  6. A Model for Climate Change Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualini, D.; Keating, G. N.

    2009-12-01

    Climate models predict serious impacts on the western U.S. in the next few decades, including increased temperatures and reduced precipitation. In combination, these changes are linked to profound impacts on fundamental systems, such as water and energy supplies, agriculture, population stability, and the economy. Global and national imperatives for climate change mitigation and adaptation are made actionable at the state level, for instance through greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and incentives for renewable energy sources. However, adaptation occurs at the local level, where energy and water usage can be understood relative to local patterns of agriculture, industry, and culture. In response to the greenhouse gas emission reductions required by California’s Assembly Bill 32 (2006), Sonoma County has committed to sharp emissions reductions across several sectors, including water, energy, and transportation. To assist Sonoma County develop a renewable energy (RE) portfolio to achieve this goal we have developed an integrated assessment model, CLEAR (CLimate-Energy Assessment for Resiliency) model. Building on Sonoma County’s existing baseline studies of energy use, carbon emissions and potential RE sources, the CLEAR model simulates the complex interactions among technology deployment, economics and social behavior. This model enables assessment of these and other components with specific analysis of their coupling and feedbacks because, due to the complex nature of the problem, the interrelated sectors cannot be studied independently. The goal is an approach to climate change mitigation and adaptation that is replicable for use by other interested communities. The model user interfaces helps stakeholders and policymakers understand options for technology implementation.

  7. Income distribution: An adaptive heterogeneous model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. C.; de Figueirêdo, P. H.

    2014-02-01

    In this communication an adaptive process is introduced into a many-agent model for closed economic system in order to establish general features of income distribution. In this new version agents are able to modify their exchange parameter ωi of resources through an adaptive process. The conclusions indicate that assuming an instantaneous learning behavior of all agents a Γ-distribution for income is reproduced while a frozen behavior establishes a Pareto’s distribution for income with an exponent ν=0.94±0.02. A third case occurs when a heterogeneous “inertia” behavior is introduced leading us to a Γ-distribution at the low income regime and a power-law decay for the large income values with an exponent ν=2.05±0.05. This method enables investigation of the resources flux in the economic environment and produces also bounding values for the Gini index comparable with data evidences.

  8. An adaptive contextual quantum language model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingfei; Zhang, Peng; Song, Dawei; Hou, Yuexian

    2016-08-01

    User interactions in search system represent a rich source of implicit knowledge about the user's cognitive state and information need that continuously evolves over time. Despite massive efforts that have been made to exploiting and incorporating this implicit knowledge in information retrieval, it is still a challenge to effectively capture the term dependencies and the user's dynamic information need (reflected by query modifications) in the context of user interaction. To tackle these issues, motivated by the recent Quantum Language Model (QLM), we develop a QLM based retrieval model for session search, which naturally incorporates the complex term dependencies occurring in user's historical queries and clicked documents with density matrices. In order to capture the dynamic information within users' search session, we propose a density matrix transformation framework and further develop an adaptive QLM ranking model. Extensive comparative experiments show the effectiveness of our session quantum language models.

  9. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-09

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  10. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-07-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  11. Model reference adaptive control of robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinvorth, Rodrigo

    1991-01-01

    This project presents the results of controlling two types of robots using new Command Generator Tracker (CGT) based Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) algorithms. Two mathematical models were used to represent a single-link, flexible joint arm and a Unimation PUMA 560 arm; and these were then controlled in simulation using different MRAC algorithms. Special attention was given to the performance of the algorithms in the presence of sudden changes in the robot load. Previously used CGT based MRAC algorithms had several problems. The original algorithm that was developed guaranteed asymptotic stability only for almost strictly positive real (ASPR) plants. This condition is very restrictive, since most systems do not satisfy this assumption. Further developments to the algorithm led to an expansion of the number of plants that could be controlled, however, a steady state error was introduced in the response. These problems led to the introduction of some modifications to the algorithms so that they would be able to control a wider class of plants and at the same time would asymptotically track the reference model. This project presents the development of two algorithms that achieve the desired results and simulates the control of the two robots mentioned before. The results of the simulations are satisfactory and show that the problems stated above have been corrected in the new algorithms. In addition, the responses obtained show that the adaptively controlled processes are resistant to sudden changes in the load.

  12. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M; Lee, Vo

    2014-04-15

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  13. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-11-18

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  14. Plant adaptive behaviour in hydrological models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, M. J.; Teuling, R.

    2013-12-01

    Models that will be able to cope with future precipitation and evaporation regimes need a solid base that describes the essence of the processes involved [1]. Micro-behaviour in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system may have a large impact on patterns emerging at larger scales. A complicating factor in the micro-behaviour is the constant interaction between vegetation and geology in which water plays a key role. The resilience of the coupled vegetation-soil system critically depends on its sensitivity to environmental changes. As a result of environmental changes vegetation may wither and die, but such environmental changes may also trigger gene adaptation. Constant exposure to environmental stresses, biotic or abiotic, influences plant physiology, gene adaptations, and flexibility in gene adaptation [2-6]. Gene expression as a result of different environmental conditions may profoundly impact drought responses across the same plant species. Differences in response to an environmental stress, has consequences for the way species are currently being treated in models (single plant to global scale). In particular, model parameters that control root water uptake and plant transpiration are generally assumed to be a property of the plant functional type. Assigning plant functional types does not allow for local plant adaptation to be reflected in the model parameters, nor does it allow for correlations that might exist between root parameters and soil type. Models potentially provide a means to link root water uptake and transport to large scale processes (e.g. Rosnay and Polcher 1998, Feddes et al. 2001, Jung 2010), especially when powered with an integrated hydrological, ecological and physiological base. We explore the experimental evidence from natural vegetation to formulate possible alternative modeling concepts. [1] Seibert, J. 2000. Multi-criteria calibration of a conceptual runoff model using a genetic algorithm. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 4(2): 215

  15. Adaptive Model of Wastewater Aeration Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniders, Andris; Laizans, Aigars

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the methodology of oxygen transfer virtual simulation in a wastewater biological treatment process, using the MATLAB/SIMULINK technology. A self-tuning adaptive model of a wastewater aeration tank, as a non-stationary object, with variable time dependent sensitivity and inertia indexes, as the functions of input variable - air pneumatic supply capacity Lg(t) (m3/min), output variable - dissolved oxygen concentration C(t) (g/m3) and oxygen expenditure, as a load - q(t) (g/min), required for wastewater complete purification, is expounded. Virtual models, applying Laplace transforms and SIMULINK blocks library, are composed in order to compare the transient processes of dissolved oxygen concentration in the simplified stationary model with constant sensitivity and inertia coefficients, and in the non-stationary model with variable sensitivity and inertia indexes. The simulation block-diagram for non-stationary model adoption to the variable parameters is developed, using informative links from input variable Lg(t), from variable load q(t) and feedback from output variable C(t) as inputs of calculation modulus, allowing to instantly re-calculate the variable indexes during simulation time. Comparison of the simplified stationary model and the non-stationary model shows that the simulation results of oxygen transfer differ up to 50%.

  16. 3D quantification of microclimate volume in layered clothing for the prediction of clothing insulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yejin; Hong, Kyunghi; Hong, Sung-Ae

    2007-05-01

    Garment fit and resultant air volume is a crucial factor in thermal insulation, and yet, it has been difficult to quantify the air volume of clothing microclimate and relate it to the thermal insulation value just using the information on the size of clothing pattern without actual 3D volume measurement in wear condition. As earlier methods for the computation of air volume in clothing microclimate, vacuum over suit and circumference model have been used. However, these methods have inevitable disadvantages in terms of cost or accuracy due to the limitations of measurement equipment. In this paper, the phase-shifting moiré topography was introduced as one of the 3D scanning tools to measure the air volume of clothing microclimate quantitatively. The purpose of this research is to adopt a non-contact image scanning technology, phase-shifting moiré topography, to ascertain relationship between air volume and insulation value of layered clothing systems in wear situations where the 2D fabric creates new conditions in 3D spaces. The insulation of vests over shirts as a layered clothing system was measured with a thermal manikin in the environmental condition of 20 degrees C, 65% RH and air velocity of 0.79 m/s. As the pattern size increased, the insulation of the clothing system was increased. But beyond a certain limit, the insulation started to decrease due to convection and ventilation, which is more apparent when only the vest was worn over the torso of manikin. The relationship between clothing air volume and insulation was difficult to predict with a single vest due to the extreme openings which induced active ventilation. But when the vest was worn over the shirt, the effects of thickness of the fabrics on insulation were less pronounced compared with that of air volume. In conclusion, phase-shifting moiré topography was one of the efficient and accurate ways of quantifying air volume and its distribution across the clothing microclimate. It is also noted

  17. The Adaptive Calibration Model of stress responsivity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Adaptive Calibration Model (ACM), an evolutionary-developmental theory of individual differences in the functioning of the stress response system. The stress response system has three main biological functions: (1) to coordinate the organism’s allostatic response to physical and psychosocial challenges; (2) to encode and filter information about the organism’s social and physical environment, mediating the organism’s openness to environmental inputs; and (3) to regulate the organism’s physiology and behavior in a broad range of fitness-relevant areas including defensive behaviors, competitive risk-taking, learning, attachment, affiliation and reproductive functioning. The information encoded by the system during development feeds back on the long-term calibration of the system itself, resulting in adaptive patterns of responsivity and individual differences in behavior. Drawing on evolutionary life history theory, we build a model of the development of stress responsivity across life stages, describe four prototypical responsivity patterns, and discuss the emergence and meaning of sex differences. The ACM extends the theory of biological sensitivity to context (BSC) and provides an integrative framework for future research in the field. PMID:21145350

  18. Effect of clothing material on thermal responses of the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengzhi, Li; Yi, Li

    2005-09-01

    The influence of clothing material on thermal responses of the human body are investigated by using an integrated model of a clothed thermoregulatory human body. A modified 25-nodes model considering the sweat accumulation on the skin surface is applied to simulate the human physiological regulatory responses. The heat and moisture coupled transfer mechanisms, including water vapour diffusion, the moisture evaporation/condensation, the moisture sorbtion/desorption by fibres, liquid sweat transfer under capillary pressure, and latent heat absorption/release due to phase change, are considered in the clothing model. On comparing prediction results with the experimental data in the literature, the proposed model seems able to predict dynamic heat and moisture transfer between the human body and the clothing system. The human body's thermal responses and clothing temperature and moisture variations are compared for different clothing materials during transient periods. We concluded that the hygroscopicity of clothing materials influences the human thermoregulation process significantly during environmental transients.

  19. Adaptation dynamics of the quasispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kavita

    2009-02-01

    We study the adaptation dynamics of an initially maladapted population evolving via the elementary processes of mutation and selection. The evolution occurs on rugged fitness landscapes which are defined on the multi-dimensional genotypic space and have many local peaks separated by low fitness valleys. We mainly focus on the Eigen's model that describes the deterministic dynamics of an infinite number of self-replicating molecules. In the stationary state, for small mutation rates such a population forms a {\\it quasispecies} which consists of the fittest genotype and its closely related mutants. The quasispecies dynamics on rugged fitness landscape follow a punctuated (or step-like) pattern in which a population jumps from a low fitness peak to a higher one, stays there for a considerable time before shifting the peak again and eventually reaches the global maximum of the fitness landscape. We calculate exactly several properties of this dynamical process within a simplified version of the quasispecies model.

  20. European upper mantle tomography: adaptively parameterized models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Boschi, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have devised a new algorithm for upper-mantle surface-wave tomography based on adaptive parameterization: i.e. the size of each parameterization pixel depends on the local density of seismic data coverage. The advantage in using this kind of parameterization is that a high resolution can be achieved in regions with dense data coverage while a lower (and cheaper) resolution is kept in regions with low coverage. This way, parameterization is everywhere optimal, both in terms of its computational cost, and of model resolution. This is especially important for data sets with inhomogenous data coverage, as it is usually the case for global seismic databases. The data set we use has an especially good coverage around Switzerland and over central Europe. We focus on periods from 35s to 150s. The final goal of the project is to determine a new model of seismic velocities for the upper mantle underlying Europe and the Mediterranean Basin, of resolution higher than what is currently found in the literature. Our inversions involve regularization via norm and roughness minimization, and this in turn requires that discrete norm and roughness operators associated with our adaptive grid be precisely defined. The discretization of the roughness damping operator in the case of adaptive parameterizations is not as trivial as it is for the uniform ones; important complications arise from the significant lateral variations in the size of pixels. We chose to first define the roughness operator in a spherical harmonic framework, and subsequently translate it to discrete pixels via a linear transformation. Since the smallest pixels we allow in our parameterization have a size of 0.625 °, the spherical-harmonic roughness operator has to be defined up to harmonic degree 899, corresponding to 810.000 harmonic coefficients. This results in considerable computational costs: we conduct the harmonic-pixel transformations on a small Beowulf cluster. We validate our implementation of adaptive

  1. Adjustments for weighing clothed babies at high altitude or in cold climates.

    PubMed

    Roche, Marion L; Gyorkos, Theresa W; Sarsoza, Julieta; Kuhnlein, Harriet V

    2015-01-01

    Public health nutritionists rely on anthropometry for nutritional assessment, program planning, and evaluation. Children are usually heavily clothed at high altitudes and in cold climates. Failing to adjust for clothing weight could underestimate malnutrition prevalence. The objective of this paper is to validate an adjustment process for estimating clothing weight and quantify potential misclassification error. In March and September 2009, 293 and 272 children under 2 years of age, respectively, were measured for weight and length in 14 highlands communities in Ecuador. Weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ) and weight-for-height z-scores (WHZ) were compared using clothing-unadjusted weights and two types of clothing-adjusted weights: individual clothing-weights and population-mean clothing-weights. Modelling showed up to 24% of children's nutritional status and degree of malnutrition were misclassified for WAZ, and 13% for WHZ, when clothing was not taken into account in this cold climate. Compared with the more time-intensive individual clothing-weight adjustment, the population-mean clothing-weight adjustments had high specificity and sensitivity for WAZ. In cold climates, adjusting for population mean clothing weight provides a better estimate of the prevalence of malnutrition to inform appropriate program decisions for addressing underweight. An individual clothing weight adjustment may also be essential to classify a specific child's nutritional status when acute malnutrition is a concern.

  2. Non-iterative distance constraints enforcement for cloth drapes simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajat, R. L. L. G.; Wibowo, Arifin, Z.; Suyitno

    2016-03-01

    A cloth simulation represents the behavior of cloth objects such as flag, tablecloth, or even garments has application in clothing animation for games and virtual shops. Elastically deformable models have widely used to provide realistic and efficient simulation, however problem of overstretching is encountered. We introduce a new cloth simulation algorithm that replaces iterative distance constraint enforcement steps with non-iterative ones for preventing over stretching in a spring-mass system for cloth modeling. Our method is based on a simple position correction procedure applied at one end of a spring. In our experiments, we developed a rectangle cloth model which is initially at a horizontal position with one point is fixed, and it is allowed to drape by its own weight. Our simulation is able to achieve a plausible cloth drapes as in reality. This paper aims to demonstrate the reliability of our approach to overcome overstretches while decreasing the computational cost of the constraint enforcement process due to an iterative procedure that is eliminated.

  3. Advanced Clothing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne; Poritz, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    All human space missions require significant logistical mass and volume that add an unprecedented burden on longduration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. For these missions with limited cleaning resources, a new wardrobe must be developed to reduce this logistical burden by reducing clothing mass and extending clothing wear. The present studies have been undertaken, for the first time, to measure length of wear and to assess the acceptance of such extended wear. Garments in these studies are commercially available exercise T-shirts and shorts, routine-wear T-shirts, and longsleeved pullover shirts. Fabric composition (cotton, polyester, light-weight, superfine Merino wool, modacrylic, cotton/rayon, polyester/Cocona, modacrylic/Xstatic, modacrylic/rayon, modacrylic/lyocell/aramid), construction (open knit, tight knit, open weave, tight weave), and finishing treatment (none, quaternary ammonium salt) are the independent variables. Eleven studies are reported here: five studies of exercise T-shirts, three of exercise shorts, two of routine wear Tshirts, and one of shirts used as sleep-wear. All studies are conducted in a climate-controlled environment, similar to a space vehicle's. For exercise clothing, study participants wear the garments during aerobic exercise. For routine wear clothing, study participants wear the T-shirts daily in an office or laboratory. Daily questionnaires collected data on ordinal preferences of nine sensory elements and on reason for retiring a used garment. Study 1 compares knitted cotton, polyester, and Merino exercise T-shirts (61 participants), study 2, knitted polyester, modacrylic, and polyester/Cocona exercise T-shirts (40 participants), study 3, cotton and polyester exercise shorts, knitted and woven (70 participants), all three using factorial experimental designs with and without a finishing treatment, conducted at the Johnson Space Center, sharing study participants. Study 4 compares knitted polyester and ZQ Merino exercise T

  4. Adaptable Multivariate Calibration Models for Spectral Applications

    SciTech Connect

    THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    1999-12-20

    Multivariate calibration techniques have been used in a wide variety of spectroscopic situations. In many of these situations spectral variation can be partitioned into meaningful classes. For example, suppose that multiple spectra are obtained from each of a number of different objects wherein the level of the analyte of interest varies within each object over time. In such situations the total spectral variation observed across all measurements has two distinct general sources of variation: intra-object and inter-object. One might want to develop a global multivariate calibration model that predicts the analyte of interest accurately both within and across objects, including new objects not involved in developing the calibration model. However, this goal might be hard to realize if the inter-object spectral variation is complex and difficult to model. If the intra-object spectral variation is consistent across objects, an effective alternative approach might be to develop a generic intra-object model that can be adapted to each object separately. This paper contains recommendations for experimental protocols and data analysis in such situations. The approach is illustrated with an example involving the noninvasive measurement of glucose using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Extensions to calibration maintenance and calibration transfer are discussed.

  5. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Protective Clothing for Pesticide Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brief, largely pictorial guide to protective clothing for pesticide users addresses moderately to highly toxic pesticides. The guide discusses the potential hazards of pesticides and the kinds of clothing and equipment that should be worn for personal protection. It also explains how the type of pesticide formulation affects an individual's…

  7. Carbon Cloth Supports Catalytic Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. T. P.; Ammon, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon cloth is starting material for promising new catalytic electrodes. Carbon-cloth electrodes are more efficient than sintered-carbon configuration previously used. Are also chemically stable and require less catalyst--an important economic advantage when catalyst is metal such as platinum.

  8. New Clothing for Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Clothing is influenced by many factors, trends, and social happenings. Much of what is worn today had utilitarian roots in the past. In the activitiy presented in this article, students will have the opportunity to redesign clothing for new trends, in this case, the explosion of handheld electronic devices.

  9. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, JuYoun; Choi, Jeongwha

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (P<0.05). The ranges of Tchest were 31.6 to 33.5°C and 32.2 to 33.4°C in Tscapular. The range of Tinnermost was 28.6 to 32.0°C. The range of the upper clothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl

  10. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (P<0.05). The ranges of Tchest were 31.6 to 33.5°C and 32.2 to 33.4°C in Tscapular. The range of Tinnermost was 28.6 to 32.0°C. The range of the upper clothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl

  11. A Sharing Item Response Theory Model for Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Daniel O.

    2004-01-01

    A new sharing item response theory (SIRT) model is presented that explicitly models the effects of sharing item content between informants and test takers. This model is used to construct adaptive item selection and scoring rules that provide increased precision and reduced score gains in instances where sharing occurs. The adaptive item selection…

  12. Adapting the ALP Model for Student and Institutional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sides, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing adoption of accelerated models of learning comes the necessary step of adapting these models to fit the unique needs of the student population at each individual institution. One such college adapted the ALP (Accelerated Learning Program) model and made specific changes to the target population, structure and scheduling, and…

  13. A Conceptual Model of Childhood Adaptation to Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Robin; Jaser, Sarah; Guo, Jia; Grey, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The Childhood Adaptation Model to Chronic Illness: Diabetes Mellitus was developed to identify factors that influence childhood adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Since this model was proposed, considerable research has been completed. The purpose of this paper is to update the model on childhood adaptation to T1D using research conducted since the original model was proposed. The framework suggests that individual and family characteristics, such as age, socioeconomic status, and in children with T1D, treatment modality (pump vs. injections), psychosocial responses (depressive symptoms and anxiety), and individual and family responses (self-management, coping, self-efficacy, family functioning, social competence) influence the level of adaptation. Adaptation has both physiologic (metabolic control) and psychosocial (QOL) components. This revised model provides greater specificity to the factors that influence adaptation to chronic illness in children. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:20934079

  14. Silicon on graphite cloth

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Thomas, C.J.; Ingram, A.E.; Bai, Y.B.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    A new polycrystalline silicon solar cell has been developed that utilizes commercially available graphite cloth as a substrate. This solar cell has achieved an energy conversion efficiency of 13.4% (AM1.5G). It is believed that this is a record efficiency for a silicon solar cell formed on a graphite substrate. The silicon-on-fabric structure is comprised of a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon grown directly on the graphite fabric substrate. The structure is fabricated by a low-cost ribbon process that avoids the expense and waste of wafering. The fabric substrate gives structural support to the thin device. Critical to the achievement of device quality silicon layers is control over impurities in the graphite fabric. The silicon-on-fabric technology has the potential to supply lightweight, low-cost solar cells to weight-sensitive markets at a fraction of the cost of conventionally thinned wafers.

  15. Adaptive h -refinement for reduced-order models: ADAPTIVE h -refinement for reduced-order models

    DOE PAGES

    Carlberg, Kevin T.

    2014-11-05

    Our work presents a method to adaptively refine reduced-order models a posteriori without requiring additional full-order-model solves. The technique is analogous to mesh-adaptive h-refinement: it enriches the reduced-basis space online by ‘splitting’ a given basis vector into several vectors with disjoint support. The splitting scheme is defined by a tree structure constructed offline via recursive k-means clustering of the state variables using snapshot data. This method identifies the vectors to split online using a dual-weighted-residual approach that aims to reduce error in an output quantity of interest. The resulting method generates a hierarchy of subspaces online without requiring large-scale operationsmore » or full-order-model solves. Furthermore, it enables the reduced-order model to satisfy any prescribed error tolerance regardless of its original fidelity, as a completely refined reduced-order model is mathematically equivalent to the original full-order model. Experiments on a parameterized inviscid Burgers equation highlight the ability of the method to capture phenomena (e.g., moving shocks) not contained in the span of the original reduced basis.« less

  16. Applicable Adaptive Testing Models for School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Albert Chang-hwa; Chuang, Chi-lin

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study conducted in Taipei (Taiwan) that investigated the attitudinal effects of SPRT (Sequential Probability Ratio Test) adaptive testing environment on junior high school students. Discusses test anxiety; student preferences; test adaptability; acceptance of test results; number of items answered; and computer experience. (Author/LRW)

  17. Clothing and thermoregulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P

    2003-01-01

    Exercise increases heat production. During exercise in both warm and cold conditions, the major dilemma is the dissipation of the heat produced from muscular activity. The use of clothing generally represents a layer of insulation and as such imposes a barrier to heat transfer and evaporation from the skin surface. In warm environments, additional clothing increases thermal insulation causing more rapid increases in temperature during exercise and imposes a barrier to sweat evaporation. However, clothing can serve a protective function by reducing radiant heat gain and thermal stress. Recent research suggests that neither the inclusion of modest amounts of clothing nor the clothing fabric alter thermoregulation or thermal comfort during exercise in warm conditions. In the cold, most reports do not support an effect of clothing fabric on thermoregulation; however, there are reports demonstrating an effect. Clothing construction does alter thermoregulation during and following exercise in the cold, where fishnet construction offers greater heat dissipation. Future research should include conditions that more closely mimic outdoor conditions, where high work rates, large airflow and high relative humidity can significantly impact thermoregulation.

  18. Scripting patienthood with patient clothing.

    PubMed

    Topo, Päivi; Iltanen-Tähkävuori, Sonja

    2010-06-01

    The potential of care environments to promote patient healing has gained increasing attention over the last decade, with evidence-based designs used to explore developments in this field. Medical textiles, such as clothes provided to patients, are part of the care environment in many countries. Our study focuses on patients' experiences of such clothing. The goal of this research is to understand how patienthood is constructed in relation to patient clothing and the practices around their use. The study is based on four group interviews involving a total of 12 people with experience of being patients in a hospital or of visiting residential care environments. We employed an active interview format, and the medical textiles currently used in Finnish hospitals and residential care facilities were available for scrutiny during the interviews. Content analyses were carried out on the interview transcripts. Patient clothing was critically evaluated by the participants; they experienced giving up their own clothes as akin to a rite of passage into their new role as a patient. The low status of a patient in a hospital environment was symbolised by the outworn appearance of patient clothing and the problems in protecting privacy. Patient clothing was also felt to provide limited possibilities for being active and in some cases was found to be annoying or even harmful and upsetting. For patients, being dressed in patient clothing may be symbolic of lower status and narrowed agency in everyday life. We can conclude that artefacts such as clothing worn in care environments need to be given attention when considering possibilities for improving care.

  19. Modeling adaptive non-repudiation security services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunia, Marcin A.

    2016-09-01

    Non-repudiation security service helps to protect an electronic system against false denial of performing certain actions by the participants of communication involving that system. In the development process of such a security service it is important to implement all the necessary elements and adapt them in accordance with the defined protection scope. There are several types of non-repudiation and cases of their use. In this paper the author focuses on the situation when a nonrepudiation service is being implemented on an application server. All necessary actions of the users i.e. of people and/or machines are recorded by the service. Currently a new type of security services called "context-aware security services" is under studies. This type of service involves acquiring and processing additional information in order to provide flexible protection. This paper presents the elements of non-repudiation security service and how the elements can be modeled with context awareness support including reputation systems.

  20. Multiclient Identification System Using Adaptive Probabilistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Siana, Linda; Shou, Yu-Wen; Yang, Chien-Ting

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims at integrating detection and identification of human faces in a more practical and real-time face recognition system. The proposed face detection system is based on the cascade Adaboost method to improve the precision and robustness toward unstable surrounding lightings. Our Adaboost method innovates to adjust the environmental lighting conditions by histogram lighting normalization and to accurately locate the face regions by a region-based-clustering process as well. We also address on the problem of multi-scale faces in this paper by using 12 different scales of searching windows and 5 different orientations for each client in pursuit of the multi-view independent face identification. There are majorly two methodological parts in our face identification system, including PCA (principal component analysis) facial feature extraction and adaptive probabilistic model (APM). The structure of our implemented APM with a weighted combination of simple probabilistic functions constructs the likelihood functions by the probabilistic constraint in the similarity measures. In addition, our proposed method can online add a new client and update the information of registered clients due to the constructed APM. The experimental results eventually show the superior performance of our proposed system for both offline and real-time online testing.

  1. Study on Aerosol Penetration Through Clothing and Individual Protective Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    significantly higher than the Poiseuille flow resistance through the outer clothing gap. This is the case for the clothing ensembles and gap geometries...penetrate through air permeable fabrics. Air flow and aerosol deposition models were used to determine the skin deposition rates of aerosols through up...liquid or solid, behave differently in air flows when compared to gases and vapours. Gases or chemical vapour are captured by the activated carbon

  2. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clothing allowance. 3.810..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.810 Clothing allowance. (a) Except... therefor, to an annual clothing allowance as specified in 38 U.S.C. 1162. The annual clothing allowance...

  3. 20 CFR 638.525 - Clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clothing. 638.525 Section 638.525 Employees... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.525 Clothing. The Job Corps Director shall establish procedures to provide clothing for all students by means of a clothing purchase allowance and...

  4. Influence of the air gap between protective clothing and skin on clothing performance during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2011-10-01

    A finite volume model was developed to simulate transient heat transfer in protective clothing during flash fire exposure. The model accounts for the combined conduction-radiation heat transfer in the air gap between the fabric and skin. The variation in the fabric and air gap properties with temperature and the thermochemical reactions in the fabric are also considered. This study investigates the influence of the air gap in protective clothing on the energy transfer through the clothing and hence on its performance. Different parameters that affect the conduction-radiation heat transfer through the air gap such as the air gap absorption coefficient and the air gap width were studied. Finally, the paper demonstrates that an innovative and potentially significant way to improve protective clothing performance is to reduce the emissivity on the backside of the fabric.

  5. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Modeling Adaptation as a Flow and Stock Decsion with Mitigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitigation and adaptation are the two key responses available to policymakers to reduce the risks of climate change. We model these two policies together in a new DICE-based integrated assessment model that characterizes adaptation as either short-lived flow spending or long-live...

  7. Modeling Two Types of Adaptation to Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitigation and adaptation are the two key responses available to policymakers to reduce the risks of climate change. We model these two policies together in a new DICE-based integrated assessment model that characterizes adaptation as either short-lived flow spending or long-live...

  8. Modeling Adaptation as a Flow and Stock Decision with Mitigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitigation and adaptation are the two key responses available to policymakers to reduce the risks of climate change. We model these two policies together in a new DICE-based integrated assessment model that characterizes adaptation as either short-lived flow spending or long-liv...

  9. Adaptive Networks Foundations: Modeling, Dynamics, and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-13

    22-Mar. 2, 2012. • Shaw, L.B., Long, Y., and Gross, T. Simultaneous spread of infection and information in adaptive networks. Casablanca ...International Workshop on Mathematical Biology, Casablanca , Morocco, Jun. 20-24, 2011. • Tunc, I. and Shaw, L.B. Dynamics of infection spreading in adaptive...Defense The number of undergraduates funded by your agreement who graduated during this period and will receive scholarships or fellowships for further

  10. Testing Adhesive Bonds to Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Nondestructive tool simple and inexpensive. Easy-to-use tool nondestructively tests strength of adhesive bond between cloth and straight rigid edge. Developed for testing advanced flexible reusable surface insulation.

  11. Designing Clothing for Coal Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Susan M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes procedures taken by apparel design students, working in an industrial setting, in designing functional clothing for coal miners as part of the Armco Steel Corporation's Student Design Program. (TA)

  12. Gradient-based adaptation of continuous dynamic model structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cava, William G.; Danai, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    A gradient-based method of symbolic adaptation is introduced for a class of continuous dynamic models. The proposed model structure adaptation method starts with the first-principles model of the system and adapts its structure after adjusting its individual components in symbolic form. A key contribution of this work is its introduction of the model's parameter sensitivity as the measure of symbolic changes to the model. This measure, which is essential to defining the structural sensitivity of the model, not only accommodates algebraic evaluation of candidate models in lieu of more computationally expensive simulation-based evaluation, but also makes possible the implementation of gradient-based optimisation in symbolic adaptation. The proposed method is applied to models of several virtual and real-world systems that demonstrate its potential utility.

  13. Waterless Clothes-Cleaning Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Glenn; Ganske, Shane

    2013-01-01

    A waterless clothes-cleaning machine has been developed that removes loose particulates and deodorizes dirty laundry with regenerative chemical processes to make the clothes more comfortable to wear and have a fresher smell. This system was initially developed for use in zero-g, but could be altered for 1-g environments where water or other re sources are scarce. Some of these processes include, but are not limited to, airflow, filtration, ozone generation, heat, ultraviolet light, and photocatalytic titanium oxide.

  14. Consensus time and conformity in the adaptive voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2013-09-01

    The adaptive voter model is a paradigmatic model in the study of opinion formation. Here we propose an extension for this model, in which conflicts are resolved by obtaining another opinion, and analytically study the time required for consensus to emerge. Our results shed light on the rich phenomenology of both the original and extended adaptive voter models, including a dynamical phase transition in the scaling behavior of the mean time to consensus.

  15. An Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Modeling Atmospheric Convection (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-13

    Giraldo and Volkmar Wirth 5 SENSITIVITY STUDIES One important question for each adaptive numerical model is: how accurate is the adaptive method? For...this criterion that is used later for some sensitivity studies . These studies include a comparison between a simulation on an adaptive mesh with a...simulation on a uniform mesh and a sensitivity study concerning the size of the refinement region. 5.1 Comparison Criterion For comparing different

  16. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  17. Dynamic three-dimensional simulations of densely-packed fluid loaded cloth in a complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz T.; Schultz, William W.; Dowling, David R.

    2006-11-01

    This talk presents three-dimensional simulations of the fluid-structure interaction that occurs inside the washtub of a modern clothes washing machine. The results are based on the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on a Cartesian grid using Peskin's Immersed Boundary Method for the cloth-fluid coupling, and a weighted domain-mapping method to represent the complicated moving boundaries of the agitator and washtub. Cloth pieces are modeled as impermeable flexible isotropic elastic plates. Results from simple benchmarking studies with theoretical and experimental results for the individual cloth and complex geometry models are presented. A variety of simulation studies involving complicated mixing patterns that result from mechanical excitation from a realistic agitator are shown and analyzed. The effects of cloth size, bending stiffness, and load density on the resulting motion of individual pieces of cloth and on the bulk flow within the machine are analyzed. [Sponsored by Whirlpool Corporation

  18. Uncovering Sundanese Values by Analyzing Symbolic Meaning of Ménak Priangan Clothing (1800-1942)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmila, M.; Suciati; Widiaty, I.

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates symbolic meanings found in the Sunda ethnic clothing, particularly the Menak Priangan clothing. This study aims to uncover and document those symbolic meanings found in the Menak Priangan clothing as an effort to develop Sunda cultural artefacts of West Java. This study on Menak Priangan clothing applies ethnography (visual) and aesthetic methods. The visual method is utilized in order to uncover local cultural (Sunda) values found in Menak Priangan clothing visualization, including: design, model, name, and representing colours, which then directed towards local Sundanese aesthetic concepts living within the Priangan community. Furthermore, aesthetic method is used to explore role of aesthetic values in empowering visual cultural values within certain community, particularly Sunda aesthetic values. The study results show that since the 19th century, Sunda ethnic clothing was limited to Priangan Sunda only, while traditional clothing wearing by Priangan people reflects their social strata, consisting of: a. Menak Gede (Menak pangluhurna: mayor), bearing raden title, b. Menak Leutik/Santana (mayor assistant), titles: asep, mas, agus, ujang, (Nyimas for woman), c. Somah/Cacah: ordinary people/lower class. Clothing is a cultural phenomenon within certain culture reflecting such society experiences. For Menak people, clothing and its accessories have important meanings. They wear such traditional clothing and accessories as a symbol of power they have within bureaucratic structure and as a symbol of social status they bear within traditional community structure.

  19. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  20. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  1. The Structure and Properties of Parachute Cloths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholas, H J; Hedrick, F

    1930-01-01

    The requisite properties of a parachute cloth are discussed and the methods for measuring these properties described. In addition to the structural analysis of the cloths, the properties measured were weight, breaking strength, tear resistance, elasticity, and air permeability. Thirty-six silk cloths of domestic manufacture, not previously used in parachute construction are compared with some silk cloths of foreign manufacture. These foreign cloths were ones proven by trial and extended use to be suitable materials for parachute construction. Contrary to the belief that domestic woven cloths were not suitable materials for parachute construction, it is shown that many domestic silk cloths are satisfactory and in some respects superior to the foreign products. Based on a comparative study of all the cloths, specifications are drawn for the manufacture of silk parachute cloth.

  2. Adaptive regularization network based neural modeling paradigm for nonlinear adaptive estimation of cerebral evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Böhme, Johann F

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we report an adaptive regularization network (ARN) approach to realizing fast blind separation of cerebral evoked potentials (EPs) from background electroencephalogram (EEG) activity with no need to make any explicit assumption on the statistical (or deterministic) signal model. The ARNs are proposed to construct nonlinear EEG and EP signal models. A novel adaptive regularization training (ART) algorithm is proposed to improve the generalization performance of the ARN. Two adaptive neural modeling methods based on the ARN are developed and their implementation and performance analysis are also presented. The computer experiments using simulated and measured visual evoked potential (VEP) data have shown that the proposed ARN modeling paradigm yields computationally efficient and more accurate VEP signal estimation owing to its intrinsic model-free and nonlinear processing characteristics.

  3. Adaptive User Model for Web-Based Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalakis, John; Sirmakessis, Spiros; Sakkopoulos, Evangelos; Tsakalidis, Athanasios

    This paper describes the design of an adaptive user model and its implementation in an advanced Web-based Virtual University environment that encompasses combined and synchronized adaptation between educational material and well-known communication facilities. The Virtual University environment has been implemented to support a postgraduate…

  4. Validity of Greenspan's Models of Adaptive and Social Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathias, Jane L.; Nettelbeck, Ted

    1992-01-01

    Two studies assessed the construct validity of Greenspan's models of adaptive and social intelligence with 75 adolescents with mental retardation. Factor analysis measures of conceptual intelligence, adaptive behavior, and social intelligence yielded a practice-interpersonal competence construct. The second study, however, failed to establish the…

  5. Improving nonlinear modeling capabilities of functional link adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Scardapane, Simone; Parisi, Raffaele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The functional link adaptive filter (FLAF) represents an effective solution for online nonlinear modeling problems. In this paper, we take into account a FLAF-based architecture, which separates the adaptation of linear and nonlinear elements, and we focus on the nonlinear branch to improve the modeling performance. In particular, we propose a new model that involves an adaptive combination of filters downstream of the nonlinear expansion. Such combination leads to a cooperative behavior of the whole architecture, thus yielding a performance improvement, particularly in the presence of strong nonlinearities. An advanced architecture is also proposed involving the adaptive combination of multiple filters on the nonlinear branch. The proposed models are assessed in different nonlinear modeling problems, in which their effectiveness and capabilities are shown.

  6. Adaptive filter design using recurrent cerebellar model articulation controller.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Chen, Li-Yang; Yeung, Daniel S

    2010-07-01

    A novel adaptive filter is proposed using a recurrent cerebellar-model-articulation-controller (CMAC). The proposed locally recurrent globally feedforward recurrent CMAC (RCMAC) has favorable properties of small size, good generalization, rapid learning, and dynamic response, thus it is more suitable for high-speed signal processing. To provide fast training, an efficient parameter learning algorithm based on the normalized gradient descent method is presented, in which the learning rates are on-line adapted. Then the Lyapunov function is utilized to derive the conditions of the adaptive learning rates, so the stability of the filtering error can be guaranteed. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed adaptive RCMAC filter, it is applied to a nonlinear channel equalization system and an adaptive noise cancelation system. The advantages of the proposed filter over other adaptive filters are verified through simulations.

  7. Context aware adaptive security service model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunia, Marcin A.

    2015-09-01

    Present systems and devices are usually protected against different threats concerning digital data processing. The protection mechanisms consume resources, which are either highly limited or intensively utilized by many entities. The optimization of these resources usage is advantageous. The resources that are saved performing optimization may be utilized by other mechanisms or may be sufficient for longer time. It is usually assumed that protection has to provide specific quality and attack resistance. By interpreting context situation of business services - users and services themselves, it is possible to adapt security services parameters to countermeasure threats associated with current situation. This approach leads to optimization of used resources and maintains sufficient security level. This paper presents architecture of adaptive security service, which is context-aware and exploits quality of context data issue.

  8. A model for culturally adapting a learning system.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, M L

    1975-12-01

    The Cross-Cultural Adaption Model (XCAM) is designed to help identify cultural values contained in the text, narration, or visual components of a learning instrument and enables the adapter to evaluate his adapted model so that he can modify or revise it, and allows him to assess the modified version by actually measuring the amount of cultural conflict still present in it. Such a model would permit world-wide adaption of learning materials in population regulation. A random sample of the target group is selected. The adapter develops a measurin g instrument, the cross-cultural adaption scale (XCA), a number of statements about the cultural affinity of the object evaluated. The pretest portion of the sample tests the clarity and understandability of the rating scale to be used for evaluating the instructional materials; the pilot group analyzes the original version of the instructional mater ials, determines the criteria for change, and analyzes the adapted version in terms of these criteria; the control group is administered the original version of the learning materials; and the experimental group is administered the adapted version. Finally, the responses obtained from the XRA rating scale and discussions of both the experimental and control groups are studied and group differences are ev aluated according to cultural conflicts met with each version. With this data, the preferred combination of elements is constructed.

  9. Clothing creator trademark : Business plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, B.

    1990-10-01

    SYMAGERY has developed a patented process to manufacture clothing without direct human labor. This CLOTHING CREATOR{trademark}, will have the ability to produce two (2) perfect garments every 45 seconds or one (1) every 30 seconds. The process will combine Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) technology with heat molding and ultrasonic bonding/cutting techniques. This system for garment production, will have the capacity to produce garments of higher quality and at lower productions costs than convention cut and sew methods. ADVANTAGES of the process include: greatly reduced production costs; increased quality of garments; reduction in lead time; and capacity to make new class of garments. This technology will accommodate a variety of knit, woven and nonwoven materials containing a majority of synthetic fibers. Among the many style of garments that could be manufactured by this process are: work clothing, career apparel, athletic garments, medical disposables, health care products, activewear, haz/mat garments, military clothing, cleanroom clothing, outdoor wear, upholstery, and highly contoured stuffed toy shells. 3 refs.

  10. Prediction of the physiological response of humans wearing protective clothing using a thermophysiological human simulator.

    PubMed

    Psikuta, Agnes; Wang, Li-Chu; Rossi, René M

    2013-01-01

    Most standards and devices for determining clothing properties ignore the physiological state of the wearer and are inadequate to evaluate the transient thermal properties of clothing ensembles. This study evaluated the physiological burden of different types of protective clothing and environmental conditions using the recently developed single-sector thermo-physiological human simulator and compared its performance with a thermal cylinder (without the physiological control model) and with an advanced physiological model (with a simple clothing model). A single-sector physiological simulator developed to simulate the dynamic thermal and perceptual behavior of humans over a wide range of environmental and personal conditions was successfully validated in this study through tests with clothed individuals exposed to hot and cold conditions. In comparative tests on water vapor permeable and impermeable clothing samples, the simulator provided a much more complete picture of actual clothing performance, for example, in terms of moisture retention within the clothing and the additional cooling due to the "heat pipe" effect in impermeable clothing.

  11. The cerebellum as an adaptive filter: a general model?

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2010-01-01

    Many functional models of the cerebellar microcircuit are based on the adaptive-filter model first proposed by Fujita. The adaptive filter has powerful signal processing capacities that are suitable for both sensory and motor tasks, and uses a simple and intuitively plausible decorrelation learning rule that offers and account of the evolution of the inferior olive. Moreover, in those cases where the input-output transformations of cerebellar microzones have been sufficiently characterised, they appear to conform to those predicted by the adaptive-filter model. However, these cases are few in number, and comparing the model with the internal operations of the microcircuit itself has not proved straightforward. Whereas some microcircuit features appear compatible with adaptive-filter function, others such as simple granular-layer processing or Purkinje cell bistability, do not. How far these seeming incompatibilities indicate additional computational roles for the cerebellar microcircuit remains to be determined.

  12. Modeling adaptation of carbon use efficiency in microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Allison, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    In new microbial-biogeochemical models, microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) is often assumed to decline with increasing temperature. Under this assumption, soil carbon losses under warming are small because microbial biomass declines. Yet there is also empirical evidence that CUE may adapt (i.e., become less sensitive) to warming, thereby mitigating negative effects on microbial biomass. To analyze potential mechanisms of CUE adaptation, I used two theoretical models to implement a tradeoff between microbial uptake rate and CUE. This rate-yield tradeoff is based on thermodynamic principles and suggests that microbes with greater investment in resource acquisition should have lower CUE. Microbial communities or individuals could adapt to warming by reducing investment in enzymes and uptake machinery. Consistent with this idea, a simple analytical model predicted that adaptation can offset 50% of the warming-induced decline in CUE. To assess the ecosystem implications of the rate-yield tradeoff, I quantified CUE adaptation in a spatially-structured simulation model with 100 microbial taxa and 12 soil carbon substrates. This model predicted much lower CUE adaptation, likely due to additional physiological and ecological constraints on microbes. In particular, specific resource acquisition traits are needed to maintain stoichiometric balance, and taxa with high CUE and low enzyme investment rely on low-yield, high-enzyme neighbors to catalyze substrate degradation. In contrast to published microbial models, simulations with greater CUE adaptation also showed greater carbon storage under warming. This pattern occurred because microbial communities with stronger CUE adaptation produced fewer degradative enzymes, despite increases in biomass. Thus, the rate-yield tradeoff prevents CUE adaptation from driving ecosystem carbon loss under climate warming.

  13. Dynamics modeling and adaptive control of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasiadek, J. Z.

    1991-01-01

    An application of Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) to the position and force control of flexible manipulators and robots is presented. A single-link flexible manipulator is analyzed. The problem was to develop a mathematical model of a flexible robot that is accurate. The objective is to show that the adaptive control works better than 'conventional' systems and is suitable for flexible structure control.

  14. Adaptive Modeling of the International Space Station Electrical Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin Ray

    2007-01-01

    Software simulations provide NASA engineers the ability to experiment with spacecraft systems in a computer-imitated environment. Engineers currently develop software models that encapsulate spacecraft system behavior. These models can be inaccurate due to invalid assumptions, erroneous operation, or system evolution. Increasing accuracy requires manual calibration and domain-specific knowledge. This thesis presents a method for automatically learning system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques are applied to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). We also explore a knowledge fusion approach that uses traditional engineered EPS models to supplement the learned models. We observed that these engineered EPS models provide useful background knowledge to reduce predictive error spikes when confronted with making predictions in situations that are quite different from the training scenarios used when learning the model. Evaluations using ISS sensor data and existing EPS models demonstrate the success of the adaptive approach. Our experimental results show that adaptive modeling provides reductions in model error anywhere from 80% to 96% over these existing models. Final discussions include impending use of adaptive modeling technology for ISS mission operations and the need for adaptive modeling in future NASA lunar and Martian exploration.

  15. Computational quantum chemistry and adaptive ligand modeling in mechanistic QSAR.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Pier G; Fanelli, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Drugs are adaptive molecules. They realize this peculiarity by generating different ensembles of prototropic forms and conformers that depend on the environment. Among the impressive amount of available computational drug discovery technologies, quantitative structure-activity relationship approaches that rely on computational quantum chemistry descriptors are the most appropriate to model adaptive drugs. Indeed, computational quantum chemistry descriptors are able to account for the variation of the intramolecular interactions of the training compounds, which reflect their adaptive intermolecular interaction propensities. This enables the development of causative, interpretive and reasonably predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models, and, hence, sound chemical information finalized to drug design and discovery.

  16. Post-Revolution Egypt: The Roy Adaptation Model in Community.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Britton S; Buckner, Ellen B

    2015-10-01

    The 2011 Arab Spring swept across the Middle East creating profound instability in Egypt, a country already challenged with poverty and internal pressures. To respond to this crisis, Catholic Relief Services led a community-based program called "Egypt Works" that included community improvement projects and psychosocial support. Following implementation, program outcomes were analyzed using the middle-range theory of adaptation to situational life events, based on the Roy adaptation model. The comprehensive, community-based approach facilitated adaptation, serving as a model for applying theory in post-crisis environments.

  17. Clothing burns in Canadian children

    PubMed Central

    Stanwick, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    A Canadian survey of 11 tertiary care pediatric centres with specialized burn facilities revealed that an estimated 37 children up to 9 years of age are admitted annually to such hospitals because of clothing burns. Sleepwear accounts for an estimated 21 such burns per year. Girls were found to suffer the most severe burns and represented eight of the nine children in the series who died. Loose and flowing garments dominated the girls' styles. The results of multiple-regression analysis confirmed that style of clothing (loose and flowing as opposed to snug) was the most significant predictor of burn severity, length of hospital stay, the need for skin grafting and survival. The ignition situation (avoidance of parental supervision at the time of injury) was the only other important predictor. The success of regulatory actions in other countries in reducing the incidence of severe clothing burns is reviewed, and preventive strategies for Canada are explored. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:3995433

  18. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  19. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J.; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design. PMID:28281646

  20. Reversible Humidity Sensitive Clothing for Personal Thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ying; Zhang, Fenghua; Wang, Meng; Gardner, Calvin J; Kim, Gunwoo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong; Jin, Sungho; Chen, Renkun

    2017-03-10

    Two kinds of humidity-induced, bendable smart clothing have been designed to reversibly adapt their thermal insulation functionality. The first design mimics the pores in human skin, in which pre-cut flaps open to produce pores in Nafion sheets when humidity increases, as might occur during human sweating thus permitting air flow and reducing both the humidity level and the apparent temperature. Like the smart human sweating pores, the flaps can close automatically after the perspiration to keep the wearer warm. The second design involves thickness adjustable clothes by inserting the bent polymer sheets between two fabrics. As the humidity increases, the sheets become thinner, thus reducing the gap between the two fabrics to reduce the thermal insulation. The insulation layer can recover its original thickness upon humidity reduction to restore its warmth-preservation function. Such humidity sensitive smart polymer materials can be utilized to adjust personal comfort, and be effective in reducing energy consumption for building heating or cooling with numerous smart design.

  1. Adaptive Input Reconstruction with Application to Model Refinement, State Estimation, and Adaptive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, Anthony M.

    Input reconstruction is the process of using the output of a system to estimate its input. In some cases, input reconstruction can be accomplished by determining the output of the inverse of a model of the system whose input is the output of the original system. Inversion, however, requires an exact and fully known analytical model, and is limited by instabilities arising from nonminimum-phase zeros. The main contribution of this work is a novel technique for input reconstruction that does not require model inversion. This technique is based on a retrospective cost, which requires a limited number of Markov parameters. Retrospective cost input reconstruction (RCIR) does not require knowledge of nonminimum-phase zero locations or an analytical model of the system. RCIR provides a technique that can be used for model refinement, state estimation, and adaptive control. In the model refinement application, data are used to refine or improve a model of a system. It is assumed that the difference between the model output and the data is due to an unmodeled subsystem whose interconnection with the modeled system is inaccessible, that is, the interconnection signals cannot be measured and thus standard system identification techniques cannot be used. Using input reconstruction, these inaccessible signals can be estimated, and the inaccessible subsystem can be fitted. We demonstrate input reconstruction in a model refinement framework by identifying unknown physics in a space weather model and by estimating an unknown film growth in a lithium ion battery. The same technique can be used to obtain estimates of states that cannot be directly measured. Adaptive control can be formulated as a model-refinement problem, where the unknown subsystem is the idealized controller that minimizes a measured performance variable. Minimal modeling input reconstruction for adaptive control is useful for applications where modeling information may be difficult to obtain. We demonstrate

  2. Detecting ticks on light versus dark clothing.

    PubMed

    Stjernberg, Louise; Berglund, Johan

    2005-01-01

    It is a common belief that ticks are more visible and easier to detect on light clothing in comparison with dark clothing. We studied which of the clothing, light or dark, had the least attractive effect on Ixodes ricinus, thus minimizing exposure and thereby in theory helping to prevent tick-borne diseases in humans. 10 participants, exposed by walking in tick endemic areas, wore alternately light and dark clothing before every new exposure. Nymphal and adult ticks on the clothing were collected and counted. In total, 886 nymphal ticks were collected. The overall mean in found ticks between both groups differed significantly, with 20.8 more ticks per person on light clothing. All participants had more ticks on light clothing in all periods of exposure. Dark clothing seems to attract fewer ticks.

  3. Advocating for Normal Birth With Normal Clothes

    PubMed Central

    Waller-Wise, Renece

    2007-01-01

    Childbirth educators need to be aware that the clothes they wear when teaching classes send a nonverbal message to class participants. Regardless of who wears the clothing or what is worn, clothes send a message; thus, both the advantages and disadvantages related to clothing choice should be considered. Ultimately, the message should reflect the values of supporting normal birth. For childbirth educators who are allowed to choose their own apparel to wear in their classes, street clothes may be the benchmark for which to strive. This article discusses the many nonverbal messages that clothes convey and provides support for the choice of street clothes as the dress for the professional childbirth educator; thus, “normal clothes to promote normal birth.” PMID:18408807

  4. 46 CFR 154.1840 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1840 Protective clothing... operation, except those assigned to gas-safe cargo control rooms, wears protective clothing....

  5. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  6. Modeling Students' Memory for Application in Adaptive Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelánek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Human memory has been thoroughly studied and modeled in psychology, but mainly in laboratory setting under simplified conditions. For application in practical adaptive educational systems we need simple and robust models which can cope with aspects like varied prior knowledge or multiple-choice questions. We discuss and evaluate several models of…

  7. Modeling-Error-Driven Performance-Seeking Direct Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V.; Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Burken, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a stable discrete-time adaptive law that targets modeling errors in a direct adaptive control framework. The update law was developed in our previous work for the adaptive disturbance rejection application. The approach is based on the philosophy that without modeling errors, the original control design has been tuned to achieve the desired performance. The adaptive control should, therefore, work towards getting this performance even in the face of modeling uncertainties/errors. In this work, the baseline controller uses dynamic inversion with proportional-integral augmentation. Dynamic inversion is carried out using the assumed system model. On-line adaptation of this control law is achieved by providing a parameterized augmentation signal to the dynamic inversion block. The parameters of this augmentation signal are updated to achieve the nominal desired error dynamics. Contrary to the typical Lyapunov-based adaptive approaches that guarantee only stability, the current approach investigates conditions for stability as well as performance. A high-fidelity F-15 model is used to illustrate the overall approach.

  8. Modeling hospitals' adaptive capacity during a loss of infrastructure services.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Resilience in hospitals - their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover from disruptive events - is vital to their role as part of national critical infrastructure. This paper presents a model to provide planning guidance to decision makers about how to make hospitals more resilient against possible disruption scenarios. This model represents a hospital's adaptive capacities that are leveraged to care for patients during loss of infrastructure services (power, water, etc.). The model is an optimization that reallocates and substitutes resources to keep patients in a high care state or allocates resources to allow evacuation if necessary. An illustrative example demonstrates how the model might be used in practice.

  9. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnigan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track a payload trajectory using a four-parameter model instead of the full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  10. Adaptive tracking for complex systems using reduced-order models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.

    1990-01-01

    Reduced-order models are considered in the context of parameter adaptive controllers for tracking workspace trajectories. A dual-arm manipulation task is used to illustrate the methodology and provide simulation results. A parameter adaptive controller is designed to track the desired position trajectory of a payload using a four-parameter model instead of a full-order, nine-parameter model. Several simulations with different payload-to-arm mass ratios are used to illustrate the capabilities of the reduced-order model in tracking the desired trajectory.

  11. Optical and control modeling for adaptive beam-combining experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetzner, J.K.; Tucker, S.D.; Neal, D.R.; Bentley, A.E.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    1995-08-01

    The development of modeling algorithms for adaptive optics systems is important for evaluating both performance and design parameters prior to system construction. Two of the most critical subsystems to be modeled are the binary optic design and the adaptive control system. Since these two are intimately related, it is beneficial to model them simultaneously. Optic modeling techniques have some significant limitations. Diffraction effects directly limit the utility of geometrical ray-tracing models, and transform techniques such as the fast fourier transform can be both cumbersome and memory intensive. The authors have developed a hybrid system incorporating elements of both ray-tracing and fourier transform techniques. In this paper they present an analytical model of wavefront propagation through a binary optic lens system developed and implemented at Sandia. This model is unique in that it solves the transfer function for each portion of a diffractive optic analytically. The overall performance is obtained by a linear superposition of each result. The model has been successfully used in the design of a wide range of binary optics, including an adaptive optic for a beam combining system consisting of an array of rectangular mirrors, each controllable in tip/tilt and piston. Wavefront sensing and the control models for a beam combining system have been integrated and used to predict overall systems performance. Applicability of the model for design purposes is demonstrated with several lens designs through a comparison of model predictions with actual adaptive optics results.

  12. Shopping for clothes: Body satisfaction, appearance investment, and functions of clothing among female shoppers.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lacey, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the link between clothing and body experience in women of different ages. Participants were 162 female clothes shoppers between the ages of 18 and 55 who completed questionnaire measures of body image, functions of clothing, self-esteem, and enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was found that clothing was worn primarily for assurance and fashion by women of all ages. On the other hand, BMI and body dissatisfaction were related to the use of clothing for camouflage purposes and to a more negative clothes shopping experience. Both components of appearance investment were related to choice of clothes for fashion and assurance. However, the self-evaluative salience component was negatively related, while the motivational salience was positively related, to enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was concluded that although clothing is an under-researched aspect of body image, it represents an important part of women's appearance management, whatever their age.

  13. Effect of clothing weight on body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In clinical settings, it is common to measure weight of clothed patients and estimate a correction for the weight of clothing, but we can find no papers in the medical literature regarding the variability in clothing weight with weather, season, and gender. Methods: Fifty adults (35 wom...

  14. A primer on clothing systems for cold-weather field work

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denner, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Hypothermia in cold environments can be prevented by physiological adaptation and by the proper use of cold weather clothing. The human body adjusts to cold temperature by increasing the rates of basal metabolism, specific dynamic action, and physical exercise. Heat loss is reduced by vasoconstriction. Clothing systems for cold weather reduce loss by providing insulation and protection from the elements. Satisfactory cold- weather clothing is constructed of wool fabrics or the synthetic fibers polypropylene and polyester. Outerwear suitable for cold climates is insulated with down, high-loft polyester fiberfills, or the new synthetic thin insulators. (USGS)

  15. A primer on clothing systems for cold-weather field work

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denner, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Hypothermia in cold environments can be prevented by physiological adaptation and by the proper use of cold weather clothing. The human body adjusts to cold temperature by increasing the rates of basal metabolism, specific dynamic action, and physical exercise. Heat loss is reduced by vasoconstriction. Clothing systems for cold weather reduce loss by providing insulation and protection from the elements. Satisfactory cold- weather clothing is constructed of wool fabrics or the synthetic fibers polypropylene and polyester. Outerwear suitable for cold climates is insulated with down, high-loft polyester fiberfills, or the new synthetic thin insulators. (USGS)

  16. Thermal insulation and clothing area factors of typical Arabian Gulf clothing ensembles for males and females: measurements using thermal manikins.

    PubMed

    Al-ajmi, F F; Loveday, D L; Bedwell, K H; Havenith, G

    2008-05-01

    The thermal insulation of clothing is one of the most important parameters used in the thermal comfort model adopted by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) [BS EN ISO 7730, 2005. Ergonomics of the thermal environment. Analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort using calculation of the PMV and PPD indices and local thermal comfort criteria. International Standardisation Organisation, Geneva.] and by ASHRAE [ASHRAE Handbook, 2005. Fundamentals. Chapter 8. American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1791 Tullie Circle N.E., Atlanta, GA.]. To date, thermal insulation values of mainly Western clothing have been published with only minimal data being available for non-Western clothing. Thus, the objective of the present study is to measure and present the thermal insulation (clo) values of a number of Arabian Gulf garments as worn by males and females. The clothing ensembles and garments of Arabian Gulf males and females presented in this study are representative of those typically worn in the region during both summer and winter seasons. Measurements of total thermal insulation values (clo) were obtained using a male and a female shape thermal manikin in accordance with the definition of insulation as given in ISO 9920. In addition, the clothing area factors (f cl) determined in two different ways were compared. The first method used a photographic technique and the second a regression equation as proposed in ISO 9920, based on the insulation values of Arabian Gulf male and female garments and ensembles as they were determined in this study. In addition, fibre content, descriptions and weights of Arabian Gulf clothing have been recorded and tabulated in this study. The findings of this study are presented as additions to the existing knowledge base of clothing insulation, and provide for the first time data for Arabian Gulf clothing. The analysis showed that for these non-Western clothing designs, the

  17. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  18. Clothing Production. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 59 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 59 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in clothing production. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 2-5 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline…

  19. Kids, Clothes and Peer Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Parents are advised on ways to cope with the peer pressure associated with clothes. Techniques focus on countering and preventing peer pressure or, at least, putting it into healthier perspective. A list of retorts children can make to peer critics is included. (IAH)

  20. 76 FR 70883 - Clothing Allowance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... out or tears a single article of the veteran's clothing and for each physician-prescribed medication... uses more than one qualifying prosthetic or orthopedic appliance, physician- prescribed medication for more than one skin condition, or an appliance and a medication for a service-connected disability...

  1. Dynamic model of heat inactivation kinetics for bacterial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Maria G; Peleg, Micha

    2009-04-01

    The Weibullian-log logistic (WeLL) inactivation model was modified to account for heat adaptation by introducing a logistic adaptation factor, which rendered its "rate parameter" a function of both temperature and heating rate. The resulting model is consistent with the observation that adaptation is primarily noticeable in slow heat processes in which the cells are exposed to sublethal temperatures for a sufficiently long time. Dynamic survival patterns generated with the proposed model were in general agreement with those of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes as reported in the literature. Although the modified model's rate equation has a cumbersome appearance, especially for thermal processes having a variable heating rate, it can be solved numerically with commercial mathematical software. The dynamic model has five survival/adaptation parameters whose determination will require a large experimental database. However, with assumed or estimated parameter values, the model can simulate survival patterns of adapting pathogens in cooked foods that can be used in risk assessment and the establishment of safe preparation conditions.

  2. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  3. Transfer of radiative heat through clothing ensembles.

    PubMed

    Lotens, W A; Pieters, A M

    1995-06-01

    A mathematical model was designed to calculate the temperature and dry heat transfer in the various layers of a clothing ensemble, and the total heat loss of a human who is irradiated for a certain fraction of his or her area. The clothing ensemble that is irradiated by an external heat source is considered to be composed of underclothing, trapped air, and outer fabric. The model was experimentally tested with heat balance methods, using subjects, varying the activity, wind, and radiation characteristics of the outer garment of two-layer ensembles. In two experiments the subjects could only give off dry heat because they were wrapped in plastic foil. The model appeared to be correct within about 1 degree C (rms error) and 10 Wm-2 (rms error). In a third experiment, sweat evaporation was also taken into account, showing that the resulting physiological heat load of 10 to 30% of the intercepted additional radiation is compensated by additional sweating. The resulting heat strain was rather mild. It is concluded that the mathematical model is a valid tool for the investigation of heat transfer through two-layer ensembles in radiant environments.

  4. Adaptive Modeling and Real-Time Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    34 Artificial Inteligence , Vol. 13, pp. 27-39 (1980). Describes circumscription which is just the assumption that everything that is known to have a particular... Artificial Intelligence Truth Maintenance Planning Resolution Modeling Wcrld Models ~ .. ~2.. ASSTR AT (Coninue n evrse sieIf necesaran Identfy by...represents a marriage of (1) the procedural-network st, planning technology developed in artificial intelligence with (2) the PERT/CPM technology developed in

  5. Adaptative gravity modelling from GOCE gradient data over the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayn, M.; Holschneider, M.; Panet, I.

    2013-12-01

    GOCE data deliver information about the static gravity anomalies with a spatial resolution of about 90km. The derived gravity models are used to investigate the Earth's interior structure. Most models for the GOCE data are limited by the facts 1. that they have a uniform resolution and 2. that this resolution is defined with respect to a sphere. One can improve the stability and decrease the numerical costs by adapting the resolution to the local scales of variability of the modelled field. Furthermore, respecting the ellipsoidal shape of the Earth and even its topography allows to increase the resolution of the models. We thus propose a new adaptative modelling approach. In this approach, the modelled gravity potential is represented as a superposition of potentials of poles, located closely below the Earth's surface. The distribution of the poles below the surface determines the local scale of the model. It is adapted to prior knowledge on the local roughness of the gravity field. The prior knowledge is built by estimating characteristic local scales from the wavelet transform of a prior gravity model, EGM2008. After positioning the poles by means of an iterative approach, we build a gravity model by maximising the Bayesian posterior distribution of the model. This Bayesian approach also allows estimating the model's uncertainty. We apply this modelling approach on an area over the Himalaya and show our preliminary results. The model will be used to study the dynamic processes in this active area.

  6. Evaluation of cloths for decontamination by wiping

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.; Reiff, D.J.; Fink, S.D. ); Luckenbach, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Treated polyester cloth was evaluated in laboratory-scale and larger-scale tests as an alternative to atomic wipes and cotton cloth for use in decontamination by wiping. The advantages of the treated polyester are as follows: does not react with nitric acid to form unstable product, more fire resistant, less volume of radioactive waste generated (versus atomic wipes), and product can be recovered by soaking the polyester cloths in nitric acid. Results are that even though treated polyester wiping cloths are slightly less effective than atomic wipes and cotton cloth, its many other benefits greatly outweigh this slight disadvantage. 5 figs.

  7. Adapting a Diagnostic Problem-Solving Model to Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syu, Inien; Lang, S. D.

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a competition-based connectionist model for diagnostic problem-solving is adapted to information retrieval. Topics include probabilistic causal networks; Bayesian networks; the neural network model; empirical studies of test collections that evaluated retrieval performance; precision results; and the use of a thesaurus to provide…

  8. Adapting the Kirkpatrick Model to Technical Communication Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carliner, Saul

    1997-01-01

    Proposes a four-level model for adapting the Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation to suit technical manuals and services assessing: (1) user satisfaction; (2) user performance; (3) client performance; and (4) client satisfaction. Discusses assessing of the value of work, limitations in evaluating technical communication products, and the…

  9. Multiple Model Parameter Adaptive Control for In-Flight Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    dynamics of an aircraft. The plant is control- lable by a proportional-plus-integral ( PI ) control law. This section describes two methods of calculating...adaptive model-following PI control law [20-24]. The control law bases its control gains upon the parameters of a linear difference equation model which

  10. Statistical Models of Adaptive Immune populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethna, Zachary; Callan, Curtis; Walczak, Aleksandra; Mora, Thierry

    The availability of large (104-106 sequences) datasets of B or T cell populations from a single individual allows reliable fitting of complex statistical models for naïve generation, somatic selection, and hypermutation. It is crucial to utilize a probabilistic/informational approach when modeling these populations. The inferred probability distributions allow for population characterization, calculation of probability distributions of various hidden variables (e.g. number of insertions), as well as statistical properties of the distribution itself (e.g. entropy). In particular, the differences between the T cell populations of embryonic and mature mice will be examined as a case study. Comparing these populations, as well as proposed mixed populations, provides a concrete exercise in model creation, comparison, choice, and validation.

  11. Clothing Matching for Visually Impaired Persons

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuai; Tian, YingLi; Arditi, Aries

    2012-01-01

    Matching clothes is a challenging task for many blind people. In this paper, we present a proof of concept system to solve this problem. The system consists of 1) a camera connected to a computer to perform pattern and color matching process; 2) speech commands for system control and configuration; and 3) audio feedback to provide matching results for both color and patterns of clothes. This system can handle clothes in deficient color without any pattern, as well as clothing with multiple colors and complex patterns to aid both blind and color deficient people. Furthermore, our method is robust to variations of illumination, clothing rotation and wrinkling. To evaluate the proposed prototype, we collect two challenging databases including clothes without any pattern, or with multiple colors and different patterns under different conditions of lighting and rotation. Results reported here demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed clothing matching system. PMID:22523465

  12. Clothing Matching for Visually Impaired Persons.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuai; Tian, Yingli; Arditi, Aries

    2011-01-01

    Matching clothes is a challenging task for many blind people. In this paper, we present a proof of concept system to solve this problem. The system consists of 1) a camera connected to a computer to perform pattern and color matching process; 2) speech commands for system control and configuration; and 3) audio feedback to provide matching results for both color and patterns of clothes. This system can handle clothes in deficient color without any pattern, as well as clothing with multiple colors and complex patterns to aid both blind and color deficient people. Furthermore, our method is robust to variations of illumination, clothing rotation and wrinkling. To evaluate the proposed prototype, we collect two challenging databases including clothes without any pattern, or with multiple colors and different patterns under different conditions of lighting and rotation. Results reported here demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed clothing matching system.

  13. Roy's adaptation model. Interview by Pamela Clarke.

    PubMed

    Barone, Stacey H; Hanna, Debra; Senesac, Pamela M

    2011-10-01

    This column presents a dialogue with three Roy scholars. They discuss research, practice, administration, and education issues in nursing from a Roy perspective and present data on curriculum in schools across the United States in relation to the use of nursing theory and Roy's model.

  14. Modeling Developmental Transitions in Adaptive Resonance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are applied to a theoretical subject in developmental psychology: modeling developmental transitions. Two issues that are involved will be discussed: discontinuities and acquiring qualitatively new knowledge. We will argue that by the appearance of a bifurcation, a neural network can show discontinuities and may acquire…

  15. A Model of Adaptive Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Lindy J.

    2006-01-01

    This study applies theorizing from educational psychology and language learning to hypothesize a model of language learning that takes into account affect, motivation, and language learning strategies. The study employed a questionnaire to assess variables of motivation, self-efficacy, anxiety, and language learning strategies. The sample…

  16. Model-adaptive hybrid dynamic control for robotic assembly tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, D.J.; McCarragher, B.J.

    1999-10-01

    A new task-level adaptive controller is presented for the hybrid dynamic control of robotic assembly tasks. Using a hybrid dynamic model of the assembly task, velocity constraints are derived from which satisfactory velocity commands are obtained. Due to modeling errors and parametric uncertainties, the velocity commands may be erroneous and may result in suboptimal performance. Task-level adaptive control schemes, based on the occurrence of discrete events, are used to change the model parameters from which the velocity commands are determined. Two adaptive schemes are presented: the first is based on intuitive reasoning about the vector spaces involved whereas the second uses a search region that is reduced with each iteration. For the first adaptation law, asymptotic convergence to the correct model parameters is proven except for one case. This weakness motivated the development of the second adaptation law, for which asymptotic convergence is proven in all cases. Automated control of a peg-in-hole assembly task is given as an example, and simulations and experiments for this task are presented. These results demonstrate the success of the method and also indicate properties for rapid convergence.

  17. The Importance of Formalizing Computational Models of Face Adaptation Aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    Ross, David A.; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Face adaptation is widely used as a means to probe the neural representations that support face recognition. While the theories that relate face adaptation to behavioral aftereffects may seem conceptually simple, our work has shown that testing computational instantiations of these theories can lead to unexpected results. Instantiating a model of face adaptation not only requires specifying how faces are represented and how adaptation shapes those representations but also specifying how decisions are made, translating hidden representational states into observed responses. Considering the high-dimensionality of face representations, the parallel activation of multiple representations, and the non-linearity of activation functions and decision mechanisms, intuitions alone are unlikely to succeed. If the goal is to understand mechanism, not simply to examine the boundaries of a behavioral phenomenon or correlate behavior with brain activity, then formal computational modeling must be a component of theory testing. To illustrate, we highlight our recent computational modeling of face adaptation aftereffects and discuss how models can be used to understand the mechanisms by which faces are recognized. PMID:27378960

  18. Multithreaded Model for Dynamic Load Balancing Parallel Adaptive PDE Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisochoides, Nikos

    1995-01-01

    We present a multithreaded model for the dynamic load-balancing of numerical, adaptive computations required for the solution of Partial Differential Equations (PDE's) on multiprocessors. Multithreading is used as a means of exploring concurrency in the processor level in order to tolerate synchronization costs inherent to traditional (non-threaded) parallel adaptive PDE solvers. Our preliminary analysis for parallel, adaptive PDE solvers indicates that multithreading can be used an a mechanism to mask overheads required for the dynamic balancing of processor workloads with computations required for the actual numerical solution of the PDE's. Also, multithreading can simplify the implementation of dynamic load-balancing algorithms, a task that is very difficult for traditional data parallel adaptive PDE computations. Unfortunately, multithreading does not always simplify program complexity, often makes code re-usability not an easy task, and increases software complexity.

  19. Modeling and Adaptive Control of Magnetostrictive Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    in using these and other smart actuators is at a high frequency – for producing large displacements with mechanical rectification, producing sonar...effects; and mechanical damping. We show rigorously that the system with the intial state at the origin has a periodic orbit as its Ω limit set. For the...Root locus of example system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 5.18 Mechanical system model at high frequencies. . . . . . . . . . . . 195 F.1

  20. A geometric view of adaptive optics control: boiling atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Donald M.; Max, Claire E.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2004-10-01

    The separation principle of optimal adaptive optics control is derived, and definitions of controllability and observability are introduced. An exact finite dimensional state space representation of the control system dynamics is obtained without the need for truncation in modes such as Zernikes. The uncertainty of sensing uncontrollable modes confuses present adaptive optics controllers. This uncertainty can be modeled by a Kalman filter. Reducing this uncertainty permits increased gain, increasing the Strehl, which is done by an optimal control law derived here. A general model of the atmosphere is considered, including boiling.

  1. Systems approach to clothing for disabled users. Why is it difficult for disabled users to find suitable clothing.

    PubMed

    Thorén, M

    1996-12-01

    Today's clothing market is not adapted for people with unusual body dimensions and/or different kinds of functional impairments. They will be referred to as disabled users. The method of user-oriented product development combined with the soft systems methodology has been applied in order to understand and possibly solve their problem. Sixty five disabled users were interviewed. The results show that the disabled users must be divided into subgroups. Their requirements are very much dependent on their impairment not only regarding the fit and function of the clothing, but also regarding shopping and service in the stores. The symbolic values of clothing are just as important as the functional values. However, it is essential not to focus on the end product only, but to look at the problem as a system consisting of: manufacturing, marketing and end use. A new method of taking three dimensional measurements from range images of the human body has been developed. In combination with other developments in information technology it will be possible to synthesise a new system where the manufacturers and retailers of clothing can co-operate in order to give service to disabled users.

  2. The adaptive cruise control vehicles in the cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song

    2006-11-01

    This Letter presented a cellular automata model where the adaptive cruise control vehicles are modelled. In this model, the constant time headway policy is adopted. The fundamental diagram is presented. The simulation results are in good agreement with the analytical ones. The mixture of ACC vehicles with manually driven vehicles is investigated. It is shown that with the introduction of ACC vehicles, the jam can be suppressed.

  3. Quantifying the CV: Adapting an Impact Assessment Model to Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohémier, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    We present the process and results of applying the Becker Model to the curriculum vitae of a Yale University astronomy professor. As background, in July 2013, the Becker Medical Library at Washington Univ. in St. Louis held a workshop for librarians on the Becker Model, a framework developed by research assessment librarians for quantifying medical researchers' individual and group outputs. Following the workshop, the model was analyzed for content to adapt it to the physical sciences.

  4. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  5. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  6. Sewing: Easier with Adaptations. PAM Repeater, No. 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensign, Arselia S., Ed.

    Techniques are presented for sewing clothing for children or adults with handicaps. Considerations in sewing adapted clothing include the most appropriate type of pattern for a particular disability, fabric choices, and items needed for clothing construction. Eight sources of sewing supplies are listed, with descriptions of items available.…

  7. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  8. Adaptation of the microdosimetric kinetic model to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, C.; Hirayama, R.; Inaniwa, T.; Kitagawa, A.; Matsufuji, N.; Noda, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ion beams present a potential advantage in terms of treatment of lesions with hypoxic regions. In order to use this potential, it is important to accurately model the cell survival of oxic as well as hypoxic cells. In this work, an adaptation of the microdosimetric kinetic (MK) model making it possible to account for cell hypoxia is presented. The adaptation relies on the modification of damage quantity (double strand breaks and more complex lesions) due to the radiation. Model parameters such as domain size and nucleus size are then adapted through a fitting procedure. We applied this approach to two cell lines, HSG and V79 for helium, carbon and neon ions. A similar behaviour of the parameters was found for the two cell lines, namely a reduction of the domain size and an increase in the sensitive nuclear volume of hypoxic cells compared to those of oxic cells. In terms of oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), the experimental data behaviour can be reproduced, including dependence on particle type at the same linear energy transfer (LET). Errors on the cell survival prediction are of the same order of magnitude than for the original MK model. Our adaptation makes it possible to account for hypoxia without modelling the OER as a function of the LET of the particles, but directly accounting for hypoxic cell survival data.

  9. Data Assimilation in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Godinez, Humberto C.; Henney, Carl J.; Arge, C. Nick

    2015-04-01

    Global maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind and therefore are important predictors of geoeffective events. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over approximately half of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time, this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux-transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the implementation of the LETKF into ADAPT. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

  10. Data Assimilation in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Godinez, Humberto C.; Henney, Carl J.; Arge, C. Nick

    2015-03-17

    Global maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind and therefore are important predictors of geoeffective events. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over approximately half of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time, this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux-transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the implementation of the LETKF into ADAPT. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.

  11. Improvements in CB Protective Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    GB protective clothing system is designed to " protect against toxic or corrosive chemical warfare agents capable of affecting or penetrating...to defeat chemical warfare agents that can enter through the auro- nasal route. Obviously, it also protects the face and eyes as well. The remainder...the same system exposed to the fire pit test provided over 24 hours protection when tested against both mustard gas and a nerve agent (

  12. Achieving runtime adaptability through automated model evolution and variant selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosincat, Adina; Binder, Walter; Jazayeri, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Dynamically adaptive systems propose adaptation by means of variants that are specified in the system model at design time and allow for a fixed set of different runtime configurations. However, in a dynamic environment, unanticipated changes may result in the inability of the system to meet its quality requirements. To allow the system to react to these changes, this article proposes a solution for automatically evolving the system model by integrating new variants and periodically validating the existing ones based on updated quality parameters. To illustrate this approach, the article presents a BPEL-based framework using a service composition model to represent the functional requirements of the system. The framework estimates quality of service (QoS) values based on information provided by a monitoring mechanism, ensuring that changes in QoS are reflected in the system model. The article shows how the evolved model can be used at runtime to increase the system's autonomic capabilities and delivered QoS.

  13. The ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) of sensorimotor synchronization

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, M. C. (Marieke); Keller, Peter E.

    2013-01-01

    A constantly changing environment requires precise yet flexible timing of movements. Sensorimotor synchronization (SMS)—the temporal coordination of an action with events in a predictable external rhythm—is a fundamental human skill that contributes to optimal sensory-motor control in daily life. A large body of research related to SMS has focused on adaptive error correction mechanisms that support the synchronization of periodic movements (e.g., finger taps) with events in regular pacing sequences. The results of recent studies additionally highlight the importance of anticipatory mechanisms that support temporal prediction in the context of SMS with sequences that contain tempo changes. To investigate the role of adaptation and anticipatory mechanisms in SMS we introduce ADAM: an ADaptation and Anticipation Model. ADAM combines reactive error correction processes (adaptation) with predictive temporal extrapolation processes (anticipation) inspired by the computational neuroscience concept of internal models. The combination of simulations and experimental manipulations based on ADAM creates a novel and promising approach for exploring adaptation and anticipation in SMS. The current paper describes the conceptual basis and architecture of ADAM. PMID:23772211

  14. Adjoint Methods for Guiding Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Tsunami Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, B. N.; LeVeque, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    One difficulty in developing numerical methods for tsunami modeling is the fact that solutions contain time-varying regions where much higher resolution is required than elsewhere in the domain, particularly when tracking a tsunami propagating across the ocean. The open source GeoClaw software deals with this issue by using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to selectively refine around propagating waves. For problems where only a target area of the total solution is of interest (e.g., one coastal community), a method that allows identifying and refining the grid only in regions that influence this target area would significantly reduce the computational cost of finding a solution. In this work, we show that solving the time-dependent adjoint equation and using a suitable inner product with the forward solution allows more precise refinement of the relevant waves. We present the adjoint methodology first in one space dimension for illustration and in a broad context since it could also be used in other adaptive software, and potentially for other tsunami applications beyond adaptive refinement. We then show how this adjoint method has been integrated into the adaptive mesh refinement strategy of the open source GeoClaw software and present tsunami modeling results showing that the accuracy of the solution is maintained and the computational time required is significantly reduced through the integration of the adjoint method into adaptive mesh refinement.

  15. TEACHING-LEARNING UNITS IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Association of Future Homemakers of America, Phoenix.

    GUIDELINES FOR TEACHERS WHO ARE PLANNING LESSONS FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY STUDENTS IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILE CLASSES WERE DEVELOPED BY TEACHERS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, AND STATE SUPERVISORS. MATERIALS WERE TESTED BY CLASSROOM TEACHERS, REFINED, AND EDITED. MODELS OF TEACHING-LEARNING UNITS, EACH ON DIFFERENT COLORED PAPER, ARE PRESENTED FOR THREE…

  16. Classrooms as Complex Adaptive Systems: A Relational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Anne; Knox, John S.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe and model the language classroom as a complex adaptive system (see Logan & Schumann, 2005). We argue that linear, categorical descriptions of classroom processes and interactions do not sufficiently explain the complex nature of classrooms, and cannot account for how classroom change occurs (or does not occur), over…

  17. A Model of Internal Communication in Adaptive Communication Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Lee

    A study identified and categorized different types of internal communication systems and developed an applied model of internal communication in adaptive organizational systems. Twenty-one large organizations were selected for their varied missions and diverse approaches to managing internal communication. Individual face-to-face or telephone…

  18. Adapting the Transtheoretical Model of Change to the Bereavement Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Theorists currently believe that bereaved people undergo some transformation of self rather than returning to their original state. To advance our understanding of this process, this article presents an adaptation of Prochaska and DiClemente's transtheoretical model of change as it could be applied to the journey that bereaved individuals…

  19. Communicating to Farmers about Skin Cancer: The Behavior Adaptation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Roxanne; Monahan, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Steiner, Carol

    1998-01-01

    States health campaign messages designed to encourage behavior adaptation have greater likelihood of success than campaigns promoting avoidance of at-risk behaviors that cannot be avoided. Tests a model of health risk behavior using four different behaviors in a communication campaign aimed at reducing farmers' risk for skin cancer--questions…

  20. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  1. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-01-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics. PMID:27282089

  2. Apparent evaporative resistance at critical conditions for five clothing ensembles.

    PubMed

    Caravello, Victor; McCullough, Elizabeth A; Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2008-09-01

    A limiting factor for clothing ensembles inherent during heat stress exposures is the evaporative resistance, which can be used to compare candidate ensembles and in rational models of heat exchange. In this study, the apparent total evaporative resistance of five clothing ensembles (cotton work clothes, cotton coveralls, and coveralls made of Tyvek 1424 and 1427, NexGen and Tychem QC was estimated empirically from wear trials using a progressive heat stress protocol and from clothing insulation adjustments based on ISO 9920 (2007) and wetness. The metabolic rate was moderate at 165 W m(-2) and relative humidity was held at 50%. Twenty-nine heat-acclimated participants (20 men and 9 women) completed trials for all clothing ensembles. A general linear mixed effects model (ensemble and participants as a random effect) was used to analyze the data. Significant differences (p < 0.0001) among ensembles were observed for apparent total evaporative resistance. As expected, Tychem QC had the highest apparent total evaporative resistance at 0.033 kPa m(2) W(-1). NexGen was next at 0.017 kPa m(2) W(-1). These were followed by Tyvek 1424 at 0.015 kPa m(2) W(-1), and Tyvek 1427, Cotton Coveralls and Work Clothes all at 0.013 kPa m(2) W(-1). This wear test method improves on past methods using the progressive protocol to determine evaporative resistance by including the effects of movement, air motion and wetness on the estimate of clothing insulation. The pattern of evaporative resistance is the same as that for critical WBGTs and a linear relationship between apparent total evaporative resistance and WBGT clothing adjustment factor is suggested. With the large sample size, a good estimate of sample variance associated with progressive method can be made, where the standard error is 0.0044 kPa m(2) W(-1) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.0040-0.0050 kPa m(2) W(-1).

  3. An adaptive multi-feature segmentation model for infrared image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Han, Jin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2016-04-01

    Active contour models (ACM) have been extensively applied to image segmentation, conventional region-based active contour models only utilize global or local single feature information to minimize the energy functional to drive the contour evolution. Considering the limitations of original ACMs, an adaptive multi-feature segmentation model is proposed to handle infrared images with blurred boundaries and low contrast. In the proposed model, several essential local statistic features are introduced to construct a multi-feature signed pressure function (MFSPF). In addition, we draw upon the adaptive weight coefficient to modify the level set formulation, which is formed by integrating MFSPF with local statistic features and signed pressure function with global information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can make up for the inadequacy of the original method and get desirable results in segmenting infrared images.

  4. On fractional order composite model reference adaptive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiheng; Sun, Zhenyuan; Hu, Yangsheng; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel composite model reference adaptive control approach for a class of fractional order linear systems with unknown constant parameters. The method is extended from the model reference adaptive control. The parameter estimation error of our method depends on both the tracking error and the prediction error, whereas the existing method only depends on the tracking error, which makes our method has better transient performance in the sense of generating smooth system output. By the aid of the continuous frequency distributed model, stability of the proposed approach is established in the Lyapunov sense. Furthermore, the convergence property of the model parameters estimation is presented, on the premise that the closed-loop control system is stable. Finally, numerical simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  5. Evaluating mallard adaptive management models with time series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, P.B.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Wildlife practitioners concerned with midcontinent mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) management in the United States have instituted a system of adaptive harvest management (AHM) as an objective format for setting harvest regulations. Under the AHM paradigm, predictions from a set of models that reflect key uncertainties about processes underlying population dynamics are used in coordination with optimization software to determine an optimal set of harvest decisions. Managers use comparisons of the predictive abilities of these models to gauge the relative truth of different hypotheses about density-dependent recruitment and survival, with better-predicting models giving more weight to the determination of harvest regulations. We tested the effectiveness of this strategy by examining convergence rates of 'predictor' models when the true model for population dynamics was known a priori. We generated time series for cases when the a priori model was 1 of the predictor models as well as for several cases when the a priori model was not in the model set. We further examined the addition of different levels of uncertainty into the variance structure of predictor models, reflecting different levels of confidence about estimated parameters. We showed that in certain situations, the model-selection process favors a predictor model that incorporates the hypotheses of additive harvest mortality and weakly density-dependent recruitment, even when the model is not used to generate data. Higher levels of predictor model variance led to decreased rates of convergence to the model that generated the data, but model weight trajectories were in general more stable. We suggest that predictive models should incorporate all sources of uncertainty about estimated parameters, that the variance structure should be similar for all predictor models, and that models with different functional forms for population dynamics should be considered for inclusion in predictor model! sets. All of these

  6. Complex Environmental Data Modelling Using Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The research deals with an adaptation and application of Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks (GRNN) to high dimensional environmental data. GRNN [1,2,3] are efficient modelling tools both for spatial and temporal data and are based on nonparametric kernel methods closely related to classical Nadaraya-Watson estimator. Adaptive GRNN, using anisotropic kernels, can be also applied for features selection tasks when working with high dimensional data [1,3]. In the present research Adaptive GRNN are used to study geospatial data predictability and relevant feature selection using both simulated and real data case studies. The original raw data were either three dimensional monthly precipitation data or monthly wind speeds embedded into 13 dimensional space constructed by geographical coordinates and geo-features calculated from digital elevation model. GRNN were applied in two different ways: 1) adaptive GRNN with the resulting list of features ordered according to their relevancy; and 2) adaptive GRNN applied to evaluate all possible models N [in case of wind fields N=(2^13 -1)=8191] and rank them according to the cross-validation error. In both cases training were carried out applying leave-one-out procedure. An important result of the study is that the set of the most relevant features depends on the month (strong seasonal effect) and year. The predictabilities of precipitation and wind field patterns, estimated using the cross-validation and testing errors of raw and shuffled data, were studied in detail. The results of both approaches were qualitatively and quantitatively compared. In conclusion, Adaptive GRNN with their ability to select features and efficient modelling of complex high dimensional data can be widely used in automatic/on-line mapping and as an integrated part of environmental decision support systems. 1. Kanevski M., Pozdnoukhov A., Timonin V. Machine Learning for Spatial Environmental Data. Theory, applications and software. EPFL Press

  7. [Clothes of the HOUSE, or Clothes of REASON? Children's clothing during the Age of Enlightenment].

    PubMed

    Kottek, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Children's clothing is a subject that forms part of the history of pediatrics. Many studies focus on the ideas developed by Locke and Rousseau. Here we choose to focus our study on an author who is rarely quoted: Jacques Ballexserd (1726-1774), "citizen of Geneva," who is little known to historians of pediatrics. However, George Frederic Still (1868-1941) devotes two pages to his views in his Histoire de la Pédiatrie.

  8. A Systems Analysis of Alternative Concepts for Aircrew Cold Weather Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    requirements specIfied ’in the Letter of Agreement. I Two analytical models which simulate body cooling for various metabolic anc environmental...of Heat Loss and the Application of Clothing 45 Theory Modeling of Whole Body Cooling 45 Modeling of Extremity Cooling 48 4. Auxiliary Heat for...feasibility of conventional clothing to protect from the cold is assessed by applying cooling models . The results of the analysis of the insulation requirements

  9. Numerical simulations of heat and moisture transport in thermal protective clothing under flash fire conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Guowen; Chitrphiromsri, Patirop; Ding, Dan

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model of heat and moisture transport in thermal protective clothing during exposure to a flash fire was introduced. The model was developed with the assumption that textiles are treated as porous media. The numerical model predictions were compared with experimental data from different fabric systems and configurations. Additionally, with the introduction of a skin model, the parameters that affect the performance of thermal protective clothing were investigated.

  10. Learning Adaptive Forecasting Models from Irregularly Sampled Multivariate Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-02-01

    Building accurate predictive models of clinical multivariate time series is crucial for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, and clinical decision making. A challenging aspect of this process is that the model should be flexible and adaptive to reflect well patient-specific temporal behaviors and this also in the case when the available patient-specific data are sparse and short span. To address this problem we propose and develop an adaptive two-stage forecasting approach for modeling multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series of varying lengths. The proposed model (1) learns the population trend from a collection of time series for past patients; (2) captures individual-specific short-term multivariate variability; and (3) adapts by automatically adjusting its predictions based on new observations. The proposed forecasting model is evaluated on a real-world clinical time series dataset. The results demonstrate the benefits of our approach on the prediction tasks for multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series, and show that it can outperform both the population based and patient-specific time series prediction models in terms of prediction accuracy.

  11. Learning Adaptive Forecasting Models from Irregularly Sampled Multivariate Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Building accurate predictive models of clinical multivariate time series is crucial for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, and clinical decision making. A challenging aspect of this process is that the model should be flexible and adaptive to reflect well patient-specific temporal behaviors and this also in the case when the available patient-specific data are sparse and short span. To address this problem we propose and develop an adaptive two-stage forecasting approach for modeling multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series of varying lengths. The proposed model (1) learns the population trend from a collection of time series for past patients; (2) captures individual-specific short-term multivariate variability; and (3) adapts by automatically adjusting its predictions based on new observations. The proposed forecasting model is evaluated on a real-world clinical time series dataset. The results demonstrate the benefits of our approach on the prediction tasks for multivariate, irregularly sampled clinical time series, and show that it can outperform both the population based and patient-specific time series prediction models in terms of prediction accuracy. PMID:27525189

  12. A generic efficient adaptive grid scheme for rocket propulsion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, J. D.; Chow, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient, time-accurate numerical algorithm to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations for the predictions of internal one-, two-dimensional and axisymmetric flows. A generic, efficient, elliptic adaptive grid generator is implicitly coupled with the Lower-Upper factorization scheme in the development of ALUNS computer code. The calculations of one-dimensional shock tube wave propagation and two-dimensional shock wave capture, wave-wave interactions, shock wave-boundary interactions show that the developed scheme is stable, accurate and extremely robust. The adaptive grid generator produced a very favorable grid network by a grid speed technique. This generic adaptive grid generator is also applied in the PARC and FDNS codes and the computational results for solid rocket nozzle flowfield and crystal growth modeling by those codes will be presented in the conference, too. This research work is being supported by NASA/MSFC.

  13. Adaptive Modeling: An Approach for Incorporating Nonlinearity in Regression Analyses.

    PubMed

    Knafl, George J; Barakat, Lamia P; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Hardie, Thomas; Knafl, Kathleen A; Li, Yimei; Deatrick, Janet A

    2017-02-01

    Although regression relationships commonly are treated as linear, this often is not the case. An adaptive approach is described for identifying nonlinear relationships based on power transforms of predictor (or independent) variables and for assessing whether or not relationships are distinctly nonlinear. It is also possible to model adaptively both means and variances of continuous outcome (or dependent) variables and to adaptively power transform positive-valued continuous outcomes, along with their predictors. Example analyses are provided of data from parents in a nursing study on emotional-health-related quality of life for childhood brain tumor survivors as a function of the effort to manage the survivors' condition. These analyses demonstrate that relationships, including moderation relationships, can be distinctly nonlinear, that conclusions about means can be affected by accounting for non-constant variances, and that outcome transformation along with predictor transformation can provide distinct improvements and can resolve skewness problems.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. OMEGA: The operational multiscale environment model with grid adaptivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This review talk describes the OMEGA code, used for weather simulation and the modeling of aerosol transport through the atmosphere. Omega employs a 3D mesh of wedge shaped elements (triangles when viewed from above) that adapt with time. Because wedges are laid out in layers of triangular elements, the scheme can utilize structured storage and differencing techniques along the elevation coordinate, and is thus a hybrid of structured and unstructured methods. The utility of adaptive gridding in this moded, near geographic features such as coastlines, where material properties change discontinuously, is illustrated. Temporal adaptivity was used additionally to track moving internal fronts, such as clouds of aerosol contaminants. The author also discusses limitations specific to this problem, including manipulation of huge data bases and fixed turn-around times. In practice, the latter requires a carefully tuned optimization between accuracy and computation speed.

  15. Cloth Ballistic Vest Alters Response to Blast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701-501 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. jACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) CLOTH BALLSISTIC VEST ALTERS RESPONSE...Suppl. ’rintd in USA Cloth Ballistic Vest Alters Response to Blast YANCY Y. PHILLIPS, M.D., THOMAS G. MUNDIE, PH.D., JOHN T. YELVERTON, M.S., AND DONALD R...RICHMOND, PH.D. Ballistic wounds have been and will remain the principal cause of casualties in combat. Cloth ballistic vests (CBV) play an

  16. Nonhydrostatic adaptive mesh dynamics for multiscale climate models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W.; Johansen, H.; McCorquodale, P.; Colella, P.; Ullrich, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Many of the atmospheric phenomena with the greatest potential impact in future warmer climates are inherently multiscale. Such meteorological systems include hurricanes and tropical cyclones, atmospheric rivers, and other types of hydrometeorological extremes. These phenomena are challenging to simulate in conventional climate models due to the relatively coarse uniform model resolutions relative to the native nonhydrostatic scales of the phenomonological dynamics. To enable studies of these systems with sufficient local resolution for the multiscale dynamics yet with sufficient speed for climate-change studies, we have adapted existing adaptive mesh dynamics for the DOE-NSF Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). In this talk, we present an adaptive, conservative finite volume approach for moist non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamics. The approach is based on the compressible Euler equations on 3D thin spherical shells, where the radial direction is treated implicitly (using a fourth-order Runga-Kutta IMEX scheme) to eliminate time step constraints from vertical acoustic waves. Refinement is performed only in the horizontal directions. The spatial discretization is the equiangular cubed-sphere mapping, with a fourth-order accurate discretization to compute flux averages on faces. By using both space-and time-adaptive mesh refinement, the solver allocates computational effort only where greater accuracy is needed. The resulting method is demonstrated to be fourth-order accurate for model problems, and robust at solution discontinuities and stable for large aspect ratios. We present comparisons using a simplified physics package for dycore comparisons of moist physics. Hadley cell lifting an advected tracer into upper atmosphere, with horizontal adaptivity

  17. Career Development and Older Workers: Study Evaluating Adaptability in Older Workers Using Hall's Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Merwyn L.; Torraco, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative case study described the development of adaptive competence in older workers using a Model of Adaptability and Adaptation developed by Dr. Douglas T. Hall (2002). Few studies have focused on the development of adaptability in workers when faced with change and no studies have focused on the development of adaptability in older…

  18. Insertion Loss of Personal Protective Clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Shull D.J.; Biesel, V.B.; Cunefare, K.A.

    1999-05-13

    'The use of personal protective clothing that covers the head is a common practice in many industries. Such personal protective clothing will impact the sound pressure level and the frequency content of sounds to which the wearer will be exposed. The use of such clothing, then, may impact speech and alarm audibility. A measure of the impact of such clothing is its insertion loss. Insertion loss measurements were performed on four types of personal protective clothing in use by Westinghouse Savannah River Company personnel which utilize cloth and plastic hood configurations to protect the head. All clothing configurations tested at least partially cover the ears. The measurements revealed that insertion loss of the items tested was notable at frequencies above 1000 Hz only and was a function of material stiffness and acoustic flanking paths to the ear. Further, an estimate of the clothing''s noise reduction rating reveals poor performance in that regard, even though the insertion loss of the test articles was significant at frequencies at and above 1000 Hz.'

  19. 77 FR 4999 - Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to LG From the Department of Energy Clothes Washer Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of the decision and order (Case No. CW-022) that grants to LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. (LG) a waiver from the DOE clothes washer test procedure for determining the energy consumption of clothes washers for the basic models set forth in its petition for waiver. Under today's decision and order, LG shall be required to test and rate these clothes......

  20. Awareness of the Social Implications of Clothing in Relation to Fashion Awareness and Clothing Economic Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horridge, Patricia; Richards, Mary Lynne

    1986-01-01

    The Sproles Consumer Interests and Priorities questionnaire was administered to 3,036 home economists. Awareness of social implications of clothing, correlated positively with fashion awareness and clothing economic practices. Results suggest that persons exhibiting substantial awareness of social importance of clothing also tend to evidence…

  1. Asymmetric adaptive modeling of central tarsal bones in racing greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Muir, P; Nicoll, R G; Roush, J K

    2000-08-01

    Fatigue fracture of the cuboidal bones of the foot, especially the navicular tarsal bone, is common in athletes and dancers. The racing greyhound is a naturally occurring animal model of this injury because both microcracking and complete fracture occur in the right central (navicular) tarsal bone (CTB). The right limb is on the outside when racing in a counter-clockwise direction on circular tracks, and is subjected to asymmetric cyclic compressive loading. We wished to study in more detail adaptive modeling in the right CTB in racing greyhounds. We hypothesized that cyclic asymmetric loading of a cuboidal bone induced by racing on a circular track would induce site-specific bone adaptation. We also hypothesized that such an adaptive response would be attenuated in greyhounds that were retired from racing and no longer subjected to cyclic asymmetric loading. Central tarsal bones from racing greyhounds (racing group, n = 6) and retired greyhounds being used for breeding (nonracing group, n = 4) were examined using quantitative computed tomography (CT). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined in a 3-mm diameter region-of-interest (ROI) in six contiguous 1-mm-thick sagittal CT slices of each CTB. Bones were subsequently examined histomorphometrically and percentage bone area (B.Ar./T.Ar., %) was determined in 10 ROI from dorsal to plantar in a transverse plane, mid-way between the proximal and distal articular surfaces. The BMD of the right CTB was greater than the left in all greyhounds (p < 0. 001). In comparing ipsilateral limbs between groups, BMD of the racing group was greater than the nonracing group for each side (p < 0.005). In sagittal plane histologic sections, bone in the dorsal region of the right CTB had undergone adaptive modeling, through thickening and compaction of trabeculae. B.Ar./T.Ar., % in the right CTB of the racing group was greater than in the contralateral CTB (p < 0.001), and the ipsilateral CTB of the nonracing group (p < 0.001). In the

  2. Astronaut Clothing for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poritz, Darwin H.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Kaspranskiy, Rustem R.; Schesinger, Thilini; Byrne, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Astronaut clothes for exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit need to satisfy several challenges not met by the currently-used mostly-cotton clothing. A laundering system is not expected to be available, and thus soiled garments must be trashed. Jettisoning waste does not seem feasible at this time. The cabin oxygen concentration is expected to be higher than standard, and thus fabrics must better resist ignition and burning. Fabrics need to be identified that reduce logistical mass, that can be worn longer before disposal, that are at least as comfortable as cotton, and that resist ignition or that char immediately after ignition. Human factors and psychology indicate that crew well-being and morale require a variety of colors and styles to accommodate personal identity and preferences. Over the past four years, the Logistics Reduction Project under NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program has sponsored the Advanced Clothing System Task to conduct several ground studies and one ISS study. These studies have evaluated length of wear and personal preferences of commercially-available exercise- and routine-wear garments made from several fabrics (cotton, polyester, Merino wool, and modacrylic), woven and knitted. Note that Merino wool and modacrylic char like cotton in ambient air, while polyester unacceptably melts. This paper focuses on the two components of an International Space Station study, onboard and on the ground, with astronauts and cosmonauts. Fabrics were randomized to participants. Length of wear was assessed by statistical survival analysis, and preference by exact binomial confidence limits. Merino wool and modacrylic t-shirts were worn longer on average than polyester t-shirts. Interestingly, self-assessed preferences were inconsistent with length-of-wear behavior, as polyester was preferred to Merino wool and modacrylic.

  3. Adaptive fuzzy modeling of the hypnotic process in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Marrero, A; Méndez, J A; Reboso, J A; Martín, I; Calvo, J L

    2017-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of patient model synthesis in anesthesia. Recent advanced drug infusion mechanisms use a patient model to establish the proper drug dose. However, due to the inherent complexity and variability of the patient dynamics, difficulty obtaining a good model is high. In this paper, a method based on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms is proposed as an alternative to standard compartmental models. The model uses a Mamdani type fuzzy inference system developed in a two-step procedure. First, an offline model is obtained using information from real patients. Then, an adaptive strategy that uses genetic algorithms is implemented. The validation of the modeling technique was done using real data obtained from real patients in the operating room. Results show that the proposed method based on artificial intelligence appears to be an improved alternative to existing compartmental methodologies.

  4. A new adaptive hybrid electromagnetic damper: modelling, optimization, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Ehsan; Ribeiro, Roberto; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Khajepour, Amir

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a new electromagnetic hybrid damper which provides regenerative adaptive damping force for various applications. Recently, the introduction of electromagnetic technologies to the damping systems has provided researchers with new opportunities for the realization of adaptive semi-active damping systems with the added benefit of energy recovery. In this research, a hybrid electromagnetic damper is proposed. The hybrid damper is configured to operate with viscous and electromagnetic subsystems. The viscous medium provides a bias and fail-safe damping force while the electromagnetic component adds adaptability and the capacity for regeneration to the hybrid design. The electromagnetic component is modeled and analyzed using analytical (lumped equivalent magnetic circuit) and electromagnetic finite element method (FEM) (COMSOL® software package) approaches. By implementing both modeling approaches, an optimization for the geometric aspects of the electromagnetic subsystem is obtained. Based on the proposed electromagnetic hybrid damping concept and the preliminary optimization solution, a prototype is designed and fabricated. A good agreement is observed between the experimental and FEM results for the magnetic field distribution and electromagnetic damping forces. These results validate the accuracy of the modeling approach and the preliminary optimization solution. An analytical model is also presented for viscous damping force, and is compared with experimental results The results show that the damper is able to produce damping coefficients of 1300 and 0-238 N s m-1 through the viscous and electromagnetic components, respectively.

  5. Short-term heat stress exposure limits based on wet bulb globe temperature adjusted for clothing and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thomas E; Ashley, Candi D

    2009-10-01

    Most heat stress exposure assessments based on wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) consider the environmental conditions, metabolic demands, and clothing requirements, and the exposure limit is for extended work periods (e.g., a typical workday). The U.S. Navy physiological heat exposure limit (PHEL) curves and rational models of heat stress also consider time as a job risk factor so that there is a limiting time for exposures above a conventional WBGT exposure limit. The PHEL charts have not been examined for different clothing and the rational models require personal computers. The current study examined the role of clothing in short-term (time limited) exposures and proposed a relationship between a Safe Exposure Time and WBGT adjusted for clothing and metabolic rate. Twelve participants worked at a metabolic rate of 380 W in three clothing ensembles [clothing adjustment factors]: (1) work clothes (0 degrees C-WBGT), (2) NexGen microporous coveralls (2.5 degrees C-WBGT), and (2) vapor-barrier coveralls (6.5 degrees C-WBGT) at five levels of heat stress (approximately at the clothing adjusted TLV plus 7.0, 8.0, 9.5, 11.5 and 15.0 degrees C-WBGT). The combinations of metabolic rate, clothing, and environment were selected in anticipation that the participants would reach a physiological limit in less than 120 min. WBGT-based clothing adjustment factors were used to account for different clothing ensembles, and no differences were found for ensemble, which meant that the clothing adjustment factor can be used in WBGT-based time limited exposures. An equation was proposed to recommend a Safe Exposure Time for exposures under 120 min. The recommended times were longer than the PHEL times or times from a rational model of heat stress.

  6. Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control for a Magnetic Bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Durling, Mike

    1999-11-01

    A Direct Model Reference Adaptive Controller (DMRAC) is applied to a magnetic bearing test stand. The bearing of interest is the MBC 500 Magnetic Bearing System manufactured by Magnetic Moments, LLC. The bearing model is presented in state space form and the system transfer function is measured directly using a closed-loop swept sine technique. Next, the bearing models are used to design a phase-lead controller, notch filter and then a DMRAC. The controllers are tuned in simulations and finally are implemented using a combination of MATLAB, SIMULINK and dSPACE. The results show a successful implementation of a DMRAC on the magnetic bearing hardware.

  7. On valuing information in adaptive-management models.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alana L; McCarthy, Michael A

    2010-08-01

    Active adaptive management looks at the benefit of using strategies that may be suboptimal in the near term but may provide additional information that will facilitate better management in the future. In many adaptive-management problems that have been studied, the optimal active and passive policies (accounting for learning when designing policies and designing policy on the basis of current best information, respectively) are very similar. This seems paradoxical; when faced with uncertainty about the best course of action, managers should spend very little effort on actively designing programs to learn about the system they are managing. We considered two possible reasons why active and passive adaptive solutions are often similar. First, the benefits of learning are often confined to the particular case study in the modeled scenario, whereas in reality information gained from local studies is often applied more broadly. Second, management objectives that incorporate the variance of an estimate may place greater emphasis on learning than more commonly used objectives that aim to maximize an expected value. We explored these issues in a case study of Merri Creek, Melbourne, Australia, in which the aim was to choose between two options for revegetation. We explicitly incorporated monitoring costs in the model. The value of the terminal rewards and the choice of objective both influenced the difference between active and passive adaptive solutions. Explicitly considering the cost of monitoring provided a different perspective on how the terminal reward and management objective affected learning. The states for which it was optimal to monitor did not always coincide with the states in which active and passive adaptive management differed. Our results emphasize that spending resources on monitoring is only optimal when the expected benefits of the options being considered are similar and when the pay-off for learning about their benefits is large.

  8. On a combined adaptive tetrahedral tracing and edge diffraction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Carl R.

    A major challenge in architectural acoustics is the unification of diffraction models and geometric acoustics. For example, geometric acoustics is insufficient to quantify the scattering characteristics of acoustic diffusors. Typically the time-independent boundary element method (BEM) is the method of choice. In contrast, time-domain computations are of interest for characterizing both the spatial and temporal scattering characteristics of acoustic diffusors. Hence, a method is sought that predicts acoustic scattering in the time-domain. A prediction method, which combines an advanced image source method and an edge diffraction model, is investigated for the prediction of time-domain scattering. Adaptive tetrahedral tracing is an advanced image source method that generates image sources through an adaptive process. Propagating tetrahedral beams adapt to ensonified geometry mapping the geometric sound field in space and along boundaries. The edge diffraction model interfaces with the adaptive tetrahedral tracing process by the transfer of edge geometry and visibility information. Scattering is quantified as the contribution of secondary sources along a single or multiple interacting edges. Accounting for a finite number of diffraction permutations approximates the scattered sound field. Superposition of the geometric and scattered sound fields results in a synthesized impulse response between a source and a receiver. Evaluation of the prediction technique involves numerical verification and numerical validation. Numerical verification is based upon a comparison with analytic and numerical (BEM) solutions for scattering geometries. Good agreement is shown for the selected scattering geometries. Numerical validation is based upon experimentally determined scattered impulse responses of acoustic diffusors. Experimental data suggests that the predictive model is appropriate for high-frequency predictions. For the experimental determination of the scattered impulse

  9. Modeling Adaptive Middleware and Its Applications to Military Tactical Datalinks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    execution of the WSOA architecture to On- Time QoS region, and associated Y offset. The above calculations are performed each time a complete image tile is...early Image A Image B 0.X I 0.Z I 0. Y I Figure 3-3. Early, On-Time and Late QoS Boundaries Table 3-4 WSOA QoS Adaptation Model Updated QoS

  10. Adaptive Control Law Design for Model Uncertainty Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-14

    AD-A211 712 WRDC-TR-89-3061 ADAPTIVE CONTROL LAW DESIGN FOR MODEL UNCERTAINTY COMPENSATION J. E. SORRELLS DYNETICS , INC. U 1000 EXPLORER BLVD. L Ell...MONITORING ORGANIZATION Dynetics , Inc. (If applicable) Wright Research and Development Center netics,_ _ I _nc.Flight Dynamics Laboratory, AFSC 6c. ADDRESS...controllers designed using Dynetics innovative aporoach were able to equal or surpass the STR and MRAC controllers in terms of performance robustness

  11. Modeling of Complex Adaptive Systems in Air Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    control of C3 in an increasingly complex military environment. Control theory is a multidisciplinary science associated with dynamic systems and, while...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2006-282 In- House Final Technical Report September 2006 MODELING OF COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS IN AIR OPERATIONS...NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this document for any purpose other than Government

  12. Goal-oriented model adaptivity for viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Opstal, T. M.; Bauman, P. T.; Prudhomme, S.; van Brummelen, E. H.

    2015-06-01

    In van Opstal et al. (Comput Mech 50:779-788, 2012) airbag inflation simulations were performed where the flow was approximated by Stokes flow. Inside the intricately folded initial geometry the Stokes assumption is argued to hold. This linearity assumption leads to a boundary-integral representation, the key to bypassing mesh generation and remeshing. It therefore enables very large displacements with near-contact. However, such a coarse assumption cannot hold throughout the domain, where it breaks down one needs to revert to the original model. The present work formalizes this idea. A model adaptive approach is proposed, in which the coarse model (a Stokes boundary-integral equation) is locally replaced by the original high-fidelity model (Navier-Stokes) based on a-posteriori estimates of the error in a quantity of interest. This adaptive modeling framework aims at taking away the burden and heuristics of manually partitioning the domain while providing new insight into the physics. We elucidate how challenges pertaining to model disparity can be addressed. Essentially, the solution in the interior of the coarse model domain is reconstructed as a post-processing step. We furthermore present a two-dimensional numerical experiments to show that the error estimator is reliable.

  13. Network and adaptive system of systems modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E. Dr.; Anderson, Dennis James; Eddy, John P.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled ''Network and Adaptive System of Systems Modeling and Analysis'' that was conducted during FY 2005 and FY 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate network communications modeling into existing System of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling, particularly for the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, is conducted under the assumption that communication between the various systems is always possible and occurs instantaneously. A more realistic representation of these communications allows for better, more accurate simulation results. The current approach to meeting this objective has been to use existing capabilities to model network hardware reliability and adding capabilities to use that information to model the impact on the sustainment supply chain and operational availability.

  14. Language Model Combination and Adaptation Using Weighted Finite State Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Gales, M. J. F.; Hieronymus, J. L.; Woodland, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In speech recognition systems language model (LMs) are often constructed by training and combining multiple n-gram models. They can be either used to represent different genres or tasks found in diverse text sources, or capture stochastic properties of different linguistic symbol sequences, for example, syllables and words. Unsupervised LM adaption may also be used to further improve robustness to varying styles or tasks. When using these techniques, extensive software changes are often required. In this paper an alternative and more general approach based on weighted finite state transducers (WFSTs) is investigated for LM combination and adaptation. As it is entirely based on well-defined WFST operations, minimum change to decoding tools is needed. A wide range of LM combination configurations can be flexibly supported. An efficient on-the-fly WFST decoding algorithm is also proposed. Significant error rate gains of 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art broadcast audio recognition task using a history dependently adapted multi-level LM modelling both syllable and word sequences

  15. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Presenting for Redundant Clothing

    PubMed Central

    Uvais, N. A.; Sreeraj, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a 15-year-old girl who presented with redundant clothing. On evaluation, it was found that she had obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and redundant clothing was a symptom of OCD, which has hitherto not been reported. PMID:27011408

  16. Your Clothing Dollar. [Revised.] Money Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Nancy H., Ed.; Tarrant, Sharon M., Ed.

    This booklet on clothing, 1 in a series of 12 covers all the basic aspects of personal- and family-money management. Suitable for use by high school and college students as well as adults, this handbook gives wardrobe planning, buying, and care information. The first three sections consider the functions of clothing, the importance of…

  17. Kente Cloth-Inspired Reduction Prints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    The textiles of Africa are rich with possibilities for art lessons. With their unique balance of color, pattern, symmetry and repetition, they lend themselves to exciting art lessons with cultural significance. Asante cloth--or Kente cloth, as it is commonly known--is a perfect example. These rich, colorful repeat patterns from Ghana are woven in…

  18. The Role of Clothing in Perpetuating Ageism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.; Johnson, Kim K. P.

    1989-01-01

    A study examined 197 college students' impressions of memory skills and personality of older adults and the relation of these impressions to clothing cleanliness and condition. It found that clothing cleanliness and coordination affected attitudes and also interacted with the gender of the older person to affect those impressions. (JOW)

  19. MICROCLIMATE-CONTROLLED (THERMALIBRIUM) CLOTHING SYSTEMS FOR MILITARY APPLICATIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERES), REVIEWS, AMMUNITION, TOXICITY, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT, HEATING, GAS FLOW, CONTROL , AIRCRAFT , TROPICAL REGIONS, THERMAL RADIATION, FLIGHT CLOTHING

  20. Model Adaptation for Prognostics in a Particle Filtering Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    One of the key motivating factors for using particle filters for prognostics is the ability to include model parameters as part of the state vector to be estimated. This performs model adaptation in conjunction with state tracking, and thus, produces a tuned model that can used for long term predictions. This feature of particle filters works in most part due to the fact that they are not subject to the "curse of dimensionality", i.e. the exponential growth of computational complexity with state dimension. However, in practice, this property holds for "well-designed" particle filters only as dimensionality increases. This paper explores the notion of wellness of design in the context of predicting remaining useful life for individual discharge cycles of Li-ion batteries. Prognostic metrics are used to analyze the tradeoff between different model designs and prediction performance. Results demonstrate how sensitivity analysis may be used to arrive at a well-designed prognostic model that can take advantage of the model adaptation properties of a particle filter.

  1. Evaluating the adaptive-filter model of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2011-07-15

    The adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit is in widespread use, combining as it does an explanation of key microcircuit features with well-specified computational power. Here we consider two methods for its evaluation. One is to test its predictions concerning relations between cerebellar inputs and outputs. Where the relevant experimental data are available, e.g. for the floccular role in image stabilization, the predictions appear to be upheld. However, for the majority of cerebellar microzones these data have yet to be obtained. The second method is to test model predictions about details of the microcircuit. We focus on features apparently incompatible with the model, in particular non-linear patterns in Purkinje cell simple-spike firing. Analysis of these patterns suggests the following three conclusions. (i) It is important to establish whether they can be observed during task-related behaviour. (ii) Highly non-linear models based on these patterns are unlikely to be universal, because they would be incompatible with the (approximately) linear nature of floccular function. (iii) The control tasks for which these models are computationally suited need to be identified. At present, therefore, the adaptive filter remains a candidate model of at least some cerebellar microzones, and its evaluation suggests promising lines for future enquiry.

  2. Wind adaptive modeling of transmission lines using minimum description length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaw, Yoonseok; Sohn, Gunho

    2017-03-01

    The transmission lines are moving objects, which positions are dynamically affected by wind-induced conductor motion while they are acquired by airborne laser scanners. This wind effect results in a noisy distribution of laser points, which often hinders accurate representation of transmission lines and thus, leads to various types of modeling errors. This paper presents a new method for complete 3D transmission line model reconstruction in the framework of inner and across span analysis. The highlighted fact is that the proposed method is capable of indirectly estimating noise scales, which corrupts the quality of laser observations affected by different wind speeds through a linear regression analysis. In the inner span analysis, individual transmission line models of each span are evaluated based on the Minimum Description Length theory and erroneous transmission line segments are subsequently replaced by precise transmission line models with wind-adaptive noise scale estimated. In the subsequent step of across span analysis, detecting the precise start and end positions of the transmission line models, known as the Point of Attachment, is the key issue for correcting partial modeling errors, as well as refining transmission line models. Finally, the geometric and topological completion of transmission line models are achieved over the entire network. A performance evaluation was conducted over 138.5 km long corridor data. In a modest wind condition, the results demonstrates that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of non-wind-adaptive initial models on an average of 48% success rate to produce complete transmission line models in the range between 85% and 99.5% with the positional accuracy of 9.55 cm transmission line models and 28 cm Point of Attachment in the root-mean-square error.

  3. A model for the emergence of adaptive subsystems.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, H; Gordon, M B; Perazzo, R; Risau-Gusman, S

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of learning and evolution in a changing environment. A stable learning capability is regarded as an emergent adaptive system evolved by natural selection of genetic variants. We consider the evolution of an asexual population. Each genotype can have 'fixed' and 'flexible' alleles. The former express themselves as synaptic connections that remain unchanged during ontogeny and the latter as synapses that can be adjusted through a learning algorithm. Evolution is modelled using genetic algorithms and the changing environment is represented by two optimal synaptic patterns that alternate a fixed number of times during the 'life' of the individuals. The amplitude of the change is related to the Hamming distance between the two optimal patterns and the rate of change to the frequency with which both exchange roles. This model is an extension of that of Hinton and Nowlan in which the fitness is given by a probabilistic measure of the Hamming distance to the optimum. We find that two types of evolutionary pathways are possible depending upon how difficult (costly) it is to cope with the changes of the environment. In one case the population loses the learning ability, and the individuals inherit fixed synapses that are optimal in only one of the environmental states. In the other case a flexible subsystem emerges that allows the individuals to adapt to the changes of the environment. The model helps us to understand how an adaptive subsystem can emerge as the result of the tradeoff between the exploitation of a congenital structure and the exploration of the adaptive capabilities practised by learning.

  4. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  5. Model reference adaptive control with an augmented error signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown how globally stable model reference adaptive control systems may be designed when one has access to only the plant's input and output signals. Controllers for single input-single output, nonlinear, nonautonomous plants are developed based on Lyapunov's direct method and the Meyer-Kalman-Yacubovich lemma. Derivatives of the plant output are not required, but are replaced by filtered derivative signals. An augmented error signal replaces the error normally used, which is defined as the difference between the model and plant outputs. However, global stability is assured in the sense that the normally used error signal approaches zero asymptotically.

  6. Model reference adaptive control using only input and output signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monopoli, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown how globally stable model reference adaptive control systems may be designed using only the plant's input and output signals. Controllers for single input-single output, nonlinear, nonautonomous plants are developed based on Liapunov's direct method and the Meyer-Kalman-Yacubovich lemma. Filtered derivatives of the plant output replace pure derivatives which are normally required in these systems. An augmented error signal replaces the error previously used which is the difference between the model and plant outputs. However, global stability is assured in the sense that this difference approaches zero asymptotically.

  7. Digital adaptive controllers using second order models with transport lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Design of a discrete optimal regulator requires the a priori knowledge of a mathematical model for the system of interest. Because a second-order model with transport lag is very amenable to control computations and because this type of model has been used previously to represent certain high order single input-single output processes, an adaptive controller was designed based upon adjustment of controls computed for such a model. An extended Kalman filter was utilized for tracking the model parameters which were subsequently used to update a set of optimal control gains. Favorable results were obtained in applying this procedure to the control of several examples including a ninth order nonlinear process.

  8. Modeling Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Adaptation and Diabetes in the Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Lisette A.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2017-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is an important element of energy balance and is conserved in organisms from fruit fly to mammals. Central to the control of circulating glucose levels in vertebrates are the endocrine cells of the pancreas, particularly the insulin-producing β-cells and the glucagon producing α-cells. A feature of α- and β-cells is their plasticity, an ability to adapt, in function and number as a response to physiological and pathophysiological conditions of increased hormone demand. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptive responses that maintain glucose homeostasis are incompletely defined. The zebrafish is an attractive model due to the low cost, high fecundity, and amenability to genetic and compound screens, and mechanisms governing the development of the pancreatic endocrine cells are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. Post development, both β- and α-cells of zebrafish display plasticity as in mammals. Here, we summarize the studies of pancreatic endocrine cell adaptation in zebrafish. We further explore the utility of the zebrafish as a model for diabetes, a relevant topic considering the increase in diabetes in the human population. PMID:28184214

  9. Data Assimilation in the ADAPT Photospheric Flux Transport Model

    DOE PAGES

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Godinez, Humberto C.; Henney, Carl J.; ...

    2015-03-17

    Global maps of the solar photospheric magnetic flux are fundamental drivers for simulations of the corona and solar wind and therefore are important predictors of geoeffective events. However, observations of the solar photosphere are only made intermittently over approximately half of the solar surface. The Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model uses localized ensemble Kalman filtering techniques to adjust a set of photospheric simulations to agree with the available observations. At the same time, this information is propagated to areas of the simulation that have not been observed. ADAPT implements a local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF)more » to accomplish data assimilation, allowing the covariance structure of the flux-transport model to influence assimilation of photosphere observations while eliminating spurious correlations between ensemble members arising from a limited ensemble size. We give a detailed account of the implementation of the LETKF into ADAPT. Advantages of the LETKF scheme over previously implemented assimilation methods are highlighted.« less

  10. [Analysis of the stability and adaptability of near infrared spectra qualitative analysis model].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wu; Li, Wei-jun; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Li-ping

    2014-06-01

    The stability and adaptability of model of near infrared spectra qualitative analysis were studied. Method of separate modeling can significantly improve the stability and adaptability of model; but its ability of improving adaptability of model is limited. Method of joint modeling can not only improve the adaptability of the model, but also the stability of model, at the same time, compared to separate modeling, the method can shorten the modeling time, reduce the modeling workload; extend the term of validity of model, and improve the modeling efficiency. The experiment of model adaptability shows that, the correct recognition rate of separate modeling method is relatively low, which can not meet the requirements of application, and joint modeling method can reach the correct recognition rate of 90%, and significantly enhances the recognition effect. The experiment of model stability shows that, the identification results of model by joint modeling are better than the model by separate modeling, and has good application value.

  11. Comparison of wavefront sensor models for simulation of adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwen; Enmark, Anita; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Andersen, Torben

    2009-10-26

    The new generation of extremely large telescopes will have adaptive optics. Due to the complexity and cost of such systems, it is important to simulate their performance before construction. Most systems planned will have Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Different mathematical models are available for simulation of such wavefront sensors. The choice of wavefront sensor model strongly influences computation time and simulation accuracy. We have studied the influence of three wavefront sensor models on performance calculations for a generic, adaptive optics (AO) system designed for K-band operation of a 42 m telescope. The performance of this AO system has been investigated both for reduced wavelengths and for reduced r(0) in the K band. The telescope AO system was designed for K-band operation, that is both the subaperture size and the actuator pitch were matched to a fixed value of r(0) in the K-band. We find that under certain conditions, such as investigating limiting guide star magnitude for large Strehl-ratios, a full model based on Fraunhofer propagation to the subimages is significantly more accurate. It does however require long computation times. The shortcomings of simpler models based on either direct use of average wavefront tilt over the subapertures for actuator control, or use of the average tilt to move a precalculated point spread function in the subimages are most pronounced for studies of system limitations to operating parameter variations. In the long run, efficient parallelization techniques may be developed to overcome the problem.

  12. A Comparison of Three Programming Models for Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Hong-Zhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswa, Rupak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We study the performance and programming effort for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models. We find that all three models can achieve scalable performance on the state-of-the-art multiprocessor machines. The basic parallel algorithms needed for different programming models to deliver their best performance are similar, but the implementations differ greatly, far beyond the fact of using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores. Compared with MPI and SHMEM, CC-SAS (cache-coherent shared address space) provides substantial ease of programming at the conceptual and program orchestration level, which often leads to the performance gain. However it may also suffer from the poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large number of processors. Our CC-SAS implementation of the PARMETIS partitioner itself runs faster than in the other two programming models, and generates more balanced result for our application.

  13. Prediction of Conductivity by Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Model

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, S.; Arof, A. K.; Ramesh, S.; Khanmirzaei, M. H.; Nor, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a key method for the characterizing the ionic and electronic conductivity of materials. One of the requirements of this technique is a model to forecast conductivity in preliminary experiments. The aim of this paper is to examine the prediction of conductivity by neuro-fuzzy inference with basic experimental factors such as temperature, frequency, thickness of the film and weight percentage of salt. In order to provide the optimal sets of fuzzy logic rule bases, the grid partition fuzzy inference method was applied. The validation of the model was tested by four random data sets. To evaluate the validity of the model, eleven statistical features were examined. Statistical analysis of the results clearly shows that modeling with an adaptive neuro-fuzzy is powerful enough for the prediction of conductivity. PMID:24658582

  14. A heuristic model on the role of plasticity in adaptive evolution: plasticity increases adaptation, population viability and genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Jovani, Roger

    2013-11-22

    An ongoing new synthesis in evolutionary theory is expanding our view of the sources of heritable variation beyond point mutations of fixed phenotypic effects to include environmentally sensitive changes in gene regulation. This expansion of the paradigm is necessary given ample evidence for a heritable ability to alter gene expression in response to environmental cues. In consequence, single genotypes are often capable of adaptively expressing different phenotypes in different environments, i.e. are adaptively plastic. We present an individual-based heuristic model to compare the adaptive dynamics of populations composed of plastic or non-plastic genotypes under a wide range of scenarios where we modify environmental variation, mutation rate and costs of plasticity. The model shows that adaptive plasticity contributes to the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, reduces bottlenecks when facing rapid environmental changes and confers an overall faster rate of adaptation. In fluctuating environments, plasticity is favoured by selection and maintained in the population. However, if the environment stabilizes and costs of plasticity are high, plasticity is reduced by selection, leading to genetic assimilation, which could result in species diversification. More broadly, our model shows that adaptive plasticity is a common consequence of selection under environmental heterogeneity, and hence a potentially common phenomenon in nature. Thus, taking adaptive plasticity into account substantially extends our view of adaptive evolution.

  15. Adaptive-filter models of the cerebellum: computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2008-01-01

    Many current models of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit are equivalent to an adaptive filter using the covariance learning rule. The adaptive filter is a development of the original Marr-Albus framework that deals naturally with continuous time-varying signals, thus addressing the issue of 'timing' in cerebellar function, and it can be connected in a variety of ways to other parts of the system, consistent with the microzonal organization of cerebellar cortex. However, its computational capacities are not well understood. Here we summarise the results of recent work that has focused on two of its intrinsic properties. First, an adaptive filter seeks to decorrelate its (mossy fibre) inputs from a (climbing fibre) teaching signal. This procedure can be used both for sensory processing, e.g. removal of interference from sensory signals, and for learning accurate motor commands, by decorrelating an efference copy of those commands from a sensory signal of inaccuracy. As a model of the cerebellum the adaptive filter thus forms a natural link between events at the cellular level, such as forms of synaptic plasticity and the learning rules they embody, and intelligent behaviour at the system level. Secondly, it has been shown that the covariance learning rule enables the filter to handle input and intrinsic noise optimally. Such optimality may underlie the recently described role of the cerebellum in producing accurate smooth pursuit eye movements in the face of sensory noise. Moreover, it has the consequence of driving most input weights to very small values, consistent with experimental data that many parallel-fibre synapses are normally silent. The effectiveness of silent synapses can only be altered by LTP, so learning tasks depending on a reduction of Purkinje cell firing require the synapses to be embedded in a second, inhibitory pathway from parallel fibre to Purkinje cell. This pathway and the appropriate climbing-fibre related plasticity have been described

  16. An Adaptive Complex Network Model for Brain Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gomez Portillo, Ignacio J.; Gleiser, Pablo M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain functional networks are graph representations of activity in the brain, where the vertices represent anatomical regions and the edges their functional connectivity. These networks present a robust small world topological structure, characterized by highly integrated modules connected sparsely by long range links. Recent studies showed that other topological properties such as the degree distribution and the presence (or absence) of a hierarchical structure are not robust, and show different intriguing behaviors. In order to understand the basic ingredients necessary for the emergence of these complex network structures we present an adaptive complex network model for human brain functional networks. The microscopic units of the model are dynamical nodes that represent active regions of the brain, whose interaction gives rise to complex network structures. The links between the nodes are chosen following an adaptive algorithm that establishes connections between dynamical elements with similar internal states. We show that the model is able to describe topological characteristics of human brain networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In particular, when the dynamical rules of the model allow for integrated processing over the entire network scale-free non-hierarchical networks with well defined communities emerge. On the other hand, when the dynamical rules restrict the information to a local neighborhood, communities cluster together into larger ones, giving rise to a hierarchical structure, with a truncated power law degree distribution. PMID:19738902

  17. Prequential Analysis of Complex Data with Adaptive Model Reselection.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer; Clarke, Bertrand

    2009-11-01

    In Prequential analysis, an inference method is viewed as a forecasting system, and the quality of the inference method is based on the quality of its predictions. This is an alternative approach to more traditional statistical methods that focus on the inference of parameters of the data generating distribution. In this paper, we introduce adaptive combined average predictors (ACAPs) for the Prequential analysis of complex data. That is, we use convex combinations of two different model averages to form a predictor at each time step in a sequence. A novel feature of our strategy is that the models in each average are re-chosen adaptively at each time step. To assess the complexity of a given data set, we introduce measures of data complexity for continuous response data. We validate our measures in several simulated contexts prior to using them in real data examples. The performance of ACAPs is compared with the performances of predictors based on stacking or likelihood weighted averaging in several model classes and in both simulated and real data sets. Our results suggest that ACAPs achieve a better trade off between model list bias and model list variability in cases where the data is very complex. This implies that the choices of model class and averaging method should be guided by a concept of complexity matching, i.e. the analysis of a complex data set may require a more complex model class and averaging strategy than the analysis of a simpler data set. We propose that complexity matching is akin to a bias-variance tradeoff in statistical modeling.

  18. The Role of Scale and Model Bias in ADAPT's Photospheric Eatimation

    SciTech Connect

    Godinez Vazquez, Humberto C.; Hickmann, Kyle Scott; Arge, Charles Nicholas; Henney, Carl

    2015-05-20

    The Air Force Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport model (ADAPT), is a magnetic flux propagation based on Worden-Harvey (WH) model. ADAPT would be used to provide a global photospheric map of the Earth. A data assimilation method based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a method of Monte Carlo approximation tied with Kalman filtering, is used in calculating the ADAPT models.

  19. UV clothing and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Tarbuk, Anita; Grancarić, Ana Marija; Situm, Mirna; Martinis, Mladen

    2010-04-01

    Skin cancer incidence in Croatia is steadily increasing in spite of public and governmental permanently measurements. It is clear that will soon become a major public health problem. The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The future designers of UV protective materials should be able to block totally the ultraviolet radiation. The aim of this paper is to present results of measurements concerning UV protecting ability of garments and sun-screening textiles using transmission spectrophotometer Cary 50 Solarscreen (Varian) according to AS/NZS 4399:1996; to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV radiation to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose.

  20. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of posture positions on the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y S; Fan, J T; Yu, W

    2011-03-01

    Evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing are important parameters in the design and engineering of thermal environments and functional clothing. Past work on the measurement of evaporative resistance of clothing was, however, limited to the standing posture with or without body motion. Information on the evaporative resistance of clothing when the wearer is in a sedentary or supine posture and how it is related to that when the wearer is in a standing posture is lacking. This paper presents original data on the effect of postures on the evaporative resistance of clothing, thermal insulation and permeability index, based on the measurements under three postures, viz. standing, sedentary and supine, using the sweating fabric manikin-Walter. Regression models are also established to relate the evaporative resistance and thermal insulation of clothing under sedentary and supine postures to those under the standing posture. The study further shows that the apparent evaporated resistances of standing and sedentary postures measured in the non-isothermal condition are much lower than those in the isothermal condition. The apparent evaporative resistances measured using the mass loss method are generally lower than those measured using the heat loss method due to moisture absorption or condensation within clothing. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The thermal insulation and evaporative resistance values of clothing ensembles under different postures are essential data for the ergonomics design of thermal environments (e.g. indoors or a vehicle's interior environment) and functional clothing. They are also necessary for the prediction of thermal comfort or duration of exposure in different environmental conditions.

  2. An investigation of cotton for parachute cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appel, Wm D; Worner, R K

    1931-01-01

    This is a resume of the work of the Bureau of Standards on a cotton parachute cloth for use as a substitute for silk in the event of an emergency curtailing the supply. Cotton yarn of high strength in proportion to its weight and otherwise specially suitable for parachute cloth was developed. Cloth woven from this yarn in the bureau mill was equal or superior to parachute silk in strength and tear resistance, met the requirements with respect to air permeability, and weighed only a few tenths of an ounce per square yard more than the silk cloth. Practical trials of cotton parachutes carried out by the Navy Department clearly indicate that the cotton parachute closely approaches the silk parachute in performance as to rate of descent, opening time, strength and ability to function when stored in the pack for sixty days. The increase in weight of the equipment resulting from the use of cotton cloth instead of silk is considered to be well within practicable limits. A specification for cotton parachute cloth and the way in which the requirements of the specification have been met are given. Cotton yarns suitable for parachute cloth are now being woven commercially in the United States.

  3. Unexpected behavioural consequences of preterm newborns' clothing.

    PubMed

    Durier, Virginie; Henry, Séverine; Martin, Emmanuelle; Dollion, Nicolas; Hausberger, Martine; Sizun, Jacques

    2015-03-17

    Restrictions of preterm newborns' movements could have consequences ranging from stress enhancement to impairment of their motor development. Therefore, ability to freely express motor activities appears crucial for their behavioural and physiological development. Our aim was to evaluate behavioural issues of two types of clothing used in NICU. We observed 18 healthy 34-37 post-conception week-old preterm newborns, during resting periods, when they were undisturbed by any interventions. Newborns wore either light clothing (bodysuit and a light wrapping) or heavy clothing (pyjamas, cardigan and sleep-sack). The percentages of time each subject spent in different postures were compared between clothing situations. Arm and hand postures differed in relation to clothing: babies bent their arms more and held their hands nearer their heads when in bodysuits than when in sleepwear. Consequently, babies in bodysuits spent more time touching their body or their environment whereas the others generally were touching nothing. Self-touch is an important way to comfort one's self. Heavy clothing may impair self-soothing behaviours of preterm newborn babies that already lack other forms of contact. Results suggest that more attention should be paid to apparently routine and marginal decisions such as choice of clothes.

  4. Weed seeds on clothing: a global review.

    PubMed

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity including in areas of high conservation value. Unfortunately, people may be unintentionally introducing and dispersing weed seeds on their clothing when they visit these areas. To inform the management of these areas, we conducted a systematic quantitative literature review to determine the diversity and characteristics of species with seeds that can attach and be dispersed from clothing. Across 21 studies identified from systematic literature searches on this topic, seeds from 449 species have been recorded on clothing, more than double the diversity found in a previous review. Nearly all of them, 391 species, are listed weeds in one or more countries, with 58 classified as internationally-recognised environmental weeds. When our database was compared with weed lists from different countries and continents we found that clothing can carry the seeds of important regional weeds. A total of 287 of the species are listed as aliens in one or more countries in Europe, 156 are invasive species/noxious weeds in North America, 211 are naturalized alien plants in Australia, 97 are alien species in India, 33 are invasive species in China and 5 are declared weeds/invaders in South Africa. Seeds on the clothing of hikers can be carried to an average distance of 13 km, and where people travel in cars, trains, planes and boats, the seeds on their clothing can be carried much further. Factors that affect this type of seed dispersal include the type of clothing, the type of material the clothing is made from, the number and location of the seeds on plants, and seed traits such as adhesive and attachment structures. With increasing use of protected areas by tourists, including in remote regions, popular protected areas may be at great risk of biological invasions by weeds with seeds carried on clothing.

  5. Adaptive Modeling, Engineering Analysis and Design of Advanced Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Mason, Brian H.; Hicks, Mike D.; Jones, William T.; Sleight, David W.; Chun, Julio; Spangler, Jan L.; Kamhawi, Hilmi; Dahl, Jorgen L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes initial progress towards the development and enhancement of a set of software tools for rapid adaptive modeling, and conceptual design of advanced aerospace vehicle concepts. With demanding structural and aerodynamic performance requirements, these high fidelity geometry based modeling tools are essential for rapid and accurate engineering analysis at the early concept development stage. This adaptive modeling tool was used for generating vehicle parametric geometry, outer mold line and detailed internal structural layout of wing, fuselage, skin, spars, ribs, control surfaces, frames, bulkheads, floors, etc., that facilitated rapid finite element analysis, sizing study and weight optimization. The high quality outer mold line enabled rapid aerodynamic analysis in order to provide reliable design data at critical flight conditions. Example application for structural design of a conventional aircraft and a high altitude long endurance vehicle configuration are presented. This work was performed under the Conceptual Design Shop sub-project within the Efficient Aerodynamic Shape and Integration project, under the former Vehicle Systems Program. The project objective was to design and assess unconventional atmospheric vehicle concepts efficiently and confidently. The implementation may also dramatically facilitate physics-based systems analysis for the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Mission. In addition to providing technology for design and development of unconventional aircraft, the techniques for generation of accurate geometry and internal sub-structure and the automated interface with the high fidelity analysis codes could also be applied towards the design of vehicles for the NASA Exploration and Space Science Mission projects.

  6. Adaptive modeling of compression hearing aids: Convergence and tracking issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Vijay; Jamieson, Donald

    2003-10-01

    Typical measurements of electroacoustic performance of hearing aids include frequency response, compression ratio, threshold and time constants, equivalent input noise, and total harmonic distortion. These measurements employ artificial test signals and do not relate well to perceptual indices of hearing aid performance. Speech-based electroacoustic measures provide means to quantify the real world performance of hearing aids and have been shown to correlate better with perceptual data. This paper investigates the application of system identification paradigm for deriving the speech-based measures, where the hearing aid is modeled as a linear time-varying system and its response to speech stimuli is predicted using a linear adaptive filter. The performance of three adaptive filtering algorithms, viz. the Least Mean Square (LMS), Normalized LMS, and the Affine Projection Algorithm (APA) was investigated using simulated and real digital hearing aids. In particular, the convergence and tracking behavior of these algorithms in modeling compression hearing aids was thoroughly investigated for a range of compression ratio and threshold parameters, and attack and release time constants. Our results show that the NLMS and APA algorithms are capable of modeling digital hearing aids under a variety of compression conditions, and are suitable for deriving speech-based metrics of hearing aid performance.

  7. Direct model reference adaptive control of a flexible robotic manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meldrum, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Quick, precise control of a flexible manipulator in a space environment is essential for future Space Station repair and satellite servicing. Numerous control algorithms have proven successful in controlling rigid manipulators wih colocated sensors and actuators; however, few have been tested on a flexible manipulator with noncolocated sensors and actuators. In this thesis, a model reference adaptive control (MRAC) scheme based on command generator tracker theory is designed for a flexible manipulator. Quicker, more precise tracking results are expected over nonadaptive control laws for this MRAC approach. Equations of motion in modal coordinates are derived for a single-link, flexible manipulator with an actuator at the pinned-end and a sensor at the free end. An MRAC is designed with the objective of controlling the torquing actuator so that the tip position follows a trajectory that is prescribed by the reference model. An appealing feature of this direct MRAC law is that it allows the reference model to have fewer states than the plant itself. Direct adaptive control also adjusts the controller parameters directly with knowledge of only the plant output and input signals.

  8. Parallel adaptive discontinuous Galerkin approximation for thin layer avalanche modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. K.; Nichita, C. C.; Bauer, A. C.; Pitman, E. B.; Bursik, M.; Sheridan, M. F.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes the development of highly accurate adaptive discontinuous Galerkin schemes for the solution of the equations arising from a thin layer type model of debris flows. Such flows have wide applicability in the analysis of avalanches induced by many natural calamities, e.g. volcanoes, earthquakes, etc. These schemes are coupled with special parallel solution methodologies to produce a simulation tool capable of very high-order numerical accuracy. The methodology successfully replicates cold rock avalanches at Mount Rainier, Washington and hot volcanic particulate flows at Colima Volcano, Mexico.

  9. Discrete model reference adaptive control with an augmented error signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionescu, T.; Monopoli, R.

    1975-01-01

    A method for designing discrete model reference adaptive control systems when one has access to only the plant's input and output signals is given. Controllers for single-input, single-output, nonlinear, nonautonomous plants are developed via Liapunov's second method. Anticipative values of the plant output are not required, but are replaced by signals easily obtained from a low-pass filter operating on the plant's output. The augmented error signal method is employed, ensuring finally that the normally used error signal also approaches zero asymptotically.

  10. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  11. An adaptive multigrid model for hurricane track prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a simple numerical model for hurricane track prediction which uses a multigrid method to adapt the model resolution as the vortex moves. The model is based on the modified barotropic vorticity equation, discretized in space by conservative finite differences and in time by a Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid method is used to solve an elliptic problem for the streamfunction at each time step. Nonuniform resolution is obtained by superimposing uniform grids of different spatial extent; these grids move with the vortex as it moves. Preliminary numerical results indicate that the local mesh refinement allows accurate prediction of the hurricane track with substantially less computer time than required on a single uniform grid.

  12. An Evolutionary Dynamics Model Adapted to Eusocial Insects

    PubMed Central

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Cerdá, Xim; Bernstein, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to better understand the evolutionary processes allowing species coexistence in eusocial insect communities. We develop a mathematical model that applies adaptive dynamics theory to the evolutionary dynamics of eusocial insects, focusing on the colony as the unit of selection. The model links long-term evolutionary processes to ecological interactions among colonies and seasonal worker production within the colony. Colony population dynamics is defined by both worker production and colony reproduction. Random mutations occur in strategies, and mutant colonies enter the community. The interactions of colonies at the ecological timescale drive the evolution of strategies at the evolutionary timescale by natural selection. This model is used to study two specific traits in ants: worker body size and the degree of collective foraging. For both traits, trade-offs in competitive ability and other fitness components allows to determine conditions in which selection becomes disruptive. Our results illustrate that asymmetric competition underpins diversity in ant communities. PMID:23469162

  13. An evolutionary dynamics model adapted to eusocial insects.

    PubMed

    van Oudenhove, Louise; Cerdá, Xim; Bernstein, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to better understand the evolutionary processes allowing species coexistence in eusocial insect communities. We develop a mathematical model that applies adaptive dynamics theory to the evolutionary dynamics of eusocial insects, focusing on the colony as the unit of selection. The model links long-term evolutionary processes to ecological interactions among colonies and seasonal worker production within the colony. Colony population dynamics is defined by both worker production and colony reproduction. Random mutations occur in strategies, and mutant colonies enter the community. The interactions of colonies at the ecological timescale drive the evolution of strategies at the evolutionary timescale by natural selection. This model is used to study two specific traits in ants: worker body size and the degree of collective foraging. For both traits, trade-offs in competitive ability and other fitness components allows to determine conditions in which selection becomes disruptive. Our results illustrate that asymmetric competition underpins diversity in ant communities.

  14. Multiple Model Adaptive Estimation Techniques for Adaptive Model-Based Robot Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Proportional Derivative (PD) or Propor- tional Integral Derivative (PID) feedback controller [6]. 1-1 The PD or PID controllers feedback the measured...Unfortunately, as the speed of the trajectory increases or the con- figuration of the robot changes, the PD or PID controllers cannot maintain track along the...desired trajectory. The main reason for poor tracking is that the PD and PID controllers were developed based on a simplified linear dynamics model

  15. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  16. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  17. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  18. 19 CFR 10.58 - Bolting cloths; marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... § 10.58 Bolting cloths; marking. (a) As a prerequisite to the free entry of bolting cloth for milling... expressly for milling purposes” in block letters 7.62 centimeters in height. Bolting cloths composed of silk imported expressly for milling purposes shall be considered only such cloths as are suitable for and...

  19. 28 CFR 571.22 - Release clothing and transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release clothing and transportation. 571... AND RELEASE RELEASE FROM CUSTODY Release Gratuities, Transportation, and Clothing § 571.22 Release clothing and transportation. (a) Staff shall provide release clothing appropriate for the time of year...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1720 - Protective clothing; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective clothing; requirements. 75.1720... clothing; requirements. On and after the effective date of this § 75.1720 each miner regularly employed in... clothing and devices: (a) Protective clothing or equipment and face-shields or goggles when...

  1. Distributed control in adaptive optics: deformable mirror and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Rogier; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek; Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten

    2006-06-01

    Future large optical telescopes require adaptive optics (AO) systems whose deformable mirrors (DM) have ever more degrees of freedom. This paper describes advances that are made in a project aimed to design a new AO system that is extendible to meet tomorrow's specifications. Advances on the mechanical design are reported in a companion paper [6272-75], whereas this paper discusses the controller design aspects. The numerical complexity of controller designs often used for AO scales with the fourth power in the diameter of the telescope's primary mirror. For future large telescopes this will undoubtedly become a critical aspect. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of solving this issue with a distributed controller design. A distributed framework will be introduced in which each actuator has a separate processor that can communicate with a few direct neighbors. First, the DM will be modeled and shown to be compatible with the framework. Then, adaptive turbulence models that fit the framework will be shown to adequately capture the spatio-temporal behavior of the atmospheric disturbance, constituting a first step towards a distributed optimal control. Finally, the wavefront reconstruction step is fitted into the distributed framework such that the computational complexity for each processor increases only linearly with the telescope diameter.

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Reactive Transport Modeling of Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Day, M.; Trebotich, D.; Graves, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally adjusting the resolution of computational grids. AMR makes it possible to superimpose levels of finer grids on the global computational grid in an adaptive manner allowing for more accurate calculations locally. AMR codes rely on the fundamental concept that the solution can be computed in different regions of the domain with different spatial resolutions. AMR codes have been applied to a wide range of problem including (but not limited to): fully compressible hydrodynamics, astrophysical flows, cosmological applications, combustion, blood flow, heat transfer in nuclear reactors, and land ice and atmospheric models for climate. In subsurface applications, in particular, reactive transport modeling, AMR may be particularly useful in accurately capturing concentration gradients (hence, reaction rates) that develop in localized areas of the simulation domain. Accurate evaluation of reaction rates is critical in many subsurface applications. In this contribution, we will discuss recent applications that bring to bear AMR capabilities on reactive transport problems from the pore scale to the flood plain scale.

  3. Adaptive model reduction for continuous systems via recursive rational interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, John H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for adaptive identification of reduced-order models for continuous stable SISO and MIMO plants is presented. The method recursively finds a model whose transfer function (matrix) matches that of the plant on a set of frequencies chosen by the designer. The algorithm utilizes the Moving Discrete Fourier Transform (MDFT) to continuously monitor the frequency-domain profile of the system input and output signals. The MDFT is an efficient method of monitoring discrete points in the frequency domain of an evolving function of time. The model parameters are estimated from MDFT data using standard recursive parameter estimation techniques. The algorithm has been shown in simulations to be quite robust to additive noise in the inputs and outputs. A significant advantage of the method is that it enables a type of on-line model validation. This is accomplished by simultaneously identifying a number of models and comparing each with the plant in the frequency domain. Simulations of the method applied to an 8th-order SISO plant and a 10-state 2-input 2-output plant are presented. An example of on-line model validation applied to the SISO plant is also presented.

  4. Dynamic modeling and adaptive control for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, C. H. C.; Wang, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Of all large space structural systems, space stations present a unique challenge and requirement to advanced control technology. Their operations require control system stability over an extremely broad range of parameter changes and high level of disturbances. During shuttle docking the system mass may suddenly increase by more than 100% and during station assembly the mass may vary even more drastically. These coupled with the inherent dynamic model uncertainties associated with large space structural systems require highly sophisticated control systems that can grow as the stations evolve and cope with the uncertainties and time-varying elements to maintain the stability and pointing of the space stations. The aspects of space station operational properties are first examined, including configurations, dynamic models, shuttle docking contact dynamics, solar panel interaction, and load reduction to yield a set of system models and conditions. A model reference adaptive control algorithm along with the inner-loop plant augmentation design for controlling the space stations under severe operational conditions of shuttle docking, excessive model parameter errors, and model truncation are then investigated. The instability problem caused by the zero-frequency rigid body modes and a proposed solution using plant augmentation are addressed. Two sets of sufficient conditions which guarantee the globablly asymptotic stability for the space station systems are obtained.

  5. Adaptive control using neural networks and approximate models.

    PubMed

    Narendra, K S; Mukhopadhyay, S

    1997-01-01

    The NARMA model is an exact representation of the input-output behavior of finite-dimensional nonlinear discrete-time dynamical systems in a neighborhood of the equilibrium state. However, it is not convenient for purposes of adaptive control using neural networks due to its nonlinear dependence on the control input. Hence, quite often, approximate methods are used for realizing the neural controllers to overcome computational complexity. In this paper, we introduce two classes of models which are approximations to the NARMA model, and which are linear in the control input. The latter fact substantially simplifies both the theoretical analysis as well as the practical implementation of the controller. Extensive simulation studies have shown that the neural controllers designed using the proposed approximate models perform very well, and in many cases even better than an approximate controller designed using the exact NARMA model. In view of their mathematical tractability as well as their success in simulation studies, a case is made in this paper that such approximate input-output models warrant a detailed study in their own right.

  6. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  7. Modelling interactions between mitigation, adaptation and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, D. E.; Siabatto, F. A. P.; Garcia Cantu Ros, A.; Pape, C.; Lissner, T.; Kropp, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Managing the interdependence of climate mitigation, adaptation and sustainable development requires a good understanding of the dominant socioecological processes that have determined the pathways in the past. Key variables include water and food availability which depend on climate and overall ecosystem services, as well as energy supply and social, political and economic conditions. We present our initial steps to build a system dynamic model of nations that represents a minimal set of relevant variables of the socio- ecological development. The ultimate goal of the modelling exercise is to derive possible future scenarios and test those for their compatibility with sustainability boundaries. Where dynamics go beyond sustainability boundaries intervention points in the dynamics can be searched.

  8. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  9. Direct model reference adaptive control of robotic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Howard; Swift, David C.; Cummings, Steven T.; Shankey, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    The results of controlling A PUMA 560 Robotic Manipulator and the NASA shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) using a Command Generator Tracker (CGT) based Model Reference Adaptive Controller (DMRAC) are presented. Initially, the DMRAC algorithm was run in simulation using a detailed dynamic model of the PUMA 560. The algorithm was tuned on the simulation and then used to control the manipulator using minimum jerk trajectories as the desired reference inputs. The ability to track a trajectory in the presence of load changes was also investigated in the simulation. Satisfactory performance was achieved in both simulation and on the actual robot. The obtained responses showed that the algorithm was robust in the presence of sudden load changes. Because these results indicate that the DMRAC algorithm can indeed be successfully applied to the control of robotic manipulators, additional testing was performed to validate the applicability of DMRAC to simulated dynamics of the shuttle RMS.

  10. Efficient Plasma Ion Source Modeling With Adaptive Mesh Refinement (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Vay, J.L.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    2005-03-15

    Ion beam drivers for high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research require high brightness beams, so there is little margin of error allowed for aberration at the emitter. Thus, accurate plasma ion source computer modeling is required to model the plasma sheath region and time-dependent effects correctly.A computer plasma source simulation module that can be used with a powerful heavy ion fusion code, WARP, or as a standalone code, is being developed. In order to treat the plasma sheath region accurately and efficiently, the module will have the capability of handling multiple spatial scale problems by using Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR). We will report on our progress on the project.

  11. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a wheelchair) because of such disability and such disability is the loss or loss of use of a hand or... wheelchair. (b) Effective August 1, 1972, the initial lump sum clothing allowance is due and payable...

  12. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.36 Protective clothing. Personnel in areas where there are flying particles, molten metal, radiant energy,...

  13. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.36 Protective clothing. Personnel in areas where there are flying particles, molten metal, radiant energy,...

  14. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.36 Protective clothing. Personnel in areas where there are flying particles, molten metal, radiant energy,...

  15. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment § 142.36 Protective clothing. Personnel in areas where there are flying particles, molten metal, radiant energy,...

  16. FLUORESCENT TRACER EVALUATION OF PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies evaluating chemical protective clothing (CPC), which is often employed as a primary control option to reduce occupational exposures during pesticide applications, are limited. This study, supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was designed to...

  17. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research concerning the reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems is reported. The adaptive control strategy was chosen for investigation in the annular momentum control device. It is noted, that if there is no observation spill over, and no model errors, an indirect adaptive control strategy can be globally stable. Recent publications concerning adaptive control are included.

  18. A new adaptive data transfer library for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Li; Yang, Guangwen; Li, Ruizhe; Wang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Data transfer means transferring data fields from a sender to a receiver. It is a fundamental and frequently used operation of a coupler. Most versions of state-of-the-art couplers currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the message passing interface (MPI) (referred to as "P2P implementation" hereafter). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation when the parallel decompositions of the sender and the receiver are different, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and high number of MPI messages, as well as network contention. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation outperforms the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance when the sender and the receiver have similar parallel decompositions or when the number of processes used for running models is small. To ensure data transfer with optimal performance, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. As the adaptive data transfer library automatically uses the best implementation for data transfer, it outperforms the P2P implementation in many cases while it does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now, the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into the C-Coupler1 coupler for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that other couplers can also benefit from this.

  19. The relationship between environmental temperature and clothing insulation across a year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, JuYoun; Choi, Jeongwha

    2012-09-01

    People adapt to thermal environments, such as the changing seasons, predominantly by controlling the amount of clothing insulation, usually in the form of the clothing that they wear. The aim of this study was to determine the actual daily clothing insulation on sedentary human subjects across the seasons. Thirteen females and seven males participated in experiments from January to December in a thermal chamber. Adjacent months were grouped in pairs to give six environmental conditions: (1) January/February = 5°C; (2) March/April = 14°C; (3) May/June = 25°C; (4) July/August = 29°C; (5) September/October = 23°C; (6) November/December = 8°C. Humidity(45 ± 5%) and air velocity(0.14 ± 0.01 m/s) were constant across all six experimental conditions. Participants put on their own clothing that allowed them to achieve thermal comfort for each air temperature, and sat for 60 min (1Met). The clothing insulation (clo) required by these participants had a significant relationship with air temperature: insulation was reduced as air temperature increased. The range of clothing insulation for each condition was 1.87-3.14 clo at 5°C(Jan/Feb), 1.62-2.63 clo at 14°C(Mar/Apr), 0.87-1.59 clo at 25°C(May/Jun), 0.4-1.01 clo at 29°C(Jul/Aug), 0.92-1.81 clo at 23°C (Sept/Oct), and 2.12-3.09 clo at 8°C(Nov/Dec) for females, and 1.84-2.90 clo at 5°C, 1.52-1.98 clo at 14°C, 1.04-1.23 clo at 25°C, 0.51-1.30 clo at 29°C, 0.82-1.45 clo at 23°C and 1.96-3.53 clo at 8°C for males. The hypothesis was that thermal insulation of free living clothing worn by sedentary Korean people would vary across seasons. For Korean people, a comfortable air temperature with clothing insulation of 1 clo was approximately 27°C. This is greater than the typical comfort temperature for 1 clo. It was also found that women clearly increased their clothing insulation level of their clothing as winter approached but did not decrease it by the same amount when spring came.

  20. The relationship between environmental temperature and clothing insulation across a year.

    PubMed

    Kwon, JuYoun; Choi, Jeongwha

    2012-09-01

    People adapt to thermal environments, such as the changing seasons, predominantly by controlling the amount of clothing insulation, usually in the form of the clothing that they wear. The aim of this study was to determine the actual daily clothing insulation on sedentary human subjects across the seasons. Thirteen females and seven males participated in experiments from January to December in a thermal chamber. Adjacent months were grouped in pairs to give six environmental conditions: (1) January/February = 5°C; (2) March/April = 14°C; (3) May/June = 25°C; (4) July/August = 29°C; (5) September/October = 23°C; (6) November/December = 8°C. Humidity(45 ± 5%) and air velocity(0.14 ± 0.01 m/s) were constant across all six experimental conditions. Participants put on their own clothing that allowed them to achieve thermal comfort for each air temperature, and sat for 60 min (1Met). The clothing insulation (clo) required by these participants had a significant relationship with air temperature: insulation was reduced as air temperature increased. The range of clothing insulation for each condition was 1.87-3.14 clo at 5°C(Jan/Feb), 1.62-2.63 clo at 14°C(Mar/Apr), 0.87-1.59 clo at 25°C(May/Jun), 0.4-1.01 clo at 29°C(Jul/Aug), 0.92-1.81 clo at 23°C (Sept/Oct), and 2.12-3.09 clo at 8°C(Nov/Dec) for females, and 1.84-2.90 clo at 5°C, 1.52-1.98 clo at 14°C, 1.04-1.23 clo at 25°C, 0.51-1.30 clo at 29°C, 0.82-1.45 clo at 23°C and 1.96-3.53 clo at 8°C for males. The hypothesis was that thermal insulation of free living clothing worn by sedentary Korean people would vary across seasons. For Korean people, a comfortable air temperature with clothing insulation of 1 clo was approximately 27°C. This is greater than the typical comfort temperature for 1 clo. It was also found that women clearly increased their clothing insulation level of their clothing as winter approached but did not decrease it by the same amount when spring came.

  1. Adapting a weather forecast model for greenhouse gas simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polavarapu, S. M.; Neish, M.; Tanguay, M.; Girard, C.; de Grandpré, J.; Gravel, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Chan, D.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to simulate greenhouse gases on the global domain is useful for providing boundary conditions for regional flux inversions, as well as for providing reference data for bias correction of satellite measurements. Given the existence of operational weather and environmental prediction models and assimilation systems at Environment Canada, it makes sense to use these tools for greenhouse gas simulations. In this work, we describe the adaptations needed to reasonably simulate CO2 with a weather forecast model. The main challenges were the implementation of a mass conserving advection scheme, and the careful implementation of a mixing ratio defined with respect to dry air. The transport of tracers through convection was also added, and the vertical mixing through the boundary layer was slightly modified. With all these changes, the model conserves CO2 mass well on the annual time scale, and the high resolution (0.9 degree grid spacing) permits a good description of synoptic scale transport. The use of a coupled meteorological/tracer transport model also permits an assessment of approximations needed in offline transport model approaches, such as the neglect of water vapour mass when computing a tracer mixing ratio with respect to dry air.

  2. Cloth colorization caused by microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuki; Ohta, Jun; Ishida, Yoshiki; Morisaki, Hisao

    2008-07-15

    In this study, cloth disfeaturement was investigated biologically. To clarify whether or not microbes can cause cloth disfeaturement, and to identify the microbes causing the disfeaturement, worn cloth samples were incubated on sweat-ingredient agar medium. Non-sterilized cloth samples became yellow-colored during incubation, and bacterial strains belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus were isolated from the yellow-colored parts. Two major isolates close to the genera Bacillus and Micrococcus were inoculated separately or together on cloth samples to examine whether or not these isolates can cause colorization. When the isolate close to Micrococcus was inoculated on its own or mixed with the isolate close to Bacillus, the samples turned yellow to a greater extent and a biofilm-like structure was observed by SEM on the colored areas. In contrast, the isolate close to Bacillus alone barely caused any colorization, and no biofilm-like structure was observed. From the yellow-colored samples, bacterial strains with the same 16S rRNA gene sequences as those of the inoculated strains were re-isolated. These results strongly suggest that the bacterial strain belonging to genus Micrococcus causes cloth colorization by forming a biofilm structure.

  3. Shooting through clothing in firearm suicides.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr; Safr, Miroslav

    2010-05-01

    There is a longstanding empirical rule that people who commit suicide rarely shoot through their clothing, but rather put it aside to expose the nude skin. Signs of shots through clothing have always been considered suspicious, raising presumptions of the presence of an abettor. Our report, based on a retrospective study of fatal suicidal firearm injuries from the years 1980 to 2007, points out that suicide victims only rarely remove clothing from the site of the future entry wound. The report covered 43 cases with fatal gunshot wounds in the area of the thorax, with only four persons (9%) removing the clothing present in the area of the subsequent self-inflicted wound. Defects present on the clothing of a victim cannot, therefore, be understood as an absolute criterion for disproving the possibility of suicide, and nor do they necessarily indicate an unfortunate accident or homicide. If, however, the suicide victim removes the clothing from the area of the future wound, then this is almost always an indication of suicide.

  4. Thermal response properties of protective clothing fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baitinger, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    In the industrial workplace, it becomes increasingly incumbent upon employers to require employees to use suitable protective equipment and to wear protective apparel. When workers may be subjected to accidental radiant, flame, or electric arc heat sources, work clothing should be used that does not become involved in burning. It is axiomatic that work clothing should not become a primary fuel source, adding to the level of heat exposure, since clothing is usually in intimate contact with the skin. Further, clothing should provide sufficient insulation to protect the skin from severe burn injury. If the worker receives such protection from clothing, action then may be taken to escape the confronted thermal hazard. Published laboratory test methods are used to measure flame resistance and thermal responses of flame resistant fabrics in protective clothing. The purpose of this article is to review these test methods, to discuss certain limitations in application, and to suggest how flame resistant cotton fabrics may be used to enhance worker safety.

  5. Roy’s Adaptation Model-Guided Education and Promoting the Adaptation of Veterans With Lower Extremities Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Azarmi, Somayeh; Farsi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Any defect in extremities of the body can affect different life aspects. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-guided education on promoting the adaptation of veterans with lower extremities amputation. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 veterans with lower extremities amputation referring to Kowsar Orthotics and Prosthetics Center of veterans clinic in Tehran, Iran, were recruited with convenience method and were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during 2013 - 2014. For data collection, Roy’s adaptation model questionnaire was used. After completing the questionnaires in both groups, maladaptive behaviors were determined in the intervention group and an education program based on Roy’s adaptation model was implemented. After two months, both groups completed the questionnaires again. Data was analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Independent t-test showed statistically significant differences between the two groups in the post-test stage in terms of the total score of adaptation (P = 0.001) as well as physiologic (P = 0.0001) and role function modes (P = 0.004). The total score of adaptation (139.43 ± 5.45 to 127.54 ± 14.55, P = 0.006) as well as the scores of physiologic (60.26 ± 5.45 to 53.73 ± 7.79, P = 0.001) and role function (20.30 ± 2.42 to 18.13 ± 3.18, P = 0.01) modes in the intervention group significantly increased, whereas the scores of self-concept (42.10 ± 4.71 to 39.40 ± 5.67, P = 0.21) and interdependence (16.76 ± 2.22 to 16.30 ± 2.57, P = 0.44) modes in the two stages did not have a significant difference. Conclusions: Findings of this research indicated that the Roy’s adaptation model-guided education promoted the adaptation level of physiologic and role function modes in veterans with lower extremities amputation. However, this intervention could not promote adaptation in self-concept and interdependence modes. More

  6. An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new genefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Francino, M. Pilar

    2004-10-18

    The evolution of new gene functions is one of the keys to evolutionary innovation. Most novel functions result from gene duplication followed by divergence. However, the models hitherto proposed to account for this process are not fully satisfactory. The classic model of neofunctionalization holds that the two paralogous gene copies resulting from a duplication are functionally redundant, such that one of them can evolve under no functional constraints and occasionally acquire a new function. This model lacks a convincing mechanism for the new gene copies to increase in frequency in the population and survive the mutational load expected to accumulate under neutrality, before the acquisition of the rare beneficial mutations that would confer new functionality. The subfunctionalization model has been proposed as an alternative way to generate genes with altered functions. This model also assumes that new paralogous gene copies are functionally redundant and therefore neutral, but it predicts that relaxed selection will affect both gene copies such that some of the capabilities of the parent gene will disappear in one of the copies and be retained in the other. Thus, the functions originally present in a single gene will be partitioned between the two descendant copies. However, although this model can explain increases in gene number, it does not really address the main evolutionary question, which is the development of new biochemical capabilities. Recently, a new concept has been introduced into the gene evolution literature which is most likely to help solve this dilemma. The key point is to allow for a period of natural selection for the duplication per se, before new function evolves, rather than considering gene duplication to be neutral as in the previous models. Here, I suggest a new model that draws on the advantage of postulating selection for gene duplication, and proposes that bursts of adaptive gene amplification in response to specific selection

  7. A Universal Model of Giftedness--An Adaptation of the Munich Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessurun, J. H.; Shearer, C. B.; Weggeman, M. C. D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Munich Model of Giftedness (MMG) by Heller and his colleagues, developed for the identification of gifted children, is adapted and expanded, with the aim of making it more universally usable as a model for the pathway from talents to performance. On the side of the talent-factors, the concept of multiple intelligences is introduced, and the…

  8. Turnaround Management Strategies: The Adaptive Model and the Constructive Model. ASHE 1983 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen E.

    The use of two management strategies by 14 liberal arts and comprehensive colleges attempting to recover from serious financial decline during 1973-1976 were studied. The adaptive model of strategy, based on resource dependence, involves managing demands in order to satisfy critical-resource providers. The constructive model of strategy, based on…

  9. Tsunami modelling with adaptively refined finite volume methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeVeque, R.J.; George, D.L.; Berger, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modelling of transoceanic tsunami propagation, together with the detailed modelling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions, poses a number of algorithmic challenges. The depth-averaged shallow water equations can be used to reduce this to a time-dependent problem in two space dimensions, but even so it is crucial to use adaptive mesh refinement in order to efficiently handle the vast differences in spatial scales. This must be done in a 'wellbalanced' manner that accurately captures very small perturbations to the steady state of the ocean at rest. Inundation can be modelled by allowing cells to dynamically change from dry to wet, but this must also be done carefully near refinement boundaries. We discuss these issues in the context of Riemann-solver-based finite volume methods for tsunami modelling. Several examples are presented using the GeoClaw software, and sample codes are available to accompany the paper. The techniques discussed also apply to a variety of other geophysical flows. ?? 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  10. The National Astronomy Consortium - An Adaptable Model for OAD?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and Associated Universities Inc., (AUI) in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP), and a number of minority and majority universities to increase the numbers of students from underrepresented groups and those otherwise overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM or STEM-related careers. The seed for the NAC was a partnership between NRAO and Howard University which began with an exchange of a few summer students five years ago. Since then the NAC has grown tremendously. Today the NAC aims to host between 4 to 5 cohorts nationally in an innovative model in which the students are mentored throughout the year with multiple mentors and peer mentoring, continued engagement in research and professional development / career training throughout the academic year and throughout their careers.The NAC model has already shown success and is a very promising and innovative model for increasing participation of young people in STEM and STEM-related careers. I will discuss how this model could be adapted in various countries at all levels of education.

  11. Adaptive elastic networks as models of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    The thermodynamics and dynamics of supercooled liquids correlate with their elasticity. In particular for covalent networks, the jump of specific heat is small and the liquid is strong near the threshold valence where the network acquires rigidity. By contrast, the jump of specific heat and the fragility are large away from this threshold valence. In a previous work [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 6307 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1300534110], we could explain these behaviors by introducing a model of supercooled liquids in which local rearrangements interact via elasticity. However, in that model the disorder characterizing elasticity was frozen, whereas it is itself a dynamic variable in supercooled liquids. Here we study numerically and theoretically adaptive elastic network models where polydisperse springs can move on a lattice, thus allowing for the geometry of the elastic network to fluctuate and evolve with temperature. We show numerically that our previous results on the relationship between structure and thermodynamics hold in these models. We introduce an approximation where redundant constraints (highly coordinated regions where the frustration is large) are treated as an ideal gas, leading to analytical predictions that are accurate in the range of parameters relevant for real materials. Overall, these results lead to a description of supercooled liquids, in which the distance to the rigidity transition controls the number of directions in phase space that cost energy and the specific heat.

  12. Preliminary Exploration of Adaptive State Predictor Based Human Operator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    Control-theoretic modeling of the human operator dynamic behavior in manual control tasks has a long and rich history. In the last two decades, there has been a renewed interest in modeling the human operator. There has also been significant work on techniques used to identify the pilot model of a given structure. The purpose of this research is to attempt to go beyond pilot identification based on collected experimental data and to develop a predictor of pilot behavior. An experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of changing aircraft dynamics on an operator s ability to track a signal in order to eventually model a pilot adapting to changing aircraft dynamics. A gradient descent estimator and a least squares estimator with exponential forgetting used these data to predict pilot stick input. The results indicate that individual pilot characteristics and vehicle dynamics did not affect the accuracy of either estimator method to estimate pilot stick input. These methods also were able to predict pilot stick input during changing aircraft dynamics and they may have the capability to detect a change in a subject due to workload, engagement, etc., or the effects of changes in vehicle dynamics on the pilot.

  13. Relationship between clothing ventilation and thermal insulation.

    PubMed

    Bouskill, L M; Havenith, G; Kuklane, K; Parsons, K C; Withey, W R

    2002-01-01

    Air layers trapped within a clothing microenvironment contribute to the thermal insulation afforded by the ensemble. Any exchange of air between the external environment and these trapped air layers results in a change in the ensemble's thermal insulation and water vapor resistance characteristics. These effects are seldom taken into account when considering the effects of clothing on human heat balance, the thermal characteristics usually being restricted to intrinsic insulation and intrinsic evaporative resistance measurements on static manikins. Environmental assessments based on these measurements alone may therefore lead to under-(or over-) estimation of thermal stress of the worker. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between clothing ventilation and thermal insulation properties. A one-layer, air-impermeable ensemble and a three-layer, air-permeable ensemble were tested using an articulated, thermal manikin in a controlled climate chamber (ta = tr = 10 degrees C, PaH2O = 0.73 kPa). The manikin, which was designed for thermal insulation measurements, was also equipped with a system to determine clothing ventilation. Baseline measurements of clothing ventilation (VT) and thermal insulation (total clothing insulation: I(T)--measured, intrinsic insulation: Icl--calculated) were made of the clothing with the manikin standing stationary in still air conditions. Increased clothing ventilation was induced when the manikin "walked" (walking speeds of 0.37 m/sec and 0.77 m/sec) and by increasing the environmental air speed (Va = 1.0 m/sec). These increases in VT reduced Icl, this being ascribed to the increased heat transfer from the manikin skin surface to the cooler external environment due to the exchange of air between the clothing microenvironment and the external environment. Measured air exchanges were shown to have a potential heat exchange capacity of up to 17 and 161 W/m2 for the one- and three-layer ensembles, respectively, emphasizing

  14. Modeling the behavioral substrates of associate learning and memory - Adaptive neural models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chuen-Chien

    1991-01-01

    Three adaptive single-neuron models based on neural analogies of behavior modification episodes are proposed, which attempt to bridge the gap between psychology and neurophysiology. The proposed models capture the predictive nature of Pavlovian conditioning, which is essential to the theory of adaptive/learning systems. The models learn to anticipate the occurrence of a conditioned response before the presence of a reinforcing stimulus when training is complete. Furthermore, each model can find the most nonredundant and earliest predictor of reinforcement. The behavior of the models accounts for several aspects of basic animal learning phenomena in Pavlovian conditioning beyond previous related models. Computer simulations show how well the models fit empirical data from various animal learning paradigms.

  15. Thermal modeling and adaptive control of scan welding

    SciTech Connect

    Doumanidis, C.C.

    1998-11-01

    This article introduces scan welding as a redesign of classical joining methods, employing automation technology to ensure the overall geometric, material and mechanical integrity of the joint. This is obtained by real-time control of the welding temperature field by a proper dynamic heat input distribution on the weld surface. This distribution is implemented in scan welding by a single torch, sweeping the joint surface by a controlled reciprocating motion, and power adjusted by feedback of infrared temperature measurements in-process. An off-line numerical simulation of the thermal field in scan welding is established, as well as a linearized multivariable model with real-time parameter identification. An adaptive thermal control scheme is thus implemented and validated--both computationally and experimentally on a robotic plasma arc welding (PAW) station. The resulting thermal features related to the generated material structure and properties of the joint are finally analyzed in scan welding tests and simulations.

  16. Rao-Blackwellization for Adaptive Gaussian Sum Nonlinear Model Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semper, Sean R.; Crassidis, John L.; George, Jemin; Mukherjee, Siddharth; Singla, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    When dealing with imperfect data and general models of dynamic systems, the best estimate is always sought in the presence of uncertainty or unknown parameters. In many cases, as the first attempt, the Extended Kalman filter (EKF) provides sufficient solutions to handling issues arising from nonlinear and non-Gaussian estimation problems. But these issues may lead unacceptable performance and even divergence. In order to accurately capture the nonlinearities of most real-world dynamic systems, advanced filtering methods have been created to reduce filter divergence while enhancing performance. Approaches, such as Gaussian sum filtering, grid based Bayesian methods and particle filters are well-known examples of advanced methods used to represent and recursively reproduce an approximation to the state probability density function (pdf). Some of these filtering methods were conceptually developed years before their widespread uses were realized. Advanced nonlinear filtering methods currently benefit from the computing advancements in computational speeds, memory, and parallel processing. Grid based methods, multiple-model approaches and Gaussian sum filtering are numerical solutions that take advantage of different state coordinates or multiple-model methods that reduced the amount of approximations used. Choosing an efficient grid is very difficult for multi-dimensional state spaces, and oftentimes expensive computations must be done at each point. For the original Gaussian sum filter, a weighted sum of Gaussian density functions approximates the pdf but suffers at the update step for the individual component weight selections. In order to improve upon the original Gaussian sum filter, Ref. [2] introduces a weight update approach at the filter propagation stage instead of the measurement update stage. This weight update is performed by minimizing the integral square difference between the true forecast pdf and its Gaussian sum approximation. By adaptively updating

  17. Scale Adaptive Simulation Model for the Darrieus Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowski, K.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Maroński, R.; Lichota, P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of aerodynamic loads for the Darrieus wind turbine using more or less complex aerodynamic models is still a challenge. One of the problems is the small amount of experimental data available to validate the numerical codes. The major objective of the present study is to examine the scale adaptive simulation (SAS) approach for performance analysis of a one-bladed Darrieus wind turbine working at a tip speed ratio of 5 and at a blade Reynolds number of 40 000. The three-dimensional incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are used. Numerical results of aerodynamic loads and wake velocity profiles behind the rotor are compared with experimental data taken from literature. The level of agreement between CFD and experimental results is reasonable.

  18. From dysfunction to adaptation: an interactionist model of dependency.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to clinical lore, a dependent personality style is associated with active as well as passive behavior and may be adaptive in certain contexts (e.g., in fostering compliance with medical and psychotherapeutic treatment regimens). The cognitive/interactionist model conceptualizes dependency-related responding in terms of four components: (a) motivational (a marked need for guidance, support, and approval from others); (b) cognitive (a perception of oneself as powerless and ineffectual); (c) affective (a tendency to become anxious when required to function autonomously); and (d) behavioral (use of diverse self-presentation strategies to strengthen ties to potential caregivers). Clinicians' understanding of the etiology and dynamics of dependency has improved substantially in recent years; current challenges include delineating useful subtypes of dependency, developing valid symptom criteria for Dependent Personality Disorder in DSM-5 and beyond, and working effectively with dependent patients in the age of managed care.

  19. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, Kevin L.; Baum, Christopher C.; Jones, Roger D.

    1997-01-01

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data.

  20. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    DOEpatents

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  1. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  2. Apparent latent heat of evaporation from clothing: attenuation and "heat pipe" effects.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Richards, Mark G; Wang, Xiaoxin; Bröde, Peter; Candas, Victor; den Hartog, Emiel; Holmér, Ingvar; Kuklane, Kalev; Meinander, Harriet; Nocker, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Investigating claims that a clothed person's mass loss does not always represent their evaporative heat loss (EVAP), a thermal manikin study was performed measuring heat balance components in more detail than human studies would permit. Using clothing with different levels of vapor permeability and measuring heat losses from skin controlled at 34 degrees C in ambient temperatures of 10, 20, and 34 degrees C with constant vapor pressure (1 kPa), additional heat losses from wet skin compared with dry skin were analyzed. EVAP based on mass loss (E(mass)) measurement and direct measurement of the extra heat loss by the manikin due to wet skin (E(app)) were compared. A clear discrepancy was observed. E(mass) overestimated E(app) in warm environments, and both under and overestimations were observed in cool environments, depending on the clothing vapor permeability. At 34 degrees C, apparent latent heat (lambda(app)) of pure evaporative cooling was lower than the physical value (lambda; 2,430 J/g) and reduced with increasing vapor resistance up to 45%. At lower temperatures, lambda(app) increases due to additional skin heat loss via evaporation of moisture that condenses inside the clothing, analogous to a heat pipe. For impermeable clothing, lambda(app) even exceeds lambda by four times that value at 10 degrees C. These findings demonstrate that the traditional way of calculating evaporative heat loss of a clothed person can lead to substantial errors, especially for clothing with low permeability, which can be positive or negative, depending on the climate and clothing type. The model presented explains human subject data on EVAP that previously seemed contradictive.

  3. A photoviscoplastic model for photoactivated covalent adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Mu, Xiaoming; Bowman, Christopher N.; Sun, Youyi; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry; Fang, Daining

    2014-10-01

    Light activated polymers (LAPs) are a class of contemporary materials that when irradiated with light respond with mechanical deformation. Among the different molecular mechanisms of photoactuation, here we study radical induced bond exchange reactions (BERs) that alter macromolecular chains through an addition-fragmentation process where a free chain whose active end group attaches then breaks a network chain. Thus the BER yields a polymer with a covalently adaptable network. When a LAP sample is loaded, the macroscopic consequence of BERs is stress relaxation and plastic deformation. Furthermore, if light penetration through the sample is nonuniform, resulting in nonuniform stress relaxation, the sample will deform after unloading in order to achieve equilibrium. In the past, this light activation mechanism was modeled as a phase evolution process where chain addition-fragmentation process was considered as a phase transformation between stressed phases and newly-born phases that are undeformed and stress free at birth. Such a modeling scheme describes the underlying physics with reasonable fidelity but is computationally expensive. In this paper, we propose a new approach where the BER induced macromolecular network alteration is modeled as a viscoplastic deformation process, based on the observation that stress relaxation due to light irradiation is a time-dependent process similar to that in viscoelastic solids with an irrecoverable deformation after light irradiation. This modeling concept is further translated into a finite deformation photomechanical constitutive model. The rheological representation of this model is a photoviscoplastic element placed in series with a standard linear solid model in viscoelasticity. A two-step iterative implicit scheme is developed for time integration of the two time-dependent elements. We carry out a series of experiments to determine material parameters in our model as well as to validate the performance of the model in

  4. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  5. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z.; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  6. European Cloth and “Tropical” Skin:

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    As Britain’s imperial and colonial ambitions intensified toward the end of the nineteenth century, the preservation of white European health in tropical climates became an increasingly important concern. Since at least the seventeenth century, the “tropics” had been seen as spaces holding vast potential wealth but also death and disease. To combat these deadly but desirable landscapes, the British built a considerable commodity culture around the preservation of white European health, and for many, tropical clothing was one of the most important and essential items in their “kits.” This article investigates the composition and use of such clothing in relation to British ideas of health and hygiene in tropical climates. First, it considers debates that ensued over the best material—wool, cotton, linen, silk, or a combination of these materials—and the role of “black” skin and local practice in the development of tropical clothing. Second, it demonstrates the importance of location in any discussion of tropical medicine and hygiene, and the tension and ambiguity that still surrounded British ideas of health and hygiene in the tropical colonies. Third, it argues that tropical clothing was important in the maintenance of climatic etiologies despite advances in parasitology and sanitary science. Finally, it considers the relationship of tropical clothing to the formation of a unique colonial identity. To British men and women embarking for any number of tropical destinations, proper clothing was not a banal and mundane component of their outfitting. For many, the clothing signified a departure from the safe and “civil” climes of Britain for adventure in the expanding tropical empire. PMID:19801795

  7. Role of clothes in sun protection.

    PubMed

    Gambichler, Thilo; Altmeyer, Peter; Hoffmann, Klauss

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the carcinogenic factor in sunlight. Damage to skin cells from repeated UV exposure can lead to the development of skin cancer. Apart from avoidance of the sun, the most frequently used form of UV protection has been the application of sunscreens. The use of textiles as a means of sun protection has been underrated in previous educational campaigns, even though suitable clothing offers usually simple and effective broadband protection against the sun. Apart from skin cancer formation, exacerbation of photosensitive disorders and premature skin aging could be prevented by suitable UV-protective clothing. Nevertheless, several studies have recently shown that, contrary to popular opinion, some textiles provide only limited UV protection. It has been found that one-third of commercial summer clothing items provide a UV protection factor (UPF) less than 15. Given the increasing interest in sun protection, recreationally and occupationally, test methods and a rating scheme for clothing were needed that would ensure sufficient UV protection. Various textile parameters have an influence on the UPF of a finished garment. Important parameters are the fabric porosity, type, color, weight and thickness. The application of UV absorbers into the yarns significantly improves the UPF of a garment. Under the conditions of wear and use several factors can alter the UV-protective properties of a textile, e.g., stretch, wetness and laundering. The use of UV-blocking cloths can provide excellent protection against the hazards of sunlight; this is especially true for garments manufactured as UV-protective clothing. However, further educational efforts are necessary to change people's sun behavior and raise awareness for the use of adequate sun-protective clothing.

  8. Workload Model Based Dynamic Adaptation of Social Internet of Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alam, Kazi Masudul; Saini, Mukesh; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2015-09-15

    Social Internet of Things (SIoT) has gained much interest among different research groups in recent times. As a key member of a smart city, the vehicular domain of SIoT (SIoV) is also undergoing steep development. In the SIoV, vehicles work as sensor-hub to capture surrounding information using the in-vehicle and Smartphone sensors and later publish them for the consumers. A cloud centric cyber-physical system better describes the SIoV model where physical sensing-actuation process affects the cloud based service sharing or computation in a feedback loop or vice versa. The cyber based social relationship abstraction enables distributed, easily navigable and scalable peer-to-peer communication among the SIoV subsystems. These cyber-physical interactions involve a huge amount of data and it is difficult to form a real instance of the system to test the feasibility of SIoV applications. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to measure the workloads of various subsystems involved in the SIoV process. We present the basic model which is further extended to incorporate complex scenarios. We provide extensive simulation results for different parameter settings of the SIoV system. The findings of the analyses are further used to design example adaptation strategies for the SIoV subsystems which would foster deployment of intelligent transport systems.

  9. Workload Model Based Dynamic Adaptation of Social Internet of Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Kazi Masudul; Saini, Mukesh; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2015-01-01

    Social Internet of Things (SIoT) has gained much interest among different research groups in recent times. As a key member of a smart city, the vehicular domain of SIoT (SIoV) is also undergoing steep development. In the SIoV, vehicles work as sensor-hub to capture surrounding information using the in-vehicle and Smartphone sensors and later publish them for the consumers. A cloud centric cyber-physical system better describes the SIoV model where physical sensing-actuation process affects the cloud based service sharing or computation in a feedback loop or vice versa. The cyber based social relationship abstraction enables distributed, easily navigable and scalable peer-to-peer communication among the SIoV subsystems. These cyber-physical interactions involve a huge amount of data and it is difficult to form a real instance of the system to test the feasibility of SIoV applications. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to measure the workloads of various subsystems involved in the SIoV process. We present the basic model which is further extended to incorporate complex scenarios. We provide extensive simulation results for different parameter settings of the SIoV system. The findings of the analyses are further used to design example adaptation strategies for the SIoV subsystems which would foster deployment of intelligent transport systems. PMID:26389905

  10. A Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Controller for a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) architecture for a generic transport aircraft. At its core, this architecture features a three-axis, non-linear, dynamic-inversion controller. Command inputs for this baseline controller are provided by pilot roll-rate, pitch-rate, and sideslip commands. This paper will first thoroughly present the baseline controller followed by a description of the PMRAC adaptive augmentation to this control system. Results are presented via a full-scale, nonlinear simulation of NASA s Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  11. Thermal-chemical Mantle Convection Models With Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Zhong, S.

    2008-12-01

    In numerical modeling of mantle convection, resolution is often crucial for resolving small-scale features. New techniques, adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), allow local mesh refinement wherever high resolution is needed, while leaving other regions with relatively low resolution. Both computational efficiency for large- scale simulation and accuracy for small-scale features can thus be achieved with AMR. Based on the octree data structure [Tu et al. 2005], we implement the AMR techniques into the 2-D mantle convection models. For pure thermal convection models, benchmark tests show that our code can achieve high accuracy with relatively small number of elements both for isoviscous cases (i.e. 7492 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements) and for temperature-dependent viscosity cases (i.e. 14620 AMR elements v.s. 65536 uniform elements). We further implement tracer-method into the models for simulating thermal-chemical convection. By appropriately adding and removing tracers according to the refinement of the meshes, our code successfully reproduces the benchmark results in van Keken et al. [1997] with much fewer elements and tracers compared with uniform-mesh models (i.e. 7552 AMR elements v.s. 16384 uniform elements, and ~83000 tracers v.s. ~410000 tracers). The boundaries of the chemical piles in our AMR code can be easily refined to the scales of a few kilometers for the Earth's mantle and the tracers are concentrated near the chemical boundaries to precisely trace the evolvement of the boundaries. It is thus very suitable for our AMR code to study the thermal-chemical convection problems which need high resolution to resolve the evolvement of chemical boundaries, such as the entrainment problems [Sleep, 1988].

  12. A regional adaptive and assimilative three-dimensional ionospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Dario; Scotto, Carlo; Sgrigna, Vittorio

    2016-03-01

    A regional adaptive and assimilative three-dimensional (3D) ionospheric model is proposed. It is able to ingest real-time data from different ionosondes, providing the ionospheric bottomside plasma frequency fp over the Italian area. The model is constructed on the basis of empirical values for a set of ionospheric parameters Pi[base] over the considered region, some of which have an assigned variation ΔPi. The values for the ionospheric parameters actually observed at a given time at a given site will thus be Pi = Pi[base] + ΔPi. These Pi values are used as input for an electron density N(h) profiler. The latter is derived from the Advanced Ionospheric Profiler (AIP), which is software used by Autoscala as part of the process of automatic inversion of ionogram traces. The 3D model ingests ionosonde data by minimizing the root-mean-square deviation between the observed and modeled values of fp(h) profiles obtained from the associated N(h) values at the points where observations are available. The ΔPi values are obtained from this minimization procedure. The 3D model is tested using data collected at the ionospheric stations of Rome (41.8N, 12.5E) and Gibilmanna (37.9N, 14.0E), and then comparing the results against data from the ionospheric station of San Vito dei Normanni (40.6N, 18.0E). The software developed is able to produce maps of the critical frequencies foF2 and foF1, and of fp at a fixed altitude, with transverse and longitudinal cross-sections of the bottomside ionosphere in a color scale. fp(h) and associated simulated ordinary ionogram traces can easily be produced for any geographic location within the Italian region. fp values within the volume in question can also be provided.

  13. Proximal and Distal Influences on Development: The Model of Developmental Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Peter; Martin, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Presents a model of developmental adaptation that explains the process of adaptation to life stress on the basis of adverse childhood events and paternal care, and internal and external resources available for adaptation to current life events. The appraisal of past and current events, as well as coping behaviors, are hypothesized to influence the…

  14. Adaptation to mechanical load determines shape and properties of heart and circulation: the CircAdapt model.

    PubMed

    Arts, Theo; Delhaas, Tammo; Bovendeerd, Peter; Verbeek, Xander; Prinzen, Frits W

    2005-04-01

    With circulatory pathology, patient-specific simulation of hemodynamics is required to minimize invasiveness for diagnosis, treatment planning, and followup. We investigated the advantages of a smart combination of often already known hemodynamic principles. The CircAdapt model was designed to simulate beat-to-beat dynamics of the four-chamber heart with systemic and pulmonary circulation while incorporating a realistic relation between pressure-volume load and tissue mechanics and adaptation of tissues to mechanical load. Adaptation was modeled by rules, where a locally sensed signal results in a local action of the tissue. The applied rules were as follows: For blood vessel walls, 1) flow shear stress dilates the wall and 2) tensile stress thickens the wall; for myocardial tissue, 3) strain dilates the wall material, 4) larger maximum sarcomere length increases contractility, and 5) contractility increases wall mass. The circulation was composed of active and passive compliances and inertias. A realistic circulation developed by self-structuring through adaptation provided mean levels of systemic pressure and flow. Ability to simulate a wide variety of patient-specific circumstances was demonstrated by application of the same adaptation rules to the conditions of fetal circulation followed by a switch to the newborn circulation around birth. It was concluded that a few adaptation rules, directed to normalize mechanical load of the tissue, were sufficient to develop and maintain a realistic circulation automatically. Adaptation rules appear to be the key to reduce dramatically the number of input parameters for simulating circulation dynamics. The model may be used to simulate circulation pathology and to predict effects of treatment.

  15. Clothing choices, weight, and trait self-objectification.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Marika; Andrew, Rachel

    2012-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the link between clothing choice and aspects of body image. Participants were 112 female undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire containing a measure of clothing functions, as well as BMI, self-classified weight, and trait self-objectification. Results indicated that BMI and self-classified weight were positively correlated with the choice of clothes for camouflage. Self-objectification was positively correlated with choice of clothes for fashion, and negatively correlated with choosing clothes for comfort. It was concluded that clothing represents an important but neglected aspect of contemporary women's management of their body's appearance.

  16. Radioactive contamination incidents involving protective clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Reichelt, R.; Clay, M.; Eichorst, J.

    1996-10-01

    The study focuses on incidents at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involving the migration of radioactive contaminants through protective clothing. The authors analyzed 68 occurrence reports for the following factors: (1) type of work; (2) working conditions; (3) type of anti-contamination (anti-C) material; (4) area of body or clothing contaminated; and (5) nature of spread of contamination. A majority of reports identified strenuous work activities such as maintenance, construction, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects. The reports also indicated adverse working conditions that included hot and humid or cramped work environments. The type of anti-C clothing most often identified was cotton or water-resistant, disposable clothing. Most of the reports also indicated contaminants migrating through perspiration-soaked areas, typically in the knees and forearms. On the basis of their survey, the authors recommend the use of improved engineering controls and resilient, breathable, waterproof protective clothing for work in hot, humid, or damp areas where the possibility of prolonged contact with contamination cannot be easily avoided or controlled.

  17. Beyond Reactive Planning: Self Adaptive Software and Self Modeling Software in Predictive Deliberation Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    13th ICCRTS “C2 for Complex Endeavors” Title of Paper: Beyond Reactive Planning: Self Adaptive Software and Self Modeling Software in...Adaptive Software and Self Modeling Software in Predictive Deliberation Management 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...space. We present the following hypothesis: predictive deliberation management using self adapting and self modeling software will be required to provide

  18. An adaptive Gaussian model for satellite image deblurring.

    PubMed

    Jalobeanu, André; Blanc-Féraud, Laure; Zerubia, Josiane

    2004-04-01

    The deconvolution of blurred and noisy satellite images is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be regularized within a Bayesian context by using an a priori model of the reconstructed solution. Since real satellite data show spatially variant characteristics, we propose here to use an inhomogeneous model. We use the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to estimate its parameters and we show that the MLE computed on the corrupted image is not suitable for image deconvolution because it is not robust to noise. We then show that the estimation is correct only if it is made from the original image. Since this image is unknown, we need to compute an approximation of sufficiently good quality to provide useful estimation results. Such an approximation is provided by a wavelet-based deconvolution algorithm. Thus, a hybrid method is first used to estimate the space-variant parameters from this image and then to compute the regularized solution. The obtained results on high resolution satellite images simultaneously exhibit sharp edges, correctly restored textures, and a high SNR in homogeneous areas, since the proposed technique adapts to the local characteristics of the data.

  19. Adaptive Texture Synthesis for Large Scale City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despine, G.; Colleu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Large scale city models textured with aerial images are well suited for bird-eye navigation but generally the image resolution does not allow pedestrian navigation. One solution to face this problem is to use high resolution terrestrial photos but it requires huge amount of manual work to remove occlusions. Another solution is to synthesize generic textures with a set of procedural rules and elementary patterns like bricks, roof tiles, doors and windows. This solution may give realistic textures but with no correlation to the ground truth. Instead of using pure procedural modelling we present a method to extract information from aerial images and adapt the texture synthesis to each building. We describe a workflow allowing the user to drive the information extraction and to select the appropriate texture patterns. We also emphasize the importance to organize the knowledge about elementary pattern in a texture catalogue allowing attaching physical information, semantic attributes and to execute selection requests. Roofs are processed according to the detected building material. Façades are first described in terms of principal colours, then opening positions are detected and some window features are computed. These features allow selecting the most appropriate patterns from the texture catalogue. We experimented this workflow on two samples with 20 cm and 5 cm resolution images. The roof texture synthesis and opening detection were successfully conducted on hundreds of buildings. The window characterization is still sensitive to the distortions inherent to the projection of aerial images onto the facades.

  20. Attitude determination using an adaptive multiple model filtering Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Quang; Ray, Surendra N.

    1995-01-01

    Attitude determination has been considered as a permanent topic of active research and perhaps remaining as a forever-lasting interest for spacecraft system designers. Its role is to provide a reference for controls such as pointing the directional antennas or solar panels, stabilizing the spacecraft or maneuvering the spacecraft to a new orbit. Least Square Estimation (LSE) technique was utilized to provide attitude determination for the Nimbus 6 and G. Despite its poor performance (estimation accuracy consideration), LSE was considered as an effective and practical approach to meet the urgent need and requirement back in the 70's. One reason for this poor performance associated with the LSE scheme is the lack of dynamic filtering or 'compensation'. In other words, the scheme is based totally on the measurements and no attempts were made to model the dynamic equations of motion of the spacecraft. We propose an adaptive filtering approach which employs a bank of Kalman filters to perform robust attitude estimation. The proposed approach, whose architecture is depicted, is essentially based on the latest proof on the interactive multiple model design framework to handle the unknown of the system noise characteristics or statistics. The concept fundamentally employs a bank of Kalman filter or submodel, instead of using fixed values for the system noise statistics for each submodel (per operating condition) as the traditional multiple model approach does, we use an on-line dynamic system noise identifier to 'identify' the system noise level (statistics) and update the filter noise statistics using 'live' information from the sensor model. The advanced noise identifier, whose architecture is also shown, is implemented using an advanced system identifier. To insure the robust performance for the proposed advanced system identifier, it is also further reinforced by a learning system which is implemented (in the outer loop) using neural networks to identify other unknown

  1. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  2. Adaptive invasive species distribution models: A framework for modeling incipient invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uden, Daniel R.; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.; Corral, Lucia; Fricke, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of species distribution model(s) (SDM) for approximating, explaining, and predicting changes in species’ geographic locations is increasingly promoted for proactive ecological management. Although frameworks for modeling non-invasive species distributions are relatively well developed, their counterparts for invasive species—which may not be at equilibrium within recipient environments and often exhibit rapid transformations—are lacking. Additionally, adaptive ecological management strategies address the causes and effects of biological invasions and other complex issues in social-ecological systems. We conducted a review of biological invasions, species distribution models, and adaptive practices in ecological management, and developed a framework for adaptive, niche-based, invasive species distribution model (iSDM) development and utilization. This iterative, 10-step framework promotes consistency and transparency in iSDM development, allows for changes in invasive drivers and filters, integrates mechanistic and correlative modeling techniques, balances the avoidance of type 1 and type 2 errors in predictions, encourages the linking of monitoring and management actions, and facilitates incremental improvements in models and management across space, time, and institutional boundaries. These improvements are useful for advancing coordinated invasive species modeling, management and monitoring from local scales to the regional, continental and global scales at which biological invasions occur and harm native ecosystems and economies, as well as for anticipating and responding to biological invasions under continuing global change.

  3. ADAPT: A Developmental, Asemantic, and Procedural Model for Transcoding From Verbal to Arabic Numerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Camos, Valerie; Perruchet, Pierre; Seron, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a new model of transcoding numbers from verbal to arabic form. This model, called ADAPT, is developmental, asemantic, and procedural. The authors' main proposal is that the transcoding process shifts from an algorithmic strategy to the direct retrieval from memory of digital forms. Thus, the model is evolutive, adaptive, and…

  4. Use of Time Information in Models behind Adaptive System for Building Fluency in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rihák, Jirí

    2015-01-01

    In this work we introduce the system for adaptive practice of foundations of mathematics. Adaptivity of the system is primarily provided by selection of suitable tasks, which uses information from a domain model and a student model. The domain model does not use prerequisites but works with splitting skills to more concrete sub-skills. The student…

  5. Adaptive Error Estimation in Linearized Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chechelnitsky, Michael Y.

    1999-01-01

    Data assimilation methods are routinely used in oceanography. The statistics of the model and measurement errors need to be specified a priori. This study addresses the problem of estimating model and measurement error statistics from observations. We start by testing innovation based methods of adaptive error estimation with low-dimensional models in the North Pacific (5-60 deg N, 132-252 deg E) to TOPEX/POSEIDON (TIP) sea level anomaly data, acoustic tomography data from the ATOC project, and the MIT General Circulation Model (GCM). A reduced state linear model that describes large scale internal (baroclinic) error dynamics is used. The methods are shown to be sensitive to the initial guess for the error statistics and the type of observations. A new off-line approach is developed, the covariance matching approach (CMA), where covariance matrices of model-data residuals are "matched" to their theoretical expectations using familiar least squares methods. This method uses observations directly instead of the innovations sequence and is shown to be related to the MT method and the method of Fu et al. (1993). Twin experiments using the same linearized MIT GCM suggest that altimetric data are ill-suited to the estimation of internal GCM errors, but that such estimates can in theory be obtained using acoustic data. The CMA is then applied to T/P sea level anomaly data and a linearization of a global GFDL GCM which uses two vertical modes. We show that the CMA method can be used with a global model and a global data set, and that the estimates of the error statistics are robust. We show that the fraction of the GCM-T/P residual variance explained by the model error is larger than that derived in Fukumori et al.(1999) with the method of Fu et al.(1993). Most of the model error is explained by the barotropic mode. However, we find that impact of the change in the error statistics on the data assimilation estimates is very small. This is explained by the large

  6. (Solar clothes dryer and wastewater heat exchanger). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, B.F.

    1984-12-04

    The first project investigated the technical possibilities of adapting a domestic electric clothes dryer to utilize solar-heated water as the heat source, replacing electric resistance heat. The second project attempted to extract wastewater heat from a commercial dishwasher to preheat fresh water to be used in the next dish washing cycle. It is felt that the clothes dryer project has met all of intended goals. Although a solar application has some real-world practical problems, the application of a dryer connected directly to the home heating system will prove to be cost-beneficial over the life of a dryer. The additional cost of a heat exchanger is not excessive, and the installation cost, if installed with the initial house plumbing is less than $100. From a practical point of view, the complexity of installing a wastewater heat extracter is considered impractical. The environment in which such equipment must operate is difficult at best, and most restaurants prefer to maintain as simple an operation as possible. If problems were to occur in this type of equipment, the kitchen would effectively be crippled. In conclusion, further research in the concept is not recommended. Recent advances in commercial dishwashers have also considerably reduced the heat losses which accompanied equipment only a few years old.

  7. Saccade adaptation as a model of learning in voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yoshiki; Kaku, Yuki

    2010-07-01

    Motor learning ensures the accuracy of our daily movements. However, we know relatively little about its mechanisms, particularly for voluntary movements. Saccadic eye movements serve to bring the image of a visual target precisely onto the fovea. Their accuracy is maintained not by on-line sensory feedback but by a learning mechanism, called saccade adaptation. Recent studies on saccade adaptation have provided valuable additions to our knowledge of motor learning. This review summarizes what we know about the characteristics and neural mechanisms of saccade adaptation, emphasizing recent findings and new ideas. Long-term adaptation, distinct from its short-term counterpart, seems to be present in the saccadic system. Accumulating evidence indicates the involvement of the oculomotor cerebellar vermis as a learning site. The superior colliculus is now suggested not only to generate saccade commands but also to issue driving signals for motor learning. These and other significant contributions have advanced our understanding of saccade adaptation and motor learning in general.

  8. Otzi, the iceman and his leather clothes.

    PubMed

    Püntener, Alois G; Moss, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Over 5000 years ago, a man climbed up to the icy heights of the glacier in South Tyrol, Italy and died. He was found by accident in 1991, with his clothes and equipment, mummified and frozen: an archaeological sensation and a unique snapshot of a Copper Age man. For several years highly specialised research teams have examined the mummy and all accompanying items. This paper describes how fur and leather clothes of the iceman could have been tanned. Details of the analytical tests undertaken on the 5000 year old leather samples and what they revealed are presented.

  9. Chemical scavenging of post-consumed clothes.

    PubMed

    Barot, Amit A; Sinha, Vijay Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Aiming toward the rectification of fiber grade PET waste accumulation as well as recycling and providing a technically viable route leading to preservation of the natural resources and environment, the post consumed polyester clothes were chemically recycled. Post consumed polyester clothes were recycled into bis(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate (BHET) monomer in the presence of ethylene glycol as depolymerising agent and zinc acetate as catalyst. Depolymerized product was characterized by chemical as well as analytical techniques. The fiber grade PET was eventually converted into BHET monomer with nearly 90% yield by employing 1% catalyst concentration and at optimum temperature of 180°C without mechanical input of stirring condition.

  10. Self-contained clothing system provides protection against hazardous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Self-contained clothing system protects personnel against hazardous environments. The clothing has an environmental control system and a complete protection envelope consisting of an outer garment, inner garment, underwear, boots, gloves, and helmet.

  11. The Radio Language Arts Project: adapting the radio mathematics model.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P R

    1985-01-01

    Kenya's Radio Language Arts Project, directed by the Academy for Educational Development in cooperation with the Kenya Institute of Education in 1980-85, sought to teach English to rural school children in grades 1-3 through use of an intensive, radio-based instructional system. Daily 1/2 hour lessons are broadcast throughout the school year and supported by teachers and print materials. The project further was aimed at testing the feasibility of adaptation of the successful Nicaraguan Radio Math Project to a new subject area. Difficulties were encountered in articulating a language curriculum with the precision required for a media-based instructional system. Also a challenge was defining the acceptable regional standard for pronunciation and grammar; British English was finally selected. An important modification of the Radio Math model concerned the role of the teacher. While Radio Math sought to reduce the teacher's responsibilities during the broadcast, Radio Language Arts teachers played an important instructional role during the English lesson broadcasts by providing translation and checks on work. Evaluations of the Radio language Arts Project suggest significant gains in speaking, listening, and reading skills as well as high levels of satisfaction on the part of parents and teachers.

  12. Modeling Cooperative Threads to Project GPU Performance for Adaptive Parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jiayuan; Uram, Thomas; Morozov, Vitali A.; Vishwanath, Venkatram; Kumaran, Kalyan

    2015-01-01

    Most accelerators, such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and vector processors, are particularly suitable for accelerating massively parallel workloads. On the other hand, conventional workloads are developed for multi-core parallelism, which often scale to only a few dozen OpenMP threads. When hardware threads significantly outnumber the degree of parallelism in the outer loop, programmers are challenged with efficient hardware utilization. A common solution is to further exploit the parallelism hidden deep in the code structure. Such parallelism is less structured: parallel and sequential loops may be imperfectly nested within each other, neigh boring inner loops may exhibit different concurrency patterns (e.g. Reduction vs. Forall), yet have to be parallelized in the same parallel section. Many input-dependent transformations have to be explored. A programmer often employs a larger group of hardware threads to cooperatively walk through a smaller outer loop partition and adaptively exploit any encountered parallelism. This process is time-consuming and error-prone, yet the risk of gaining little or no performance remains high for such workloads. To reduce risk and guide implementation, we propose a technique to model workloads with limited parallelism that can automatically explore and evaluate transformations involving cooperative threads. Eventually, our framework projects the best achievable performance and the most promising transformations without implementing GPU code or using physical hardware. We envision our technique to be integrated into future compilers or optimization frameworks for autotuning.

  13. Adaptable Information Models in the Global Change Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, B.; Buddenberg, A.; Aulenbach, S.; Wolfe, R.; Goldstein, J.

    2014-12-01

    The US Global Change Research Program has sponsored the creation of the Global Change Information System () to provide a web based source of accessible, usable, and timely information about climate and global change for use by scientists, decision makers, and the public. The GCIS played multiple roles during the assembly and release of the Third National Climate Assessment. It provided human and programmable interfaces, relational and semantic representations of information, and discrete identifiers for various types of resources, which could then be manipulated by a distributed team with a wide range of specialties. The GCIS also served as a scalable backend for the web based version of the report. In this talk, we discuss the infrastructure decisions made during the design and deployment of the GCIS, as well as ongoing work to adapt to new types of information. Both a constrained relational database and an open ended triple store are used to ensure data integrity while maintaining fluidity. Using natural primary keys allows identifiers to propagate through both models. Changing identifiers are accomodated through fine grained auditing and explicit mappings to external lexicons. A practical RESTful API is used whose endpoints are also URIs in an ontology. Both the relational schema and the ontology are maleable, and stability is ensured through test driven development and continuous integration testing using modern open source techniques. Content is also validated through continuous testing techniques. A high degres of scalability is achieved through caching.

  14. Distinguishing Models of Professional Development: The Case of an Adaptive Model's Impact on Teachers' Knowledge, Instruction, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koellner, Karen; Jacobs, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We posit that professional development (PD) models fall on a continuum from highly adaptive to highly specified, and that these constructs provide a productive way to characterize and distinguish among models. The study reported here examines the impact of an adaptive mathematics PD model on teachers' knowledge and instructional practices as well…

  15. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  16. Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, James Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    Background The prenatal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory neurons allows nutrients and human pheromones to alter GnRH pulsatility, which modulates the concurrent maturation of the neuroendocrine, reproductive, and central nervous systems, thus influencing the development of ingestive behavior, reproductive sexual behavior, and other behaviors. Methods This model details how chemical ecology drives adaptive evolution via: (1) ecological niche construction, (2) social niche construction, (3) neurogenic niche construction, and (4) socio-cognitive niche construction. This model exemplifies the epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal conditioning, which alters genetically predisposed, nutrient-dependent, hormone-driven mammalian behavior and choices for pheromones that control reproduction via their effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) and systems biology. Results Nutrients are metabolized to pheromones that condition behavior in the same way that food odors condition behavior associated with food preferences. The epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal input calibrate and standardize molecular mechanisms for genetically predisposed receptor-mediated changes in intracellular signaling and stochastic gene expression in GnRH neurosecretory neurons of brain tissue. For example, glucose and pheromones alter the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH and LH. A form of GnRH associated with sexual orientation in yeasts links control of the feedback loops and developmental processes required for nutrient acquisition, movement, reproduction, and the diversification of species from microbes to man. Conclusion An environmental drive evolved from that of nutrient ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of pheromone-controlled socialization in insects. In mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on pheromone-controlled sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent reproductively fit individuals

  17. Fantastic animals as an experimental model to teach animal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Roberto; Baraldi, Laura; Calzolai, Caterina; Pini, Lorenza; Veronesi, Paola; Pederzoli, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    Background Science curricula and teachers should emphasize evolution in a manner commensurate with its importance as a unifying concept in science. The concept of adaptation represents a first step to understand the results of natural selection. We settled an experimental project of alternative didactic to improve knowledge of organism adaptation. Students were involved and stimulated in learning processes by creative activities. To set adaptation in a historic frame, fossil records as evidence of past life and evolution were considered. Results The experimental project is schematized in nine phases: review of previous knowledge; lesson on fossils; lesson on fantastic animals; planning an imaginary world; creation of an imaginary animal; revision of the imaginary animals; adaptations of real animals; adaptations of fossil animals; and public exposition. A rubric to evaluate the student's performances is reported. The project involved professors and students of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia and of the "G. Marconi" Secondary School of First Degree (Modena, Italy). Conclusion The educational objectives of the project are in line with the National Indications of the Italian Ministry of Public Instruction: knowledge of the characteristics of living beings, the meanings of the term "adaptation", the meaning of fossils, the definition of ecosystem, and the particularity of the different biomes. At the end of the project, students will be able to grasp particular adaptations of real organisms and to deduce information about the environment in which the organism evolved. This project allows students to review previous knowledge and to form their personalities. PMID:17767729

  18. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines.

    PubMed

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  19. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines

    PubMed Central

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines. PMID:23408775

  20. 20 CFR 670.640 - Are students provided with clothing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are students provided with clothing? 670.640...) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Student Support § 670.640 Are students provided with clothing? Yes, Job Corps students are provided cash clothing allowances and/or articles...

  1. 20 CFR 670.640 - Are students provided with clothing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are students provided with clothing? 670.640...) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Student Support § 670.640 Are students provided with clothing? Yes, Job Corps students are provided cash clothing allowances and/or articles...

  2. 20 CFR 670.640 - Are students provided with clothing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are students provided with clothing? 670.640...) THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Student Support § 670.640 Are students provided with clothing? Yes, Job Corps students are provided cash clothing allowances and/or articles...

  3. 20 CFR 670.640 - Are students provided with clothing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are students provided with clothing? 670.640... CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Student Support § 670.640 Are students provided with clothing? Yes, Job Corps students are provided cash clothing allowances and/or articles of...

  4. 20 CFR 670.640 - Are students provided with clothing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are students provided with clothing? 670.640... CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Student Support § 670.640 Are students provided with clothing? Yes, Job Corps students are provided cash clothing allowances and/or articles of...

  5. 10 CFR 429.21 - Residential clothes dryers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Residential clothes dryers. 429.21 Section 429.21 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.21 Residential clothes dryers. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to clothes dryers; and...

  6. 10 CFR 429.21 - Residential clothes dryers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Residential clothes dryers. 429.21 Section 429.21 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.21 Residential clothes dryers. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to clothes dryers; and...

  7. 10 CFR 429.21 - Residential clothes dryers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Residential clothes dryers. 429.21 Section 429.21 Energy... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.21 Residential clothes dryers. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to clothes dryers; and...

  8. 28 CFR 551.7 - Bathing and clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bathing and clothing. 551.7 Section 551.7... Grooming § 551.7 Bathing and clothing. Each inmate must observe the standards concerning bathing and clothing that exist in the institution as required by standards of § 551.1....

  9. 33 CFR 150.614 - When is protective clothing required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When is protective clothing... SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: OPERATIONS Workplace Safety and Health Clothing § 150.614 When is protective clothing required? The deepwater port operator must ensure that...

  10. Alcohol Promotional Clothing Items and Alcohol Use by Underage Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.

    2003-01-01

    Of 154 female and 106 male adolescents, 76.3% had tried alcohol; more than 36% owned alcohol promotional clothing and more than half had seen such clothing at school. Ownership increased with alcohol use status. Those who received such clothing from their parents were more likely to perceive parental approval of their drinking. (Contains 59…

  11. [Resources on Clothing for Persons with Special Needs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    P.R.I.D.E. Foundation, Inc., Groton, CT.

    The resource guide to the modification of clothing for disabled individuals suggests solutions to clothing, grooming, and home management problems for a variety of handicapping conditions. Services of PRIDE (Promote Real Independence for the Disabled and Elderly) are noted, including manuals on clothing for the disabled, a workshop, a curriculum…

  12. 30 CFR 77.1710 - Protective clothing; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... footwear. (f) Snug-fitting clothing when working around moving machinery or equipment. (g) Safety belts and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective clothing; requirements. 77.1710... COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 77.1710 Protective clothing; requirements. Each employee working in...

  13. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  14. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  15. 46 CFR 153.933 - Chemical protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical protective clothing. 153.933 Section 153.933... § 153.933 Chemical protective clothing. When table 1 refers to this section, the following apply: (a) The master shall ensure that the following chemical protective clothing constructed of...

  16. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for...

  17. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for...

  18. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for...

  19. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for...

  20. 7 CFR 58.225 - Clothing and shoe covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clothing and shoe covers. 58.225 Section 58.225 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....225 Clothing and shoe covers. Clean clothing and shoe covers shall be provided exclusively for...

  1. A Hybrid Acoustic and Pronunciation Model Adaptation Approach for Non-native Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoo Rhee; Kim, Hong Kook

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid model adaptation approach in which pronunciation and acoustic models are adapted by incorporating the pronunciation and acoustic variabilities of non-native speech in order to improve the performance of non-native automatic speech recognition (ASR). Specifically, the proposed hybrid model adaptation can be performed at either the state-tying or triphone-modeling level, depending at which acoustic model adaptation is performed. In both methods, we first analyze the pronunciation variant rules of non-native speakers and then classify each rule as either a pronunciation variant or an acoustic variant. The state-tying level hybrid method then adapts pronunciation models and acoustic models by accommodating the pronunciation variants in the pronunciation dictionary and by clustering the states of triphone acoustic models using the acoustic variants, respectively. On the other hand, the triphone-modeling level hybrid method initially adapts pronunciation models in the same way as in the state-tying level hybrid method; however, for the acoustic model adaptation, the triphone acoustic models are then re-estimated based on the adapted pronunciation models and the states of the re-estimated triphone acoustic models are clustered using the acoustic variants. From the Korean-spoken English speech recognition experiments, it is shown that ASR systems employing the state-tying and triphone-modeling level adaptation methods can relatively reduce the average word error rates (WERs) by 17.1% and 22.1% for non-native speech, respectively, when compared to a baseline ASR system.

  2. Command generator tracker based direct model reference adaptive control of a PUMA 560 manipulator. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This project dealt with the application of a Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control algorithm to the control of a PUMA 560 Robotic Manipulator. This chapter will present some motivation for using Direct Model Reference Adaptive Control, followed by a brief historical review, the project goals, and a summary of the subsequent chapters.

  3. A Context-Adaptive Teacher Training Model in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Min; Chiang, Feng Kuang; Jiang, Ya Na; Yu, Sheng Quan

    2017-01-01

    In view of the discrepancies in teacher training and teaching practice, this paper put forward a context-adaptive teacher training model in a ubiquitous learning (u-learning) environment. The innovative model provides teachers of different subjects with adaptive and personalized learning content in a u-learning environment, implements intra- and…

  4. A Systematic Ecological Model for Adapting Physical Activities: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a theory- and practice-based model for adapting physical activities. The ecological frame of reference includes Dynamic and Action System Theory, World Health Organization International Classification of Function and Disability, and Adaptation Theory. A systematic model is presented addressing (a) the task objective, (b) task…

  5. Manikin measurements versus wear trials of cold protective clothing (Subzero project).

    PubMed

    Meinander, Harriet; Anttonen, Hannu; Bartels, Volkmar; Holmér, Ingvar; Reinertsen, Randi E; Soltynski, Krzysztof; Varieras, Sabine

    2004-09-01

    The thermal insulation properties of clothing systems can be defined through physical measurements using thermal manikins or through wear trials using human test subjects. One objective of the European Subzero project was to define the relationship between physically measured thermal insulation values of cold-protective clothing and the corresponding physiological reactions on human test subjects. Four cold-protective clothing ensembles, intended for use in temperatures between 0 and -50 degrees C, were measured with manikins in eight European laboratories and on human test subjects in four of these laboratories. The results showed that reasonably good reproducible values from the manikin tests can be achieved (CV < 8%); however, the fit of the clothing on the manikin is a critical factor. There were greater individual differences in the wear trial results. Comparing the results from the manikin and the wear trials, good agreement in the thermal insulation values was shown if the amount of accumulated sweat was low. In these situations, which are normal when using cold protective clothing, the thermal comfort can also be determined with good accuracy by means of mathematical models based on manikin results. Special situations, e.g. for highly perspiring wearers, strong wind, or high friction between garment layers, need specific modelling; some suggestions have been made as a result of the Subzero project, but further research is required.

  6. Dry and wet heat transfer through clothing dependent on the clothing properties under cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark G M; Rossi, René; Meinander, Harriet; Broede, Peter; Candas, Victor; den Hartog, Emiel; Holmér, Ingvar; Nocker, Wolfgang; Havenith, George

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of moisture on the heat transfer through clothing in relation to the water vapour resistance, type of underwear, location of the moisture and climate. This forms part of the work performed for work package 2 of the European Union THERMPROTECT project. Thermal manikin results of dry and wet heat loss are presented from different laboratories for a range of 2-layer clothing with similar dry insulations but different water vapour permeabilities and absorptive properties. The results obtained from the different manikins are generally consistent with each other. For each climate, total wet heat loss is predominately dependent on the permeability of the outer layer. At 10 degrees C, the apparent evaporative heat loss is markedly higher than expected from evaporation alone (measured at 34 degrees C), which is attributed to condensation within the clothing and to increased conductivity of the wet clothing layers.

  7. Design of Low Complexity Model Reference Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Johnson, Marcus; Nguyen, Nhan

    2012-01-01

    Flight research experiments have demonstrated that adaptive flight controls can be an effective technology for improving aircraft safety in the event of failures or damage. However, the nonlinear, timevarying nature of adaptive algorithms continues to challenge traditional methods for the verification and validation testing of safety-critical flight control systems. Increasingly complex adaptive control theories and designs are emerging, but only make testing challenges more difficult. A potential first step toward the acceptance of adaptive flight controllers by aircraft manufacturers, operators, and certification authorities is a very simple design that operates as an augmentation to a non-adaptive baseline controller. Three such controllers were developed as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration flight research experiment to determine the appropriate level of complexity required to restore acceptable handling qualities to an aircraft that has suffered failures or damage. The controllers consist of the same basic design, but incorporate incrementally-increasing levels of complexity. Derivations of the controllers and their adaptive parameter update laws are presented along with details of the controllers implementations.

  8. 38 CFR 3.810 - Clothing allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear... appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair) which tends to wear or tear clothing; or (B) A... allowance for each prosthetic or orthopedic appliance (including, but not limited to, a wheelchair)...

  9. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    subjective feelings of thermal comfort and temperature sensation were examined. Under many conditions that Navy cold weather clothing items are worn, it...is not practical to expect that the optimal level of thermal comfort can be obtained. Allowing for a moderate level of cold sensation and thermal

  10. Clothing Services: Coordinated Vocational Academic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    Designed for junior or senior high school students with academic, socio-economic, or other handicaps, the Coordinated Vocational-Academic Education (CVAE) Clothing Services curriculum guide is also useful in other vocational education programs. Information is presented in three sections. Section one is an overview for teacher preparation;…

  11. Protective clothing ensembles and physical employment standards.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M; Havenith, George

    2016-06-01

    Physical employment standards (PESs) exist for certain occupational groups that also require the use of protective clothing ensembles (PCEs) during their normal work. This review addresses whether these current PESs appropriately incorporate the physiological burden associated with wearing PCEs during respective tasks. Metabolic heat production increases because of wearing PCE; this increase is greater than that because of simply the weight of the clothing and can vary 2-fold among individuals. This variation negates a simple adjustment to the PES for the effect of the clothing on metabolic rate. As a result, PES testing that only simulates the weight of the clothing and protective equipment does not adequately accommodate this effect. The physiological heat strain associated with the use of PCEs is also not addressed with current PESs. Typically the selection tests of a PES lasts less than 20 min, whereas the requirement for use of PCE in the workplace may approach 1 h before cooling strategies can be employed. One option that might be considered is to construct a heat stress test that requires new recruits and incumbents to work for a predetermined duration while exposed to a warm environmental temperature while wearing the PCE.

  12. Clothing and Textiles II. Semester Course. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Harriet; And Others

    The clothing and textiles guide for a second level semester course for grades 10-12 identifies objectives and learning experiences with basic reference to developmental tasks, needs, interests, capacities, and prior learning experiences of students. It was developed for use with students who exhibited skill and a high degree of satisfaction from…

  13. Airborne phthalate partitioning to cotton clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Li, Hongwan; Mishra, Santosh; Buechlein, Melissa

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation on indoor surfaces and fabrics can increase dermal uptake and non-dietary ingestion of semi-volatile organic compounds. To better understand the potential for dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing, we measured the mass accumulation on cotton fabrics of two phthalate esters commonly identified in indoor air: diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). In 10-day chamber experiments, we observed strong air-to-cloth partitioning of these phthalates to shirts and jean material. Area-normalized partition coefficients ranged from 209 to 411 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 2850 to 6580 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. Clothing volume-normalized partition coefficients averaged 2.6 × 105 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 3.9 × 106 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. At equilibrium, we estimate that a typical set of cotton clothing can sorb DnBP from the equivalent of >10,000 m3 of indoor air, thereby substantially decreasing external mass-transfer barriers to dermal uptake. Further, we estimate that a significant fraction of a child's body burden of DnBP may come from mouthing fabric material that has been equilibrated with indoor air.

  14. The Art of African Senufo Cloth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Senufo people create paintings on hand-woven fabric using natural fibers, natural dyes made from leaves, and mud dug from the roots of trees. The fabric of the Senufo is woven in strips approximately six-to-eight inches wide, and sewn together to make a larger fabric for painting. The stylized drawings painted on the cloth are of masked…

  15. Abstract Sculptures: Wire and Plaster Cloth Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Presents a three-dimensional art project for middle-school students in which they create sculptures of plaster cloth and wire. The introduction explains that they learn about Alexander Calder, a master of using wire in art. Discusses how to make the sculptures. (CMK)

  16. 33 CFR 142.36 - Protective clothing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective clothing. 142.36 Section 142.36 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH Personal Protective Equipment §...

  17. North Carolina Clothing and Textiles Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide was developed to be used by consumer home economics teachers as a resource in planning and teaching a year-long course in clothing and textiles for high school students in North Carolina. The guide is organized in units of instruction for a first semester course and a second semester course. Each unit contains a content outline,…

  18. Statistical behaviour of adaptive multilevel splitting algorithms in simple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Joran; Simonnet, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Adaptive multilevel splitting algorithms have been introduced rather recently for estimating tail distributions in a fast and efficient way. In particular, they can be used for computing the so-called reactive trajectories corresponding to direct transitions from one metastable state to another. The algorithm is based on successive selection-mutation steps performed on the system in a controlled way. It has two intrinsic parameters, the number of particles/trajectories and the reaction coordinate used for discriminating good or bad trajectories. We investigate first the convergence in law of the algorithm as a function of the timestep for several simple stochastic models. Second, we consider the average duration of reactive trajectories for which no theoretical predictions exist. The most important aspect of this work concerns some systems with two degrees of freedom. They are studied in detail as a function of the reaction coordinate in the asymptotic regime where the number of trajectories goes to infinity. We show that during phase transitions, the statistics of the algorithm deviate significatively from known theoretical results when using non-optimal reaction coordinates. In this case, the variance of the algorithm is peaking at the transition and the convergence of the algorithm can be much slower than the usual expected central limit behaviour. The duration of trajectories is affected as well. Moreover, reactive trajectories do not correspond to the most probable ones. Such behaviour disappears when using the optimal reaction coordinate called committor as predicted by the theory. We finally investigate a three-state Markov chain which reproduces this phenomenon and show logarithmic convergence of the trajectory durations.

  19. Statistical behaviour of adaptive multilevel splitting algorithms in simple models

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland, Joran Simonnet, Eric

    2015-02-15

    Adaptive multilevel splitting algorithms have been introduced rather recently for estimating tail distributions in a fast and efficient way. In particular, they can be used for computing the so-called reactive trajectories corresponding to direct transitions from one metastable state to another. The algorithm is based on successive selection–mutation steps performed on the system in a controlled way. It has two intrinsic parameters, the number of particles/trajectories and the reaction coordinate used for discriminating good or bad trajectories. We investigate first the convergence in law of the algorithm as a function of the timestep for several simple stochastic models. Second, we consider the average duration of reactive trajectories for which no theoretical predictions exist. The most important aspect of this work concerns some systems with two degrees of freedom. They are studied in detail as a function of the reaction coordinate in the asymptotic regime where the number of trajectories goes to infinity. We show that during phase transitions, the statistics of the algorithm deviate significatively from known theoretical results when using non-optimal reaction coordinates. In this case, the variance of the algorithm is peaking at the transition and the convergence of the algorithm can be much slower than the usual expected central limit behaviour. The duration of trajectories is affected as well. Moreover, reactive trajectories do not correspond to the most probable ones. Such behaviour disappears when using the optimal reaction coordinate called committor as predicted by the theory. We finally investigate a three-state Markov chain which reproduces this phenomenon and show logarithmic convergence of the trajectory durations.

  20. Model predictive control with constraints for a nonlinear adaptive cruise control vehicle model in transition manoeuvres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zeeshan; Popov, Atanas A.; Charles, Guy

    2013-06-01

    A vehicle following control law, based on the model predictive control method, to perform transition manoeuvres (TMs) for a nonlinear adaptive cruise control (ACC) vehicle is presented in this paper. The TM controller ultimately establishes a steady-state following distance behind a preceding vehicle to avoid collision, keeping account of acceleration limits, safe distance, and state constraints. The vehicle dynamics model is for continuous-time domain and captures the real dynamics of the sub-vehicle models for steady-state and transient operations. The ACC vehicle can execute the TM successfully and achieves a steady-state in the presence of complex dynamics within the constraint boundaries.

  1. [Study on simplification of extraction kinetics model and adaptability of total flavonoids model of Scutellariae radix].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Zhang, Jin; Ni, Jian; Dong, Xiao-Xu; Xu, Meng-Jie; Dou, Hao-Ran; Shen, Ming-Rui; Yang, Bo-Di; Fu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Because of irregular shapes of Chinese herbal pieces, we simplified the previously deduced general extraction kinetic model for TCMs, and integrated particle diameters of Chinese herbs that had been hard to be determined in the final parameter "a". The reduction of the direct determination of particle diameters of Chinese herbs was conducive to increase the accuracy of the model, expand the application scope of the model, and get closer to the actual production conditions. Finally, a simplified model was established, with its corresponding experimental methods and data processing methods determined. With total flavonoids in Scutellariae Radix as the determination index, we conducted a study on the adaptability of total flavonoids extracted from Scutellariae Radix with the water decoction method in the model. The results showed a good linear correlation among the natural logarithm value of the mass concentration of total flavonoids in Scutellariae Radix, the time and the changes in the natural logarithm of solvent multiple. Through calculating and fitting, efforts were made to establish the kinetic model of extracting total flavonoids from Scutellariae Radix with the water decoction method, and verify the model, with a good degree of fitting and deviation within the range of the industrial production requirements. This indicated that the model established by the method has a good adaptability.

  2. Soft sensor modelling by time difference, recursive partial least squares and adaptive model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Yang, W.; Xu, O.; Zhou, L.; Wang, J.

    2017-04-01

    To investigate time-variant and nonlinear characteristics in industrial processes, a soft sensor modelling method based on time difference, moving-window recursive partial least square (PLS) and adaptive model updating is proposed. In this method, time difference values of input and output variables are used as training samples to construct the model, which can reduce the effects of the nonlinear characteristic on modelling accuracy and retain the advantages of recursive PLS algorithm. To solve the high updating frequency of the model, a confidence value is introduced, which can be updated adaptively according to the results of the model performance assessment. Once the confidence value is updated, the model can be updated. The proposed method has been used to predict the 4-carboxy-benz-aldehyde (CBA) content in the purified terephthalic acid (PTA) oxidation reaction process. The results show that the proposed soft sensor modelling method can reduce computation effectively, improve prediction accuracy by making use of process information and reflect the process characteristics accurately.

  3. Tensor Product Model Transformation Based Adaptive Integral-Sliding Mode Controller: Equivalent Control Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoliang; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model. PMID:24453897

  4. Model-Based Nonrigid Motion Analysis Using Natural Feature Adaptive Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Goldgof, D.B.; Sarkar, S.; Tsap, L.V.

    2000-04-25

    The success of nonrigid motion analysis using physical finite element model is dependent on the mesh that characterizes the object's geometric structure. We suggest a deformable mesh adapted to the natural features of images. The adaptive mesh requires much fewer number of nodes than the fixed mesh which was used in our previous work. We demonstrate the higher efficiency of the adaptive mesh in the context of estimating burn scar elasticity relative to normal skin elasticity using the observed 2D image sequence. Our results show that the scar assessment method based on the physical model using natural feature adaptive mesh can be applied to images which do not have artificial markers.

  5. Tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode controller: equivalent control method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoliang; Sun, Kaibiao; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model.

  6. Digital adaptive model following flight control. [using fighter aircraft mathematical model-following algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alag, G. S.; Kaufman, H.

    1974-01-01

    Simple mechanical linkages are often unable to cope with the many control problems associated with high performance aircraft maneuvering over a wide flight envelope. One procedure for retaining uniform handling qualities over such an envelope is to implement a digital adaptive controller. Towards such an implementation an explicit adaptive controller, which makes direct use of online parameter identification, has been developed and applied to the linearized equations of motion for a typical fighter aircraft. The system is composed of an online weighted least squares identifier, a Kalman state filter, and a single stage real model following control law. The corresponding control gains are readily adjustable in accordance with parameter changes to ensure asymptotic stability if the conditions for perfect model following are satisfied and stability in the sense of boundedness otherwise.

  7. Effects of Endurance Training on Heat-Exercise Tolerance in Men Wearing NBC Protective Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    carried on the head, hands, or feet. J Appl Physiol 27:687-690 39. Taylor NAS (1986) Eccrine sweat glands: adaptations to UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 22...environments. The additional strains imposed by protective clothing arise mainly because it is difficult for sweat to evaporate through relatively...include improved physical fitness, increased sweating , and expanded plasma volume. However, it is unclear whether such responses develop and/or are

  8. Hierarchically Arranged Helical Fiber Actuators Derived from Commercial Cloth.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiang; Lin, Huijuan; Dunlop, John W C; Yuan, Jiayin

    2017-02-20

    The first hygroscopically tunable cloth actuator is realized via impregnation of a commercial cloth template by a three dimensionally (3D) nanoporous polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid network. The nanoporous hybrid guarantees diffusion of water into the cloth actuator and amplifies the deformation scale. The cloth actuators are mechanically stable with high tensile strength. Because the commercial cotton cloth is inexpensive, such actuators capable of complex motions can be produced in a large size and scale for a wide variety of utilities (e.g. electric generators and "smart" materials).

  9. The professional clothing bank as evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Bishop, SueZanne Monique

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists linking interview-appropriate attire to improved employment outcomes for women. Thus, it appears that the professional clothing bank has not been investigated as evidence-based practice. To provide preliminary evidence for clothing banks, in this article the author synthesizes findings from existing research on the provision of a professional clothing bank as a means for offering interview-appropriate attire to poor women in job readiness programming. For context, job readiness programs are explored and a case study of one program operating a professional clothing bank is presented. Finally, preliminary considerations for planning and implementing clothing banks based on this literature review are given.

  10. Modeling irrigation-based climate change adaptation in agriculture: Model development and evaluation in Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masashi; Iizumi, Toshichika; Sakurai, Gen; Hanasaki, Naota; Sakai, Toru; Okamoto, Katsuo; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2015-09-01

    Replacing a rainfed cropping system with an irrigated one is widely assumed to be an effective measure for climate change adaptation. However, many agricultural impact studies have not necessarily accounted for the space-time variations in the water availability under changing climate and land use. Moreover, many hydrologic and agricultural assessments of climate change impacts are not fully integrated. To overcome this shortcoming, a tool that can simultaneously simulate the dynamic interactions between crop production and water resources in a watershed is essential. Here we propose the regional production and circulation coupled model (CROVER) by embedding the PRYSBI-2 (Process-based Regional Yield Simulator with Bayesian Inference version 2) large-area crop model into the global water resources model (called H08), and apply this model to the Songhua River watershed in Northeast China. The evaluation reveals that the model's performance in capturing the major characteristics of historical change in surface soil moisture, river discharge, actual crop evapotranspiration, and soybean yield relative to the reference data during the interval 1979-2010 is satisfactory accurate. The simulation experiments using the model demonstrated that subregional irrigation management, such as designating the area to which irrigation is primarily applied, has measurable influences on the regional crop production in a drought year. This finding suggests that reassessing climate change risk in agriculture using this type of modeling is crucial not to overestimate potential of irrigation-based adaptation.

  11. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  12. A novel approach for fit analysis of thermal protective clothing using three-dimensional body scanning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    The garment fit played an important role in protective performance, comfort and mobility. The purpose of this study is to quantify the air gap to quantitatively characterize a three-dimensional (3-D) garment fit using a 3-D body scanning technique. A method for processing of scanned data was developed to investigate the air gap size and distribution between the clothing and human body. The mesh model formed from nude and clothed body was aligned, superimposed and sectioned using Rapidform software. The air gap size and distribution over the body surface were analyzed. The total air volume was also calculated. The effects of fabric properties and garment size on air gap distribution were explored. The results indicated that average air gap of the fit clothing was around 25-30 mm and the overall air gap distribution was similar. The air gap was unevenly distributed over the body and it was strongly associated with the body parts, fabric properties and garment size. The research will help understand the overall clothing fit and its association with protection, thermal and movement comfort, and provide guidelines for clothing engineers to improve thermal performance and reduce physiological burden.

  13. Research on human physiological parameters intelligent clothing based on distributed Fiber Bragg Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Changyun; Shi, Boya; Li, Hongqiang

    2008-12-01

    A human physiological parameters intelligent clothing is researched with FBG sensor technology. In this paper, the principles and methods of measuring human physiological parameters including body temperature and heart rate in intelligent clothing with distributed FBG are studied, the mathematical models of human physiological parameters measurement are built; the processing method of body temperature and heart rate detection signals is presented; human physiological parameters detection module is designed, the interference signals are filtered out, and the measurement accuracy is improved; the integration of the intelligent clothing is given. The intelligent clothing can implement real-time measurement, processing, storage and output of body temperature and heart rate. It has accurate measurement, portability, low cost, real-time monitoring, and other advantages. The intelligent clothing can realize the non-contact monitoring between doctors and patients, timely find the diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases, and make patients get timely treatment. It has great significance and value for ensuring the health of the elders and the children with language dysfunction.

  14. The Progress of the Clothing for Cold Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takeshi; Ijiri, Tokiko

    The clothing for cold weather were discused. The total insulation in man is made up of sum of the insulation afforded by clothes, air and tissues. A function of clothing is to protect the body from the environment, this is especially true when himalayan expedition. Many expedition to the himalayan high altitude have had useful experiences in the textile and clothing field. Historical development and fundamental matters of clothing for himalayan expedition were explained. The insulating properties of a fabric are due not to the fibers of the fabric itseif, but to the air trapped with in the fabric. it is impotant to realise that the thermal insulation of clothing is proportional to the thickness of the dead space air trapped within the clothing. Down clothes are extremely warm, light and comfortable. A windproof outer layer is necessary to prevent penetration by external air. If air penetrates, clothing the trapped dead air is moved and insu1ation will diminish. Overheating when exercising in the cold with loss of insulation associated with the production of sweat, and thus of darnp clothing, is a well recognized hazard. It was considered that we must make every effort to be as safe as possible in clothing science field for cold environment.

  15. Estimation of Model's Marginal likelihood Using Adaptive Sparse Grid Surrogates in Bayesian Model Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of model executions are required to obtain alternative conceptual models' predictions and their posterior probabilities in Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The posterior model probability is estimated through models' marginal likelihood and prior probability. The heavy computation burden hinders the implementation of BMA prediction, especially for the elaborated marginal likelihood estimator. For overcoming the computation burden of BMA, an adaptive sparse grid (SG) stochastic collocation method is used to build surrogates for alternative conceptual models through the numerical experiment of a synthetical groundwater model. BMA predictions depend on model posterior weights (or marginal likelihoods), and this study also evaluated four marginal likelihood estimators, including arithmetic mean estimator (AME), harmonic mean estimator (HME), stabilized harmonic mean estimator (SHME), and thermodynamic integration estimator (TIE). The results demonstrate that TIE is accurate in estimating conceptual models' marginal likelihoods. The BMA-TIE has better predictive performance than other BMA predictions. TIE has high stability for estimating conceptual model's marginal likelihood. The repeated estimated conceptual model's marginal likelihoods by TIE have significant less variability than that estimated by other estimators. In addition, the SG surrogates are efficient to facilitate BMA predictions, especially for BMA-TIE. The number of model executions needed for building surrogates is 4.13%, 6.89%, 3.44%, and 0.43% of the required model executions of BMA-AME, BMA-HME, BMA-SHME, and BMA-TIE, respectively.

  16. A test battery related to ergonomics of protective clothing.

    PubMed

    Havenith, George; Heus, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Specialised protective clothing, such as that worn by firefighters, is usually tested only to standards which give requirements for the materials used (e.g. EN469). However, this testing often neglects the effect the manufacturing process of the garment has on the material properties, the effects of clothing design, sizing and fit, as well as the interaction of the clothing with other components of the standard gear for the profession. Such effects can only be tested by looking at the protective gear as a whole. This paper deals with methods to do additional testing on protective garments with firefighter clothing as example. In other words, methods which go beyond EN469. Human subject tests for physiological load, heat protection, ergonomic design, loss of performance, rain/moisture protection and conspicuity/visibility of the clothing are described and proposed for evaluation of protective clothing in general and for further development of standards on firefighters' clothing.

  17. Dynamics of Dual Prism Adaptation: Relating Novel Experimental Results to a Minimalistic Neural Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo, Orlando; Bornschlegl, Mona A.; Eberhardt, Sven; Ernst, Udo; Pawelzik, Klaus; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo–motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements (‘dual–adaptation’). A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual–adaptation be faster if switches (‘phase changes’) between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual–adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo–motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual–adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual–adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of

  18. Maximizing Adaptivity in Hierarchical Topological Models Using Cancellation Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P; Pascucci, V; Hamann, B

    2008-12-08

    We present a highly adaptive hierarchical representation of the topology of functions defined over two-manifold domains. Guided by the theory of Morse-Smale complexes, we encode dependencies between cancellations of critical points using two independent structures: a traditional mesh hierarchy to store connectivity information and a new structure called cancellation trees to encode the configuration of critical points. Cancellation trees provide a powerful method to increase adaptivity while using a simple, easy-to-implement data structure. The resulting hierarchy is significantly more flexible than the one previously reported. In particular, the resulting hierarchy is guaranteed to be of logarithmic height.

  19. Parametric recursive system identification and self-adaptive modeling of the human energy metabolism for adaptive control of fat weight.

    PubMed

    Őri, Zsolt P

    2016-08-03

    A mathematical model has been developed to facilitate indirect measurements of difficult to measure variables of the human energy metabolism on a daily basis. The model performs recursive system identification of the parameters of the metabolic model of the human energy metabolism using the law of conservation of energy and principle of indirect calorimetry. Self-adaptive models of the utilized energy intake prediction, macronutrient oxidation rates, and daily body composition changes were created utilizing Kalman filter and the nominal trajectory methods. The accuracy of the models was tested in a simulation study utilizing data from the Minnesota starvation and overfeeding study. With biweekly macronutrient intake measurements, the average prediction error of the utilized carbohydrate intake was -23.2 ± 53.8 kcal/day, fat intake was 11.0 ± 72.3 kcal/day, and protein was 3.7 ± 16.3 kcal/day. The fat and fat-free mass changes were estimated with an error of 0.44 ± 1.16 g/day for fat and -2.6 ± 64.98 g/day for fat-free mass. The daily metabolized macronutrient energy intake and/or daily macronutrient oxidation rate and the daily body composition change from directly measured serial data are optimally predicted with a self-adaptive model with Kalman filter that uses recursive system identification.

  20. Energetic Metabolism and Biochemical Adaptation: A Bird Flight Muscle Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Pierre; Blier, Pierre U.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to measure the activity of two metabolic enzymes in crude extract from bird pectoral muscle and to relate the differences to their mode of locomotion and ecology. The laboratory is adapted to stimulate the interest of wildlife management students to biochemistry. The enzymatic activities of cytochrome…

  1. An Adaptive Model of Student Performance Using Inverse Bayes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a coherent framework for the use of Inverse Bayesian estimation to summarize and make predictions about student behaviour in adaptive educational settings. The Inverse Bayes Filter utilizes Bayes theorem to estimate the relative impact of contextual factors and internal student factors on student performance using time series…

  2. Application of the Bifactor Model to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong Gi

    2011-01-01

    Most computerized adaptive tests (CAT) have been studied under the framework of unidimensional item response theory. However, many psychological variables are multidimensional and might benefit from using a multidimensional approach to CAT. In addition, a number of psychological variables (e.g., quality of life, depression) can be conceptualized…

  3. Adaptive multiresolution modeling of groundwater flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenica, Luka; Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Andric, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Proposed methodology was originally developed by our scientific team in Split who designed multiresolution approach for analyzing flow and transport processes in highly heterogeneous porous media. The main properties of the adaptive Fup multi-resolution approach are: 1) computational capabilities of Fup basis functions with compact support capable to resolve all spatial and temporal scales, 2) multi-resolution presentation of heterogeneity as well as all other input and output variables, 3) accurate, adaptive and efficient strategy and 4) semi-analytical properties which increase our understanding of usually complex flow and transport processes in porous media. The main computational idea behind this approach is to separately find the minimum number of basis functions and resolution levels necessary to describe each flow and transport variable with the desired accuracy on a particular adaptive grid. Therefore, each variable is separately analyzed, and the adaptive and multi-scale nature of the methodology enables not only computational efficiency and accuracy, but it also describes subsurface processes closely related to their understood physical interpretation. The methodology inherently supports a mesh-free procedure, avoiding the classical numerical integration, and yields continuous velocity and flux fields, which is vitally important for flow and transport simulations. In this paper, we will show recent improvements within the proposed methodology. Since "state of the art" multiresolution approach usually uses method of lines and only spatial adaptive procedure, temporal approximation was rarely considered as a multiscale. Therefore, novel adaptive implicit Fup integration scheme is developed, resolving all time scales within each global time step. It means that algorithm uses smaller time steps only in lines where solution changes are intensive. Application of Fup basis functions enables continuous time approximation, simple interpolation calculations across

  4. Ergonomics principles to design clothing work for electrical workers in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan; Cubillos, A

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of the Colombian legislation, have been identified the need to develop protective clothing to work according to specifications from the work done and in compliance with international standards. These involve the development and design of new strategies and measures for work clothing design. In this study we analyzes the activities of the workers in the electrical sector, the method analyzes the risks activity data in various activities, that activities include power generation plants, local facilities, industrial facilities and maintenance of urban and rural networks. The analyses method is focused on ergonomic approach, risk analysis is done, we evaluate the role of security expert and we use a design algorithm developed for this purpose. The result of this study is the identification of constraints and variables that contribute to the development of a model of analysis that leads to the development the work protective clothes.

  5. Simulation of the electrically stimulated cochlear neuron: modeling adaptation to trains of electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jihwan; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model does not simulate the significant changes in auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to sustained stimulation that are associated with neural adaptation. Given that the electric stimuli used by cochlear prostheses can result in adapted responses, a computational model incorporating an adaptation process is warranted if such models are to remain relevant and contribute to related research efforts. In this paper, we describe the development of a modified HH single-node model that includes potassium ion ( K(+)) concentration changes in response to each action potential. This activity-related change results in an altered resting potential, and hence, excitability. Our implementation of K(+)-related changes uses a phenomenological approach based upon K(+) accumulation and dissipation time constants. Modeled spike times were computed using repeated presentations of modeled pulse-train stimuli. Spike-rate adaptation was characterized by rate decrements and time constants and compared against ANF data from animal experiments. Responses to relatively low (250 pulse/s) and high rate (5000 pulse/s) trains were evaluated and the novel adaptation model results were compared against model results obtained without the adaptation mechanism. In addition to spike-rate changes, jitter and spike intervals were evaluated and found to change with the addition of modeled adaptation. These results provide one means of incorporating a heretofore neglected (although important) aspect of ANF responses to electric stimuli. Future studies could include evaluation of alternative versions of the adaptation model elements and broadening the model to simulate a complete axon, and eventually, a spatially realistic model of the electrically stimulated nerve within extracochlear tissues.

  6. Dynamic modeling, property investigation, and adaptive controller design of serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Tosunoglu, Sabri; Lin, Shyng-Her

    1990-01-01

    Research results on general serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliances are presented. Two compliant manipulator modeling approaches, distributed and lumped parameter models, are used in this study. System dynamic equations for both compliant models are derived by using the first and second order influence coefficients. Also, the properties of compliant manipulator system dynamics are investigated. One of the properties, which is defined as inaccessibility of vibratory modes, is shown to display a distinct character associated with compliant manipulators. This property indicates the impact of robot geometry on the control of structural oscillations. Example studies are provided to illustrate the physical interpretation of inaccessibility of vibratory modes. Two types of controllers are designed for compliant manipulators modeled by either lumped or distributed parameter techniques. In order to maintain the generality of the results, neither linearization is introduced. Example simulations are given to demonstrate the controller performance. The second type controller is also built for general serial robot arms and is adaptive in nature which can estimate uncertain payload parameters on-line and simultaneously maintain trajectory tracking properties. The relation between manipulator motion tracking capability and convergence of parameter estimation properties is discussed through example case studies. The effect of control input update delays on adaptive controller performance is also studied.

  7. Transient thermal-mechanical behavior of cracked glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, Y.; Ueda, S.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the transient thermal-mechanical response of cracked G-10CR glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates with temperature-dependent properties. The glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates are suddenly cooled on the surfaces. A generalized plane strain finite element model is used to study the influence of warp angle and crack formation on the thermal shock behavior of two-layer woven laminates at low temperatures. Numerical calculations are carried out, and the transient temperature distribution and the thermal-mechanical stresses are shown graphically.

  8. Robust high-resolution cloth using parallelism, history-based collisions, and accurate friction.

    PubMed

    Selle, Andrew; Su, Jonathan; Irving, Geoffrey; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we simulate high resolution cloth consisting of up to 2 million triangles which allows us to achieve highly detailed folds and wrinkles. Since the level of detail is also influenced by object collision and self collision, we propose a more accurate model for cloth-object friction. We also propose a robust history-based repulsion/collision framework where repulsions are treated accurately and efficiently on a per time step basis. Distributed memory parallelism is used for both time evolution and collisions and we specifically address Gauss-Seidel ordering of repulsion/collision response. This algorithm is demonstrated by several high resolution and high-fidelity simulations.

  9. How Career Variety Promotes the Adaptability of Managers: A Theoretical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaevli, Ayse; Tim Hall, Douglas T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model showing how managerial adaptability develops from career variety over the span of the person's career. By building on the literature of career theory, adult learning and development, and career adjustment, we offer a new conceptualization of managerial adaptability by identifying its behavioral, cognitive,…

  10. An Algebraic Model of Adaptive Optics for Continuous-Wave Thermal Blooming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    blooming. The aberrations modeled generally include those applied by an adaptive optics system to compensate the naturally occurring ones. For the...results when applied to thermal blooming. However, the analysis suggests novel remedies that will tend to optimize the corrections made, thus better realizing the full potential of adaptive optics . (Author)

  11. A Mixture Rasch Model-Based Computerized Adaptive Test for Latent Class Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Hong; Macready, George; Liu, Junhui; Cho, Youngmi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a computerized adaptive test delivery algorithm for latent class identification based on the mixture Rasch model. Four item selection methods based on the Kullback-Leibler (KL) information were proposed and compared with the reversed and the adaptive KL information under simulated testing conditions. When item separation was…

  12. Sensorimotor synchronization with tempo-changing auditory sequences: Modeling temporal adaptation and anticipation.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C Marieke; Jacoby, Nori; Fairhurst, Merle T; Keller, Peter E

    2015-11-11

    The current study investigated the human ability to synchronize movements with event sequences containing continuous tempo changes. This capacity is evident, for example, in ensemble musicians who maintain precise interpersonal coordination while modulating the performance tempo for expressive purposes. Here we tested an ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) that was developed to account for such behavior by combining error correction processes (adaptation) with a predictive temporal extrapolation process (anticipation). While previous computational models of synchronization incorporate error correction, they do not account for prediction during tempo-changing behavior. The fit between behavioral data and computer simulations based on four versions of ADAM was assessed. These versions included a model with adaptation only, one in which adaptation and anticipation act in combination (error correction is applied on the basis of predicted tempo changes), and two models in which adaptation and anticipation were linked in a joint module that corrects for predicted discrepancies between the outcomes of adaptive and anticipatory processes. The behavioral experiment required participants to tap their finger in time with three auditory pacing sequences containing tempo changes that differed in the rate of change and the number of turning points. Behavioral results indicated that sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and precision, while generally high, decreased with increases in the rate of tempo change and number of turning points. Simulations and model-based parameter estimates showed that adaptation mechanisms alone could not fully explain the observed precision of sensorimotor synchronization. Including anticipation in the model increased the precision of simulated sensorimotor synchronization and improved the fit of model to behavioral data, especially when adaptation and anticipation mechanisms were linked via a joint module based on the notion of joint internal

  13. Understanding wax screen-printing: a novel patterning process for microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Chunsun; Liu, Feifei

    2015-09-03

    In this work, we first introduce the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a wax screen-printing approach that is suitable for simple, inexpensive, rapid, low-energy-consumption and high-throughput preparation of cloth-based analytical devices. We have carried out a detailed study on the wax screen-printing of μCADs and have obtained some interesting results. Firstly, an analytical model is established for the spreading of molten wax in cloth. Secondly, a new wax screen-printing process has been proposed for fabricating μCADs, where the melting of wax into the cloth is much faster (∼5 s) and the heating temperature is much lower (75 °C). Thirdly, the experimental results show that the patterning effects of the proposed wax screen-printing method depend to a certain extent on types of screens, wax melting temperatures and melting time. Under optimized conditions, the minimum printing width of hydrophobic wax barrier and hydrophilic channel is 100 μm and 1.9 mm, respectively. Importantly, the developed analytical model is also well validated by these experiments. Fourthly, the μCADs fabricated by the presented wax screen-printing method are used to perform a proof-of-concept assay of glucose or protein in artificial urine with rapid high-throughput detection taking place on a 48-chamber cloth-based device and being performed by a visual readout. Overall, the developed cloth-based wax screen-printing and arrayed μCADs should provide a new research direction in the development of advanced sensor arrays for detection of a series of analytes relevant to many diverse applications.

  14. Tween consumers: catalog clothing purchase behavior.

    PubMed

    Simpson, L; Douglas, S; Schimmel, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the catalog shopping behavior of students in their tween years (i.e., between childhood and adolescence; ages 12-14) with that of older students (ages 15-18). Junior high and high school students who had purchased clothing from a catalog in the past 12 months responded to a questionnaire that examined the label information sought and product-specific attributes considered. Results indicated that tweens were more concerned with style, brand names, and the latest fashion than were older students. This finding was especially interesting, as these attributes all relate to status; the tweens were more interested than the older students in wearing the latest fashions, being in style, and gaining the prestige of wearing brand-name clothing. This supports previous findings indicating that the tween years are a time when peer pressure and "fitting in" are very important.

  15. Ensuring congruency in multiscale modeling: towards linking agent based and continuum biomechanical models of arterial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hayenga, Heather N; Thorne, Bryan C; Peirce, Shayn M; Humphrey, Jay D

    2011-11-01

    There is a need to develop multiscale models of vascular adaptations to understand tissue-level manifestations of cellular level mechanisms. Continuum-based biomechanical models are well suited for relating blood pressures and flows to stress-mediated changes in geometry and properties, but less so for describing underlying mechanobiological processes. Discrete stochastic agent-based models are well suited for representing biological processes at a cellular level, but not for describing tissue-level mechanical changes. We present here a conceptually new approach to facilitate the coupling of continuum and agent-based models. Because of ubiquitous limitations in both the tissue- and cell-level data from which one derives constitutive relations for continuum models and rule-sets for agent-based models, we suggest that model verification should enforce congruency across scales. That is, multiscale model parameters initially determined from data sets representing different scales should be refined, when possible, to ensure that common outputs are consistent. Potential advantages of this approach are illustrated by comparing simulated aortic responses to a sustained increase in blood pressure predicted by continuum and agent-based models both before and after instituting a genetic algorithm to refine 16 objectively bounded model parameters. We show that congruency-based parameter refinement not only yielded increased consistency across scales, it also yielded predictions that are closer to in vivo observations.

  16. Forecasting societies' adaptive capacities through a demographic metabolism model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Muttarak, Raya

    2017-03-01

    In seeking to understand how future societies will be affected by climate change we cannot simply assume they will be identical to those of today, because climate and societies are both dynamic. Here we propose that the concept of demographic metabolism and the associated methods of multi-dimensional population projections provide an effective analytical toolbox to forecast important aspects of societal change that affect adaptive capacity. We present an example of how the changing educational composition of future populations can influence societies' adaptive capacity. Multi-dimensional population projections form the human core of the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways scenarios, and knowledge and analytical tools from demography have great value in assessing the likely implications of climate change on future human well-being.

  17. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  18. Musical and clothing invitations to protection.

    PubMed

    Deniaud, F

    1993-01-01

    The Chaussez Capote Project interviewed 48 youths in Abidjan and Dabou aged 14-25 years on how to best get individuals in their age group to use condoms. 251 individuals aged 15-25 were also surveyed in Abidjan on the same subject. While more than 80% of this latter group had already discussed AIDS, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and prevention with others, 90% still wanted advice on these themes from medical staff and the media. 40% who had already used condoms did so incorrectly, while approximately 33% had experienced condom breakage during use. Respondents felt that condom promotion should be associated with information on AIDS, STDs, and contraception or information on general health. In response to this feedback, the project commissioned the creation of a promotional music cassette with French and African songs of different musical styles. Lyrics imparted technical information and correct misconceptions related to condom use. Free distribution of the cassette commenced August 1992, and approximately 800 were given to organizations and businesses. The cassette also aired on radio and Ivorian television, but met with only limited success. It is thought that its impact was limited due to the small number of copies duplicated and inefficient distribution. A new version was therefore created with different songs and short messages by popular African singers for local duplication and sale at a subsidized price starting December 1993. As a 2nd intervention, clothing metaphors applied to condoms and condom use were applied to the development of a clothing promotion loincloth designed Spring 1993. The cloth was pretested and revised to ultimately consist of panels depicting 2 young couples, a condom, a panther, and the words Entre nous. The cloth has been ordered for use by the National AIDS Committee, a condom social marketing project, and the French agency for development cooperation.

  19. Adaptive Detection and Parameter Estimation for Multidimensional Signal Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-19

    expected value of the non-adaptive parameter array estimator directly from Equation (5-1), using the fact that .zP = dppH = d We obtain EbI = (e-H E eI 1...depend only on the dimensional parameters of tlc problem. We will caerive these properties shcrLly, but first we wish to express the conditional pdf

  20. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  1. Electrostatic sampling of trace DNA from clothing.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Martin; Defaux, Priscille Merciani; Utz, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    During acts of physical aggression, offenders frequently come into contact with clothes of the victim, thereby leaving traces of DNA-bearing biological material on the garments. Since tape-lifting and swabbing, the currently established methods for non-destructive trace DNA sampling from clothing, both have their shortcomings in collection efficiency and handling, we thought about a new collection method for these challenging samples. Testing two readily available electrostatic devices for their potential to sample biological material from garments made of different fabrics, we found one of them, the electrostatic dust print lifter (DPL), to perform comparable to well-established sampling with wet cotton swabs. In simulated aggression scenarios, we had the same success rate for the establishment of single aggressor profiles, suitable for database submission, with both the DPL and wet swabbing. However, we lost a substantial amount of information with electrostatic sampling, since almost no mixed aggressor-victim profiles suitable for database entry could be established, compared to conventional swabbing. This study serves as a proof of principle for electrostatic DNA sampling from items of clothing. The technique still requires optimization before it might be used in real casework. But we are confident that in the future it could be an efficient and convenient contribution to the toolbox of forensic practitioners.

  2. A model of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    I propose a model that replicates the kinetics of a rapidly-adapting mechanosensitive current generated by a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. When the DRG neuron is mechanically stimulated, an ionic current called a mechanosensitive current flows across its membrane. The kinetics of mechanosensitive currents are broadly classified into three types; rapidly adapting (RA), intermediately adapting, and slowly adapting. The kinetics of RA mechanosensitive currents are particularly intriguing. An RA mechanosensitive current is initially evoked by and rapidly adapts to a mechanical stimulus, but can also respond to an additional stimulus. Furthermore, an antecedent stimulus immediately followed by an additional stimulus suppresses reactivation of the current. The features of the kinetics depend on the characteristics of the mechanotransducer channels. Physiologists have proposed three factors associated with mechanotransducer channels, invoking activation, adaptation, and inactivation. In the present study, these factors are incorporated into an RA mechanosensitive current model. Computer simulations verified that the proposed model replicates the kinetics of real RA DRG mechanosensitive currents. The mechanosensitive current elicited by successive pulse-form stimuli was predominantly desensitized by the inactivating factor. Both the inactivating and adapting factors were involved in desensitization of a double-decker stimulus. The reduction of the sensitivity with decreasing velocity of the stimulus was mainly controlled by the adapting factor.

  3. Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™) in Mexico City: Integrating Cultural Adaptation Activities in an Implementation Model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M; Amador, Nancy G; Forgatch, Marion S; Parra-Cardona, J Rubén

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the process of cultural adaptation at the start of the implementation of the Parent Management Training intervention-Oregon model (PMTO) in Mexico City. The implementation process was guided by the model, and the cultural adaptation of PMTO was theoretically guided by the cultural adaptation process (CAP) model. During the process of the adaptation, we uncovered the potential for the CAP to be embedded in the implementation process, taking into account broader training and economic challenges and opportunities. We discuss how cultural adaptation and implementation processes are inextricably linked and iterative and how maintaining a collaborative relationship with the treatment developer has guided our work and has helped expand our research efforts, and how building human capital to implement PMTO in Mexico supported the implementation efforts of PMTO in other places in the United States.

  4. Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™) in Mexico City: Integrating Cultural Adaptation Activities in an Implementation Model

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M.; Amador, Nancy G.; Forgatch, Marion S.; Parra-Cardona, J. Rubén

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the process of cultural adaptation at the start of the implementation of the Parent Management Training intervention-Oregon model (PMTO) in Mexico City. The implementation process was guided by the model, and the cultural adaptation of PMTO was theoretically guided by the cultural adaptation process (CAP) model. During the process of the adaptation, we uncovered the potential for the CAP to be embedded in the implementation process, taking into account broader training and economic challenges and opportunities. We discuss how cultural adaptation and implementation processes are inextricably linked and iterative and how maintaining a collaborative relationship with the treatment developer has guided our work and has helped expand our research efforts, and how building human capital to implement PMTO in Mexico supported the implementation efforts of PMTO in other places in the United States. PMID:26052184

  5. Portrayal of Tanning, Clothing Fashion and Shade Use in Australian Women's Magazines, 1987-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Helen; Dobbinson, Suzanne; Wakefield, Melanie; Jamsen, Kris; McLeod, Kim

    2008-01-01

    To examine modelling of outcomes relevant to sun protection in Australian women's magazines, content analysis was performed on 538 spring and summer issues of popular women's magazines from 1987 to 2005. A total of 4949 full-colour images of Caucasian females were coded for depth of tan, extent of clothing cover, use of shade and setting. Logistic…

  6. On the role of model-based monitoring for adaptive planning under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raso, Luciano; Kwakkel, Jan; Timmermans, Jos; Haasnoot, Mariolijn

    2016-04-01

    , triggered by the challenge of uncertainty in operational control, may offer solutions from which monitoring for adaptive planning can benefit. Specifically: (i) in control, observations are incorporated into the model through data assimilation, updating the present state, boundary conditions, and parameters based on new observations, diminishing the shadow of the past; (ii) adaptive control is a way to modify the characteristics of the internal model, incorporating new knowledge on the system, countervailing the inhibition of learning; and (iii) in closed-loop control, a continuous system update equips the controller with "inherent robustness", i.e. to capacity to adapts to new conditions even when these were not initially considered. We aim to explore how inherent robustness addresses the challenge of surprise. Innovations in model-based control might help to improve and adapt the models used to support adaptive delta management to new information (reducing uncertainty). Moreover, this would offer a starting point for using these models not only in the design of adaptive plans, but also as part of the monitoring. The proposed research requires multidisciplinary cooperation between control theory, the policy sciences, and integrated assessment modeling.

  7. Modeling of Rate-Dependent Hysteresis Using a GPO-Based Adaptive Filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Yaopeng

    2016-02-06

    A novel generalized play operator-based (GPO-based) nonlinear adaptive filter is proposed to model rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinearity for smart actuators. In the proposed filter, the input signal vector consists of the output of a tapped delay line. GPOs with various thresholds are used to construct a nonlinear network and connected with the input signals. The output signal of the filter is composed of a linear combination of signals from the output of GPOs. The least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm is used to adjust the weights of the nonlinear filter. The modeling results of four adaptive filter methods are compared: GPO-based adaptive filter, Volterra filter, backlash filter and linear adaptive filter. Moreover, a phenomenological operator-based model, the rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (RDGPI) model, is compared to the proposed adaptive filter. The various rate-dependent modeling methods are applied to model the rate-dependent hysteresis of a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA). It is shown from the modeling results that the GPO-based adaptive filter can describe the rate-dependent hysteresis nonlinear of the GMA more accurately and effectively.

  8. Construction and solution of an adaptive image-restoration model for removing blur and mixed noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youquan; Cui, Lihong; Cen, Yigang; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-03-01

    We establish a practical regularized least-squares model with adaptive regularization for dealing with blur and mixed noise in images. This model has some advantages, such as good adaptability for edge restoration and noise suppression due to the application of a priori spatial information obtained from a polluted image. We further focus on finding an important feature of image restoration using an adaptive restoration model with different regularization parameters in polluted images. A more important observation is that the gradient of an image varies regularly from one regularization parameter to another under certain conditions. Then, a modified graduated nonconvexity approach combined with a median filter version of a spatial information indicator is proposed to seek the solution of our adaptive image-restoration model by applying variable splitting and weighted penalty techniques. Numerical experiments show that the method is robust and effective for dealing with various blur and mixed noise levels in images.

  9. Multivariate adaptive regression splines models for the prediction of energy expenditure in children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced mathematical models have the potential to capture the complex metabolic and physiological processes that result in heat production, or energy expenditure (EE). Multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), is a nonparametric method that estimates complex nonlinear relationships by a seri...

  10. Solid modelling for the manipulative robot arm (power) and adaptive vision control for space station missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrand, V.; Choudry, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of a flexible arm derived from concatenation of the Stewart-Table-based links were studied. Solid modeling provides not only a realistic simulation, but is also essential for studying vision algorithms. These algorithms could be used for the adaptive control of the arm, using the well-known algorithms such as shape from shading, edge detection, orientation, etc. Details of solid modeling and its relation to vision based adaptive control are discussed.

  11. The software package CAOS 7.0: enhanced numerical modelling of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbillet, Marcel; La Camera, Andrea; Folcher, Jean-Pierre; Perruchon-Monge, Ulysse; Sy, Adama

    2016-07-01

    The Software Package CAOS (acronym for Code for Adaptive Optics Systems) is a modular scientific package performing end-to-end numerical modelling of astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems. It is IDL-based and developed within the eponymous CAOS Problem-Solving Environment, recently completely re-organized. In this paper we present version 7.0 of the Software Package CAOS, containing a number of enhancements and new modules, in particular for wide-field AO systems modelling.

  12. Modeling of oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation to compensate for the acoustic effects of nasalization.

    PubMed

    Rong, Panying; Kuehn, David P; Shosted, Ryan K

    2016-09-01

    Hypernasality is one of the most detrimental speech disturbances that lead to declines of speech intelligibility. Velopharyngeal inadequacy, which is associated with anatomic defects such as cleft palate or neuromuscular disorders that affect velopharygneal function, is the primary cause of hypernasality. A simulation study by Rong and Kuehn [J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res. 55(5), 1438-1448 (2012)] demonstrated that properly adjusted oropharyngeal articulation can reduce nasality for vowels synthesized with an articulatory model [Mermelstein, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53(4), 1070-1082 (1973)]. In this study, a speaker-adaptive articulatory model was developed to simulate speaker-customized oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation to compensate for the acoustic effects of nasalization on /a/, /i/, and /u/. The results demonstrated that (1) the oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation effectively counteracted the effects of nasalization on the second lowest formant frequency (F2) and partially compensated for the effects of nasalization on vowel space (e.g., shifting and constriction of vowel space) and (2) the articulatory adaptation strategies generated by the speaker-adaptive model might be more efficacious for counteracting the acoustic effects of nasalization compared to the adaptation strategies generated by the standard articulatory model in Rong and Kuehn. The findings of this study indicated the potential of using oropharyngeal articulatory adaptation as a means to correct maladaptive articulatory behaviors and to reduce nasality.

  13. Acoustic model adaptation for ortolan bunting (Emberiza hortulana L.) song-type classification.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jidong; Johnson, Michael T; Osiejuk, Tomasz S

    2008-03-01

    Automatic systems for vocalization classification often require fairly large amounts of data on which to train models. However, animal vocalization data collection and transcription is a difficult and time-consuming task, so that it is expensive to create large data sets. One natural solution to this problem is the use of acoustic adaptation methods. Such methods, common in human speech recognition systems, create initial models trained on speaker independent data, then use small amounts of adaptation data to build individual-specific models. Since, as in human speech, individual vocal variability is a significant source of variation in bioacoustic data, acoustic model adaptation is naturally suited to classification in this domain as well. To demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of this approach, this paper presents the application of maximum likelihood linear regression adaptation to ortolan bunting (Emberiza hortulana L.) song-type classification. Classification accuracies for the adapted system are computed as a function of the amount of adaptation data and compared to caller-independent and caller-dependent systems. The experimental results indicate that given the same amount of data, supervised adaptation significantly outperforms both caller-independent and caller-dependent systems.

  14. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  15. Wavelet detection of weak far-magnetic signal based on adaptive ARMA model threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Lin, Chun-sheng; Fang, Shi

    2009-10-01

    Based on Mallat algorithm, a de-noising algorithm of adaptive wavelet threshold is applied for weak magnetic signal detection of far moving target in complex magnetic environment. The choice of threshold is the key problem. With the spectrum analysis of the magnetic field target, a threshold algorithm on the basis of adaptive ARMA model filter is brought forward to improve the wavelet filtering performance. The simulation of this algorithm on measured data is carried out. Compared to Donoho threshold algorithm, it shows that adaptive ARMA model threshold algorithm significantly improved the capability of weak magnetic signal detection in complex magnetic environment.

  16. A Model for Designing Adaptive Laboratory Evolution Experiments.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Ryan A; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2017-04-15

    The occurrence of mutations is a cornerstone of the evolutionary theory of adaptation, capitalizing on the rare chance that a mutation confers a fitness benefit. Natural selection is increasingly being leveraged in laboratory settings for industrial and basic science applications. Despite increasing deployment, there are no standardized procedures available for designing and performing adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) experiments. Thus, there is a need to optimize the experimental design, specifically for determining when to consider an experiment complete and for balancing outcomes with available resources (i.e., laboratory supplies, personnel, and time). To design and to better understand ALE experiments, a simulator, ALEsim, was developed, validated, and applied to the optimization of ALE experiments. The effects of various passage sizes were experimentally determined and subsequently evaluated with ALEsim, to explain differences in experimental outcomes. Furthermore, a beneficial mutation rate of 10(-6.9) to 10(-8.4) mutations per cell division was derived. A retrospective analysis of ALE experiments revealed that passage sizes typically employed in serial passage batch culture ALE experiments led to inefficient production and fixation of beneficial mutations. ALEsim and the results described here will aid in the design of ALE experiments to fit the exact needs of a project while taking into account the resources required and will lower the barriers to entry for this experimental technique.IMPORTANCE ALE is a widely used scientific technique to increase scientific understanding, as well as to create industrially relevant organisms. The manner in which ALE experiments are conducted is highly manual and uniform, with little optimization for efficiency. Such inefficiencies result in suboptimal experiments that can take multiple months to complete. With the availability of automation and computer simulations, we can now perform these experiments in an optimized

  17. Direct Adaptive Control Methodologies for Flexible-Joint Space Manipulators with Uncertainties and Modeling Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Steve

    This work addresses the direct adaptive trajectory tracking control problem associated with lightweight space robotic manipulators that exhibit elastic vibrations in their joints, and which are subject to parametric uncertainties and modeling errors. Unlike existing adaptive control methodologies, the proposed flexible-joint control techniques do not require identification of unknown parameters, or mathematical models of the system to be controlled. The direct adaptive controllers developed in this work are based on the model reference adaptive control approach, and manage modeling errors and parametric uncertainties by time-varying the controller gains using new adaptation mechanisms, thereby reducing the errors between an ideal model and the actual robot system. More specifically, new decentralized adaptation mechanisms derived from the simple adaptive control technique and fuzzy logic control theory are considered in this work. Numerical simulations compare the performance of the adaptive controllers with a nonadaptive and a conventional model-based controller, in the context of 12.6 m xx 12.6 m square trajectory tracking. To validate the robustness of the controllers to modeling errors, a new dynamics formulation that includes several nonlinear effects usually neglected in flexible-joint dynamics models is proposed. Results obtained with the adaptive methodologies demonstrate an increased robustness to both uncertainties in joint stiffness coefficients and dynamics modeling errors, as well as highly improved tracking performance compared with the nonadaptive and model-based strategies. Finally, this work considers the partial state feedback problem related to flexible-joint space robotic manipulators equipped only with sensors that provide noisy measurements of motor positions and velocities. An extended Kalman filter-based estimation strategy is developed to estimate all state variables in real-time. The state estimation filter is combined with an adaptive

  18. [The mathematical modelling of population dynamics taking into account the adaptive behavior of individuals].

    PubMed

    Abakumov, A I

    2000-01-01

    The general approach for modelling of abundance dynamic of biological populations and communities is offered. The mechanisms of individual adaptation in changing environment are considered. The approach is detailed for population models without structure and with age structure. The property of solutions are investigated. As examples the author studies the concrete definitions of general models by analogy with models of Ricker and May. Theoretical analysis and calculations shows that survival of model population in extreme situation increases if adaptive behaviour is taking into account.

  19. Particle Swarm Social Adaptive Model for Multi-Agent Based Insurgency Warfare Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    To better understand insurgent activities and asymmetric warfare, a social adaptive model for modeling multiple insurgent groups attacking multiple military and civilian targets is proposed and investigated. This report presents a pilot study using the particle swarm modeling, a widely used non-linear optimal tool to model the emergence of insurgency campaign. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of insurgent social adaptation for the dynamically changing environment and to provide insight and understanding of insurgency warfare. Our results show that unified leadership, strategic planning, and effective communication between insurgent groups are not the necessary requirements for insurgents to efficiently attain their objective.

  20. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.