Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive computer technologies

  1. Four-stage computational technology with adaptive numerical methods for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaydurov, V.; Liu, T.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Computational aerodynamics is a key technology in aircraft design which is ahead of physical experiment and complements it. Of course all three components of computational modeling are actively developed: mathematical models of real aerodynamic processes, numerical algorithms, and high-performance computing. The most impressive progress has been made in the field of computing, though with a considerable complication of computer architecture. Numerical algorithms are developed more conservative. More precisely, they are offered and theoretically justified for more simple mathematical problems. Nevertheless, computational mathematics now has amassed a whole palette of numerical algorithms that can provide acceptable accuracy and interface between modern mathematical models in aerodynamics and high-performance computers. A significant step in this direction was the European Project ADIGMA whose positive experience will be used in International Project TRISTAM for further movement in the field of computational technologies for aerodynamics. This paper gives a general overview of objectives and approaches intended to use and a description of the recommended four-stage computer technology.

  2. Reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coxe, Robin L. (Inventor); Galica, Gary E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Described are methods and apparatus, including computer program products, for reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing technology. An environmental signal representative of an external environmental condition is received. A processing configuration is automatically selected, based on the environmental signal, from a plurality of processing configurations. A reconfigurable processing element is reconfigured to operate according to the selected processing configuration. In some examples, the environmental condition is detected and the environmental signal is generated based on the detected condition.

  3. Computer Access in Higher Education for Students with Disabilities: A Practical Guide to the Selection and Use of Adapted Computer Technology. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carl; And Others

    The manual provides a review of trends in adapted computer technology as well as guidelines to the selection and use of computer technology in college programs serving disabled students. Changes in the second edition include a new section dealing with the computer access needs of the severely disabled, an enlarged product guide, a curriculum guide…

  4. Adaptive Technology that Provides Access to Computers. DO-IT Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brochure describes the different types of barriers individuals with mobility impairments, blindness, low vision, hearing impairments, and specific learning disabilities face in providing computer input, interpreting output, and reading documentation. The adaptive hardware and software that has been developed to provide functional alternatives…

  5. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  6. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  7. Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Architecture Adaptive Computing Environment (aCe) is a software system that includes a language, compiler, and run-time library for parallel computing. aCe was developed to enable programmers to write programs, more easily than was previously possible, for a variety of parallel computing architectures. Heretofore, it has been perceived to be difficult to write parallel programs for parallel computers and more difficult to port the programs to different parallel computing architectures. In contrast, aCe is supportable on all high-performance computing architectures. Currently, it is supported on LINUX clusters. aCe uses parallel programming constructs that facilitate writing of parallel programs. Such constructs were used in single-instruction/multiple-data (SIMD) programming languages of the 1980s, including Parallel Pascal, Parallel Forth, C*, *LISP, and MasPar MPL. In aCe, these constructs are extended and implemented for both SIMD and multiple- instruction/multiple-data (MIMD) architectures. Two new constructs incorporated in aCe are those of (1) scalar and virtual variables and (2) pre-computed paths. The scalar-and-virtual-variables construct increases flexibility in optimizing memory utilization in various architectures. The pre-computed-paths construct enables the compiler to pre-compute part of a communication operation once, rather than computing it every time the communication operation is performed.

  8. Computer adaptive testing.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Richard C

    2005-01-01

    The creation of item response theory (IRT) and Rasch models, inexpensive accessibility to high speed desktop computers, and the growth of the Internet, has led to the creation and growth of computerized adaptive testing or CAT. This form of assessment is applicable for both high stakes tests such as certification or licensure exams, as well as health related quality of life surveys. This article discusses the historical background of CAT including its many advantages over conventional (typically paper and pencil) alternatives. The process of CAT is then described including descriptions of the specific differences of using CAT based upon 1-, 2- and 3-parameter IRT and various Rasch models. Numerous specific topics describing CAT in practice are described including: initial item selection, content balancing, test difficulty, test length and stopping rules. The article concludes with the author's reflections regarding the future of CAT.

  9. Ubiquitous Computing Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    The prosperous development of wireless communication and sensor technologies has attracted the attention of researchers from both computer and education fields. Various investigations have been made for applying the new technologies to education purposes, such that more active and adaptive learning activities can be conducted in the real world.…

  10. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  11. Optimizing Computer Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon-Marable, Elizabeth; Valentine, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand what optimal computer technology integration looks like in adult basic skills education (ABSE). One question guided the research: How is computer technology integration best conceptualized and measured? The study used the Delphi method to map the construct of computer technology integration and…

  12. Computer Access. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on access including adaptations in input devices, output devices, and computer interfaces. Low technology devices include "no-technology" devices (usually modifications to existing devices), simple switches, and multiple switches. High technology input…

  13. Adaptive Technologies for Training and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durlach, Paula J., Ed; Lesgold, Alan M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This edited volume provides an overview of the latest advancements in adaptive training technology. Intelligent tutoring has been deployed for well-defined and relatively static educational domains such as algebra and geometry. However, this adaptive approach to computer-based training has yet to come into wider usage for domains that are less…

  14. Adaptive Devices and the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Florence M.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines for selecting appropriate assistive devices which afford disabled individuals access to computers are presented. In general, the individual who is to use the computer must be evaluated first to ensure that the adaptive device makes the most efficient use of his/her muscle control, mobility, reflexes, etc. (CB)

  15. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Hajah Rugayah Hj.; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2005-01-01

    As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have…

  16. Human Adaptation to the Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    8217"’ TECHNOSTRESS " 5 5’..,:. VI I. CONCLUSIONS-------------------------59 -- LIST OF REFERENCES-------------------------61 BI BLI OGRAPHY...computer has not developed. Instead, what has developed is a "modern disease of adaptation" called " technostress ," a phrase coined by Brod. Craig...34 technostress ." Managers (according to Brod) have been implementing computers in ways that contribute directly to this stress: [Ref. 3:p. 38) 1. They

  17. Equity of access: adaptive technology.

    PubMed

    Grodzinsky, F S

    2000-04-01

    In this age of information technology, it is morally imperative that equal access to information via computer systems be afforded to people with disabilities. This paper addresses the problems that computer technology poses for students with disabilities and discusses what is needed to ensure equity of access, particularly in a university environment.

  18. Computers boost structural technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    1989-01-01

    Derived from matrix methods of structural analysis and finite element methods developed over the last three decades, computational structures technology (CST) blends computer science, numerical analysis, and approximation theory into structural analysis and synthesis. Recent significant advances in CST include stochastic-based modeling, strategies for performing large-scale structural calculations on new computing systems, and the integration of CST with other disciplinary modules for multidisciplinary analysis and design. New methodologies have been developed at NASA for integrated fluid-thermal structural analysis and integrated aerodynamic-structure-control design. The need for multiple views of data for different modules also led to the development of a number of sophisticated data-base management systems. For CST to play a role in the future development of structures technology and in the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles, major advances and computational tools are needed in a number of key areas.

  19. Access to College for All: ITAC Project--Computer and Adaptive Computer Technologies in the Cegeps for Students with Disabilities = L'accessibilite au cegep pour tous: Projet ITAC--informatique et technologies adaptees dans les cegeps pour les etudiants handicapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Barile, Maria

    This report discusses outcomes of three empirical studies which investigated the computer and adaptive computer technology needs and concerns of Quebec college students with various disabilities, professors, and individuals responsible for providing services to students with disabilities. Key findings are highlighted and recommendations are made…

  20. Adaptive Testing without a Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    AO-A09? 353 AErSIARCH APPLICATIONS INC ROCKVILZI 14 P /s 5/9 ADAPTIVE TESTING WITHOUT A COMPUTER,(U) MAR 81 0 FRIEDMAN. A STEINBRG. N J RE I33615-?797...I -, IhI, III h II I I ,.-, r 11 % lll,.l ,n h . ,’l , ,, *i I.T I .- I,’ I I I ,I,, ’, I .I ,. I- Rofk %i h’ I l ,r I N ,,II I _ 2 1 W - P II11_...a., ,ol ) I ,I’l t \\I. I T1Hl.11’r . A a. SLCUi~~ AS AT ,N IF T HIS P AGE .’%h,, 0i.1. 1’ ,lli EPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE IIEI-op INST!WAI(T)s O U R

  1. Computational quantum chemistry and adaptive ligand modeling in mechanistic QSAR.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Pier G; Fanelli, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Drugs are adaptive molecules. They realize this peculiarity by generating different ensembles of prototropic forms and conformers that depend on the environment. Among the impressive amount of available computational drug discovery technologies, quantitative structure-activity relationship approaches that rely on computational quantum chemistry descriptors are the most appropriate to model adaptive drugs. Indeed, computational quantum chemistry descriptors are able to account for the variation of the intramolecular interactions of the training compounds, which reflect their adaptive intermolecular interaction propensities. This enables the development of causative, interpretive and reasonably predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models, and, hence, sound chemical information finalized to drug design and discovery.

  2. Computer Technology in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slider, Patty; Hodges, Kathy; Carter, Cea; White, Barbara

    This publication provides materials to help adult educators use computer technology in their teaching. Section 1, Computer Basics, contains activities and materials on these topics: increasing computer literacy, computer glossary, parts of a computer, keyboard, disk care, highlighting text, scrolling and wrap-around text, setting up text,…

  3. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  4. Principals' Relationship with Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockmeier, Lantry L.; Sermon, Janet M.; Hope, Warren C.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation sought information about principals and their relationship with computer technology. Several questions were fundamental to the inquiry. Are principals prepared to facilitate the attainment of technology's promise through the integration of computer technology into the teaching and learning process? Are principals prepared to use…

  5. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  6. Computer Accessibility Technology Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This technology information packet includes information about the technical aspects of access to technology, legal obligations concerning technology and individuals with disabilities, and a list of resources for further information and assistance. A question and answer section addresses: barriers to educational technology for students with…

  7. QPSO-based adaptive DNA computing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm.

  8. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  9. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  10. Computer Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

    The influences of computer technology on college nursing education programs and health care delivery systems are discussed in eight papers. The use of computers is considered, with attention to clinical care, nursing education and continuing education, administration, and research. Attention is also directed to basic computer terminology, computer…

  11. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  12. Adaptive Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-16

    1993. [17] James F. Blinn. Jim Blinn’s corner: Fugue for MMX. IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 17(2):88– 93, March/April 1997. Makes several...processors. IEEE Transactions on Computers, C-29(4):308–316, April 1980. [22] Doug Burger and James R. Goodman. Guest editors introduction: Billion...sequencing and scheduling: A survey. Ann. Discrete Mathematics, 5:287–326, 1979. [58] C. Ebeling D. C. Green and P. Franklin . RaPiD – reconfigurable

  13. Opinion: Adaptive Computing and the Internet: One Step forward, Two Steps Back?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1994-01-01

    This overview of adaptive technology for computers and networking identifies issues that must be addressed for people with disabilities to participate fully in online activities. Discussion includes adaptive equipment; Internet access; and graphical user interface (GUI) concerns. Contact information for vendors for adaptive technology and…

  14. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Shell Oil Company used a COSMIC program, called VISCEL to insure the accuracy of the company's new computer code for analyzing polymers, and chemical compounds. Shell reported that there were no other programs available that could provide the necessary calculations. Shell produces chemicals for plastic products used in the manufacture of automobiles, housewares, appliances, film, textiles, electronic equipment and furniture.

  15. Computer Technology and Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garson, G. David

    Computing involves social issues and political choices. Issues such as privacy, computer crime, gender inequity, disemployment, and electronic democracy versus "Big Brother" are addressed in the context of efforts to develop a national public policy for information technology. A broad range of research and case studies are examined in an…

  16. Technology Trends: Buying a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strot, Melody; Benno, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Provides guidelines for buying computers for parents of gifted children. Steps for making decisions include deciding who will use the computer, deciding its purposes and what software packages will be used, determining current and future needs, setting a budget, and reviewing needs with salespersons and school-based technology specialists. (CR)

  17. Adaptive multiclass classification for brain computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Llera, A; Gómez, V; Kappen, H J

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of multiclass adaptive classification for brain-computer interfaces and propose the use of multiclass pooled mean linear discriminant analysis (MPMLDA), a multiclass generalization of the adaptation rule introduced by Vidaurre, Kawanabe, von Bünau, Blankertz, and Müller (2010) for the binary class setting. Using publicly available EEG data sets and tangent space mapping (Barachant, Bonnet, Congedo, & Jutten, 2012) as a feature extractor, we demonstrate that MPMLDA can significantly outperform state-of-the-art multiclass static and adaptive methods. Furthermore, efficient learning rates can be achieved using data from different subjects.

  18. Evaluation Parameters for Computer-Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiadou, Elisabeth; Triantafillou, Evangelos; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2006-01-01

    With the proliferation of computers in test delivery today, adaptive testing has become quite popular, especially when examinees must be classified into two categories (passfail, master nonmaster). Several well-established organisations have provided standards and guidelines for the design and evaluation of educational and psychological testing.…

  19. Computer Adaptive Testing: A New Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smittle, Pat

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study to determine whether traditional paper-and-pencil tests or new computer-adaptive tests were better suited for assessing entering students at Santa Fe Community College, Florida. Focuses on teachers' attitudes toward computerized placement tests (CPTs), relationships between CPT scores and course grades, predictive ability of CPT…

  20. Climate adaptation: Holistic thinking beyond technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Emily

    2017-02-01

    The countries most vulnerable to climate change impacts are among the poorest in the world. A recent evaluation of Least Developed Countries Fund projects suggests that adaptation efforts must move beyond technological solutions.

  1. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  2. Adaptive and perceptual learning technologies in medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Philip J

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in the learning sciences offer remarkable potential to improve medical education and maximize the benefits of emerging medical technologies. This article describes 2 major innovation areas in the learning sciences that apply to simulation and other aspects of medical learning: Perceptual learning (PL) and adaptive learning technologies. PL technology offers, for the first time, systematic, computer-based methods for teaching pattern recognition, structural intuition, transfer, and fluency. Synergistic with PL are new adaptive learning technologies that optimize learning for each individual, embed objective assessment, and implement mastery criteria. The author describes the Adaptive Response-Time-based Sequencing (ARTS) system, which uses each learner's accuracy and speed in interactive learning to guide spacing, sequencing, and mastery. In recent efforts, these new technologies have been applied in medical learning contexts, including adaptive learning modules for initial medical diagnosis and perceptual/adaptive learning modules (PALMs) in dermatology, histology, and radiology. Results of all these efforts indicate the remarkable potential of perceptual and adaptive learning technologies, individually and in combination, to improve learning in a variety of medical domains.

  3. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  4. Computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Card, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: goals of computational technology for high-temperature structures; computational material modeling; life prediction methodology; computational modeling of high-temperature composites; error estimation and adaptive improvement strategies; strategies for solution of fluid flow/thermal/structural problems; and probabilistic methods and stochastic modeling approaches, integrated analysis and design. Recent trends in high-performance computing environment are described and the research areas which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified.

  5. Teacher Teams and Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.; Roberts, Nicole K.; Schoon, Perry L.; Fansler, Gigi

    This research used three groups in a quasi-experimental approach to assess the combined impact of teacher teaming and computer technology on student grade point averages (GPAs). Ninth-grade students' academic achievement in each of four different subject areas (algebra, biology, world cultures, and English) was studied. Two separate treatments…

  6. Optical Computers and Space Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis; Hicks, Rosilen; Shields, Angela

    1995-01-01

    The rapidly increasing demand for greater speed and efficiency on the information superhighway requires significant improvements over conventional electronic logic circuits. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strong candidates to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by the conventional electronic logic circuits. The new optical technology has increased the demand for high quality optical materials. NASA's recent involvement in processing optical materials in space has demonstrated that a new and unique class of high quality optical materials are processible in a microgravity environment. Microgravity processing can induce improved orders in these materials and could have a significant impact on the development of optical computers. We will discuss NASA's role in processing these materials and report on some of the associated nonlinear optical properties which are quite useful for optical computers technology.

  7. Comparison of Item Targeting Strategies for Pass/Fail Computer Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Betty A.; Gershon, Richard

    The most useful method of item selection for making pass-fail decisions with a Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT) was studied. Medical technology students (n=86) took a computer adaptive test in which items were targeted to the ability of the examinee. The adaptive algorithm that selected items and estimated person measures used the Rasch model and…

  8. Cooling Technology for Electronic Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Wataru

    The rapid growth of data processing speed in computers has been sustained by the advances in cooling technology. This article first presents a review of the published data of heat loads in recent Japanese large-scale computers. The survey indicates that, since around 1980, the high-level integration of microelectronic circuits has brought about almost four fold increase in the power dissipation from logic chips. The integration also has invited the evolutions of multichip modules and new schemes of electronic interconnections. Forced convection air-cooling and liquid cooling coupled with thermal connectors are discussed with reference to the designs employed in actual computers. More advanced cooling schemes are also discussed. Finally, the importance of thermal environmental control of computer rooms is emphasized.

  9. ASP: a parallel computing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, R. M.

    1990-09-01

    ASP modules constitute the basis of a parallel computing technology platform for the rapid development of a broad range of numeric and symbolic information processing systems. Based on off-the-shelf general-purpose hardware and software modules ASP technology is intended to increase productivity in the development (and competitiveness in the marketing) of cost-effective low-MIMD/high-SIMD Massively Parallel Processor (MPPs). The paper discusses ASP module philosophy and demonstrates how ASP modules can satisfy the market algorithmic architectural and engineering requirements of such MPPs. In particular two specific ASP modules based on VLSI and WSI technologies are studied as case examples of ASP technology the latter reporting 1 TOPS/fl3 1 GOPS/W and 1 MOPS/$ as ball-park figures-of-merit of cost-effectiveness.

  10. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  11. Adaptive security systems -- Combining expert systems with adaptive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.; Loveland, R.; Anderson, K.

    1997-09-01

    The Adaptive Multisensor Integrated Security System (AMISS) uses a variety of computational intelligence techniques to reason from raw sensor data through an array of processing layers to arrive at an assessment for alarm/alert conditions based on human behavior within a secure facility. In this paper, the authors give an overview of the system and briefly describe some of the major components of the system. This system is currently under development and testing in a realistic facility setting.

  12. Towards psychologically adaptive brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrden, A.; Chau, T.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) performance is sensitive to short-term changes in psychological states such as fatigue, frustration, and attention. This paper explores the design of a BCI that can adapt to these short-term changes. Approach. Eleven able-bodied individuals participated in a study during which they used a mental task-based EEG-BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while self-reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. In an offline analysis, a regression algorithm was trained to predict changes in these states, yielding Pearson correlation coefficients in excess of 0.45 between the self-reported and predicted states. Two means of fusing the resultant mental state predictions with mental task classification were investigated. First, single-trial mental state predictions were used to predict correct classification by the BCI during each trial. Second, an adaptive BCI was designed that retrained a new classifier for each testing sample using only those training samples for which predicted mental state was similar to that predicted for the current testing sample. Main results. Mental state-based prediction of BCI reliability exceeded chance levels. The adaptive BCI exhibited significant, but practically modest, increases in classification accuracy for five of 11 participants and no significant difference for the remaining six despite a smaller average training set size. Significance. Collectively, these findings indicate that adaptation to psychological state may allow the design of more accurate BCIs.

  13. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  14. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will

  15. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will

  16. Adaptable Computing Environment/Self-Assembling Software

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Gordon C.; Bouchard, Ann M.; Bartholomew, John W.

    2007-09-25

    Complex software applications are difficult to learn to use and to remember how to use. Further, the user has no control over the functionality available in a given application. The software we use can be created and modified only by a relatively small group of elite, highly skilled artisans known as programmers. "Normal users" are powerless to create and modify software themselves, because the tools for software development, designed by and for programmers, are a barrier to entry. This software, when completed, will be a user-adaptable computing environment in which the user is really in control of his/her own software, able to adapt the system, make new parts of the system interactive, and even modify the behavior of the system itself. Som key features of the basic environment that have been implemented are (a) books in bookcases, where all data is stored, (b) context-sensitive compass menus (compass, because the buttons are located in compass directions relative to the mouose cursor position), (c) importing tabular data and displaying it in a book, (d) light-weight table querying/sorting, (e) a Reach&Get capability (sort of a "smart" copy/paste that prevents the user from copying invalid data), and (f) a LogBook that automatically logs all user actions that change data or the system itself. To bootstrap toward full end-user adaptability, we implemented a set of development tools. With the development tools, compass menus can be made and customized.

  17. Computer technologies and institutional memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

  18. Teaching with technology: computer basics.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane

    2009-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes approaches to finding information on the Web. Web-based search tools including Internet search engines, organizational databases, and those at the library will be discussed. Techniques to evaluate the validity, usefulness, and applicability of search outcomes are included.

  19. Military engine computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

  20. Adaptive Management of Computing and Network Resources for Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Barbara; Welch, Lonnie R.; Detter, Ryan; Tjaden, Brett; Huh, Eui-Nam; Szczur, Martha R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that NASA's future spacecraft systems will consist of distributed processes which will handle dynamically varying workloads in response to perceived scientific events, the spacecraft environment, spacecraft anomalies and user commands. Since all situations and possible uses of sensors cannot be anticipated during pre-deployment phases, an approach for dynamically adapting the allocation of distributed computational and communication resources is needed. To address this, we are evolving the DeSiDeRaTa adaptive resource management approach to enable reconfigurable ground and space information systems. The DeSiDeRaTa approach embodies a set of middleware mechanisms for adapting resource allocations, and a framework for reasoning about the real-time performance of distributed application systems. The framework and middleware will be extended to accommodate (1) the dynamic aspects of intra-constellation network topologies, and (2) the complete real-time path from the instrument to the user. We are developing a ground-based testbed that will enable NASA to perform early evaluation of adaptive resource management techniques without the expense of first deploying them in space. The benefits of the proposed effort are numerous, including the ability to use sensors in new ways not anticipated at design time; the production of information technology that ties the sensor web together; the accommodation of greater numbers of missions with fewer resources; and the opportunity to leverage the DeSiDeRaTa project's expertise, infrastructure and models for adaptive resource management for distributed real-time systems.

  1. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-01-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme. PMID:27841339

  2. Multi-scale Adaptive Computational Ghost Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuai; Liu, Wei-Tao; Lin, Hui-Zu; Zhang, Er-Feng; Liu, Ji-Ying; Li, Quan; Chen, Ping-Xing

    2016-11-01

    In some cases of imaging, wide spatial range and high spatial resolution are both required, which requests high performance of detection devices and huge resource consumption for data processing. We propose and demonstrate a multi-scale adaptive imaging method based on the idea of computational ghost imaging, which can obtain a rough outline of the whole scene with a wide range then accordingly find out the interested parts and achieve high-resolution details of those parts, by controlling the field of view and the transverse coherence width of the pseudo-thermal field illuminated on the scene with a spatial light modulator. Compared to typical ghost imaging, the resource consumption can be dramatically reduced using our scheme.

  3. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  4. Case Studies in Computer Adaptive Test Design through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eignor, Daniel R.; And Others

    The extensive computer simulation work done in developing the computer adaptive versions of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Board General Test and the College Board Admissions Testing Program (ATP) Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is described in this report. Both the GRE General and SAT computer adaptive tests (CATs), which are fixed length…

  5. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  6. Confidence in Pass/Fail Decisions for Computer Adaptive and Paper and Pencil Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Betty A.; Lunz, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The level of confidence in pass/fail decisions obtained with computerized adaptive tests and paper-and-pencil tests was greater for 645 medical technology students when the computer adaptive test implemented a 90 percent confidence stopping rule than for paper-and-pencil tests of comparable length. (SLD)

  7. Art and Technology: Computers in the Studio?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby-Baird, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Because the graphic industry demands graduates with computer skills, art students want college programs that include complex computer technologies. However, students can produce good computer art only if they have mastered traditional drawing and design skills. Discusses designing an art curriculum including both technology and traditional course…

  8. Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

  9. Retinal imaging using adaptive optics technology.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor

    2014-04-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effect of wave front distortions. Retinal imaging using AO aims to compensate for higher order aberrations originating from the cornea and the lens by using deformable mirror. The main application of AO retinal imaging has been to assess photoreceptor cell density, spacing, and mosaic regularity in normal and diseased eyes. Apart from photoreceptors, the retinal pigment epithelium, retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal vessel wall and lamina cribrosa can also be visualized with AO technology. Recent interest in AO technology in eye research has resulted in growing number of reports and publications utilizing this technology in both animals and humans. With the availability of first commercially available instruments we are making transformation of AO technology from a research tool to diagnostic instrument. The current challenges include imaging eyes with less than perfect optical media, formation of normative databases for acquired images such as cone mosaics, and the cost of the technology. The opportunities for AO will include more detailed diagnosis with description of some new findings in retinal diseases and glaucoma as well as expansion of AO into clinical trials which has already started.

  10. ICAN Computer Code Adapted for Building Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been involved in developing composite micromechanics and macromechanics theories over the last three decades. These activities have resulted in several composite mechanics theories and structural analysis codes whose applications range from material behavior design and analysis to structural component response. One of these computer codes, the Integrated Composite Analyzer (ICAN), is designed primarily to address issues related to designing polymer matrix composites and predicting their properties - including hygral, thermal, and mechanical load effects. Recently, under a cost-sharing cooperative agreement with a Fortune 500 corporation, Master Builders Inc., ICAN was adapted to analyze building materials. The high costs and technical difficulties involved with the fabrication of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites sometimes limit their use. Particulate-reinforced composites can be thought of as a viable alternative. They are as easily processed to near-net shape as monolithic materials, yet have the improved stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness that is characteristic of continuous-fiber-reinforced composites. For example, particlereinforced metal-matrix composites show great potential for a variety of automotive applications, such as disk brake rotors, connecting rods, cylinder liners, and other hightemperature applications. Building materials, such as concrete, can be thought of as one of the oldest materials in this category of multiphase, particle-reinforced materials. The adaptation of ICAN to analyze particle-reinforced composite materials involved the development of new micromechanics-based theories. A derivative of the ICAN code, ICAN/PART, was developed and delivered to Master Builders Inc. as a part of the cooperative activity.

  11. Adaptive Resource Management Technology for Satellite Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Lonnie; Tjaden, Brett; Pfarr, Barbara B.; Hennessy, Joseph F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This manuscript describes the Sensor Web Adaptive Resource Manager (SWARM) project. The primary focus of the project is on the design and prototyping of middleware for managing computing and network resources in a way that enables the information systems of satellite constellations to provide realtime performance within dynamic environments. The middleware has been prototyped, and it has been evaluated by employing it to manage a pool of distributed resources for the ITOS (Integrated Test and Operations System) satellite command and control software system. The design of the middleware is discussed and a summary of the evaluation effort is provided.

  12. A Very High Order, Adaptable MESA Implementation for Aeroacoustic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dydson, Roger W.; Goodrich, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Since computational efficiency and wave resolution scale with accuracy, the ideal would be infinitely high accuracy for problems with widely varying wavelength scales. Currently, many of the computational aeroacoustics methods are limited to 4th order accurate Runge-Kutta methods in time which limits their resolution and efficiency. However, a new procedure for implementing the Modified Expansion Solution Approximation (MESA) schemes, based upon Hermitian divided differences, is presented which extends the effective accuracy of the MESA schemes to 57th order in space and time when using 128 bit floating point precision. This new approach has the advantages of reducing round-off error, being easy to program. and is more computationally efficient when compared to previous approaches. Its accuracy is limited only by the floating point hardware. The advantages of this new approach are demonstrated by solving the linearized Euler equations in an open bi-periodic domain. A 500th order MESA scheme can now be created in seconds, making these schemes ideally suited for the next generation of high performance 256-bit (double quadruple) or higher precision computers. This ease of creation makes it possible to adapt the algorithm to the mesh in time instead of its converse: this is ideal for resolving varying wavelength scales which occur in noise generation simulations. And finally, the sources of round-off error which effect the very high order methods are examined and remedies provided that effectively increase the accuracy of the MESA schemes while using current computer technology.

  13. Computer Technology: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withington, Frederic G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature of modern general-purpose computer systems, including hardware, semiconductor electronics, microprocessors, computer architecture, input output technology, and system control programs. Seven suggested readings are cited. (FM)

  14. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    PubMed

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities.

  15. Operator versus computer control of adaptive automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburn, Brian; Molloy, Robert; Wong, Dick; Parasuraman, Raja

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive automation refers to real-time allocation of functions between the human operator and automated subsystems. The article reports the results of a series of experiments whose aim is to examine the effects of adaptive automation on operator performance during multi-task flight simulation, and to provide an empirical basis for evaluations of different forms of adaptive logic. The combined results of these studies suggest several things. First, it appears that either excessively long, or excessively short, adaptation cycles can limit the effectiveness of adaptive automation in enhancing operator performance of both primary flight and monitoring tasks. Second, occasional brief reversions to manual control can counter some of the monitoring inefficiency typically associated with long cycle automation, and further, that benefits of such reversions can be sustained for some time after return to automated control. Third, no evidence was found that the benefits of such reversions depend on the adaptive logic by which long-cycle adaptive switches are triggered.

  16. Assessing Existing Item Bank Depth for Computer Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Betty A.; Stahl, John A.

    This paper reports a method for assessing the adequacy of existing item banks for computer adaptive testing. The method takes into account content specifications, test length, and stopping rules, and can be used to determine if an existing item bank is adequate to administer a computer adaptive test efficiently across differing levels of examinee…

  17. Test Anxiety, Computer-Adaptive Testing and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Nicole Makas

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the current findings and issues regarding the role of computer-adaptive testing in test anxiety. The computer-adaptive test (CAT) proposed by one of the Common Core consortia brings these issues to the forefront. Research has long indicated that test anxiety impairs student performance. More recent research indicates that…

  18. Adaptive wing and flow control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanewsky, E.

    2001-10-01

    The development of the boundary layer and the interaction of the boundary layer with the outer “inviscid” flow field, exacerbated at high speed by the occurrence of shock waves, essentially determine the performance boundaries of high-speed flight. Furthermore, flight and freestream conditions may change considerably during an aircraft mission while the aircraft itself is only designed for multiple but fixed design points thus impairing overall performance. Consequently, flow and boundary layer control and adaptive wing technology may have revolutionary new benefits for take-off, landing and cruise operating conditions for many aircraft by enabling real-time effective geometry optimization relative to the flight conditions. In this paper we will consider various conventional and novel means of boundary layer and flow control applied to moderate-to-large aspect ratio wings, delta wings and bodies with the specific objectives of drag reduction, lift enhancement, separation suppression and the improvement of air-vehicle control effectiveness. In addition, adaptive wing concepts of varying complexity and corresponding aerodynamic performance gains will be discussed, also giving some examples of possible structural realizations. Furthermore, penalties associated with the implementation of control and adaptation mechanisms into actual aircraft will be addressed. Note that the present contribution is rather application oriented.

  19. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A; De Luigi, Arthur Jason

    2014-08-01

    Wheelchair sports are an important tool in the rehabilitation of people with severe chronic disabilities and have been a driving force for innovation in technology and practice. In this paper, we will present an overview of the adaptive technology used in Paralympic sports with a special focus on wheeled technology and the impact of design on performance (defined as achieving the greatest level of athletic ability and minimizing the risk of injury). Many advances in manual wheelchairs trace their origins to wheelchair sports. Features of wheelchairs that were used for racing and basketball 25 or more years ago have become integral to the manual wheelchairs that people now use every day; moreover, the current components used on ultralight wheelchairs also have benefitted from technological advances developed for sports wheelchairs. For example, the wheels now used on chairs for daily mobility incorporate many of the components first developed for sports chairs. Also, advances in manufacturing and the availability of aerospace materials have driven current wheelchair design and manufacture. Basic principles of sports wheelchair design are universal across sports and include fit; minimizing weight while maintaining high stiffness; minimizing rolling resistance; and optimizing the sports-specific design of the chair. However, a well-designed and fitted wheelchair is not sufficient for optimal sports performance: the athlete must be well trained, skilled, and use effective biomechanics because wheelchair athletes face some unique biomechanical challenges.

  20. Employee Resistance to Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of computers to the work place may cause employee stress. Aggressive, protective, and avoidance behaviors are forms of staff resistance. The development of good training programs will enhance productivity. Suggestions for evaluating computer systems are offered. (DF)

  1. Implementation of Multispectral Image Classification on a Remote Adaptive Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueiredo, Marco A.; Gloster, Clay S.; Stephens, Mark; Graves, Corey A.; Nakkar, Mouna

    1999-01-01

    As the demand for higher performance computers for the processing of remote sensing science algorithms increases, the need to investigate new computing paradigms its justified. Field Programmable Gate Arrays enable the implementation of algorithms at the hardware gate level, leading to orders of m a,gnitude performance increase over microprocessor based systems. The automatic classification of spaceborne multispectral images is an example of a computation intensive application, that, can benefit from implementation on an FPGA - based custom computing machine (adaptive or reconfigurable computer). A probabilistic neural network is used here to classify pixels of of a multispectral LANDSAT-2 image. The implementation described utilizes Java client/server application programs to access the adaptive computer from a remote site. Results verify that a remote hardware version of the algorithm (implemented on an adaptive computer) is significantly faster than a local software version of the same algorithm implemented on a typical general - purpose computer).

  2. Adaptive Technologies. Research Report. ETS RR-07-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shute, Valerie J.; Zapata-Rivera, Diego

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes research and development efforts related to adaptive technologies, which can be combined with other technologies and processes to form an adaptive system. The goal of an adaptive system, in the context of this paper, is to create an instructionally sound and flexible environment that supports learning for students with a range…

  3. College Students' Attitude towards Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njagi, K. O.; Havice, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the contemporary world, especially in the area of computer technology, have heralded the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies and particularly with the Internet revolution. This study assessed students' attitude towards computer technology. Specifically, the study assessed differences in…

  4. Computer Technology-Infused Learning Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Anyanwu, Longy O.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine students' perception of instructional integration of computer technology to improve learning. Two key questions were investigated in this study: (a) What is the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology into classroom instruction? (b) To what extent does the students' perception of…

  5. Computer Technology and Education: A Policy Delphi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steier, Lloyd P.

    Realizing the educational potential of computer technology largely depends on developing appropriate policies related to the technology. A Policy Delphi method was used to identify changes in education that are both probable and possible on account of the introduction of computers, and to explore potential patterns for arriving at a desired…

  6. Prior Computer Experience and Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Prior computer experience with information technology has been identified as a key variable (Lee, Kozar, & Larsen, 2003) that can influence an individual's future use of newer computer technology. The lack of a theory driven approach to measuring prior experience has however led to conceptually different factors being used interchangeably in…

  7. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  8. The research on thermal adaptability reinforcement technology for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Nana; Zhou, Guozhong

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, Photovoltaic module contains more high-performance components in smaller space. It is also demanded to work in severe temperature condition for special use, such as aerospace. As temperature rises, the failure rate will increase exponentially which makes reliability significantly reduce. In order to improve thermal adaptability of photovoltaic module, this paper makes a research on reinforcement technologies. Thermoelectric cooler is widely used in aerospace which has harsh working environment. So, theoretical formulas for computing refrigerating efficiency, refrigerating capacity and temperature difference are described in detail. The optimum operating current of three classical working condition is obtained which can be used to guide the design of driven circuit. Taken some equipment enclosure for example, we use thermoelectric cooler to reinforce its thermal adaptability. By building physical model and thermal model with the aid of physical dimension and constraint condition, the model is simulated by Flotherm. The temperature field cloud is shown to verify the effectiveness of reinforcement.

  9. Computing Environment for Adaptive Multiscale Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    Computation Research Center (SCOREC). The primary component is a parallel computing cluster with 22 Dell R620 compute nodes, each with two 8-core...cluster with 22 Dell R620 compute nodes, each with two 8-core 2.6 GHz Intel Xeon processors (352 processors) and a direct connection to both a 56Gbps...compute  cluster  purchased  with  the  DURIP  funds  consists  of  22   Dell  R620  compute  nodes,  each  with  two  8

  10. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the…

  11. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  12. Education & Technology: Reflections on Computing in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Charles, Ed.; Dwyer, David C., Ed.; Yocam, Keith, Ed.

    This volume examines learning in the age of technology, describes changing practices in technology-rich classrooms, and proposes new ways to support teachers as they incorporate technology into their work. It commemorates the eleventh anniversary of the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) Project, when Apple Computer, Inc., in partnership with a…

  13. RASCAL: A Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John Christopher

    Both the background of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems in general and the requirements of a computer-aided learning system which would be a reasonable assistant to a teacher are discussed. RASCAL (Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning) is a first attempt at defining a CAI system which would individualize the learning…

  14. The Efficacy of Psychophysiological Measures for Implementing Adaptive Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scerbo, Mark W.; Freeman, Frederick G.; Mikulka, Peter J.; Parasuraman, Raja; DiNocero, Francesco; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2001-01-01

    Adaptive automation refers to technology that can change its mode of operation dynamically. Further, both the technology and the operator can initiate changes in the level or mode of automation. The present paper reviews research on adaptive technology. It is divided into three primary sections. In the first section, issues surrounding the development and implementation of adaptive automation are presented. Because physiological-based measures show much promise for implementing adaptive automation, the second section is devoted to examining candidate indices. In the final section, those techniques that show the greatest promise for adaptive automation as well as issues that still need to be resolved are discussed.

  15. Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, John; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology Program (CICT) was established in 2001 to ensure NASA's Continuing leadership in emerging technologies. It is a coordinated, Agency-wide effort to develop and deploy key enabling technologies for a broad range of mission-critical tasks. The NASA CICT program is designed to address Agency-specific computing, information, and communications technology requirements beyond the projected capabilities of commercially available solutions. The areas of technical focus have been chosen for their impact on NASA's missions, their national importance, and the technical challenge they provide to the Program. In order to meet its objectives, the CICT Program is organized into the following four technology focused projects: 1) Computing, Networking and Information Systems (CNIS); 2) Intelligent Systems (IS); 3) Space Communications (SC); 4) Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR).

  16. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    Scientists usually identify themselves as either theoreticians or experimentalists, while technology - the application of science in practice - is done by engineers. In computer science, these distinctions are often blurred. This paper examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by the winners of the prestigious Turing Award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. The reasons why TGT is practical in computer science are discussed, as is the cool reception that TGT has been received by software engineers.

  17. (CICT) Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) program is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communications technologies. This viewgraph presentation includes diagrams of how the political guidance behind CICT is structured. The presentation profiles each part of the NASA Mission in detail, and relates the Mission to the activities of CICT. CICT's Integrated Capability Goal is illustrated, and hypothetical missions which could be enabled by CICT are profiled. CICT technology development is profiled.

  18. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  19. The Computer as Adaptive Instructional Decision Maker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopstein, Felix F.; Seidel, Robert J.

    The computer's potential for education, and most particularly for instruction, is contingent on the development of a class of instructional decision models (formal instructional strategies) that interact with the student through appropriate peripheral equipment (man-machine interfaces). Computer hardware and software by themselves should not be…

  20. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  1. A Guide to Computer Adaptive Testing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Some brand names are used generically to describe an entire class of products that perform the same function. "Kleenex," "Xerox," "Thermos," and "Band-Aid" are good examples. The term "computerized adaptive testing" (CAT) is similar in that it is often applied uniformly across a diverse family of testing methods. Although the various members of…

  2. Computer Programming Projects in Technology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses programming projects in applied technology courses, examining documentation, formal reports, and implementation. Includes recommendations based on experience with a sophomore machine elements course which provided computers for problem solving exercises. (DH)

  3. Ultimate computing. Biomolecular consciousness and nano Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hameroff, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book advances the premise that the cytoskeleton is the cell's nervous system, the biological controller/computer. If indeed cytoskeletal dynamics in the nanoscale (billionth meter, billionth second) are the texture of intracellular information processing, emerging ''NanoTechnologies'' (scanning tunneling microscopy, Feynman machines, von Neumann replicators, etc.) should enable direct monitoring, decoding and interfacing between biological and technological information devices. This in turn could result in important biomedical applications and perhaps a merger of mind and machine: Ultimate Computing.

  4. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  5. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc.

  6. Computer Maintenance Technology. Suggested Basic Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This competency-based basic course outline is designed for a two-year secondary program in computer maintenance technology. The first year is devoted to basic electricity and electronics, the second to the troubleshooting, maintenance, and service of microcomputers. (The repair section is based upon the Apple II computer, disc drive, monitor, and…

  7. Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jack, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Focusing on how computers can and should be used in intercollegiate forensics, this journal issue offers the perspectives of a number of forensics instructors. The lead article, "Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate" by Theodore F. Sheckels, Jr., discusses five areas in which forensics educators might use computer…

  8. Computer Technology: For Better or Worse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Willis H.

    Computer technology ought to be among the most helpful and useful of any technology, but if it is not treated with care, the society will be worse off for it. The Federal Privacy Act of 1974 established the Privacy Protection Study Commission whose business started in June, 1975. In examination of the private sector, the commission's…

  9. Implementing Computer Technologies: Teachers' Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wozney, Lori; Venkatesh, Vivek; Abrami, Philip

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates personal and setting characteristics, teacher attitudes, and current computer technology practices among 764 elementary and secondary teachers from both private and public school sectors in Quebec. Using expectancy-value theory, the Technology Implementation Questionnaire (TIQ) was developed; it consists of 33 belief items…

  10. [Computer-assisted monitoring systems. Use of computer networks and internet technologies].

    PubMed

    Flerov, E V; Sablin, I N; Broĭtman, O G; Tolmachev, V A; Batchaev, Sh S

    2005-01-01

    The automated workplace (AWP) of anesthesiologist developed by the early 1990s provided data collection and processing, viewing of all monitors, and printing of anesthesiological chart (AC). AWP is a subject of continuous modification and adaptation to variable conditions. Computer monitoring including various measuring devises equipped with series interface RS-232 was implemented in Russian Research Center for Surgery. Rapid progress in computer network technologies made it necessary to adapt AWP to operation in computer networks. Since 1999 the computer network has been connected to the Internet. The use of computer technologies, including Internet, provides remote access to AC, thereby providing conditions for remote monitoring. AWP of anesthesiologist can be regarded as an automated control system of the patient state operated by anesthesiologist. Specific features of data processing in AWP are described. The AWP system is planed to be multiprocessor with distributed data flow. The suggested structure of computer network system for surgery rooms meeting the requirements of WWW-technology connected to the Internet is a promising approach to remote monitoring in medicine.

  11. Multithreaded Model for Dynamic Load Balancing Parallel Adaptive PDE Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisochoides, Nikos

    1995-01-01

    We present a multithreaded model for the dynamic load-balancing of numerical, adaptive computations required for the solution of Partial Differential Equations (PDE's) on multiprocessors. Multithreading is used as a means of exploring concurrency in the processor level in order to tolerate synchronization costs inherent to traditional (non-threaded) parallel adaptive PDE solvers. Our preliminary analysis for parallel, adaptive PDE solvers indicates that multithreading can be used an a mechanism to mask overheads required for the dynamic balancing of processor workloads with computations required for the actual numerical solution of the PDE's. Also, multithreading can simplify the implementation of dynamic load-balancing algorithms, a task that is very difficult for traditional data parallel adaptive PDE computations. Unfortunately, multithreading does not always simplify program complexity, often makes code re-usability not an easy task, and increases software complexity.

  12. Simple and Effective Algorithms: Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linacre, John Michael

    Computer-adaptive testing (CAT) allows improved security, greater scoring accuracy, shorter testing periods, quicker availability of results, and reduced guessing and other undesirable test behavior. Simple approaches can be applied by the classroom teacher, or other content specialist, who possesses simple computer equipment and elementary…

  13. An Adaptive Evaluation Structure for Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, William A.

    Adaptive Evaluation Structure (AES) is a set of linked computer programs designed to increase the effectiveness of interactive computer-assisted instruction at the college level. The package has four major features, the first of which is based on a prior cognitive inventory and on the accuracy and pace of student responses. AES adjusts materials…

  14. Confidence in Pass/Fail Decisions for Computer Adaptive and Paper and Pencil Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Betty A.; Lunz, Mary E.

    The level of confidence in pass/fail decisions obtained with computer adaptive tests (CATs) was compared to decisions based on paper-and-pencil tests. Subjects included 645 medical technology students from 238 educational programs across the country. The tests used in this study constituted part of the subjects' review for the certification…

  15. Adapting Technological Interventions to Meet the Needs of Priority Populations.

    PubMed

    Linke, Sarah E; Larsen, Britta A; Marquez, Becky; Mendoza-Vasconez, Andrea; Marcus, Bess H

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) comprise the leading cause of mortality worldwide, accounting for 3 in 10 deaths. Individuals with certain risk factors, including tobacco use, obesity, low levels of physical activity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, racial/ethnic minority status and low socioeconomic status, experience higher rates of CVD and are, therefore, considered priority populations. Technological devices such as computers and smartphones are now routinely utilized in research studies aiming to prevent CVD and its risk factors, and they are also rampant in the public and private health sectors. Traditional health behavior interventions targeting these risk factors have been adapted for technology-based approaches. This review provides an overview of technology-based interventions conducted in these priority populations as well as the challenges and gaps to be addressed in future research. Researchers currently possess tremendous opportunities to engage in technology-based implementation and dissemination science to help spread evidence-based programs focusing on CVD risk factors in these and other priority populations.

  16. Implementations of adaptive associative optical computing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Arthur D.; Lee, John N.; Fukuda, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present optical implementations for heteroassociative memory modules, which are capable of real time adaptive learning, are pertinent to the eventual construction of large, multimodule associative/neural network architectures that can consider problems in the acquisition, transformation, matching/recognition, and manipulation of large amounts of data in parallel. These modules offer such performance features as convergence to the least-squares-optimum pseudoinverse association, accumulative and gated learning, forgetfulness of unused associations, resistance to dynamic-range saturation, and compensation of optical system aberrations. Optics uniquely furnish the massive parallel interconnection paths required to cascade and interconnect a number of modules to form the more sophisticated multiple module architectures.

  17. The Prisoner's Dilemma: A Computer Adaption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Timothy M.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a computerized version of the Prisoner's Dilemma game, which runs on several Apple computers. Makes a case for utilizing the program in interpersonal, small group, and social conflict communication classes. Describes the four computerized versions of the game: rational, partially rational, nonrational, and assumed rational. (JD)

  18. Adapting Books: Ready, Set, Read!: EAT: Equipment, Adaptations, and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoonover, Judith; Norton-Darr, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Developing multimodal materials to introduce or extend literacy experiences sets the stage for literacy success. Alternative ways to organize, display and arrange, interact and respond to information produces greater understanding of concepts. Adaptations include making books easier to use (turning pages or holding), and text easier to read…

  19. Research on Key Technologies of Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufen; Yan, Hongcan; Chen, Xuebin

    With the development of multi-core processors, virtualization, distributed storage, broadband Internet and automatic management, a new type of computing mode named cloud computing is produced. It distributes computation task on the resource pool which consists of massive computers, so the application systems can obtain the computing power, the storage space and software service according to its demand. It can concentrate all the computing resources and manage them automatically by the software without intervene. This makes application offers not to annoy for tedious details and more absorbed in his business. It will be advantageous to innovation and reduce cost. It's the ultimate goal of cloud computing to provide calculation, services and applications as a public facility for the public, So that people can use the computer resources just like using water, electricity, gas and telephone. Currently, the understanding of cloud computing is developing and changing constantly, cloud computing still has no unanimous definition. This paper describes three main service forms of cloud computing: SAAS, PAAS, IAAS, compared the definition of cloud computing which is given by Google, Amazon, IBM and other companies, summarized the basic characteristics of cloud computing, and emphasized on the key technologies such as data storage, data management, virtualization and programming model.

  20. Cloud Computing Technologies and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinzy

    In a nutshell, the existing Internet provides to us content in the forms of videos, emails and information served up in web pages. With Cloud Computing, the next generation of Internet will allow us to "buy" IT services from a web portal, drastic expanding the types of merchandise available beyond those on e-commerce sites such as eBay and Taobao. We would be able to rent from a virtual storefront the basic necessities to build a virtual data center: such as CPU, memory, storage, and add on top of that the middleware necessary: web application servers, databases, enterprise server bus, etc. as the platform(s) to support the applications we would like to either rent from an Independent Software Vendor (ISV) or develop ourselves. Together this is what we call as "IT as a Service," or ITaaS, bundled to us the end users as a virtual data center.

  1. Voice Technology Using Personal Computers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    PROGRA -.. NDC -A85 -AiSG 743 VOICE TECNOLOGY USING PERSONAL COMPUTE3SI(U) alit FORCE 212 INST OF TECH MRIGJ4T-PATTERSON RFB ON G L TALBOT 1987...Inline( $2E/$C6/$06/ Int24Err $Ol/$50/$89/$F8/$2E/$A2/ Int24ErrCode /$58/$BO/$OO/$89/$EC/$5D/$CF); - 150 - i..r - l. .. { Turbo: PUSH BP save...caller’s stack frame MOV BP,SP Set up this procedure’s stack frame PUSH BP ? Inline: MOV BYTE CS:[INT24Err],I Set INT24Err to True PUSH AX MOV AX,DI Get INT

  2. Adapting Inspection Data for Computer Numerical Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    Machining time for repetitive tasks reduced. Program converts measurements of stub post locations by coordinate-measuring machine into form used by numerical-control computer. Work time thus reduced by 10 to 15 minutes for each post. Since there are 600 such posts on each injector, time saved per injector is 100 to 150 hours. With modifications this approach applicable to machining of many precise holes on large machine frames and similar objects.

  3. Adaptive computational methods for aerothermal heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, John M.; Oden, J. Tinsley

    1988-01-01

    The development of adaptive gridding techniques for finite-element analysis of fluid dynamics equations is described. The developmental work was done with the Euler equations with concentration on shock and inviscid flow field capturing. Ultimately this methodology is to be applied to a viscous analysis for the purpose of predicting accurate aerothermal loads on complex shapes subjected to high speed flow environments. The development of local error estimate strategies as a basis for refinement strategies is discussed, as well as the refinement strategies themselves. The application of the strategies to triangular elements and a finite-element flux-corrected-transport numerical scheme are presented. The implementation of these strategies in the GIM/PAGE code for 2-D and 3-D applications is documented and demonstrated.

  4. Adaptive Fuzzy Systems in Computational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in computational intelligence techniques, which currently includes neural networks, fuzzy systems, and evolutionary programming, has grown significantly and a number of their applications have been developed in the government and industry. In future, an essential element in these systems will be fuzzy systems that can learn from experience by using neural network in refining their performances. The GARIC architecture, introduced earlier, is an example of a fuzzy reinforcement learning system which has been applied in several control domains such as cart-pole balancing, simulation of to Space Shuttle orbital operations, and tether control. A number of examples from GARIC's applications in these domains will be demonstrated.

  5. The Technology Fix: The Promise and Reality of Computers in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaum, William D.

    2004-01-01

    During the technology boom of the 1980s and 1990s, computers seemed set to revolutionize education. Do any of these promises sound familiar? (1) Technology would help all students learn better, thanks to multimedia programs capable of adapting to individual needs, learning styles, and skill levels; (2) Technology would transform the teacher's role…

  6. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  7. Adapting Teaching Strategies To Encompass New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2001-01-01

    The explosion of special-purpose computing devices--Internet appliances, handheld computers, wireless Internet, networked household appliances--challenges business educators attempting to provide computer literacy education. At a minimum, they should address connectivity, expanded applications, and social and public policy implications of these…

  8. Memory System Technologies for Future High-End Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, S A; de Supinski, B R; Mueller, F; Tyson, G S

    2003-05-16

    Our ability to solve Grand Challenge Problems in computing hinges on the development of reliable and efficient High-End Computing systems. Unfortunately, the increasing gap between memory and processor speeds remains one of the major bottlenecks in modern architectures. Uniprocessor nodes still suffer, but symmetric multiprocessor nodes--where access to physical memory is shared among all processors--are among the hardest hit. In the latter case, the memory system must juggle multiple working sets and maintain memory coherence, on top of simply responding to access requests. To illustrate the severity of the current situation, consider two important examples: even the high-performance parallel supercomputers in use at Department of Energy National labs observe single-processor utilization rates as low as 5%, and transaction processing commercial workloads see utilizations of at most about 33%. A wealth of research demonstrates that traditional memory systems are incapable of bridging the processor/memory performance gap, and the problem continues to grow. The success of future High-End Computing platforms therefore depends on our developing hardware and software technologies to dramatically relieve the memory bottleneck. In order to take better advantage of the tremendous computing power of modern microprocessors and future High-End systems, we consider it crucial to develop the hardware for intelligent, adaptable memory systems; the middleware and OS modifications to manage them; and the compiler technology and performance tools to exploit them. Taken together, these will provide the foundations for meeting the requirements of future generations of performance-critical, parallel systems based on either uniprocessor or SMP nodes (including PIM organizations). We feel that such solutions should not be vendor-specific, but should be sufficiently general and adaptable such that the technologies could be leveraged by any commercial vendor of High-End Computing systems

  9. Matter: Modular Adaptive Technology Targeting Efficient Reasoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    be computed in parallel [dD05]. • Sparse Neural -Network Evaluation – This can essentially be the same problem as SMVM above. • Shortest Path – A...Papers Symposium on VLSI Circuits, pages 55–56, 1997. [McK04] Sally A. McKee. Reflections on the memory wall. In Proceedings of Computing Frontiers...DIRECTOR: /s/ JAMES A. COLLINS Deputy Chief, Advanced Computing Division Information Directorate REPORT

  10. Adaptive Engine Technologies for Aviation CO2 Emissions Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive turbine engine technologies are assessed for their potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from commercial air transports.Technologies including inlet, fan, and compressor flow control, compressor stall control, blade clearance control, combustion control, active bearings and enabling technologies such as active materials and wireless sensors are discussed. The method of systems assessment is described, including strengths and weaknesses of the approach. Performance benefit estimates are presented for each technology, with a summary of potential emissions reduction possible from the development of new, adaptively controlled engine components.

  11. Competency Index. [Business/Computer Technologies Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This index allows the user to scan the competencies under each title for the 28 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Titles of the 28 units are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; professional and ethical standards; economic and business…

  12. The Computer as Doorstop: Technology as Disempowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callister, Thomas A., Jr.; Dunne, Faith

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to replace teachers with technology have uniformly failed. Machines are only tools. Good classroom tools extend the teacher's power to create a rich learning environment. If the teacher perceives the tool as master or misconstrues its use, its potential will never be realized. Strategies for computer use must focus on purpose and derive…

  13. Women Workers as Users of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwood, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expectations, trends, and implications of growth of computer technology and its effect on women workers argues that the experience of women is different from that of men in the nature of jobs in which women are found, their training and education, home-family conflict, and discrimination. The impact on women of increasing…

  14. Business/Computer Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 272 competencies, grouped into 36 units, for tech prep programs in the business/computer technology cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential"…

  15. Adaptive Hypermedia Educational System Based on XML Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Yeongtae; Wang, Changjong; Lee, Sehoon

    This paper proposes an adaptive hypermedia educational system using XML technologies, such as XML, XSL, XSLT, and XLink. Adaptive systems are capable of altering the presentation of the content of the hypermedia on the basis of a dynamic understanding of the individual user. The user profile can be collected in a user model, while the knowledge…

  16. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  17. Adaptive Tracking Control for Robots With an Interneural Computing Scheme.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Feng-Sheng; Hsu, Sheng-Yi; Shih, Mau-Hsiang

    2017-01-24

    Adaptive tracking control of mobile robots requires the ability to follow a trajectory generated by a moving target. The conventional analysis of adaptive tracking uses energy minimization to study the convergence and robustness of the tracking error when the mobile robot follows a desired trajectory. However, in the case that the moving target generates trajectories with uncertainties, a common Lyapunov-like function for energy minimization may be extremely difficult to determine. Here, to solve the adaptive tracking problem with uncertainties, we wish to implement an interneural computing scheme in the design of a mobile robot for behavior-based navigation. The behavior-based navigation adopts an adaptive plan of behavior patterns learning from the uncertainties of the environment. The characteristic feature of the interneural computing scheme is the use of neural path pruning with rewards and punishment interacting with the environment. On this basis, the mobile robot can be exploited to change its coupling weights in paths of neural connections systematically, which can then inhibit or enhance the effect of flow elimination in the dynamics of the evolutionary neural network. Such dynamical flow translation ultimately leads to robust sensory-to-motor transformations adapting to the uncertainties of the environment. A simulation result shows that the mobile robot with the interneural computing scheme can perform fault-tolerant behavior of tracking by maintaining suitable behavior patterns at high frequency levels.

  18. An Adaptive Middleware Framework for Scientific Computing at Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gosney, Arzu; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Wynne, Adam S.; Almquist, Justin P.

    2010-08-04

    Large computing systems including clusters, clouds, and grids, provide high-performance capabilities that can be utilized for many applications. But as the ubiquity of these systems increases and the scope of analysis being done on them grows, there is a growing need for applications that 1) do not require users to learn the details of high performance systems, and 2) are flexible and adaptive in their usage of these systems to accommodate the best time-to-solution for end users. We introduce a new adaptive interface design and a prototype implementation within the framework of an established middleware framework, MeDICi, for high performance computing systems and describe the applicability of this adaptive design to a real-life scientific workflow. This adaptive framework provides an access model for implementing a processing pipeline using high performance systems that are not local to the data source, making it possible for the compute capabilities at one site to be applied to analysis on data being generated at another site in an automated process. This adaptive design improves overall time-to-solution by moving the data analysis task to the most appropriate resource dynamically, reacting to failures and load fluctuations.

  19. The Importance of Formalizing Computational Models of Face Adaptation Aftereffects

    PubMed Central

    Ross, David A.; Palmeri, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Face adaptation is widely used as a means to probe the neural representations that support face recognition. While the theories that relate face adaptation to behavioral aftereffects may seem conceptually simple, our work has shown that testing computational instantiations of these theories can lead to unexpected results. Instantiating a model of face adaptation not only requires specifying how faces are represented and how adaptation shapes those representations but also specifying how decisions are made, translating hidden representational states into observed responses. Considering the high-dimensionality of face representations, the parallel activation of multiple representations, and the non-linearity of activation functions and decision mechanisms, intuitions alone are unlikely to succeed. If the goal is to understand mechanism, not simply to examine the boundaries of a behavioral phenomenon or correlate behavior with brain activity, then formal computational modeling must be a component of theory testing. To illustrate, we highlight our recent computational modeling of face adaptation aftereffects and discuss how models can be used to understand the mechanisms by which faces are recognized. PMID:27378960

  20. Computer technology forecasting at the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A M

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Office of ADP Management organized a group of scientists and computer professionals, mostly from their own national laboratories, to prepare an annually updated technology forecast to accompany the Department's five-year ADP Plan. The activities of the task force were originally reported in an informal presentation made at the ACM Conference in 1978. This presentation represents an update of that report. It also deals with the process of applying the results obtained at a particular computing center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Computer technology forecasting is a difficult and hazardous endeavor, but it can reap considerable advantage. The forecast performed on an industry-wide basis can be applied to the particular needs of a given installation, and thus give installation managers considerable guidance in planning. A beneficial side effect of this process is that it forces installation managers, who might otherwise tend to preoccupy themselves with immediate problems, to focus on longer term goals and means to their ends. (RWR)

  1. Scale of Adaptive Information Technology Accessibility for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (SAITAPSD): A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Nguyen, Mai N.; Barile, Maria; Asuncion, Jennison V.

    2007-01-01

    The responses of 81 Canadian junior and community college students with disabilities were used to develop and evaluate the Scale of Adaptive Information Technology Accessibility for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (SAITAPSD). This is an 18-item self-administered tool that evaluates computing accessibility for and by students with various…

  2. Digital mammography performed with computed radiography technology.

    PubMed

    Jouan, B

    1999-07-01

    Introduced by Fuji Photo Film Japan in the early 1980s, computed radiography (CR) technology has developed considerably since then to become the mature widely installed technology it is today (about 7500 systems worldwide). Various mammographic examinations require high performance results to which CR complies on demand or following some procedures such as geometrical magnification carried out during the examination. The basic CR principles and digital image processing as well as technical improvements are detailed in this study, which also includes a synthesis of the articles on CR mammographic applications referenced in the bibliography, focusing on strong points, limits and current methods of surpassing these limits. New CR technology development perspectives in mammography and computed assisted diagnosis (CAD) algorithms will allow wider use of this method in the near future.

  3. Enabling Computational Technologies for Terascale Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    2000-08-24

    We develop scalable algorithms and object-oriented code frameworks for terascale scientific simulations on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Our research in multigrid-based linear solvers and adaptive mesh refinement enables Laboratory programs to use MPPs to explore important physical phenomena. For example, our research aids stockpile stewardship by making practical detailed 3D simulations of radiation transport. The need to solve large linear systems arises in many applications, including radiation transport, structural dynamics, combustion, and flow in porous media. These systems result from discretizations of partial differential equations on computational meshes. Our first research objective is to develop multigrid preconditioned iterative methods for such problems and to demonstrate their scalability on MPPs. Scalability describes how total computational work grows with problem size; it measures how effectively additional resources can help solve increasingly larger problems. Many factors contribute to scalability: computer architecture, parallel implementation, and choice of algorithm. Scalable algorithms have been shown to decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude.

  4. Computer Adaptive Testing for Small Scale Programs and Instructional Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Guo, Fanmin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates measurement decision theory (MDT) as an underlying model for computer adaptive testing when the goal is to classify examinees into one of a finite number of groups. The first analysis compares MDT with a popular item response theory model and finds little difference in terms of the percentage of correct classifications. The…

  5. DIF Analysis for Pretest Items in Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    A simulation study of methods of assessing differential item functioning (DIF) in computer-adaptive tests (CATs) was conducted by Zwick, Thayer, and Wingersky (in press, 1993). Results showed that modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel and standardization methods work well with CAT data. DIF methods were also investigated for nonadaptive…

  6. Sequential decision making in computational sustainability via adaptive submodularity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreas Krause,; Daniel Golovin,; Converse, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many problems in computational sustainability require making a sequence of decisions in complex, uncertain environments. Such problems are generally notoriously difficult. In this article, we review the recently discovered notion of adaptive submodularity, an intuitive diminishing returns condition that generalizes the classical notion of submodular set functions to sequential decision problems. Problems exhibiting the adaptive submodularity property can be efficiently and provably near-optimally solved using simple myopic policies. We illustrate this concept in several case studies of interest in computational sustainability: First, we demonstrate how it can be used to efficiently plan for resolving uncertainty in adaptive management scenarios. Secondly, we show how it applies to dynamic conservation planning for protecting endangered species, a case study carried out in collaboration with the US Geological Survey and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  7. Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations on an Array of SMPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Pramanick, Ira; Sohn, Andrew; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic load balancing is necessary for parallel adaptive methods to solve unsteady CFD problems on unstructured grids. We have presented such a dynamic load balancing framework called JOVE, in this paper. Results on a four-POWERnode POWER CHALLENGEarray demonstrated that load balancing gives significant performance improvements over no load balancing for such adaptive computations. The parallel speedup of JOVE, implemented using MPI on the POWER CHALLENCEarray, was significant, being as high as 31 for 32 processors. An implementation of JOVE that exploits 'an array of SMPS' architecture was also studied; this hybrid JOVE outperformed flat JOVE by up to 28% on the meshes and adaption models tested. With large, realistic meshes and actual flow-solver and adaption phases incorporated into JOVE, hybrid JOVE can be expected to yield significant advantage over flat JOVE, especially as the number of processors is increased, thus demonstrating the scalability of an array of SMPs architecture.

  8. Maximizing a transport platform through computer technology.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Timothy L

    2003-01-01

    One of the most recent innovations coalescing computer technology and medical care is the further development of integrated medical component technology coupled with a computer subsystem. One such example is the self-contained patient transport system known as the Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT(tm)). The LSTAT creates a new transport platform that integrates the most current medical monitoring and therapeutic capabilities with computer processing capacity, creating the first "smart litter". The LSTAT is built around a computer system that is network capable and acts as the data hub for multiple medical devices and utilities, including data, power, and oxygen systems. The system logs patient and device data in a simultaneous, time-synchronized, continuous format, allowing electronic transmission, storage, and electronic documentation. The third-generation LSTAT includes an oxygen system, ventilator, clinical point-of-care blood analyzer, suction, defibrillator, infusion pump, and physiologic monitor, as well as on-board power and oxygen systems. The developers of LSTAT and other developers have the ability to further expand integrative component technology by developing and integrating clinical decision support systems.

  9. Educational Software and Adaptive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Mario D.; Sachs, Rose

    Technological solutions have enabled postsecondary students with learning disabilities to compete equally with nondisabled peers in the educational environment. Such solutions have included a variety of educational software, word processing applications, and adaptive technology. Educational software has many benefits over more traditional…

  10. Adaptation of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Scale to Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Zehra; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Emre, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt "Survey of Pre-service Teachers' Knowledge of Teaching and Technology" in order to assess pre-service primary teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) to Turkish. 407 pre-service primary teachers (227 female and 180 male) in their final semester in Education Faculties in Turkey…

  11. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our

  12. Probabilistic co-adaptive brain-computer interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Matthew J.; Martin, Stefan A.; Cheung, Willy; Rao, Rajesh P. N.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are confronted with two fundamental challenges: (a) the uncertainty associated with decoding noisy brain signals, and (b) the need for co-adaptation between the brain and the interface so as to cooperatively achieve a common goal in a task. We seek to mitigate these challenges. Approach. We introduce a new approach to brain-computer interfacing based on partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs). POMDPs provide a principled approach to handling uncertainty and achieving co-adaptation in the following manner: (1) Bayesian inference is used to compute posterior probability distributions (‘beliefs’) over brain and environment state, and (2) actions are selected based on entire belief distributions in order to maximize total expected reward; by employing methods from reinforcement learning, the POMDP’s reward function can be updated over time to allow for co-adaptive behaviour. Main results. We illustrate our approach using a simple non-invasive BCI which optimizes the speed-accuracy trade-off for individual subjects based on the signal-to-noise characteristics of their brain signals. We additionally demonstrate that the POMDP BCI can automatically detect changes in the user’s control strategy and can co-adaptively switch control strategies on-the-fly to maximize expected reward. Significance. Our results suggest that the framework of POMDPs offers a promising approach for designing BCIs that can handle uncertainty in neural signals and co-adapt with the user on an ongoing basis. The fact that the POMDP BCI maintains a probability distribution over the user’s brain state allows a much more powerful form of decision making than traditional BCI approaches, which have typically been based on the output of classifiers or regression techniques. Furthermore, the co-adaptation of the system allows the BCI to make online improvements to its behaviour, adjusting itself automatically to the user’s changing

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  14. The role of computer technology in radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wikler, David; Coussaert, Olivier; Schoovaerts, Frédéric; Joly, Anthony; Levivier, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery treatment principles and irradiation techniques have shown little evolution since its introduction in 1968. Conversely, technology progress linked to computers has produced a major impact on the methods used for treatment planning and dose delivery. In order to fully comprehend modern radiosurgery approaches, one has to acquire good insight of the underlying technology, specifically computer software. In this chapter, we describe the evolution from X-ray films to high-resolution digital imaging, the shift from simple trigonometric calculation to highly complex algorithms and new perspectives in patient follow-up. If these changes open new prospects, they also add complexity, which leads to new pitfalls and limits of the stereotactic radiosurgery method.

  15. Technologies for Achieving Field Ubiquitous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Akira

    Although the term “ubiquitous” may sound like jargon used in information appliances, ubiquitous computing is an emerging concept in industrial automation. This paper presents the author's visions of field ubiquitous computing, which is based on the novel Internet Protocol IPv6. IPv6-based instrumentation will realize the next generation manufacturing excellence. This paper focuses on the following five key issues: 1. IPv6 standardization; 2. IPv6 interfaces embedded in field devices; 3. Compatibility with FOUNDATION fieldbus; 4. Network securities for field applications; and 5. Wireless technologies to complement IP instrumentation. Furthermore, the principles of digital plant operations and ubiquitous production to support the above key technologies to achieve field ubiquitous systems are discussed.

  16. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  17. Use of Computer Technology for English Language Learning: Do Learning Styles, Gender, and Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cynthia; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Ip, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Computer technology provides spaces and locales for language learning. However, learning style preference and demographic variables may affect the effectiveness of technology use for a desired goal. Adapting Reid's pioneering Perceptual Learning Style Preference Questionnaire (PLSPQ), this study investigated the relations of university students'…

  18. Grid computing technology for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecca, G.; Petitdidier, M.; Hluchy, L.; Ivanovic, M.; Kussul, N.; Ray, N.; Thieron, V.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryAdvances in e-Infrastructure promise to revolutionize sensing systems and the way in which data are collected and assimilated, and complex water systems are simulated and visualized. According to the EU Infrastructure 2010 work-programme, data and compute infrastructures and their underlying technologies, either oriented to tackle scientific challenges or complex problem solving in engineering, are expected to converge together into the so-called knowledge infrastructures, leading to a more effective research, education and innovation in the next decade and beyond. Grid technology is recognized as a fundamental component of e-Infrastructures. Nevertheless, this emerging paradigm highlights several topics, including data management, algorithm optimization, security, performance (speed, throughput, bandwidth, etc.), and scientific cooperation and collaboration issues that require further examination to fully exploit it and to better inform future research policies. The paper illustrates the results of six different surface and subsurface hydrology applications that have been deployed on the Grid. All the applications aim to answer to strong requirements from the Civil Society at large, relatively to natural and anthropogenic risks. Grid technology has been successfully tested to improve flood prediction, groundwater resources management and Black Sea hydrological survey, by providing large computing resources. It is also shown that Grid technology facilitates e-cooperation among partners by means of services for authentication and authorization, seamless access to distributed data sources, data protection and access right, and standardization.

  19. Computational Support for Technology- Investment Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, Virgil; Hua, Hook; Lincoln, William; Block, Gary; Mrozinski, Joseph; Shelton, Kacie; Weisbin, Charles; Elfes, Alberto; Smith, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology (START) is a user-friendly computer program that assists human managers in making decisions regarding research-and-development investment portfolios in the presence of uncertainties and of non-technological constraints that include budgetary and time limits, restrictions related to infrastructure, and programmatic and institutional priorities. START facilitates quantitative analysis of technologies, capabilities, missions, scenarios and programs, and thereby enables the selection and scheduling of value-optimal development efforts. START incorporates features that, variously, perform or support a unique combination of functions, most of which are not systematically performed or supported by prior decision- support software. These functions include the following: Optimal portfolio selection using an expected-utility-based assessment of capabilities and technologies; Temporal investment recommendations; Distinctions between enhancing and enabling capabilities; Analysis of partial funding for enhancing capabilities; and Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. START can run on almost any computing hardware, within Linux and related operating systems that include Mac OS X versions 10.3 and later, and can run in Windows under the Cygwin environment. START can be distributed in binary code form. START calls, as external libraries, several open-source software packages. Output is in Excel (.xls) file format.

  20. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  1. Adaptive kinetic-fluid solvers for heterogeneous computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabelok, Sergey; Arslanbekov, Robert; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We show feasibility and benefits of porting an adaptive multi-scale kinetic-fluid code to CPU-GPU systems. Challenges are due to the irregular data access for adaptive Cartesian mesh, vast difference of computational cost between kinetic and fluid cells, and desire to evenly load all CPUs and GPUs during grid adaptation and algorithm refinement. Our Unified Flow Solver (UFS) combines Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with automatic cell-by-cell selection of kinetic or fluid solvers based on continuum breakdown criteria. Using GPUs enables hybrid simulations of mixed rarefied-continuum flows with a million of Boltzmann cells each having a 24 × 24 × 24 velocity mesh. We describe the implementation of CUDA kernels for three modules in UFS: the direct Boltzmann solver using the discrete velocity method (DVM), the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver, and a mesoscopic solver based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), all using adaptive Cartesian mesh. Double digit speedups on single GPU and good scaling for multi-GPUs have been demonstrated.

  2. Adapting communication technology for rural development.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C

    1983-01-01

    The experience in most Third World countries is that communication technology is not being applied to rural development. Originally, communications programs were advanced to meet the need for better participation in development programs by rural people and to facilitate the transfer of technical know-how. However, there has been so systematic use of this approach. Rural broadcasting rarely receives more than a fraction of total air time, and programs that do exist are uninspiring and ineffective. There is a shortage of portable recording equipment and transport, meaning that very little field recording can be done. Totally unexplored has been the potential of portable closed-circuit video for use in rural areas. The mere availability of cheap and appropriate communication technology such as videotaping does not ensure its use for rural development. The real obstacles are linked to rural development policies and politics. Within most governments, rural and agricultural development are not priorities in terms of budgetary and staff allocations. Morever, within that sector, communication is viewed as a peripheral activity. Governments have found it easier in many cases to issue 1-way commands than to communicate and plan with the rural population. A final factor of great importance is training people to use the tools of communication.

  3. [Computer technology in clinical preventive medicine].

    PubMed

    Okada, M

    1990-12-01

    Predicting who will suffer from diseases in the future is basically mathematical work. Current computer technology will accelerate the progress of preventive medicine. In this respect, there are two useful tools for the research. First, long-term archiving of health-care information is valuable in a retrospective study, such as, determination of diagnostic criteria for the prediction. Health-care information here includes past history, laboratory data, and dietary habits. Using such criteria, potential patients can be discriminated from truly healthy persons. Second, prediction is successfully carried out on the basis of mathematical equations which represent the relationship between disease status and health-care information. In conclusion, technology for database management and mathematical modelling is essential for the basic study in preventive medicine.

  4. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  5. Technology Needs for Teachers Web Development and Curriculum Adaptations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Christy J.

    1999-01-01

    Computer-based mathematics and science curricula focusing on NASA inventions and technologies will enhance current teacher knowledge and skills. Materials and interactive software developed by educators will allow students to integrate their various courses, to work cooperatively, and to collaborate with both NASA scientists and students at other locations by using computer networks, email and the World Wide Web.

  6. Adapting biomarker technologies to adverse outcome ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) research is a relatively new concept in human systems biology for assessing the molecular level linkage from an initiating (chemical) event that could lead to a disease state. Although most implementations of AOPs are based on liquids analyses, there are now new technologies being considered derived from the broad field of breath research, especially in applications of gas-phase analysis and instrumentation. The ultimate goal is to discover disease progressions in human or animal systems, identify them at the molecular or cellular level, and then choose analytes that can distinctly define the presence of a particular path (Ankley et al. 2010, Villeneuve et al. 2014). Once such in vivo pathways are identified, then in vitro assays can be developed for streamlined testing of chemical effects without additional human or animal based studies (Pleil et al. 2012). Recent work has focused on discovery analysis in breath, or other biological media, wherein as many as possible compounds are cataloged and then linked to their biochemical source as exogenous (external), endogenous (internal) or from the microbiome (Pleil et al. 2013a, de Lacy Costello 2014, Pleil et al. 2013b, Trefz et al. 2013, Pleil et al. 2014). Such research lays the groundwork for identifying compounds from systems biology that might be relevant for developing AOPs for in vitro research. The National Exposure Research Laboratory’s (NERL’s) Human Exposure and Atm

  7. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  8. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  9. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  10. Making Effective Use of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1992-01-01

    Six computer applications in education are word processing, computer-assisted instruction, computer-aided design, computer authoring systems, computer data systems, and computer storage. Computers may assist students with three learning stages: acquisition, transformation, and evaluation of information. Advances in computer programing, software,…

  11. Topology and grid adaption for high-speed flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1989-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of grid topology and grid adaptation on numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. In the first part of this study, a general procedure is presented for computation of high-speed flow over complex three-dimensional configurations. The flow field is simulated on the surface of a Butler wing in a uniform stream. Results are presented for Mach number 3.5 and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000. The O-type and H-type grids have been used for this study, and the results are compared together and with other theoretical and experimental results. The results demonstrate that while the H-type grid is suitable for the leading and trailing edges, a more accurate solution can be obtained for the middle part of the wing with an O-type grid. In the second part of this study, methods of grid adaption are reviewed and a method is developed with the capability of adapting to several variables. This method is based on a variational approach and is an algebraic method. Also, the method has been formulated in such a way that there is no need for any matrix inversion. This method is used in conjunction with the calculation of hypersonic flow over a blunt-nose body. A movie has been produced which shows simultaneously the transient behavior of the solution and the grid adaption.

  12. Topology and grid adaption for high-speed flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of grid topology and grid adaptation on numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. In the first part of this study, a general procedure is presented for computation of high-speed flow over complex three-dimensional configurations. The flow field is simulated on the surface of a Butler wing in a uniform stream. Results are presented for Mach number 3.5 and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000. The O-type and H-type grids have been used for this study, and the results are compared together and with other theoretical and experimental results. The results demonstrate that while the H-type grid is suitable for the leading and trailing edges, a more accurate solution can be obtained for the middle part of the wing with an O-type grid. In the second part of this study, methods of grid adaption are reviewed and a method is developed with the capability of adapting to several variables. This method is based on a variational approach and is an algebraic method. Also, the method has been formulated in such a way that there is no need for any matrix inversion. This method is used in conjunction with the calculation of hypersonic flow over a blunt-nose body. A movie has been produced which shows simultaneously the transient behavior of the solution and the grid adaption.

  13. Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    11-1-0755 TITLE: Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maciej...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening 5b. GRANT...propose to research the methodology for constructing adaptive computer-aided education systems for mammography . Improved mammography education could

  14. Adaptive wall technology for minimization of wall interferences in transonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Modern experimental techniques to improve free air simulations in transonic wind tunnels by use of adaptive wall technology are reviewed. Considered are the significant advantages of adaptive wall testing techniques with respect to wall interferences, Reynolds number, tunnel drive power, and flow quality. The application of these testing techniques relies on making the test section boundaries adjustable and using a rapid wall adjustment procedure. A historical overview shows how the disjointed development of these testing techniques, since 1938, is closely linked to available computer support. An overview of Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS) designs shows a preference for use of relatively simple designs with solid adaptive walls in 2- and 3-D testing. Operational aspects of AWTS's are discussed with regard to production type operation where adaptive wall adjustments need to be quick. Both 2- and 3-D data are presented to illustrate the quality of AWTS data over the transonic speed range. Adaptive wall technology is available for general use in 2-D testing, even in cryogenic wind tunnels. In 3-D testing, more refinement of the adaptive wall testing techniques is required before more widespread use can be planned.

  15. Adaptive E-Learning Environments: Research Dimensions and Technological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Bitonto, Pierpaolo; Roselli, Teresa; Rossano, Veronica; Sinatra, Maria

    2013-01-01

    One of the most closely investigated topics in e-learning research has always been the effectiveness of adaptive learning environments. The technological evolutions that have dramatically changed the educational world in the last six decades have allowed ever more advanced and smarter solutions to be proposed. The focus of this paper is to depict…

  16. Shape Morphing Adaptive Radiator Technology (SMART) for Variable Heat Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology leverages the temperature dependent phase change of shape memory alloys (SMAs) to drive the shape of a flexible radiator panel. The opening/closing of the radiator panel, as a function of temperature, passively adapts the radiator's rate of heat rejection in response to a vehicle's needs.

  17. Resituation or Resistance? Higher Education Teachers' Adaptations to Technological Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberry, Nicola; McNaughton, Susan; Billot, Jennie; Gaeta, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a project that explored teachers' adaptations to technological change in four large classes in higher education. In these classes, lecturers changed from single- to multi-lecture settings mediated by videoconferencing, requiring them to transfer their beliefs and practices into a new pedagogical space. The…

  18. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  19. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation.

    PubMed

    Tiersch, M; Ganahl, E J; Briegel, H J

    2015-08-11

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent's learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent's performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover's search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  20. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  1. Spacecraft computer technology at Southwest Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has developed and delivered spacecraft computers for a number of different near-Earth-orbit spacecraft including shuttle experiments and SDIO free-flyer experiments. We describe the evolution of the basic SwRI spacecraft computer design from those weighing in at 20 to 25 lb and using 20 to 30 W to newer models weighing less than 5 lb and using only about 5 W, yet delivering twice the processing throughput. Because of their reduced size, weight, and power, these newer designs are especially applicable to planetary instrument requirements. The basis of our design evolution has been the availability of more powerful processor chip sets and the development of higher density packaging technology, coupled with more aggressive design strategies in incorporating high-density FPGA technology and use of high-density memory chips. In addition to reductions in size, weight, and power, the newer designs also address the necessity of survival in the harsh radiation environment of space. Spurred by participation in such programs as MSTI, LACE, RME, Delta 181, Delta Star, and RADARSAT, our designs have evolved in response to program demands to be small, low-powered units, radiation tolerant enough to be suitable for both Earth-orbit microsats and for planetary instruments. Present designs already include MIL-STD-1750 and Multi-Chip Module (MCM) technology with near-term plans to include RISC processors and higher-density MCM's. Long term plans include development of whole-core processors on one or two MCM's.

  2. Experience with automatic, dynamic load balancing and adaptive finite element computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, S.R.; Devine, K.D.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-10-01

    Distributed memory, Massively Parallel (MP), MIMD technology has enabled the development of applications requiring computational resources previously unobtainable. Structural mechanics and fluid dynamics applications, for example, are often solved by finite element methods (FEMs) requiring, millions of degrees of freedom to accurately simulate physical phenomenon. Adaptive methods, which automatically refine or coarsen meshes and vary the order of accuracy of the numerical solution, offer greater robustness and computational efficiency than traditional FEMs by reducing the amount of computation required away from physical structures such as shock waves and boundary layers. On MP computers, FEMs frequently result in distributed processor load imbalances. To overcome load imbalance, many MP FEMs use static load balancing as a preprocessor to the finite element calculation. Adaptive methods complicate the load imbalance problem since the work per element is not uniform across the solution domain and changes as the computation proceeds. Therefore, dynamic load balancing is required to maintain global load balance. We describe a dynamic, fine-grained, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance and is effective in the presence of changing work loads. Global load balance is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method utilizes an automatic element management system library to which a programmer integrates the application`s computational description. The library`s flexibility supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications.

  3. Gathering computational genomics and proteomics to unravel adaptive evolution.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Agostinho; Ramos, Maria João

    2007-09-06

    A recent editorial in PLoS Biology by MacCallum and Hill (2006) pointed out the inappropriateness of studies evaluating signatures of positive selection based solely in single-site analyses. Therefore the rising number of articles claiming positive selection that have been recently published urges the question of how to improve the bioinformatics standards for reliably unravel positive selection? Deeper integrative efforts using state-of-the-art methodologies at the gene-level and protein-level are improving positive selection studies. Here we provide some computational guidelines to thoroughly document molecular adaptation.

  4. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  5. Adaptive-filter models of the cerebellum: computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2008-01-01

    Many current models of the cerebellar cortical microcircuit are equivalent to an adaptive filter using the covariance learning rule. The adaptive filter is a development of the original Marr-Albus framework that deals naturally with continuous time-varying signals, thus addressing the issue of 'timing' in cerebellar function, and it can be connected in a variety of ways to other parts of the system, consistent with the microzonal organization of cerebellar cortex. However, its computational capacities are not well understood. Here we summarise the results of recent work that has focused on two of its intrinsic properties. First, an adaptive filter seeks to decorrelate its (mossy fibre) inputs from a (climbing fibre) teaching signal. This procedure can be used both for sensory processing, e.g. removal of interference from sensory signals, and for learning accurate motor commands, by decorrelating an efference copy of those commands from a sensory signal of inaccuracy. As a model of the cerebellum the adaptive filter thus forms a natural link between events at the cellular level, such as forms of synaptic plasticity and the learning rules they embody, and intelligent behaviour at the system level. Secondly, it has been shown that the covariance learning rule enables the filter to handle input and intrinsic noise optimally. Such optimality may underlie the recently described role of the cerebellum in producing accurate smooth pursuit eye movements in the face of sensory noise. Moreover, it has the consequence of driving most input weights to very small values, consistent with experimental data that many parallel-fibre synapses are normally silent. The effectiveness of silent synapses can only be altered by LTP, so learning tasks depending on a reduction of Purkinje cell firing require the synapses to be embedded in a second, inhibitory pathway from parallel fibre to Purkinje cell. This pathway and the appropriate climbing-fibre related plasticity have been described

  6. Computer vision research with new imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangqi; Liu, Fei; Sun, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Light field imaging is capable of capturing dense multi-view 2D images in one snapshot, which record both intensity values and directions of rays simultaneously. As an emerging 3D device, the light field camera has been widely used in digital refocusing, depth estimation, stereoscopic display, etc. Traditional multi-view stereo (MVS) methods only perform well on strongly texture surfaces, but the depth map contains numerous holes and large ambiguities on textureless or low-textured regions. In this paper, we exploit the light field imaging technology on 3D face modeling in computer vision. Based on a 3D morphable model, we estimate the pose parameters from facial feature points. Then the depth map is estimated through the epipolar plane images (EPIs) method. At last, the high quality 3D face model is exactly recovered via the fusing strategy. We evaluate the effectiveness and robustness on face images captured by a light field camera with different poses.

  7. UV light source adaptive sensing technology for flue gas measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Changku; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Bo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The UV absorption spectrometry technique DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) has been widely used in continuous monitoring of flue gas, and has achieved good results. DOAS method is based on the basic law of light absorption--Lambert-Beer law. SO2, NOX are the principal component of the flue gas. These components are considered by DOAS method at the same time. And certain mathematical methods are used for concentrations measuring. The Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS) based on the principle of DOAS mainly has two probe-styles present: in-situ probe-style and extractive probe-style. For the in-situ probe-style CEMS based on DOAS method, prolonged use for the UV light source, contaminated lens caused by floating oil and complex environment of the flue will all bring attenuation of the spectral intensity, it will affect the accuracy of measurement. In this article, an in-situ continuous monitoring system based on DOAS method is described, and a component adaptive sensing technology is proposed. By using this adaptive sensing technology, CEMS can adjust the integral time of the spectrometer according to the non-measuring attenuation of the light source intensity and automatically compensate the loss of spectral intensity. Under the laboratory conditions, the experiments for SO2, NO standard gas measurement using adaptive sensing technology is made. Many different levels of light intensity attenuation are considered in the experiments. The results show that the adaptive sensing technology can well compensate the non-measuring loss of spectral intensity. In the field measurement, this technology can well reduce the measurement error brought by attenuation of light intensity, compared with the handheld gas analyzer, the average error of concentration measurement is less than 2% FS(Full Scale).

  8. The Contextualized Technology Adaptation Process (CTAP): Optimizing Health Information Technology to Improve Mental Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Wasse, Jessica Knaster; Ludwig, Kristy; Zachry, Mark; Bruns, Eric J; Unützer, Jürgen; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Health information technologies have become a central fixture in the mental healthcare landscape, but few frameworks exist to guide their adaptation to novel settings. This paper introduces the contextualized technology adaptation process (CTAP) and presents data collected during Phase 1 of its application to measurement feedback system development in school mental health. The CTAP is built on models of human-centered design and implementation science and incorporates repeated mixed methods assessments to guide the design of technologies to ensure high compatibility with a destination setting. CTAP phases include: (1) Contextual evaluation, (2) Evaluation of the unadapted technology, (3) Trialing and evaluation of the adapted technology, (4) Refinement and larger-scale implementation, and (5) Sustainment through ongoing evaluation and system revision. Qualitative findings from school-based practitioner focus groups are presented, which provided information for CTAP Phase 1, contextual evaluation, surrounding education sector clinicians' workflows, types of technologies currently available, and influences on technology use. Discussion focuses on how findings will inform subsequent CTAP phases, as well as their implications for future technology adaptation across content domains and service sectors.

  9. Beam damage detection using computer vision technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jing; Xu, Xiangjun; Wang, Jialai; Li, Gong

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, a new approach for efficient damage detection in engineering structures is introduced. The key concept is to use the mature computer vision technology to capture the static deformation profile of a structure, and then employ profile analysis methods to detect the locations of the damages. By combining with wireless communication techniques, the proposed approach can provide an effective and economical solution for remote monitoring of structure health. Moreover, a preliminary experiment is conducted to verify the proposed concept. A commercial computer vision camera is used to capture the static deformation profiles of cracked cantilever beams under loading. The profiles are then processed to reveal the existence and location of the irregularities on the deformation profiles by applying fractal dimension, wavelet transform and roughness methods, respectively. The proposed concept is validated on both one-crack and two-crack cantilever beam-type specimens. It is also shown that all three methods can produce satisfactory results based on the profiles provided by the vision camera. In addition, the profile quality is the determining factor for the noise level in resultant detection signal.

  10. The Invisible Barrier to Integrating Computer Technology in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, Ester

    2014-01-01

    The article explores contradictions in teachers' perceptions regarding the place of computer technologies in education. The research population included 47 teachers who have incorporated computers in the classroom for several years. The teachers expressed positive attitudes regarding the decisive importance of computer technologies in furthering…

  11. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  12. Computer Utilization in Industrial Arts/Technology Education. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Industrial Arts Association.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts/technology education teachers in helping students in grades K-12 understand the impact of computers and computer technology in the world. Discussed in the introductory sections are the ways in which computers have changed the face of business, industry, and education and training; the scope and…

  13. Computer Science and Technology Publications. NBS Publications List 84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    This bibliography lists publications of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology of the National Bureau of Standards. Publications are listed by subject in the areas of computer security, computer networking, and automation technology. Sections list publications of: (1) current Federal Information Processing Standards; (2) computer…

  14. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  15. Adaptive optics technology for high-resolution retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2012-12-27

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging.

  16. Adaptive Optics Technology for High-Resolution Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Serrao, Sebastiano; Devaney, Nicholas; Parravano, Mariacristina; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology used to improve the performance of optical systems by reducing the effects of optical aberrations. The direct visualization of the photoreceptor cells, capillaries and nerve fiber bundles represents the major benefit of adding AO to retinal imaging. Adaptive optics is opening a new frontier for clinical research in ophthalmology, providing new information on the early pathological changes of the retinal microstructures in various retinal diseases. We have reviewed AO technology for retinal imaging, providing information on the core components of an AO retinal camera. The most commonly used wavefront sensing and correcting elements are discussed. Furthermore, we discuss current applications of AO imaging to a population of healthy adults and to the most frequent causes of blindness, including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. We conclude our work with a discussion on future clinical prospects for AO retinal imaging. PMID:23271600

  17. Computer Graphics. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Clyde O.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-quarter or 1-semester course in computer graphics is designed to be used with Apple II computers. Some of the topics covered include the following: computer graphics terminology and applications, operating Apple computers, graphics programming in BASIC using various programs and commands, computer graphics painting,…

  18. Adopt or Adapt: Sanitation Technology Choices in Urbanizing Malawi.

    PubMed

    Chunga, Richard M; Ensink, Jeroen H J; Jenkins, Marion W; Brown, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a mixed-methods study examining adaptation strategies that property owners in low-income, rapidly urbanizing areas in Malawi adopt to address the limitations of pit latrines, the most common method of disposing human excreta. A particular challenge is lack of space for constructing new latrines as population density increases: traditional practice has been to cap full pits and simply move to a new site, but increasing demands on space require new approaches to extend the service life of latrines. In this context, we collected data on sanitation technology choices from January to September 2013 through 48 in-depth interviews and a stated preference survey targeting 1,300 property owners from 27 low-income urban areas. Results showed that property owners with concern about space for replacing pit latrines were 1.8 times more likely to select pit emptying service over the construction of new pit latrines with a slab floor (p = 0.02) but there was no significant association between concern about space for replacing pit latrines and intention to adopt locally promoted, novel sanitation technology known as ecological sanitation (ecosan). Property owners preferred to adapt existing, known technology by constructing replacement pit latrines on old pit latrine locations, reducing the frequency of replacing pit latrines, or via emptying pit latrines when full. This study highlights potential challenges to adoption of wholly new sanitation technologies, even when they present clear advantages to end users. To scale, alternative sanitation technologies for rapidly urbanising cities should offer clear advantages, be affordable, be easy to use when shared among multiple households, and their design should be informed by existing adaptation strategies and local knowledge.

  19. Adopt or Adapt: Sanitation Technology Choices in Urbanizing Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chunga, Richard M.; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Jenkins, Marion W.; Brown, Joe

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a mixed-methods study examining adaptation strategies that property owners in low-income, rapidly urbanizing areas in Malawi adopt to address the limitations of pit latrines, the most common method of disposing human excreta. A particular challenge is lack of space for constructing new latrines as population density increases: traditional practice has been to cap full pits and simply move to a new site, but increasing demands on space require new approaches to extend the service life of latrines. In this context, we collected data on sanitation technology choices from January to September 2013 through 48 in-depth interviews and a stated preference survey targeting 1,300 property owners from 27 low-income urban areas. Results showed that property owners with concern about space for replacing pit latrines were 1.8 times more likely to select pit emptying service over the construction of new pit latrines with a slab floor (p = 0.02) but there was no significant association between concern about space for replacing pit latrines and intention to adopt locally promoted, novel sanitation technology known as ecological sanitation (ecosan). Property owners preferred to adapt existing, known technology by constructing replacement pit latrines on old pit latrine locations, reducing the frequency of replacing pit latrines, or via emptying pit latrines when full. This study highlights potential challenges to adoption of wholly new sanitation technologies, even when they present clear advantages to end users. To scale, alternative sanitation technologies for rapidly urbanising cities should offer clear advantages, be affordable, be easy to use when shared among multiple households, and their design should be informed by existing adaptation strategies and local knowledge. PMID:27532871

  20. Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy, Technology, Attitudes and Anxiety: Development of the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Agatha M.; Munro, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two studies are reported which describe the development and evaluation of a new instrument, the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS), comprising three domains: computer self-efficacy, attitudes to technology, and technology related anxiety. Study 1 describes the development of the instrument and explores its factor structure. Study 2 used…

  1. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    required for the airfoil-aircraft matching. Examples are presented to illustrate the flapped-airfoil design approach for a general aviation aircraft and the results are validated by comparison with results from post-design aircraft performance computations. Once the airfoil is designed to incorporate a TE flap, it is important to determine the most suitable flap angles along the wing for different flight conditions. The second part of this dissertation presents a method for determining the optimum flap angles to minimize drag based on pressures measured at select locations on the wing. Computational flow simulations using a panel method are used "in the loop" for demonstrating closed-loop control of the flaps. Examples in the paper show that the control algorithm is successful in correctly adapting the wing to achieve the target lift distributions for minimizing induced drag while adjusting the wing angle of attack for operation of the wing in the drag bucket. It is shown that the "sense-and-adapt" approach developed is capable of handling varying and unpredictable inflow conditions. Such a capability could be useful in adapting long-span flexible wings that may experience significant and unknown atmospheric inflow variations along the span. To further develop the "sense-and-adapt" approach, the method was tested experimentally in the third part of the research. The goal of the testing was to see if the same results found computationally can be obtained experimentally. The North Carolina State University subsonic wind tunnel was used for the wind tunnel tests. Results from the testing showed that the "sense-and-adapt" approach has the same performance experimentally as it did computationally. The research presented in this dissertation is a stepping stone towards further development of the concept, which includes modeling the system in the Simulink environment and flight experiments using uninhabited aerial vehicles.

  2. The Steam Engine and the Computer: What Makes Technology Revolutionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of technological revolution focuses on the computer and its uses in education. Contrasts between human traits, such as insight and creativity, and computer capabilities are discussed; the computer as its own instructional device is described; and possible educational changes resulting from computers are addressed. (LRW)

  3. Dose reduction with adaptive bolus chasing computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J; Abada, Hicham T

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%.

  4. Dose Reduction with Adaptive Bolus Chasing Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhijun; Bai, Er-Wei; Wang, Ge; Sharafuddin, Melhem J.; Abada, Hicham T.

    2010-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become an effective diagnosis and evaluating tool in clinical; however, its radiation exposure has drawn great attention as more and more CT scans are performed every year. How to reduce the radiation dose and meanwhile keep the resultant CT images diagnosable becomes an important research topic. In this paper, we propose a dose reduction approach along with the adaptive bolus chasing CT Angiography (CTA) techniques, which are capable of tracking the contrast bolus peak over all the blood vessel segments during the CTA scan. By modulating the tube current (and collimator width) online, we can reduce the total radiation dose and maintain the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the blood vessel. Numerical experiments on reference DSA data sets show that by using the proposed dose reduction method, the effective radiation dose can be saved about 39%. PMID:20421701

  5. A Multiscale Computational Framework to Understand Vascular Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Garbey, Marc; Rahman, Mahbubur; Berceli, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The failure rate for vascular interventions (vein bypass grafting, arterial angioplasty/stenting) remains unacceptably high. Over the past two decades, researchers have applied a wide variety of approaches to investigate the primary failure mechanisms, neointimal hyperplasia and aberrant remodeling of the wall, in an effort to identify novel therapeutic strategies. Despite incremental progress, specific cause/effect linkages among the primary drivers of the pathology, (hemodynamic factors, inflammatory biochemical mediators, cellular effectors) and vascular occlusive phenotype remain lacking. We propose a multiscale computational framework of vascular adaptation to develop a bridge between theory and experimental observation and to provide a method for the systematic testing of relevant clinical hypotheses. Cornerstone to our model is a feedback mechanism between environmental conditions and dynamic tissue plasticity described at the cellular level with an agent based model. Our implementation (i) is modular, (ii) starts from basic mechano-biology principle at the cell level and (iii) facilitates the agile development of the model. PMID:25977733

  6. Developing adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dohm, Sebastian; Spohr, Eckhard; Korth, Martin

    2017-01-05

    We report the development of adaptive QM/MM computer simulations for electrochemistry, providing public access to all sources via the free and open source software development model. We present a modular workflow-based MD simulation code as a platform for algorithms for partitioning space into different regions, which can be treated at different levels of theory on a per-timestep basis. Currently implemented algorithms focus on targeting molecules and their solvation layers relevant to electrochemistry. Instead of using built-in forcefields and quantum mechanical methods, the code features a universal interface, which allows for extension to a range of external forcefield programs and programs for quantum mechanical calculations, thus enabling the user to readily implement interfaces to those programs. The purpose of this article is to describe our codes and illustrate its usage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Electronic Quality of Life Assessment Using Computer-Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are desirable for clinical practice but can be time-consuming to administer and interpret, making their widespread adoption difficult. Objective Our aim was to assess the performance of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-100 questionnaire as four item banks to facilitate adaptive testing using simulated computer adaptive tests (CATs) for physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL. Methods We used data from the UK WHOQOL-100 questionnaire (N=320) to calibrate item banks using item response theory, which included psychometric assessments of differential item functioning, local dependency, unidimensionality, and reliability. We simulated CATs to assess the number of items administered before prespecified levels of reliability was met. Results The item banks (40 items) all displayed good model fit (P>.01) and were unidimensional (fewer than 5% of t tests significant), reliable (Person Separation Index>.70), and free from differential item functioning (no significant analysis of variance interaction) or local dependency (residual correlations < +.20). When matched for reliability, the item banks were between 45% and 75% shorter than paper-based WHOQOL measures. Across the four domains, a high standard of reliability (alpha>.90) could be gained with a median of 9 items. Conclusions Using CAT, simulated assessments were as reliable as paper-based forms of the WHOQOL with a fraction of the number of items. These properties suggest that these item banks are suitable for computerized adaptive assessment. These item banks have the potential for international development using existing alternative language versions of the WHOQOL items. PMID:27694100

  8. Applied Computer Technology in Cree and Naskapi Language Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancewicz, Bill; MacKenzie, Marguerite

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the parameters for the application of computer technology in Cree and Naskapi language programs, and shows that the deliberate and structured introduction of these technologies to indigenous language programs can facilitate indigenous language stabilization and development. (Author/VWL)

  9. What Effects Will Computer Technology Have on You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Bill

    1984-01-01

    Outlines changes that individuals might expect as a result of computer technology in the areas of education, medicine, industry, and office work. Also considers the new technology's impact on managerial organization, job opportunities, and entrepreneurship. (GC)

  10. Configurable multiplier modules for an adaptive computing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfänder, O. A.; Pfleiderer, H.-J.; Lachowicz, S. W.

    2006-09-01

    The importance of reconfigurable hardware is increasing steadily. For example, the primary approach of using adaptive systems based on programmable gate arrays and configurable routing resources has gone mainstream and high-performance programmable logic devices are rivaling traditional application-specific hardwired integrated circuits. Also, the idea of moving from the 2-D domain into a 3-D design which stacks several active layers above each other is gaining momentum in research and industry, to cope with the demand for smaller devices with a higher scale of integration. However, optimized arithmetic blocks in course-grain reconfigurable arrays as well as field-programmable architectures still play an important role. In countless digital systems and signal processing applications, the multiplication is one of the critical challenges, where in many cases a trade-off between area usage and data throughput has to be made. But the a priori choice of word-length and number representation can also be replaced by a dynamic choice at run-time, in order to improve flexibility, area efficiency and the level of parallelism in computation. In this contribution, we look at an adaptive computing system called 3-D-SoftChip to point out what parameters are crucial to implement flexible multiplier blocks into optimized elements for accelerated processing. The 3-D-SoftChip architecture uses a novel approach to 3-dimensional integration based on flip-chip bonding with indium bumps. The modular construction, the introduction of interfaces to realize the exchange of intermediate data, and the reconfigurable sign handling approach will be explained, as well as a beneficial way to handle and distribute the numerous required control signals.

  11. Attitudes Toward Computer Technology Between Nursing and Medical Educators

    PubMed Central

    Harsanyi, Bennie E.; Kelsey, Clyde E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of this descriptive study indicated no significant difference between nursing and medical educators' attitudes toward computer technology. Demographic variables and usages of computer technology in educational and clinical practice environments were not significant. Previous experience with computer technology was significant but negatively correlated; whereas, education regarding computer technology was not. Word processing and record keeping in the education environment, however, were negatively correlated with attitudes. In the clinical environment, diagnosing was positively correlated, but patient assessment and network systems were negatively correlated with attitudes.

  12. Overview of deformable mirror technologies for adaptive optics and astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madec, P.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    From the ardent bucklers used during the Syracuse battle to set fire to Romans’ ships to more contemporary piezoelectric deformable mirrors widely used in astronomy, from very large voice coil deformable mirrors considered in future Extremely Large Telescopes to very small and compact ones embedded in Multi Object Adaptive Optics systems, this paper aims at giving an overview of Deformable Mirror technology for Adaptive Optics and Astronomy. First the main drivers for the design of Deformable Mirrors are recalled, not only related to atmospheric aberration compensation but also to environmental conditions or mechanical constraints. Then the different technologies available today for the manufacturing of Deformable Mirrors will be described, pros and cons analyzed. A review of the Companies and Institutes with capabilities in delivering Deformable Mirrors to astronomers will be presented, as well as lessons learned from the past 25 years of technological development and operation on sky. In conclusion, perspective will be tentatively drawn for what regards the future of Deformable Mirror technology for Astronomy.

  13. Children and Computer Technology: Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Margie K.; Behrman, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines how computer use affects children's development, disparities between rich and poor, and how computers enhance learning, noting risks and benefits. Recommendations to improve computer access and use at home and school include: researchers must study the effects of extended computer use on child development, and parents should limit the…

  14. Cloud Computing. Technology Briefing. Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is Internet-based computing in which shared resources, software and information are delivered as a service that computers or mobile devices can access on demand. Cloud computing is already used extensively in education. Free or low-cost cloud-based services are used daily by learners and educators to support learning, social…

  15. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  16. Numerical Technology for Large-Scale Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R; Champagne, N; White, D; Stowell, M; Adams, R

    2003-01-30

    The key bottleneck of implicit computational electromagnetics tools for large complex geometries is the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. The goal of this effort was to research and develop critical numerical technology that alleviates this bottleneck for large-scale computational electromagnetics (CEM). The mathematical operators and numerical formulations used in this arena of CEM yield linear equations that are complex valued, unstructured, and indefinite. Also, simultaneously applying multiple mathematical modeling formulations to different portions of a complex problem (hybrid formulations) results in a mixed structure linear system, further increasing the computational difficulty. Typically, these hybrid linear systems are solved using a direct solution method, which was acceptable for Cray-class machines but does not scale adequately for ASCI-class machines. Additionally, LLNL's previously existing linear solvers were not well suited for the linear systems that are created by hybrid implicit CEM codes. Hence, a new approach was required to make effective use of ASCI-class computing platforms and to enable the next generation design capabilities. Multiple approaches were investigated, including the latest sparse-direct methods developed by our ASCI collaborators. In addition, approaches that combine domain decomposition (or matrix partitioning) with general-purpose iterative methods and special purpose pre-conditioners were investigated. Special-purpose pre-conditioners that take advantage of the structure of the matrix were adapted and developed based on intimate knowledge of the matrix properties. Finally, new operator formulations were developed that radically improve the conditioning of the resulting linear systems thus greatly reducing solution time. The goal was to enable the solution of CEM problems that are 10 to 100 times larger than our previous capability.

  17. Computers--Teaching, Technology, and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Anthony M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Managing Personality Types in the Computer Classroom" (Cocco); "External I/O Input/Output with a PC" (Fryda); "The Future of CAD/CAM Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing Software" (Fulton); and "Teaching Quality Assurance--A Laboratory Approach" (Wojslaw). (SK)

  18. Preschool Children. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on uses with preschool children with either mild to severe disabilities. Especially noted is the ability of the computer to provide access to environmental experiences otherwise inaccessible to the young handicapped child. Appropriate technology for…

  19. Project for Tech Prep Curricula in Computer Science Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1993

    A project was conducted to establish criteria for entry- and exit-level competencies in computer technology along with concomitant entry-level job positions and to recommend a modified, updated computer technology curriculum. Information was gathered through employer interviews, discussions with educators, and examinations of exemplary programs…

  20. The Impact of Computer Technology on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Anne Wiseman

    1982-01-01

    Computer technology as it affects home and family life is explored. Elements of this technology which are examined include electronic fund transfers (EFT), consumer rights and responsibilities relating to use of EFT, working at home via computer, housing design, costs of computerizing the home, and computerized aids for the handicapped. (CT)

  1. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  2. Adaptive Fault Tolerance for Many-Core Based Space-Borne Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Springer, Paul; Zima, Hans

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to providing software fault tolerance for future deep-space robotic NASA missions, which will require a high degree of autonomy supported by an enhanced on-board computational capability. Such systems have become possible as a result of the emerging many-core technology, which is expected to offer 1024-core chips by 2015. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of this new technology, focusing on introspection-based adaptive fault tolerance that takes into account the specific requirements of applications, guided by a fault model. Introspection supports runtime monitoring of the program execution with the goal of identifying, locating, and analyzing errors. Fault tolerance assertions for the introspection system can be provided by the user, domain-specific knowledge, or via the results of static or dynamic program analysis. This work is part of an on-going project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

  3. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  4. The Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) Technology: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Dyche, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Conventional aerosol delivery systems and the availability of new technologies have led to the development of “intelligent” nebulizers such as the I-neb Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) System. Based on the AAD technology, the I-neb AAD System has been designed to continuously adapt to changes in the patient's breathing pattern, and to pulse aerosol only during the inspiratory part of the breathing cycle. This eliminates waste of aerosol during exhalation, and creates a foundation for precise aerosol (dose) delivery. To facilitate the delivery of precise metered doses of aerosol to the patient, a unique metering chamber design has been developed. Through the vibrating mesh technology, the metering chamber design, and the AAD Disc function, the aerosol output rate and metered (delivered) dose can be tailored to the demands of the specific drug to be delivered. In the I-neb AAD System, aerosol delivery is guided through two algorithms, one for the Tidal Breathing Mode (TBM), and one for slow and deep inhalations, the Target Inhalation Mode (TIM). The aim of TIM is to reduce the treatment time by increasing the total inhalation time per minute, and to increase lung deposition by reducing impaction in the upper airways through slow and deep inhalations. A key feature of the AAD technology is the patient feedback mechanisms that are provided to guide the patient on delivery performance. These feedback signals, which include visual, audible, and tactile forms, are configured in a feedback cascade that leads to a high level of compliance with the use of the I-neb AAD System. The I-neb Insight and the Patient Logging System facilitate a further degree of sophistication to the feedback mechanisms, by providing information on long term adherence and compliance data. These can be assessed by patients and clinicians via a Web-based delivery of information in the form of customized graphical analyses. PMID:20373904

  5. The Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) technology: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Denyer, John; Dyche, Tony

    2010-04-01

    Conventional aerosol delivery systems and the availability of new technologies have led to the development of "intelligent" nebulizers such as the I-neb Adaptive Aerosol Delivery (AAD) System. Based on the AAD technology, the I-neb AAD System has been designed to continuously adapt to changes in the patient's breathing pattern, and to pulse aerosol only during the inspiratory part of the breathing cycle. This eliminates waste of aerosol during exhalation, and creates a foundation for precise aerosol (dose) delivery. To facilitate the delivery of precise metered doses of aerosol to the patient, a unique metering chamber design has been developed. Through the vibrating mesh technology, the metering chamber design, and the AAD Disc function, the aerosol output rate and metered (delivered) dose can be tailored to the demands of the specific drug to be delivered. In the I-neb AAD System, aerosol delivery is guided through two algorithms, one for the Tidal Breathing Mode (TBM), and one for slow and deep inhalations, the Target Inhalation Mode (TIM). The aim of TIM is to reduce the treatment time by increasing the total inhalation time per minute, and to increase lung deposition by reducing impaction in the upper airways through slow and deep inhalations. A key feature of the AAD technology is the patient feedback mechanisms that are provided to guide the patient on delivery performance. These feedback signals, which include visual, audible, and tactile forms, are configured in a feedback cascade that leads to a high level of compliance with the use of the I-neb AAD System. The I-neb Insight and the Patient Logging System facilitate a further degree of sophistication to the feedback mechanisms, by providing information on long term adherence and compliance data. These can be assessed by patients and clinicians via a Web-based delivery of information in the form of customized graphical analyses.

  6. Historical Context: The Relationship of Computer Technologies and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granello, Paul F.

    There has been a growing relationship between the profession of counseling and computers over the last four decades. The focus in the 1950s and 1960s was on producing programs that could emulate a human therapist and computer-aided instruction. In the 1970s and 1980s computing technology was utilized primarily for counseling intervention and…

  7. Fostering an Informal Learning Community of Computer Technologies at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lu; Carroll, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Computer technologies develop at a challenging fast pace. Formal education should not only teach students basic computer skills to meet current computer needs, but also foster student development of informal learning ability for a lifelong learning process. On the other hand, students growing up in the digital world are often more skilled with…

  8. Math Attitudes of Computer Education and Instructional Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekerek, Mehmet; Yeniterzi, Betul; Ercan, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) Departments train computer teachers to fill gap of computer instructor in all grades of schools in Turkey. Additionally graduates can also work as instructional technologist or software developer. The curriculum of CEIT departments includes mathematics courses. The aim of this study is to…

  9. Engineering Technologies and the Role of the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lester W., Jr.

    This discussion of computers and their place in the field of engineering technology begins with an outline of the historical development and significance of computers, tracing advancements from the first generation of computers, which began to be produced in 1946, to current third-generation models; reviewing the current state of the art in…

  10. JPRS Report. Science & Technology, Japan: Computer Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    No 3, 1987, pp 650-651. [HIBI86] Information provided by Y. Hibino of NTT. [KNUT73] D.E. Knuth , "The Art of Computer Programming," Vol 3: Sorting... computation model, and have been engaged in the experimental generation of a neural network description language, a compiler and simulators and in...functions by simulation. For the simulations, we used simulators implemented by software on conventional types of computers (LISP machine, VAX

  11. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    information approach in sciences about society has its natural science roots in the corresponding approach to genetics , physiology, and human...introduction. FTD /SNAP /9716 CSO: 1863/164 19 HARDWARE AFFILIATE OF ACADEMY COMPUTER INSTITUTE DEVELOPS PERSONAL COMPUTER Moscow PRAVDA, 24 Dec...processing. FTD /SNAP /9716 CSO: 1863/164 20 HARDWARE BROCHURE: MICROPROCESSORS AND PERSONAL COMPUTERS Moscow NOVOYE V ZHIZNI, NAUKE, TEKHNIKE

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AVTOMATIZATSIYA PROIZVODSTVA, No 1, Jan 87) 69 EDUCATION The Computer Has Come to School (RUSSKIY YAZYK I LITERATURA V KAZAKHSKOY SHKOLE, No 7, Jul 86) 76...avtomatizatsiya proizvodstva", 1987 12770 CSO: 1Ö63/209 75 EDUCATION THE COMPUTER HAS COME TO SCHOOL Alma-Ata RUSSKIY YAZYK I LITERATURA V...and wins over minds and inspires upperclassmen—the avant-garde of computer education. COPYRIGHT: "Russkiy yazyk i literatura v Kazakhskoy shkole

  13. Adaptive Offset Correction for Intracortical Brain Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Mark L.; Perge, János A.; Black, Michael J.; Harrison, Matthew T.; Cash, Sydney S.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-01-01

    Intracortical brain computer interfaces (iBCIs) decode intended movement from neural activity for the control of external devices such as a robotic arm. Standard approaches include a calibration phase to estimate decoding parameters. During iBCI operation, the statistical properties of the neural activity can depart from those observed during calibration, sometimes hindering a user’s ability to control the iBCI. To address this problem, we adaptively correct the offset terms within a Kalman filter decoder via penalized maximum likelihood estimation. The approach can handle rapid shifts in neural signal behavior (on the order of seconds) and requires no knowledge of the intended movement. The algorithm, called MOCA, was tested using simulated neural activity and evaluated retrospectively using data collected from two people with tetraplegia operating an iBCI. In 19 clinical research test cases, where a nonadaptive Kalman filter yielded relatively high decoding errors, MOCA significantly reduced these errors (10.6 ±10.1%; p<0.05, pairwise t-test). MOCA did not significantly change the error in the remaining 23 cases where a nonadaptive Kalman filter already performed well. These results suggest that MOCA provides more robust decoding than the standard Kalman filter for iBCIs. PMID:24196868

  14. Adaptive offset correction for intracortical brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Homer, Mark L; Perge, Janos A; Black, Michael J; Harrison, Matthew T; Cash, Sydney S; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2014-03-01

    Intracortical brain-computer interfaces (iBCIs) decode intended movement from neural activity for the control of external devices such as a robotic arm. Standard approaches include a calibration phase to estimate decoding parameters. During iBCI operation, the statistical properties of the neural activity can depart from those observed during calibration, sometimes hindering a user's ability to control the iBCI. To address this problem, we adaptively correct the offset terms within a Kalman filter decoder via penalized maximum likelihood estimation. The approach can handle rapid shifts in neural signal behavior (on the order of seconds) and requires no knowledge of the intended movement. The algorithm, called multiple offset correction algorithm (MOCA), was tested using simulated neural activity and evaluated retrospectively using data collected from two people with tetraplegia operating an iBCI. In 19 clinical research test cases, where a nonadaptive Kalman filter yielded relatively high decoding errors, MOCA significantly reduced these errors ( 10.6 ± 10.1% ; p < 0.05, pairwise t-test). MOCA did not significantly change the error in the remaining 23 cases where a nonadaptive Kalman filter already performed well. These results suggest that MOCA provides more robust decoding than the standard Kalman filter for iBCIs.

  15. Computer-adaptive test to measure community reintegration of Veterans.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Tian, Feng; Ni, Pengsheng; Jette, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The Community Reintegration of Injured Service Members (CRIS) measure consists of three scales measuring extent of, perceived limitations in, and satisfaction with community reintegration. Length of the CRIS may be a barrier to its widespread use. Using item response theory (IRT) and computer-adaptive test (CAT) methodologies, this study developed and evaluated a briefer community reintegration measure called the CRIS-CAT. Large item banks for each CRIS scale were constructed. A convenience sample of 517 Veterans responded to all items. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were used to identify the dimensionality within each domain, and IRT methods were used to calibrate items. Accuracy and precision of CATs of different lengths were compared with the full-item bank, and data were examined for differential item functioning (DIF). CFAs supported unidimensionality of scales. Acceptable item fit statistics were found for final models. Accuracy of 10-, 15-, 20-, and variable-item CATs for all three scales was 0.88 or above. CAT precision increased with number of items administered and decreased at the upper ranges of each scale. Three items exhibited moderate DIF by sex. The CRIS-CAT demonstrated promising measurement properties and is recommended for use in community reintegration assessment.

  16. Impact of Computer Technology on Design and Craft Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to answer the question, "How has the use of computer technology benefited the compulsory education system, focusing on Design and Technology?" In order to reply this question, it was necessary to focus on interactive whiteboards, e-portfolios and digital projectors as the main technology formats. An initial literature…

  17. Computer-Assisted Technology for the Twice Exceptional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizza, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Technology helps students develop coping strategies to deal with various learning differences. Assistive technology is a common intervention provided to students with disabilities and generally varies depending on student need. Within gifted education, the use of computers and technology is concentrated on curricular applications and activities…

  18. On the use of computation optimization opportunities in computer technologies for applied and computational mathematics problems with prescribed quality characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, M. D.; Zadiraka, V. K.; Lyudvichenko, V. A.; Sergienko, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The use of various opportunities for computation optimization in computer technologies for applied and computational mathematics problems with prescribed quality characteristics is investigated. More precisely, the choice and determination of computational resources and methods of their efficient use for finding an approximate solution of problems up to prescribed accuracy in a limited amount of processor time are investigated.

  19. Computers and Autistic Learners: An Evolving Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedbring, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A research and demonstration computer center for severely handicapped autistic children, STEPPE-Lab, which uses computers as an augmentative communication and instructional system, is described. The article first reviews the keyboard, joystick, mouse, and drawing tablet as augmentative devices for helping communication disordered children interact…

  20. Cutting Technology Costs with Refurbished Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Many district administrators are finding that they can save money on computers by buying preowned ones instead of new ones. The practice has other benefits as well: It allows districts to give more computers to more students who need them, and it also promotes good environmental practices by keeping the machines out of landfills, where they…

  1. Wireless Adaptive Therapeutic TeleGaming in a Pervasive Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, James F.; Szturm, Tony; Borkowski, Maciej; Lockery, Dan; Ramanna, Sheela; Shay, Barbara

    This chapter introduces a wireless, pervasive computing approach to adaptive therapeutic telegaming considered in the context of near set theory. Near set theory provides a formal basis for observation, comparison and classification of perceptual granules. A perceptual granule is defined by a collection of objects that are graspable by the senses or by the mind. In the proposed pervasive computing approach to telegaming, a handicapped person (e.g., stroke patient with limited hand, finger, arm function) plays a video game by interacting with familiar instrumented objects such as cups, cutlery, soccer balls, nozzles, screw top-lids, spoons, so that the technology that makes therapeutic exercise game-playing possible is largely invisible (Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 89:2213-2217, 2008). The basic approach to adaptive learning (AL) in the proposed telegaming environment is ethology-inspired and is quite different from the traditional approach to reinforcement learning. In biologically-inspired learning, organisms learn to achieve some goal by durable modification of behaviours in response to signals from the environment resulting from specific experiences (Animal Behavior, 1995). The term adaptive is used here in an ethological sense, where learning by an organism results from modifying behaviour in response to perceived changes in the environment. To instill adaptivity in a video game, it is assumed that learning by a video game is episodic. During an episode, the behaviour of a player is measured indirectly by tracking the occurrence of gaming events such as a hit or a miss of a target (e.g., hitting a moving ball with a game paddle). An ethogram provides a record of behaviour feature values that provide a basis a functional registry for handicapped players for gaming adaptivity. An important practical application of adaptive gaming is therapeutic rehabilitation exercise carried out in parallel with playing action video games. Enjoyable and

  2. Ageing, Learning, and Computer Technology in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton-Lewis, Gillian M.; Buys, Laurie; Lovie-Kitchin, Jan; Barnett, Karen; David, L. Nikki

    2007-01-01

    Learning is an important aspect of active ageing, yet older people are not often included in discussions of the issue. Older people vary in their need, desire, and ability to learn, and this is evident in the context of technology. The focus of the data analysis for this paper was on determining the place of learning and technology in active…

  3. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  4. Nursing faculty concerns regarding the adoption of computer technology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D; Watson, J E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a study conducted to determine nursing faculty concerns about the use of computer technology. Study participants answered a standardized questionnaire (Stages of Concern) designed to measure concern about innovation adoption, and an author-developed survey, which included questions on level of technology use. The questionnaire and survey were given to nursing faculty before and after their participation in a series of computer technology and literacy workshops. Initially, most workshop participants were low-level computer users whose concerns about technology decreased after the workshops. Some workshop participants also experienced a statistically significant increase in their comfort levels in the use of computer applications. Results support the Stages of Concern questionnaire as a tool to monitor the technology integration process and to guide ongoing faculty development efforts.

  5. Audit and Evaluation of Computer Security. Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthberg, Zella G.

    This is a collection of consensus reports, each produced at a session of an invitational workshop sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of the workshop was to explore the state-of-the-art and define appropriate subjects for future research in the audit and evaluation of computer security. Leading experts in the audit and…

  6. Evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Dean G.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations are presented. The human-computer computer software environment modules are described. The following topics are addressed: command and control workstation concept; cupola workstation concept; Japanese experiment module RMS workstation concept; remote devices controlled from workstations; orbital maneuvering vehicle free flyer; remote manipulator system; Japanese experiment module exposed facility; Japanese experiment module small fine arm; flight telerobotic servicer; human-computer interaction; and workstation/robotics related activities.

  7. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-12-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, Am Educ 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools, there is still concern about instructional integration of computer technology to support student learning. Appropriate integration of computer tools constitutes a major change in people's lives; technology integration is a complex phenomenon that involves understanding teachers' motivations, perceptions, and beliefs about learning and technology (Woodbridge, http://www.techlearning.com/story/showArticle.php?articleID=17701367). Although computer technology has a great potential to reform or even transform education, barriers come in the way of achieving success especially with student learning. This paper presents an overview of technology use in education with a focus on barriers to computer technology integration. Further, this paper provides suggestions to maximize the benefits of learning with computer technology.

  8. An object-oriented, technology-adaptive information model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyiwo, Joshua C.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective was to develop a computer information system for effectively presenting NASA's technologies to American industries, for appropriate commercialization. To this end a comprehensive information management model, applicable to a wide variety of situations, and immune to computer software/hardware technological gyrations, was developed. The model consists of four main elements: a DATA_STORE, a data PRODUCER/UPDATER_CLIENT and a data PRESENTATION_CLIENT, anchored to a central object-oriented SERVER engine. This server engine facilitates exchanges among the other model elements and safeguards the integrity of the DATA_STORE element. It is designed to support new technologies, as they become available, such as Object Linking and Embedding (OLE), on-demand audio-video data streaming with compression (such as is required for video conferencing), Worldwide Web (WWW) and other information services and browsing, fax-back data requests, presentation of information on CD-ROM, and regular in-house database management, regardless of the data model in place. The four components of this information model interact through a system of intelligent message agents which are customized to specific information exchange needs. This model is at the leading edge of modern information management models. It is independent of technological changes and can be implemented in a variety of ways to meet the specific needs of any communications situation. This summer a partial implementation of the model has been achieved. The structure of the DATA_STORE has been fully specified and successfully tested using Microsoft's FoxPro 2.6 database management system. Data PRODUCER/UPDATER and PRESENTATION architectures have been developed and also successfully implemented in FoxPro; and work has started on a full implementation of the SERVER engine. The model has also been successfully applied to a CD-ROM presentation of NASA's technologies in support of Langley Research Center's TAG

  9. Mistaking Computers for Technology: Technology Literacy and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel

    2006-01-01

    No other information and communication technology has swept the globe with greater speed than the Internet, having the potential to promote vast social, economic, and political transformations. As new technologies become available the pattern of adoption and diffusion creates disparities in access and ownership. At the most basic this gap is…

  10. Reviews of computing technology: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, W.R.; Johnson, A.L.

    1994-01-05

    The Savannah River Site Computing Architecture states that the site computing environment will be standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented. Larger server systems deliver needed information to users in a client-server relationship. Goals of the Architecture include utilizing computing resources effectively, maintaining a high level of data integrity, developing a robust infrastructure, and storing data in such a way as to promote accessibility and usability. This document describes the current storage environment at Savannah River Site (SRS) and presents some of the problems that will be faced and strategies that are planned over the next few years.

  11. Application of advanced computational technology to propulsion CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szuch, John R.

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid dynamics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion system design. This paper presents an overview of efforts underway at NASA Lewis to advance and apply computational technology to ICFM. These efforts include the use of modern, software engineering principles for code development, the development of an AI-based user-interface for large codes, the establishment of a high-performance, data communications network to link ICFM researchers and facilities, and the application of parallel processing to speed up computationally intensive and/or time-critical ICFM problems. A multistage compressor flow physics program is cited as an example of efforts to use advanced computational technology to enhance a current NASA Lewis ICFM research program.

  12. Wearable computer technology for dismounted applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Reginald

    2010-04-01

    Small computing devices which rival the compact size of traditional personal digital assistants (PDA) have recently established a market niche. These computing devices are small enough to be considered unobtrusive for humans to wear. The computing devices are also powerful enough to run full multi-tasking general purpose operating systems. This paper will explore the wearable computer information system for dismounted applications recently fielded for ground-based US Air Force use. The environments that the information systems are used in will be reviewed, as well as a description of the net-centric, ground-based warrior. The paper will conclude with a discussion regarding the importance of intuitive, usable, and unobtrusive operator interfaces for dismounted operators.

  13. Computer technology: Silicon chips lighten up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivien, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Microprocessor communications have received a boost from the integration of electronics and photonics in silicon -- a first step towards low power consumption and efficient computing systems. See Letter p.534

  14. Emerging Trends in Technology Education Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil I.

    1993-01-01

    Graphical User Interface (GUI)--and its variant, pen computing--is rapidly replacing older types of operating environments. Despite its heavier demand for processing power, GUI has many advantages. (SK)

  15. Dilution Refrigerator Technology for Scalable Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    has successfully designed, built, tested, and delivered a cryogen free dilution refrigerator for scalable quantum computing. This document is intended... Cryogenics , quantum computing REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...W911NF-10-C-0004. High Precision Devices, Inc. has successfully designed, built, tested, and delivered a cryogen free dilution refrigerator for

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-08

    Computer Graphics in Ergonomie Design (A. H. Kudryavtsev; TEKHNICHESKAYA ESTETIKA, No 9, 1987) 45 Prospecting Systems Based on Electrical and Seismic...kodirovanlya, 1987 9835 44 APPLICATIONS UDC 331.101.1:62,001.66:681.3:766 Computer Graphics in Ergonomie Design 18630003 Moscow TEKHN1CHESKAYA ESTETIKA in...characteristics (visual, aural and other sensory capabilities), Figure 1. Ergonomie CAD System Structure (10) (15) CPEflCTBA MAWWHHOW TPAOMKH

  17. USSR Report, Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    FKTRONNOYE (M. N. Kulik, G. V. Voytsekhovskaya, et al.; ELEKTRONNOYü ^ MODELIROVANIYE, No 4, Jul-Aug 86) THEORY OF COMPUTATIONS Method of Machine...Modeling of Variation Problems Using the Shortest Path Method (V. V. Vasilev; ELEKTRONNOYE MODELIROVANIYE, No 4, ^ Jul-Aug 86) T-Transforms of...introducing the new methods of processing information proved to be so great that the output of computers left behind all other sectors in terms of growth

  18. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  19. Technology and society: ideological implications of information and computer technologies in the Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Weigle, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the impact of technology on the USSR's social system from the perspective of Soviet ideological development. The analysis of information and computer technologies within this framework de-emphasizes both modernization theories and those that assume unchallenged Communist Party control over technological development. Previous studies have examined the level of Soviet technological achievements and the gap between this level and those in the West, many referring to ideological boundaries of Soviet technological development without, however, systematically analyzing the resulting implications for the Soviet ideology of Marxism-Leninism. This study develops a framework for analyzing the impact of new technologies in the USSR in the fields of technology, ideology, and the scientific and technological revolution. On the basis of this framework, examination turns to the relevant Soviet theoretical and technical literature and debates among Soviety elites, concluding that the introduction of information and computer technologies and the organization of computer networks has exacerbated tensions in Soviety Marxism-Leninism.

  20. Theories of Learning and Computer-Mediated Instructional Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes four major models of learning: behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and social constructivism. Discusses situated cognition; differences between learning theories and instructional approaches; and how computer-mediated technologies can be integrated with learning theories. (LRW)

  1. Restricted access processor - An application of computer security technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a security guard device that is currently being developed by Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). The methods used to provide assurance that the system meets its security requirements include the system architecture, a system security evaluation, and the application of formal and informal verification techniques. The combination of state-of-the-art technology and the incorporation of new verification procedures results in a demonstration of the feasibility of computer security technology for operational applications.

  2. Full custom VLSI - A technology for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1990-01-01

    Full custom VLSI is presented as a viable technology for addressing the need for the computing capabilities required for the real-time health monitoring of spacecraft systems. This technology presents solutions that cannot be realized with stored program computers or semicustom VLSI; also, it is not dependent on current IC processes. It is argued that, while design time is longer, full custom VLSI produces the fastest and densest VLSI solution and that high density normally also yields low manufacturing costs.

  3. USSR Report, Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    27 Automating Data Processing on the Rayon and Oblast Levels (A.P. Kolesnik, K.V. Golovin , et al.; FINANSY SSSR, No 5, May 86) 29 Development of...RSFSR Ministry of Finance, K. V. Golovin , division chief, main computer center, USSR Ministry of Finance, and V. Z. Usov, division chief, main

  4. CACTUS: Calculator and Computer Technology User Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use computer-based spreadsheets to find out how much grain should be added to a chess board when a grain of rice is put on the first square, the amount is doubled for the next square, and the chess board is covered. (ASK)

  5. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  6. USSR Report: Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Georgian SSR Academy of Sciences: "Ready for Dialogue"] [Text] Computers in schools, auditoria , and educational laboratories are an phenomenon to which we...professional-technical academies and VUZ auditoria . Obviously, the color of the screens and the characters on them is of major importance for people

  7. Technological Imperatives: Using Computers in Academic Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticku, Ravinder; Phelps, Greg

    Intended for forensic educators and debate teams, this document details how one university debate team, at the University of Iowa, makes use of computer resources on campus to facilitate storage and retrieval of information useful to debaters. The introduction notes the problem of storing and retrieving the amount of information required by debate…

  8. Impact of Computer Technology on Library Expansions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Describes the impact of information technology on the physical and functional organization of libraries and briefly discusses technical issues, including wiring and distribution, access to power sources, codes, lighting, and security. The Duke University Library and the Purcellville (VA) public library's renovation and expansion plans are…

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    fast set-up change for manufacturing of new products" (GOST [State All-Union Standart ] 14.001-73 and GOST 26228- 85). A flexible automated...tekhnologicheskoy podgotovki proizvodstva" [Scientific Foundations of Integrated Standart izat ion of Technological Preparation of Production

  10. Computers and Telecommunications at National Technological University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, M. E.; Lumsden, D. Barry

    The National Technological University (NTU), a consortium of approximately 30 American engineering schools which has been in operation on a continent-wide scale since 1985, uses telecommunications to broadcast engineering education courses to corporate sites across the country. Courses are produced at member institutions and are distributed to…

  11. Advanced sensor-computer technology for urban runoff monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byunggu; Behera, Pradeep K.; Ramirez Rochac, Juan F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the project team's advanced sensor-computer sphere technology for real-time and continuous monitoring of wastewater runoff at the sewer discharge outfalls along the receiving water. This research significantly enhances and extends the previously proposed novel sensor-computer technology. This advanced technology offers new computation models for an innovative use of the sensor-computer sphere comprising accelerometer, programmable in-situ computer, solar power, and wireless communication for real-time and online monitoring of runoff quantity. This innovation can enable more effective planning and decision-making in civil infrastructure, natural environment protection, and water pollution related emergencies. The paper presents the following: (i) the sensor-computer sphere technology; (ii) a significant enhancement to the previously proposed discrete runoff quantity model of this technology; (iii) a new continuous runoff quantity model. Our comparative study on the two distinct models is presented. Based on this study, the paper further investigates the following: (1) energy-, memory-, and communication-efficient use of the technology for runoff monitoring; (2) possible sensor extensions for runoff quality monitoring.

  12. Adaptability and the integration of computer-based information processing into the dynamics of organizations.

    PubMed

    Kampfner, Roberto R

    2006-07-01

    The structure of a system influences its adaptability. An important result of adaptability theory is that subsystem independence increases adaptability [Conrad, M., 1983. Adaptability. Plenum Press, New York]. Adaptability is essential in systems that face an uncertain environment such as biological systems and organizations. Modern organizations are the product of human design. And so it is their structure and the effect that it has on their adaptability. In this paper we explore the potential effects of computer-based information processing on the adaptability of organizations. The integration of computer-based processes into the dynamics of the functions they support and the effect it has on subsystem independence are especially relevant to our analysis.

  13. Computer-Mediated Technology and Transcultural Counselor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, John

    2000-01-01

    This manuscript traces the history of computer technologies, their applications in mental health settings, and suggests that transcultural counselor educators engage their students in the design of a case-based computer simulation. The avatar-focused simulation offers an unprecedented environment for experimentation in collaborative learning and…

  14. Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology. Annual Report FY 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    Activities of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology (ICST) within the U.S. Department of Commerce during fiscal year 1986 are described in this annual report, which summarizes research and publications by ICST in the following areas: (1) standards and guidelines for computer security, including encryption and message authentication…

  15. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  16. Two Year Computer System Technology Curricula for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palko, Donald N.; Hata, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The computer industry is viewed on a collision course with a human resources crisis. Changes expected during the next decade are outlined, with expectations noted that merging of hardware and software skills will be met in a technician's skill set. Essential curricula components of a computer system technology program are detailed. (MP)

  17. Course Syllabus: The Social Impact of Computer Information Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    This syllabus describes the course background, central themes and issues, texts, resources, and recommended readings. Main topics are the sociology of information technology, computers and social change, telecommunications, computers and human interactions, applications in working, and social issues and political implications. (YP)

  18. Information and Communicative Technology--Computers as Research Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarsani, Mahender Reddy

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of "the electronic age,/electronic cottages/the electronic world" has affected the whole world; particularly the emergence of computers has penetrated everyone's life to a remarkable degree. They are being used in various fields including education. Recent advances, especially in the area of computer technology have…

  19. Beyond Theory: Improving Public Relations Writing through Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Computer technology (primarily word processing) enables the student of public relations writing to improve the writing process through increased flexibility in writing, enhanced creativity, increased support of management skills and team work. A new instructional model for computer use in public relations courses at Purdue University Calumet…

  20. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  1. Contactless thin adaptive mirror technology: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Salinari, Piero; Riccardi, Armando; Mantegazza, Paolo

    2010-07-01

    The contactless, voice coil motor adaptive mirror technology starts from an idea by Piero Salinari in 1993. This idea has progressively evolved to real systems thanks to a fruitful collaboration involving Italian research institutes (INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and Aerospace Department of Politecnico di Milano) and small Italian enterprises (Microgate and ADS). Collaboration between research institutions and industry is still very effectively in place, but nowadays the technology has left the initial R&D phase reaching a stage in which the whole projects are managed by the industrial entities. In this paper we present the baseline concept and its evolution, describing the main progress milestones. These are paced by the actual implementation of this idea into real systems, from MMT, to LBT, Magellan, VLT, GMT and E-ELT. The fundamental concept and layout has remained unchanged through this evolution, maintaining its intrinsic advantages: tolerance to actuators' failures, mechanical de-coupling and relaxed tolerances between correcting mirror and reference structure, large stroke, hysteresis-free behavior. Moreover, this concept has proved its expandability to very large systems with thousands of controlled d.o.f. Notwithstanding the solidity of the fundamentals, the implementation has strongly evolved from the beginning, in order to deal with the dimensional, power, maintainability and reliability constraints imposed by the increased size of the targeted systems.

  2. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A.; Duro, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location. PMID:27399711

  3. A Framework for the Development of Context-Adaptable User Interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing Systems.

    PubMed

    Varela, Gervasio; Paz-Lopez, Alejandro; Becerra, Jose A; Duro, Richard

    2016-07-07

    This paper addresses the problem of developing user interfaces for Ubiquitous Computing (UC) and Ambient Intelligence (AmI) systems. These kind of systems are expected to provide a natural user experience, considering interaction modalities adapted to the user abilities and preferences and using whatever interaction devices are present in the environment. These interaction devices are not necessarily known at design time. The task is quite complicated due to the variety of devices and technologies, and the diversity of scenarios, and it usually burdens the developer with the need to create many different UIs in order to consider the foreseeable user-environment combinations. Here, we propose an UI abstraction framework for UC and AmI systems that effectively improves the portability of those systems between different environments and for different users. It allows developers to design and implement a single UI capable of being deployed with different devices and modalities regardless the physical location.

  4. USSR Report, Cybernetics, Computers and Automation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Klimenko; SOTSIALISTICHESKAYA INDUSTRIYA, 13 Feb 85) ......... Mini- and Microcomputer Local Control Network Architecture and Design Principles (V. A...and posts for continuous Komsomol monitoring of the development of computers of new generations and automated control systems have recommended...partitions. "Job Control " is also a control program and receives the batch job input stream, preparing the system to execute a job or single program

  5. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Feb 86) , 13 THEORY OF COMPUTATION Method of Localizing the Area of the Optimum in Mathematical Programming Problems (A.F. Voloshin; DOKLADY...Subdifferentials (L.I. Minchenko; KIBERNETIKA, No 2, Feb 86) 17 - b - Convergence of Method of Chebyshev Centers and Some of Its Applications (E.I...Nenakhov, M.Ye. Primak; KIBERNETIKA, No 2, Feb 86) 17 Finite Method of Minimizing Concave Function With Linear . Limitations and Its Applications

  6. A Partnership Project: Integrating Computer Technology and Orff-Schulwerk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.; Fredrickson, Julie M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach for general music educators wanting to study new instructional strategies in which a classroom teacher and university educator collaborated to explore the integration of computer technology with Orff-Schulwerk in second- and third-grade music classes. Discusses the project and two of its technology-assisted…

  7. National Survey of Computer Aided Manufacturing in Industrial Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidari, Farzin

    The current status of computer-aided manufacturing in the 4-year industrial technology programs in the United States was studied. All industrial technology department chairs were mailed a questionnaire divided into program information, equipment information, and general comments sections. The questionnaire was designed to determine the subjects…

  8. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  9. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    SciTech Connect

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-26

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT and E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  10. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  11. Video and Computer Technologies for Extended-Campus Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagan, Edgar L.; And Others

    This paper discusses video and computer technologies for extended-campus programming (courses and programs at off-campus sites). The first section provides an overview of the distance education program at the University of Kentucky (UK), and highlights the improved access to graduate and professional programs, advances in technology, funding,…

  12. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  13. The Federal Government's Role in Advancing Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Hotline, 1978

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Study submitted by the Science and Technology Team, the Federal Government's role in advancing and diffusing computer technology is discussed. Findings and conclusions assess the state-of-the-art in government and in industry, and five recommendations provide directions for government policy…

  14. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  15. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  16. Using Computer and Video Technologies to Develop Interpersonal Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. Olin; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two studies investigated ways in which computer and video technology can support expert human coaches in order to reduce instructor time and increase learner-centered environments; the goal was to train undergraduate students to facilitate others' interpersonal problem solving. Results indicate that the technology-supported methods can decrease…

  17. Building Computer Technology Skills in TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research study that investigated factors influencing TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages) teacher candidates' (TCs) selection and use of technology in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom and the influence of explicit training in context in the use of computer technology for second…

  18. COMPUGIRLS: Stepping Stone to Future Computer-Based Technology Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jieun; Husman, Jenefer; Scott, Kimberly A.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The COMPUGIRLS: Culturally relevant technology program for adolescent girls was developed to promote underrepresented girls' future possible selves and career pathways in computer-related technology fields. We hypothesized that the COMPUGIRLS would promote academic possible selves and self-regulation to achieve these possible selves. We compared…

  19. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Computers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    No 11, Nov 86) 34 Renovation of Galvanic Production Plant (V. Katsuk; NARODNOYE KHOZYAYSTVO BELORUSSII, No 11, Nov 86) 40 Classification...and the management of society and production took place on the same material basis as before industrialization. Even in the early stages of...revolutionary change in the technology and structure of production and management . Only in this case will computerization produce fundamentally new

  20. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  1. Computers and terminals as an aid to international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    As technology transfer becomes more popular and proves to be an economical method for companies of all sizes to take advantage of a tremendous amount of new and available technology from sources all over the world, the introduction of computers and terminals into the international technology transfer process is proving to be a successful method for companies to take part in this beneficial approach to new business opportunities.

  2. Adaptive Local Grid Refinement in Computational Fluid Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Adaptive mesh refinements in reservoir simulation applications (R.E. Ew- ing), Proceedings Intl. Conference on Accuracy Est. and Adaptive Refine... reservoir simulation (R.E. Ewing and .J.V. 1{oebbe), Innovati’ve Numerical Mlethods in Engineering, (R.P. Shaw, J. Pc- riaux, A. Chaudouet, J. Wu...Universities, Cheyenne, Wyoming, February 21, 1986, O 9. Finite element techniques for reservoir simulation , Fourth International Sym- posium on Numerical

  3. Space systems computer-aided design technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system is described, together with planned capability increases in the IDEAS system. The system's disciplines consist of interactive graphics and interactive computing. A single user at an interactive terminal can create, design, analyze, and conduct parametric studies of earth-orbiting satellites, which represents a timely and cost-effective method during the conceptual design phase where various missions and spacecraft options require evaluation. Spacecraft concepts evaluated include microwave radiometer satellites, communication satellite systems, solar-powered lasers, power platforms, and orbiting space stations.

  4. Diffusion of innovation: computer technology in hospital pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Browning, W C; Hurd, P D; Bootman, J L; Tansik, D A; McGhan, W F

    1984-11-01

    The diffusion of computer technology in hospital pharmacy departments was studied by surveying pharmacy directors in a randomly selected sample of 501 hospitals in the United States with at least 100 beds. Pharmacy directors were asked to indicate for which of 17 tasks a computer or memory typewriter was used in the pharmacy department. The time of first adopting computers in the department was compared with the predicted S adoption curve; adoption time was also correlated with characteristics of the hospital, pharmacy, and pharmacy director. Of the 417 respondents, 308 reported use of a memory typewriter or computer in the pharmacy. Fifty-one directors reported only memory-typewriter use, and 94 reported both computer and memory-typewriter use. Maintenance of patient census lists and patient billing were the most frequent uses of computers. The primary uses of memory typewriters were preparation of letters and labels. There was no significant difference in the actual and predicted S curves for time of adoption of computers. The number of months since first adopting computers was positively correlated with hospital bed size and the pharmacy director's number of years as a pharmacist, years in current position and with current employer, and number of subordinates; it was also positively correlated with number of pharmaceutical services and number of computer uses in the department. Computer technology is becoming more universally accepted in hospital pharmacy, and research on the diffusion of innovations suggests that acceptance will continue to increase.

  5. Implementing cognitive learning strategies in computer-based educational technology: a proposed system.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M. J.; Contino, P. B.; Ramirez, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    Switching the development focus of computer-based instruction from the concerns of delivery technology to the fundamentals of instructional methodology, is a notion that has received increased attention among educational theorists and instructional designers over the last several years. Building upon this precept, a proposed methodology and computer support system is presented for distilling educational objectives into concept maps using strategies derived from cognitive theory. Our system design allows for a flexible and extensible architecture in which an educator can create instructional modules that encapsulate their teaching strategies, and mimics the adaptive behavior used by experienced instructors in teaching complex educational objectives. PMID:9357716

  6. Implementation and Evaluation of Multiple Adaptive Control Technologies for a Generic Transport Aircraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishakumar, Kalmanje S.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is the evaluation of multiple adaptive control technologies for a generic transport aircraft simulation. For this study, seven model reference adaptive control (MRAC) based technologies were considered. Each technology was integrated into an identical dynamic-inversion control architecture and tuned using a methodology based on metrics and specific design requirements. Simulation tests were then performed to evaluate each technology s sensitivity to time-delay, flight condition, model uncertainty, and artificially induced cross-coupling. The resulting robustness and performance characteristics were used to identify potential strengths, weaknesses, and integration challenges of the individual adaptive control technologies

  7. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    CATALOG NUMBERTechnical Report 475%; , ADAPTIVE DECISION &IDING IN OMPUTER-ASSISTED *JECHNICAL REPOT INSTRUCTION: ADAPTIVE COMPUTERIZED TRAINING )16...alternative. For example, in auto maintenance, the mechanic is trained to adjust the dis- tributor with a "feeler" guage or a dwell tachometer . He

  8. Kinematics and computation of workspace for adaptive geometry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourki, Forouza; Sosa, Horacio

    1993-09-01

    A new feature in the design of smart structures is the capability of the structure to respond autonomously to undesirable phenomena and environment. This capability is often synonymous to the requirement that the structure should assume a set of different geometric shapes or adapt to a set of kinematic constraints to accomplish a maneuver. Systems with these characteristics have been referred to as `shape adaptive' or `variable geometry' structures. The present paper introduces a basis for the kinematics and work space studies of statically deterministic truss structures which are shape adaptive. The difference between these structures and the traditional truss structures, which are merely built to support the weight and may be modelled by finite element methods, is the fact that these variable geometry structures allow for large (and nonlinear) deformations. On the other hand, these structures unlike structures composed of well investigated `four bar mechanisms,' are statically deterministic.

  9. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  10. Molecular determinants of enzyme cold adaptation: comparative structural and computational studies of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena; Tiberti, Matteo; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Pasi, Marco; Ranzani, Valeria

    2011-11-01

    The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying enzyme cold adaptation is a hot-topic both for fundamental research and industrial applications. In the present contribution, we review the last decades of structural computational investigations on cold-adapted enzymes in comparison to their warm-adapted counterparts. Comparative sequence and structural studies allow the definition of a multitude of adaptation strategies. Different enzymes carried out diverse mechanisms to adapt to low temperatures, so that a general theory for enzyme cold adaptation cannot be formulated. However, some common features can be traced in dynamic and flexibility properties of these enzymes, as well as in their intra- and inter-molecular interaction networks. Interestingly, the current data suggest that a family-centered point of view is necessary in the comparative analyses of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. In fact, enzymes belonging to the same family or superfamily, thus sharing at least the three-dimensional fold and common features of the functional sites, have evolved similar structural and dynamic patterns to overcome the detrimental effects of low temperatures.

  11. A New Socio-technical Model for Studying Health Information Technology in Complex Adaptive Healthcare Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual models have been developed to address challenges inherent in studying health information technology (HIT). This manuscript introduces an 8-dimensional model specifically designed to address the socio-technical challenges involved in design, development, implementation, use, and evaluation of HIT within complex adaptive healthcare systems. The 8 dimensions are not independent, sequential, or hierarchical, but rather are interdependent and interrelated concepts similar to compositions of other complex adaptive systems. Hardware and software computing infrastructure refers to equipment and software used to power, support, and operate clinical applications and devices. Clinical content refers to textual or numeric data and images that constitute the “language” of clinical applications. The human computer interface includes all aspects of the computer that users can see, touch, or hear as they interact with it. People refers to everyone who interacts in some way with the system, from developer to end-user, including potential patient-users. Workflow and communication are the processes or steps involved in assuring that patient care tasks are carried out effectively. Two additional dimensions of the model are internal organizational features (e.g., policies, procedures, and culture) and external rules and regulations, both of which may facilitate or constrain many aspects of the preceding dimensions. The final dimension is measurement and monitoring, which refers to the process of measuring and evaluating both intended and unintended consequences of HIT implementation and use. We illustrate how our model has been successfully applied in real-world complex adaptive settings to understand and improve HIT applications at various stages of development and implementation. PMID:20959322

  12. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  13. Study of large adaptive arrays for space technology applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Steinberg, B.; Powers, E.; Lim, T.

    1977-01-01

    The research in large adaptive antenna arrays for space technology applications is reported. Specifically two tasks were considered. The first was a system design study for accurate determination of the positions and the frequencies of sources radiating from the earth's surface that could be used for the rapid location of people or vehicles in distress. This system design study led to a nonrigid array about 8 km in size with means for locating the array element positions, receiving signals from the earth and determining the source locations and frequencies of the transmitting sources. It is concluded that this system design is feasible, and satisfies the desired objectives. The second task was an experiment to determine the largest earthbound array which could simulate a spaceborne experiment. It was determined that an 800 ft array would perform indistinguishably in both locations and it is estimated that one several times larger also would serve satisfactorily. In addition the power density spectrum of the phase difference fluctuations across a large array was measured. It was found that the spectrum falls off approximately as f to the minus 5/2 power.

  14. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  15. Impact of new computing systems on computational mechanics and flight-vehicle structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in computer technology which may have an impact on computational mechanics and flight vehicle structures technology were reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario for future hardware/software environment and engineering analysis systems is presented. Research areas with potential for improving the effectiveness of analysis methods in the new environment are identified.

  16. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  17. An Investigation on Computer-Adaptive Multistage Testing Panels for Multidimensional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xinrui

    2013-01-01

    The computer-adaptive multistage testing (ca-MST) has been developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and been increasingly adopted in large-scale assessments. Current research and practice only focus on ca-MST panels for credentialing purposes. The ca-MST test mode, therefore, is designed to gauge a single scale. The…

  18. Adaptive 3D single-block grids for the computation of viscous flows around wings

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmeijer, R.; Kok, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A robust algorithm for the adaption of a 3D single-block structured grid suitable for the computation of viscous flows around a wing is presented and demonstrated by application to the ONERA M6 wing. The effects of grid adaption on the flow solution and accuracy improvements is analyzed. Reynolds number variations are studied.

  19. New developments in adaptive methods for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Bass, Jon M.

    1990-01-01

    New developments in a posteriori error estimates, smart algorithms, and h- and h-p adaptive finite element methods are discussed in the context of two- and three-dimensional compressible and incompressible flow simulations. Applications to rotor-stator interaction, rotorcraft aerodynamics, shock and viscous boundary layer interaction and fluid-structure interaction problems are discussed.

  20. Identifying Reading Problems with Computer-Adaptive Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrell, C.; Tymms, P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an adaptive assessment called Interactive Computerised Assessment System (InCAS) that is aimed at children of a wide age and ability range to identify specific reading problems. Rasch measurement has been used to create the equal interval scales that form each part of the assessment. The rationale for the…

  1. Adding Statistical Machine Translation Adaptation to Computer-Assisted Translation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    on Telecommunications. Tehran, 2012, 822–826. Bertoldi, N.; Federico, M. Domain Adaptation for Statistical Machine Translation with Monolingual ...for Interactive Machine Translation. ICMI’11. Alicante, Spain: ACM, 2011, 197–200. 14 Haffari, G.; Sarkar, A. Active Learning for Multilingual

  2. Socio-Pedagogical Complex as a Pedagogical Support Technology of Students' Social Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadovaya, Victoriya V.; Simonova, Galina I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the need of developing technological approaches to pedagogical support of students' social adaptation. The purpose of this paper is to position the technological sequence of pedagogical support of students' social adaptation in the activities of the socio-pedagogical complex. The…

  3. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  4. WRF4G project: Adaptation of WRF Model to Distributed Computing Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García Díez, Markel; Blanco Real, Jose C.; Fernández, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays Grid Computing is powerful computational tool which is ready to be used for scientific community in different areas (such as biomedicine, astrophysics, climate, etc.). However, the use of this distributed computing infrastructures (DCI) is not yet common practice in climate research, and only a few teams and applications in this area take advantage of this infrastructure. Thus, the first objective of this project is to popularize the use of this technology in the atmospheric sciences area. In order to achieve this objective, one of the most used applications has been taken (WRF; a limited- area model, successor of the MM5 model), that has a user community formed by more than 8000 researchers worldwide. This community develop its research activity on different areas and could benefit from the advantages of Grid resources (case study simulations, regional hind-cast/forecast, sensitivity studies, etc.). The WRF model is been used as input by many energy and natural hazards community, therefore those community will also benefit. However, Grid infrastructures have some drawbacks for the execution of applications that make an intensive use of CPU and memory for a long period of time. This makes necessary to develop a specific framework (middleware). This middleware encapsulates the application and provides appropriate services for the monitoring and management of the jobs and the data. Thus, the second objective of the project consists on the development of a generic adaptation of WRF for Grid (WRF4G), to be distributed as open-source and to be integrated in the official WRF development cycle. The use of this WRF adaptation should be transparent and useful to face any of the previously described studies, and avoid any of the problems of the Grid infrastructure. Moreover it should simplify the access to the Grid infrastructures for the research teams, and also to free them from the technical and computational aspects of the use of the Grid. Finally, in order to

  5. Beyond computer literacy: supporting youth's positive development through technology.

    PubMed

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for children to make a better world through the use of their computational skills, is just as important. The Positive Technological Development framework (PTD), a natural extension of the computer literacy and the technological fluency movements that have influenced the world of educational technology, adds psychosocial, civic, and ethical components to the cognitive ones. PTD examines the developmental tasks of a child growing up in our digital era and provides a model for developing and evaluating technology-rich youth programs. The explicit goal of PTD programs is to support children in the positive uses of technology to lead more fulfilling lives and make the world a better place. This article introduces the concept of PTD and presents examples of the Zora virtual world program for young people that the author developed following this framework.

  6. Design of a fault tolerant airborne digital computer. Volume 2: Computational requirements and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, R. S.; Shapiro, E. B.; Zeidler, H. M.; Wahlstrom, S. E.; Clark, C. B.; Goldberg, J.

    1973-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work on the design of a fault tolerant digital computer for aircraft. Volume 2 is composed of two parts. Part 1 is concerned with the computational requirements associated with an advanced commercial aircraft. Part 2 reviews the technology that will be available for the implementation of the computer in the 1975-1985 period. With regard to the computation task 26 computations have been categorized according to computational load, memory requirements, criticality, permitted down-time, and the need to save data in order to effect a roll-back. The technology part stresses the impact of large scale integration (LSI) on the realization of logic and memory. Also considered was module interconnection possibilities so as to minimize fault propagation.

  7. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  8. First Year Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Computers from Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakin, Ilker, Sumuer, Evren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the attitudes of first year university students towards computers. The study focuses on preservice teachers (N=46) included 33 male and 12 female from Middle East Technical University, Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) department. The study is delimited to first grade preservice teachers…

  9. Understanding and enhancing user acceptance of computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, William B.; Morris, Nancy M.

    1986-01-01

    Technology-driven efforts to implement computer technology often encounter problems due to lack of acceptance or begrudging acceptance of the personnel involved. It is argued that individuals' acceptance of automation, in terms of either computerization or computer aiding, is heavily influenced by their perceptions of the impact of the automation on their discretion in performing their jobs. It is suggested that desired levels of discretion reflect needs to feel in control and achieve self-satisfaction in task performance, as well as perceptions of inadequacies of computer technology. Discussion of these factors leads to a structured set of considerations for performing front-end analysis, deciding what to automate, and implementing the resulting changes.

  10. Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Research and Development Program Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Michael; McGuire, Kenyon; Sorgi, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this project report, focused on: (1) Design and development of two Advanced Portable Workstation 2 (APW 2) units. These units incorporate advanced technology features such as a low power Pentium processor, a high resolution color display, National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) video handling capabilities, a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) interface, and Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) and ethernet interfaces. (2) Use these units to integrate and demonstrate advanced wireless network and portable video capabilities. (3) Qualification of the APW 2 systems for use in specific experiments aboard the Mir Space Station. A major objective of the PCT Phase 2 program was to help guide future choices in computing platforms and techniques for meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission objectives. The focus being on the development of optimal configurations of computing hardware, software applications, and network technologies for use on NASA missions.

  11. GPU-based computational adaptive optics for volumetric optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Han; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Untracht, Gavrielle R.; Zhang, Xihao; Adie, Steven G.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that measures reflectance from within biological tissues. Current higher-NA optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technologies with near cellular resolution have limitations on volumetric imaging capabilities due to the trade-offs between resolution vs. depth-of-field and sensitivity to aberrations. Such trade-offs can be addressed using computational adaptive optics (CAO), which corrects aberration computationally for all depths based on the complex optical field measured by OCT. However, due to the large size of datasets plus the computational complexity of CAO and OCT algorithms, it is a challenge to achieve high-resolution 3D-OCM reconstructions at speeds suitable for clinical and research OCM imaging. In recent years, real-time OCT reconstruction incorporating both dispersion and defocus correction has been achieved through parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). We add to these methods by implementing depth-dependent aberration correction for volumetric OCM using plane-by-plane phase deconvolution. Following both defocus and aberration correction, our reconstruction algorithm achieved depth-independent transverse resolution of 2.8 um, equal to the diffraction-limited focal plane resolution. We have translated the CAO algorithm to a CUDA code implementation and tested the speed of the software in real-time using two GPUs - NVIDIA Quadro K600 and Geforce TITAN Z. For a data volume containing 4096×256×256 voxels, our system's processing speed can keep up with the 60 kHz acquisition rate of the line-scan camera, and takes 1.09 seconds to simultaneously update the CAO correction for 3 en face planes at user-selectable depths.

  12. Development of the Navy Computer Adaptive Personality Scales (NCAPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    237 2- 12 high school students first assessed as juniors, the five- year stability is r = .49 for 91 females first assessed as college seniors...item revision of the Traditional NCAPS scales. 5- 12 Table 5-7 Reliability of Adaptive NCAPS by scale at various points along the posterior...a series of interrelated research projects. This report covers how the personality constructs were selected, items were developed and scaled, and

  13. Application of software technology to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaugh, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how major improvements in spacecraft computer systems can be obtained from recent advances in hardware and software technology. Investigations into integrated circuit technology indicated that the CMOS/SOS chip set being developed for the Air Force Avionics Laboratory at Wright Patterson had the best potential for improving the performance of spaceborne computer systems. An integral part of the chip set is the bit slice arithmetic and logic unit. The flexibility allowed by microprogramming, combined with the software investigations, led to the specification of a baseline architecture and instruction set.

  14. Adaptive computational methods for SSME internal flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Adaptive finite element methods for the analysis of classes of problems in compressible and incompressible flow of interest in SSME (space shuttle main engine) analysis and design are described. The general objective of the adaptive methods is to improve and to quantify the quality of numerical solutions to the governing partial differential equations of fluid dynamics in two-dimensional cases. There are several different families of adaptive schemes that can be used to improve the quality of solutions in complex flow simulations. Among these are: (1) r-methods (node-redistribution or moving mesh methods) in which a fixed number of nodal points is allowed to migrate to points in the mesh where high error is detected; (2) h-methods, in which the mesh size h is automatically refined to reduce local error; and (3) p-methods, in which the local degree p of the finite element approximation is increased to reduce local error. Two of the three basic techniques have been studied in this project: an r-method for steady Euler equations in two dimensions and a p-method for transient, laminar, viscous incompressible flow. Numerical results are presented. A brief introduction to residual methods of a-posterior error estimation is also given and some pertinent conclusions of the study are listed.

  15. The implementation of AI technologies in computer wargames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, John A.

    2004-08-01

    Computer wargames involve the most in-depth analysis of general game theory. The enumerated turns of a game like chess are dwarfed by the exponentially larger possibilities of even a simple computer wargame. Implementing challenging AI is computer wargames is an important goal in both the commercial and military environments. In the commercial marketplace, customers demand a challenging AI opponent when they play a computer wargame and are frustrated by a lack of competence on the part of the AI. In the military environment, challenging AI opponents are important for several reasons. A challenging AI opponent will force the military professional to avoid routine or set-piece approaches to situations and cause them to think much deeper about military situations before taking action. A good AI opponent would also include national characteristics of the opponent being simulated, thus providing the military professional with even more of a challenge in planning and approach. Implementing current AI technologies in computer wargames is a technological challenge. The goal is to join the needs of AI in computer wargames with the solutions of current AI technologies. This talk will address several of those issues, possible solutions, and currently unsolved problems.

  16. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

    2005-10-01

    The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for

  17. A survey of adaptive control technology in robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosunoglu, S.; Tesar, D.

    1987-01-01

    Previous work on the adaptive control of robotic systems is reviewed. Although the field is relatively new and does not yet represent a mature discipline, considerable attention has been given to the design of sophisticated robot controllers. Here, adaptive control methods are divided into model reference adaptive systems and self-tuning regulators with further definition of various approaches given in each class. The similarity and distinct features of the designed controllers are delineated and tabulated to enhance comparative review.

  18. Comparing Computer-Adaptive and Curriculum-Based Measurement Methods of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.; Gebhardt, Sarah N.

    2012-01-01

    This article reported the concurrent, predictive, and diagnostic accuracy of a computer-adaptive test (CAT) and curriculum-based measurements (CBM; both computation and concepts/application measures) for universal screening in mathematics among students in first through fourth grade. Correlational analyses indicated moderate to strong…

  19. Helicopter mission optimization study. [portable computer technology for flight optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-cost, portable computer technology to help a helicopter pilot optimize flight parameters to minimize fuel consumption and takeoff and landing noise was demonstrated. Eight separate computer programs were developed for use in the helicopter cockpit using a hand-held computer. The programs provide the helicopter pilot with the ability to calculate power required, minimum fuel consumption for both range and endurance, maximum speed and a minimum noise profile for both takeoff and landing. Each program is defined by a maximum of two magnetic cards. The helicopter pilot is required to key in the proper input parameter such as gross weight, outside air temperature or pressure altitude.

  20. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  1. Adaptive mesh refinement strategies in isogeometric analysis— A computational comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Paul; Kästner, Markus; Morgenstern, Philipp; Peterseim, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    We explain four variants of an adaptive finite element method with cubic splines and compare their performance in simple elliptic model problems. The methods in comparison are Truncated Hierarchical B-splines with two different refinement strategies, T-splines with the refinement strategy introduced by Scott et al. in 2012, and T-splines with an alternative refinement strategy introduced by some of the authors. In four examples, including singular and non-singular problems of linear elasticity and the Poisson problem, the H1-errors of the discrete solutions, the number of degrees of freedom as well as sparsity patterns and condition numbers of the discretized problem are compared.

  2. Helping Students Adapt to Computer-Based Encrypted Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Eveleth, Lori; Eveleth, Daniel M.; O'Neill, Michele; Stone, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    The College of Business and Economics at the University of Idaho conducted a pilot study that used commercially available encryption software called Securexam to deliver computer-based examinations. A multi-step implementation procedure was developed, implemented, and then evaluated on the basis of what students viewed as valuable. Two key aspects…

  3. Adapting the traveling salesman problem to an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to guide a quantum computer to select an optimal tour for the traveling salesman. This is significant because it opens a rapid solution method for the wide range of applications of the traveling salesman problem, which include vehicle routing, job sequencing and data clustering.

  4. Implications of Computer Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene; Burbank, Judith

    Lengthy abstracts of a small number of selected books and articles on the implications of computer technology are presented, preceded by a brief state-of-the-art survey which traces the impact of computers on the structure of economic and political organizations and socio-cultural patterns. A summary statement introduces each of the three abstract…

  5. The Effect of Using Item Parameters Calibrated from Paper Administrations in Computer Adaptive Test Administrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommerich, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Computer administered tests are becoming increasingly prevalent as computer technology becomes more readily available on a large scale. For testing programs that utilize both computer and paper administrations, mode effects are problematic in that they can result in examinee scores that are artificially inflated or deflated. As such, researchers…

  6. Introduction to CAD/Computers. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Hugh

    This learning module for an eighth-grade introductory technology course is designed to help teachers introduce students to computer-assisted design (CAD) in a communications unit on graphics. The module contains a module objective and five specific objectives, a content outline, suggested instructor methodology, student activities, a list of six…

  7. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  8. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  9. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  10. Troubling Discourse: Basic Writing and Computer-Mediated Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonaitis, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    Through an examination of literature in the fields of Basic Writing and developmental education, this essay provides some historical perspective and examines the prevalent discourses on the use of computer-mediated technologies in the basic writing classroom. The author uses Bertram Bruce's (1997) framework of various "stances" on…

  11. Computational Structures Technology for Airframes and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Starnes, James H., Jr. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler); Chamis, Christos C. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint University of Virginia (UVA)/NASA Workshops. The presentations included NASA Headquarters perspectives on High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), goals and objectives of the UVA Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST), NASA and Air Force CST activities, CST activities for airframes and propulsion systems in industry, and CST activities at Sandia National Laboratory.

  12. Instructors' Integration of Computer Technology: Examining the Role of Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hoe Kyeung; Rissel, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Computer technology has the potential to provide rich resources for language teaching and learning. However, it continues to be underutilized, even though its availability, familiarity, and sophistication are steadily increasing. This case study explored the way in which three language instructors' beliefs about language teaching and learning…

  13. The Voice as Computer Interface: A Look at Tomorrow's Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Holley R.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of voice as the communications device for computer-human interaction focuses on voice recognition systems for use within a library environment. Voice technologies are described, including voice response and voice recognition; examples of voice systems in use in libraries are examined; and further possibilities, including use with…

  14. Beyond Computer Literacy: Technology Integration and Curriculum Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safar, Ammar H.; AlKhezzi, Fahad A.

    2013-01-01

    Personal computers, the Internet, smartphones, and other forms of information and communication technology (ICT) have changed our world, our job, our personal lives, as well as how we manage our knowledge and time effectively and efficiently. Research findings in the past decades have acknowledged and affirmed that the content the ICT medium…

  15. Pervasive Computing and Communication Technologies for U-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods influences a significant effect on education. The assimilation of pervasive computing and communication technologies marks another great step forward, with Ubiquitous Learning (U-learning) emerging for next generation learners. In the evolutionary view the 5G (or…

  16. Computer Technology and Student Preferences in a Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Norman J.; Kemp, Wendy C.; Benson, Wendy A.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed learner preferences for using computer-based technology in a distance education course. A questionnaire was posted to students who had taken an undergraduate nutrition course at Athabasca University, Canada. The response rate was 57.1% (176 returned out of 308). Subjects were predominately female (93.7%) and nursing students…

  17. NASA CST aids U.S. industry. [computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerry M.; Pinson, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of NASA's computational structures Technology (CST) research on aerospace vehicle design and operation is discussed. The application of this research to proposed version of a high-speed civil transport, to composite structures in aerospace, to the study of crack growth, and to resolving field problems is addressed.

  18. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  19. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are.

  20. Computer-related assistive technology: satisfaction and experiences among users with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Burton, Mary; Nieuwenhuijsen, Els R; Epstein, Marcy J

    2008-01-01

    Many people with disabilities use assistive technology devices (ATDs) for computer access. The specific focus of this exploratory study was (a) to assess the experiences, opinions, and satisfaction levels of 24 individuals with disabilities using computer-related ATDs; (b) to investigate their awareness of health risk factors related to computer usage; and (c) to examine the psychosocial impact of computer-related ATDs on users. Data were collected via telephone interviews with 24 individuals with physical disabilities who had experience using one or more ATDs. The Quebec User Evaluation with Assistive Technology instrument was used to evaluate users' satisfaction with ATDs in a number of dimensions, including their physical attributes. The Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale measured the psychosocial impact (i.e., independence, competence, and adequacy) of an ATD on users. Additional questions were posed to gather information about user's opinions and experiences. Training appeared to be an important component for ATD users, many of whom preferred a setting to try out devices rather than group or individual training. Respondents with visual impairments revealed a higher level of adaptability versus those without visual impairments (p = .001). Additional research is needed to develop specific survey items focused on users of computer-related ATDs and the evaluation of the psychosocial impact of ATDs on computer users.

  1. Overview of European technology in computers, telecommunications, and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, J. F.

    1990-05-01

    The emergence of the personal computer, the growing use of distributed systems, and the increasing demand for supercomputers and mini-supercomputers are causing a profound impact on the European computer market. An equally profound development in telecommunications is the integration of voice, data, and images in the public network systems - the Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN). The programs being mounted in Europe to meet the challenges of these technologies are described. The Europe-wide trends and actions with respect to computers, telecommunications, and microelectronics are discussed, and the major European collaborative programs in these fields are described. Specific attention is given to the European Strategic Programme for Research and Development in Information (ESPRIT); Research in Advanced Communications for Europe (RACE); European Research Coordination Agency (Eureka) programs; Joint European Submicron Silicon Initiative (JESSI); and the recently combined programs Basic Research Industrial Technologies in Europe/European Research in Advanced Materials (BRITE/EURAM).

  2. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  3. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  4. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

    2006-04-30

    Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the

  5. An adaptable computer control system for the Daresbury Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, T. P.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes a computer system for the setting and control of all the magnets and high voltage supplies of a many element spectrometer using an LSI11/23 running RT11 with CAMAC input/output. Magnetic field strengths are measured by an inexpensive and easily constructed system of Hall probes and temperature transducers. The software calculates the field strength in each magnet by applying a temperature correction and a quadratic calibration to the measured Hall voltage. Keyboard commands to the system provide many facilities for setting up and control of the separator. Communication with a remote processor via an X25 link is also described.

  6. Computational adaptive optics for live three-dimensional biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Z.; Hanser, B.; Gustafsson, M. G. L.; Agard, D. A.; Sedat, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Light microscopy of thick biological samples, such as tissues, is often limited by aberrations caused by refractive index variations within the sample itself. This problem is particularly severe for live imaging, a field of great current excitement due to the development of inherently fluorescent proteins. We describe a method of removing such aberrations computationally by mapping the refractive index of the sample using differential interference contrast microscopy, modeling the aberrations by ray tracing through this index map, and using space-variant deconvolution to remove aberrations. This approach will open possibilities to study weakly labeled molecules in difficult-to-image live specimens. PMID:11274396

  7. A survey on adaptive engine technology for serious games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasim, Langi, Armein Z. R.; Munir, Rosmansyah, Yusep

    2016-02-01

    Serious Games has become a priceless tool in learning because it can simulate abstract concept to appear more realistic. The problem faced is that the players have different ability in playing the games. This causes the players to become frustrated if the game is too difficult or to get bored if it is too easy. Serious games have non-player character (NPC) in it. The NPC should be able to adapt to the players in such a way so that the players can feel comfortable in playing the games. Because of that, serious games development must involve an adaptive engine, which is by applying a learning machine that can adapt to different players. The development of adaptive engine can be viewed in terms of the frameworks and the algorithms. Frameworks include rules based, plan based, organization description based, proficiency of player based, and learning style and cognitive state based. Algorithms include agents based and non-agent based

  8. Adaption of space station technology for lunar operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Space Station Freedom technology will have the potential for numerous applications in an early lunar base program. The benefits of utilizing station technology in such a fashion include reduced development and facility costs for lunar base systems, shorter schedules, and verification of such technology through space station experience. This paper presents an assessment of opportunities for using station technology in a lunar base program, particularly in the lander/ascent vehicles and surface modules.

  9. Adapting Wood Technology to Teach Design and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Technology education has changed dramatically over the last few years. The transition of industrial arts to technology education and more recently the pursuit of design and engineering has resulted in technology education teachers often needing to change their curriculum and course activities to meet the demands of a rapidly changing profession.…

  10. Affective Outcomes of Coursework on Computer Technology in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Barbara; Delaney, Connie; Weiler, Kay

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine affective outcomes of the introduction to computer technology provided baccalaureate nursing students. Correlates of positive attitudes were also investigated. Third, the construct validity of the two parallel forms of the attitude measure employed was studied. A one group, pre-test, post-test design was used. Analysis using a paired t-test showed that students' attitudes were significantly higher after the coursework than before it. Significant relationships between attitudes toward computing and the following factors were revealed: area of greatest interest in computing, expectations of future use of computers, age, and basic nursing/RN student status. Outcomes of the study contribute to the construct validity of the attitude measures.

  11. Computing, information, and communications: Technologies for the 21. Century

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    To meet the challenges of a radically new and technologically demanding century, the Federal Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) programs are investing in long-term research and development (R and D) to advance computing, information, and communications in the United States. CIC R and D programs help Federal departments and agencies to fulfill their evolving missions, assure the long-term national security, better understand and manage the physical environment, improve health care, help improve the teaching of children, provide tools for lifelong training and distance learning to the workforce, and sustain critical US economic competitiveness. One of the nine committees of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the Committee on Computing, Information, and Communications (CCIC)--through its CIC R and D Subcommittee--coordinates R and D programs conducted by twelve Federal departments and agencies in cooperation with US academia and industry. These R and D programs are organized into five Program Component Areas: (1) HECC--High End Computing and Computation; (2) LSN--Large Scale Networking, including the Next Generation Internet Initiative; (3) HCS--High Confidence Systems; (4) HuCS--Human Centered Systems; and (5) ETHR--Education, Training, and Human Resources. A brief synopsis of FY 1997 accomplishments and FY 1998 goals by PCA is presented. This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1998 Budget, describes the interagency CIC programs.

  12. Computational technology of multiscale modeling the gas flows in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podryga, V. O.

    2016-11-01

    The work is devoted to modeling the gas mixture flows in engineering microchannels under conditions of many scales of computational domain. The computational technology of using the multiscale approach combining macro - and microscopic models is presented. At macrolevel the nature of the flow and the external influence on it are considered. As a model the system of quasigasdynamic equations is selected. At microlevel the correction of gasdynamic parameters and the determination of boundary conditions are made. As a numerical model the Newton's equations and the molecular dynamics method are selected. Different algorithm types used for implementation of multiscale modeling are considered. The results of the model problems for separate stages are given.

  13. Report of the Panel on Computer and Information Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Stephen F.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft have become more and more dependent on computers (information processing) for improved performance and safety. It is clear that this activity will grow, since information processing technology has advanced by a factor of 10 every 5 years for the past 35 years and will continue to do so. Breakthroughs in device technology, from vacuum tubes through transistors to integrated circuits, contribute to this rapid pace. This progress is nearly matched by similar, though not as dramatic, advances in numerical software and algorithms. Progress has not been easy. Many technical and nontechnical challenges were surmounted. The outlook is for continued growth in capability but will require surmounting new challenges. The technology forecast presented in this report has been developed by extrapolating current trends and assessing the possibilities of several high-risk research topics. In the process, critical problem areas that require research and development emphasis have been identified. The outlook assumes a positive perspective; the projected capabilities are possible by the year 2000, and adequate resources will be made available to achieve them. Computer and information technology forecasts and the potential impacts of this technology on aeronautics are identified. Critical issues and technical challenges underlying the achievement of forecasted performance and benefits are addressed.

  14. Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    ARL-TN-0688 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web...Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies by Jacob C Randall and Jeffrey O...COVERED (From - To) May–Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server

  15. Program on Promoting Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Bridging Policy Making and Science Research in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Y.; Chiang, W.; Sui, C.; Tung, C.; Ho, H.; Li, M.; Chan, S.; Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Program, National Science Council, Taiwan

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes adaptation needs innovative technological revolution on demand for transdisciplinary studies in various temporal and spatial scales. In our proposed program, a systematic and scientific framework will be developed to promote innovative adaptation technologies with respect to providing decision making information for government sectors, enhancing applicability of scientific research output, strengthening national research capabilities, and integrating both academic and non-academic resources. The objectives of this program are to identify key issues, required technologies, and scientific knowledge for climate change adaptations, and to build a transdisciplinary platform bridging science-supported technologies required by government sectors and demand-oriented scientific research conducted by academic communities. The approach proposed herein will be practiced in vulnerable regions, such as urban, rural, mountain, river basin, and coastal areas, which are particularly sensitive to climate change. The first phase of 3-year (2011~2013) work is to deploy framework and strategies of climate change impact assessment and adaptation measures between related government sectors and researchers from academic communities. The proposed framework involves three principle research groups, namely Environmental System, Vulnerability Assessment, and Risk Management and Adaptation Technology. The goal of the first group, Environmental System, is to combine climate change projections with enhanced scientific and environmental monitoring technologies for better adaptations to future scenarios in different social, economic, and environmental sectors to support adaptation measures planning and to reduce uncertainties on assessing vulnerability. The goal of the second group, Vulnerability Assessment, is to identify interfaces and information structures of climate change vulnerably issues and to develop protocol, models, and indices for vulnerability assessment. The goal of

  16. Foundations of software technology and theoretical computer science

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, C.E.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this book report on foundations of software technology and theoretical computer science project research results. The authors report on algorithmics: design and analysis of graph, geometric, algebraic and VLSI algorithms; data structures; average analysis; complexity theory; parallel parsing; concurrency; algebraic semantics, event structures; logic programming; algebraic properties, semantics; and software technology: program transformations, algebraic methods. These results together with the formal techniques employed to present them reflect current trends pursued by research groups around the world. The papers treat their topics by reviewing existing results, developing and demonstrating new techniques and suggesting further directions for research.

  17. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well.

  18. Self-Adaptive Filon's Integration Method and Its Application to Computing Synthetic Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Fei

    2001-03-01

    Based on the principle of the self-adaptive Simpson integration method, and by incorporating the `fifth-order' Filon's integration algorithm [Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 73(1983)913], we have proposed a simple and efficient numerical integration method, i.e., the self-adaptive Filon's integration method (SAFIM), for computing synthetic seismograms at large epicentral distances. With numerical examples, we have demonstrated that the SAFIM is not only accurate but also very efficient. This new integration method is expected to be very useful in seismology, as well as in computing similar oscillatory integrals in other branches of physics.

  19. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    PubMed

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  20. Development of Multi-Adaptive Simulation Technologies for Nonlinear Solid Polymer Viscoelasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of multi-adaptive simulation technologies for nonlinear solid polymer viscoelasticity 6. AUTHOR(S) J.R. Whiteman...Close out report (funding period 1 April 2007 – 31 July 2007) Development of multi-adaptive simulation technologies for nonlinear solid polymer ...equations describing the inflation of a hyperelastic membrane. With U denoting the exact displacement and V denoting the exact velocity the weak forms

  1. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program: SPMS Training Class: Student Handout. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    Sequence 03705-001B 30 September 1991 (3 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM ELEGTE m AUG15 1991 Ö I 0 SPMS Training...September 1991 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM SPMS Training Class: Student Handout Addendum to: Software...document is the student handout prepared for the "SEI/ STARS P.3 Asset Acquisition Sub-task" training class. The student handout covers basic aspects

  2. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  3. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  4. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  5. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  6. L(sub 1) Adaptive Flight Control System: Flight Evaluation and Technology Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xargay, Enric; Hovakimyan, Naira; Dobrokhodov, Vladimir; Kaminer, Isaac; Gregory, Irene M.; Cao, Chengyu

    2010-01-01

    Certification of adaptive control technologies for both manned and unmanned aircraft represent a major challenge for current Verification and Validation techniques. A (missing) key step towards flight certification of adaptive flight control systems is the definition and development of analysis tools and methods to support Verification and Validation for nonlinear systems, similar to the procedures currently used for linear systems. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate the advantages of L(sub l) adaptive control architectures for closing some of the gaps in certification of adaptive flight control systems, which may facilitate the transition of adaptive control into military and commercial aerospace applications. As illustrative examples, we present the results of a piloted simulation evaluation on the NASA AirSTAR flight test vehicle, and results of an extensive flight test program conducted by the Naval Postgraduate School to demonstrate the advantages of L(sub l) adaptive control as a verifiable robust adaptive flight control system.

  7. Diversity in computing technologies and strategies for dynamic resource allocation

    DOE PAGES

    Garzoglio, G.; Gutsche, O.

    2015-12-23

    Here, High Energy Physics (HEP) is a very data intensive and trivially parallelizable science discipline. HEP is probing nature at increasingly finer details requiring ever increasing computational resources to process and analyze experimental data. In this paper, we discuss how HEP provisioned resources so far using Grid technologies, how HEP is starting to include new resource providers like commercial Clouds and HPC installations, and how HEP is transparently provisioning resources at these diverse providers.

  8. Using Soft Computing Technologies for the Simulation of LCAC Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    real-time, time-domain predictions of the vehicle’s dynamics as a function of the control signals given by the driver. Results are presented...free- running LCAC model, faster-than-real-time simulation, soft computing technology 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Maneuvering and Control Division (MCD...like all hovercraft , rides on a cushion of air. The air is supplied to the cushion by four centrifugal fans driven by the craft’s gas turbine

  9. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  10. Cases on Technological Adaptability and Transnational Learning: Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukerji, Siran, Ed.; Tripathi, Purnendu, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Technology holds the key for bridging the gap between access to quality education and the need for enhanced learning experiences. This book contains case studies on divergent themes of personalized learning environments, inclusive learning for social change, innovative learning and assessment techniques, technology and international partnership…

  11. Adapting Technology for School Improvement: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W., Ed.; Mahlck, Lars O., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a compilation of articles based on the premise that the move to advanced technology use in primary and secondary schools offers great hope for improving the access, quality, and efficiency of basic education. The aim of the book is to identify and examine how information technologies can be, and are being, used to strengthen the…

  12. Collaborative Learning with Multi-Touch Technology: Developing Adaptive Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, Emma M.; Higgins, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Developing fluency and flexibility in mathematics is a key goal of upper primary schooling, however, while fluency can be developed with practice, designing activities that support the development of flexibility is more difficult. Drawing on concepts of adaptive expertise, we developed a task for a multi-touch classroom, NumberNet, that aimed to…

  13. Computer-Based Technologies in Dentistry: Types and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Albuha Al-Mussawi, Raja’a M.; Farid, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    During dental education, dental students learn how to examine patients, make diagnosis, plan treatment and perform dental procedures perfectly and efficiently. However, progresses in computer-based technologies including virtual reality (VR) simulators, augmented reality (AR) and computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have resulted in new modalities for instruction and practice of dentistry. Virtual reality dental simulators enable repeated, objective and assessable practice in various controlled situations. Superimposition of three-dimensional (3D) virtual images on actual images in AR allows surgeons to simultaneously visualize the surgical site and superimpose informative 3D images of invisible regions on the surgical site to serve as a guide. The use of CAD/CAM systems for designing and manufacturing of dental appliances and prostheses has been well established. This article reviews computer-based technologies, their application in dentistry and their potentials and limitations in promoting dental education, training and practice. Practitioners will be able to choose from a broader spectrum of options in their field of practice by becoming familiar with new modalities of training and practice. PMID:28392819

  14. A virtual computer lab for distance biomedical technology education

    PubMed Central

    Locatis, Craig; Vega, Anibal; Bhagwat, Medha; Liu, Wei-Li; Conde, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background The National Library of Medicine's National Center for Biotechnology Information offers mini-courses which entail applying concepts in biochemistry and genetics to search genomics databases and other information sources. They are highly interactive and involve use of 3D molecular visualization software that can be computationally taxing. Methods Methods were devised to offer the courses at a distance so as to provide as much functionality of a computer lab as possible, the venue where they are normally taught. The methods, which can be employed with varied videoconferencing technology and desktop sharing software, were used to deliver mini-courses at a distance in pilot applications where students could see demonstrations by the instructor and the instructor could observe and interact with students working at their remote desktops. Results Student ratings of the learning experience and comments to open ended questions were similar to those when the courses are offered face to face. The real time interaction and the instructor's ability to access student desktops from a distance in order to provide individual assistance and feedback were considered invaluable. Conclusion The technologies and methods mimic much of the functionality of computer labs and may be usefully applied in any context where content changes frequently, training needs to be offered on complex computer applications at a distance in real time, and where it is necessary for the instructor to monitor students as they work. PMID:18366629

  15. A case for Sandia investment in complex adaptive systems science and technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Colbaugh, Richard; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Backus, George A.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Jones, Katherine A.

    2012-05-01

    This white paper makes a case for Sandia National Laboratories investments in complex adaptive systems science and technology (S&T) -- investments that could enable higher-value-added and more-robustly-engineered solutions to challenges of importance to Sandia's national security mission and to the nation. Complex adaptive systems are ubiquitous in Sandia's national security mission areas. We often ignore the adaptive complexity of these systems by narrowing our 'aperture of concern' to systems or subsystems with a limited range of function exposed to a limited range of environments over limited periods of time. But by widening our aperture of concern we could increase our impact considerably. To do so, the science and technology of complex adaptive systems must mature considerably. Despite an explosion of interest outside of Sandia, however, that science and technology is still in its youth. What has been missing is contact with real (rather than model) systems and real domain-area detail. With its center-of-gravity as an engineering laboratory, Sandia's has made considerable progress applying existing science and technology to real complex adaptive systems. It has focused much less, however, on advancing the science and technology itself. But its close contact with real systems and real domain-area detail represents a powerful strength with which to help complex adaptive systems science and technology mature. Sandia is thus both a prime beneficiary of, as well as potentially a prime contributor to, complex adaptive systems science and technology. Building a productive program in complex adaptive systems science and technology at Sandia will not be trivial, but a credible path can be envisioned: in the short run, continue to apply existing science and technology to real domain-area complex adaptive systems; in the medium run, jump-start the creation of new science and technology capability through Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development program; and

  16. SIMCA T 1.0: A SAS Computer Program for Simulating Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo methodologies are frequently applied to study the sampling distribution of the estimated proficiency level in adaptive testing. These methods eliminate real situational constraints. However, these Monte Carlo methodologies are not currently supported by the available software programs, and when these programs are available, their…

  17. Stratified and Maximum Information Item Selection Procedures in Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Hui; Ansley, Timothy; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In this study we evaluated and compared three item selection procedures: the maximum Fisher information procedure (F), the a-stratified multistage computer adaptive testing (CAT) (STR), and a refined stratification procedure that allows more items to be selected from the high a strata and fewer items from the low a strata (USTR), along with…

  18. An Interactive Computer Program to Construct Adaptive Landscapes and to Simulate the Changes Expected with Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Describes an interactive computer program which can be used by students to construct adaptive landscapes of two types as an illustration of the expected effects of selection. Simulates effects of selection on populations of this type and changes of gene frequency can be plotted on the same contour map. (Author/MA)

  19. Comparing Computer Adaptive and Curriculum-Based Measures of Math in Progress Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.; Dennis, Minyi Shih; Fu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the use of a Computer Adaptive Test and Curriculum-Based Measurement in the assessment of mathematics. This study also investigated the degree to which slope or rate of change predicted student outcomes on the annual state assessment of mathematics above and beyond scores of single point screening…

  20. The Effect of Adaptive Confidence Strategies in Computer-Assisted Instruction on Learning and Learner Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Richard Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of including adaptive confidence strategies in instructionally sound computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on learning and learner confidence. Seventy-one general educational development (GED) learners recruited from various GED learning centers at community colleges in the southeast United…

  1. The Development and Evaluation of a Software Prototype for Computer-Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, M.; Barker, T.; Britton, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents ongoing research at the University of Hertfordshire on the use of computer-adaptive tests (CATs) in Higher Education. A software prototype based on Item Response Theory has been developed and is described here. This application was designed to estimate the level of proficiency in English for those students whose first language…

  2. A Practical Computer Adaptive Testing Model for Small-Scale Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Yu-Hui; Wu, Yu-Lung; Chang, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Computer adaptive testing (CAT) is theoretically sound and efficient, and is commonly seen in larger testing programs. It is, however, rarely seen in a smaller-scale scenario, such as in classrooms or business daily routines, because of the complexity of most adopted Item Response Theory (IRT) models. While the Sequential Probability Ratio Test…

  3. A Simulation Study of Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Computer-Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Simulated data were used to investigate the performance of modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel and standardization methods of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis in computer-adaptive tests (CATs). Each "examinee" received 25 items out of a 75-item pool. A three-parameter logistic item response model was assumed, and…

  4. Lessons Learned in Designing and Implementing a Computer-Adaptive Test for English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack; Neophytou, Maro

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned in designing and implementing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) for English. The early identification of students with weak L2 English proficiency is of critical importance in university settings that have compulsory English language course graduation requirements. The most efficient means of diagnosing the L2…

  5. An adaptive sliding mode control technology for weld seam tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Youmin; Wu, Bo; Zhou, Kaibo; Ge, Mingfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel adaptive sliding mode control algorithm is derived to deal with seam tracking control problem of welding robotic manipulator, during the process of large-scale structure component welding. The proposed algorithm does not require the precise dynamic model, and is more practical. Its robustness is verified by the Lyapunov stability theory. The analytical results show that the proposed algorithm enables better high-precision tracking performance with chattering-free than traditional sliding mode control algorithm under various disturbances.

  6. Renewable energy technologies and its adaptation in an urban environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thampi, K. Ravindranathan Byrne, Owen Surolia, Praveen K.

    2014-01-28

    This general article is based on the inaugural talk delivered at the opening of OMTAT 2013 conference. It notes that the integration of renewable energy sources into living and transport sectors presents a daunting task, still. In spite of the fact that the earth and its atmosphere continually receive 1.7 × 10{sup 17} watts of radiation from the sun, in the portfolio of sustainable and environment friendly energy options, which is about 16% of the world’s energy consumption and mostly met by biomass, only a paltry 0.04% is accredited to solar. First and second generation solar cells offer mature technologies for applications. The most important difficulty with regards to integration with structures is not only the additional cost, but also the lack of sufficient knowledge in managing the available energy smartly and efficiently. The incorporation of PV as a part of building fabric greatly reduces the overall costs compared with retrofitting. BIPV (Building Integrated photovoltaic) is a critical technology for establishing aesthetically pleasing solar structures. Infusing PV and building elements is greatly simplified with some of the second generation thin film technologies now manufactured as flexible panels. The same holds true for 3{sup rd} generation technologies under development such as, and dye- and quantum dot- sensitized solar cells. Additionally, these technologies offer transparent or translucent solar cells for incorporation into windows and skylights. This review deals with the present state of solar cell technologies suitable for BIPV and the status of BIPV applications and its future prospects.

  7. Renewable energy technologies and its adaptation in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, K. Ravindranathan; Byrne, Owen; Surolia, Praveen K.

    2014-01-01

    This general article is based on the inaugural talk delivered at the opening of OMTAT 2013 conference. It notes that the integration of renewable energy sources into living and transport sectors presents a daunting task, still. In spite of the fact that the earth and its atmosphere continually receive 1.7 × 1017 watts of radiation from the sun, in the portfolio of sustainable and environment friendly energy options, which is about 16% of the world's energy consumption and mostly met by biomass, only a paltry 0.04% is accredited to solar. First and second generation solar cells offer mature technologies for applications. The most important difficulty with regards to integration with structures is not only the additional cost, but also the lack of sufficient knowledge in managing the available energy smartly and efficiently. The incorporation of PV as a part of building fabric greatly reduces the overall costs compared with retrofitting. BIPV (Building Integrated photovoltaic) is a critical technology for establishing aesthetically pleasing solar structures. Infusing PV and building elements is greatly simplified with some of the second generation thin film technologies now manufactured as flexible panels. The same holds true for 3rd generation technologies under development such as, and dye- and quantum dot- sensitized solar cells. Additionally, these technologies offer transparent or translucent solar cells for incorporation into windows and skylights. This review deals with the present state of solar cell technologies suitable for BIPV and the status of BIPV applications and its future prospects.

  8. Computers in My Curriculum? 18 Lesson Plans for Teaching Computer Awareness without a Computer. Adaptable Grades 3-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Suzanne Powers; Jeffers, Marcia

    Eighteen interrelated, sequential lesson plans and supporting materials for teaching computer literacy at the elementary and secondary levels are presented. The activities, intended to be infused into the regular curriculum, do not require the use of a computer. The introduction presents background information on computer literacy, suggests a…

  9. Impact of Load Balancing on Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations for Distributed-Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Andrew; Biswas, Rupak; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    The computational requirements for an adaptive solution of unsteady problems change as the simulation progresses. This causes workload imbalance among processors on a parallel machine which, in turn, requires significant data movement at runtime. We present a new dynamic load-balancing framework, called JOVE, that balances the workload across all processors with a global view. Whenever the computational mesh is adapted, JOVE is activated to eliminate the load imbalance. JOVE has been implemented on an IBM SP2 distributed-memory machine in MPI for portability. Experimental results for two model meshes demonstrate that mesh adaption with load balancing gives more than a sixfold improvement over one without load balancing. We also show that JOVE gives a 24-fold speedup on 64 processors compared to sequential execution.

  10. Advances in Adaptive Control Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This poster presentation describes recent advances in adaptive control technology developed by NASA. Optimal Control Modification is a novel adaptive law that can improve performance and robustness of adaptive control systems. A new technique has been developed to provide an analytical method for computing time delay stability margin for adaptive control systems.

  11. Adaptation for a Changing Environment: Developing Learning and Teaching with Information and Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and learning and teaching, particularly in distance education contexts. We argue that environmental changes (societal, educational, and technological) make it necessary to adapt systems and practices that are no longer appropriate. The need…

  12. Adaptable, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, P.; Venkatapathy, E.; Gage, P.; Prabhu, D.; Smith, B.; Cassell, A.; Yount, B.; Allen, G.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a mechanically deploy- able hypersonic decelerator, developed initially for high mass (40 MT) human Mars missions, is currently funded by OCT for technology maturation. The ADEPT (Adaptive, Deployable Entry and Placement Technology) project has broad, game-changing applicability to in situ science missions to Venus, Mars, and the Outer Planets.

  13. Computer-Assisted Virtual Planning for Surgical Guide Manufacturing and Internal Distractor Adaptation in the Management of Midface Hypoplasia in Cleft Patients.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Herzog, Georges

    2016-05-25

    We are reporting the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia in two patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate by using a specific approach combining the Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis technique coupled with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing customized surgical guides and internal distractors based on virtual computational planning. This technology allows for the transfer of the virtual planned reconstruction to the operating room by using custom patient-specific implants, surgical splints, surgical cutting guides, and surgical guides to plate or distractor adaptation.

  14. Agile Development of Various Computational Power Adaptive Web-Based Mobile-Learning Software Using Mobile Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zadahmad, Manouchehr; Yousefzadehfard, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) aims to improve all mobile applications such as m-learning systems. This study presents an innovative method to use web technology and software engineering's best practices to provide m-learning functionalities hosted in a MCC-learning system as service. Components hosted by MCC are used to empower developers to create…

  15. “Happiness Inventors”: Informing Positive Computing Technologies Through Participatory Design With Children

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Stephen Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive psychological interventions for children have typically focused on direct adaptations of interventions developed for adults. As the community moves toward designing positive computing technologies to support child well-being, it is important to use a more participatory process that directly engages children’s voices. Objective Our objectives were, through a participatory design study, to understand children’s interpretations of positive psychology concepts, as well as their perspectives on technologies that are best suited to enhance their engagement with practice of well-being skills. Methods We addressed these questions through a content analysis of 434 design ideas, 51 sketches, and 8 prototype and videos, which emerged from a 14-session cooperative inquiry study with 12 child “happiness inventors.” The study was part of a summer learning camp held at the children’s middle school, which focused on teaching the invention process, teaching well-being skills drawn from positive psychology and related areas (gratitude, mindfulness, and problem solving), and iterating design ideas for technologies to support these skills. Results The children’s ideas and prototypes revealed specific facets of how they interpreted gratitude (as thanking, being positive, and doing good things), mindfulness (as externally representing thought and emotions, controlling those thoughts and emotions, getting through unpleasant things, and avoiding forgetting something), and problem solving (as preventing bad decisions, seeking alternative solutions, and not dwelling on unproductive thoughts). This process also revealed that children emphasized particular technologies in their solutions. While desktop or laptop solutions were notably lacking, other ideas were roughly evenly distributed between mobile apps and embodied computing technologies (toys, wearables, etc). We also report on desired functionalities and approaches to engagement in the children’s ideas

  16. Challenges of technology integration and computer-assisted surgery.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Gurion; Liebergall, Meir

    2009-02-01

    The rapid progress of modern computerized capabilities has not been paralleled by a similar progress in the operating room setting and in operating techniques. The major advance in orthopaedic surgery during the past fifty years has been the introduction of intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging, while surgical techniques have remained mostly unchanged. Orthopaedic procedures dealing with bones--a nondeformable tissue--are suitable for computerized guidance based on preoperatively and intraoperatively obtained images. Computer-assisted surgery progressed from the first-generation systems of the 1990 s to the present third-generation systems, enabling surgeons to implant a knee or hip prosthesis with high precision. However, most orthopaedic surgeons avoid using computer-navigation surgical techniques. Why has the implementation of computer-assisted surgery procedures met so many hurdles and obstacles? The factors that make up the answer to this question can be grouped into three categories: human, technological, and financial. Computer-assisted surgery has the potential to revolutionize orthopaedic surgery just as fluoroscopy did a few decades ago; however, its widespread use has been hampered by a lack of sufficient clinical data on the one hand and by a reluctance to use the technique and thereby collect and share data on the other. The challenge is to overcome the human, technological, and financial hurdles. Once these obstacles are addressed, we believe that computer-assisted surgery will set a new standard of care. Until that time, some will be willing to lead the revolution and pay the price of progress, and others will be reluctant to take part in this endeavor.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  18. Comparing computer adaptive and curriculum-based measures of math in progress monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Edward S; Dennis, Minyi Shih; Fu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the use of a Computer Adaptive Test and Curriculum-Based Measurement in the assessment of mathematics. This study also investigated the degree to which slope or rate of change predicted student outcomes on the annual state assessment of mathematics above and beyond scores of single point screening assessments (i.e., the computer adaptive test or the CBM assessment just before the administration of the state assessment). Repeated measurement of mathematics once per month across a 7-month period using a Computer Adaptive Test (STAR-Math) and Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM, AIMSweb Math Computation, AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications) was collected for a maximum total of 250 third, fourth, and fifth grade students. Results showed STAR-Math in all 3 grades and AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications in the third and fifth grades had primarily linear growth patterns in mathematics. AIMSweb Math Computation in all grades and AIMSweb Math Concepts/Applications in Grade 4 had decelerating positive trends. Predictive validity evidence showed the strongest relationships were between STAR-Math and outcomes for third and fourth grade students. The blockwise multiple regression by grade revealed that slopes accounted for only a very small proportion of additional variance above and beyond what was explained by the scores obtained on a single point of assessment just prior to the administration of the state assessment.

  19. Computer technology applications in industrial and organizational psychology.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Timothy R; Austin, James T

    2002-08-01

    This article reviews computer applications developed and utilized by industrial-organizational (I-O) psychologists, both in practice and in research. A primary emphasis is on applications developed for Internet usage, because this "network of networks" changes the way I-O psychologists work. The review focuses on traditional and emerging topics in I-O psychology. The first topic involves information technology applications in measurement, defined broadly across levels of analysis (persons, groups, organizations) and domains (abilities, personality, attitudes). Discussion then focuses on individual learning at work, both in formal training and in coping with continual automation of work. A section on job analysis follows, illustrating the role of computers and the Internet in studying jobs. Shifting focus to the group level of analysis, we briefly review how information technology is being used to understand and support cooperative work. Finally, special emphasis is given to the emerging "third discipline" in I-O psychology research-computational modeling of behavioral events in organizations. Throughout this review, themes of innovation and dissemination underlie a continuum between research and practice. The review concludes by setting a framework for I-O psychology in a computerized and networked world.

  20. Integrated Geo Hazard Management System in Cloud Computing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifah, M. I. M.; Omar, R. C.; Khalid, N. H. N.; Ismail, A.; Mustapha, I. S.; Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Roslan, R.; Zalam, W. M. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Geo hazard can result in reducing of environmental health and huge economic losses especially in mountainous area. In order to mitigate geo-hazard effectively, cloud computer technology are introduce for managing geo hazard database. Cloud computing technology and it services capable to provide stakeholder's with geo hazards information in near to real time for an effective environmental management and decision-making. UNITEN Integrated Geo Hazard Management System consist of the network management and operation to monitor geo-hazard disaster especially landslide in our study area at Kelantan River Basin and boundary between Hulu Kelantan and Hulu Terengganu. The system will provide easily manage flexible measuring system with data management operates autonomously and can be controlled by commands to collects and controls remotely by using “cloud” system computing. This paper aims to document the above relationship by identifying the special features and needs associated with effective geohazard database management using “cloud system”. This system later will use as part of the development activities and result in minimizing the frequency of the geo-hazard and risk at that research area.

  1. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  2. Adaptive remote sensing technology for feature recognition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Bullock, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    A technology development plan designed to reduce the data load and data-management problems associated with global study and monitoring missions is described with a heavy emphasis placed on developing mission capabilities to eliminate the collection of unnecessary data. Improved data selectivity can be achieved through sensor automation correlated with the real-time needs of data users. The first phase of the plan includes the Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE) which is scheduled for the 1980 Shuttle flight. The FILE experiment is described with attention given to technology needs, development plan, feature recognition and classification, and cloud-snow detection/discrimination. Pointing, tracking and navigation received particular consideration, and it is concluded that this technology plan is viewed as an alternative to approaches to real-time acquisition that are based on extensive onboard format and inventory processing and reliance upon global-satellite-system navigation data.

  3. Architecture-Adaptive Computing Environment: A Tool for Teaching Parallel Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular. This paper is an introduction to a new C based parallel language for architecture-adaptive programming, aCe C. The primary purpose of aCe (Architecture-adaptive Computing Environment) is to encourage programmers to implement applications on parallel architectures by providing them the assurance that future architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. A secondary purpose is to encourage computer architects to develop new types of architectures by providing an easily implemented software development environment and a library of test applications. This new language should be an ideal tool to teach parallel programming. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of aCe C.

  4. Use of Soft Computing Technologies For Rocket Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Olcmen, Semih; Polites, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to further improve overall engine system reliability and performance. Specifically, this will be presented by enhancing rocket engine control and engine health management (EHM) using SCT coupled with conventional control technologies, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall s Flight Software Group. The principle goals are to improve software management, software development time and maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control and EHM methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, EHM, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion, software engineering for embedded systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, and Bayesian belief networks), much of which is presented in this paper. The first targeted demonstration rocket engine platform is the MC-1 (formerly FASTRAC Engine) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed laboratory that

  5. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Order Finite-Volume Schemes in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwing, Alan Michael

    For computational fluid dynamics, the governing equations are solved on a discretized domain of nodes, faces, and cells. The quality of the grid or mesh can be a driving source for error in the results. While refinement studies can help guide the creation of a mesh, grid quality is largely determined by user expertise and understanding of the flow physics. Adaptive mesh refinement is a technique for enriching the mesh during a simulation based on metrics for error, impact on important parameters, or location of important flow features. This can offload from the user some of the difficult and ambiguous decisions necessary when discretizing the domain. This work explores the implementation of adaptive mesh refinement in an implicit, unstructured, finite-volume solver. Consideration is made for applying modern computational techniques in the presence of hanging nodes and refined cells. The approach is developed to be independent of the flow solver in order to provide a path for augmenting existing codes. It is designed to be applicable for unsteady simulations and refinement and coarsening of the grid does not impact the conservatism of the underlying numerics. The effect on high-order numerical fluxes of fourth- and sixth-order are explored. Provided the criteria for refinement is appropriately selected, solutions obtained using adapted meshes have no additional error when compared to results obtained on traditional, unadapted meshes. In order to leverage large-scale computational resources common today, the methods are parallelized using MPI. Parallel performance is considered for several test problems in order to assess scalability of both adapted and unadapted grids. Dynamic repartitioning of the mesh during refinement is crucial for load balancing an evolving grid. Development of the methods outlined here depend on a dual-memory approach that is described in detail. Validation of the solver developed here against a number of motivating problems shows favorable

  6. Contingency support using adaptive telemetry extractor and expert system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Thomas; Cruse, Bryant; Wende, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The 'telemetry analysis logic for operations support' prototype system constitutes an expert system that is charged with contingency planning for the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST); this system has demonstrated the feasibility of using an adaptive telemetry extractor/reformatter that is integrated with an expert system. A test case generated by a simulator has demonstrated the reduction of the time required for analysis of a complex series of failures to a few minutes, from the hour usually required. The HST's telemetry extractor will be able to read real-time engineering telemetry streams and disk-based data. Telemetry format changes will be handled almost instantaneously.

  7. Using Computer Technology to Foster Learning for Understanding

    PubMed Central

    VAN MELLE, ELAINE; TOMALTY, LEWIS

    2000-01-01

    The literature shows that students typically use either a surface approach to learning, in which the emphasis is on memorization of facts, or a deep approach to learning, in which learning for understanding is the primary focus. This paper describes how computer technology, specifically the use of a multimedia CD-ROM, was integrated into a microbiology curriculum as part of the transition from focusing on facts to fostering learning for understanding. Evaluation of the changes in approaches to learning over the course of the term showed a statistically significant shift in a deep approach to learning, as measured by the Study Process Questionnaire. Additional data collected showed that the use of computer technology supported this shift by providing students with the opportunity to apply what they had learned in class to order tests and interpret the test results in relation to specific patient-focused case studies. The extent of the impact, however, varied among different groups of students in the class. For example, students who were recent high school graduates did not show a statistically significant increase in deep learning scores over the course of the term and did not perform as well in the course. The results also showed that a surface approach to learning was an important aspect of learning for understanding, although only those students who were able to combine a surface with a deep approach to learning were successfully able to learn for understanding. Implications of this finding for the future use of computer technology and learning for understanding are considered. PMID:23653533

  8. Application Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-09-30

    Our accomplishments over the last three years of the DOE project Application- Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing (DOE Agreement: DE-FG02-05ER25680) are described below. The project will have met all of its objectives by the time of its completion at the end of September, 2008. Two extensive yearly progress reports were produced in in March 2006 and 2007 and were previously submitted to the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR). Following an overview of the objectives of the project, we summarize for each of the project areas the achievements in the first two years, and then describe in some more detail the project accomplishments this past year. At the end, we discuss the relationship of the proposed renewal application to the work done on the current project.

  9. Technologies for Large Data Management in Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, intense usage of computing has been the main strategy of investigations in several scientific research projects. The progress in computing technology has opened unprecedented opportunities for systematic collection of experimental data and the associated analysis that were considered impossible only few years ago. This paper focuses on the strategies in use: it reviews the various components that are necessary for an effective solution that ensures the storage, the long term preservation, and the worldwide distribution of large quantities of data that are necessary in a large scientific research project. The paper also mentions several examples of data management solutions used in High Energy Physics for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments in Geneva, Switzerland which generate more than 30,000 terabytes of data every year that need to be preserved, analyzed, and made available to a community of several tenth of thousands scientists worldwide.

  10. Emerging computer technologies and the news media of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrabel, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    The media environment of the future may be dramatically different from what exists today. As new computing and communications technologies evolve and synthesize to form a global, integrated communications system of networks, public domain hardware and software, and consumer products, it will be possible for citizens to fulfill most information needs at any time and from any place, to obtain desired information easily and quickly, to obtain information in a variety of forms, and to experience and interact with information in a variety of ways. This system will transform almost every institution, every profession, and every aspect of human life--including the creation, packaging, and distribution of news and information by media organizations. This paper presents one vision of a 21st century global information system and how it might be used by citizens. It surveys some of the technologies now on the market that are paving the way for new media environment.

  11. Japanese technology assessment: Computer science, opto- and microelectronics mechatronics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Brandin, D.; Wieder, H.; Spicer, W.; Nevins, J.; Oxender, D.

    1986-01-01

    The series studies Japanese research and development in four high-technology areas - computer science, opto and microelectronics, mechatronics (a term created by the Japanese to describe the union of mechanical and electronic engineering to produce the next generation of machines, robots, and the like), and biotechnology. The evaluations were conducted by panels of U.S. scientists - chosen from academia, government, and industry - actively involved in research in areas of expertise. The studies were prepared for the purpose of aiding the U.S. response to Japan's technological challenge. The main focus of the assessments is on the current status and long-term direction and emphasis of Japanese research and development. Other aspects covered include evolution of the state of the art; identification of Japanese researchers, R and D organizations, and resources; and comparative U.S. efforts. The general time frame of the studies corresponds to future industrial applications and potential commercial impacts spanning approximately the next two decades.

  12. Processing instrumentation technology: Process definition with a cognitive computer

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.L.

    1996-11-01

    Much of the polymer composites industry is built around the thermochemical conversion of raw material into useful composites. The raw materials (molding compound, prepreg) often are made up of thermosetting resins and small fibers or particles. While this conversion can follow a large number of paths, only a few paths are efficient, economical and lead to desirable composite properties. Processing instrument (P/I) technology enables a computer to sense and interpret changes taking place during the cure of prepreg or molding compound. P/I technology has been used to make estimates of gel time and cure time, thermal diffusivity measurements and transition temperature measurements. Control and sensing software is comparatively straightforward. The interpretation of results with appropriate software is under development.

  13. Large-Scale Assessment of a Fully Automatic Co-Adaptive Motor Imagery-Based Brain Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Acqualagna, Laura; Botrel, Loic; Vidaurre, Carmen; Kübler, Andrea; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In the last years Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology has benefited from the development of sophisticated machine leaning methods that let the user operate the BCI after a few trials of calibration. One remarkable example is the recent development of co-adaptive techniques that proved to extend the use of BCIs also to people not able to achieve successful control with the standard BCI procedure. Especially for BCIs based on the modulation of the Sensorimotor Rhythm (SMR) these improvements are essential, since a not negligible percentage of users is unable to operate SMR-BCIs efficiently. In this study we evaluated for the first time a fully automatic co-adaptive BCI system on a large scale. A pool of 168 participants naive to BCIs operated the co-adaptive SMR-BCI in one single session. Different psychological interventions were performed prior the BCI session in order to investigate how motor coordination training and relaxation could influence BCI performance. A neurophysiological indicator based on the Power Spectral Density (PSD) was extracted by the recording of few minutes of resting state brain activity and tested as predictor of BCI performances. Results show that high accuracies in operating the BCI could be reached by the majority of the participants before the end of the session. BCI performances could be significantly predicted by the neurophysiological indicator, consolidating the validity of the model previously developed. Anyway, we still found about 22% of users with performance significantly lower than the threshold of efficient BCI control at the end of the session. Being the inter-subject variability still the major problem of BCI technology, we pointed out crucial issues for those who did not achieve sufficient control. Finally, we propose valid developments to move a step forward to the applicability of the promising co-adaptive methods. PMID:26891350

  14. The Development of Sociocultural Competence with the Help of Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakhimova, Alina E.; Yashina, Marianna E.; Mukhamadiarova, Albina F.; Sharipova, Astrid V.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the description of the process of development sociocultural knowledge and competences using computer technologies. On the whole the development of modern computer technologies allows teachers to broaden trainees' sociocultural outlook and trace their progress online. Observation of modern computer technologies and estimation…

  15. Relating North American Experiences with Computer-Related Technology in Education to Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty

    This essay considers several areas of research in computer technology for education in North America and the implications of these areas of focus for the implementation of educational computer technologies in developing nations. The five areas of focus are: (1) curriculum integration, or the general rationale for using computer technology in…

  16. Building climate adaptation capabilities through technology and community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D.; McWhirter, J.; Intsiful, J. D.; Cozzini, S.

    2011-12-01

    To effectively plan for adaptation to changes in climate, decision makers require infrastructure and tools that will provide them with timely access to current and future climate information. For example, climate scientists and operational forecasters need to access global and regional model projections and current climate information that they can use to prepare monitoring products and reports and then publish these for the decision makers. Through the UNDP African Adaption Programme, an infrastructure is being built across Africa that will provide multi-tiered access to such information. Web accessible servers running RAMADDA, an open source content management system for geoscience information, will provide access to the information at many levels: from the raw and processed climate model output to real-time climate conditions and predictions to documents and presentation for government officials. Output from regional climate models (e.g. RegCM4) and downscaled global climate models will be accessible through RAMADDA. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is being used by scientists to create visualizations that assist the understanding of climate processes and projections, using the data on these as well as external servers. Since RAMADDA is more than a data server, it is also being used as a publishing platform for the generated material that will be available and searchable by the decision makers. Users can wade through the enormous volumes of information and extract subsets for their region or project of interest. Participants from 20 countries attended workshops at ICTP during 2011. They received training on setting up and installing the servers and necessary software and are now working on deploying the systems in their respective countries. This is the first time an integrated and comprehensive approach to climate change adaptation has been widely applied in Africa. It is expected that this infrastructure will enhance North-South collaboration and improve the

  17. Computational efficiency and Amdahl’s law for the adaptive resolution simulation technique

    DOE PAGES

    Junghans, Christoph; Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Here, we discuss the computational performance of the adaptive resolution technique in molecular simulation when it is compared with equivalent full coarse-grained and full atomistic simulations. We show that an estimate of its efficiency, within 10%–15% accuracy, is given by the Amdahl’s Law adapted to the specific quantities involved in the problem. The derivation of the predictive formula is general enough that it may be applied to the general case of molecular dynamics approaches where a reduction of degrees of freedom in a multi scale fashion occurs.

  18. Skill Training Using Adaptive Technology: A Better Way to Hover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    of the system. In practice, this is perhaps the most frequently broken rule in Expert System development. The Subject Matter Expert ( SME ) in a field is...often in high demand and not always available when needed. To stretch the SME budget a little farther, several experts are generally consulted over...21 Monterey Technologies, Inc. Contract No. DAS 01 -l-00-1--4084 SBIR Phase I Final Report ATS IFr TAA IP SMAPI p I Network Trah Student Aensim* Moiinr

  19. LUCHAR: Using Computer Technology to Battle Heart Disease Among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Leeman-Castillo, Bonnie; Beaty, Brenda; Raghunath, Silvia; Steiner, John

    2010-01-01

    Many promising technology-based programs designed to promote healthy behaviors such as physical activity and healthy eating have not been adapted for use with diverse communities, including Latino communities. We designed a community-based health kiosk program for English- and Spanish-speaking Latinos. Users receive personalized feedback on nutrition, physical activity, and smoking behaviors from computerized role models that guide them in establishing goals in 1 or more of these 3 areas. We found significant improvements in nutrition and physical activity among 245 Latino program users; however, no changes were observed with respect to smoking behaviors. The program shows promise for extending the reach of chronic disease prevention and self-management programs. PMID:20019305

  20. Adaptation of existing infrared technologies to unanticipated applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Radiation thermometry is just but one of many applications, both potential and realized, of infrared technology. During the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndromes) global crisis in 2003, the technology was utilized as a preliminary screening method for infected persons as a defense against a major outbreak, as the primary symptom of this disease is elevated body temperature. ATC timely developed a product designed specifically for mass volume crowd screening of febrile individuals. For this application, the machine must register temperature of subjects rapidly and efficiently, with a certain degree of accuracy, and function for extended periods of time. The equipment must be safe to use, easily deployed, and function with minimum maintenance needed. The ATIR-303 model satisfies all of the above and other pre-requisite conditions amicably. Studies on the correlation between the maximum temperature registered among individual's facial features, as measured under the conditions of usage, and the core temperature of individuals were performed. The results demonstrated that ATIR-303 is very suitable for this application. Other applications of the infrared technology in various areas, like medical diagnosis, non-destructive testing, security, search and rescue, and others, are also interest areas of ATC. The progress ATC has achieved in these areas is presented also.

  1. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won

  2. Counseling Student Computer Competency Skills: Effects of Technology Course in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Yolanda V.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Bethea, James

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this article is to assess counseling student computer competency level as an effect of a one-credit hour introductory course in computer technology. Results indicate student computer competencies increased after completing the computer technology course in the following areas: ethics, assisting clients with internet searches,…

  3. Using archaeogenomic and computational approaches to unravel the history of local adaptation in crops

    PubMed Central

    Allaby, Robin G.; Gutaker, Rafal; Clarke, Andrew C.; Pearson, Neil; Ware, Roselyn; Palmer, Sarah A.; Kitchen, James L.; Smith, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of domestication has changed radically in the past 10 years, from a relatively simplistic rapid origin scenario to a protracted complex process in which plants adapted to the human environment. The adaptation of plants continued as the human environment changed with the expansion of agriculture from its centres of origin. Using archaeogenomics and computational models, we can observe genome evolution directly and understand how plants adapted to the human environment and the regional conditions to which agriculture expanded. We have applied various archaeogenomics approaches as exemplars to study local adaptation of barley to drought resistance at Qasr Ibrim, Egypt. We show the utility of DNA capture, ancient RNA, methylation patterns and DNA from charred remains of archaeobotanical samples from low latitudes where preservation conditions restrict ancient DNA research to within a Holocene timescale. The genomic level of analyses that is now possible, and the complexity of the evolutionary process of local adaptation means that plant studies are set to move to the genome level, and account for the interaction of genes under selection in systems-level approaches. This way we can understand how plants adapted during the expansion of agriculture across many latitudes with rapidity. PMID:25487329

  4. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting. PMID:25729347

  5. Reinforcement learning for adaptive threshold control of restorative brain-computer interfaces: a Bayesian simulation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Restorative brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are increasingly used to provide feedback of neuronal states in a bid to normalize pathological brain activity and achieve behavioral gains. However, patients and healthy subjects alike often show a large variability, or even inability, of brain self-regulation for BCI control, known as BCI illiteracy. Although current co-adaptive algorithms are powerful for assistive BCIs, their inherent class switching clashes with the operant conditioning goal of restorative BCIs. Moreover, due to the treatment rationale, the classifier of restorative BCIs usually has a constrained feature space, thus limiting the possibility of classifier adaptation. In this context, we applied a Bayesian model of neurofeedback and reinforcement learning for different threshold selection strategies to study the impact of threshold adaptation of a linear classifier on optimizing restorative BCIs. For each feedback iteration, we first determined the thresholds that result in minimal action entropy and maximal instructional efficiency. We then used the resulting vector for the simulation of continuous threshold adaptation. We could thus show that threshold adaptation can improve reinforcement learning, particularly in cases of BCI illiteracy. Finally, on the basis of information-theory, we provided an explanation for the achieved benefits of adaptive threshold setting.

  6. Electrical hand tools and techniques: A compilation. [utilization of space technology for tools and adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Space technology utilization for developing tools, adapters, and fixtures and procedures for assembling, installing, and servicing electrical components and equipment are discussed. Some of the items considered are: (1) pivotal screwdriver, (2) termination locator tool for shielded cables, (3) solder application tools, (4) insulation and shield removing tool, and (5) torque wrench adapter for cable connector engaging ring. Diagrams of the various tools and devices are provided.

  7. Condition monitoring through advanced sensor and computational technology : final report (January 2002 to May 2005).

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Taek; Luk, Vincent K.

    2005-05-01

    The overall goal of this joint research project was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensors and computational technology for continuous monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This project included investigating and adapting several advanced sensor technologies from Korean and US national laboratory research communities, some of which were developed and applied in non-nuclear industries. The project team investigated and developed sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms. The researchers installed sensors and conducted condition monitoring tests on two test loops, a check valve (an active component) and a piping elbow (a passive component), to demonstrate the feasibility of using advanced sensors and computational technology to achieve the project goal. Acoustic emission (AE) devices, optical fiber sensors, accelerometers, and ultrasonic transducers (UTs) were used to detect mechanical vibratory response of check valve and piping elbow in normal and degraded configurations. Chemical sensors were also installed to monitor the water chemistry in the piping elbow test loop. Analysis results of processed sensor data indicate that it is feasible to differentiate between the normal and degraded (with selected degradation mechanisms) configurations of these two components from the acquired sensor signals, but it is questionable that these methods can reliably identify the level and type of degradation. Additional research and development efforts are needed to refine the differentiation techniques and to reduce the level of uncertainties.

  8. The technological influence on health professionals' care: translation and adaptation of scales1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Carlos Manuel Torres; Almeida, Filipe Nuno Alves dos Santos; Escola, Joaquim José Jacinto; Rodrigues, Vitor Manuel Costa Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: in this study, two research tools were validated to study the impact of technological influence on health professionals' care practice. Methods: the following methodological steps were taken: bibliographic review, selection of the scales, translation and cultural adaptation and analysis of psychometric properties. Results: the psychometric properties of the scale were assessed based on its application to a sample of 341 individuals (nurses, physicians, final-year nursing and medical students). The validity, reliability and internal consistency were tested. Two scales were found: Caring Attributes Questionnaire (adapted) with a Cronbach's Alpha coefficient of 0.647 and the Technological Influence Questionnaire (adapted) with an Alpha coefficient of 0.777. Conclusions: the scales are easy to apply and reveal reliable psychometric properties, an additional quality as they permit generalized studies on a theme as important as the impact of technological influence in health care. PMID:27143537

  9. Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar D.; Ciferno, Jared; Litynski, John; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2013-08-15

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28-Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  10. Distributed Problem Solving: Adaptive Networks with a Computer Intermediary Resource. Intelligent Executive Computer Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Alto Research Center, August 1982. [82] Ernst W. Mayr . Well Structured Parallel Programs Are Not Easier to Schedule. Technical Report No. STAN-CS-81...articles on scheduling) [Dolev, 80; Graham, 69; Helmbold and Mayr , 84; Mayr , 81], in systems [Ackerman, 82] and in artificial intelligence [Rosenschein...Flight Control. NASA Technical Memorandum 58258, May 1984. [60] D. Helmbold and E. Mayr . Fast Scheduling Algorithms on Parallel Computers. Technical

  11. Performance Evaluation of Emerging High Performance Computing Technologies using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, G. B.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) has evaluated multicore processors and other emerging processor technologies for a variety of high performance computing applications in the earth and space sciences, especially climate and weather applications. A flagship effort has been to assess dual core processor nodes on ARSC's Midnight supercomputer, in which two-socket systems were compared to eight-socket systems. Midnight is utilized for ARSC's twice-daily weather research and forecasting (WRF) model runs, available at weather.arsc.edu. Among other findings on Midnight, it was found that the Hypertransport system for interconnecting Opteron processors, memory, and other subsystems does not scale as well on eight-socket (sixteen processor) systems as well as two-socket (four processor) systems. A fundamental limitation is the cache snooping operation performed whenever a computational thread accesses main memory. This increases memory latency as the number of processor sockets increases. This is particularly noticeable on applications such as WRF that are primarily CPU-bound, versus applications that are bound by input/output or communication. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer at ARSC features quad core processors, and will host a variety of scaling experiments for WRF, CCSM4, and other models. Early results will be presented, including a series of WRF runs for Alaska with grid resolutions under 2km. ARSC will discuss a set of standardized test cases for the Alaska domain, similar to existing test cases for CONUS. These test cases will provide different configuration sizes and resolutions, suitable for single processors up to thousands. Beyond multi-core Opteron-based supercomputers, ARSC has examined WRF and other applications on additional emerging technologies. One such technology is the graphics processing unit, or GPU. The 9800-series nVidia GPU was evaluated with the cuBLAS software library. While in-socket GPUs might be forthcoming in the future, current

  12. Communication: Spin-free quantum computational simulations and symmetry adapted states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, James Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The ideas of digital simulation of quantum systems using a quantum computer parallel the original ideas of numerical simulation using a classical computer. In order for quantum computational simulations to advance to a competitive point, many techniques from classical simulations must be imported into the quantum domain. In this article, we consider the applications of symmetry in the context of quantum simulation. Building upon well established machinery, we propose a form of first quantized simulation that only requires the spatial part of the wave function, thereby allowing spin-free quantum computational simulations. We go further and discuss the preparation of N-body states with specified symmetries based on projection techniques. We consider two simple examples, molecular hydrogen and cyclopropenyl cation, to illustrate the ideas. The methods here are the first to explicitly deal with preparing N-body symmetry-adapted states and open the door for future investigations into group theory, chemistry, and quantum simulation.

  13. Adaptive Nulling: A New Enabling Technology for Interferometric Exoplanet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Peters, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Deep, stable nulling of starlight requires careful control of the amplitudes and phases of the beams that are being combined. The detection of earth-like planets using the interferometer architectures currently being considered for the Terrestrial Planet Finder mission require that the E-field amplitudes are balanced at the level of approx. 0.1%, and the phases are controlled at the level of 1 mrad (corresponding to approx.1.5 nm for a wavelength of 10 microns). These conditions must be met simultaneously at all wavelengths across the science band, and for both polarization states, imposing unrealistic tolerances on the symmetry between the optical beamtrains. We introduce the concept of a compensator that is inserted into the beamtrain, which can adaptively correct for the mismatches across the spectrum, enabling deep nulls with realistic, imperfect optics. The design presented uses a deformable mirror to adjust the amplitude and phase of each beam as an arbitrary function of wavelength and polarization. A proof-of-concept experiment will be conducted at visible/near-IR wavelengths, followed by a system operating in the Mid-IR band.

  14. Global assessment of technological innovation for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing world.

    PubMed

    Adenle, Ademola A; Azadi, Hossein; Arbiol, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Concerns about mitigating and adapting to climate change resulted in renewing the incentive for agricultural research investments and developing further innovation priorities around the world particularly in developing countries. In the near future, development of new agricultural measures and proper diffusion of technologies will greatly influence the ability of farmers in adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Using bibliometric approaches through output of academic journal publications and patent-based data, we assess the impact of research and development (R&D) for new and existing technologies within the context of climate change mitigation and adaptation. We show that many developing countries invest limited resources for R&D in relevant technologies that have great potential for mitigation and adaption in agricultural production. We also discuss constraints including weak infrastructure, limited research capacity, lack of credit facilities and technology transfer that may hinder the application of innovation in tackling the challenges of climate change. A range of policy measures is also suggested to overcome identified constraints and to ensure that potentials of innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation are realized.

  15. Experimental demonstration of noninvasive transskull adaptive focusing based on prior computed tomography scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, J.-F.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.; Thomas, J.-L.; Fink, M.

    2003-01-01

    Developing minimally invasive brain surgery by high-intensity focused ultrasound beams is of great interest in cancer therapy. However, the skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Thus, an efficient brain tumor therapy would require an adaptive focusing, taking into account the effects of the skull. In this paper, we will show that the acoustic properties of the skull can be deduced from high resolution CT scans and used to achieve a noninvasive adaptive focusing. Simulations have been performed with a full 3-D finite differences code, taking into account all the heterogeneities inside the skull. The set of signals to be emitted in order to focus through the skull can thus be computed. The complete adaptive focusing procedure based on prior CT scans has been experimentally validated. This could have promising applications in brain tumor hyperthermia but also in transcranial ultrasonic imaging.

  16. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System for Computing the Resonant Frequency of Circular Microstrip Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Use of Artificial Neural Networks,” Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, Vol.14, pp. 89-93, 1997. [41] S. Sagiroglu, K. Guney, and M. Erler ...Computer-Aided Engineering, Vol. 8, pp. 270- 277, 1998. [42] S. Sagiroglu, K. Guney, and M. Erler , “Calculation of Bandwidth for Electrically Thin and...S. Sagiroglu, and M. Erler , “Neural Computation of Resonant Frequency of Electrically Thin and Thick Rectangular Microstrip Antennas,” IEE. Proc

  17. Implementation of Parallel Computing Technology to Vortex Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Mainframe supercomputers such as the Cray C90 was invaluable in obtaining large scale computations using several millions of grid points to resolve salient features of a tip vortex flow over a lifting wing. However, real flight configurations require tracking not only of the flow over several lifting wings but its growth and decay in the near- and intermediate- wake regions, not to mention the interaction of these vortices with each other. Resolving and tracking the evolution and interaction of these vortices shed from complex bodies is computationally intensive. Parallel computing technology is an attractive option in solving these flows. In planetary science vortical flows are also important in studying how planets and protoplanets form when cosmic dust and gases become gravitationally unstable and eventually form planets or protoplanets. The current paradigm for the formation of planetary systems maintains that the planets accreted from the nebula of gas and dust left over from the formation of the Sun. Traditional theory also indicate that such a preplanetary nebula took the form of flattened disk. The coagulation of dust led to the settling of aggregates toward the midplane of the disk, where they grew further into asteroid-like planetesimals. Some of the issues still remaining in this process are the onset of gravitational instability, the role of turbulence in the damping of particles and radial effects. In this study the focus will be with the role of turbulence and the radial effects.

  18. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, M.; Knabner, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present adaptive mixed hybrid finite element discretizations of the Richards equation, a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation modeling the flow of water into a variably saturated porous medium. The approach simultaneously constructs approximations of the flux and the pressure head in Raviart-Thomas spaces. The resulting nonlinear systems of equations are solved by a Newton method. For the linear problems of the Newton iteration a multigrid algorithm is used. We consider two different kinds of error indicators for space adaptive grid refinement: superconvergence and residual based indicators. They can be calculated easily by means of the available finite element approximations. This seems attractive for computations since no additional (sub-)problems have to be solved. Computational experiments conducted for realistic water table recharge problems illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the approach.

  19. JCMmode: an adaptive finite element solver for the computation of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin W.; Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank

    2005-03-01

    We present our simulation tool JCMmode for calculating propagating modes of an optical waveguide. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec elements, edge elements). Further we construct transparent boundary conditions to deal with leaky modes even for problems with inhomogeneous exterior domains as for integrated hollow core Arrow waveguides. We have implemented an error estimator which steers the adaptive mesh refinement. This allows the precise computation of singularities near the metal's corner of a Plasmon-Polariton waveguide even for irregular shaped metal films on a standard personal computer.

  20. Design and realization of dynamic self-adaptive technology based on disc quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gongye; Wang, Jingqi; Fang, Xiaojing; Xie, Changsheng; Liu, Tong

    2003-04-01

    Dynamic self-adaptive technology makes it possible to adjust the spindle motor speed of optical disc drive based on the different quality of optical discs. It guarantees the read process have the optimal speed to read data smoothly and protect the optical-head components. This paper presents a dynamic self-adaptive technology based on disc quality which uses fussy logic control to make the speed adjusting process fast. It is applied to the servo system of high-speed CD-ROM driver system and good results are obtained.

  1. Energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on the adaptive neuro-controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Karandeev, D.

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing evolution of the power system towards a Smart Grid implies an important role of intelligent technologies, but poses strict requirements on their control schemes to preserve stability and controllability. This paper presents the adaptive neuro-controller for the vector control of induction motor within Smart Gird. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed energy-saving technology of vector controlled induction motor based on adaptive neuro-controller are verified by simulation results at different operating conditions over a wide speed range of induction motor.

  2. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Umberger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology. PMID:27684554

  3. A Review and Reappraisal of Adaptive Human-Computer Interfaces in Complex Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    composed of 3 stages: 1) EEG , ECG, and changing rate of SPR, are measured as original biological signals and physiological indices are extracted by...This portable Adaptive Brain Interface (ABI) is based on the on-line analysis of spontaneous electroencephalogram ( EEG ) signals measured with eight...computer interface (BCI) is based on the analysis of EEG signals associated with spontaneous mental activity. The analysis is concerned with local

  4. Cameron - Optimized Compilation of Visual Programs for Image Processing on Adaptive Computing Systems (ACS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    the Cameron project. The goal of the Cameron project is to make FPGAs and other adaptive computer systems available to more applications programmers...loops onto an FPGA , but this is invisible. SA-C therefore makes recon- gurable processors accessible to applications programmers with no hardware...happens that for SA-C programs, the host executable off-loads the processing of loops onto an FPGA , but this is invisible. SA-C therefore makes

  5. Adapting Strategic Aircraft Assets to a Changing World: Technology Insertion to Provide Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    PROCESSOR L ALTm AMSS-- A MtAAn S Sute m DEU DATAI A RT HF-- Hgh Frquen- AIRCRAFT nrNTERC SUBSYST MSM St Legend: ALT- Altimeter AMSS- Altitude Motion Sensor...these are superior computer systems. To put this information in perspective, note that most 1992 consumers would not want to buy 1982 computer (8088...technology; instead, they would want to buy the latest technology, such as a 486. If they owned the older 8088, they would remember that it

  6. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1994-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: first, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the dentist who will offer this new technology directly to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities.

  7. Technical Education Transfer: Perceptions of Employee Computer Technology Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated influences on employee self-efficacy of computer technologies resulting from computer-training programs that were intended to meet individual and organization objectives for university personnel. Influences on the transfer of training process included previous computer training, computer-use requirements, computer-use…

  8. Strategic Computing. New-Generation Computing Technology: A Strategic Plan for Its Development and Application to Critical Problems in Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-28

    Computing. By seizing an opportunity to leverage recent advances in artificial intelligence, computer science, and microelectronics, the Agency plans...occurred in many separated areas of artificial intelligence, computer science, and microelectronics. Advances in "expert system" technology now...and expert knowledge o Advances in Artificial Intelligence: Mechanization of speech recognition, vision, and natural language understanding. o

  9. Fluidic technology: adding control, computation, and sensing capability to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzewiecki, Tadeusz M.; Macia, Narciso F.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of fluidic technology - a technology that provides an additional dimension to conventional microfluidic technology by adding sensing, computation (both analog and digital) and control. The US Army Diamond Ordnance Fuze Labs officially recognized fluidics as a comprehensive technology comparable to electronics with its announcement in 1959. Because fluidic elements have very few or no moving parts the technology provides significant operational advantages in harsh environments (EMI, radiation, high temperature and vibration). It also offers advantages when dealing with fluid variables (flow, pressure, density, viscosity, etc.) by eliminating the need for interfaces. With the elimination of the inertia and friction associated with moving parts there are even greater advantages as a result of higher speed of operation. Where mechanical and micromechanical devices may be limited to only hundreds of hertz true microfluidic systems can operate at tens of thousands of hertz. We discuss the fundamental principles of jet deflection amplification and vortex modulation and present circuit building blocks such as the laminar proportional amplifier, vortex valve, oscillators, and positive-feedback digital components. However, most importantly, we present and discuss three specific applications illustrating the power of fluidics in microfluidics and MEMS. These are: a gas analyzer-on-a-chip, capable of simultaneous analysis of multiple gas mixtures with clinical accuracies; an intermittent oxygen delivery system that provides supplemental oxygen to ambulatory patients through a nasal cannula; and, an array of vortex microvalves capable of controlling propellants for micropropulsion systems or for the temporal and spatial modulation of fuel for the optimal control of gas turbine combustors. A sampling of other fluidic in microfluidic application are mentioned to include pressure and acoustic amplification (a kosher public address system is

  10. Using Intelligent Tutor Technology to Implement Adaptive Support for Student Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diziol, Dejana; Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning has shown that students need support to benefit from collaborative activities. While classical collaboration scripts have been effective in providing such support, they have also been criticized for being coercive and not allowing students to self-regulate their learning. Adaptive collaboration…

  11. Recent Developments and Adaptations in Diamond Wireline Core Drilling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Nielson, D. L.; Howell, B. B.; Pardey, M.

    2001-05-01

    Scientific drilling using diamond wireline technology is presently undergoing a significant expansion and extension of activities that has allowed us to recover geologic samples that have heretofore been technically or financially unattainable. Under the direction and management of DOSECC, a high-capacity hybrid core drilling system was designed and fabricated for the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) in 1998. This system, the DOSECC Hybrid Coring System (DHCS), has the capacity to recover H-sized core from depths of more than 6 km. In 1999, the DHCS completed the first phase of the HSDP to a depth of 3100 m at a substantially lower cost per foot than any previous scientific borehole to comparable depths and, in the process, established a new depth record for recovery of H-sized wireline core. This system has been offered for use in the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project, the Chicxulub (impact crater) Scientific Drilling Project, and the Geysers Deep Geothermal Reservoir Project. More recently, DOSECC has developed a smaller barge-mounted wireline core drilling system, the GLAD800, that is capable of recovering P-sized sediment core to depths of up to 800 m. The GLAD800 has been successfully deployed on Great Salt Lake and Bear Lake in Utah and is presently being mobilized to Lake Titicaca in South America for an extensive core recovery effort there. The coring capabilities of the GLAD800 system will be available to the global lakes drilling community for acquisition of sediment cores from many of the world's deep lakes for use in calibrating and refining global climate models. Presently under development by DOSECC is a heave-compensation system that will allow us to expand the capabilities of the moderate depth coring system to allow us to collect sediment and bottom core from the shallow marine environment. The design and capabilities of these coring systems will be presented along with a discussion of their potential applications for addressing a range of

  12. Adaptive intermittent control: A computational model explaining motor intermittency observed in human behavior.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Masato; Inoue, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    It is a fundamental question how our brain performs a given motor task in a real-time fashion with the slow sensorimotor system. Computational theory proposed an influential idea of feed-forward control, but it has mainly treated the case that the movement is ballistic (such as reaching) because the motor commands should be calculated in advance of movement execution. As a possible mechanism for operating feed-forward control in continuous motor tasks (such as target tracking), we propose a control model called "adaptive intermittent control" or "segmented control," that brain adaptively divides the continuous time axis into discrete segments and executes feed-forward control in each segment. The idea of intermittent control has been proposed in the fields of control theory, biological modeling and nonlinear dynamical system. Compared with these previous models, the key of the proposed model is that the system speculatively determines the segmentation based on the future prediction and its uncertainty. The result of computer simulation showed that the proposed model realized faithful visuo-manual tracking with realistic sensorimotor delays and with less computational costs (i.e., with fewer number of segments). Furthermore, it replicated "motor intermittency", that is, intermittent discontinuities commonly observed in human movement trajectories. We discuss that the temporally segmented control is an inevitable strategy for brain which has to achieve a given task with small computational (or cognitive) cost, using a slow control system in an uncertain variable environment, and the motor intermittency is the side-effect of this strategy.

  13. Three Authentic Curriculum-Integration Approaches to Bird Adaptations That Incorporate Technology and Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Barrera, Manuel T., III

    2008-01-01

    Integration of subject areas with technology and thinking skills is a way to help teachers cope with today's overloaded curriculum and to help students see the connectedness of different curriculum areas. This study compares three authentic approaches to teaching a science unit on bird adaptations for habitat that integrate thinking skills and…

  14. Overcoming Barriers in the Use of Adaptive and Assistive Technology in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushrow, Kathy M.; Turner, Keith D.

    This paper examines change and change facilitators as they affect full use of adaptive and assistive technology (AAT) in special education, and compares qualitative versus quantitative methods of researching the change process. Four administrators and two teachers from a rural school district completed the Stages of Concern Questionnaire, which…

  15. Simulation Based Evaluation of Integrated Adaptive Control and Flight Planning Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan Forrest; Kaneshige, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to leverage NASA resources to enable effective evaluation of resilient aircraft technologies through simulation. This includes examining strengths and weaknesses of adaptive controllers, emergency flight planning algorithms, and flight envelope determination algorithms both individually and as an integrated package.

  16. Self-Regulation Strategies and Technologies for Adaptive Learning Management Systems for Web-based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Heeok; Joung, Sunyoung

    2004-01-01

    The current study identifies the potential problems of current web-based instruction and learning management systems in terms of its lack of flexibility and customization required for individual learners? different goals, backgrounds, knowledge levels, and learning capabilities. Advanced adaptive learning management system technologies are able to…

  17. Adaptive Technology for the Internet: Making Electronic Resources Accessible to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    This book seeks to guide information providers in establishing accessible World Wide Web sites and acquiring the hardware and software needed by people with disabilities, focusing on access to the Internet using large print, voice, and Braille. The book also covers how to acquire the funds for adaptive technology, what type of equipment to choose,…

  18. Adaptive information interchange system of the fiber-optic measuring networks with the computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Igor V.; Drozdov, Roman S.; Sedov, Victor A.

    2005-06-01

    In the present paper the characteristics and opportunities of application of the system of parallel input-output of information from the fiber-optical measuring network into computer are considered. The system consists of two pars: on manframe and several expansion blocks. The first part is internal, is connected directly in the socket of the motherboard of the personal computer. It is designed for buffering system signals and development of cojmands of controlling by the system for input-output of signals into personal computer and signals generation onto expansion blocks. The second part is external, connects to the mainframe by means of cables. It designed for transformation of information from the fiber-optical measuring network into signalsof rthe mainframe and instrument settings adaptation. The analysis of speed of procesing of analog and digital data by system is presented. The possible schemes of use of the system for processing quasistationary and dynamic fields are considered.

  19. Enabling Technologies for Scalable Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Stephen; Gaultney, Daniel; Mount, Emily; Knoernschild, Caleb; Baek, Soyoung; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-05-01

    Scalability is one of the main challenges of trapped ion based quantum computation, mainly limited by the lack of enabling technologies needed to trap, manipulate and process the increasing number of qubits. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows one to design movable micromirrors to focus laser beams on individual ions in a chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Our current MEMS system is designed to steer 355 nm pulsed laser beams to carry out logic gates on a chain of Yb ions with a waist of 1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. In order to read the state of the qubit chain we developed a 32-channel PMT with a custom read-out circuit operating near the thermal noise limit of the readout amplifier which increases state detection fidelity. We also developed a set of digital to analog converters (DACs) used to supply analog DC voltages to the electrodes of an ion trap. We designed asynchronous DACs to avoid added noise injection at the update rate commonly found in synchronous DACs. Effective noise filtering is expected to reduce the heating rate of a surface trap, thus improving multi-qubit logic gate fidelities. Our DAC system features 96 channels and an integrated FPGA that allows the system to be controlled in real time. This work was supported by IARPA/ARO.

  20. Promoting Physical Activity through Hand-Held Computer Technology

    PubMed Central

    King, Abby C.; Ahn, David K.; Oliveira, Brian M.; Atienza, Audie A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Design Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Setting/Participants Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Intervention Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Results Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Conclusions Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults. PMID:18201644

  1. Computationally Efficient Adaptive Beamformer for Ultrasound Imaging Based on QR Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongin; Wi, Seok-Min; Lee, Jin S

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive beamforming methods for ultrasound imaging have been studied to improve image resolution and contrast. The most common approach is the minimum variance (MV) beamformer which minimizes the power of the beamformed output while maintaining the response from the direction of interest constant. The method achieves higher resolution and better contrast than the delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer, but it suffers from high computational cost. This cost is mainly due to the computation of the spatial covariance matrix and its inverse, which requires O(L(3)) computations, where L denotes the subarray size. In this study, we propose a computationally efficient MV beamformer based on QR decomposition. The idea behind our approach is to transform the spatial covariance matrix to be a scalar matrix σI and we subsequently obtain the apodization weights and the beamformed output without computing the matrix inverse. To do that, QR decomposition algorithm is used and also can be executed at low cost, and therefore, the computational complexity is reduced to O(L(2)). In addition, our approach is mathematically equivalent to the conventional MV beamformer, thereby showing the equivalent performances. The simulation and experimental results support the validity of our approach.

  2. Adaptive allocation of decisionmaking responsibility between human and computer in multitask situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y.-Y.; Rouse, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    As human and computer come to have overlapping decisionmaking abilities, a dynamic or adaptive allocation of responsibilities may be the best mode of human-computer interaction. It is suggested that the computer serve as a backup decisionmaker, accepting responsibility when human workload becomes excessive and relinquishing responsibility when workload becomes acceptable. A queueing theory formulation of multitask decisionmaking is used and a threshold policy for turning the computer on/off is proposed. This policy minimizes event-waiting cost subject to human workload constraints. An experiment was conducted with a balanced design of several subject runs within a computer-aided multitask flight management situation with different task demand levels. It was found that computer aiding enhanced subsystem performance as well as subjective ratings. The queueing model appears to be an adequate representation of the multitask decisionmaking situation, and to be capable of predicting system performance in terms of average waiting time and server occupancy. Server occupancy was further found to correlate highly with the subjective effort ratings.

  3. Factors Contributing to Teachers' Use of Computer Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2013-01-01

    There are many factors for teachers to use computer technology in their classrooms. The goal of this study is to identify some of the important factors contributing the teachers' use of computer technology. The first goal of this paper is to discuss computer self-efficacy. The second goal is to explain teaching experience. The third goal is to…

  4. Computer-Based Technology in Language Learning: Beyond the Walls of the Traditional Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Peter-Andrew; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Considers computer-based technology as a change agent for methodological emphasis in the use of language learning applications; examines the issues of language learning methodology, the relationship of methodology and computer-based technology, and changes in institutional learning environments; and highlights some of the computer-aided language…

  5. The Technology Refresh Program: Affording State-of-the Art Personal Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Florida Community College Technology Refresh Program in which 28 Florida community colleges refresh their personal computer technology on a three-year cyclical basis through negotiation of a contract with Dell Computer Corporation. Discusses the contract highlights (such as a 22.5 percent discount on personal computers and on-site…

  6. A Detailed Analysis over Some Important Issues towards Using Computer Technology into the EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2014-01-01

    Computer technology has changed the ways we work, learn, interact and spend our leisure time. Computer technology has changed every aspect of our daily life--how and where we get our news, how we order goods and services, and how we communicate. This study investigates some of the significant issues concerning the use of computer technology…

  7. The Diffusion of Computer-Based Technology in K-12 Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colandrea, John Louis

    2012-01-01

    Because computer technology represents a major financial outlay for school districts and is an efficient method of preparing and delivering lessons, studying the process of teacher adoption of computer use is beneficial and adds to the current body of knowledge. Because the teacher is the ultimate user of computer technology for lesson preparation…

  8. Technological Metaphors and Moral Education: The Hacker Ethic and the Computational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to understand how technological metaphors, particularly computer metaphors, are relevant to moral education. After discussing various types of technological metaphors, it is argued that technological metaphors enter moral thought through their "functional descriptions." The computer metaphor is then explored by turning to…

  9. Moving from Computer Literate to Technologically Competent: The Next Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Bassoppo-Moyo, Temba; Morrison, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes that educators must go beyond computer literacy to achieve technological competence if successful integration of technology into the classroom is to occur. An educator who is technologically competent understands the relationship between basic computer functions and student learning, and uses this understanding to design, facilitate, and…

  10. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pelfrey, Daniel S; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution environments

  11. Applying observations from technological transformations in complex adaptive systems to inform health policy on technology adoption.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Many complex markets such as banking and manufacturing have benefited significantly from technology adoption. Each of these complex markets experienced increased efficiency, quality, security, and customer involvement as a result of technology transformation in their industry. Healthcare has not benefited to the same extent. We provide initial findings from a policy analysis of complex markets and the features of these transformations that can influence health technology adoption and acceptance.

  12. Evaluating the Appropriateness of a New Computer-Administered Measure of Adaptive Function for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coster, Wendy J.; Kramer, Jessica M.; Tian, Feng; Dooley, Meghan; Liljenquist, Kendra; Kao, Ying-Chia; Ni, Pengsheng

    2016-01-01

    The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test is an alternative method for describing the adaptive function of children and youth with disabilities using a computer-administered assessment. This study evaluated the performance of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test with a national…

  13. Nanoinformatics: an emerging area of information technology at the intersection of bioinformatics, computational chemistry and nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    González-Nilo, Fernando; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; Guínez-Molinos, Sergio; Geraldo, Daniela A; Sandoval, Claudia; Yévenes, Alejandro; Santos, Leonardo S; Laurie, V Felipe; Mendoza, Hegaly; Cachau, Raúl E

    2011-01-01

    After the progress made during the genomics era, bioinformatics was tasked with supporting the flow of information generated by nanobiotechnology efforts. This challenge requires adapting classical bioinformatic and computational chemistry tools to store, standardize, analyze, and visualize nanobiotechnological information. Thus, old and new bioinformatic and computational chemistry tools have been merged into a new sub-discipline: nanoinformatics. This review takes a second look at the development of this new and exciting area as seen from the perspective of the evolution of nanobiotechnology applied to the life sciences. The knowledge obtained at the nano-scale level implies answers to new questions and the development of new concepts in different fields. The rapid convergence of technologies around nanobiotechnologies has spun off collaborative networks and web platforms created for sharing and discussing the knowledge generated in nanobiotechnology. The implementation of new database schemes suitable for storage, processing and integrating physical, chemical, and biological properties of nanoparticles will be a key element in achieving the promises in this convergent field. In this work, we will review some applications of nanobiotechnology to life sciences in generating new requirements for diverse scientific fields, such as bioinformatics and computational chemistry.

  14. Prototype Space Technology Hall of Fame exhibit at Technology 2003: Analysis of data from computer-based questionaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, Robert N.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Space Foundation displayed its prototype Space Technology Hall of Fame exhibit design at the Technology 2003 conference in Anaheim, CA, December 7-9, 1993. In order to sample public opinion on space technology in general and the exhibit in particular, a computer-based survey was set up as a part of the display. The data collected was analyzed.

  15. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  16. Nonlinear systems modeling based on self-organizing fuzzy-neural-network with adaptive computation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Han, Honggui; Wu, Xiao-Long; Qiao, Jun-Fei

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a self-organizing fuzzy-neural-network with adaptive computation algorithm (SOFNN-ACA) is proposed for modeling a class of nonlinear systems. This SOFNN-ACA is constructed online via simultaneous structure and parameter learning processes. In structure learning, a set of fuzzy rules can be self-designed using an information-theoretic methodology. The fuzzy rules with high spiking intensities (SI) are divided into new ones. And the fuzzy rules with a small relative mutual information (RMI) value will be pruned in order to simplify the FNN structure. In parameter learning, the consequent part parameters are learned through the use of an ACA that incorporates an adaptive learning rate strategy into the learning process to accelerate the convergence speed. Then, the convergence of SOFNN-ACA is analyzed. Finally, the proposed SOFNN-ACA is used to model nonlinear systems. The modeling results demonstrate that this proposed SOFNN-ACA can model nonlinear systems effectively.

  17. COMET-AR User's Manual: COmputational MEchanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moas, E. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The COMET-AR User's Manual provides a reference manual for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement (COMET-AR), a software system developed jointly by Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and NASA Langley Research Center under contract NAS1-18444. The COMET-AR system is an extended version of an earlier finite element based structural analysis system called COMET, also developed by Lockheed and NASA. The primary extensions are the adaptive mesh refinement capabilities and a new "object-like" database interface that makes COMET-AR easier to extend further. This User's Manual provides a detailed description of the user interface to COMET-AR from the viewpoint of a structural analyst.

  18. Computer and mobile technology-based interventions for substance use disorders: an organizing framework.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Erika B; Abrantes, Ana M; Brown, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    Research devoted to the development of therapeutic, behavioral interventions for substance use disorders (SUDs) that can be accessed and delivered via computer and mobile technologies has increased rapidly during the past decade. Numerous recent reviews of this literature have supported the efficacy of technology-based interventions (TBIs), but have also revealed their great heterogeneity and a limited understanding of treatment mechanisms. We conducted a "review of reviews" focused on summarizing findings of previous reviews with respect to moderators of TBIs' efficacy, and present an organizing framework of considerations involved in designing and evaluating TBIs for SUDs. The four primary elements that comprise our framework are Accessibility, Usage, Human Contact, and Intervention Content, with several sub-elements within each category. We offer some suggested directions for future research grouped within these four primary considerations. We believe that technology affords unique opportunities to improve, support, and supplement therapeutic and peer relationships via dynamic applications that adapt to individuals' constantly changing motivation and treatment needs. We hope that our framework will aid in guiding programmatic progress in this exciting field.

  19. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  20. Computer-Adaptive Testing for Students with Disabilities: A Review of the Literature. Research Report. ETS RR-11-32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Elizabeth; Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increased interest in developing computer-adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage assessments for K-12 accountability assessments. The move to adaptive testing has been met with some resistance by those in the field of special education who express concern about routing of students with divergent profiles (e.g., some students with…