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Sample records for adaptive contact elements

  1. Adaptive meshing technique applied to an orthopaedic finite element contact problem.

    PubMed

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants. Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely applied in the analysis and design of hip and knee implants, with additional joints (ankle, shoulder, wrist) attracting increased attention. The objective of this investigation was to develop a simplified adaptive meshing scheme to facilitate the finite element analysis of a dual-curvature total wrist implant. Using currently available software, the analyst has great flexibility in mesh generation, but must prescribe element sizes and refinement schemes throughout the domain of interest. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to predict in advance a mesh spacing that will give acceptable results. Adaptive finite-element mesh capabilities operate to continuously refine the mesh to improve accuracy where it is required, with minimal intervention by the analyst. Such mesh adaptation generally means that in certain areas of the analysis domain, the size of the elements is decreased (or increased) and/or the order of the elements may be increased (or decreased). In concept, mesh adaptation is very appealing. Although there have been several previous applications of adaptive meshing for in-house FE codes, we have coupled an adaptive mesh formulation with the pre-existing commercial programs PATRAN (MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., USA) and ABAQUS (Hibbit Karlson and Sorensen, Pawtucket, RI). In doing so, we have retained several attributes of the commercial software, which are very attractive for orthopaedic implant applications.

  2. A contact layer element for large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißenfels, C.; Wriggers, P.

    2015-05-01

    In many contact situations the material behavior of one contact member strongly influences the force acting between the two bodies. Unfortunately standard friction models cannot reproduce all of these material effects at the contact layer and often continuum interface elements are used instead. These elements are intrinsically tied to the fixed grid and hence cannot be used in large sliding simulations. Due to the shortcomings of the standard contact formulations and of the interface elements a new type of a contact layer element is developed in this work. The advantages of this element are the direct implementation of continuum models into the contact formulation and the application to arbitrary large deformations. Showing a relation between continuum and contact kinematics based on the solid-shell concept the new contact element is at the end a natural extension of the standard contact formulations into 3D. Two examples show that the continuum behavior can be exactly reproduced at the contact surface even in large sliding situations using this contact layer element. For the discretization of the new contact element the Mortar method is chosen exemplary, but it can be combined with all kinds of contact formulations.

  3. Comparison of Gap Elements and Contact Algorithm for 3D Contact Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Tiku, K.; Kumar, A.; Handschuh, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method is presented. A finite element model is generated by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Contact is simulated by the automatic generation of nonpenetration constraints. This method is compared to a finite element contact analysis conducted with gap elements.

  4. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  5. Metal Silicides: Active elements of ULSI contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, C. M.; Tsai, J. Y.; Sun, J.

    1996-11-01

    As device dimensions scale to the 0.1 urn regime, the self-aligned suicide (SALICIDE) contact technology increasingly becomes an integral part of both the ultra-shallow junction and the metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor device itself. This paper will discuss the effect of suicide materials and formation processes on suicide stability, junction consumption, the ability to accurately profile shallow junctions, and contact resistance in series with the channel. The use of suicides as diffusion sources (SADS) provides an important pathway toward optimization of suicide technology. Diffusion of boron and arsenic from nearly epitaxial layers of CoSi2, formed from bilayers of Ti and Co, offer good suicide stability, ultra-shallow, low-leakage junctions, and low contact resistance.

  6. A Direct analysis of elastic contact using super elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2006-02-01

    Solutions to contact problems are important in mechanical as well as in civil engineering, and even for the most simple problems there is still a need for research results. In the present paper we suggest an alternative finite element procedure and by examples show the need for more knowledge related to the compliance of contact surfaces. The most simple solutions are named Hertz solutions from 1882, and we use some of these solutions for comparison with our finite element results. As a function of the total contact force we find the size of the contact area, the distribution of the contact pressure, and the contact compliance. In models of finite size the compliance depends on the flexibility of the total model, including the boundary condition of the model, and therefore disagreement with the locally based analytical models is expected and found. With computational contact mechanics we can solve more advanced contact problems and treat models that are closer to physical reality. The finite element method is widely used and solutions are obtained by incrementation and/or iteration for these non-linear problems with unknown boundary conditions. Still with these advanced tools the solution is difficult because of extreme sensitivity. Here we present a direct analysis of elastic contact without incrementation and iteration, and the procedure is based on a finite element super element technique. This means that the contacting bodies can be analyzed independently, and are only coupled through a direct analysis with low order super element stiffness matrices. The examples of the present paper are restricted to axisymmetric problems with isotropic, elastic materials and excluding friction. Direct extensions to cases of non-isotropy, including laminates, and to plane and general 3D models are possible.

  7. Adaptive methods, rolling contact, and nonclassical friction laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results and methods on three different areas of contemporary research are outlined. These include adaptive methods, the rolling contact problem for finite deformation of a hyperelastic or viscoelastic cylinder, and non-classical friction laws for modeling dynamic friction phenomena.

  8. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  9. Finite Element Simulation of Articular Contact Mechanics with Quadratic Tetrahedral Elements

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Steve A.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Rawlins, David S.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics. PMID:26900037

  10. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Posteriori error estimation of h-p finite element approximations of frictional contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Oden, J. T.

    1994-03-01

    Dynamic and static fractional contact problems are described using the normal compliance law on the contact boundary. Dynamic problems are recast into quasistatic problems by time discretization. An a posteriori error estimator is developed for nonlinear elliptic equation of corresponding static or quasistatic problems. The a posteriori error estimator is applied to a frictionless case and extended to frictional contact problems. An adaptive strategy is introduced and h-p finite element meshes are obtained through a procedure based on a priori and a posteriori error estimations. Numerical examples are given to support the theoretical results.

  12. Adaptive electrowetting lens-prism element.

    PubMed

    Terrab, Soraya; Watson, Alexander M; Roath, Christopher; Gopinath, Juliet T; Bright, Victor M

    2015-10-05

    An adaptive electrowetting-based element with focusing and steering capability has been demonstrated in a monolithic design. Curvature and tip-tilt variation have been demonstrated using low voltages. A steering range of up to 4.3° and lens tuning of 18 diopters have been measured at 30 V DC and 21 V DC, respectively.

  13. Singular solutions of contact problems and block elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeshko, V. A.; Evdokimova, O. V.; Babeshko, O. M.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we consider mixed problems of elasticity theory, in particular, contact problems for cases that are nontraditional. They include mixed problems with discontinuous boundary conditions in which the singularities in the behavior of contact stresses are not studied or the energy of the singularities is unbounded. An example of such mixed problems is contact problems for two rigid stamps approaching each other by rectilinear boundaries up to contact but not merging into one stamp. It has been shown that such problems, which appear in seismology, failure theory, and civil engineering, have singular components with unbounded energy and can be solved by topological methods with pointwise convergence, in particular, by the block element method. Numerical methods that are based on using the energy integral are not applicable to such problems in view of its divergence.

  14. Adaptive Prognostics for Rolling Element Bearing Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Billington, S.; Zhang, C.; Kurfess, T.; Danyluk, S.; Liang, S.

    1999-01-01

    Rolling element bearing failure is one of the foremost causes of breakdown in rotating machinery. This paper proposes a remaining life adaptation methodology based on mechanistic modeling and parameter tuning. Vibration measurement is used to estimate defect severity by monitoring the signals generated from rotating bearings. Through a defect propagation model and defect diagnostic model, an adaptive algorithm is developed to fine tune the parameters involved in the propagation model by comparing predicted and measured defect sizes. In this manner, the instantaneous rate of defect propagation can be captured despite defect growth behavior variation. Therefore, a precise estimation of the remaining life can be determined. Simulations and experimental results are presented to illustrate the implementation principles and to verify the applicability of the adaptive prognostic methodology.

  15. Making contact with the primitive mind: the contact-barrier, beta-elements and the drives.

    PubMed

    Kohon, Sebastian José

    2014-04-01

    A clinical vignette is used as the starting point for an exploration of Bion's notion of a contact-barrier, which "separates mental phenomena into two groups one of which performs the functions of consciousness and the other the functions of unconsciousness" (Bion, 1962a, p. 22), and its relation to Freud's drive theory. Bion's concept is compared to Freud's (1950[1895]) description of the 'contact-barrier' in the Project for a scientific psychology. Through this comparison, light is shed on various aspects of Bion's metapsychology, especially on the notion of 'beta-elements', described by Bion in quantitative/energetic terms as 'accretions of stimuli'. The processing of beta-elements through the function of the contact-barrier is understood as an elaboration of Freud's notion of the 'binding' of the drives, with the difference that beta-elements encompass 'unprocessed' external stimuli as well as impulses arising from within. The 'beta-element' and the 'drives' are both understood as concepts that delimit what is knowable in the psyche. Further clinical material is presented to illustrate the author's argument that Bion's contact-barrier and related concepts (alpha function, containment) should be understood with reference to the economic/energetic aspect of Freud's metapsychology.

  16. Finite Element Analysis for Turbine Blades with Contact Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Jian; Yang, Liang; Wang, Hai-Kun; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Turbine blades are one of the key components in a typical turbofan engine, which plays an important role in flight safety. In this paper, we establish a establishes a three-dimensional finite element model of the turbine blades, then analyses the strength of the blade in complicated conditions under the joint function of temperature load, centrifugal load, and aerodynamic load. Furthermore, contact analysis of blade tenon and dovetail slot is also carried out to study the stress based on the contact elements. Finally, the Von Mises stress-strain distributions are obtained to acquire the several dangerous points and maximum Von Mises stress, which provide the basis for life prediction of turbine blade.

  17. Adaptive finite element methods in electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, David J; Gillow, Kathryn; Süli, Endre

    2006-12-05

    In this article, we review some of our previous work that considers the general problem of numerical simulation of the currents at microelectrodes using an adaptive finite element approach. Microelectrodes typically consist of an electrode embedded (or recessed) in an insulating material. For all such electrodes, numerical simulation is made difficult by the presence of a boundary singularity at the electrode edge (where the electrode meets the insulator), manifested by the large increase in the current density at this point, often referred to as the edge effect. Our approach to overcoming this problem has involved the derivation of an a posteriori bound on the error in the numerical approximation for the current that can be used to drive an adaptive mesh-generation algorithm, allowing calculation of the quantity of interest (the current) to within a prescribed tolerance. We illustrate the generic applicability of the approach by considering a broad range of steady-state applications of the technique.

  18. Finite Element Modeling of a Cylindrical Contact Using Hertzian Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The turbine blades in the high-pressure fuel turbopump/alternate turbopump (HPFTP/AT) are subjected to hot gases rapidly flowing around them. This flow excites vibrations in the blades. Naturally, one has to worry about resonance, so a damping device was added to dissipate some energy from the system. The foundation is now laid for a very complex problem. The damper is in contact with the blade, so now there are contact stresses (both normal and tangential) to contend with. Since these stresses can be very high, it is not all that difficult to yield the material. Friction is another non-linearity and the blade is made out of a Nickel-based single-crystal superalloy that is orthotropic. A few approaches exist to solve such a problem and computer models, using contact elements, have been built with friction, plasticity, etc. These models are quite cumbersome and require many hours to solve just one load case and material orientation. A simpler approach is required. Ideally, the model should be simplified so the analysis can be conducted faster. When working with contact problems determining the contact patch and the stresses in the material are the main concerns. Closed-form solutions for non-conforming bodies, developed by Hertz, made out of isotropic materials are readily available. More involved solutions for 3-D cases using different materials are also available. The question is this: can Hertzian1 solutions be applied, or superimposed, to more complicated problems-like those involving anisotropic materials? That is the point of the investigation here. If these results agree with the more complicated computer models, then the analytical solutions can be used in lieu of the numerical solutions that take a very long time to process. As time goes on, the analytical solution will eventually have to include things like friction and plasticity. The models in this report use no contact elements and are essentially an applied load problem using Hertzian assumptions to

  19. Partition of the contact force network obtained in discrete element simulations of element tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Hanley, Kevin J.; Kwok, Chung-Yee

    2017-04-01

    The transmission of stress within a granular material composed of rigid spheres is explored using the discrete element method. The contribution of contacts to both deviatoric stress and structural anisotropy is investigated. The influences of five factors are considered: inter-particle friction coefficient, loading regime, packing density, contact model, and boundary conditions. The data generated indicate that using the above-average normal contact force criterion to decompose the contact force network into two subsets with distinct contributions to stress transmission and structural anisotropy is not robust. The characteristic normal contact forces marking the transition from negative to positive contribution to the overall deviatoric stress and structural anisotropy are not unique values but vary during shearing. Once the critical state is attained (i.e., once shearing continues at a constant deviator stress and solid fraction), the characteristic normal contact force remains approximately constant and this critical state characteristic normal force is observed to decrease with increasing inter-particle friction. The characteristic normal contact force considering the contribution to deviatoric stress has a power-law relationship with the mean effective stress at the critical state.

  20. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a height...

  1. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a height...

  2. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a height...

  3. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a height...

  4. 49 CFR 236.560 - Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contact element, mechanical trip type; location... Instructions; Locomotives § 236.560 Contact element, mechanical trip type; location with respect to rail. Contact element of automatic train stop device of the mechanical trip type shall be maintained at a height...

  5. Adaptive local surface refinement based on LR NURBS and its application to contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Christopher; Sauer, Roger A.

    2017-08-01

    A novel adaptive local surface refinement technique based on Locally Refined Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (LR NURBS) is presented. LR NURBS can model complex geometries exactly and are the rational extension of LR B-splines. The local representation of the parameter space overcomes the drawback of non-existent local refinement in standard NURBS-based isogeometric analysis. For a convenient embedding into general finite element codes, the Bézier extraction operator for LR NURBS is formulated. An automatic remeshing technique is presented that allows adaptive local refinement and coarsening of LR NURBS. In this work, LR NURBS are applied to contact computations of 3D solids and membranes. For solids, LR NURBS-enriched finite elements are used to discretize the contact surfaces with LR NURBS finite elements, while the rest of the body is discretized by linear Lagrange finite elements. For membranes, the entire surface is discretized by LR NURBS. Various numerical examples are shown, and they demonstrate the benefit of using LR NURBS: Compared to uniform refinement, LR NURBS can achieve high accuracy at lower computational cost.

  6. Adapter for contact force sensing of the da Vinci robot.

    PubMed

    Shimachi, Shigeyuki; Hirunyanitiwatna, Surakij; Fujiwara, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Akira; Hakozaki, Yoshinori

    2008-06-01

    At present, the da Vinci surgical robot system does not provide haptic feedback. One of the authors has proposed a contact-force sensing method called the 'overcoat method', in which the instrument/driver is supported by force sensors. In the da Vinci robot, the instrument jaws are powered by a wire-pulley mechanism; thus, in order to apply the overcoat method to the da Vinci system, we must transfer the power through a frame that is supported by force sensors. The authors have attempted to add a force-sensor function to the Sterile Adapter of the da Vinci system. In developing a sensorized adapter, a new configuration of force sensors and a new axial-force-free (AFF) joint have been devised in order to obtain an independent 'axial force effect' from the drive torque fed from the da Vinci robot arm. The force-sensing errors of the present system have been measured to have a maximum value of approximately 0.2 N while driving the jaws, and a maximum value of approximately 0.2 N when the robot arm is inclined with some excitation. Some impact reference forces applied on to the ends of the jaws agree with the outputs of the sensorized adapter to within <0.05 N. It is shown that the new adapter can be sterilized. One apprehension is that the total weight of the new adapter-approximately 1.2 kg-might unbalance the robot arm. In the case of the new adapter, the centre-line of the instrument shaft is shifted externally through approximately 3.5 mm from its original position. However, a new cannula for the da Vinci robot might solve this problem. The new configuration of force sensors and the new AFF joint work well in their basic functions. The total force-sensing error is estimated as approximately 0.5 N. One of the main reasons for the error appears to be the deformation of the adapter frame. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  8. Auto-adaptive finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Roland; Leyland, Penelope

    1995-01-01

    Accurate capturing of discontinuities within compressible flow computations is achieved by coupling a suitable solver with an automatic adaptive mesh algorithm for unstructured triangular meshes. The mesh adaptation procedures developed rely on non-hierarchical dynamical local refinement/derefinement techniques, which hence enable structural optimization as well as geometrical optimization. The methods described are applied for a number of the ICASE test cases are particularly interesting for unsteady flow simulations.

  9. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  10. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    the method . Using the above definitions , the weak statement of the non-linear local problem at the kth 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0305 An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations Carlos Duarte UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN...14-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Adaptive Multiscale Generalized Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  11. A Parallel Algorithm for Contact in a Finite Element Hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Timothy G.

    2003-06-01

    A parallel algorithm is developed for contact/impact of multiple three dimensional bodies undergoing large deformation. As time progresses the relative positions of contact between the multiple bodies changes as collision and sliding occurs. The parallel algorithm is capable of tracking these changes and enforcing an impenetrability constraint and momentum transfer across the surfaces in contact. Portions of the various surfaces of the bodies are assigned to the processors of a distributed-memory parallel machine in an arbitrary fashion, known as the primary decomposition. A secondary, dynamic decomposition is utilized to bring opposing sections of the contacting surfaces together on the same processors, so that opposing forces may be balanced and the resultant deformation of the bodies calculated. The secondary decomposition is accomplished and updated using only local communication with a limited subset of neighbor processors. Each processor represents both a domain of the primary decomposition and a domain of the secondary, or contact, decomposition. Thus each processor has four sets of neighbor processors: (a) those processors which represent regions adjacent to it in the primary decomposition, (b) those processors which represent regions adjacent to it in the contact decomposition, (c) those processors which send it the data from which it constructs its contact domain, and (d) those processors to which it sends its primary domain data, from which they construct their contact domains. The latter three of these neighbor sets change dynamically as the simulation progresses. By constraining all communication to these sets of neighbors, all global communication, with its attendant nonscalable performance, is avoided. A set of tests are provided to measure the degree of scalability achieved by this algorithm on up to 1024 processors. Issues related to the operating system of the test platform which lead to some degradation of the results are analyzed. This algorithm

  12. Implementations of adaptive associative optical computing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Arthur D.; Lee, John N.; Fukuda, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present optical implementations for heteroassociative memory modules, which are capable of real time adaptive learning, are pertinent to the eventual construction of large, multimodule associative/neural network architectures that can consider problems in the acquisition, transformation, matching/recognition, and manipulation of large amounts of data in parallel. These modules offer such performance features as convergence to the least-squares-optimum pseudoinverse association, accumulative and gated learning, forgetfulness of unused associations, resistance to dynamic-range saturation, and compensation of optical system aberrations. Optics uniquely furnish the massive parallel interconnection paths required to cascade and interconnect a number of modules to form the more sophisticated multiple module architectures.

  13. Finite-Element Analysis of a Mach-8 Flight Test Article Using Nonlinear Contact Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance

    1997-01-01

    A flight test article, called a glove, is required for a Mach-8 boundary-layer experiment to be conducted on a flight mission of the air-launched Pegasus(reg) space booster. The glove is required to provide a smooth, three-dimensional, structurally stable, aerodynamic surface and includes instrumentation to determine when and where boundary-layer transition occurs during the hypersonic flight trajectory. A restraint mechanism has been invented to attach the glove to the wing of the space booster. The restraint mechanism securely attaches the glove to the wing in directions normal to the wing/glove interface surface, but allows the glove to thermally expand and contract to alleviate stresses in directions parallel to the interface surface. A finite-element analysis has been performed using nonlinear contact elements to model the complex behavior of the sliding restraint mechanism. This paper provides an overview of the glove design and presents details of the analysis that were essential to demonstrate the flight worthiness of the wing-glove test article. Results show that all glove components are well within the allowable stress and deformation requirements to satisfy the objectives of the flight research experiment.

  14. Adaptive implicit-explicit and parallel element-by-element iteration schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.; Nguyen, T.; Poole, S.

    1989-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) and grouped element-by-element (GEBE) iteration schemes are presented for the finite element solution of large-scale problems in computational mechanics and physics. The AIE approach is based on the dynamic arrangement of the elements into differently treated groups. The GEBE procedure, which is a way of rewriting the EBE formulation to make its parallel processing potential and implementation more clear, is based on the static arrangement of the elements into groups with no inter-element coupling within each group. Various numerical tests performed demonstrate the savings in the CPU time and memory.

  15. Adaptive implicit-explicit and parallel element-by-element iteration schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.; Nguyen, T.; Poole, S.

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) and grouped element-by-element (GEBE) iteration schemes are presented for the finite element solution of large-scale problems in computational mechanics and physics. The AIE approach is based on the dynamic arrangement of the elements into differently treated groups. The GEBE procedure, which is a way of rewriting the EBE formulation to make its parallel processing potential and implementation more clear, is based on the static arrangement of the elements into groups with no inter-element coupling within each group. Various numerical tests performed demonstrate the savings in the CPU time and memory.

  16. Adaptive implicit-explicit and parallel element-by-element iteration schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.; Nguyen, T.; Poole, S.

    1989-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) and grouped element-by-element (GEBE) iteration schemes are presented for the finite element solution of large-scale problems in computational mechanics and physics. The AIE approach is based on the dynamic arrangement of the elements into differently treated groups. The GEBE procedure, which is a way of rewriting the EBE formulation to make its parallel processing potential and implementation more clear, is based on the static arrangement of the elements into groups with no inter-element coupling within each group. Various numerical tests performed demonstrate the savings in the CPU time and memory.

  17. Finite element analysis of sliding distance and contact mechanics of hip implant under dynamic walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongchang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Manyi

    2015-06-01

    An explicit finite element method was developed to predict the dynamic behavior of the contact mechanics for a hip implant under normal walking conditions. Two key parameters of mesh sensitivity and time steps were examined to balance the accuracy and computational cost. Both the maximum contact pressure and accumulated sliding distance showed good agreement with those in the previous studies using the implicit finite element analysis and analytical methods. Therefore, the explicit finite element method could be used to predict the contact pressure and accumulated sliding distance for an artificial hip joint simultaneously in dynamic manner.

  18. An augmented Lagrangian finite element formulation for 3D contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongqiang; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic contact analysis is essential to obtain a complete understanding of soft tissue biomechanics, and the importance of physiological structure on the joint biomechanics has long been recognised; however, up to date, there are no successful developments of biphasic finite element contact analysis for three-dimensional (3D) geometries of physiological joints. The aim of this study was to develop a finite element formulation for biphasic contact of 3D physiological joints. The augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The biphasic contact method was implemented in the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2(®) (COMSOL, Inc., Burlington, MA). The accuracy of the implementation was verified using 3D biphasic contact problems, including indentation with a flat-ended indenter and contact of glenohumeral cartilage layers. The ability of the method to model multibody biphasic contact of physiological joints was proved by a 3D knee model. The 3D biphasic finite element contact method developed in this study can be used to study the biphasic behaviours of the physiological joints.

  19. Adaptive Through-Thickness Integration Strategy for Shell Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchitz, I. A.; Meinders, T.; Huétink, J.

    2007-05-01

    Reliable numerical prediction of springback in sheet metal forming is essential for the automotive industry. There are numerous factors that influence the accuracy of springback prediction by using the finite element method. One of the reasons is the through-thickness numerical integration of shell elements. It is known that even for simple problems the traditional integration schemes may require up to 50 integration points to achieve a high accuracy of springback analysis. An adaptive through-thickness integration strategy can be a good alternative. The strategy defines abscissas and weights depending on the integrand's properties and, thus, can adapt itself to improve the accuracy of integration. A concept of the adaptive through-thickness integration strategy for shell elements is presented. It is tested using a simple problem of bending of a beam under tension. Results show that for a similar set of material and process parameters the adaptive Simpson's rule with 7 integration points performs better than the traditional trapezoidal rule with 50 points. The adaptive through-thickness integration strategy for shell elements can improve the accuracy of springback prediction at minimal costs.

  20. Argon plasma contact ionization of alkali metal element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kato, Masaaki; Kochi, Kenji; Okamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    1996-05-01

    The secondary ionization of lithium metal and lithium iodide by contact with an argon ECR plasma was studied. Lithium and argon ion densities in the lithium - argon mixture plasma were diagnosed by using double probes, a photospectrometer and a mass spectrometer. According to plasma diagnostics, the apparent ionization cross sections were 0963-0252/5/2/030/img8 for lithium metal and 0963-0252/5/2/030/img9 for lithium iodide. This ionization method produces a low-temperature plasma which would be appropriate for ion cyclotron resonance isotope separation.

  1. Contact stress analysis of spiral bevel gears using nonlinear finite element static analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Kumar, A.; Reddy, S.; Handschuh, R.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure is presented for performing three-dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method. The procedure involves generating a finite element model by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Coordinate transformations are used to orientate the gear and pinion for gear meshing. Contact boundary conditions are simulated with gap elements. A solution technique for correct orientation of the gap elements is given. Example models and results are presented.

  2. Contact Stress Analysis of Spiral Bevel Gears Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Kumar, A; Reddy, S.; Handschuh, R.

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is presented for performing three-dimensional stress analysis of spiral bevel gears in mesh using the finite element method. The procedure involves generating a finite element model by solving equations that identify tooth surface coordinates. Coordinate transformations are used to orientate the gear and pinion for gear meshing. Contact boundary conditions are simulated with gap elements. A solution technique for correct orientation of the gap elements is given. Example models and results are presented.

  3. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  4. A Novel Three-Dimensional Contact Finite Element Based on Smooth Pressure Interpolations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Papadopoulos, P.

    2000-10-01

    This article proposes a new three-dimensional contact finite element which employs continuous and weakly coupled pressure interpolations on each of the interacting boundaries. The resulting formulation circumvents the geometric bias of one-pass methods, as well as the surface locking of traditional two-pass node-on-surf ace methods. A Lagrange multiplier implementation of the proposed element is validated for frictionless quasi-static contact by a series of numerical simulations.

  5. Numerical Differentiation for Adaptively Refined Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgioli, Andrea; Cwik, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Postprocessing of point-wise data is a fundamental process in many fields of research. Numerical differentiation is a key operation in computational electromagnetics. In the case of data obtained from a finite element method with automatic mesh refinement much work needs still to be done. This paper addresses some issues in differentiating data obtained from a finite element electromagnetic code with adaptive mesh refinement, and it proposes a methodology for deriving the electric field given the magnetic field on a mesh of linear triangular elements. The procedure itself is nevertheless more general and might be extended for numerically differentiating any point-wise solution based on triangular meshes.

  6. A finite-element model predicts thermal damage in cutaneous contact burns.

    PubMed

    Orgill, D P; Solari, M G; Barlow, M S; O'Connor, N E

    1998-01-01

    Thermal injury results from exposure of skin elements to an externally applied heat source. Finite-element analysis of heat transfer in cutaneous burns allows for an accurate prediction of tissue time-temperature relationships throughout the exposed tissue. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric, finite-element model of a contact burn was constructed, and damage integrals were calculated by applying the Arrhenius equation to the time-temperature profiles at each point. The epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat were modeled as uniform elements with distinct thermal properties. Heated aluminum blocks were applied to Yorkshire pigs for 10 to 80 seconds to produce contact burns. Wound biopsies taken at 1, 24, and 48 hours were examined histologically and measured for the depth of burn. A significant deepening of the gelatinized tissue was observed in tissue taken from 1 hour to 24 hours. The finite-element prediction of cutaneous contact burn damage correlated well with histologic observations in this porcine model.

  7. Elemental profiles reflect plant adaptations to the environment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elemental concentrations in plants are determined by interactions with the soil. Soil is one of the key environmental influences (along with water, light, gas and other organisms) of plant success and drivers of speciation and adaptation. Environmental conditions influence common measures of adaptat...

  8. Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth: Use of an incremental finite element procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Contact stresses in meshing spur gear teeth are examined. The analysis is based upon an incremental finite element procedure that simultaneously determines the stresses in the contact region between the meshing teeth. The teeth themselves are modeled by two dimensional plain strain elements. Friction effects are included, with the friction forces assumed to obey Coulomb's law. The analysis assumes that the displacements are small and that the tooth materials are linearly elastic. The analysis procedure is validated by comparing its results with those for the classical two contacting semicylinders obtained from the Hertz method. Agreement is excellent.

  9. A finite element implementation for biphasic contact of hydrated porous media under finite deformation and sliding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Shah, Mitul; Spilker, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The study of biphasic soft tissues contact is fundamental to understanding the biomechanical behavior of human diarthrodial joints. However, to date, few biphasic finite element contact analysis for 3D physiological geometries under finite deformation has been developed. The objective of this paper is to develop a hyperelastic biphasic contact implementation for finite deformation and sliding problem. An augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The finite element implementation was based on a general purpose software, COMSOL Multiphysics. The accuracy of the implementation is verified using example problems, for which solutions are available by alternative analyses. The implementation was proven to be robust and able to handle finite deformation and sliding. PMID:24496915

  10. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  11. Finite element analysis of carbon fiber composite adaptive mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, Sarah; Doel, Peter

    2004-10-01

    With the advent of the new generation of ground-based telescopes with primary sizes of 30-100 m, adaptive optics (AO) technology is in rapid development. One important area of research is that of integration of AO into the telescope's operation. A possible solution for this is the use of an adaptive secondary mirror. However, for a secondary of several meters in size, this presents many problems in choice of material, as well as design for the adaptive control. An active mirror prototype made out of a carbon fibre composite material (CFC) is under development at University College London in collaboration with QinetiQ and Cobham Composites. We present here results from finite element analysis of this mirror, as well as modelling results of an adaptive secondary mirror section as might be developed for the new class of telescopes. These results indicate that CFC could indeed present a viable alternative to more traditional deformable mirror materials.

  12. A Lagrange multiplier mixed finite element formulation for three-dimensional contact of biphasic tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Taiseung; Spilker, Robert L

    2007-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) contact finite element formulation has been developed for biological soft tissue-to-tissue contact analysis. The linear biphasic theory of Mow, Holmes, and Lai (1984, J. Biomech., 17(5), pp. 377-394) based on continuum mixture theory, is adopted to describe the hydrated soft tissue as a continuum of solid and fluid phases. Four contact continuity conditions derived for biphasic mixtures by Hou et al. (1989, ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 111(1), pp. 78-87) are introduced on the assumed contact surface, and a weighted residual method has been used to derive a mixed velocity-pressure finite element contact formulation. The Lagrange multiplier method is used to enforce two of the four contact continuity conditions, while the other two conditions are introduced directly into the weighted residual statement. Alternate formulations are possible, which differ in the choice of continuity conditions that are enforced with Lagrange multipliers. Primary attention is focused on a formulation that enforces the normal solid traction and relative fluid flow continuity conditions on the contact surface using Lagrange multipliers. An alternate approach, in which the multipliers enforce normal solid traction and pressure continuity conditions, is also discussed. The contact nonlinearity is treated with an iterative algorithm, where the assumed area is either extended or reduced based on the validity of the solution relative to contact conditions. The resulting first-order system of equations is solved in time using the generalized finite difference scheme. The formulation is validated by a series of increasingly complex canonical problems, including the confined and unconfined compression, the Hertz contact problem, and two biphasic indentation tests. As a clinical demonstration of the capability of the contact analysis, the gleno-humeral joint contact of human shoulders is analyzed using an idealized 3D geometry. In the joint, both glenoid and humeral head

  13. Validation of a Finite Element Humeroradial Joint Model of Contact Pressure Using Fuji Pressure Sensitive Film.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghwan; Carl Miller, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A finite element (FE) elbow model was developed to predict the contact stress and contact area of the native humeroradial joint. The model was validated using Fuji pressure sensitive film with cadaveric elbows for which axial loads of 50, 100, and 200 N were applied through the radial head. Maximum contact stresses ranged from 1.7 to 4.32 MPa by FE predictions and from 1.34 to 3.84 MPa by pressure sensitive film measurement while contact areas extended from 39.33 to 77.86 mm2 and 29.73 to 83.34 mm2 by FE prediction and experimental measurement, respectively. Measurements from cadaveric testing and FE predictions showed the same patterns in both the maximum contact stress and contact area, as another demonstration of agreement. While measured contact pressures and contact areas validated the FE predictions, computed maximum stresses and contact area tended to overestimate the maximum contact stress and contact area.

  14. Finite element based contact analysis of radio frequency MEMs switch membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Ya; Chalivendra, Vijaya; Huang, Wenzhen

    2017-10-01

    Finite element simulations were performed to determine the contact behavior of radio frequency (RF) micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) switch contact surfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to capture the topography of RF-MEM switch membranes and later they were analyzed for multi-scale regular as well as fractal structures. Frictionless, non-adhesive contact 3D finite element analysis was carried out at different length scales to investigate the contact behavior of the regular-fractal surface using an elasto-plastic material model. Dominant micro-scale regular patterns were found to significantly change the contact behavior. Contact areas mainly cluster around the regular pattern. The contribution from the fractal structure is not significant. Under cyclic loading conditions, plastic deformation in the 1st loading/unloading cycle smooth the surface. The subsequent repetitive loading/unloading cycles undergo elastic contact without changing the morphology of the contacting surfaces. The work is expected to shed light on the quality of the switch surface contact as well as the optimum design of RF MEM switch surfaces.

  15. Adaptive beam shaping by controlled thermal lensing in optical elements.

    PubMed

    Arain, Muzammil A; Quetschke, Volker; Gleason, Joseph; Williams, Luke F; Rakhmanov, Malik; Lee, Jinho; Cruz, Rachel J; Mueller, Guido; Tanner, D B; Reitze, David H

    2007-04-20

    We describe an adaptive optical system for use as a tunable focusing element. The system provides adaptive beam shaping via controlled thermal lensing in the optical elements. The system is agile, remotely controllable, touch free, and vacuum compatible; it offers a wide dynamic range, aberration-free focal length tuning, and can provide both positive and negative lensing effects. Focusing is obtained through dynamic heating of an optical element by an external pump beam. The system is especially suitable for use in interferometric gravitational wave interferometers employing high laser power, allowing for in situ control of the laser modal properties and compensation for thermal lensing of the primary laser. Using CO(2) laser heating of fused-silica substrates, we demonstrate a focal length variable from infinity to 4.0 m, with a slope of 0.082 diopter/W of absorbed heat. For on-axis operation, no higher-order modes are introduced by the adaptive optical element. Theoretical modeling of the induced optical path change and predicted thermal lens agrees well with measurement.

  16. Finite element predictions of cartilage contact mechanics in hips with retroverted acetabula.

    PubMed

    Henak, C R; Carruth, E D; Anderson, A E; Harris, M D; Ellis, B J; Peters, C L; Weiss, J A

    2013-10-01

    A contributory factor to hip osteoarthritis (OA) is abnormal cartilage mechanics. Acetabular retroversion, a version deformity of the acetabulum, has been postulated to cause OA via decreased posterior contact area and increased posterior contact stress. Although cartilage mechanics cannot be measured directly in vivo to evaluate the causes of OA, they can be predicted using finite element (FE) modeling. The objective of this study was to compare cartilage contact mechanics between hips with normal and retroverted acetabula using subject-specific FE modeling. Twenty subjects were recruited and imaged: 10 with normal acetabula and 10 with retroverted acetabula. FE models were constructed using a validated protocol. Walking, stair ascent, stair descent and rising from a chair were simulated. Acetabular cartilage contact stress and contact area were compared between groups. Retroverted acetabula had superomedial cartilage contact patterns, while normal acetabula had widely distributed cartilage contact patterns. In the posterolateral acetabulum, average contact stress and contact area during walking and stair descent were 2.6-7.6 times larger in normal than retroverted acetabula (P ≤ 0.017). Conversely, in the superomedial acetabulum, peak contact stress during walking was 1.2-1.6 times larger in retroverted than normal acetabula (P ≤ 0.044). Further differences varied by region and activity. This study demonstrated superomedial contact patterns in retroverted acetabula vs widely distributed contact patterns in normal acetabula. Smaller posterolateral contact stress in retroverted acetabula than in normal acetabula suggests that increased posterior contact stress alone may not be the link between retroversion and OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical validation of a patient-specific contact finite element model of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald D; Goldsworthy, Jane K; Li, Wendy; James Rudert, M; Tochigi, Yuki; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to determine the extent to which computational ankle contact finite element (FE) results agreed with experimentally measured tibio-talar contact stress. Two cadaver ankles were loaded in separate test sessions, during which ankle contact stresses were measured with a high-resolution (Tekscan) pressure sensor. Corresponding contact FE analyses were subsequently performed for comparison. The agreement was good between FE-computed and experimentally measured mean (3.2% discrepancy for one ankle, 19.3% for the other) and maximum (1.5% and 6.2%) contact stress, as well as for contact area (1.7% and 14.9%). There was also excellent agreement between histograms of fractional areas of cartilage experiencing specific ranges of contact stress. Finally, point-by-point comparisons between the computed and measured contact stress distributions over the articular surface showed substantial agreement, with correlation coefficients of 90% for one ankle and 86% for the other. In the past, general qualitative, but little direct quantitative agreement has been demonstrated with articular joint contact FE models. The methods used for this validation enable formal comparison of computational and experimental results, and open the way for objective statistical measures of regional correlation between FE-computed contact stress distributions from comparison articular joint surfaces (e.g., those from an intact versus those with residual intra-articular fracture incongruity).

  18. Tooth displacement due to occlusal contacts: a three-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Gomes de Oliveira, S; Seraidarian, P I; Landre, J; Oliveira, D D; Cavalcanti, B N

    2006-12-01

    The use of the Finite Element Method (FE) is an appropriate way to study occlusal forces and tooth movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different occlusal contact patterns on tooth displacement in an adult dentition using a three-dimensional FE model of a human maxilla and mandible. Initially, images of a computerized tomography scan were redrawn in a computer program (CATIA) followed by the FE mesh construction. The MSC/Patran software was used to develop the FE mesh comprising 520,445 elements and 106,633 nodes. The MSC/Nastran program was utilized as pre and post-processor for all mathematical calculations necessary to evaluate dental and mandibular biomechanics. Four occlusal patterns were tested: FEM 1 - standard occlusal contacts; FEM 2 - removal of mesial marginal and mesial tripoidism contacts; FEM 3 - removal of distal marginal and distal tripoidism contacts; FEM 4 - similar to FEM 3 with added contacts between upper and lower incisors. Small changes in the standard distribution of occlusal contacts resulted in an imbalance of occlusal forces and changes in dental positioning. All simulations tested showed mesial displacement of posterior teeth. The most significant changes were registered in the model presenting unstable occlusal contacts when the anterior teeth were in occlusion (FEM 4). These findings may explain mandibular incisors crowding and maxillary incisors flaring as a result of small variations in dental contacts.

  19. Contact Stress Analysis in Wheel-Rail by Hertzian Method and Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, J. P.; Sarkar, P. K.; Ranjan, V.

    2014-10-01

    Safety and economy of railway traffic is enormously influenced by the contact stress variation caused by wheel rail contact profile changes. A change in designed surface topology may result from wear that brings in a wide change in contact geometry and stresses. To study the influence of interacting wheel and rail profile topology of standard rail UIC60, the standard wheel profile as per Indian Railway standards are considered in this paper. Rail profile radii, wheel profile radii and wheel profile taper are chosen for six different values. The analytical formulation is based on Timoshenko's approach and Finite Element Method (FEM) based simulation of the problems is undertaken. With these tools, distribution of contact zones, contact stress and contact pressure for different configuration of the wheel and rail profiles are obtained. The mesh density in contact region is found to have a direct influence on the accuracy of the solution [1]. To standardize the analysis of the contact region, mesh with an element size of 1 mm for all the configurations are chosen. Using stress response obtained through FEM analysis and multiaxial fatigue crack initiation model, the effects of vertical loading on fatigue crack initiation life are investigated. This may allow a direct design application for railways in particular.

  20. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  1. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  2. Investigation of high thermal contact conductance at low contact pressure for high-heat-load optical elements of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Ohashi, H.; Goto, S.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the thermal-contact-conductance (TCC) of indirect cooling components in synchrotron radiation beamlines. To reduce the strain on the optical element, we explored conditions for insertion materials with a high TCC in region with low contact pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa. We examined the TCC at the interface between oxygen-free copper (OFC) and insertion materials such as indium, graphite, and gold foil. The TCC depended on the hardness and thickness of the insertion material. Thin indium (20 μm thick) showed the highest TCC. Nickel and gold passivation on the OFC surface reduced the TCC to 30% of that for the bare OFC. Future work will involve exploring the passivation conditions of OFC for higher TCC is and measuring the TCC under cryogenic-cooling conditions.

  3. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithms for Parallel Unstructured Finite Element Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, I D; Solberg, J M

    2006-02-03

    This project produced algorithms for and software implementations of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) methods for solving practical solid and thermal mechanics problems on multiprocessor parallel computers using unstructured finite element meshes. The overall goal is to provide computational solutions that are accurate to some prescribed tolerance, and adaptivity is the correct path toward this goal. These new tools will enable analysts to conduct more reliable simulations at reduced cost, both in terms of analyst and computer time. Previous academic research in the field of adaptive mesh refinement has produced a voluminous literature focused on error estimators and demonstration problems; relatively little progress has been made on producing efficient implementations suitable for large-scale problem solving on state-of-the-art computer systems. Research issues that were considered include: effective error estimators for nonlinear structural mechanics; local meshing at irregular geometric boundaries; and constructing efficient software for parallel computing environments.

  4. Anisotropic adaptive finite element method for modelling blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Sahni, O; Li, X; Jansen, K E; Shephard, M S; Taylor, C A

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we present an adaptive anisotropic finite element method (FEM) and demonstrate how computational efficiency can be increased when applying the method to the simulation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. We use the SUPG formulation for the transient 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are discretised by linear finite elements for both the pressure and the velocity field. Given the pulsatile nature of the flow in blood vessels we have pursued adaptivity based on the average flow over a cardiac cycle. Error indicators are derived to define an anisotropic mesh metric field. Mesh modification algorithms are used to anisotropically adapt the mesh according to the desired size field. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by first applying it to pulsatile flow in a straight cylindrical vessel and then to a porcine aorta with a stenosis bypassed by a graft. We demonstrate that the use of an anisotropic adaptive FEM can result in an order of magnitude reduction in computing time with no loss of accuracy compared to analyses obtained with uniform meshes.

  5. Discrete adaptive zone light elements (DAZLE): a new approach to adaptive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Robert L.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    New advances in Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulators (LCSLM) offer opportunities for large adaptive optics in the midwave infrared spectrum. A light focusing adaptive imaging system, using the zero-order diffraction state of a polarizer-free liquid crystal polarization grating modulator to create millions of high transmittance apertures, is envisioned in a system called DAZLE (Discrete Adaptive Zone Light Elements). DAZLE adaptively selects large sets of LCSLM apertures using the principles of coded masks, embodied in a hybrid Discrete Fresnel Zone Plate (DFZP) design. Issues of system architecture, including factors of LCSLM aperture pattern and adaptive control, image resolution and focal plane array (FPA) matching, and trade-offs between filter bandwidths, background photon noise, and chromatic aberration are discussed.

  6. Finite element prediction of contact pressures in cam-type femoroacetabular impingement with varied alpha angles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Wanchun; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhu, Weihong; Dou, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    Three dimensional finite element models of cam-type FAI with alpha angles of 60°, 70°, 80°, and 90° were created to investigate the cartilage contact mechanics in daily activities. Intra-articular cartilage contact pressures during routine daily activities were assessed and cross-compared with a normal control hip. Alpha angles and hip range of motion were found to have a combined influence on the cartilage contact mechanics in hips with cam-type FAI, thereby resulting in abnormally high pressures and driving the cartilage damage. In particular, alpha angles of 80° or greater contribute to substantial pressure increase under certain types of daily activities.

  7. Finite Element Algorithm for Frictionless Contact of Porous Permeable Media Under Finite Deformation and Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This study formulates and implements a finite element contact algorithm for solid-fluid (biphasic) mixtures, accommodating both finite deformation and sliding. The finite element source code is made available to the general public. Methods The algorithm uses a penalty method regularized with an augmented Lagrangian method to enforce the continuity of contact traction and normal component of fluid flux across the contact interface. The formulation addresses the need to automatically enforce free-draining conditions outside of the contact interface. The formulation addresses the need to automatically enforce free-draining conditions outside of the contact interface. Results The accuracy of the implementation is verified using contact problems for which exact solutions are obtained by alternative analyses. Illustrations are also provided that demonstrate large deformations and sliding under configurations relevant to biomechanical applications such as articular contact. Conclusions This study addresses an important computational need in the biomechanics of porous-permeable soft tissues. Placing the source code in the public domain provides a useful resource to the biomechanics community. PMID:20887031

  8. A penetration-based finite element method for hyperelastic 3D biphasic tissues in contact: Part 1--Derivation of contact boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Un, Kerem; Spilker, Robert L

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we extend the penetration method, previously introduced to simulate contact of linear hydrated tissues in an efficient manner with the finite element method, to problems of nonlinear biphasic tissues in contact. This paper presents the derivation of contact boundary conditions for a biphasic tissue with hyperelastic solid phase using experimental kinematics data. Validation of the method for calculating these boundary conditions is demonstrated using a canonical biphasic contact problem. The method is then demonstrated on a shoulder joint model with contacting humerus and glenoid tissues. In both the canonical and shoulder examples, the resulting boundary conditions are found to satisfy the kinetic continuity requirements of biphasic contact. These boundary conditions represent input to a three-dimensional nonlinear biphasic finite element analysis; details of that finite element analysis will be presented in a manuscript to follow.

  9. A new discrete element analysis method for predicting hip joint contact stresses.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Christine L; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2013-04-05

    Quantifying cartilage contact stress is paramount to understanding hip osteoarthritis. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a computationally efficient method to estimate cartilage contact stresses. Previous applications of DEA have underestimated cartilage stresses and yielded unrealistic contact patterns because they assumed constant cartilage thickness and/or concentric joint geometry. The study objectives were to: (1) develop a DEA model of the hip joint with subject-specific bone and cartilage geometry, (2) validate the DEA model by comparing DEA predictions to those of a validated finite element analysis (FEA) model, and (3) verify both the DEA and FEA models with a linear-elastic boundary value problem. Springs representing cartilage in the DEA model were given lengths equivalent to the sum of acetabular and femoral cartilage thickness and gap distance in the FEA model. Material properties and boundary/loading conditions were equivalent. Walking, descending, and ascending stairs were simulated. Solution times for DEA and FEA models were ~7 s and ~65 min, respectively. Irregular, complex contact patterns predicted by DEA were in excellent agreement with FEA. DEA contact areas were 7.5%, 9.7% and 3.7% less than FEA for walking, descending stairs, and ascending stairs, respectively. DEA models predicted higher peak contact stresses (9.8-13.6 MPa) and average contact stresses (3.0-3.7 MPa) than FEA (6.2-9.8 and 2.0-2.5 MPa, respectively). DEA overestimated stresses due to the absence of the Poisson's effect and a direct contact interface between cartilage layers. Nevertheless, DEA predicted realistic contact patterns when subject-specific bone geometry and cartilage thickness were used. This DEA method may have application as an alternative to FEA for pre-operative planning of joint-preserving surgery such as acetabular reorientation during peri-acetabular osteotomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An adaptive grid scheme using the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Munipalli, R.; Anderson, D.A.

    1996-09-01

    A technique to solve the Poisson grid generation equations by Green`s function related methods has been proposed, with the source terms being purely position dependent. The use of distributed singularities in the flow domain coupled with the boundary element method (BEM) formulation is presented in this paper as a natural extension of the Green`s function method. This scheme greatly simplifies the adaption process. The BEM reduces the dimensionality of the given problem by one. Internal grid-point placement can be achieved for a given boundary distribution by adding continuous and discrete source terms in the BEM formulation. A distribution of vortex doublets is suggested as a means of controlling grid-point placement and grid-line orientation. Examples for sample adaption problems are presented and discussed. 15 refs., 20 figs.

  11. Adaptive 6-DoF Haptic Contact Stiffness Using the Gauss Map.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyi; Barbic, Jernej

    2016-04-25

    The penalty method is a popular approach to resolving contact in haptic rendering. In simulations involving complex distributed contact, there are, however, many simultaneous individual contacts. These contacts have normals pointing in several directions, many of which may be parallel, causing the stiffness effectively to add up in a temporally highly-varying and unpredictable way. Consequently, penalty-based simulation suffers from stability problems. Previous methods tackled this problem using implicit integration, or simply by scaling the stiffness down globally by the number of contacts. Although this provides some control over the net stiffness, it leads to large penetrations, as small contacts are effectively ignored when compared to larger contacts. We propose an adaptive stiffness method that employs the Gauss map of the normal distribution to ensure a spatially uniform and controllable stiffness in all the contact directions. Combined with virtual coupling saturation, the penetration can be kept shallow all the while haptic simulation remains stable, even for large-scale complex geometry with complex distributed 6-DoF contact scenarios. Our method is fast and can be applied to any penalty-based formulation between rigid objects. While used primarily for rigid objects, we also apply our method to reduced deformable objects. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach on several challenging 6-DoF haptic rendering scenarios, such as car engine and landing gear virtual assembly.

  12. An hp-adaptive finite element/boundary element coupling method for electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E. P.; Maischak, M.; Leydecker, F.

    2007-04-01

    We present an hp-version of the finite element / boundary element coupling method to solve the eddy current problem for the time-harmonic Maxwell’s equations. We use H(curl, Ω -conforming vector-valued polynomials to approximate the electric field in the conductor Ω and surface curls of continuous piecewise polynomials on the boundary Γ of Ω to approximate the twisted tangential trace of the magnetic field on Γ. We present both a priori and a posteriori error estimates together with a three-fold hp-adaptive algorithm to compute the fem/bem coupling solution with appropriate distributions of polynomial degrees on suitably refined meshes.

  13. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  14. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  15. A Parallel Multigrid Method for the Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical Contact

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J D; Parsons, I D

    2002-03-21

    A geometrical multigrid method for solving the linearized matrix equations arising from node-on-face three-dimensional finite element contact is described. The development of an efficient implementation of this combination that minimizes both the memory requirements and the computational cost requires careful construction and storage of the portion of the coarse mesh stiffness matrices that are associated with the contact stiffness on the fine mesh. The multigrid contact algorithm is parallelized in a manner suitable for distributed memory architectures: results are presented that demonstrates the scheme's scalability. The solution of a large contact problem derived from an analysis of the factory joints present in the Space Shuttle reusable solid rocket motor demonstrates the usefulness of the general approach.

  16. A constitutive law for finite element contact problems with unclassical friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesha, M. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for modeling complex, unclassical contact-friction problems arising in solid and structural mechanics are discussed. A constitutive modeling concept is employed whereby analytic relations between increments of contact surface stress (i.e., traction) and contact surface deformation (i.e., relative displacement) are developed. Because of the incremental form of these relations, they are valid for arbitrary load-deformation histories. The motivation for the development of such a constitutive law is that more realistic friction idealizations can be implemented in finite element analysis software in a consistent, straightforward manner. Of particular interest is modeling of two-body (i.e., unlubricated) metal-metal, ceramic-ceramic, and metal-ceramic contact. Interfaces involving ceramics are of engineering importance and are being considered for advanced turbine engines in which higher temperature materials offer potential for higher engine fuel efficiency.

  17. Spherical gearing with intermediate ball elements: parameter ranges with a high contact ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, M. V.; Gorbenko, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents analytical research of the geometry and kinematical parameters of spherical gearing with ball intermediate elements. The main attention is paid to the influence of the offset coefficient on the tooth geometry generation, the contact ratio and the motion transmission angle. Intermediate ball element racetracks on the gear are trochoidal curves on a spherical surface. Two areas for the offset coefficient values providing a high value of the contact ratio – basic trochoid (without offset) and prolate trochoid with abutting racetracks of adjacent ball elements ― were revealed. Analysis of the investigated parameters showed that for power transmission, it is preferable to use spherical gearing without an offset, and for kinematic transmission, it is possible to use profiles with a large offset. The present study allows making a rational choice of geometrical parameters depending on the transmission predestination.

  18. Accelerated evolution of constraint elements for hematophagic adaptation in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Ming-Shan; ADEOLA, Adeniyi C.; LI, Yan; ZHANG, Ya-Ping; WU, Dong-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a powerful approach that comprehensively interprets the genome. Herein, we performed whole genome comparative analysis of 16 Diptera genomes, including four mosquitoes and 12 Drosophilae. We found more than 540 000 constraint elements (CEs) in the Diptera genome, with the majority found in the intergenic, coding and intronic regions. Accelerated elements (AEs) identified in mosquitoes were mostly in the protein-coding regions (>93%), which differs from vertebrates in genomic distribution. Some genes functionally enriched in blood digestion, body temperature regulation and insecticide resistance showed rapid evolution not only in the lineage of the recent common ancestor of mosquitoes (RCAM), but also in some mosquito lineages. This may be associated with lineage-specific traits and/or adaptations in comparison with other insects. Our findings revealed that although universally fast evolution acted on biological systems in RCAM, such as hematophagy, same adaptations also appear to have occurred through distinct degrees of evolution in different mosquito species, enabling them to be successful blood feeders in different environments. PMID:26646568

  19. Accelerated evolution of constraint elements for hematophagic adaptation in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Shan; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Wu, Dong-Dong

    2015-11-18

    Comparative genomics is a powerful approach that comprehensively interprets the genome. Herein, we performed whole genome comparative analysis of 16 Diptera genomes, including four mosquitoes and 12 Drosophilae. We found more than 540 000 constraint elements (CEs) in the Diptera genome, with the majority found in the intergenic, coding and intronic regions. Accelerated elements (AEs) identified in mosquitoes were mostly in the protein-coding regions (>93%), which differs from vertebrates in genomic distribution. Some genes functionally enriched in blood digestion, body temperature regulation and insecticide resistance showed rapid evolution not only in the lineage of the recent common ancestor of mosquitoes (RCAM), but also in some mosquito lineages. This may be associated with lineage-specific traits and/or adaptations in comparison with other insects. Our findings revealed that although universally fast evolution acted on biological systems in RCAM, such as hematophagy, same adaptations also appear to have occurred through distinct degrees of evolution in different mosquito species, enabling them to be successful blood feeders in different environments.

  20. Finite element prediction of cartilage contact stresses in normal human hips.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael D; Anderson, Andrew E; Henak, Corinne R; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-01

    Our objectives were to determine cartilage contact stress during walking, stair climbing, and descending stairs in a well-defined group of normal volunteers and to assess variations in contact stress and area among subjects and across loading scenarios. Ten volunteers without history of hip pain or disease with normal lateral center-edge angle and acetabular index were selected. Computed tomography imaging with contrast was performed on one hip. Bone and cartilage surfaces were segmented from volumetric image data, and subject-specific finite element models were constructed and analyzed using a validated protocol. Acetabular contact stress and area were determined for seven activities. Peak stress ranged from 7.52±2.11 MPa for heel-strike during walking (233% BW) to 8.66 ± 3.01 MPa for heel-strike during descending stairs (261% BW). Average contact area across all activities was 34% of the surface area of the acetabular cartilage. The distribution of contact stress was highly non-uniform, and more variability occurred among subjects for a given activity than among activities for a single subject. The magnitude and area of contact stress were consistent between activities, although inter-activity shifts in contact pattern were found as the direction of loading changed. Relatively small incongruencies between the femoral and acetabular cartilage had a large effect on the contact stresses. These effects tended to persist across all simulated activities. These results demonstrate the diversity and trends in cartilage contact stress in healthy hips during activities of daily living and provide a basis for future comparisons between normal and pathologic hips. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. Adaptive Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Elements in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Yeon; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2007-01-01

    Conserved noncoding elements (CNCs) are an abundant feature of vertebrate genomes. Some CNCs have been shown to act as cis-regulatory modules, but the function of most CNCs remains unclear. To study the evolution of CNCs, we have developed a statistical method called the “shared rates test” to identify CNCs that show significant variation in substitution rates across branches of a phylogenetic tree. We report an application of this method to alignments of 98,910 CNCs from the human, chimpanzee, dog, mouse, and rat genomes. We find that ∼68% of CNCs evolve according to a null model where, for each CNC, a single parameter models the level of constraint acting throughout the phylogeny linking these five species. The remaining ∼32% of CNCs show departures from the basic model including speed-ups and slow-downs on particular branches and occasionally multiple rate changes on different branches. We find that a subset of the significant CNCs have evolved significantly faster than the local neutral rate on a particular branch, providing strong evidence for adaptive evolution in these CNCs. The distribution of these signals on the phylogeny suggests that adaptive evolution of CNCs occurs in occasional short bursts of evolution. Our analyses suggest a large set of promising targets for future functional studies of adaptation. PMID:17845075

  2. Ulna-humerus contact mechanics: Finite element analysis and experimental measurements using a tactile pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Renani, Mohsen Sharifi; Rahman, Munsur; Cil, Akin; Stylianou, Antonis P

    2017-09-07

    Elbow articular cartilage withstands high compressive and shear forces while protecting the bone from excessive loading. Better understanding of elbow cartilage contact mechanics can provide insight into cartilage degeneration. In this study a tactile pressure sensor was used to measure the contact pressure distribution within the ulno-humeral joint of two cadaver specimens at 20° flexion angle across three different axial loads of 80 N, 110 N, and 140 N. Corresponding 3D finite element (FE) models were constructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and contact analysis was performed for each specimen with boundary and loading conditions identical to the experiment. Direct comparison between FE results and experimental measurements was conducted for the validation of the FE models and a sensitivity analysis was employed for assessing the effect of cartilage parameters on the model's outputs. The results showed a good agreement between the FE models and the experiments in terms of contact characteristics. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated that outcomes of the model, particularly peak contact pressure is more sensitive to the Poisson's ratio rather than to Young's modulus under static conditions. This result suggests that selection of Poisson's ratio is very critical for accurate prediction of contact mechanics within the ulno-humeral joint. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 3-D finite element cyclic symmetric and contact stress analysis for a complete gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zeyong; Xu, Youliang; Gao, Xiangqun; Wei, Gang

    1992-10-01

    A complete gear train of a reduction gearbox is the object of finite element stress analysis. One of the basic segments of the complete gear train is taken as the computational model in the light of the cyclic symmetry of the gear train; meanwhile, the contact transmission forces between the corresponding meshed teeth are considered in the analysis of the model. For simplicity, the corresponding meshed lines are used instead of the actual contact surfaces. Both torque and centrifugal loads are involved in the analysis. The stresses in all the parts of a complete gear train can be determined by one analysis. The computed results show that the contact force on a meshed tooth is correlative not only to the length of the meshed line, but also to its position. It is shown that the neglect of the stress resulted from centrifugal load is inappropriate to a high speed gear train.

  4. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  5. Adaptive multi-analysis strategy for contact problems with friction. Application to aerospace bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champaney, L.; Boucard, P.-A.; Guinard, S.

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to develop an efficient strategy for the parametric analysis of bolted joints designed for aerospace applications. These joints are used in elastic structural assemblies with local nonlinearities (such as unilateral contact with friction) under quasi-static loading. Our approach is based on a decomposition of an assembly into substructures (representing the parts) and interfaces (representing the connections). The problem within each substructure is solved by the finite element method, while an iterative scheme based on the LATIN method (Ladevèze in Nonlinear computational structural mechanics—new approaches and non-incremental methods of calculation, 1999) is used for the global resolution. The proposed strategy consists in calculating response surfaces (Rajashekhar and Ellingwood in Struct Saf 12:205-220, 1993) such that each point of a surface is associated with a design configuration. Each design configuration corresponds to a set of values of all the variable parameters (friction coefficients, prestresses) which are introduced into the mechanical analysis. Here, instead of carrying out a full calculation for each point of the surface, we propose to use the capabilities of the LATIN method and reutilize the solution of one problem (for one set of parameters) in order to solve similar problems (for the other sets of parameters) (Boucard and Champaney in Int J Numer Methods Eng 57:1259-1281, 2003). The strategy is adaptive in the sense that it takes into account the results of the previous calculations. The method presented can be used for several types of nonlinear problems requiring multiple analyses: for example, it has already been used for structural identification (Allix and Vidal in Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 191:2727-2758, 2001).

  6. Reliability Optimization Design for Contact Springs of AC Contactors Based on Adaptive Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sheng; Su, Xiuping; Wu, Ziran; Xu, Chengwen

    The paper illustrates the procedure of reliability optimization modeling for contact springs of AC contactors under nonlinear multi-constraint conditions. The adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is utilized to perform reliability optimization on the contact spring parameters of a type of AC contactor. A method that changes crossover and mutation rates at different times in the AGA can effectively avoid premature convergence, and experimental tests are performed after optimization. The experimental result shows that the mass of each optimized spring is reduced by 16.2%, while the reliability increases to 99.9% from 94.5%. The experimental result verifies the correctness and feasibility of this reliability optimization designing method.

  7. On the contact treatment of non-convex particles in the granular element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Keng-Wit; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Andrade, José E.

    2014-09-01

    We present a new contact algorithm that endows the granular element method [1] with the ability to model non-convex particles using non-uniform rational basis splines. This significant extension allows for the representation of particle morphological features, namely, sphericity and angularity, to their fullest extent, with local contact rolling resistance and interlocking emanating directly from grain geometry. Both particle elasticity and friction at the contact level are treated implicitly and simultaneously, and the contact algorithm is cast into a mathematical programming-based contact dynamics framework. The framework provides the advantages of implicit time integrators (for e.g., stability and larger time steps) and ability to handle both rigid and highly stiff particles. By allowing for particle non-convexity, modeling flexibility is significantly enhanced, to a level that is comparable with isogeometric methods. As such, the transition from image data to particle shapes is greatly streamlined. More importantly, increased macroscopic strength in granular packings comprising of non-convex particles is fully captured. All the above capabilities are achieved under a very modest implementation effort.

  8. On Foundations of Discrete Element Analysis of Contact in Diarthrodial Joints

    PubMed Central

    Volokh, K. Y.; Chao, E. Y. S.; Armand, M.

    2009-01-01

    Information about the stress distribution on contact surfaces of adjacent bones is indispensable for analysis of arthritis, bone fracture and remodeling. Numerical solution of the contact problem based on the classical approaches of solid mechanics is sophisticated and time-consuming. However, the solution can be essentially simplified on the following physical grounds. The bone contact surfaces are covered with a layer of articular cartilage, which is a soft tissue as compared to the hard bone. The latter allows ignoring the bone compliance in analysis of the contact problem, i.e. rigid bones are considered to interact through a compliant cartilage. Moreover, cartilage shear stresses and strains can be ignored because of the negligible friction between contacting cartilage layers. Thus, the cartilage can be approximated by a set of unilateral compressive springs normal to the bone surface. The forces in the springs can be computed from the equilibrium equations iteratively accounting for the changing contact area. This is the essence of the discrete element analysis (DEA). Despite the success in applications of DEA to various bone contact problems, its classical formulation required experimental validation because the springs approximating the cartilage were assumed linear while the real articular cartilage exhibited non-linear mechanical response in reported tests. Recent experimental results of Ateshian and his co-workers allow for revisiting the classical DEA formulation and establishing the limits of its applicability. In the present work, it is shown that the linear spring model is remarkably valid within a wide range of large deformations of the cartilage. It is also shown how to extend the classical DEA to the case of strong non-linearity if necessary. PMID:17937111

  9. 3D Finite Element Trajectory Code with Adaptive Meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Bauer, Andy; Shephard, Mark; Beal, Mark; Tran, Hien

    2004-11-01

    Beam Optics Analysis, a new, 3D charged particle program is available and in use for the design of complex, 3D electron guns and charged particle devices. The code reads files directly from most CAD and solid modeling programs, includes an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI), and a robust mesh generator that is fully automatic. Complex problems can be set up, and analysis initiated in minutes. The program includes a user-friendly post processor for displaying field and trajectory data using 3D plots and images. The electrostatic solver is based on the standard nodal finite element method. The magnetostatic field solver is based on the vector finite element method and is also called during the trajectory simulation process to solve for self magnetic fields. The user imports the geometry from essentially any commercial CAD program and uses the GUI to assign parameters (voltages, currents, dielectric constant) and designate emitters (including work function, emitter temperature, and number of trajectories). The the mesh is generated automatically and analysis is performed, including mesh adaptation to improve accuracy and optimize computational resources. This presentation will provide information on the basic structure of the code, its operation, and it's capabilities.

  10. Adaptive Network Dynamics - Modeling and Control of Time-Dependent Social Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.; Shkarayev, Maxim S.

    2013-01-01

    Real networks consisting of social contacts do not possess static connections. That is, social connections may be time dependent due to a variety of individual behavioral decisions based on current network connections. Examples of adaptive networks occur in epidemics, where information about infectious individuals may change the rewiring of healthy people, or in the recruitment of individuals to a cause or fad, where rewiring may optimize recruitment of susceptible individuals. In this paper, we will review some of the dynamical properties of adaptive networks, and show how they predict novel phenomena as well as yield insight into new controls. The applications will be control of epidemic outbreaks and terrorist recruitment modeling. PMID:25414913

  11. Overcoming element quality dependence of finite elements with adaptive extended stencil FEM (AES-FEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Rebecca; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-11-01

    The finite element methods (FEM) are important techniques in engineering for solving partial differential equations, but they depend heavily on element shape quality for stability and good performance. In this paper, we introduce the Adaptive Extended Stencil Finite Element Method (AES-FEM) as a means for overcoming this dependence on element shape quality. Our method replaces the traditional basis functions with a set of generalized Lagrange polynomial (GLP) basis functions, which we construct using local weighted least-squares approximations. The method preserves the theoretical framework of FEM, and allows imposing essential boundary conditions and integrating the stiffness matrix in the same way as the classical FEM. In addition, AES-FEM can use higher-degree polynomial basis functions than the classical FEM, while virtually preserving the sparsity pattern of the stiffness matrix. We describe the formulation and implementation of AES-FEM, and analyze its consistency and stability. We present numerical experiments in both 2D and 3D for the Poison equation and a time-independent convection-diffusion equation. The numerical results demonstrate that AES-FEM is more accurate than linear FEM, is also more efficient than linear FEM in terms of error versus runtime, and enables much better stability and faster convergence of iterative solvers than linear FEM over poor-quality meshes

  12. Human exposure to trace elements through the skin by direct contact with clothing: Risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L.

    2015-07-15

    Metals in textile products and clothing are used for many purposes, such as metal complex dyes, pigments, mordant, catalyst in synthetic fabrics manufacture, synergists of flame retardants, antimicrobials, or as water repellents and odour-preventive agents. When present in textile materials, heavy metals may mean a potential danger to human health. In the present study, the concentrations of a number of elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn) were determined in skin-contact clothes. Analysed clothes were made of different materials, colours, and brands. Interestingly, we found high levels of Cr in polyamide dark clothes (605 mg/kg), high Sb concentrations in polyester clothes (141 mg/kg), and great Cu levels in some green cotton fabrics (around 280 mg/kg). Dermal contact exposure and human health risks for adult males, adult females, and for <1-year-old children were assessed. Non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were below safe (HQ<1) and acceptable (<10{sup −6}) limits, respectively, according to international standards. However, for Sb, non-carcinogenic risk was above 10% of the safety limit (HQ>0.1) for dermal contact with clothes. - Highlights: • We determined in skin-contact clothes the concentrations of a number of metals. • Dermal contact exposure and health risks for adults and for 1-year-old children were assessed. • Carcinogenic risks were considered as acceptable (<10{sup −6}). • For non-carcinogenic risks, only Sb exceeded a 10% of the HQ for dermal contact with clothes.

  13. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  14. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  15. Frictional unilateral contact for hemitropic solids in micropolar elasticity and boundary element approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    This contribution deals with unilateral contact problems with Tresca friction (given friction model) in hemitropic mi-cropolar elasticity. Based on a boundary integral approach such problems can be reduced to boundary variational inequalities. This suggests the use of boundary element methods for their numerical treatment. With higher order approximation this leads to a nonconforming approximation what can numerically be realized by means of Gauss-Lobatto quadrature. The contribution is based on the recent papers [7, 8] of the author and on joint work [3] with A. Gachechiladze, R. Gachechi-ladze, and D. Natroshvili.

  16. Effects of idealized joint geometry on finite element predictions of cartilage contact stresses in the hip.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Andrew E; Ellis, Benjamin J; Maas, Steve A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2010-05-07

    Computational models may have the ability to quantify the relationship between hip morphology, cartilage mechanics and osteoarthritis. Most models have assumed the hip joint to be a perfect ball and socket joint and have neglected deformation at the bone-cartilage interface. The objective of this study was to analyze finite element (FE) models of hip cartilage mechanics with varying degrees of simplified geometry and a model with a rigid bone material assumption to elucidate the effects on predictions of cartilage stress. A previously validated subject-specific FE model of a cadaveric hip joint was used as the basis for the models. Geometry for the bone-cartilage interface was either: (1) subject-specific (i.e. irregular), (2) spherical, or (3) a rotational conchoid. Cartilage was assigned either a varying (irregular) or constant thickness (smoothed). Loading conditions simulated walking, stair-climbing and descending stairs. FE predictions of contact stress for the simplified models were compared with predictions from the subject-specific model. Both spheres and conchoids provided a good approximation of native hip joint geometry (average fitting error approximately 0.5mm). However, models with spherical/conchoid bone geometry and smoothed articulating cartilage surfaces grossly underestimated peak and average contact pressures (50% and 25% lower, respectively) and overestimated contact area when compared to the subject-specific FE model. Models incorporating subject-specific bone geometry with smoothed articulating cartilage also underestimated pressures and predicted evenly distributed patterns of contact. The model with rigid bones predicted much higher pressures than the subject-specific model with deformable bones. The results demonstrate that simplifications to the geometry of the bone-cartilage interface, cartilage surface and bone material properties can have a dramatic effect on the predicted magnitude and distribution of cartilage contact pressures in

  17. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  18. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  19. Non-contact high precision measurement of surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Ying

    2010-10-01

    The traditional contact measuring methods could not satisfy the current optical elements measuring requirements. Noncontact high precision measuring theory, principle and instrument of the surface form tolerances and central thickness for optical elements were studied in the paper. In comparison with other types of interferometers, such as Twyman-Green and Mach-Zehnder, a Fizeau interferometer has the advantages of having fewer optical components, greater accuracy, and is easier to use. Some relations among the 3/A(B/C), POWER/PV and N/ΔN were studied. The PV with POWER removed can be the reference number of ΔN. The chromatic longitudinal aberration of a special optical probe can be used for non-contanct central thickness measurement.

  20. A contact detection algorithm for deformable tetrahedral geometries based on a novel approach for general simplices used in the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stühler, Sven; Fleissner, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We present an extended particle model for the discrete element method that on the one hand is tetrahedral in shape and on the other hand is capable to describe deformations. The deformations of the tetrahedral particles require a framework to interrelate the particle strains and resulting stresses. Hence, adaptations from the finite element method were used. This allows to link the two methods and to adequately describe material and simulation parameters separately in each scope. Due to the complexity arising of the non-spherical tetrahedral geometry, all possible contact combinations of vertices, edges, and surfaces must be considered by the used contact detection algorithm. The deformations of the particles make the contact evaluation even more challenging. Therefore, a robust contact detection algorithm based on an optimization approach that exploits temporal coherence is presented. This algorithm is suitable for general {R}^{{n}} simplices. An evaluation of the robustness of this algorithm is performed using a numerical example. In order to create complex geometries, bonds between these deformable particles are introduced. This coupling via the tetrahedra faces allows the simulation bonding of deformable bodies composed of several particles. Numerical examples are presented and validated with results that are obtained by the same simulation setup modeled with the finite element method. The intention of using these bonds is to be able to model fracture and material failure. Therefore, the bonds between the particles are not lasting and feature a release mechanism based on a predefined criterion.

  1. Learning to push and learning to move: the adaptive control of contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Maura; Pressman, Assaf; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2015-01-01

    To be successful at manipulating objects one needs to apply simultaneously well controlled movements and contact forces. We present a computational theory of how the brain may successfully generate a vast spectrum of interactive behaviors by combining two independent processes. One process is competent to control movements in free space and the other is competent to control contact forces against rigid constraints. Free space and rigid constraints are singularities at the boundaries of a continuum of mechanical impedance. Within this continuum, forces and motions occur in “compatible pairs” connected by the equations of Newtonian dynamics. The force applied to an object determines its motion. Conversely, inverse dynamics determine a unique force trajectory from a movement trajectory. In this perspective, we describe motor learning as a process leading to the discovery of compatible force/motion pairs. The learned compatible pairs constitute a local representation of the environment's mechanics. Experiments on force field adaptation have already provided us with evidence that the brain is able to predict and compensate the forces encountered when one is attempting to generate a motion. Here, we tested the theory in the dual case, i.e., when one attempts at applying a desired contact force against a simulated rigid surface. If the surface becomes unexpectedly compliant, the contact point moves as a function of the applied force and this causes the applied force to deviate from its desired value. We found that, through repeated attempts at generating the desired contact force, subjects discovered the unique compatible hand motion. When, after learning, the rigid contact was unexpectedly restored, subjects displayed after effects of learning, consistent with the concurrent operation of a motion control system and a force control system. Together, theory and experiment support a new and broader view of modularity in the coordinated control of forces and motions

  2. Learning to push and learning to move: the adaptive control of contact forces.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Pressman, Assaf; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2015-01-01

    To be successful at manipulating objects one needs to apply simultaneously well controlled movements and contact forces. We present a computational theory of how the brain may successfully generate a vast spectrum of interactive behaviors by combining two independent processes. One process is competent to control movements in free space and the other is competent to control contact forces against rigid constraints. Free space and rigid constraints are singularities at the boundaries of a continuum of mechanical impedance. Within this continuum, forces and motions occur in "compatible pairs" connected by the equations of Newtonian dynamics. The force applied to an object determines its motion. Conversely, inverse dynamics determine a unique force trajectory from a movement trajectory. In this perspective, we describe motor learning as a process leading to the discovery of compatible force/motion pairs. The learned compatible pairs constitute a local representation of the environment's mechanics. Experiments on force field adaptation have already provided us with evidence that the brain is able to predict and compensate the forces encountered when one is attempting to generate a motion. Here, we tested the theory in the dual case, i.e., when one attempts at applying a desired contact force against a simulated rigid surface. If the surface becomes unexpectedly compliant, the contact point moves as a function of the applied force and this causes the applied force to deviate from its desired value. We found that, through repeated attempts at generating the desired contact force, subjects discovered the unique compatible hand motion. When, after learning, the rigid contact was unexpectedly restored, subjects displayed after effects of learning, consistent with the concurrent operation of a motion control system and a force control system. Together, theory and experiment support a new and broader view of modularity in the coordinated control of forces and motions.

  3. Design and analysis of Bayesian adaptive crossover trials for evaluating contact lens safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Toubouti, Youssef; Carlin, Bradley P

    2017-06-01

    A crossover study, also referred to as a crossover trial, is a form of longitudinal study. Subjects are randomly assigned to different arms of the study and receive different treatments sequentially. While there are many frequentist methods to analyze data from a crossover study, random effects models for longitudinal data are perhaps most naturally modeled within a Bayesian framework. In this article, we introduce a Bayesian adaptive approach to crossover studies for both efficacy and safety endpoints using Gibbs sampling. Using simulation, we find our approach can detect a true difference between two treatments with a specific false-positive rate that we can readily control via the standard equal-tail posterior credible interval. We then illustrate our Bayesian approaches using real data from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. contact lens studies. We then design a variety of Bayesian adaptive predictive probability crossover studies for single and multiple continuous efficacy endpoints, indicate their extension to binary safety endpoints, and investigate their frequentist operating characteristics via simulation. The Bayesian adaptive approach emerges as a crossover trials tool that is useful yet surprisingly overlooked to date, particularly in contact lens development.

  4. Human exposure to trace elements through the skin by direct contact with clothing: Risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2015-07-01

    Metals in textile products and clothing are used for many purposes, such as metal complex dyes, pigments, mordant, catalyst in synthetic fabrics manufacture, synergists of flame retardants, antimicrobials, or as water repellents and odour-preventive agents. When present in textile materials, heavy metals may mean a potential danger to human health. In the present study, the concentrations of a number of elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn) were determined in skin-contact clothes. Analysed clothes were made of different materials, colours, and brands. Interestingly, we found high levels of Cr in polyamide dark clothes (605 mg/kg), high Sb concentrations in polyester clothes (141 mg/kg), and great Cu levels in some green cotton fabrics (around 280 mg/kg). Dermal contact exposure and human health risks for adult males, adult females, and for <1-year-old children were assessed. Non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks were below safe (HQ<1) and acceptable (<10(-6)) limits, respectively, according to international standards. However, for Sb, non-carcinogenic risk was above 10% of the safety limit (HQ>0.1) for dermal contact with clothes.

  5. A numerical contact algorithm in saturated porous media with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoei, A. R.; Vahab, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled hydro-mechanical formulation is developed for deformable porous media subjected to crack interfaces in the framework of extended finite element method. Governing equations of the porous medium consist of the momentum balance of the bulk together with the momentum balance and continuity equations of the fluid phase, known as [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] formulation. The discontinuity in fractured porous medium is modeled for both opening and closing modes that results in the fluid flow within the fracture, and/or contact behavior at the crack edges. The fluid flow through the fracture is assumed to be viscous and is modeled by employing the Darcy law in which the permeability of fracture is obtained using the cubic law. The contact condition in fractured porous medium is handled by taking the advantage from two different algorithms of LATIN method and penalty algorithm. The effect of contact on fluid phase is employed by considering no leak-off from/into the porous medium. The nonlinearity of coupled equations produced due to opening and closing modes is carried out using an iterative algorithm in the Newton-Raphson procedure. Finally, several numerical examples are solved to illustrate the performance of proposed X-FEM method for hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous media with opening and closing modes.

  6. Ultrastructural and elemental imaging of biological specimens by soft x-ray contact microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa, B.J.; Hoffman, P. . Dept. of Orthopedics); Warren, J.B. ); Feder, R.; Sayre, D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1980-01-01

    Soft X-ray contact microscopy offers a means of visualizing unstained as well as stained biological materials at better than 6 nm resolution. Soft X-ray imaging depends on differential absorption of incident soft (1--10nm wavelength) X-rays by the endogenous elements within a specimen. The advantages of using soft X-rays for imaging are: (1) reduced specimen damage during exposure; (2) ability to image hydrated specimens at atmospheric pressure; (3) ability to image specimens ranging in thickness from less than 40 nm to as much as 10{mu}m; and (4) ability to map the elemental composition of the specimen through observation of the differential absorption of properly chosen incident x-ray wavelengths. This paper explains the principles of image formation and demonstrates the use of soft X-ray contact microscopy with biological samples which could not readily be imaged in their natural form using conventional electron microscopy methods. Data are also presented on the recognition of compositional features in histochemically treated articular joint tissues. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  8. Simulation of dynamic fracture using peridynamics, finite element modeling, and contact.

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John

    2010-11-01

    Peridynamics is a nonlocal extension of classical solid mechanics that allows for the modeling of bodies in which discontinuities occur spontaneously. Because the peridynamic expression for the balance of linear momentum does not contain spatial derivatives and is instead based on an integral equation, it is well suited for modeling phenomena involving spatial discontinuities such as crack formation and fracture. In this study, both peridynamics and classical finite element analysis are applied to simulate material response under dynamic blast loading conditions. A combined approach is utilized in which the portion of the simulation modeled with peridynamics interacts with the finite element portion of the model via a contact algorithm. The peridynamic portion of the analysis utilizes an elastic-plastic constitutive model with linear hardening. The peridynamic interface to the constitutive model is based on the calculation of an approximate deformation gradient, requiring the suppression of possible zero-energy modes. The classical finite element portion of the model utilizes a Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Simulation results are validated by direct comparison to expanding tube experiments. The coupled modeling approach successfully captures material response at the surface of the tube and the emerging fracture pattern. The coupling of peridynamics and finite element analysis via a contact algorithm has been shown to be a viable means for simulating material fracture in a high-velocity impact experiment. A combined peridynamics/finite element approach was applied to model an expanding tube experiment performed by Vogler, et al., in which loading on the tube is a result of Lexan slugs impacting inside the tube. The Lexan portion of the simulation was modeled with finite elements and a Johnson-Cook elastic-plastic material model in conjunction with an equation-of-state law. The steel tube portion of the simulation was modeled with peridynamics, an elastic

  9. Mechanical performance of physical-contact, multi-fiber optical connectors: Finite element analysis and semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Esteban B.; Tran, Hieu V.; Kobyakov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis of physical-contact, multi-fiber optical connector was used to characterize fiber-to-fiber contact and support the development and validation of a semi-analytical model (SAM) for the contact force. This contact behavior is determined by the elastic deformation of the system components (ferrule, fibers, and bonding adhesive) and the classical Hertzian contact at the fiber tips - effects that ultimately define the axial compliance of the system. Two 3-D finite element models for a 12-fiber connector are constructed to study the contact of two connectors, and the specific numerical simulations are carried out to generate input data to SAM, confirm the main assumptions made in its development, and numerically validate the predictions for the contact force. These simulations mainly consider non-uniform fiber height profiles and different end-face fiber tip geometries characterized by their radius of curvature. The numerically validated SAM is then used to study some performance aspects of multi-fiber connectors as related to the required contact force, namely, finding fiber height profiles that require minimum contact force and evaluating the throughput of polishing processes assuming a target contact force. Predictions are supported by Monte Carlo simulations and associated with current profile geometry metrics.

  10. High-speed adaptive contact-mode atomic force microscopy imaging with near-minimum-force.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an adaptive contact-mode imaging approach is proposed to replace the traditional contact-mode imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. The speed of the traditional contact-mode imaging is largely limited by the need to maintain precision tracking of the sample topography over the entire imaged sample surface, while large image distortion and excessive probe-sample interaction force occur during high-speed imaging. In this work, first, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification. Second, the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next-line topography is integrated to the topography feeedback loop to enhance the sample topography tracking. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated through imaging a calibration sample of square pitches at both high speeds (e.g., scan rate of 75 Hz and 130 Hz) and large sizes (e.g., scan size of 30 μm and 80 μm). The experimental results show that compared to the traditional constant-force contact-mode imaging, the imaging speed can be increased by over 30 folds (with the scanning speed at 13 mm/s), and the probe-sample interaction force can be reduced by more than 15% while maintaining the same image quality.

  11. High-speed adaptive contact-mode atomic force microscopy imaging with near-minimum-force

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, an adaptive contact-mode imaging approach is proposed to replace the traditional contact-mode imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. The speed of the traditional contact-mode imaging is largely limited by the need to maintain precision tracking of the sample topography over the entire imaged sample surface, while large image distortion and excessive probe-sample interaction force occur during high-speed imaging. In this work, first, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification. Second, the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next-line topography is integrated to the topography feeedback loop to enhance the sample topography tracking. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated through imaging a calibration sample of square pitches at both high speeds (e.g., scan rate of 75 Hz and 130 Hz) and large sizes (e.g., scan size of 30 μm and 80 μm). The experimental results show that compared to the traditional constant-force contact-mode imaging, the imaging speed can be increased by over 30 folds (with the scanning speed at 13 mm/s), and the probe-sample interaction force can be reduced by more than 15% while maintaining the same image quality.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Folded Airbag in Frontal Impact of Adapted Vehicles for Disabled Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiá, J.; Eixerés, B.; Dols, J. F.; Esquerdo, T. V.

    2009-11-01

    The car control adaptations are used in vehicles in order to facilitate the driving to persons with physical handicaps. This does not have to suppose a decrease of the passive safety that is required to the vehicles. In order to analyze this relation there will be characterized the different control adaptations that are in use together with the different devices of passive safety that can be mounted in the vehicles in diverse cases of impact in order to generate models of simulation. The methodology used to generate this simulation consists of the first phase in which there develops the three-dimensional model of the driving place. For it, there has been used a commercial software of three-dimensional design. Once realized this one divides, the model is imported to the finite elements software in which meshing is generated. Finally, dynamic simulation software is used to assign the most important characteristics like material properties, contact interfaces, gas expansion models, airbag fold types, etc.

  13. An adaptive Kalman filter approach for cardiorespiratory signal extraction and fusion of non-contacting sensors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracting cardiorespiratory signals from non-invasive and non-contacting sensor arrangements, i.e. magnetic induction sensors, is a challenging task. The respiratory and cardiac signals are mixed on top of a large and time-varying offset and are likely to be disturbed by measurement noise. Basic filtering techniques fail to extract relevant information for monitoring purposes. Methods We present a real-time filtering system based on an adaptive Kalman filter approach that separates signal offsets, respiratory and heart signals from three different sensor channels. It continuously estimates respiration and heart rates, which are fed back into the system model to enhance performance. Sensor and system noise covariance matrices are automatically adapted to the aimed application, thus improving the signal separation capabilities. We apply the filtering to two different subjects with different heart rates and sensor properties and compare the results to the non-adaptive version of the same Kalman filter. Also, the performance, depending on the initialization of the filters, is analyzed using three different configurations ranging from best to worst case. Results Extracted data are compared with reference heart rates derived from a standard pulse-photoplethysmographic sensor and respiration rates from a flowmeter. In the worst case for one of the subjects the adaptive filter obtains mean errors (standard deviations) of -0.2 min −1 (0.3 min −1) and -0.7 bpm (1.7 bpm) (compared to -0.2 min −1 (0.4 min −1) and 42.0 bpm (6.1 bpm) for the non-adaptive filter) for respiration and heart rate, respectively. In bad conditions the heart rate is only correctly measurable when the Kalman matrices are adapted to the target sensor signals. Also, the reduced mean error between the extracted offset and the raw sensor signal shows that adapting the Kalman filter continuously improves the ability to separate the desired signals from the raw sensor data. The average

  14. An adaptive Kalman filter approach for cardiorespiratory signal extraction and fusion of non-contacting sensors.

    PubMed

    Foussier, Jerome; Teichmann, Daniel; Jia, Jing; Misgeld, Berno; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2014-05-09

    Extracting cardiorespiratory signals from non-invasive and non-contacting sensor arrangements, i.e. magnetic induction sensors, is a challenging task. The respiratory and cardiac signals are mixed on top of a large and time-varying offset and are likely to be disturbed by measurement noise. Basic filtering techniques fail to extract relevant information for monitoring purposes. We present a real-time filtering system based on an adaptive Kalman filter approach that separates signal offsets, respiratory and heart signals from three different sensor channels. It continuously estimates respiration and heart rates, which are fed back into the system model to enhance performance. Sensor and system noise covariance matrices are automatically adapted to the aimed application, thus improving the signal separation capabilities. We apply the filtering to two different subjects with different heart rates and sensor properties and compare the results to the non-adaptive version of the same Kalman filter. Also, the performance, depending on the initialization of the filters, is analyzed using three different configurations ranging from best to worst case. Extracted data are compared with reference heart rates derived from a standard pulse-photoplethysmographic sensor and respiration rates from a flowmeter. In the worst case for one of the subjects the adaptive filter obtains mean errors (standard deviations) of -0.2 min(-1) (0.3 min(-1)) and -0.7 bpm (1.7 bpm) (compared to -0.2 min(-1) (0.4 min(-1)) and 42.0 bpm (6.1 bpm) for the non-adaptive filter) for respiration and heart rate, respectively. In bad conditions the heart rate is only correctly measurable when the Kalman matrices are adapted to the target sensor signals. Also, the reduced mean error between the extracted offset and the raw sensor signal shows that adapting the Kalman filter continuously improves the ability to separate the desired signals from the raw sensor data. The average total computational time needed

  15. Dark adaptation time in canine electroretinography using a contact lens electrode with a built-in light source.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Seiya; Itoh, Yoshiki; Hoshino, Sho; Hayashi, Miri; Ito, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dark adaptation time in canine electroretinography (ERG) using a contact lens electrode with a built-in LED. Twelve eyes of six normal laboratory beagle dogs were used and exposed to steady room light at 500 lux for 30 min for light adaption. ERG was recorded at different time points during dark adaptation in sedated and light-adapted beagles. The stimulus intensity was 0.0096 cd/m(2)/sec. The b-wave amplitude increased significantly until 25 min of dark adaptation, whereas no significant changes in amplitudes were observed after 30 min. Dark adaptation for more than 25 min would be necessary for accurate ERG in canine ERG using a contact lens electrode with a built-in LED.

  16. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  17. Finite element analysis of the contact interface between trans-femoral stump and prosthetic socket.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Ling; Zheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Transfemoral amputees need prosthetic devices after amputation surgery, and the interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. The purpose of this study was to build a nonlinear finite element model to investigate the interface pressure between the above-knee residual limb and its prosthetic socket. The model was three-dimensional (3D) with consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. Contact analysis was used to simulate the friction conditions between skin and the socket. The normal stresses up to 80.57 kPa at the distal end of the soft tissue. The longitudinal and circumferential shear stress distributions at the limb-socket interface were also simulated. This study explores the influences of load transfer between trans-femoral residual limb and its prosthetic socket.

  18. Numerical analysis of tire/contact pressure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranoto, Sarwo Edy; Hidayat, Royan; Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Bayuseno, Athanasius P.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between the road surface and vehicle's tire may significantly determine the stability of a vehicle. We could study the tire contact-pressure to road surfaces through a numerical simulation in this present study. In particular, the main purpose of the study was to present an illustration of the effect of the varied loads to the tire, which would affect the contact pressure on the road surface sand stress distribution on the tire by employing a commercial ABAQUS software, based on the finite element method. To make the process of data analysis easier, the tire was assumed to be made from natural rubber which composition consisted of 2 layers of the inner tire and 1 layer of carcass. In pre-conditions, the tire was given air pressure as much as 17 psi, and loads as much as 2 KN, 6 KN, and 10 KN; then, the air pressure was increased to be 30 psi; consequently, the simulation results of stress distribution and deformation on each of loads condition would be acquired. The simulation results indicated that the loads carried by the tire on the vehicle were an important factor to determine the tire-stress profile.

  19. Adaptive mesh strategies for the spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive spectral method was developed for the efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations. Adaptive mesh strategies that include resolution refinement and coarsening by three different methods are illustrated on solutions to the 1-D viscous Burger equation and the 2-D Navier-Stokes equations for driven flow in a cavity. Sharp gradients, singularities, and regions of poor resolution are resolved optimally as they develop in time using error estimators which indicate the choice of refinement to be used. The adaptive formulation presents significant increases in efficiency, flexibility, and general capabilities for high order spectral methods.

  20. Smoothed aggregation adaptive spectral element-based algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-20

    SAAMGE provides parallel methods for building multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for elliptic equations with highly heterogeneous coefficients. Additionally, hierarchy adaptation is implemented allowing solving multiple problems with close coefficients without rebuilding the hierarchy.

  1. Adaptive finite element methods for compressible flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Strouboulis, T.; Devloo, PH.

    1986-01-01

    Some recent work on adaptive FEMs for solving transient Euler equations in two-dimensional domains is summarized. The formulation of an FEM model of the Euler equations is shown, and the application of the adaptive strategies to data management schemes is addressed. Sample numerical results from the application of the model and strategies to the flow over a step and to transient cases are given.

  2. Patient-specific finite element analysis of chronic contact stress exposure after intraarticular fracture of the tibial plafond.

    PubMed

    Li, Wendy; Anderson, Donald D; Goldsworthy, Jane K; Marsh, J Lawrence; Brown, Thomas D

    2008-08-01

    The role of altered contact mechanics in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) following intraarticular fracture remains poorly understood. One proposed etiology is that residual incongruities lead to altered joint contact stresses that, over time, predispose to PTOA. Prevailing joint contact stresses following surgical fracture reduction were quantified in this study using patient-specific contact finite element (FE) analysis. FE models were created for 11 ankle pairs from tibial plafond fracture patients. Both (reduced) fractured ankles and their intact contralaterals were modeled. A sequence of 13 loading instances was used to simulate the stance phase of gait. Contact stresses were summed across loadings in the simulation, weighted by resident time in the gait cycle. This chronic exposure measure, a metric of degeneration propensity, was then compared between intact and fractured ankle pairs. Intact ankles had lower peak contact stress exposures that were more uniform and centrally located. The series-average peak contact stress elevation for fractured ankles was 38% (p = 0.0015; peak elevation was 82%). Fractured ankles had less area with low contact stress exposure than intact ankles and a greater area with high exposure. Chronic contact stress overexposures (stresses exceeding a damage threshold) ranged from near zero to a high of 18 times the matched intact value. The patient-specific FE models represent substantial progress toward elucidating the relationship between altered contact stresses and the outcome of patients treated for intraarticular fractures.

  3. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  4. Implementation of Discrete Element Analysis for Subject-Specific, Population-Wide Investigations of Habitual Contact Stress Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Iyer, Krishna S.; Segal, Neil A.; Lynch, John A.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    There exist no large-series human data linking contact stress exposure to an articular joint’s propensity for developing osteoarthritis because contact stress analysis for large numbers of subjects remains impractical. The speed and simplicity of discrete element analysis (DEA) for estimating contact stresses makes its application to this problem highly attractive, but to date DEA has been used to study only a small numbers of cases. This is because substantial issues regarding its use in population-wide studies have not been addressed. Chief among them are developing fast and robust methods for model derivation and the selection of boundary conditions, establishing accuracy of computed contact stresses, and including capabilities for modeling in-series structural elements (e.g., a meniscus). This article describes an implementation of DEA that makes it feasible to perform subject-specific modeling in articular joints in large population-based studies. PMID:20498493

  5. Selection on outlier loci and their association with adaptive phenotypes in Littorina saxatilis contact zones.

    PubMed

    Hollander, J; Galindo, J; Butlin, R K

    2015-02-01

    A fundamental issue in speciation research is to evaluate phenotypic variation and the genomics driving the evolution of reproductive isolation between sister taxa. Above all, hybrid zones are excellent study systems for researchers to examine the association of genetic differentiation, phenotypic variation and the strength of selection. We investigated two contact zones in the marine gastropod Littorina saxatilis and utilized landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis together with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to assess phenotypic and genomic divergence between ecotypes under divergent selection. From genetic markers, we calculated the cline width, linkage disequilibrium and the average effective selection on a locus. Additionally, we conducted an association analysis linking the outlier loci and phenotypic variation between ecotypes and show that a proportion of outlier loci are associated with key adaptive phenotypic traits.

  6. Rough surface contact analysis by means of the Finite Element Method and of a new reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastrebov, Vladislav A.; Durand, Julian; Proudhon, Henry; Cailletaud, Georges

    2011-07-01

    This article presents two approaches of a normal frictionless mechanical contact between an elastoplastic material and a rigid plane: a full scale finite element analysis (FEA) and a reduced model. Both of them use a representative surface element (RSE) of an experimentally measured surface roughness. The full scale FEA is performed with the Finite Element code Zset using its parallel solver. It provides the reference for the reduced model. The ingredients of the reduced model are a series of responses that are calibrated by means of FEA on a single asperity and phenomenological rules to account for asperity-asperity interaction. The reduced model is able to predict the load-displacement curve, the real contact area and the free volume between the contacting pair during the compression of a rough surface against a rigid plane. The CPU time is a few seconds for the reduced model, instead of a few days for the full FEA.

  7. Local finite element enrichment strategies for 2D contact computations and a corresponding post-processing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Roger A.

    2013-08-01

    Recently an enriched contact finite element formulation has been developed that substantially increases the accuracy of contact computations while keeping the additional numerical effort at a minimum reported by Sauer (Int J Numer Meth Eng, 87: 593-616, 2011). Two enrich-ment strategies were proposed, one based on local p-refinement using Lagrange interpolation and one based on Hermite interpolation that produces C 1-smoothness on the contact surface. Both classes, which were initially considered for the frictionless Signorini problem, are extended here to friction and contact between deformable bodies. For this, a symmetric contact formulation is used that allows the unbiased treatment of both contact partners. This paper also proposes a post-processing scheme for contact quantities like the contact pressure. The scheme, which provides a more accurate representation than the raw data, is based on an averaging procedure that is inspired by mortar formulations. The properties of the enrichment strategies and the corresponding post-processing scheme are illustrated by several numerical examples considering sliding and peeling contact in the presence of large deformations.

  8. Adaptive quadrilateral and triangular finite-element scheme for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Thornton, Earl A.; Bey, Kim S.

    1990-01-01

    The development of an adaptive mesh refinement procedure for analyzing high-speed compressible flows using the finite-element method is described. This new adaptation procedure, which uses both quadrilateral and triangular elements, was implemented with two explicit finite-element algorithms - the two-step Taylor-Galerkin and the multistep Galerkin-Runge-Kutta schemes. A von Neumann stability analysis and a rotating 'cosine hill'problem demonstrate the instability of the Taylor-Galerkin scheme when coupled with the adaptation procedure. For the same adaptive refinement scheme, the Galerkin-Runge-Kutta procedure yields stable solutions within its explicit stability limit. The utility of this new adaptation procedure for the prediction of compressible flow features is illustrated for inviscid problems involving strong shock interactions at hypersonic speeds.

  9. The effect of direct and indirect force transmission on peri-implant bone stress - a contact finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Rand, Annike; Stiesch, Meike; Eisenburger, Michael; Greuling, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    In almost all finite element (FE) studies in dentistry, virtual forces are applied directly to dentures. The purpose of this study was to develop a FE model with non-linear contact simulation using an antagonist as force transmitter and to compare this with a similar model that uses direct force transmission. Furthermore, five contact situations were created in order to examine their influence on the peri-implant bone stresses, which are relevant to the survival rate of implants. It was found that the peri-implant bone stresses were strongly influenced by the kind of force transmission and contact number.

  10. Adaptive implicit-explicit finite element algorithms for fluid mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) approach is presented for the finite-element solution of various problems in computational fluid mechanics. In the AIE approach, the elements are dynamically (adaptively) arranged into differently treated groups. The differences in treatment could be based on considerations such as the cost efficiency, the type of spatial or temporal discretization employed, the choice of field equations, etc. Several numerical tests are performed to demonstrate that this approach can achieve substantial savings in CPU time and memory.

  11. FEMHD: An adaptive finite element method for MHD and edge modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.R.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the code FEMHD, an adaptive finite element MHD code, which is applied in a number of different manners to model MHD behavior and edge plasma phenomena on a diverted tokamak. The code uses an unstructured triangular mesh in 2D and wedge shaped mesh elements in 3D. The code has been adapted to look at neutral and charged particle dynamics in the plasma scrape off region, and into a full MHD-particle code.

  12. Adaptive implicit-explicit finite element algorithms for fluid mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) approach is presented for the finite-element solution of various problems in computational fluid mechanics. In the AIE approach, the elements are dynamically (adaptively) arranged into differently treated groups. The differences in treatment could be based on considerations such as the cost efficiency, the type of spatial or temporal discretization employed, the choice of field equations, etc. Several numerical tests are performed to demonstrate that this approach can achieve substantial savings in CPU time and memory.

  13. An adaptive discontinuous finite element method for the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.; Walter, A.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we introduce a discontinuous finite element method. In our approach, it is possible to combine the advantages of finite element and finite difference methods. The main ingredients are numerical flux approximation and local orthogonal basis functions. The scheme is defined on arbitrary triangulations and two different error indicators are derived. Especially the second one is closely connected to our approach and able to handle arbitrary varying flow directions. Numerical results are given for boundary value problems in two dimensions. They demonstrate the performance of the scheme, combined with the two error indicators.

  14. Analysis and Synthesis of Adaptive Neural Elements and Assembles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    responses. it was necessary to include elements representing recently described excitatory interneurons that elicit slow, decreased-conductance EPSPs ...incorporated into a small neural network and simulations examined the functions of interneurons and the consequences of plasticity at multiple sites. (4...complete model of the circuit underlying this reflex and simulations examined the contributions of additional interneurons and loci for plasticity to

  15. Simulation Experiments with Goal-Seeking Adaptive Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    when it comes to cognition and particularly bad when it comes to remote sensing, goal seeking, adaptation and decision making, where brains excel. In...Erlbaum 1981, 161-187 Hinton, G. E., & Sejnowski, T. J. Analyzing Cooperative Computation. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Conference of the Cognitive ...Algorithms and Applications. Springer-Verlag, 1981. Lenat, D. B., Hayes-Roth, F., Klahr, P. Cognitive economy. Stanford Heuristic Program- ming Project HPP

  16. Analysis and Synthesis of Adaptive Neural Elements and Assemblies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 u,• thc renortc bsurden 4 ,r this collection of Information s estimated to averav i -our...motivational systems can influence behaviors, in part, by acting on motor systems, such as CPGs. Fourth, motor systems possess cellular mechanisms ...motor behaviors are governed by highly adaptive neural networks and help to explain how systems of nerve cells function to produce and modulate

  17. Intra-Articular Knee Contact Force Estimation During Walking Using Force-Reaction Elements and Subject-Specific Joint Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yihwan; Phan, Cong-Bo; Koo, Seungbum

    2016-02-01

    Joint contact forces measured with instrumented knee implants have not only revealed general patterns of joint loading but also showed individual variations that could be due to differences in anatomy and joint kinematics. Musculoskeletal human models for dynamic simulation have been utilized to understand body kinetics including joint moments, muscle tension, and knee contact forces. The objectives of this study were to develop a knee contact model which can predict knee contact forces using an inverse dynamics-based optimization solver and to investigate the effect of joint constraints on knee contact force prediction. A knee contact model was developed to include 32 reaction force elements on the surface of a tibial insert of a total knee replacement (TKR), which was embedded in a full-body musculoskeletal model. Various external measurements including motion data and external force data during walking trials of a subject with an instrumented knee implant were provided from the Sixth Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads. Knee contact forces in the medial and lateral portions of the instrumented knee implant were also provided for the same walking trials. A knee contact model with a hinge joint and normal alignment could predict knee contact forces with root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 165 N and 288 N for the medial and lateral portions of the knee, respectively, and coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.70 and -0.63. When the degrees-of-freedom (DOF) of the knee and locations of leg markers were adjusted to account for the valgus lower-limb alignment of the subject, RMSE values improved to 144 N and 179 N, and R2 values improved to 0.77 and 0.37, respectively. The proposed knee contact model with subject-specific joint model could predict in vivo knee contact forces with reasonable accuracy. This model may contribute to the development and improvement of knee arthroplasty.

  18. Implementation of a mesh adaptive scheme based on an element-level error indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Scott; Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmelo

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the formulation and application of element-level error indicators based on parametrized variational principles. The qualifier 'element-level' means that no information from adjacent elements is used for error estimation. This property is ideally suited to drive adaptive mesh refinement on parallel computers where access to neighboring elements resident on different processors may incur significant computational overhead. Furthermore, such indicators are not affected by physical jumps at junctures or interfaces. An element-level indicator has been derived from the higher-order element energy and applied to r and h mesh adaptation of meshes in plates and shell structures. We report on our initial experiments with a cylindrical shell that intersects with fist plates forming a simplified 'wing-body intersection' benchmark problem.

  19. Adaptive Meshing Techniques for Viscous Flow Calculations on Mixed Element Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An adaptive refinement strategy based on hierarchical element subdivision is formulated and implemented for meshes containing arbitrary mixtures of tetrahendra, hexahendra, prisms and pyramids. Special attention is given to keeping memory overheads as low as possible. This procedure is coupled with an algebraic multigrid flow solver which operates on mixed-element meshes. Inviscid flows as well as viscous flows are computed an adaptively refined tetrahedral, hexahedral, and hybrid meshes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by generating an adapted hexahedral mesh containing 3 million vertices on a relatively inexpensive workstation.

  20. ZZ-Type a posteriori error estimators for adaptive boundary element methods on a curve☆

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Führer, Thomas; Karkulik, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the adaptive finite element method (FEM), ZZ-error estimators named after Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987) [52] are mathematically well-established and widely used in practice. In this work, we propose and analyze ZZ-type error estimators for the adaptive boundary element method (BEM). We consider weakly singular and hyper-singular integral equations and prove, in particular, convergence of the related adaptive mesh-refining algorithms. Throughout, the theoretical findings are underlined by numerical experiments. PMID:24748725

  1. [Study of the surface tear tension and evaluation of its importance for the retinal physiology and pathology in contact correction and in adaptation to soft contact lenses].

    PubMed

    Cherepnin, A I; Smoliakova, G P; Sorokin, E L

    2003-01-01

    The surface lachrymal-fluid (LF) tension was investigated by teardrop dissection in 115 patients with myopia before they were prescribed soft contact lenses (SCL). Such tension was found to be of clinical importance for the development of SCL adaptation disorders. A longer adaptation period in patients with myopia was associated with a low surface LF tension. A high surface LF tension concurrent with the teardrop dissection mode of the destruction type was typical of the pathological nature of SCL adaptation (12.1% of patients). The obtained data are needed to detect timely the risk of dysadaptation disorders and corneal complications before SCL prescription for the purpose of undertaking the pathogenetically substantiated medication to prevent such complications.

  2. Adaptive mesh refinement for time-domain electromagnetics using vector finite elements :a feasibility study.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. David; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-12-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of applying Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques to a vector finite element formulation for the wave equation in three dimensions. Possible error estimators are considered first. Next, approaches for refining tetrahedral elements are reviewed. AMR capabilities within the Nevada framework are then evaluated. We summarize our conclusions on the feasibility of AMR for time-domain vector finite elements and identify a path forward.

  3. Efficient and Adaptive Orthogonal Finite Element Representation of the Geopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkins, John L.; Younes, Ahmad Bani; Woollands, Robyn M.; Bai, Xiaoli

    2017-06-01

    We unify and extend classical results from function approximation theory and consider their utility in astrodynamics. Least square approximation, using the classical Chebyshev polynomials as basis functions, is reviewed for discrete samples of the to-be-approximated function. We extend the orthogonal approximation ideas to n-dimensions in a novel way, through the use of array algebra and Kronecker operations. Approximation of test functions illustrates the resulting algorithms and provides insight into the errors of approximation, as well as the associated errors arising when the approximations are differentiated or integrated. Two sets of applications are considered that are challenges in astrodynamics. The first application addresses local approximation of high degree and order geopotential models, replacing the global spherical harmonic series by a family of locally precise orthogonal polynomial approximations for efficient computation. A method is introduced which adapts the approximation degree radially, compatible with the truth that the highest degree approximations (to ensure maximum acceleration error < 10-9 m s-2, globally) are required near the Earth's surface, whereas lower degree approximations are required as radius increases. We show that a four order of magnitude speedup is feasible, with efficiency optimized using radial adaptation.

  4. Acoustic characterization of multi-element, dual-frequency transducers for high-intensity contact ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtnyk, M.; N'Djin, W. A.; Persaud, L.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound therapy can generate precise volumes of thermal damage in deep-seated tissue using interstitial or intracavitary devices. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers offer increased spatial control of the heating pattern by enabling modulation of ultrasound power and frequency along the device. The performance and acoustic coupling between elements of simple, multi-element, dual-frequency transducers was measured. Transducer arrays were fabricated by cutting halfway through a rectangular plate of PZT, creating individual 4 × 5 mm segments with fundamental frequency (4.1 MHz) and third harmonic (13.3 MHz). Coupling between elements was investigated using a scanning laser vibrometer to measure transducer surface displacements at each frequency and different acoustic powers (0, 10, 20 W/cm2). The measured acoustic power was proportional to the input electrical power with no hysteresis and efficiencies >50% at both frequencies. Maximum transducer surface displacements were observed near element centers, reducing to ˜1/3-maximum near edges. The power and frequency of neighboring transducer segments had little impact on an element's output. In the worst case, an element operating at 4.1 MHz and 20 W/cm2 coupled only 1.5 W/cm2 to its immediate neighboring element. Multi-element, dual-frequency transducers were successfully constructed using a simple dicing method. Coupling between elements was minor, therefore the power and frequency of each transducer element could be considered independent.

  5. Stress Recovery Based h-Adaptive Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Forming Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohd.; Singh, Devinder

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, stress recovery techniques based adaptive finite element analysis of sheet forming operations is presented. An adaptive two dimensional finite element computer code allows the analysis of sheet forming operations and results in distribution of adaptively refined mesh, effective strain, and punch load, stress and strain rate tensor in the domain that has been developed. The recovery scheme for determining more accurate stress field is based on the least squares fitting of the computed stresses in an element patch surrounding and including a particular node. The solution error is estimated on the basis of an energy norm. It is shown with the help of an illustrative example of axi-symmetric stretching of a metal blank by a hemispherical punch that the adaptive analysis may be usefully employed to predict accurately deformation process, the seats of large deformations and locations of possible instability.

  6. Elasto-Plastic 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Elasto–Plastic 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon...primarily concerned with the results of a three-dimensional elasto– plastic finite element contact analysis of a typical aluminium fatigue test coupon...Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon Executive Summary Aerospace Division has been deeply involved

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  8. Community Adaptation of Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative: Contact with the Law and Delinquent Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Gary; Frensch, Karen; Preyde, Michele; Quosai, Trudy Smit

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a longitudinal investigation of the prevalence of negative contact with the law for a sample of youth 12-18 months after graduating from residential and intensive children's mental health programming. Results of this study suggest serious community adaptation difficulties face many youth graduating from…

  9. Multi-level adaptive finite element methods. 1: Variation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, A.

    1979-01-01

    A general numerical strategy for solving partial differential equations and other functional problems by cycling between coarser and finer levels of discretization is described. Optimal discretization schemes are provided together with very fast general solvers. It is described in terms of finite element discretizations of general nonlinear minimization problems. The basic processes (relaxation sweeps, fine-grid-to-coarse-grid transfers of residuals, coarse-to-fine interpolations of corrections) are directly and naturally determined by the objective functional and the sequence of approximation spaces. The natural processes, however, are not always optimal. Concrete examples are given and some new techniques are reviewed. Including the local truncation extrapolation and a multilevel procedure for inexpensively solving chains of many boundary value problems, such as those arising in the solution of time-dependent problems.

  10. Amino acid contacts in proteins adapted to different temperatures: hydrophobic interactions and surface charges play a key role.

    PubMed

    Saelensminde, Gisle; Halskau, Øyvind; Jonassen, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Thermophiles, mesophiles, and psychrophiles have different amino acid frequencies in their proteins, probably because of the way the species adapt to very different temperatures in their environment. In this paper, we analyse how contacts between sidechains vary between homologous proteins from species that are adapted to different temperatures, but displaying relatively high sequence similarity. We investigate whether specific contacts between amino acids sidechains is a key factor in thermostabilisation in proteins. The dataset was divided into two subsets with optimal growth temperatures from 0-40 and 35-102 degrees C. Comparison of homologues was made between low-temperature species and high-temperature species within each subset. We found that unspecific interactions like hydrophobic interactions in the core and solvent interactions and entropic effects at the surface, appear to be more important factors than specific contact types like salt bridges and aromatic clusters.

  11. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface.

    PubMed

    Siglioccolo, Alessandro; Paiardini, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Maria; Pascarella, Stefano

    2011-12-22

    Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy) or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy). Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  12. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    PubMed Central

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves long-distance communication between regulatory elements and target promoters, but how this is achieved remains unknown. Insulator elements have been proposed to modulate the communication between regulatory elements and promoters due to their ability to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3 histone mark reflect this insulator-dependent chromatin conformation, suggesting that Polycomb action at a distance can be organized by local chromatin topology. PMID:21262819

  13. Adaptive superposition of finite element meshes in linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhihua

    2005-11-01

    The numerical analysis of transient phenomena in solids, for instance, wave propagation and structural dynamics, is a very important and active area of study in engineering. Despite the current evolutionary state of modern computer hardware, practical analysis of large scale, nonlinear transient problems requires the use of adaptive methods where computational resources are locally allocated according to the interpolation requirements of the solution form. Adaptive analysis of transient problems involves obtaining solutions at many different time steps, each of which requires a sequence of adaptive meshes. Therefore, the execution speed of the adaptive algorithm is of paramount importance. In addition, transient problems require that the solution must be passed from one adaptive mesh to the next adaptive mesh with a bare minimum of solution-transfer error since this form of error compromises the initial conditions used for the next time step. A new adaptive finite element procedure (s-adaptive) is developed in this study for modeling transient phenomena in both linear elastic solids and nonlinear elastic solids caused by progressive damage. The adaptive procedure automatically updates the time step size and the spatial mesh discretization in transient analysis, achieving the accuracy and the efficiency requirements simultaneously. The novel feature of the s-adaptive procedure is the original use of finite element mesh superposition to produce spatial refinement in transient problems. The use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to completely avoid the need for cumbersome multipoint constraint algorithms and mesh generators, which makes the s-adaptive procedure extremely fast. Moreover, the use of mesh superposition enables the s-adaptive procedure to minimize the solution-transfer error. In a series of different solid mechanics problem types including 2-D and 3-D linear elastic quasi-static problems, 2-D material nonlinear quasi-static problems

  14. Evolution of adaptive immunity from transposable elements combined with innate immune systems.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes and animals give rise to long-term memory through modification of specific genomic loci, such as by insertion of foreign (viral or plasmid) DNA fragments into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci in prokaryotes and by V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin genes in vertebrates. Strikingly, recombinases derived from unrelated mobile genetic elements have essential roles in both prokaryotic and vertebrate adaptive immune systems. Mobile elements, which are ubiquitous in cellular life forms, provide the only known, naturally evolved tools for genome engineering that are successfully adopted by both innate immune systems and genome-editing technologies. In this Opinion article, we present a general scenario for the origin of adaptive immunity from mobile elements and innate immune systems.

  15. Parallelization of an Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Fast Solution of Finite Element Structural Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, N K; Parsons, I D; Hjelmstad, K D

    2002-03-21

    Adaptive mesh refinement selectively subdivides the elements of a coarse user supplied mesh to produce a fine mesh with reduced discretization error. Effective use of adaptive mesh refinement coupled with an a posteriori error estimator can produce a mesh that solves a problem to a given discretization error using far fewer elements than uniform refinement. A geometric multigrid solver uses increasingly finer discretizations of the same geometry to produce a very fast and numerically scalable solution to a set of linear equations. Adaptive mesh refinement is a natural method for creating the different meshes required by the multigrid solver. This paper describes the implementation of a scalable adaptive multigrid method on a distributed memory parallel computer. Results are presented that demonstrate the parallel performance of the methodology by solving a linear elastic rocket fuel deformation problem on an SGI Origin 3000. Two challenges must be met when implementing adaptive multigrid algorithms on massively parallel computing platforms. First, although the fine mesh for which the solution is desired may be large and scaled to the number of processors, the multigrid algorithm must also operate on much smaller fixed-size data sets on the coarse levels. Second, the mesh must be repartitioned as it is adapted to maintain good load balancing. In an adaptive multigrid algorithm, separate mesh levels may require separate partitioning, further complicating the load balance problem. This paper shows that, when the proper optimizations are made, parallel adaptive multigrid algorithms perform well on machines with several hundreds of processors.

  16. Morphology operators construction by adaptive elliptical structuring elements based on nonlinear structure tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunming; Liu, Xinlei; Li, Yanjie; Zhao, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    As the linear structure tensor is tending to inaccurately or even wrong estimate the gradient direction of a gray-level image, we present a novel algorithm to construct adaptive elliptical structuring elements via estimating the local anisotropy of an image based on the nonlinear structure tensor. Erosion, dilation, opening, closing and Hit-or-Miss transform are redefined according to the presented structuring elements, which have been applied to some representative images. The processed results and the quantitative analysis show that the novel morphological operators have more advantages in structure adaptation, corner protection, filtering and targets extraction than the others.

  17. Rigidity of the Bearing Elements of the Contact Structures of a Mass-Transfer Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Sabanaev, I. A.; Dmitrieva, O. S.

    2017-05-01

    A contact structure for intensification of heat and mass transfer processes at small expenditures of energy has been developed. The possible deformations of a contact structure in the process of operation have been estimated with the aid of a mathematical model. To determine the rigidity of the rods supporting the structure, a computer program has been developed that made it possible to locate the model deflections at the points of interest. The results of calculations of the rigidity of the bearing members of the developed contact structures are presented.

  18. Effect of microseparation on contact mechanics in metal‐on‐metal hip replacements—A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sophie; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some early failures of metal‐on‐metal (MoM) hip replacements associated with elevated wear have caused concerns for the use of this bearing combination. Simulator studies have shown that microseparation and its associated rim contact and edge loading may produce the most severe wear in MoM bearings. It is generally recognized that this high wear can be attributed to the high contact stress of the head on the rim of the cup. In this study, an improved finite element contact model that incorporates an elastic‐perfectly plastic material property for cobalt‐chrome alloy of the metal bearing was developed in an attempt to provide an accurate prediction of the stress and strain for the rim contact. The effects of the microseparation displacement (0.1−2 mm), cup inclination angle (25−65°) and cup rim radius (0.5−4 mm) on the contact stress/strain were investigated. The results show that a translational displacement >0.1 mm under a load >0.5 kN can produce a highly concentrated contact stress at the surface of the cup rim which can lead to plastic deformation. This study also suggests that the magnitude of translational displacement was the major factor that determined the severity of the contact conditions and level of stress and strain under microseparation conditions. Future studies will address the effect of surgical translational and rotational malposition and component design on the magnitude of microseparation, contact stress and strain and severity of wear. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 103B: 1312–1319, 2015. PMID:25370809

  19. Content-Adaptive Finite Element Mesh Generation of 3-D Complex MR Volumes for Bioelectromagnetic Problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Kim, T-S; Cho, M; Lee, S

    2005-01-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element method offers several advantages over other conventional methods such as boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropy. Mesh generation is the first requirement in the finite element analysis and there are many different approaches in mesh generation. However conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes, resulting in numerous elements in the smaller volume regions, thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present an improved content-adaptive mesh generation scheme that is efficient and fast along with options to change the contents of meshes. For demonstration, mesh models of the head from a volume MRI are presented in 2-D and 3-D.

  20. Commuters' Eye-Contact With Strangers in City and Suburban Train Stations: Evidence of Short-Term Adaptation to Interpersonal Overload in the City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Clark; And Others

    A previous study (McCauley and Newman) found that there was less eye contact with strangers in the city than in the suburbs. The interpretation offered was that decreased eye contact in the city is an adaptation to overload of strangers. It is known from laboratory experiments that adaptation to interpersonal overload is relatively fast. Baum and…

  1. A fluid-immersed multi-body contact finite element formulation for median nerve stress in the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ko, Cheolwoong; Brown, Thomas D

    2007-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is among the most important of the family of musculoskeletal disorders caused by chronic peripheral nerve compression. Despite the large body of research in many disciplinary areas aimed at reducing CTS incidence and/or severity, means for objective characterization of the biomechanical insult directly responsible for the disorder have received little attention. In this research, anatomical image-based human carpal tunnel finite element (FE) models were constructed to enable study of median nerve mechanical insult. The formulation included large-deformation multi-body contact between the nerve, the nine digital flexor tendons, and the carpal tunnel boundary. These contact engagements were addressed simultaneously with nerve and tendon fluid-structural interaction (FSI) with the synovial fluid within the carpal tunnel. The effects of pertinent physical parameters on median nerve stress were explored. The results suggest that median nerve stresses due to direct structural contact are typically far higher than those from fluid pressure.

  2. Finite Element and Experimental Analysis of Closure and Contact Bonding of Pores During Hot Rolling of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Jung, Jaimyun; Chun, Myung Sik; Moon, Chang Ho; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-08-01

    The closure and contact bonding behavior of internal pores in steel slabs during hot rolling was studied using experiments and the finite element method (FEM). Effects of pore size and shape were investigated, and three different cases of pore closure results were observed: no closure, partial closure, and full closure. The FEM results well reproduced various closure events. Bonding strengths of unsuccessfully closed pores, measured by tensile tests, showed critical effects. Also, there was a difference in bonding strengths of several fully closed pores. Fracture surfaces showed that welded regions could be divided into three (not, partially, and perfectly) welded regions. The pressure-time curves obtained from the FEM results indicate that pore surface contact time and deformed surface length are important parameters in pore welding. Pore size, pore shape, time of pressure contact, and deformed surface length should be considered to completely eliminate pores in final products.

  3. Probability distributions of whisker-surface contact: quantifying elements of the rat vibrissotactile natural scene.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jennifer A; Towal, R Blythe; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of natural scene statistics has been a powerful approach for understanding neural coding in the auditory and visual systems. In the field of somatosensation, it has been more challenging to quantify the natural tactile scene, in part because somatosensory signals are so tightly linked to the animal's movements. The present work takes a step towards quantifying the natural tactile scene for the rat vibrissal system by simulating rat whisking motions to systematically investigate the probabilities of whisker-object contact in naturalistic environments. The simulations permit an exhaustive search through the complete space of possible contact patterns, thereby allowing for the characterization of the patterns that would most likely occur during long sequences of natural exploratory behavior. We specifically quantified the probabilities of 'concomitant contact', that is, given that a particular whisker makes contact with a surface during a whisk, what is the probability that each of the other whiskers will also make contact with the surface during that whisk? Probabilities of concomitant contact were quantified in simulations that assumed increasingly naturalistic conditions: first, the space of all possible head poses; second, the space of behaviorally preferred head poses as measured experimentally; and third, common head poses in environments such as cages and burrows. As environments became more naturalistic, the probability distributions shifted from exhibiting a 'row-wise' structure to a more diagonal structure. Results also reveal that the rat appears to use motor strategies (e.g. head pitches) that generate contact patterns that are particularly well suited to extract information in the presence of uncertainty. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. The adapted augmented Lagrangian method: a new method for the resolution of the mechanical frictional contact problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussetta, Philippe; Marceau, Daniel; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new numerical method for solving the mechanical frictional contact problem in the general case of multi-bodies in a three dimensional space. This method is called adapted augmented Lagrangian method (AALM) and can be used in a multi-physical context (like thermo-electro-mechanical fields problems). This paper presents this new method and its advantages over other classical methods such as penalty method (PM), adapted penalty method (APM) and, augmented Lagrangian method (ALM). In addition, the efficiency and the reliability of the AALM are proved with some academic problems and an industrial thermo-electromechanical problem.

  5. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  6. JCMmode: an adaptive finite element solver for the computation of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin W.; Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank

    2005-03-01

    We present our simulation tool JCMmode for calculating propagating modes of an optical waveguide. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec elements, edge elements). Further we construct transparent boundary conditions to deal with leaky modes even for problems with inhomogeneous exterior domains as for integrated hollow core Arrow waveguides. We have implemented an error estimator which steers the adaptive mesh refinement. This allows the precise computation of singularities near the metal's corner of a Plasmon-Polariton waveguide even for irregular shaped metal films on a standard personal computer.

  7. Spectral-element adaptive refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the island coalescence instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2006-10-01

    A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate the problem of island coalescence instability (ICI) in 2D. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsasser formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described in [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys., 215, 59-80 (2006)], allowing both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. ICI is a MHD process that can produce strong current sheets and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [cf., Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Thus, it is desirable to use adaptive refinement grids to increase resolution, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. Results are compared with simulations using finite difference method with the same refinement grid, as well as pesudo-spectral simulations using uniform grid.

  8. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M. R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100-200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings-of the order of 1000-fold-relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using

  9. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  10. Adaptive Crack Modeling with Interface Solid Elements for Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yijian

    2017-01-01

    The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh processing technique is proposed for computational simulations of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures to progressively disintegrate the initial finite element mesh and to add degenerated solid elements into the interfacial gaps. In comparison with the implementation where the entire mesh is processed prior to the computation, the proposed adaptive cracking model allows simulating the failure behavior of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures with remarkably reduced computational expense. PMID:28773130

  11. Adaptive Crack Modeling with Interface Solid Elements for Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yijian; Meschke, Günther

    2017-07-08

    The effective analysis of the nonlinear behavior of cement-based engineering structures not only demands physically-reliable models, but also computationally-efficient algorithms. Based on a continuum interface element formulation that is suitable to capture complex cracking phenomena in concrete materials and structures, an adaptive mesh processing technique is proposed for computational simulations of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures to progressively disintegrate the initial finite element mesh and to add degenerated solid elements into the interfacial gaps. In comparison with the implementation where the entire mesh is processed prior to the computation, the proposed adaptive cracking model allows simulating the failure behavior of plain and fiber-reinforced concrete structures with remarkably reduced computational expense.

  12. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  13. Genome-Wide Patterns of Adaptation to Temperate Environments Associated with Transposable Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    González, Josefa; Karasov, Talia L.; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Investigating spatial patterns of loci under selection can give insight into how populations evolved in response to selective pressures and can provide monitoring tools for detecting the impact of environmental changes on populations. Drosophila is a particularly good model to study adaptation to environmental heterogeneity since it is a tropical species that originated in sub-Saharan Africa and has only recently colonized the rest of the world. There is strong evidence for the adaptive role of Transposable Elements (TEs) in the evolution of Drosophila, and TEs might play an important role specifically in adaptation to temperate climates. In this work, we analyzed the frequency of a set of putatively adaptive and putatively neutral TEs in populations with contrasting climates that were collected near the endpoints of two known latitudinal clines in Australia and North America. The contrasting results obtained for putatively adaptive and putatively neutral TEs and the consistency of the patterns between continents strongly suggest that putatively adaptive TEs are involved in adaptation to temperate climates. We integrated information on population behavior, possible environmental selective agents, and both molecular and functional information of the TEs and their nearby genes to infer the plausible phenotypic consequences of these insertions. We conclude that adaptation to temperate environments is widespread in Drosophila and that TEs play a significant role in this adaptation. It is remarkable that such a diverse set of TEs located next to a diverse set of genes are consistently adaptive to temperate climate-related factors. We argue that reverse population genomic analyses, as the one described in this work, are necessary to arrive at a comprehensive picture of adaptation. PMID:20386746

  14. Adaptive, High-Order, and Scalable Software Elements for Dynamic Rupture Simulations in Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, J. E.; Wilcox, L.; Aranda, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a new set of simulation tools for earthquake rupture dynamics based on state-of-the-art high-order, adaptive numerical methods capable of handling complex geometries. High-order methods are ideal for earthquake rupture simulations as the problems are wave-dominated and the waves excited in simulations propagate over distance much larger than their fundamental wavelength. When high-order methods are used for such problems significantly fewer degrees of freedom are required as compared with low-order methods. The base numerical method in our new software elements is a discontinuous Galerkin method based on curved, Kronecker product hexahedral elements. We currently use MPI for off-node parallelism and are in the process of exploring strategies for on-node parallelism. Spatial mesh adaptivity is handled using the p4est library and temporal adaptivity is achieved through an Adams-Bashforth based local time stepping method; we are presently in the process of including dynamic spatial adaptivity which we believe will be valuable for capturing the small-scale features around the propagating rupture front. One of the key features of our software elements is that the method is provably stable, even after the inclusion of the nonlinear frictions laws which govern rupture dynamics. In this presentation we will both outline the structure of the software elements as well as validate the rupture dynamics with SCEC benchmark test problems. We are also presently developing several realistic simulation geometries which may also be reported on. Finally, the software elements that we have designed are fully public domain and have been designed with tightly coupled, wave dominated multiphysics applications in mind. This latter design decisions means the software elements are applicable to many other geophysical and non-geophysical applications.

  15. Contact finite element analysis of hinge joints for large deployable antenna in space satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, K.; Takaki, R.

    Various malfunctions have been observed in space structures. These include failure of precise positioning control, such as the failure of the ASTRO-G parabolic antenna, failure of piston sliding parts, and instability due to incomplete expansion of IKAROS' membrane. One reason for such failures is the friction at the contact points. Owing to the presence of various particles in air, an adhesive layer of particles is formed on metal surfaces. When metals get rubbed with each other, these particles are removed from the metal surfaces. In the atmosphere, the adhesive particle layer forms again on the metal surface. However, this layer cannot be formed in space. Therefore, the coefficient of friction in vacuum is larger than that in air. Generally, the coefficient of friction between metals is about 0.3. In vacuum, the coefficient of friction between metals may exceed 1.0. In the design stage, it is important to understand the friction behavior of a hinge joint in vacuum. Many parts of space structures are attached to each other via hinged joints. The frictional force on the contacts is used to fix the positions of these parts. The mechanical behavior of space structures varies with the friction of the hinge joints. The reliability of the space structure depends on these hinge joints. In 2012, it has become possible to conduct a detailed analysis owing to the improvements in computational performance and numerical simulation techniques. The entire space structure can be computed, including the friction model of the contacts of hinge joints. To develop high-reliability satellites, we attempted the development of contact modeling techniques by using a high-performance computer (JSS) and the Advance/FrontSTR in this study. The contact behaviors were verified by using computational models of the hinge joints.

  16. Experience with automatic, dynamic load balancing and adaptive finite element computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, S.R.; Devine, K.D.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-10-01

    Distributed memory, Massively Parallel (MP), MIMD technology has enabled the development of applications requiring computational resources previously unobtainable. Structural mechanics and fluid dynamics applications, for example, are often solved by finite element methods (FEMs) requiring, millions of degrees of freedom to accurately simulate physical phenomenon. Adaptive methods, which automatically refine or coarsen meshes and vary the order of accuracy of the numerical solution, offer greater robustness and computational efficiency than traditional FEMs by reducing the amount of computation required away from physical structures such as shock waves and boundary layers. On MP computers, FEMs frequently result in distributed processor load imbalances. To overcome load imbalance, many MP FEMs use static load balancing as a preprocessor to the finite element calculation. Adaptive methods complicate the load imbalance problem since the work per element is not uniform across the solution domain and changes as the computation proceeds. Therefore, dynamic load balancing is required to maintain global load balance. We describe a dynamic, fine-grained, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance and is effective in the presence of changing work loads. Global load balance is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method utilizes an automatic element management system library to which a programmer integrates the application`s computational description. The library`s flexibility supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications.

  17. Autonomous Adaptation and Collaboration of Unmanned Vehicles for Tracking Submerged Contacts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    filter: CRS RANGE REPORT =”name=archie,range=23.4,target= jackal ,time=2342551.213” • Line 8: ping wait is the time delay between range pulses. • Line 13: rn...uFldContactRangeSensor Settings 1: ProcessConfig = uFldContactRangeSensor 2: { 3: AppTick = 4 4: CommsTick = 4 5: 6: reply distance = jackal = 50 7: reach distance...REPORT = CRS RANGE REPORT 8: MY SHIP = archie 9: MY FRIEND = betty 10: MY CONTACT = jackal 11: MY BEST GUESS = besttarget 12: MY AVG GUESS = avgtarget 13

  18. Bone geometry on the contact stress in the shoulder for evaluation of pressure ulcers: finite element modeling and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Yancheng; Tai, Bruce L; Chen, Roland K; Shih, Albert J

    2015-02-01

    This research presents the finite element modeling (FEM) of human-specific computed tomography (CT) data to study the effect of bone prominences on contact stress in the shoulder for prevention of pressure ulcers. The 3D geometry of scapula, skin, and surrounding soft tissues in the shoulder was reconstructed based on the anonymous CT data of a human subject in a prone posture (without loading on the shoulder) for FEM analysis of the contact stress. FEM analysis results show that the maximum stress is located at the prominence of the scapula with sharp bone geometry. This demonstrates that stress concentration at the bone prominence is a significant factor to cause the high contact stress, which is a source for pressure ulcers. For experimental validation, a physical shoulder model manufactured by 3D printing of the bone geometry and the mold for molding of tissue-mimicking silicone was developed. Compression tests of the mattress foam and silicone were conducted to find the nonlinear stress-strain relations as inputs for FEM. Experiments of compressing the shoulder model against the foam were carried out. Three flexible force sensors were embedded inside the model to measure the contact forces and compared to the FEM predictions. Results show that the FEM predicted forces match well with the experimental measurements and demonstrate that FEM can accurately predict the stress distributions in the shoulder to study the effect of bone geometry on the inception of pressure ulcers.

  19. Finite element modeling for predicting the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wookjin; Won, Byeong Hee; Cho, Seong Wook

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we generated finite element (FE) models to predict the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position. Twenty-year-old males were used for three-dimensional scanning to produce the FE human models, which was composed of skin and muscle tissue. A linear elastic isotropic material model was used for the skin, and the Mooney-Rivlin model was used for the muscle tissue because it can effectively represent the nonlinear behavior of muscle. The contact pressure between the human model and the mattress was predicted by numerical simulation. The human models were validated by comparing the body pressure distribution obtained from the same human subject when he was lying on two different mattress types. The experimental results showed that the slope of the lower part of the mattress caused a decrease in the contact pressure at the heels, and the effect of bone structure was most pronounced in the scapula. After inserting a simple structure to function as the scapula, the contact pressure predicted by the FE human models was consistent with the experimental body pressure distribution for all body parts. These results suggest that the models proposed in this paper will be useful to researchers and designers of products related to the prevention of pressure ulcers.

  20. Discrete Element Method Simulations of the Inter-Particle Contact Parameters for the Mono-Sized Iron Ore Particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Tongqing; Peng, Yuxing; Zhu, Zhencai; Zou, Shengyong; Yin, Zixin

    2017-05-11

    Aiming at predicting what happens in reality inside mills, the contact parameters of iron ore particles for discrete element method (DEM) simulations should be determined accurately. To allow the irregular shape to be accurately determined, the sphere clump method was employed in modelling the particle shape. The inter-particle contact parameters were systematically altered whilst the contact parameters between the particle and wall were arbitrarily assumed, in order to purely assess its impact on the angle of repose for the mono-sized iron ore particles. Results show that varying the restitution coefficient over the range considered does not lead to any obvious difference in the angle of repose, but the angle of repose has strong sensitivity to the rolling/static friction coefficient. The impacts of the rolling/static friction coefficient on the angle of repose are interrelated, and increasing the inter-particle rolling/static friction coefficient can evidently increase the angle of repose. However, the impact of the static friction coefficient is more profound than that of the rolling friction coefficient. Finally, a predictive equation is established and a very close agreement between the predicted and simulated angle of repose is attained. This predictive equation can enormously shorten the inter-particle contact parameters calibration time that can help in the implementation of DEM simulations.

  1. Discrete Element Method Simulations of the Inter-Particle Contact Parameters for the Mono-Sized Iron Ore Particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongqing; Peng, Yuxing; Zhu, Zhencai; Zou, Shengyong; Yin, Zixin

    2017-01-01

    Aiming at predicting what happens in reality inside mills, the contact parameters of iron ore particles for discrete element method (DEM) simulations should be determined accurately. To allow the irregular shape to be accurately determined, the sphere clump method was employed in modelling the particle shape. The inter-particle contact parameters were systematically altered whilst the contact parameters between the particle and wall were arbitrarily assumed, in order to purely assess its impact on the angle of repose for the mono-sized iron ore particles. Results show that varying the restitution coefficient over the range considered does not lead to any obvious difference in the angle of repose, but the angle of repose has strong sensitivity to the rolling/static friction coefficient. The impacts of the rolling/static friction coefficient on the angle of repose are interrelated, and increasing the inter-particle rolling/static friction coefficient can evidently increase the angle of repose. However, the impact of the static friction coefficient is more profound than that of the rolling friction coefficient. Finally, a predictive equation is established and a very close agreement between the predicted and simulated angle of repose is attained. This predictive equation can enormously shorten the inter-particle contact parameters calibration time that can help in the implementation of DEM simulations. PMID:28772880

  2. Detection and modelling of contacts in explicit finite-element simulation of soft tissue biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, S F; Taylor, Z A; Han, L; Hu, Y; Clarkson, M J; Hawkes, D J; Ourselin, S

    2015-11-01

    Realistic modelling of soft tissue biomechanics and mechanical interactions between tissues is an important part of biomechanically-informed surgical image-guidance and surgical simulation. This submission details a contact-modelling pipeline suitable for implementation in explicit matrix-free FEM solvers. While these FEM algorithms have been shown to be very suitable for simulation of soft tissue biomechanics and successfully used in a number of image-guidance systems, contact modelling specifically for these solvers is rarely addressed, partly because the typically large number of time steps required with this class of FEM solvers has led to a perception of them being a poor choice for simulations requiring complex contact modelling. The presented algorithm is capable of handling most scenarios typically encountered in image-guidance. The contact forces are computed with an evolution of the Lagrange-multiplier method first used by Taylor and Flanagan in PRONTO 3D extended with spatio-temporal smoothing heuristics for improved stability and edge-edge collision handling, and a new friction model. For contact search, a bounding-volume hierarchy (BVH) is employed, which is capable of identifying self-collisions by means of the surface-normal bounding cone of Volino and Magnenat-Thalmann, in turn computed with a novel formula. The BVH is further optimised for the small time steps by reducing the number of bounding-volume refittings between iterations through identification of regions with mostly rigid motion and negligible deformation. Further optimisation is achieved by integrating the self-collision criterion in the BVH creation and updating algorithms. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a number of artificial test cases and meshes derived from medical image data. It is shown that the proposed algorithm reduces the cost of BVH refitting to the point where it becomes a negligible part of the overall computation time of the simulation. It is also

  3. Adhesion and friction of iron and gold in contact with elemental semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Adhesion and friction experiments were conducted with single crystals of iron and gold in contact with single crystals of germanium and silicon. Surfaces were examined in the sputter cleaned state and in the presence of oxygen and a lubricant. All experiments were conducted at room temperature with loads of 1 to 50 grams, and sliding friction was at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min. Results indicate that the friction nature of metals in contact with semiconductors is sensitive to orientation, that strong adhesion of metals to both germanium and silicon occurs, and that friction is lower with silicon than with germanium for the same orientation. Surface effects are highly sensitive to environment. Silicon, for example, behaves in an entirely brittle manner in the clean state, but in the presence of a lubricant the surface deforms plastically.

  4. Adaptive variational multiscale element free Galerkin method for elliptical ring solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, S. C.; Yeak, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a coupling of adaptive element free Galerkin method with variational multiscale element free Galerkin method has been proposed in solving two-dimensional elliptical ring solitons. Meshless method is suitable in incorporating into adaptive refinement as the additional nodes can be freely inserted at the steep gradient regions without the reconstruction of geometry as in finite element method. Hence, the advantageous of adaptive refinement technique and variational multiscale method are inherited in this proposed method in order to obtain higher accuracy solution.The performance of the proposed method is first validated with solving Burgers' equation. The obtained numerical solutions are more accurate than the standard element free Galerkin method. Besides, this coupling method is then extended to solve two-dimensional elliptical ring solitons. The numerical results are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions that exist in literature. Therefore, this confirms the ability of the proposed method to deal with the large gradient problems and sine-Gordon equation.

  5. Transposable elements as agents of rapid adaptation may explain the genetic paradox of invasive species.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Jessica; Santure, Anna W; Dennis, Stuart R

    2015-05-01

    Rapid adaptation of invasive species to novel habitats has puzzled evolutionary biologists for decades, especially as this often occurs in the face of limited genetic variability. Although some ecological traits common to invasive species have been identified, little is known about the possible genomic/genetic mechanisms that may underlie their success. A common scenario in many introductions is that small founder population sizes will often lead to reduced genetic diversity, but that invading populations experience large environmental perturbations, such as changes in habitat and environmental stress. Although sudden and intense stress is usually considered in a negative context, these perturbations may actually facilitate rapid adaptation by affecting genome structure, organization and function via interactions with transposable elements (TEs), especially in populations with low genetic diversity. Stress-induced changes in TE activity can alter gene action and can promote structural variation that may facilitate the rapid adaptation observed in new environments. We focus here on the adaptive potential of TEs in relation to invasive species and highlight their role as powerful mutational forces that can rapidly create genetic diversity. We hypothesize that activity of transposable elements can explain rapid adaptation despite low genetic variation (the genetic paradox of invasive species), and provide a framework under which this hypothesis can be tested using recently developed and emerging genomic technologies.

  6. Using Multi-threading for the Automatic Load Balancing of 2D Adaptive Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-threaded approach for the automatic load balancing of adaptive finite element (FE) meshes The platform of our choice is the EARTH multi-threaded system which offers sufficient capabilities to tackle this problem. We implement the adaption phase of FE applications oil triangular meshes and exploit the EARTH token mechanism to automatically balance the resulting irregular and highly nonuniform workload. We discuss the results of our experiments oil EARTH-SP2, on implementation of EARTH on the IBM SP2 with different load balancing strategies that are built into the runtime system.

  7. Zirconia-based dental crown to support a removable partial denture: a three-dimensional finite element analysis using contact elements and micro-CT data.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Freitas, Amilcar Chagas; Martini, Ana Paula; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Sales; Luersen, Marco Antonio; Ko, Ching Chang

    2015-01-01

    Veneer fracture is the most common complication in zirconia-based restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of a zirconia-based crown in a lower canine tooth supporting removable partial denture (RPD) prosthesis, varying the bond quality of the veneer/coping interface. Microtomography (μCT) data of an extracted left lower canine were used to build the finite element model (M) varying the core material (gold core - MAu; zirconia core - MZi) and the quality of the veneer/core interface (complete bonded - MZi; incomplete bonded - MZi-NL). The incomplete bonding condition was only applied for zirconia coping by using contact elements (Target/Contact) with 0.3 frictional coefficients. Stress fields were obtained using Ansys Workbench 10.0. The loading condition (L = 1 N) was vertically applied at the base of the RPD prosthesis metallic support towards the dental apex. Maximum principal (σmax) and von Mises equivalent (σvM) stresses were obtained. The σmax (MPa) for the bonded condition was similar between gold and zirconia cores (MAu, 0.42; MZi, 0.40). The incomplete bonded condition (MZi-NL) raised σmax in the veneer up to 800% (3.23 MPa) in contrast to the bonded condition. The peak of σvM increased up to 270% in the MZi-NL. The incomplete bond condition increasing the stress in the veneer/zirconia interface.

  8. A Fully Integrated RF-Powered Contact Lens With a Single Element Display.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J; Yu-Te Liao; Lingley, Andrew; Mirjalili, R; Parviz, B; Otis, B

    2010-12-01

    We present progress toward a wirelessly-powered active contact lens comprised of a transparent polymer substrate, loop antenna, power harvesting IC, and micro-LED. The fully integrated radio power harvesting and power management system was fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process with a total die area of 0.2 mm(2). It utilizes a small on-chip capacitor for energy storage to light up a micro-LED pixel. We have demonstrated wireless power transfer at 10 cm distance using the custom IC and on-lens antenna.

  9. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Li, G.

    2014-08-28

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO{sub 2} interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  10. Analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale devices by using an accelerated finite element contact block reduction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Li, G.

    2014-08-01

    An accelerated Finite Element Contact Block Reduction (FECBR) approach is presented for computational analysis of ballistic transport in nanoscale electronic devices with arbitrary geometry and unstructured mesh. Finite element formulation is developed for the theoretical CBR/Poisson model. The FECBR approach is accelerated through eigen-pair reduction, lead mode space projection, and component mode synthesis techniques. The accelerated FECBR is applied to perform quantum mechanical ballistic transport analysis of a DG-MOSFET with taper-shaped extensions and a DG-MOSFET with Si/SiO2 interface roughness. The computed electrical transport properties of the devices obtained from the accelerated FECBR approach and associated computational cost as a function of system degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained from the original CBR and direct inversion methods. The performance of the accelerated FECBR in both its accuracy and efficiency is demonstrated.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  12. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, M.; Knabner, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present adaptive mixed hybrid finite element discretizations of the Richards equation, a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation modeling the flow of water into a variably saturated porous medium. The approach simultaneously constructs approximations of the flux and the pressure head in Raviart-Thomas spaces. The resulting nonlinear systems of equations are solved by a Newton method. For the linear problems of the Newton iteration a multigrid algorithm is used. We consider two different kinds of error indicators for space adaptive grid refinement: superconvergence and residual based indicators. They can be calculated easily by means of the available finite element approximations. This seems attractive for computations since no additional (sub-)problems have to be solved. Computational experiments conducted for realistic water table recharge problems illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the approach.

  13. MGGHAT: Elliptic PDE software with adaptive refinement, multigrid and high order finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, William F.

    1993-01-01

    MGGHAT (MultiGrid Galerkin Hierarchical Adaptive Triangles) is a program for the solution of linear second order elliptic partial differential equations in two dimensional polygonal domains. This program is now available for public use. It is a finite element method with linear, quadratic or cubic elements over triangles. The adaptive refinement via newest vertex bisection and the multigrid iteration are both based on a hierarchical basis formulation. Visualization is available at run time through an X Window display, and a posteriori through output files that can be used as GNUPLOT input. In this paper, we describe the methods used by MGGHAT, define the problem domain for which it is appropriate, illustrate use of the program, show numerical and graphical examples, and explain how to obtain the software.

  14. Error Estimation and h-Adaptivity for Optimal Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John

    1997-01-01

    The objective of adaptive meshing and automatic error control in finite element analysis is to eliminate the need for the application engineer from re-meshing and re-running design simulations to verify numerical accuracy. The user should only need to enter the component geometry and a coarse finite element mesh. The software will then autonomously and adaptively refine this mesh where needed, reducing the error in the fields to a user prescribed value. The ideal end result of the simulation is a measurable quantity (e.g. scattered field, input impedance), calculated to a prescribed error, in less time and less machine memory than if the user applied typical uniform mesh refinement by hand. It would also allow for the simulation of larger objects since an optimal mesh is created.

  15. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  16. A Mass Conservation Algorithm for Adaptive Unrefinement Meshes Used by Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    is an adaptive finite element method to simulate three-dimensional Navier- Stokes flow, unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow, overland flow...variables of fluid-motion simulations and are often solved at various times. It is important for the numerical model to predict accurate water depth...remove others where they are no longer required during the simulation . The AMR is proven to optimize the performance of a computed solution. However, mass

  17. Feasibility of Applying the Finite Element Adaptive Research Solver (FEARS) Program to the Plate Bending Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    AD-A129 395 FEASIBILITY OF APPLYING THE FINITE ELEMENT ADAPTIVE 1 / 1 RESEARCH SOLVER (FEAR..(U) MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE...DEPAR .MENT 17 18 1 A PROPULSION AND SHIP ACOUSTICS AUXILIARY SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT jDEPARTMENT 19 27 SHIP MATERIALS CENTRAL ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION...DOCUMENTATION PAGE 331033 COMPLETNG FORM 1 . REPORTNUIIIr. VT ACCESPON 00 S. RECIPINTS CATALOG WU1MSER DTNSRDC/CMLD-83/ 1 / 4. TITLE (nd Subtite) S. TYPE OF

  18. Malaria as Anthropo-Ecosystem. Part IV. Adaptation of elements of MAES.

    PubMed

    Kondrashin, A V; Kalra, N L

    1989-09-01

    Adaptations have been recognized as an essential facets of evolution. These broadly cover two types exemplified by change (adjustments) and that leads to creation of new species. The former is generally in response to environmental factors, while the others are genetic and heritable and enable the population to continue its existence. These are also accompanied by biological and behavioural changes. In the study of MAES, adaptations appear to be main mechanism which facilitate the dynamics of the malaria system in time and space. Schematically, three broad groups of resultant factors of adaptations within MAES. viz. genetical, biological and environmental have been identified and briefly discussed with regard to their diversity in all the three elements of MAES.

  19. Adaptive optics vision simulation and perceptual learning system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Zhao, Lina; Xiao, Fei; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2015-02-10

    An adaptive optics visual simulation combined with a perceptual learning (PL) system based on a 35-element bimorph deformable mirror (DM) was established. The larger stroke and smaller size of the bimorph DM made the system have larger aberration correction or superposition ability and be more compact. By simply modifying the control matrix or the reference matrix, select correction or superposition of aberrations was realized in real time similar to a conventional adaptive optics closed-loop correction. PL function was first integrated in addition to conventional adaptive optics visual simulation. PL training undertaken with high-order aberrations correction obviously improved the visual function of adult anisometropic amblyopia. The preliminary application of high-order aberrations correction with PL training on amblyopia treatment was being validated with a large scale population, which might have great potential in amblyopia treatment and visual performance maintenance.

  20. Methods and evaluations of MRI content-adaptive finite element mesh generation for bioelectromagnetic problems.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T-S; Cho, M H; Ahn, Y B; Lee, S Y

    2006-12-07

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element analysis (FEA) offers several advantages over conventional methods such as the boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropic conductivity. For FEA, mesh generation is the first critical requirement and there exist many different approaches. However, conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes (cMeshes), resulting in numerous nodes and elements in modelling the conducting domain, and thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present efficient content-adaptive mesh generation schemes for complex biological volumes of MR images. The presented methodology is fully automatic and generates FE meshes that are adaptive to the geometrical contents of MR images, allowing optimal representation of conducting domain for FEA. We have also evaluated the effect of cMeshes on FEA in three dimensions by comparing the forward solutions from various cMesh head models to the solutions from the reference FE head model in which fine and equidistant FEs constitute the model. The results show that there is a significant gain in computation time with minor loss in numerical accuracy. We believe that cMeshes should be useful in the FEA of bioelectromagnetic problems.

  1. Methods and evaluations of MRI content-adaptive finite element mesh generation for bioelectromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Kim, T.-S.; Cho, M. H.; Ahn, Y. B.; Lee, S. Y.

    2006-12-01

    In studying bioelectromagnetic problems, finite element analysis (FEA) offers several advantages over conventional methods such as the boundary element method. It allows truly volumetric analysis and incorporation of material properties such as anisotropic conductivity. For FEA, mesh generation is the first critical requirement and there exist many different approaches. However, conventional approaches offered by commercial packages and various algorithms do not generate content-adaptive meshes (cMeshes), resulting in numerous nodes and elements in modelling the conducting domain, and thereby increasing computational load and demand. In this work, we present efficient content-adaptive mesh generation schemes for complex biological volumes of MR images. The presented methodology is fully automatic and generates FE meshes that are adaptive to the geometrical contents of MR images, allowing optimal representation of conducting domain for FEA. We have also evaluated the effect of cMeshes on FEA in three dimensions by comparing the forward solutions from various cMesh head models to the solutions from the reference FE head model in which fine and equidistant FEs constitute the model. The results show that there is a significant gain in computation time with minor loss in numerical accuracy. We believe that cMeshes should be useful in the FEA of bioelectromagnetic problems.

  2. Parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element modeling for 3D electromagnetic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Key, K.; Ovall, J.; Holst, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element method for accurate and efficient electromagnetic (EM) modeling of complex 3D structures. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh allows this approach to accommodate arbitrarily complex 3D conductivity variations and a priori known boundaries. The total electric field is approximated by the lowest order linear curl-conforming shape functions and the discretized finite element equations are solved by a sparse LU factorization. Accuracy of the finite element solution is achieved through adaptive mesh refinement that is performed iteratively until the solution converges to the desired accuracy tolerance. Refinement is guided by a goal-oriented error estimator that uses a dual-weighted residual method to optimize the mesh for accurate EM responses at the locations of the EM receivers. As a result, the mesh refinement is highly efficient since it only targets the elements where the inaccuracy of the solution corrupts the response at the possibly distant locations of the EM receivers. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of two approaches for estimating the primary residual error required at the core of this method: one uses local element and inter-element residuals and the other relies on solving a global residual system using a hierarchical basis. For computational efficiency our method follows the Bank-Holst algorithm for parallelization, where solutions are computed in subdomains of the original model. To resolve the load-balancing problem, this approach applies a spectral bisection method to divide the entire model into subdomains that have approximately equal error and the same number of receivers. The finite element solutions are then computed in parallel with each subdomain carrying out goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement independently. We validate the newly developed algorithm by comparison with controlled-source EM solutions for 1D layered models and with 2D results from our earlier 2D goal oriented

  3. Chinese-Western "Contact Zone": Students' Resistance and Teachers' Adaptation to Local Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ling

    2009-01-01

    Many universities in Mainland China hire native-speaking teachers of English annually to teach English writing. Having been trained in Western Europe or North America, these native-speaking teachers of English are on the front line of global education contact zones as they introduce their writing instruction in an English as a foreign language…

  4. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  5. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    The subject of this work is the adaptive finite element simulation of problems arising in flow and transport applications on parallel computers. Of particular interest are new contributions to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in this parallel high-performance context, including novel work on data structures, treatment of constraints in a parallel setting, generality and extensibility via object-oriented programming, and the design/implementation of a flexible software framework. This technology and software capability then enables more robust, reliable treatment of multiscale--multiphysics problems and specific studies of fine scale interaction such as those in biological chemotaxis (Chapter 4) and high-speed shock physics for compressible flows (Chapter 5). The work begins by presenting an overview of key concepts and data structures employed in AMR simulations. Of particular interest is how these concepts are applied in the physics-independent software framework which is developed here and is the basis for all the numerical simulations performed in this work. This open-source software framework has been adopted by a number of researchers in the U.S. and abroad for use in a wide range of applications. The dynamic nature of adaptive simulations pose particular issues for efficient implementation on distributed-memory parallel architectures. Communication cost, computational load balance, and memory requirements must all be considered when developing adaptive software for this class of machines. Specific extensions to the adaptive data structures to enable implementation on parallel computers is therefore considered in detail. The libMesh framework for performing adaptive finite element simulations on parallel computers is developed to provide a concrete implementation of the above ideas. This physics-independent framework is applied to two distinct flow and transport applications classes in the subsequent application studies to illustrate the flexibility of the

  6. Commuters' Eye Contact with Strangers in City and Suburban Train Stations: Evidence of Short-Term Adaptation to Interpersonal Overload in the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Clark; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Experimenters attempted to make eye contact with commuters as they approached an express train linking city and suburb. Results support the hypothesis that reduced eye contact with strangers in the city is a short-term adaptation to interpersonal overload. (Author)

  7. American Indians’ Cultures: How CBPR Illuminated Inter-Tribal Cultural Elements Fundamental to an Adaptation Effort

    PubMed Central

    Jumper-Reeves, Leslie; Dustman, Patricia Allen; Harthun, Mary L.; Kulis, Stephen; Brown, Ed

    2013-01-01

    The ever-increasing numbers of ethnic minority populations in the United States seeking social services suggests that a “multicultural paradigm shift” is underway and gaining speed. This shift will increasingly demand that prevention programs and interventions be more culturally responsive. Interventions that are not aligned with prospective participants’ world views and experiences are only minimally effective. Existing models for conducting culturally grounded program adaptations emphasize identifying distinct levels of cultural influences while preserving core elements of the original intervention. An effective adaptation requires competent language translation as well as trained translations of program concepts and principles that will be meaningful to the targeted group, without compromising program fidelity. This article describes how a university research team and curriculum developers worked with American Indian youth and adults in a large southwestern city using a CBPR process to identify cultural elements that became foundational to the adaptation of a prevention curriculum that is a national model program, with the objective of increasing its applicability for urban native youth. PMID:23412946

  8. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carriington, David B

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  9. Signatures of Evolutionary Adaptation in Quantitative Trait Loci Influencing Trace Element Homeostasis in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sabidó, Eduard; Bosch, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Essential trace elements possess vital functions at molecular, cellular, and physiological levels in health and disease, and they are tightly regulated in the human body. In order to assess variability and potential adaptive evolution of trace element homeostasis, we quantified 18 trace elements in 150 liver samples, together with the expression levels of 90 genes and abundances of 40 proteins involved in their homeostasis. Additionally, we genotyped 169 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in the same sample set. We detected significant associations for 8 protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL), 10 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), and 15 micronutrient quantitative trait loci (nutriQTL). Six of these exceeded the false discovery rate cutoff and were related to essential trace elements: 1) one pQTL for GPX2 (rs10133290); 2) two previously described eQTLs for HFE (rs12346) and SELO (rs4838862) expression; and 3) three nutriQTLs: The pathogenic C282Y mutation at HFE affecting iron (rs1800562), and two SNPs within several clustered metallothionein genes determining selenium concentration (rs1811322 and rs904773). Within the complete set of significant QTLs (which involved 30 SNPs and 20 gene regions), we identified 12 SNPs with extreme patterns of population differentiation (FST values in the top 5% percentile in at least one HapMap population pair) and significant evidence for selective sweeps involving QTLs at GPX1, SELENBP1, GPX3, SLC30A9, and SLC39A8. Overall, this detailed study of various molecular phenotypes illustrates the role of regulatory variants in explaining differences in trace element homeostasis among populations and in the human adaptive response to environmental pressures related to micronutrients. PMID:26582562

  10. Performance of an adaptive MIMO controller for a multiple-element ultrasound hyperthermia system.

    PubMed

    Hartov, A; Colacchio, T A; Strohbehn, J W; Ryan, T P; Hoopes, P J

    1993-01-01

    A prototype adaptive automatic control algorithm was implemented to regulate temperatures measured at several points in a tumour by adjusting the power applied to several ultrasound transducers. The goal was to control the temperatures under the elements of a mosaic applicator individually without any priori knowledge of which probes are under which elements. The control algorithm was devised for clinical applications where the position of each probe with respect to the heat sources is difficult to determine precisely. Instead, the program 'learns' the relationship between the inputs (power levels) and the outputs (temperatures) automatically. Based on the observed transfer function relating the power at m sources to the temperatures n probes, where n and m are not necessarily the same, a new method was used to implement a feedback controller. This method simplifies the design of the controller for a multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) system, while taking into account the coupling that may exist between the various elements of the system. As a result of using an adaptive scheme, the regulator continuously tracks changes in the system, such as blood flow variations or patient motion, by modifying its control parameters. The algorithm performance has been tested in simulations as well as experiments in dog thigh and a perfused kidney model.

  11. Adaptive macro finite elements for the numerical solution of monodomain equations in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Elvio A; Ferrero, José M; Doblaré, Manuel; Rodríguez, José F

    2010-07-01

    Many problems in biology and engineering are governed by anisotropic reaction-diffusion equations with a very rapidly varying reaction term. This usually implies the use of very fine meshes and small time steps in order to accurately capture the propagating wave while avoiding the appearance of spurious oscillations in the wave front. This work develops a family of macro finite elements amenable for solving anisotropic reaction-diffusion equations with stiff reactive terms. The developed elements are incorporated on a semi-implicit algorithm based on operator splitting that includes adaptive time stepping for handling the stiff reactive term. A linear system is solved on each time step to update the transmembrane potential, whereas the remaining ordinary differential equations are solved uncoupled. The method allows solving the linear system on a coarser mesh thanks to the static condensation of the internal degrees of freedom (DOF) of the macroelements while maintaining the accuracy of the finer mesh. The method and algorithm have been implemented in parallel. The accuracy of the method has been tested on two- and three-dimensional examples demonstrating excellent behavior when compared to standard linear elements. The better performance and scalability of different macro finite elements against standard finite elements have been demonstrated in the simulation of a human heart and a heterogeneous two-dimensional problem with reentrant activity. Results have shown a reduction of up to four times in computational cost for the macro finite elements with respect to equivalent (same number of DOF) standard linear finite elements as well as good scalability properties.

  12. Evaluation of Segmented Amorphous-Contact Planar Germanium Detectors for Heavy-Element Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Emily G.

    The challenge of improving our understanding of the very heaviest nuclei is at the forefront of contemporary low-energy nuclear physics. In the last two decades, "in-beam" spectroscopy experiments have advanced from Z=98 to Z=104, Rutherfordium, allowing insights into the dynamics of the fission barrier, high-order deformations, and pairing correlations. However, new detector technologies are needed to advance to even heavier nuclei. This dissertation is aimed at evaluating one promising new technology; large segmented planar germanium wafers for this area of research. The current frontier in gamma-ray spectroscopy involves large-volume (>9 cm thick) coaxial detectors that are position sensitive and employ gamma-ray "tracking". In contrast, the detectors assessed in this dissertation are relatively thin (~1 cm) segmented planar wafers with amorphous-germanium strip contacts that can tolerate extremely high gamma-ray count rates, and can accommodate hostile neutron fluxes. They may be the only path to heavier "in-beam" spectroscopy with production rates below 1 nanobarn. The resiliency of these detectors against neutron-induced damage is examined. Two detectors were deliberately subjected to a non-uniform neutron fluence leading to considerable degradation of performance. The neutrons were produced using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at the UMass Lowell Van-de-Graaff accelerator with a 3.7-MeV proton beam incident on a natural Li target. The energy of the neutrons emitted at zero degrees was 2.0 MeV, close to the mean energy of the fission neutron spectrum, and each detector was exposed to a fluence >3.6 x109 n/cm2. A 3-D software "trap-corrector" gain-matching algorithm considerably restored the overall performance. Other neutron damage mitigation tactics were explored including over biasing the detector and flooding the detector with a high gamma-ray count rate. Various annealing processes to remove neutron damage were investigated. An array of very large diameter

  13. Proteins and DNA elements essential for the CRISPR adaptation process in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G; Qimron, Udi

    2012-07-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and their associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas) constitute a recently identified prokaryotic defense mechanism against invading nucleic acids. Activity of the CRISPR/Cas system comprises of three steps: (i) insertion of alien DNA sequences into the CRISPR array to prevent future attacks, in a process called 'adaptation', (ii) expression of the relevant proteins, as well as expression and processing of the array, followed by (iii) RNA-mediated interference with the alien nucleic acid. Here we describe a robust assay in Escherichia coli to explore the hitherto least-studied process, adaptation. We identify essential genes and DNA elements in the leader sequence and in the array which are essential for the adaptation step. We also provide mechanistic insights on the insertion of the repeat-spacer unit by showing that the first repeat serves as the template for the newly inserted repeat. Taken together, our results elucidate fundamental steps in the adaptation process of the CRISPR/Cas system.

  14. Shape-adapting thermoacoustic imaging system based on flexible multi-element transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang; Xing, Da

    2015-08-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging is efficient in detecting the anomaly that has difference in microwave absorption with normal tissue, particularly for breast tumor and foreign objects. However, the traditional circular-scanning TA system needs a large operating space for rotation of the transducers and bulk of coupling medium. The linear-scanning system can overcome these problems partially but usually lose some information and cause image distortion. In order to overcome these limitations, a shape-adapting TA imaging system based on flexible multi-element transducer is proposed in this letter. The experimental results show that this system provides obvious advantages, including shape adaptation, information integrity, and efficient transmission, which make it a preferred choice for biomedical applications, especially for breast tumor detection.

  15. Development of an adaptive failure detection and identification system for detecting aircraft control element failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for designing a failure detection and identification (FDI) system to detect and isolate control element failures in aircraft control systems is reviewed. An FDI system design for a modified B-737 aircraft resulting from this methodology is also reviewed, and the results of evaluating this system via simulation are presented. The FDI system performed well in a no-turbulence environment, but it experienced an unacceptable number of false alarms in atmospheric turbulence. An adaptive FDI system, which adjusts thresholds and other system parameters based on the estimated turbulence level, was developed and evaluated. The adaptive system performed well over all turbulence levels simulated, reliably detecting all but the smallest magnitude partially-missing-surface failures.

  16. Procedure for Tooth Contact Analysis of a Face Gear Meshing With a Spur Gear Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, George; Lewicki, David G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure was developed to perform tooth contact analysis between a face gear meshing with a spur pinion using finite element analysis. The face gear surface points from a previous analysis were used to create a connected tooth solid model without gaps or overlaps. The face gear surface points were used to create a five tooth face gear Patran model (with rim) using Patran PCL commands. These commands were saved in a series of session files suitable for Patran input. A four tooth spur gear that meshes with the face gear was designed and constructed with Patran PCL commands. These commands were also saved in a session files suitable for Patran input. The orientation of the spur gear required for meshing with the face gear was determined. The required rotations and translations are described and built into the session file for the spur gear. The Abaqus commands for three-dimensional meshing were determined and verified for a simplified model containing one spur tooth and one face gear tooth. The boundary conditions, loads, and weak spring constraints were determined to make the simplified model work. The load steps and load increments to establish contact and obtain a realistic load was determined for the simplified two tooth model. Contact patterns give some insight into required mesh density. Building the two gears in two different local coordinate systems and rotating the local coordinate systems was verified as an easy way to roll the gearset through mesh. Due to limitation of swap space, disk space and time constraints of the summer period, the larger model was not completed.

  17. Organic double layer element driven by triboelectric nanogenerator: Study of carrier behavior by non-contact optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-02-01

    By using optical electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) technique, we studied carrier behavior caused by contact electrification (CE) in an organic double-layer element. This double-layer sample was half suspended in the open air, where one electrode (anode or cathode) was connected with a Cu foil for electrification while the other electrode was floated. Results showed two distinct carrier behaviors, depending on the (anode or cathode) connections to the Cu foil, and these carrier behaviors were analyzed based on the Maxwell-Wagner model. The double-layer sample works as a simple solar cell device. The photovoltaic effect and CE process have been proved to be two paralleled effects without strong interaction with each other, while photoconductivity changing in the sample can enhance the relaxation of CE induced charges. By probing the carrier behavior in this half-suspended device, the EFISHG technique has been demonstrated to be an effective non-contact method for clarifying the CE effect on related energy harvesting devices and electronics devices. Meanwhile, the related physical analysis in this letter is also useful for elucidating the fundamental characteristic of hybrid energy system based on solar cell and triboelectric nanogenerator.

  18. The dynamic excitation of a granular chain for biomedical ultrasound applications: contact mechanics finite element analysis and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, P.; Yang, J.; Thomas, P. J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Akanji, O.; Davis, L. A. J.; Freear, S.; Harput, S.; Saffari, N.

    2016-01-01

    There has been recent interest in the transmission of acoustic signals along granular chains of spherical beads to produce waveforms of relevance to biomedical ultrasound applications. Hertzian contact between adjacent beads can introduce different harmonic content into the signal as it propagates. This transduction mechanism has the potential to be of use in both diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound applications, and is the object of the study presented here. Although discrete dynamics models of this behaviour exist, a more comprehensive solution must be sought if changes in shape and deformation of individual beads are to be considered. Thus, the finite element method was used to investigate the dynamics of a granular chain of six, 1 mm diameter chrome steel spherical beads excited at one end using a sinusoidal displacement signal at 73 kHz. Output from this model was compared with the solution provided by the discrete dynamics model, and good overall agreement obtained. In addition, it was able to resolve the complex dynamics of the granular chain, including the multiple collisions which occur. It was demonstrated that under dynamic excitation conditions, the inability of discrete mechanics models to account for elastic deformation of the beads when these lose contact, could lead to discrepancies with experimental observations.

  19. Australopithecus anamensis: a finite-element approach to studying the functional adaptations of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Macho, Gabriele A; Shimizu, Daisuke; Jiang, Yong; Spears, Iain R

    2005-04-01

    Australopithecus anamensis is the stem species of all later hominins and exhibits the suite of characters traditionally associated with hominins, i.e., bipedal locomotion when on the ground, canine reduction, and thick-enameled teeth. The functional consequences of its thick enamel are, however, unclear. Without appropriate structural reinforcement, these thick-enameled teeth may be prone to failure. This article investigates the mechanical behavior of A. anamensis enamel and represents the first in a series that will attempt to determine the functional adaptations of hominin teeth. First, the microstructural arrangement of enamel prisms in A. anamensis teeth was reconstructed using recently developed software and was compared with that of extant hominoids. Second, a finite-element model of a block of enamel containing one cycle of prism deviation was reconstructed for Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and A. anamensis and the behavior of these tissues under compressive stress was determined. Despite similarities in enamel microstructure between A. anamensis and the African great apes, the structural arrangement of prismatic enamel in A. anamensis appears to be more effective in load dissipation under these compressive loads. The findings may imply that this hominin species was well adapted to puncture crushing and are in some respects contrary to expectations based on macromorphology of teeth. Taking together, information obtained from both finite-element analyses and dental macroanatomy leads us to suggest that A. anamensis was probably adapted for habitually consuming a hard-tough diet. However, additional tests are needed to understand the functional adaptations of A. anamensis teeth fully.

  20. Adaptive particle swarm optimization for optimal orbital elements of binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Abdel-Fattah

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO) as an alternative method to determine the optimal orbital elements of the star η Bootis of MK type G0 IV. The proposed algorithm transforms the problem of finding periodic orbits into the problem of detecting global minimizers as a function, to get a best fit of Keplerian and Phase curves. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach of APSO generally more accurate than the standard particle swarm optimization (PSO) and other published optimization algorithms, in terms of solution accuracy, convergence speed and algorithm reliability.

  1. A stable interface element scheme for the p-adaptive lifting collocation penalty formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnone, J. S.; Nadarajah, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a procedure for adaptive polynomial refinement in the context of the lifting collocation penalty (LCP) formulation. The LCP scheme is a high-order unstructured discretization method unifying the discontinuous Galerkin, spectral volume, and spectral difference schemes in single differential formulation. Due to the differential nature of the scheme, the treatment of inter-cell fluxes for spatially varying polynomial approximations is not straightforward. Specially designed elements are proposed to tackle non-conforming polynomial approximations. These elements are constructed such that a conforming interface between polynomial approximations of different degrees is recovered. The stability and conservation properties of the scheme are analyzed and various inviscid compressible flow calculations are performed to demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach.

  2. Least-squares spectral element solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with adaptive refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Sert, Cuneyt

    2012-05-01

    Least-squares spectral element solution of steady, two-dimensional, incompressible flows are obtained by approximating velocity, pressure and vorticity variable set on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodes. Constrained Approximation Method is used for h- and p-type nonconforming interfaces of quadrilateral elements. Adaptive solutions are obtained using a posteriori error estimates based on least squares functional and spectral coefficient. Effective use of p-refinement to overcome poor mass conservation drawback of least-squares formulation and successful use of h- and p-refinement together to solve problems with geometric singularities are demonstrated. Capabilities and limitations of the developed code are presented using Kovasznay flow, flow past a circular cylinder in a channel and backward facing step flow.

  3. Effect of element directivity on adaptive beamforming applied to high-frame-rate ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    High-frame-rate ultrasound is a promising technique for measurement and imaging of cardiovascular dynamics. In high-frame-rate ultrasonic imaging, unfocused ultrasonic beams are used in transmit and multiple focused receiving beams are created by parallel beamforming using the delay and sum (DAS) method. However, the spatial resolution and contrast are degraded compared with conventional beamforming using focused transmit beams. In the present study, the minimum variance beamformer was examined for improvement of the spatial resolution in high-frame-rate ultrasound. In conventional minimum variance beamforming, the spatial covariance matrix of ultrasonic echo signals received by individual transducer elements is obtained without considering the directivity of the transducer element. By omitting the element directivity, the error in estimation of the desired signal (i.e., the echo from the focal point) increases, and as a result, the improvement of the spatial resolution is degraded. In the present study, the element directivity was taken into account in estimation of the spatial covariance matrix used in minimum variance beamforming. The effect of the element directivity on adaptive beamforming was evaluated by computer simulation and basic experiments using a phantom. In parallel beamforming with the conventional DAS beamformer, the lateral spatial resolution, which was evaluated from the lateral full width at half maximum of the echo amplitude profile in the basic experiment, was 0.50 mm. Using conventional amplitude and phase estimation (APES) beamforming, the lateral spatial resolution was improved to 0.37 mm. The lateral spatial resolution was further improved to 0.30 mm using the modified APES beamforming by considering the element directivity. Image contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios, respectively, were -12.3 and 6.5 dB (DAS), -32.8 and -11.3 dB (APES), and -7.0 and 3.1 dB (modified APES).

  4. Development of an adaptive hp-version finite element method for computational optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Warner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    In this research effort, the usefulness of hp-version finite elements and adaptive solution-refinement techniques in generating numerical solutions to optimal control problems has been investigated. Under NAG-939, a general FORTRAN code was developed which approximated solutions to optimal control problems with control constraints and state constraints. Within that methodology, to get high-order accuracy in solutions, the finite element mesh would have to be refined repeatedly through bisection of the entire mesh in a given phase. In the current research effort, the order of the shape functions in each element has been made a variable, giving more flexibility in error reduction and smoothing. Similarly, individual elements can each be subdivided into many pieces, depending on the local error indicator, while other parts of the mesh remain coarsely discretized. The problem remains to reduce and smooth the error while still keeping computational effort reasonable enough to calculate time histories in a short enough time for on-board applications.

  5. An iteratively adaptive multi-scale finite element method for elliptic PDEs with rough coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Liu, Pengfei; Yao, Chien-Chou

    2017-05-01

    We propose an iteratively adaptive Multi-scale Finite Element Method (MsFEM) for elliptic PDEs with rough coefficients. The choice of the local boundary conditions for the multi-sale basis functions determines the accuracy of the MsFEM numerical solution, and one needs to incorporate the global information of the elliptic equation into the local boundary conditions of the multi-scale basis functions to recover the underlying fine-mesh solution of the equation. In our proposed iteratively adaptive method, we achieve this global-to-local information transfer through the combination of coarse-mesh solving using adaptive multi-scale basis functions and fine-mesh smoothing operations. In each iteration step, we first update the multi-scale basis functions based on the approximate numerical solutions of the previous iteration steps, and obtain the coarse-mesh approximate solution using a Galerkin projection. Then we apply several steps of smoothing operations to the coarse-mesh approximate solution on the underlying fine mesh to get the updated approximate numerical solution. The proposed algorithm can be viewed as a nonlinear two-level multi-grid method with the restriction and prolongation operators adapted to the approximate numerical solutions of the previous iteration steps. Convergence analysis of the proposed algorithm is carried out under the framework of two-level multi-grid method, and the harmonic coordinates are employed to establish the approximation property of the adaptive multi-scale basis functions. We demonstrate the efficiency of our proposed multi-scale methods through several numerical examples including a multi-scale coefficient problem, a high-contrast interface problem, and a convection-dominated diffusion problem.

  6. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  7. Mobile genetic elements, a key to microbial adaptation in extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houdt, Rob; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Monsieurs, Pieter; Mergeay, Max; Leys, Natalie

    To ensure well-being of the crew during manned spaceflight, continuous monitoring of different microbial contaminants in air, in water and on surfaces in the spacecraft is vital. Next to microorganisms originating mainly from human activity, strains from the closely related gen-era Cupriavidus and Ralstonia have been identified and isolated during numerous monitoring campaigns from different space-related environments. These strains have been found in the air of the Mars Exploration Rover assembly room, on the surface of the Mars Odyssey Orbiter and in different water sources from the International Space Station, Shuttle and Mir space station. In previous studies, we investigated the response of the model bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 when cultured in the international space station (ISS) and space gravity and radiation simulation facilities, to understand it's ways to adapt to space flight conditions. It was also demonstrated that genetic rearrangements due to the movement of IS (insertion sequence) elements, enabled CH34 to adapt to toxic zinc concentrations, in space flight and on ground. In this study, we screened the full genome sequence of C. metallidurans CH34 for the presence of mobile genetic elements (MGEs), with the purpose to identified their putative role in adaptation to the new environments. Eleven genomic islands (GI) were identified in chro-mosome 1, three on the native plasmid pMOL28 and two on the native plasmid pMOL30. On the plasmids pMOL28 and pMOL30, all genes involved in the response to metals were located within GIs. Three of the GIs on chromosome 1 contained genes involved in the response to metals. Three GIs (CMGI-2, -3 and -4) on chromosome 1 belonged to the Tn4371 family, with CMGI-2 containing at least 25 genes involved in the degradation of toluene corresponding to CH34's ability to grow at expense of toluene, benzene or xylene as sole carbon source. CMGI-3 sheltered accessory genes involved in CO2 fixation and

  8. Complex adaptive systems (CAS): an overview of key elements, characteristics and application to management theory.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beverley; Herbert, Stuart Ian

    2011-01-01

    To identify key elements and characteristics of complex adaptive systems (CAS) relevant to implementing clinical governance, drawing on lessons from quality improvement programmes and the use of informatics in primary care. The research strategy includes a literature review to develop theoretical models of clinical governance of quality improvement in primary care organisations (PCOs) and a survey of PCOs. Complex adaptive system theories are a valuable tool to help make sense of natural phenomena, which include human responses to problem solving within the sampled PCOs. The research commenced with a survey; 76% (n16) of respondents preferred to support the implementation of clinical governance initiatives guided by outputs from general practice electronic health records. There was considerable variation in the way in which consultation data was captured, recorded and organised. Incentivised information sharing led to consensus on coding policies and models of data recording ahead of national contractual requirements. Informatics was acknowledged as a mechanism to link electronic health record outputs, quality improvement and resources. Investment in informatics was identified as a development priority in order to embed clinical governance principles in practice. Complex adaptive system theory usefully describes evolutionary change processes, providing insight into how the origins of quality assurance were predicated on rational reductionism and linearity. New forms of governance do not neutralise previous models, but add further dimensions to them. Clinical governance models have moved from deterministic and 'objective' factors to incorporate cultural aspects with feedback about quality enabled by informatics. The socio-technical lessons highlighted should inform healthcare management.

  9. Adaptive finite element methods for the solution of inverse problems in optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangerth, Wolfgang; Joshi, Amit

    2008-06-01

    Optical tomography attempts to determine a spatially variable coefficient in the interior of a body from measurements of light fluxes at the boundary. Like in many other applications in biomedical imaging, computing solutions in optical tomography is complicated by the fact that one wants to identify an unknown number of relatively small irregularities in this coefficient at unknown locations, for example corresponding to the presence of tumors. To recover them at the resolution needed in clinical practice, one has to use meshes that, if uniformly fine, would lead to intractably large problems with hundreds of millions of unknowns. Adaptive meshes are therefore an indispensable tool. In this paper, we will describe a framework for the adaptive finite element solution of optical tomography problems. It takes into account all steps starting from the formulation of the problem including constraints on the coefficient, outer Newton-type nonlinear and inner linear iterations, regularization, and in particular the interplay of these algorithms with discretizing the problem on a sequence of adaptively refined meshes. We will demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of these algorithms on a set of numerical examples of clinical relevance related to locating lymph nodes in tumor diagnosis.

  10. Adaptive Finite Element Method for Solving the Exact Kohn-Sham Equation of Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Holst, Michael; Weare, John H.

    2009-04-14

    Results of the application of an adaptive finite element (FE) based solution using the FETK library of M. Holst to Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximation to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules are reported. The severe problem associated with the rapid variation of the electronic wave functions in the near singular regions of the atomic centers is treated by implementing completely unstructured simplex meshes that resolve these features around atomic nuclei. This concentrates the computational work in the regions in which the shortest length scales are necessary and provides for low resolution in regions for which there is no electron density. The accuracy of the solutions significantly improved when adaptive mesh refinement was applied, and it was found that the essential difficulties of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues equation were the result of the singular behavior of the atomic potentials. Even though the matrix representations of the discrete Hamiltonian operator in the adaptive finite element basis are always sparse with a linear complexity in the number of discretization points, the overall memory and computational requirements for the solver implemented were found to be quite high. The number of mesh vertices per atom as a function of the atomic number Z and the required accuracy e (in atomic units) was esitmated to be v (e;Z) = 122:37 * Z2:2346 /1:1173 , and the number of floating point operations per minimization step for a system of NA atoms was found to be 0(N3A*v(e,Z0) (e.g. Z=26, e=0.0015 au, and NA=100, the memory requirement and computational cost would be ~0.2 terabytes and ~25 petaflops). It was found that the high cost of the method could be reduced somewhat by using a geometric based refinement strategy to fix the error near the singularities.

  11. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates adaptive IL-22 production and promotes allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Robb, Calum T; McSorley, Henry J; Lee, Jinju; Aoki, Tomohiro; Yu, Cunjing; Crittenden, Siobhan; Astier, Anne; Felton, Jennifer M; Parkinson, Nicholas; Ayele, Adane; Breyer, Richard M; Anderton, Stephen M; Narumiya, Shuh; Rossi, Adriano G; Howie, Sarah E; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Weller, Richard B; Yao, Chengcan

    2017-06-03

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are both forms of eczema and are common inflammatory skin diseases with a central role of T cell-derived IL-22 in their pathogenesis. Although prostaglandin (PG) E2 is known to promote inflammation, little is known about its role in processes related to AD and ACD development, including IL-22 upregulation. We sought to investigate whether PGE2 has a role in IL-22 induction and development of ACD, which has increased prevalence in patients with AD. T-cell cultures and in vivo sensitization of mice with haptens were used to assess the role of PGE2 in IL-22 production. The involvement of PGE2 receptors and their downstream signals was also examined. The effects of PGE2 were evaluated by using the oxazolone-induced ACD mouse model. The relationship of PGE2 and IL-22 signaling pathways in skin inflammation were also investigated by using genomic profiling in human lesional AD skin. PGE2 induces IL-22 from T cells through its receptors, E prostanoid receptor (EP) 2 and EP4, and involves cyclic AMP signaling. Selective deletion of EP4 in T cells prevents hapten-induced IL-22 production in vivo, and limits atopic-like skin inflammation in the oxazolone-induced ACD model. Moreover, both PGE2 and IL-22 pathway genes were coordinately upregulated in human AD lesional skin but were at less than significant detection levels after corticosteroid or UVB treatments. Our results define a crucial role for PGE2 in promoting ACD by facilitating IL-22 production from T cells. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Finite Element Study of the Effect of UHMWPE Liner Thickness on the Contact Area and Stress Distribution in a Bipolar Hip Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamari, J.; Saputra, E.; Anwar, I. B.; Ismail, R.; Heide, E. V. D.

    2017-05-01

    Contact area and stress distribution of the polyethylene liner (PE liner) have a major influence on the wear process. The main factor that affects the contact area and stress on the PE liner is thickness. The International Standards Organization (ISO) recommends a minimum PE liner thickness of 6 mm. However, the thickness of PE liner in a bipolar hip prosthesis has a limited range of motion compared to the unipolar one due to the addition of the outer liner component. Therefore, the study of the effect of PE liner thickness on the contact area and stress distribution in the bipolar model is interesting. Theaim of this research is to investigate the effect of the PE liner thickness to the contact area and stress distribution on the surface of contact between head and PE liner and the contact between outer liner and cup in the bipolar model. This research was carried out by finite element analysis. The results showed that the highest contact stress on the liner occurred at the lowest liner thickness. The maximum contact radius on the liner surface took place at the highest liner thickness. The bipolar model with the liner thickness of 4.5 mm in this research provided the lowest contact stress.

  13. A double-loop structure in the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm for control of robot end-point contact force.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuhuan; Zhu, Jinghai; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-09-01

    Robot force control is an essential issue in robotic intelligence. There is much high uncertainty when robot end-effector contacts with the environment. Because of the environment stiffness effects on the system of the robot end-effector contact with environment, the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm based on quantitative feedback theory is designed for robot end-point contact force system. The controller of the internal loop is designed on the foundation of QFT to control the uncertainty of the system. An adaptive GPC algorithm is used to design external loop controller to improve the performance and the robustness of the system. Two closed loops used in the design approach realize the system׳s performance and improve the robustness. The simulation results show that the algorithm of the robot end-effector contacting force control system is effective.

  14. The alarmin Mrp8/14 as regulator of the adaptive immune response during allergic contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Beatrix; Wolf, Marc; Austermann, Judith; van Lent, Peter; Foell, Dirk; Ahlmann, Martina; Kupas, Verena; Loser, Karin; Sorg, Clemens; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mrp8 and Mrp14 are endogenous alarmins amplifying inflammation via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) activation. Due to their pro-inflammatory properties, alarmins are supposed to enhance adaptive immunity via activation of dendritic cells (DCs). In contrast, analysing a model of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) we observed a more severe disease outcome in Mrp8/14-deficient compared to wild-type mice. This unexpected phenotype was associated with an enhanced T-cell response due to an accelerated maturation of DCs in Mrp8/14-deficient mice. Accordingly, Mrp8, the active component of the heterocomplex, inhibits early DC maturation and antigen presentation in a TLR-4-dependent manner. Transfer of DCs purified from the local lymph nodes of sensitized Mrp8/14-deficient to wild-type mice determined the outcome of ACD. Our results link a pro-inflammatory role of the endogenous TLR-4 ligand Mrp8/14 to a regulatory function in adaptive immunity, which shows some similarities with the ‘hygiene hypothesis' regarding continuous TLR-4 stimulation and decreased risk of allergy. PMID:23188082

  15. Transposable Elements as Stress Adaptive Capacitors Induce Genomic Instability in Fungal Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Sonia; Sharma, Mradul

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in fungal pathogenesis is to elucidate the evolutionary forces responsible for genomic rearrangements leading to races with fitter genotypes. Understanding the adaptive evolutionary mechanisms requires identification of genomic components and environmental factors reshaping the genome of fungal pathogens to adapt. Herein, Magnaporthe oryzae, a model fungal plant pathogen is used to demonstrate the impact of environmental cues on transposable elements (TE) based genome dynamics. For heat shock and copper stress exposed samples, eight TEs belonging to class I and II family were employed to obtain DNA profiles. Stress induced mutant bands showed a positive correlation with dose/duration of stress and provided evidences of TEs role in stress adaptiveness. Further, we demonstrate that genome dynamics differ for the type/family of TEs upon stress exposition and previous reports of stress induced MAGGY transposition has underestimated the role of TEs in M. oryzae. Here, we identified Pyret, MAGGY, Pot3, MINE, Mg-SINE, Grasshopper and MGLR3 as contributors of high genomic instability in M. oryzae in respective order. Sequencing of mutated bands led to the identification of LTR-retrotransposon sequences within regulatory regions of psuedogenes. DNA transposon Pot3 was identified in the coding regions of chromatin remodelling protein containing tyrosinase copper-binding and PWWP domains. LTR-retrotransposons Pyret and MAGGY are identified as key components responsible for the high genomic instability and perhaps these TEs are utilized by M. oryzae for its acclimatization to adverse environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate how common field stresses change genome dynamics of pathogen and provide perspective to explore the role of TEs in genome adaptability, signalling network and its impact on the virulence of fungal pathogens. PMID:24709911

  16. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows. [Adaptive Implicit-Explicit/Grouped Element-by-Element/Generalized Minimum Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  17. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows. [Adaptive Implicit-Explicit/Grouped Element-by-Element/Generalized Minimum Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  18. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Finite Element Elliptic Equations with Random Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchev, D

    2012-04-02

    This thesis presents a two-grid algorithm based on Smoothed Aggregation Spectral Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid (SA-{rho}AMGe) combined with adaptation. The aim is to build an efficient solver for the linear systems arising from discretization of second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with stochastic coefficients. Examples include PDEs that model subsurface flow with random permeability field. During a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation process, that draws PDE coefficient samples from a certain distribution, the PDE coefficients change, hence the resulting linear systems to be solved change. At every such step the system (discretized PDE) needs to be solved and the computed solution used to evaluate some functional(s) of interest that then determine if the coefficient sample is acceptable or not. The MCMC process is hence computationally intensive and requires the solvers used to be efficient and fast. This fact that at every step of MCMC the resulting linear system changes, makes an already existing solver built for the old problem perhaps not as efficient for the problem corresponding to the new sampled coefficient. This motivates the main goal of our study, namely, to adapt an already existing solver to handle the problem (with changed coefficient) with the objective to achieve this goal to be faster and more efficient than building a completely new solver from scratch. Our approach utilizes the local element matrices (for the problem with changed coefficients) to build local problems associated with constructed by the method agglomerated elements (a set of subdomains that cover the given computational domain). We solve a generalized eigenproblem for each set in a subspace spanned by the previous local coarse space (used for the old solver) and a vector, component of the error, that the old solver cannot handle. A portion of the spectrum of these local eigen-problems (corresponding to eigenvalues close to zero) form the

  19. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for plane wave 3-D electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a novel goal-oriented adaptive mesh refinement approach for finite-element methods to model plane wave electromagnetic (EM) fields in 3-D earth models based on the electric field differential equation. To handle complicated models of arbitrary conductivity, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity involving curved boundaries and surface topography, we employ an unstructured grid approach. The electric field is approximated by linear curl-conforming shape functions which guarantee the divergence-free condition of the electric field within each tetrahedron and continuity of the tangential component of the electric field across the interior boundaries. Based on the non-zero residuals of the approximated electric field and the yet to be satisfied boundary conditions of continuity of both the normal component of the total current density and the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior interfaces, three a-posterior error estimators are proposed as a means to drive the goal-oriented adaptive refinement procedure. The first a-posterior error estimator relies on a combination of the residual of the electric field, the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density and the discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field strength across the interior faces shared by tetrahedra. The second a-posterior error estimator is expressed in terms of the discontinuity of the normal component of the total current density (conduction plus displacement current). The discontinuity of the tangential component of the magnetic field forms the third a-posterior error estimator. Analytical solutions for magnetotelluric (MT) and radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) fields impinging on a homogeneous half-space model are used to test the performances of the newly developed goal-oriented algorithms using the above three a-posterior error estimators. A trapezoidal topographical model, using normally incident EM waves

  20. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Losko, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Vallerga, J. V.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods. The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (˜739 ± 98 kPa and ˜751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances) is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ˜758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ˜ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others) containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. The ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.

  1. Non-contact measurement of partial gas pressure and distribution of elemental composition using energy-resolved neutron imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Tremsin, A. S.; Losko, A. S.; Vogel, S. C.; ...

    2017-01-31

    Neutron resonance absorption imaging is a non-destructive technique that can characterize the elemental composition of a sample by measuring nuclear resonances in the spectrum of a transmitted beam. Recent developments in pixelated time-of-flight imaging detectors coupled with pulsed neutron sources pose new opportunities for energy-resolved imaging. In this paper we demonstrate non-contact measurements of the partial pressure of xenon and krypton gases encapsulated in a steel pipe while simultaneously passing the neutron beam through high-Z materials. The configuration was chosen as a proof of principle demonstration of the potential to make non-destructive measurement of gas composition in nuclear fuel rods.more » The pressure measured from neutron transmission spectra (~739 ± 98 kPa and ~751 ± 154 kPa for two Xe resonances) is in relatively good agreement with the pressure value of ~758 ± 21 kPa measured by a pressure gauge. This type of imaging has been performed previously for solids with a spatial resolution of ~ 100 μm. In the present study it is demonstrated that the high penetration capability of epithermal neutrons enables quantitative mapping of gases encapsulate within high-Z materials such as steel, tungsten, urania and others. This technique may be beneficial for the non-destructive testing of bulk composition of objects (such as spent nuclear fuel assemblies and others) containing various elements opaque to other more conventional imaging techniques. As a result, the ability to image the gaseous substances concealed within solid materials also allows non-destructive leak testing of various containers and ultimately measurement of gas partial pressures with sub-mm spatial resolution.« less

  2. Adhesive Measurements of Polymer Bonded Explosive Constituents using the JKR Experimental Technique and Finite Element Modelling of Viscoelastic Adhesive Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Neil; Williamson, David; Lewis, Daniel; Glauser, Annette; Jardine, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown experimentally that under many circumstances the strength limiting factor of Polymer Bonded Explosives (PBXs) is the adhesion which exists between the filler crystals and the polymer matrix. Experimental measurements of the Work of Adhesion between different binders and glass have been conducted using the JKR experimental technique; a reversible axisymmetric fracture experiment in which the area of contact and the applied force are both measured during loading and unloading of the interface. The data taken with this technique show a rate dependence not described by the analytical JKR theory, which considers only elastic bodies, that arises from the viscoelastic properties of the bulk polymer. To understand and describe the effects of viscosity on the adhesive measurements a finite element model (ABAQUS) of the idealized geometry used in the JKR experiment has been constructed. It is intended to bridge the gap between the purely elastic analytical JKR theory and the viscoelastic experimental results. Together, the experimental data and the computational model are intended to inform the development, and validate the predictions of, microstructural models of PBX deformation and failure.

  3. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S. Bijl, Hester

    2009-10-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  4. Adaptive optics vision simulator based on 35 element bimorph deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lina; Dai, Yun; Xiao, Fei; Kang, Jian; Zhao, Haoxin; Bao, Hua; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-09-01

    A novel adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS) is presented and characterized for several design features, including automated measuring and compensating eye's aberrations up to the fifth order, which fully cover aberrations typically found in the human eye, even for the cases of highly aberrated eyes. Especially, it is equipped with 35 elements bimorph deformable mirror with bigger stroke and smaller size, which could help establish near-diffraction-limited ocular optics condition. To investigate the validity of this apparatus, pilot data under different aberration correction pattern from one subjects are collected, and contrast sensitivity function (CSF), an important psychophysical function in vision, is obtained also. Results from living eyes show a practically perfect aberration correction and demonstrate the utility of this system.

  5. A goal-oriented adaptive finite-element approach for multi-electrode resistivity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian

    2014-10-01

    We present a novel accurate and efficient goal-oriented adaptive finite-element method solution for complex multi-electrodes resistivity system with arbitrary smooth surface topographies. A simple Green's function of a half-space model is adopted to eliminate the singularity. A unified boundary value problem for the regular potential is formulated for a multi-electrodes system so that it shares a common system matrix. In addition, a goal-oriented error estimation technique is developed to generate an optimal common grid so that highly accurate solutions are obtained with minimum computation cost. Synthetic models are used to verify our algorithm and excellent agreements are obtained by comparing with other methods.

  6. Active learning: effects of core training design elements on self-regulatory processes, learning, and adaptability.

    PubMed

    Bell, Bradford S; Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a comprehensive examination of the cognitive, motivational, and emotional processes underlying active learning approaches; their effects on learning and transfer; and the core training design elements (exploration, training frame, emotion control) and individual differences (cognitive ability, trait goal orientation, trait anxiety) that shape these processes. Participants (N = 350) were trained to operate a complex, computer-based simulation. Exploratory learning and error-encouragement framing had a positive effect on adaptive transfer performance and interacted with cognitive ability and dispositional goal orientation to influence trainees' metacognition and state goal orientation. Trainees who received the emotion-control strategy had lower levels of state anxiety. Implications for development of an integrated theory of active learning, learner-centered design, and research extensions are discussed.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  8. 3D CSEM inversion based on goal-oriented adaptive finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Key, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present a parallel 3D frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic inversion code name MARE3DEM. Non-linear inversion of observed data is performed with the Occam variant of regularized Gauss-Newton optimization. The forward operator is based on the goal-oriented finite element method that efficiently calculates the responses and sensitivity kernels in parallel using a data decomposition scheme where independent modeling tasks contain different frequencies and subsets of the transmitters and receivers. To accommodate complex 3D conductivity variation with high flexibility and precision, we adopt the dual-grid approach where the forward mesh conforms to the inversion parameter grid and is adaptively refined until the forward solution converges to the desired accuracy. This dual-grid approach is memory efficient, since the inverse parameter grid remains independent from fine meshing generated around the transmitter and receivers by the adaptive finite element method. Besides, the unstructured inverse mesh efficiently handles multiple scale structures and allows for fine-scale model parameters within the region of interest. Our mesh generation engine keeps track of the refinement hierarchy so that the map of conductivity and sensitivity kernel between the forward and inverse mesh is retained. We employ the adjoint-reciprocity method to calculate the sensitivity kernels which establish a linear relationship between changes in the conductivity model and changes in the modeled responses. Our code uses a direcy solver for the linear systems, so the adjoint problem is efficiently computed by re-using the factorization from the primary problem. Further computational efficiency and scalability is obtained in the regularized Gauss-Newton portion of the inversion using parallel dense matrix-matrix multiplication and matrix factorization routines implemented with the ScaLAPACK library. We show the scalability, reliability and the potential of the algorithm to deal with

  9. The influence of contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of cementless total hip arthroplasty: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Reimeringer, M; Nuño, N

    2016-05-03

    Cementless hip stems are fixed to the surrounding bone by means of press-fit. To ensure a good press-fit, current surgical technique specifies an under-reaming of the bone cavity using successively larger broaches. Nevertheless, this surgical technique is inaccurate. Several studies show that the contact ratio (percentage of stem interface in contact with bone) achieved after surgery can vary between 20% and 95%. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of a cementless total hip arthroplasty using finite element analysis. A straight tapered femoral stem implanted in a composite bone was subjected to stair climbing. Micromotion of 7600 nodes at the stem-bone interface was computed for different configurations of contact ratios between 2% and 98%) along the hip stem. Considering the 15 configurations evaluated, the average micromotion ranges between 27μm and 54μm. The percentage of the porous interface of the stem having micromotion below 40μm that allows bone ingrowth range between 25-57%. The present numerical study shows that full contact (100%) between stem and bone is not necessary to obtain a good primary stability. The stem primary stability is influenced by both the contact ratio and its location. Several configurations with contact ratio lower than 100% and involving either the proximal or the cortical contact provide better primary stability than the full contact configuration. However, with contact ratio lower than 40%, the stem should be in contact with cortical bone to ensure a good primary stability.

  10. Wind Forecasting Based on the HARMONIE Model and Adaptive Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Albert; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Escobar, José María; Montero, Gustavo; Hortal, Mariano; Calvo, Javier; Cascón, José Manuel; Montenegro, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method for wind field forecasting over complex terrain. The main idea is to use the predictions of the HARMONIE meso-scale model as the input data for an adaptive finite element mass-consistent wind model. The HARMONIE results (obtained with a maximum resolution of about 1 km) are refined in a local scale (about a few metres). An interface between both models is implemented in such a way that the initial wind field is obtained by a suitable interpolation of the HARMONIE results. Genetic algorithms are used to calibrate some parameters of the local wind field model in accordance to the HARMONIE data. In addition, measured data are considered to improve the reliability of the simulations. An automatic tetrahedral mesh generator, based on the meccano method, is applied to adapt the discretization to complex terrains. The main characteristic of the framework is a minimal user intervention. The final goal is to validate our model in several realistic applications on Gran Canaria island, Spain, with some experimental data obtained by the AEMET in their meteorological stations. The source code of the mass-consistent wind model is available online at http://www.dca.iusiani.ulpgc.es/Wind3D/.

  11. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson−Boltzmann Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson−Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer. PMID:19517026

  12. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J Andrew

    2009-06-09

    The numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer.

  13. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer.

  14. An adaptive finite element approach to modelling sediment laden density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S.; Hill, J.; Allison, P. A.; Piggott, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling sediment-laden density currents at real-world scales is a challenging task. Here we present Fluidity, which uses dynamic adaptive re-meshing to reduce computational costs whilst maintaining sufficient resolution where and when it is required. This allows small-scale processes to be captured in large scale simulations. Density currents, also known as gravity or buoyancy currents, occur wherever two fluids with different densities meet. They can occur at scales of up to hundred kilometres in the ocean when continental shelves collapse. This process releases large quantities of sediment into the ocean which increase the bulk density of the fluid to form a density current. These currents can carry sediment hundreds of kilometres, at speeds of up to a hundred kilometres per hour, over the sea bed. They can be tsunamigenic and they have the potential to cause significant damage to submarine infrastructure, such as submarine telecommunications cables or oil and gas infrastructure. They are also a key process for movement of organic material into the depths of the ocean. Due to this, they play an important role in the global carbon cycle on the Earth, forming a significant component of the stratigraphic record, and their deposits can form useful sources of important hydrocarbons. Modelling large scale sediment laden density currents is a very challenging problem. Particles within the current are suspended by turbulence that occurs at length scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the size of the current. Models that resolve the vertical structure of the flow require a very large, highly resolved mesh, and substantial computing power to solve. Here, we verify our adaptive model by comparison with a set of laboratory experiments by Gladstone et al. [1998] on the propagation and sediment deposition of bidisperse gravity currents. Comparisons are also made with fixed mesh solutions, and it is shown that accuracy can be maintained with fewer elements

  15. Computationally efficient magnetic resonance imaging based surface contact modeling as a tool to evaluate joint injuries and outcomes of surgical interventions compared to finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2014-04-01

    Joint injuries and the resulting posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA) are a significant problem. There is still a need for tools to evaluate joint injuries, their effect on joint mechanics, and the relationship between altered mechanics and OA. Better understanding of injuries and their relationship to OA may aid in the development or refinement of treatment methods. This may be partially achieved by monitoring changes in joint mechanics that are a direct consequence of injury. Techniques such as image-based finite element modeling can provide in vivo joint mechanics data but can also be laborious and computationally expensive. Alternate modeling techniques that can provide similar results in a computationally efficient manner are an attractive prospect. It is likely possible to estimate risk of OA due to injury from surface contact mechanics data alone. The objective of this study was to compare joint contact mechanics from image-based surface contact modeling (SCM) and finite element modeling (FEM) in normal, injured (scapholunate ligament tear), and surgically repaired radiocarpal joints. Since FEM is accepted as the gold standard to evaluate joint contact stresses, our assumption was that results obtained using this method would accurately represent the true value. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the normal, injured, and postoperative wrists of three subjects were acquired when relaxed and during functional grasp. Surface and volumetric models of the radiolunate and radioscaphoid articulations were constructed from the relaxed images for SCM and FEM analyses, respectively. Kinematic boundary conditions were acquired from image registration between the relaxed and grasp images. For the SCM technique, a linear contact relationship was used to estimate contact outcomes based on interactions of the rigid articular surfaces in contact. For FEM, a pressure-overclosure relationship was used to estimate outcomes based on deformable body contact interactions. The SCM

  16. Finite element study of contact pressure distribution on inner and outer liner in the bipolar hip prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Eko; Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    Wear in the hip prosthesis due to sliding contact as a product of human activity is a phenomenon which cannot be avoided. In general, there are two modelof hip prostheses which are widely used in total hip replacement, i.e. unipolar and bipolar models. Wear in the bipolar model is more complex than the unipolar model due to its contact motion. The bipolar model has two contact mechanisms while the unipolar model has only one contact mechanism. It means that the bipolar model has two wear positions, i.e. wear on inner and outer liner surface. Fortunately, wear phenomena in the hip prosthesis can be predicted by analytical or numerical method. Wear on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model itself can be early predicted by contact pressure distribution that is obtained from contact mechanic analysis.The contact pressure distribution itself is an essential variable in wear equations. This paper is aimed to studythe difference of the contact pressure distribution on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model. To obtain the contact pressure distribution at each surface, contact mechanic analysis on the inner and outer liner surface by analytical and numerical method were performed. Results showedthat there was significant difference of the contact pressure distribution on the inner and outer liner surface in the bipolar model. Therefore, it is expected that there is significant wear difference on the inner and outer liner in the bipolar model.

  17. The CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration of adaptive finite element framework for bioluminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Fei; Yang, Xin; Qin, Chenghu; Han, Dong; Ma, Xibo; Liu, Kai; Tian, Jie

    2010-09-13

    In molecular imaging (MI), especially the optical molecular imaging, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) emerges as an effective imaging modality for small animal imaging. The finite element methods (FEMs), especially the adaptive finite element (AFE) framework, play an important role in BLT. The processing speed of the FEMs and the AFE framework still needs to be improved, although the multi-thread CPU technology and the multi CPU technology have already been applied. In this paper, we for the first time introduce a new kind of acceleration technology to accelerate the AFE framework for BLT, using the graphics processing unit (GPU). Besides the processing speed, the GPU technology can get a balance between the cost and performance. The CUBLAS and CULA are two main important and powerful libraries for programming on NVIDIA GPUs. With the help of CUBLAS and CULA, it is easy to code on NVIDIA GPU and there is no need to worry about the details about the hardware environment of a specific GPU. The numerical experiments are designed to show the necessity, effect and application of the proposed CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration. From the results of the experiments, we can reach the conclusion that the proposed CUBLAS and CULA based GPU acceleration method can improve the processing speed of the AFE framework very much while getting a balance between cost and performance.

  18. Dynamic properties of magneto-sensitive elastomer cantilevers as adaptive sensor elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. I.; Raikher, Yu L.; Stolbov, O. V.; Böhm, V.; Zimmermann, K.

    2017-09-01

    In engineering applications, one of the actual scientific challenges is a development of sensor systems with complex adaptive behaviour and operating sensitivity. Smart materials like magneto-sensitive elastomers (MSEs) offer great potential for designing such intelligent devices, because they possess unique magnetic-field dependent properties. This paper deals with the investigation of the free vibrational behaviour displayed by cantilever beams made of MSEs containing magnetically soft particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The presented setup is considered as a prototype of a sensitive unit for transforming mechanical stimuli of the base into vibrations of the MSE element, which could be converted in a facile way into electromagnetic signals for measuring and analysing. It is shown experimentally that for the MSE beams of several different lengths and compositions, the first eigenfrequency depends strongly on the strength of the applied magnetic field. The developed theoretical model extends the conventional vibrational dynamics of thin rods to allow for the ponderomotive torque induced by magneto-mechanical interactions experienced by an MSE beam. The model has two adjustable parameters that characterise the geometric configuration of the cantilever beam and its magnetic material properties. It is found that the values of these parameters are ‘universally’ valid, i.e., they provide good agreement between the theoretical eigenfrequency dependencies and the experimental results for all used MSE beams. The evidence presented ensures a good basis for further investigations of the sensitivity and amplitude-frequency characteristics of MSE vibration sensor elements.

  19. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION.

    PubMed

    Holst, Michael; McCammon, James Andrew; Yu, Zeyun; Zhou, Youngcheng; Zhu, Yunrong

    2012-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L(∞) estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  20. ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR THE POISSON-BOLTZMANN EQUATION

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, MICHAEL; MCCAMMON, JAMES ANDREW; YU, ZEYUN; ZHOU, YOUNGCHENG; ZHU, YUNRONG

    2011-01-01

    We consider the design of an effective and reliable adaptive finite element method (AFEM) for the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE). We first examine the two-term regularization technique for the continuous problem recently proposed by Chen, Holst, and Xu based on the removal of the singular electrostatic potential inside biomolecules; this technique made possible the development of the first complete solution and approximation theory for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the first provably convergent discretization, and also allowed for the development of a provably convergent AFEM. However, in practical implementation, this two-term regularization exhibits numerical instability. Therefore, we examine a variation of this regularization technique which can be shown to be less susceptible to such instability. We establish a priori estimates and other basic results for the continuous regularized problem, as well as for Galerkin finite element approximations. We show that the new approach produces regularized continuous and discrete problems with the same mathematical advantages of the original regularization. We then design an AFEM scheme for the new regularized problem, and show that the resulting AFEM scheme is accurate and reliable, by proving a contraction result for the error. This result, which is one of the first results of this type for nonlinear elliptic problems, is based on using continuous and discrete a priori L∞ estimates to establish quasi-orthogonality. To provide a high-quality geometric model as input to the AFEM algorithm, we also describe a class of feature-preserving adaptive mesh generation algorithms designed specifically for constructing meshes of biomolecular structures, based on the intrinsic local structure tensor of the molecular surface. All of the algorithms described in the article are implemented in the Finite Element Toolkit (FETK), developed and maintained at UCSD. The stability advantages of the new regularization scheme

  1. Methodology to determine skull bone and brain responses from ballistic helmet-to-head contact loading using experiments and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Pintar, Frank A; Philippens, Mat M G M; Zhang, JiangYue; Yoganandan, Narayan

    2013-11-01

    The objective of the study was to obtain helmet-to-head contact forces from experiments, use a human head finite element model to determine regional responses, and compare outputs to skull fracture and brain injury thresholds. Tests were conducted using two types of helmets (A and B) fitted to a head-form. Seven load cells were used on the head-form back face to measure helmet-to-head contact forces. Projectiles were fired in frontal, left, right, and rear directions. Three tests were conducted with each helmet in each direction. Individual and summated force- and impulse-histories were obtained. Force-histories were inputted to the human head-helmet finite element model. Pulse durations were approximately 4 ms. One-third force and impulse were from the central load cell. 0.2% strain and 40 MPa stress limits were not exceeded for helmet-A. For helmet-B, strains exceeded in left, right, and rear; pressures exceeded in bilateral directions; volume of elements exceeding 0.2% strains correlated with the central load cell forces. For helmet-A, volumes exceeding brain pressure threshold were: 5-93%. All elements crossed the pressure limit for helmet-B. For both helmets, no brain elements exceeded peak principal strain limit. These findings advance our understanding of skull and brain biomechanics from helmet-head contact forces. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. An Ectopic CTCF Binding Element Inhibits Tcrd Rearrangement by Limiting Contact between Vδ and Dδ Gene Segments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Lijuan; Alt, Frederick W; Krangel, Michael S

    2016-10-15

    Chromatin looping mediated by the CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) regulates V(D)J recombination at Ag receptor loci. CTCF-mediated looping can influence recombination signal sequence (RSS) accessibility by regulating enhancer activation of germline promoters. CTCF-mediated looping has also been shown to limit directional tracking of the RAG recombinase along chromatin, and to regulate long-distance interactions between RSSs, independent of the RAG recombinase. However, in all prior instances in which CTCF-mediated looping was shown to influence V(D)J recombination, it was not possible to fully resolve the relative contributions to the V(D)J recombination phenotype of changes in accessibility, RAG tracking, and RAG-independent long-distance interactions. In this study, to assess mechanisms by which CTCF-mediated looping can impact V(D)J recombination, we introduced an ectopic CTCF binding element (CBE) immediately downstream of Eδ in the murine Tcra-Tcrd locus. The ectopic CBE impaired inversional rearrangement of Trdv5 in the absence of measurable effects on Trdv5 transcription and chromatin accessibility. The ectopic CBE also limited directional RAG tracking from the Tcrd recombination center, demonstrating that a single CBE can impact the distribution of RAG proteins along chromatin. However, such tracking cannot account for Trdv5-to-Trdd2 inversional rearrangement. Rather, the defect in Trdv5 rearrangement could only be attributed to a reconfigured chromatin loop organization that limited RAG-independent contacts between the Trdv5 and Trdd2 RSSs. We conclude that CTCF can regulate V(D)J recombination by segregating RSSs into distinct loop domains and inhibiting RSS synapsis, independent of any effects on transcription, RSS accessibility, and RAG tracking. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Adaptation mechanism of interlimb coordination in human split-belt treadmill walking through learning of foot contact timing: a robotics study

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Human walking behaviour adaptation strategies have previously been examined using split-belt treadmills, which have two parallel independently controlled belts. In such human split-belt treadmill walking, two types of adaptations have been identified: early and late. Early-type adaptations appear as rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination activities when the belt speeds of the treadmill change between tied (same speed for both belts) and split-belt (different speeds for each belt) configurations. By contrast, late-type adaptations occur after the early-type adaptations as a gradual change and only involve interlimb coordination. Furthermore, interlimb coordination shows after-effects that are related to these adaptations. It has been suggested that these adaptations are governed primarily by the spinal cord and cerebellum, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Because various physiological findings suggest that foot contact timing is crucial to adaptive locomotion, this paper reports on the development of a two-layered control model for walking composed of spinal and cerebellar models, and on its use as the focus of our control model. The spinal model generates rhythmic motor commands using an oscillator network based on a central pattern generator and modulates the commands formulated in immediate response to foot contact, while the cerebellar model modifies motor commands through learning based on error information related to differences between the predicted and actual foot contact timings of each leg. We investigated adaptive behaviour and its mechanism by split-belt treadmill walking experiments using both computer simulations and an experimental bipedal robot. Our results showed that the robot exhibited rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination that were similar to the early-type adaptations observed in humans. In addition, despite the lack of direct interlimb coordination control, gradual changes and after-effects in the

  4. Adaptation mechanism of interlimb coordination in human split-belt treadmill walking through learning of foot contact timing: a robotics study.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Soichiro; Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro; Tomita, Nozomi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2015-09-06

    Human walking behaviour adaptation strategies have previously been examined using split-belt treadmills, which have two parallel independently controlled belts. In such human split-belt treadmill walking, two types of adaptations have been identified: early and late. Early-type adaptations appear as rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination activities when the belt speeds of the treadmill change between tied (same speed for both belts) and split-belt (different speeds for each belt) configurations. By contrast, late-type adaptations occur after the early-type adaptations as a gradual change and only involve interlimb coordination. Furthermore, interlimb coordination shows after-effects that are related to these adaptations. It has been suggested that these adaptations are governed primarily by the spinal cord and cerebellum, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Because various physiological findings suggest that foot contact timing is crucial to adaptive locomotion, this paper reports on the development of a two-layered control model for walking composed of spinal and cerebellar models, and on its use as the focus of our control model. The spinal model generates rhythmic motor commands using an oscillator network based on a central pattern generator and modulates the commands formulated in immediate response to foot contact, while the cerebellar model modifies motor commands through learning based on error information related to differences between the predicted and actual foot contact timings of each leg. We investigated adaptive behaviour and its mechanism by split-belt treadmill walking experiments using both computer simulations and an experimental bipedal robot. Our results showed that the robot exhibited rapid changes in interlimb and intralimb coordination that were similar to the early-type adaptations observed in humans. In addition, despite the lack of direct interlimb coordination control, gradual changes and after-effects in the

  5. Calculation of Contact Pressures and Frictional Effects on Mechanical Contact Surfaces by Finite Element Methods with Application to Fretting Damage Prediction,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    RIGIDINTERFERENCE 00 STRSS-00 SHRINKFT ~ ---...... RIGID EV INTERFERENCEJCNATGPEMNS 0.03" CNATGPEEET APPROX Jf AXISYMMETRIC RING ELEMENTS FE N SYMMETRY...Carolina State University 1 ONR LONDON, ENGLAND 1 Prof. E. Rabinowicz MIT 1 ONR PASADENA 1 Dr. H. D. Hibbitt 3 NRL Hibbit, Karlsson and Sorensen, Inc

  6. Stress Distribution on Short Implants at Maxillary Posterior Alveolar Bone Model with Different Bone-to-Implant Contact Ratio: Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Duygu; Bayram, Burak; Oguz, Yener; Cinar, Duygu; Uckan, Sina

    2015-02-02

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the stress distribution of the short dental implants and bone-to-implant contact ratios in the posterior maxilla using 3D finite element models. Two different 3D maxillary posterior bone segments were modelled. Group 1 was composed of a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and type IV cancellous bone with 100% bone-to-implant contact. Group 2 was analoged as a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and cancellous bone including spherical bone design and homogenous tubular hollow spaced structures with 30% spherical porosities and 70% bone-to-implant contact ratio. 4 mm diameter and 5 mm height dental implants were assumed to be osseointegrated and placed at the center of the segments. 300 N lateral occlusal bite force was applied at a 25 degree inclination to the implants long axis. The maximum von Mises stresses in cortical and cancellous bones; and implant-abutment complex were calculated. The von Mises stress values upon the implants and the cancellous bone around the implants of the 70% bone-to-implant contact group were almost three times higher compared to the values of the 100% bone-to-implant contact group. For clinical reality, use of the 70% model for finite element analysis (FEA) simulation of the posterior maxilla region better represents real alveolar bone and the increased stress and strain distributions evaluated on the cortical and cancellous bone around the dental implants.

  7. Stress Distribution on Short Implants at Maxillary Posterior Alveolar Bone Model With Different Bone-to-Implant Contact Ratio: Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yazicioglu, Duygu; Bayram, Burak; Oguz, Yener; Cinar, Duygu; Uckan, Sina

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of the short dental implants and bone-to-implant contact ratios in the posterior maxilla using 3-dimensional (3D) finite element models. Two different 3D maxillary posterior bone segments were modeled. Group 1 was composed of a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and type IV cancellous bone with 100% bone-to-implant contact. Group 2 was composed of a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and type IV cancellous bone including spherical bone design and homogenous tubular hollow spaced structures with 30% spherical porosities and 70% bone-to-implant contact ratio. Four-millimeter-diameter and 5-mm-height dental implants were assumed to be osseointegrated and placed at the center of the segments. Lateral occlusal bite force (300 N) was applied at a 25° inclination to the implants long axis. The maximum von Mises stresses in cortical and cancellous bones and implant-abutment complex were calculated. The von Mises stress values on the implants and the cancellous bone around the implants of the 70% bone-to-implant contact group were almost 3 times higher compared with the values of the 100% bone-to-implant contact group. For clinical reality, use of the 70% model for finite element analysis simulation of the posterior maxilla region better represents real alveolar bone and the increased stress and strain distributions evaluated on the cortical and cancellous bone around the dental implants.

  8. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    High resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two, and three-dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring mesh performance in capturing the range of dynamics. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. Use of discontinuous discretisations and adaptive unstructured meshing technologies, which reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude, results in high resolution DNS models of turbidity currents at a fraction of the cost of traditional FE models. The benefits of this technique will enable simulation of turbidity currents in complex and large domains where DNS modelling was previously unachievable.

  9. Importance of Mobile Genetic Elements and Conjugal Gene Transfer for Subsurface Microbial Community Adaptation to Biotransformation of Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Soren J.

    2005-06-01

    The overall goal of this project is to investigate the effect of mobile genetic elements and conjugal gene transfer on subsurface microbial community adaptation to mercury and chromium stress and biotransformation. Our studies focus on the interaction between the fate of these metals in the subsurface and the microbial community structure and activity.

  10. Adaptive sparsest narrow-band decomposition method and its applications to rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Junsheng; Peng, Yanfeng; Yang, Yu; Wu, Zhantao

    2017-02-01

    Enlightened by ASTFA method, adaptive sparsest narrow-band decomposition (ASNBD) method is proposed in this paper. In ASNBD method, an optimized filter must be established at first. The parameters of the filter are determined by solving a nonlinear optimization problem. A regulated differential operator is used as the objective function so that each component is constrained to be a local narrow-band signal. Afterwards, the signal is filtered by the optimized filter to generate an intrinsic narrow-band component (INBC). ASNBD is proposed aiming at solving the problems existed in ASTFA. Gauss-Newton type method, which is applied to solve the optimization problem in ASTFA, is irreplaceable and very sensitive to initial values. However, more appropriate optimization method such as genetic algorithm (GA) can be utilized to solve the optimization problem in ASNBD. Meanwhile, compared with ASTFA, the decomposition results generated by ASNBD have better physical meaning by constraining the components to be local narrow-band signals. Comparisons are made between ASNBD, ASTFA and EMD by analyzing simulation and experimental signals. The results indicate that ASNBD method is superior to the other two methods in generating more accurate components from noise signal, restraining the boundary effect, possessing better orthogonality and diagnosing rolling element bearing fault.

  11. Diallel analysis for mineral element absorption in tropical adapted soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill].

    PubMed

    Spehar, C R

    1995-04-01

    The Brazilian tropical adapted soybeans contains, in addition to superior morphological characters, genetic factors for tolerance to cultivation in acidic, mineral-stressed soils. However, the selection process for these hindrances has been empirical, and information on the genetics of mineral element uptake by the plant is necessary. The objective of this investigation was to identify the mode of inheritance for the absorption of phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, aluminium, manganese, zinc and copper in a 9 × 9 diallel cross. General combining ability (GCA) was higher than specific combining ability (SCA), with the exception of copper, manganese and zinc, indicating predominantly additive effects. The ratios of GCA/SCA varied between 3.4 (calcium) and 8.5 (magnesium). The regression of covariance (Wr) on variance (Vr) showed that the additive-dominance model explained the genetic differences in this germ plasm. However, the detection of overdominance could be related to possible heterozygosity in the parental varieties for mineral absorption. Broad-sense heritability values were higher than narrow sense heritability values for aluminium, iron, potassium, calcium and magnesium, being in the range of 67.9-86.9% and 42.0-56.6%, respectively. This is an indication that soybeans can be further improved to efficient utilisation of nutrients and to tolerate toxic factors in the soil.

  12. Adaptive Data Gathering in Mobile Sensor Networks Using Speedy Mobile Elements

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongxuan; Xie, Jinshan; Lin, Ziyu; Wang, Tian; Liao, Minghong

    2015-01-01

    Data gathering is a key operator for applications in wireless sensor networks; yet it is also a challenging problem in mobile sensor networks when considering that all nodes are mobile and the communications among them are opportunistic. This paper proposes an efficient data gathering scheme called ADG that adopts speedy mobile elements as the mobile data collector and takes advantage of the movement patterns of the network. ADG first extracts the network meta-data at initial epochs, and calculates a set of proxy nodes based on the meta-data. Data gathering is then mapped into the Proxy node Time Slot Allocation (PTSA) problem that schedules the time slots and orders, according to which the data collector could gather the maximal amount of data within a limited period. Finally, the collector follows the schedule and picks up the sensed data from the proxy nodes through one hop of message transmissions. ADG learns the period when nodes are relatively stationary, so that the collector is able to pick up the data from them during the limited data gathering period. Moreover, proxy nodes and data gathering points could also be timely updated so that the collector could adapt to the change of node movements. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed scheme outperforms other data gathering schemes on the cost of message transmissions and the data gathering rate, especially under the constraint of limited data gathering period. PMID:26389903

  13. Viscous regularization and r-adaptive remeshing for finite element analysis of lipid membrane mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Klug, William S.

    2008-05-01

    As two-dimensional fluid shells, lipid bilayer membranes resist bending and stretching but are unable to sustain shear stresses. This property gives membranes the ability to adopt dramatic shape changes. In this paper, a finite element model is developed to study static equilibrium mechanics of membranes. In particular, a viscous regularization method is proposed to stabilize tangential mesh deformations and improve the convergence rate of nonlinear solvers. The augmented Lagrangian method is used to enforce global constraints on area and volume during membrane deformations. As a validation of the method, equilibrium shapes for a shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicle are calculated. These numerical techniques are also shown to be useful for simulations of three-dimensional large deformation problems: the formation of tethers (long tube-like extensions); and Ginzburg-Landau phase separation of a two lipid-component vesicle. To deal with the large mesh distortions of the two-phase model, modification of viscous regularization is explored to achieve r-adaptive mesh optimization.

  14. Scalable parallel inversion of electromagnetic induction data using unstructured grids and goal oriented adaptive finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Large arrays of electromagnetic data are now routinely collected to image the electrical conductivity structure of the crust and mantle for purposes ranging from the study of tectonics and volcanism to resource exploration and environmental mapping. The non-linear inversion of electromagnetic data requires the relatively expensive solution of Maxwell's equations at each step, making it a computationally demanding problem. This works presents a scalable parallel method for electromagnetic inversion that allows for increasingly larger data sets to be modeled. The forward problem is simulated using unstructured modeling grids that allow for complicated topography and other known structures to be easily and efficiently represented by the model parameterization. A highly scalable parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element method automatically generates and refines the forward modeling grid, ensuring accurate electromagnetic responses at the locations of the electromagnetic receiver array. Non-linear inversion is carried out with a regularized Gauss-Newton inversion approach where the dense matrix operations are optimized for memory and parallel scalability using the ScaLAPACK parallel library.

  15. Finite element analysis of low-cost membrane deformable mirrors for high-order adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, Robert S.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Makidon, Russell B.

    1999-10-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of glass membrane deformable mirror (DM) support structures intended for very high order low-stroke adaptive optics systems. We investigated commercially available piezoelectric ceramics. Piezoelectric tubes were determined to offer the largest amount of stroke for a given amount of space on the mirror surface that each actuator controls. We estimated the minimum spacing and the maximum expected stroke of such actuators. We developed a quantitative understanding of the response of a membrane mirror surface by performing a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) study. The results of the FEA analysis were used to develop a design and fabrication process for membrane deformable mirrors of 200 - 500 micron thicknesses. Several different values for glass thickness and actuator spacing were analyzed to determine the best combination of actuator stoke and surface deformation quality. We considered two deformable mirror configurations. The first configuration uses a vacuum membrane attachment system where the actuator tubes' central holes connect to an evacuated plenum, and atmospheric pressure holds the membrane against the actuators. This configuration allows the membrane to be removed from the actuators, facilitating easy replacement of the glass. The other configuration uses precision bearing balls epoxied to the ends of the actuator tubes, with the glass membrane epoxied to the ends of the ball bearings. While this kind of DM is not serviceable, it allows actuator spacings of 4 mm, in addition to large stroke. Fabrication of a prototype of the latter kind of DM was started.

  16. Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza Isolates from Wild Birds Replicate and Transmit via Contact in Ferrets without Prior Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Humberd-Smith, Jennifer; Gordy, James T.; Bradley, Konrad C.; Steinhauer, David A.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Stallknecht, David E.; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Tompkins, Stephen Mark

    2012-01-01

    Direct transmission of avian influenza viruses to mammals has become an increasingly investigated topic during the past decade; however, isolates that have been primarily investigated are typically ones originating from human or poultry outbreaks. Currently there is minimal comparative information on the behavior of the innumerable viruses that exist in the natural wild bird host. We have previously demonstrated the capacity of numerous North American avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds to infect and induce lesions in the respiratory tract of mice. In this study, two isolates from shorebirds that were previously examined in mice (H1N9 and H6N1 subtypes) are further examined through experimental inoculations in the ferret with analysis of viral shedding, histopathology, and antigen localization via immunohistochemistry to elucidate pathogenicity and transmission of these viruses. Using sequence analysis and glycan binding analysis, we show that these avian viruses have the typical avian influenza binding pattern, with affinity for cell glycoproteins/glycolipids having terminal sialic acid (SA) residues with α 2,3 linkage [Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal]. Despite the lack of α2,6 linked SA binding, these AIVs productively infected both the upper and lower respiratory tract of ferrets, resulting in nasal viral shedding and pulmonary lesions with minimal morbidity. Moreover, we show that one of the viruses is able to transmit to ferrets via direct contact, despite its binding affinity for α 2,3 linked SA residues. These results demonstrate that avian influenza viruses, which are endemic in aquatic birds, can potentially infect humans and other mammals without adaptation. Finally this work highlights the need for additional study of the wild bird subset of influenza viruses in regard to surveillance, transmission, and potential for reassortment, as they have zoonotic potential. PMID:22675507

  17. Low pathogenic avian influenza isolates from wild birds replicate and transmit via contact in ferrets without prior adaptation.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Elizabeth A; Pickens, Jennifer A; Humberd-Smith, Jennifer; Gordy, James T; Bradley, Konrad C; Steinhauer, David A; Berghaus, Roy D; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Tompkins, Stephen Mark

    2012-01-01

    Direct transmission of avian influenza viruses to mammals has become an increasingly investigated topic during the past decade; however, isolates that have been primarily investigated are typically ones originating from human or poultry outbreaks. Currently there is minimal comparative information on the behavior of the innumerable viruses that exist in the natural wild bird host. We have previously demonstrated the capacity of numerous North American avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds to infect and induce lesions in the respiratory tract of mice. In this study, two isolates from shorebirds that were previously examined in mice (H1N9 and H6N1 subtypes) are further examined through experimental inoculations in the ferret with analysis of viral shedding, histopathology, and antigen localization via immunohistochemistry to elucidate pathogenicity and transmission of these viruses. Using sequence analysis and glycan binding analysis, we show that these avian viruses have the typical avian influenza binding pattern, with affinity for cell glycoproteins/glycolipids having terminal sialic acid (SA) residues with α 2,3 linkage [Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal]. Despite the lack of α2,6 linked SA binding, these AIVs productively infected both the upper and lower respiratory tract of ferrets, resulting in nasal viral shedding and pulmonary lesions with minimal morbidity. Moreover, we show that one of the viruses is able to transmit to ferrets via direct contact, despite its binding affinity for α 2,3 linked SA residues. These results demonstrate that avian influenza viruses, which are endemic in aquatic birds, can potentially infect humans and other mammals without adaptation. Finally this work highlights the need for additional study of the wild bird subset of influenza viruses in regard to surveillance, transmission, and potential for reassortment, as they have zoonotic potential.

  18. An adaptive control volume finite element method for simulation of multi-scale flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaghimi, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Gorman, G.; Jackson, M.; Neethling, S.; Pain, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase flow in porous media is of importance in a wide range of applications in science and engineering. We present a novel control volume finite element method (CVFEM) to solve for multi-scale flow in heterogeneous geological formations. It employs a node centred control volume approach to discretize the saturation equation, while a control volume finite element method is applied for the pressure equation. We embed the discrete continuity equation into the pressure equation and assure that the continuity is exactly enforced. Anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to accurately model the fine grained features of multiphase flow. The adaptive algorithm uses a metric tensor field based on solution error estimates to locally control the size and shape of elements in the metric. Moreover, it uses metric advection between adaptive meshes in order to predict the future required density of mesh thereby reducing numerical dispersion at the saturation front. The scheme is capable of capturing multi-scale heterogeneity such as those in fractured porous media through the use of several constraints on the element size in different regions of porous media. We show the application of our method for simulation of flow in some challenging benchmark problems. For flow in fractured reservoirs, the scheme adapts the mesh as the flow penetrates through the fracture and the matrix. The constraints for the element size within the fracture are smaller by several orders of magnitude than the generated mesh within the matrix. We show that the scheme captures the key multi-scale features of flow while preserving the geometry. We demonstrate that mesh adaptation can be used to accurately simulate flow in heterogeneous porous media at low computational cost.

  19. Elasto-plastic coupled temperature-displacement finite element analysis of two-dimensional rolling-sliding contact with a translating heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, C. A.; Hahn, G. T.; Kulkarni, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper describes a transient translating elastoplastic thermomechanical finite element model to study two-dimensional frictional rolling contact. Frictional two-dimensional contact is simulated by repeatedly translating a nonuniform thermomechanical distribution across the surface of an elastoplastic half space. The half space is represented by a two-dimensional finite element mesh with appropriate boundaries. Calculations are for an elastic-perfectly plastic material and the selected thermophysical properties are assumed to be temperature independent. The paper presents temperature variations, stress and plastic strain distributions and deformations. Residual tensile stresses are observed. The magnitude and depth of these stresses depends on (1) the temperature gradients and (2) the magnitudes of the normal and tangential tractions.

  20. Contact anisotropy and coordination number for a granular assembly: a comparison of distinct-element-method simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    La Ragione, Luigi; Magnanimo, Vanessa

    2012-03-01

    We study an ideal granular aggregate consisting of elastic spherical particles, isotropic in stress and anisotropic in the contact network. Because of the contact anisotropy, a confining pressure applied at zero deviatoric stress, produces shear strain as well as volume strain. Our goal is to predict the coordination number k, the average number of contacts per particle, and the magnitude of the contact anisotropy ɛ, from knowledge of the elastic moduli of the aggregate. We do this through a theoretical model based upon the well known effective medium theory. However, rather than focusing on the moduli, we consider their ratios over the moduli of an equivalent isotropic state. We observe good agreement between numerical simulation and theory.

  1. Analysis of distribution rule of surface stress on cross wedge rolling contact zone by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xuedao; Li, Lianpeng; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Contact surface of cross-wedge rolling is a complicated space surface and distribution rule of contact surface stress is very complicated. So far, its analyzed result was still based on slippery line method. Designing mould and actual production mainly depend on experiential factor. Application and development of cross-wedge rolling was baffled seriously. Based on the forming characteristics of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape, the ANSYS/DYNA software was developed secondly on the basis of itself, and the corresponding command program was compiled. Rolling process of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape was simulated successfully. Through simulation, space surface shape of contact surface was achieved, and distribution rule of contact surface stress was analyzed detailed and obtained. The results provide important theoretical foundation for avoiding appearing bug on surface of rolled part, instructing to design cross-wedge mould and confirming force and energy parameter.

  2. Linear-Elastic 2D and 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test Coupon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    approximate 3D solution for the stress distribution around a circular cylindrical hole in an infinite plate of arbitrary thickness. They did this by...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Linear-Elastic 2D and 3D Finite Element Contact Analysis of a Hole Containing a Circular Insert in a Fatigue Test...large numbers of circular holes that are fitted with fasteners such as bolts or rivets. During the service life of aircraft, fatigue damage often occurs

  3. Parallel contact detection algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using PRONTO3D

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating material surface contacts in solid mechanics finite element programs has been implemented in a modular way for MIMD parallel computers. The serial contact detection algorithm that was developed previously for the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO3D has been extended for use in parallel computation by devising a dynamic (adaptive) processor load balancing scheme.

  4. Determination of remodeling parameters for a strain-adaptive finite element model of the distal ulna.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Mark A C; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-09-01

    Strain energy-based adaptive material models are used to predict bone resorption resulting from stress shielding induced by prosthetic joint implants. Generally, such models are governed by two key parameters: a homeostatic strain-energy state (K) and a threshold deviation from this state required to initiate bone reformation (s). A refinement procedure has been performed to estimate these parameters in the femur and glenoid; this study investigates the specific influences of these parameters on resulting density distributions in the distal ulna. A finite element model of a human ulna was created using micro-computed tomography (µCT) data, initialized to a homogeneous density distribution, and subjected to approximate in vivo loading. Values for K and s were tested, and the resulting steady-state density distribution compared with values derived from µCT images. The sensitivity of these parameters to initial conditions was examined by altering the initial homogeneous density value. The refined model parameters selected were then applied to six additional human ulnae to determine their performance across individuals. Model accuracy using the refined parameters was found to be comparable with that found in previous studies of the glenoid and femur, and gross bone structures, such as the cortical shell and medullary canal, were reproduced. The model was found to be insensitive to initial conditions; however, a fair degree of variation was observed between the six specimens. This work represents an important contribution to the study of changes in load transfer in the distal ulna following the implementation of commercial orthopedic implants.

  5. An adaptive Newton continuation strategy for the fully implicit finite element immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, R. H. W.; Linsenmann, C.

    2012-05-01

    The immersed boundary method (IB) is known as a powerful technique for the numerical solution of fluid-structure interaction problems as, for instance, the motion and deformation of viscoelastic bodies immersed in an external flow. It is based on the treatment of the flow equations within an Eulerian framework and of the equations of motion of the immersed bodies with respect to a Lagrangian coordinate system including interaction equations providing the transfer between both frames. The classical IB uses finite differences, but the IBM can be set up within a finite element approach in the spatial variables as well (FE-IB). The discretization in time usually relies on the Backward Euler (BE) method for the semidiscretized flow equations and the Forward Euler (FE) method for the equations of motion of the immersed bodies. The BE/FE FE-IB is subject to a CFL-type condition, whereas the fully implicit BE/BE FE-IB is unconditionally stable. The latter one can be solved numerically by Newton-type methods whose convergence properties are dictated by an appropriate choice of the time step size, in particular, if one is faced with sudden changes in the total energy of the system. In this paper, taking advantage of the well developed affine covariant convergence theory for Newton-type methods, we study a predictor-corrector continuation strategy in time with an adaptive choice of the continuation steplength. The feasibility of the approach and its superiority to BE/FE FE-IB is illustrated by two representative numerical examples.

  6. Three-dimensional multi bioluminescent sources reconstruction based on adaptive finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xibo; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing; Xue, Zhenwen; Dong, Di; Han, Dong

    2011-03-01

    Among many optical molecular imaging modalities, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has more and more wide application in tumor detection and evaluation of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, pharmacokinetics because of its noninvasive molecular and cellular level detection ability, high sensitivity and low cost in comparison with other imaging technologies. However, BLI can not present the accurate location and intensity of the inner bioluminescence sources such as in the bone, liver or lung etc. Bioluminescent tomography (BLT) shows its advantage in determining the bioluminescence source distribution inside a small animal or phantom. Considering the deficiency of two-dimensional imaging modality, we developed three-dimensional tomography to reconstruct the information of the bioluminescence source distribution in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone with the boundary measured data. In this paper, to study the osteocalcin (OC) accumulation in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone, a BLT reconstruction method based on multilevel adaptive finite element (FEM) algorithm was used for localizing and quantifying multi bioluminescence sources. Optical and anatomical information of the tissues are incorporated as a priori knowledge in this method, which can reduce the ill-posedness of BLT. The data was acquired by the dual modality BLT and Micro CT prototype system that was developed by us. Through temperature control and absolute intensity calibration, a relative accurate intensity can be calculated. The location of the OC accumulation was reconstructed, which was coherent with the principle of bone differentiation. This result also was testified by ex vivo experiment in the black 96-plate well using the BLI system and the chemiluminescence apparatus.

  7. Adaptation of H9N2 AIV in guinea pigs enables efficient transmission by direct contact and inefficient transmission by respiratory droplets.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Airong; Ding, Jie; Kong, Huihui; Gao, Xiaolong; Li, Lin; Chai, Tongjie; Li, Yuanguo; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Chengyu; Wan, Zhonghai; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Qian, Jun; Hu, Guixue; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-11-10

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulate worldwide in poultry and have sporadically infected humans, raising concern whether H9N2 viruses have pandemic potential. Here, we use a guinea pig model to examine whether serial passage results in adaptive viral changes that confer a transmissible phenotype to a wild-type H9N2 virus. After nine serial passages of an H9N2 virus through guinea pigs, productive transmission by direct contact occurred in 2/3 guinea pig pairs. The efficiency of transmission by direct contact increased following the fifteenth passage and occurred in 3/3 guinea pig pairs. In contrast, airborne transmission of the passaged virus was less efficient and occurred in 1/6 guinea pig pairs and 0/6 ferret pairs after the fifteenth passage. Three amino acid substitutions, HA1-Q227P, HA2-D46E, and NP-E434K, were sufficient for contact transmission in guinea pigs (2/3 pairs). The two HA amino acid substitutions enhanced receptor binding to α2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Additionally, the HA2-D46E substitution increased virus thermostability whereas the NP-E434K mutation enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity in vitro. Our findings suggest that adaptive changes that enhance viral receptor binding, thermostability, and replicative capacity in mammalian cells can collectively enhance the transmissibility of H9N2 AIVs by direct contact in the guinea pig model.

  8. Adaptation of H9N2 AIV in guinea pigs enables efficient transmission by direct contact and inefficient transmission by respiratory droplets

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Airong; Ding, Jie; Kong, Huihui; Gao, Xiaolong; Li, Lin; Chai, Tongjie; Li, Yuanguo; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Chengyu; Wan, Zhonghai; Huang, Geng; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Qian, Jun; Hu, Guixue; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses circulate worldwide in poultry and have sporadically infected humans, raising concern whether H9N2 viruses have pandemic potential. Here, we use a guinea pig model to examine whether serial passage results in adaptive viral changes that confer a transmissible phenotype to a wild-type H9N2 virus. After nine serial passages of an H9N2 virus through guinea pigs, productive transmission by direct contact occurred in 2/3 guinea pig pairs. The efficiency of transmission by direct contact increased following the fifteenth passage and occurred in 3/3 guinea pig pairs. In contrast, airborne transmission of the passaged virus was less efficient and occurred in 1/6 guinea pig pairs and 0/6 ferret pairs after the fifteenth passage. Three amino acid substitutions, HA1-Q227P, HA2-D46E, and NP-E434K, were sufficient for contact transmission in guinea pigs (2/3 pairs). The two HA amino acid substitutions enhanced receptor binding to α2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Additionally, the HA2-D46E substitution increased virus thermostability whereas the NP-E434K mutation enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity in vitro. Our findings suggest that adaptive changes that enhance viral receptor binding, thermostability, and replicative capacity in mammalian cells can collectively enhance the transmissibility of H9N2 AIVs by direct contact in the guinea pig model. PMID:26552719

  9. An Analysis of a Finite Element Method for Convection-Diffusion Problems. Part II. A Posteriori Error Estimates and Adaptivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N G SZYMCZAK ET AL. MAR 83 BN-i@82 F/G 12/1 NL I hhhhhhh EhhhhhhhhhhhE mhhhhomhhlhhhEIEEIEEEEEIlUso o.4 Q.8 L-A -J1 IIIII1 L MICROCOPY...AN ANALYSIS OF A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION-DIFFUSION PROBLEMS PART II: A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY by W. G. Szymczak Y 6a...ESTIMATES AND ADAPTIVITY 6. PERFORMING OR. REPORT NMBER 7. AUTNOR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUM11CR’ s) W. G. Szymczak and I. Babu~ka ONR N00014-77-0623 S

  10. Therapeutic Array Transducer Element Using Coresonance between Hemispherical Piezoceramic Shell and Water Sphere: Effect of Load Masses of Support and Electric Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsu, Kenji; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    For therapeutic ultrasound array transducers, it is necessary to reduce the electrical impedance of their elements so that the transducer can produce high ultrasonic power at a relatively low drive voltage. For this purpose, a new concept of a breathing-mode piezoceramic transducer element has been proposed. Numerical simulation showed its low electric impedance as well as good acoustical coupling between the concave hemispherical piezoceramic shell, with a diameter on the order of a wavelength in water, and the volume of a water sphere half enclosed by the shell. In the preparation of a prototype transducer, the effect of additional load masses of the flange supporting the shell and the electric contact for driving the element was numerically analyzed in this paper.

  11. Rolling-element fatigue life with traction fluids and automatic transmission fluid in a high-speed rolling-contact rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Nahm, A. H.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were run in standard and high-speed rolling-contact rigs at bar speeds from 5000 to 50,000 rpm to determine the effects of speed and lubricant film parameter on rolling-element fatigue life. AISI 52100 test bars were tested at a maximum Hertz stress of 4.83 GPa (700,000 psi) with three traction fluids and an automatic transmission fluid. Rolling-element fatigue life increased with speed, with the greatest increases occurring from 10,000 to 50,000 rpm. The life data tended to follow published life-versus-lubricant-film-parameter data up to a film parameter of approximately 3.

  12. Multi-element array signal reconstruction with adaptive least-squares algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1992-01-01

    Two versions of the adaptive least-squares algorithm are presented for combining signals from multiple feeds placed in the focal plane of a mechanical antenna whose reflector surface is distorted due to various deformations. Coherent signal combining techniques based on the adaptive least-squares algorithm are examined for nearly optimally and adaptively combining the outputs of the feeds. The performance of the two versions is evaluated by simulations. It is demonstrated for the example considered that both of the adaptive least-squares algorithms are capable of offsetting most of the loss in the antenna gain incurred due to reflector surface deformations.

  13. Concentrations of Elements in Sediments and Selective Fractions of Sediments, and in Natural Waters in Contact with Sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Wagner, Richard J.; Sanzolone, Richard F.; Cox, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-eight composite and replicate sediment samples from 8 Lake Roosevelt sites were collected and analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 2 non-metals, 20 metals, and 4 lanthanide and actinide elements. All elements were detected in all sediment samples except for silver (95 percent of the elements detected for 1,008 analyses), which was detected only in 4 samples. Sequential selective extraction procedures were performed on single composite samples from the eight sites. The percentage of detections for the 31 elements analyzed ranged from 76 percent for the first extraction fraction using a weak extractant to 93 percent for the four-acid dissolution of the sediments remaining after the third sequential selective extraction. Water samples in various degrees of contact with the sediment were analyzed for 10 alkali and alkaline earth elements, 5 non-metals, 25 metals, and 16 lanthanide and actinide elements. The filtered water samples included 10 samples from the reservoir water column at 8 sites, 32 samples of porewater, 55 samples from reservoir water overlying sediments in 8 cores from the site incubated in a field laboratory, and 24 water samples that were filtered after being tumbled with sediments from 8 sites. Overall, the concentrations of only 37 percent of the 6,776 analyses of the 121 water samples were greater than the reporting limit. Selenium, bismuth, chromium, niobium, silver, and zirconium were not detected in any water samples. The percentage of concentrations for the water samples that were above the reporting limit ranged from 14 percent for the lanthanide and actinide elements to 77 percent for the alkali and alkaline earth elements. Concentrations were greater than reporting limits in only 23 percent of the analyses of reservoir water and 29 percent of the analyses of reservoir water overlying incubation cores. In contrast, 47 and 48 percent of the concentrations of porewater and water samples tumbled with sediments, respectively

  14. Application of fluidic lens technology to an adaptive holographic optical element see-through autophoropter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancy, Carl H.

    A device for performing an objective eye exam has been developed to automatically determine ophthalmic prescriptions. The closed loop fluidic auto-phoropter has been designed, modeled, fabricated and tested for the automatic measurement and correction of a patient's prescriptions. The adaptive phoropter is designed through the combination of a spherical-powered fluidic lens and two cylindrical fluidic lenses that are orientated 45o relative to each other. In addition, the system incorporates Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing technology to identify the eye's wavefront error and corresponding prescription. Using the wavefront error information, the fluidic auto-phoropter nulls the eye's lower order wavefront error by applying the appropriate volumes to the fluidic lenses. The combination of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor the fluidic auto-phoropter allows for the identification and control of spherical refractive error, as well as cylinder error and axis; thus, creating a truly automated refractometer and corrective system. The fluidic auto-phoropter is capable of correcting defocus error ranging from -20D to 20D and astigmatism from -10D to 10D. The transmissive see-through design allows for the observation of natural scenes through the system at varying object planes with no additional imaging optics in the patient's line of sight. In this research, two generations of the fluidic auto-phoropter are designed and tested; the first generation uses traditional glass optics for the measurement channel. The second generation of the fluidic auto-phoropter takes advantage of the progress in the development of holographic optical elements (HOEs) to replace all the traditional glass optics. The addition of the HOEs has enabled the development of a more compact, inexpensive and easily reproducible system without compromising its performance. Additionally, the fluidic lenses were tested during a National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) parabolic flight campaign, to

  15. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence. PMID:26085698

  16. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence.

  17. On the performance of a generic length scale turbulence model within an adaptive finite element ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jon; Piggott, M. D.; Ham, David A.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Research into the use of unstructured mesh methods for ocean modelling has been growing steadily in the last few years. One advantage of using unstructured meshes is that one can concentrate resolution where it is needed. In addition, dynamic adaptive mesh optimisation (DAMO) strategies allow resolution to be concentrated when this is required. Despite the advantage that DAMO gives in terms of improving the spatial resolution where and when required, small-scale turbulence in the oceans still requires parameterisation. A two-equation, generic length scale (GLS) turbulence model (one equation for turbulent kinetic energy and another for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) adds this parameterisation and can be used in conjunction with adaptive mesh techniques. In this paper, an implementation of the GLS turbulence parameterisation is detailed in a non-hydrostatic, finite-element, unstructured mesh ocean model, Fluidity-ICOM. The implementation is validated by comparing to both a laboratory-scale experiment and real-world observations, on both fixed and adaptive meshes. The model performs well, matching laboratory and observed data, with resolution being adjusted as necessary by DAMO. Flexibility in the prognostic fields used to construct the error metric used in DAMO is required to ensure best performance. Moreover, the adaptive mesh models perform as well as fixed mesh models in terms of root mean square error to observation or theoretical mixed layer depths, but uses fewer elements and hence has a reduced computational cost.

  18. In vivo kinematics of knee replacement during daily living activities: Condylar and post-cam contact assessment by three-dimensional fluoroscopy and finite element analyses.

    PubMed

    Belvedere, Claudio; Leardini, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Pianigiani, Silvia; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2017-07-01

    In total knee replacement, the investigation on the exact contact patterns at the post-cam in implanted patients from real in vivo data during daily living activities is fundamental for validating implant design concepts and assessing relevant performances. This study is aimed at verifying the restoration of natural tibio-femoral condylar kinematics by investigating the post-cam engagement at different motor tasks. An innovative validated technique, combining three-dimensional fluoroscopic and finite element analyses, was applied to measure joint kinematics during daily living activities in 15 patients implanted with guided motion posterior-stabilized total knee replacement. Motion results showed physiological antero-posterior translations of the tibio-femoral condyles for every motor task. However, high variability was observed in the position of the calculated pivot point among different patients and different motor tasks, as well as in the range of post-cam engagement. Physiological tibio-femoral joint rotations and contacts at the condyles were found restored in the present knee replacement. Articular contact patterns experienced at the post-cam were found compatible with this original prosthesis design. The present study reports replaced knee kinematics also in terms of articular surface contacts, both at the condyles and, for the first time, at the post-cam. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1396-1403, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of decarbonation on elemental behaviors during subduction-zone metamorphism: Evidence from a titanite-rich contact between eclogite-facies marble and omphacitite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Lin, Jinyan; Tan, Yulong; Xu, Yongjiang

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we show the effects of subducted carbonates on geochemical processes during subduction-zone metamorphism (SZM) through the study of an eclogite-facies marble coexisting with metabasite from the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt of the Chinese Western Tianshan orogen. Between the marble and metabasite is a titanite-rich contact resulting from fluid-facilitated metamorphic reactions between the two lithologies, and recording elemental changes of geodynamic significance. Because this titanite-rich contact is dominated by titanite (an important host for high field strength elements, HFSEs) without white micas (an important host for large ion lithophile elements, LILEs), HFSEs are largely conserved in titanite whereas LILEs are moved away. This observation emphasizes the potential significance of subducting carbonate in retaining HFSEs in the slab through the formation and stabilization of titanite, contributing to the characteristic "arc signature" unique to subduction-zone magmatism (i.e., high LILEs, low HFSEs). The implicit assumption in this interpretation is that the observed lithological assemblage represents residues of subducting oceanic crust that has undergone major episodes of dehydration. Subducted carbonates also have significant implications for the origin of mantle isotopic heterogeneity as revealed from oceanic basalts.

  20. A finite element-based constrained mixture implementation for arterial growth, remodeling, and adaptation: theory and numerical verification.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Humphrey, J D; Holzapfel, G A

    2013-08-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and nonhomogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The nonlinear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons with prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential growth and remodeling within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement.

  1. A Finite Element Based Constrained Mixture Implementation for Arterial Growth, Remodeling, and Adaptation: Theory and Numerical Verification

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling (G&R) in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and non-homogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The non-linear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons to prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential G&R within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement. PMID:23713058

  2. Adaptation of a program for nonlinear finite element analysis to the CDC STAR 100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion of a nonlinear finite element program to the CDC STAR 100 pipeline computer is discussed. The program called DYCAST was developed for the crash simulation of structures. Initial results with the STAR 100 computer indicated that significant gains in computation time are possible for operations on gloval arrays. However, for element level computations that do not lend themselves easily to long vector processing, the STAR 100 was slower than comparable scalar computers. On this basis it is concluded that in order for pipeline computers to impact the economic feasibility of large nonlinear analyses it is absolutely essential that algorithms be devised to improve the efficiency of element level computations.

  3. Fission-Fusion Adaptivity in Finite Elements for Nonlinear Dynamics of Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-30

    where mesh refinement will prove useful. In fact, the deviation of a bilinear element from a smooth shell midsurface can be related to the angle between...comparisons with nonadaptive meshes. Conclusions and further discussions are given in Section 6. -5- 2. FINITE ELEMENT FORMULATION The shape of the midsurface ...8217 22 , and e3 is defined so that e, and e2 are tangent to the midsurface and rotate with the element; 2. for each node, a triad b i is defined so that

  4. Copy Number Variation and Transposable Elements Feature in Recent, Ongoing Adaptation at the Cyp6g1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Joshua M.; Good, Robert T.; Appleton, Belinda; Sherrard, Jayne; Raymant, Greta C.; Bogwitz, Michael R.; Martin, Jon; Daborn, Phillip J.; Goddard, Mike E.; Batterham, Philip; Robin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change. A fragment of an Accord transposable element inserted upstream of the Cyp6g1 gene is causally associated with resistance and has spread to high frequencies in populations around the world since the 1940s. Here we report the existence of a natural allelic series at this locus of D. melanogaster, involving copy number variation of Cyp6g1, and two additional transposable element insertions (a P and an HMS-Beagle). We provide evidence that this genetic variation underpins phenotypic variation, as the more derived the allele, the greater the level of DDT resistance. Tracking the spatial and temporal patterns of allele frequency changes indicates that the multiple steps of the allelic series are adaptive. Further, a DDT association study shows that the most resistant allele, Cyp6g1-[BP], is greatly enriched in the top 5% of the phenotypic distribution and accounts for ∼16% of the underlying phenotypic variation in resistance to DDT. In contrast, copy number variation for another candidate resistance gene, Cyp12d1, is not associated with resistance. Thus the Cyp6g1 locus is a major contributor to DDT resistance in field populations, and evolution at this locus features multiple adaptive steps occurring in rapid succession. PMID:20585622

  5. H-P adaptive methods for finite element analysis of aerothermal loads in high-speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. J.; Bass, J. M.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The commitment to develop the National Aerospace Plane and Maneuvering Reentry Vehicles has generated resurgent interest in the technology required to design structures for hypersonic flight. The principal objective of this research and development effort has been to formulate and implement a new class of computational methodologies for accurately predicting fine scale phenomena associated with this class of problems. The initial focus of this effort was to develop optimal h-refinement and p-enrichment adaptive finite element methods which utilize a-posteriori estimates of the local errors to drive the adaptive methodology. Over the past year this work has specifically focused on two issues which are related to overall performance of a flow solver. These issues include the formulation and implementation (in two dimensions) of an implicit/explicit flow solver compatible with the hp-adaptive methodology, and the design and implementation of computational algorithm for automatically selecting optimal directions in which to enrich the mesh. These concepts and algorithms have been implemented in a two-dimensional finite element code and used to solve three hypersonic flow benchmark problems (Holden Mach 14.1, Edney shock on shock interaction Mach 8.03, and the viscous backstep Mach 4.08).

  6. a Non-Linear Adapted Tri-Tree Multigrid Solver for Finite Element Formulation of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, S. Ø.

    1996-06-01

    An iterative adaptive equation multigrid solver for solving the implicit Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously with tri-tree grid generation is developed. The tri-tree grid generator builds a hierarchical grid structur e which is mapped to a finite element grid at each hierarchical level. For each hierarchical finite element multigrid the Navier-Stokes equations are solved approximately. The solution at each level is projected onto the next finer grid and used as a start vector for the iterative equation solver at the finer level. When the finest grid is reached, the equation solver is iterated until a tolerated solution is reached. The iterative multigrid equation solver is preconditioned by incomplete LU factorization with coupled node fill-in.The non-linear Navier-Stokes equations are linearized by both the Newton method and grid adaption. The efficiency and behaviour of the present adaptive method are compared with those of the previously developed iterative equation solver which is preconditioned by incomplete LU factorization with coupled node fill-in.

  7. Design of a radiative surface coil array element at 7 T: the single-side adapted dipole antenna.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Ipek, O; Klomp, D W J; Possanzini, C; Harvey, P R; Lagendijk, J J W; van den Berg, C A T

    2011-11-01

    Ultra high field MR imaging (≥7 T) of deeply located targets in the body is facing some radiofrequency-field related challenges: interference patterns, reduced penetration depth, and higher Specific Absorbtion Ratio (SAR) levels. These can be alleviated by redesigning the elements of the transmit or transceive array. This is because at these high excitation field (B(1) ) frequencies, conventional array element designs may have become suboptimal. In this work, an alternative design approach is presented, regarding coil array elements as antennas. Following this approach, the Poynting vector of the element should be oriented towards the imaging target region. The single-side adapted dipole antenna is a novel design that fulfills this requirement. The performance of this design as a transmit coil array element has been characterized by comparison with three other, more conventional designs using finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and B +1 measurements on a phantom. Results show that the B +1 level at the deeper regions is higher while maintaining relatively low SAR levels. Also, the B +1 field distribution is more symmetrical and more uniform, promising better image homogeneity. Eight radiative antennas have been combined into a belt-like surface array for prostate imaging. T(1) -weighted (T1W) and T(2) -weighted (T2W) volunteer images are presented along with B +1 measurements to demonstrate the improved efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  9. Intra-articular Contact Stress Distributions at the Ankle throughout Stance Phase – Patient-Specific Finite Element Analysis as a Metric of Degeneration Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Donald D.; Goldsworthy, Jane K.; Shivanna, Kiran; Grosland, Nicole M.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Thomas, Thaddeus P.; Tochigi, Yuki; Marsh, J.Lawrence; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    A contact finite element (FE) formulation is introduced, amenable to patient-specific analysis of cumulative cartilage mechano-stimulus attributable to habitual functional activity. CT scans of individual human ankles are segmented to delineate bony margins. Each bone surface is projected outward to create a second surface, and the intervening volume is then meshed with continuum hexahedral elements. The tibia is positioned relative to the talus into a weight-bearing apposition. The articular members are first engaged under light preload, then plantar-/dorsi-flexion kinematics and resultant loadings are input for serial FE solutions at 13 instants of the stance phase of level walking gait. Cartilage stress histories are post-processed to recover distributions of cumulative stress-time mechano-stimulus, a metric of degeneration propensity. Consistency in computed contact stress exposures presented for seven intact ankles stood in contrast to the higher magnitude and more focal exposures in an incongruously reduced tibial plafond fracture. This analytical procedure provides patient-specific estimates of degeneration propensity due to various mechanical abnormalities, and it provides a platform from which the mechanical efficacy of alternative surgical interventions can be estimated. PMID:16520960

  10. Intra-articular contact stress distributions at the ankle throughout stance phase-patient-specific finite element analysis as a metric of degeneration propensity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Donald D; Goldsworthy, Jane K; Shivanna, Kiran; Grosland, Nicole M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Tochigi, Yuki; Marsh, J Lawrence; Brown, Thomas D

    2006-06-01

    A contact finite element (FE) formulation is introduced, amenable to patient-specific analysis of cumulative cartilage mechano-stimulus attributable to habitual functional activity. CT scans of individual human ankles are segmented to delineate bony margins. Each bone surface is projected outward to create a second surface, and the intervening volume is then meshed with continuum hexahedral elements. The tibia is positioned relative to the talus into a weight-bearing apposition. The articular members are first engaged under light preload, then plantar-/dorsi-flexion kinematics and resultant loadings are input for serial FE solutions at 13 instants of the stance phase of level walking gait. Cartilage stress histories are post-processed to recover distributions of cumulative stress-time mechano-stimulus, a metric of degeneration propensity. Consistency in computed contact stress exposures presented for seven intact ankles stood in contrast to the higher magnitude and more focal exposures in an incongruously reduced tibial plafond fracture. This analytical procedure provides patient-specific estimates of degeneration propensity due to various mechanical abnormalities, and it provides a platform from which the mechanical efficacy of alternative surgical interventions can be estimated.

  11. Promoters from a cold-adapted bacterium: definition of a consensus motif and molecular characterization of UP regulative elements.

    PubMed

    Duilio, Angela; Madonna, Stefania; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Pirozzi, Marinella; Sannia, Giovanni; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-04-01

    Although low-temperature tolerant micro-organisms were discovered long ago, limited information is still available on the transcription machinery in cold-adapted bacteria. This knowledge represents a necessary background for the investigation of the adaptation of gene-expression mechanisms at low temperatures. The recent development of a shuttle genetic system for the transformation of the cold-adapted Gram-negative bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis strain TAC125 has made possible the isolation of the psychrophilic promoters described in this paper. TAC125 genomic DNA fragments were cloned in the shuttle vector and the promoter-containing recombinant clones were selected for their ability to express a promoter-less lacZ gene. The nucleotide sequence of several selected inserts and the transcription start points of the transcribed m-RNAs were determined. A promoter consensus sequence for Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 was proposed on the basis of a sequence comparison between the various active promoters. Furthermore, the identification and the functional characterization of two UP elements from this cold-adapted bacterium are also reported.

  12. Adaptive implicit finite element methods for multicomponent compressible flow in heterogeneous and fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    This work presents adaptive implicit first-order and second-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for the transport of multicomponent compressible fluids in heterogeneous and fractured porous media, discretized by triangular, quadrilateral, and hexahedral grids. The adaptive implicit method (AIM) combines the advantages of purely explicit or implicit methods (in time). In grid cells with high fluxes or low pore volumes, the transport update is done implicitly to alleviate the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) time step constraints of the conditionally stable explicit approach. Grid cells with a large CFL condition are updated explicitly. Combined, this allows higher efficiency than explicit methods, but it reduces the "penalty" of implicit methods, which exhibit high numerical dispersion and are more computationally and storage expensive per time step. The advantages of AIM are modest for uniform grids and rock properties. However, in heterogeneous or fractured reservoirs explicit methods may become impractical, while a fully implicit approach introduces unnecessary numerical dispersion and is overkill for low-permeability layers and matrix blocks. In such applications, AIM is shown to be significantly more efficient and accurate. The division between explicit and implicit grid cells is made adaptively in space and time. This allows for a high level of explicitness and can also adapt to high fluxes caused by, e.g., viscous and gravitational flow instabilities. Numerical examples demonstrate the powerful features of AIM to model, e.g., solute transport, carbon sequestration in saline aquifers, and miscible gas injection in fractured oil and gas reservoirs.

  13. Approach to prevent locking in a spring-damper system by adaptive load redistribution with auxiliary kinematic guidance elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, Christopher M.; Platz, Roland; Melz, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    In many applications, kinematic structures are used to enable and disable degrees of freedom. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for a defined movement. In most cases, a spring-damper system determines the kinetic properties of the movement. However, unexpected high load peaks may lead to maximum displacements and maybe to locking. Thus, a hard clash between two rigid components may occur, causing acceleration peaks. This may have harmful effects for the whole system. For example a hard landing of an aircraft can result in locking the landing gear and thus damage the entire aircraft. In this paper, the potential of adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a spring-damper system to prevent locking is investigated numerically. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in case of overloading the spring-damper system and thus to absorb some of the impact energy. To estimate the potential of the load redistribution in the spring-damper system, a numerical model of a two-mass oscillator is used, similar to a quarter-car-model. In numerical calculations, the reduction of the acceleration peaks of the masses with the adaptive approach is compared to the Acceleration peaks without the approach, or, respectively, when locking is not prevented. In addition, the required force of the adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements is calculated as a function of the masses of the system and the drop height, or, respectively, the impact energy.

  14. A new finite element method for solving compressible Navier-Stokes equations based on an operator splitting method and h-p adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demkowicz, L.; Oden, J. T.; Rachowicz, W.

    1990-01-01

    A new finite element method solving compressible Navier-Stokes equations is proposed. The method is based on a version of Strang's operator splitting and an h-p adaptive finite element approximation in space. This paper contains the formulation of the method with a detailed discussion of boundary conditions, a sample adaptive strategy and numerical examples involving compressible viscous flow over a flat plate with Reynolds number Re = 1000 and Re = 10,000.

  15. Exploring the Antarctic soil metagenome as a source of novel cold-adapted enzymes and genetic mobile elements.

    PubMed

    Berlemont, Renaud; Pipers, Delphine; Delsaute, Maud; Angiono, Federico; Feller, Georges; Galleni, Moreno; Power, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic library PP1 was obtained from Antarctic soil samples. Both functional and genotypic metagenomic screening were used for the isolation of novel cold-adapted enzymes with potential applications, and for the detection of genetic elements associated with gene mobilization, respectively. Fourteen lipase/esterase-, 14 amylase-, 3 protease-, and 11 cellulase-producing clones were detected by activity-driven screening, with apparent maximum activities around 35 °C for both amylolytic and lipolytic enzymes, and 35-55 °C for cellulases, as observed for other cold-adapted enzymes. However, the behavior of at least one of the studied cellulases is more compatible to that observed for mesophilic enzymes. These enzymes are usually still active at temperatures above 60 °C, probably resulting in a psychrotolerant behavior in Antarctic soils. Metagenomics allows to access novel genes encoding for enzymatic and biophysic properties from almost every environment with potential benefits for biotechnological and industrial applications. Only intI- and tnp-like genes were detected by PCR, encoding for proteins with 58-86 %, and 58-73 % amino acid identity with known entries, respectively. Two clones, BAC 27A-9 and BAC 14A-5, seem to present unique syntenic organizations, suggesting the occurrence of gene rearrangements that were probably due to evolutionary divergences within the genus or facilitated by the association with transposable elements. The evidence for genetic elements related to recruitment and mobilization of genes (transposons/integrons) in an extreme environment like Antarctica reinforces the hypothesis of the origin of some of the genes disseminated by mobile elements among "human-associated" microorganisms.

  16. Modeling of various heat adapter plate 4 and 6 array for optimization of thermoelectric generator element using modified diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrianto; Tambunan, W.; Lazuardi

    2017-07-01

    The use of waste heat from exhaust gas and converting it to electricity is now an alternative to harvest a cheap and clean energy. Thermoelectric generator (TEG) has the ability to directly recover such waste heat and generate electricity. The aim of this study is to simulate the heat transfer on the aluminum adapter plate for homogeneity temperature distribution coupled with hot side of TEG type 40-40-10/100 from Firma Eureka and adjust their high temperatures to the TEG operating temperature to avoid the element damage. Modelling was carried out using MATLAB modified diffusion equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions at defined temperature which has been set at the ends of the heat source at 463K and 373K ± 10% on the hot side of the TEG element. The use of nylon insulated material is modeled after Neumann boundary condition in which the temperature gradient is ∂T/∂n = 0 out of boundary. Realization of the modelling is done by designing a heat conductive plate using software ACAD 2015 and converted into a binary file format of Mathlab to form a finite element mesh with geometry variations of solid model. The solid cubic model of aluminum adapter plate has a dimension of 40mm length, 40mm width and also 20mm, 30mm and 40mm thickness arranged in two arrays of 2×2 and 2×3 of TEG elements. Results showed a temperature decrease about 40.95% and 50.02% respectively from the initial source and appropriate with TEG temperature tolerance.

  17. A p-adaptive stabilized finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Anil Kumar

    2008-10-01

    Stabilized finite element methods have been shown to yield robust, accurate numerical solutions to both the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for laminar and turbulent flows. This work presents an application of mesh entity based, hierarchical basis functions to a new stabilized finite element formulation, exploiting the capability to grade polynomial order while maintaining C0 continuity while using traditional finite element data structures. The hierarchical basis accomplishes this by starting with vertex interpolants (a linear basis) and then allowing the polynomial order to vary on each entity (edges, faces, and regions) in the mesh which are then multiplied by blends within each element to build a composite function that is locally higher order but still globally continuous. Details of this formulation and its efficient implementation will be presented. Partition weighting schemes were developed to achieve optimal load balance and scalability for parallel simulations. An application is presented, of p-refinement applied to a laminar flow past a surface mounted unit cube placed in a channel. Finally, post-processing techniques are also described for the effective visualization of higher order solutions.

  18. Finite element/finite volume approaches with adaptive time stepping strategies for transient thermal problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohan, Ram V.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive time stepping strategy for transient thermal analysis of engineering systems is described which computes the time step based on the local truncation error with a good global error control and obtains optimal time steps to be used during the analysis. Combined mesh partitionings involving FEM/FVM meshes based on physical situations to obtain numerically improved physical representations are also proposed. Numerical test cases are described and comparative pros and cons are identified for practical situations.

  19. SEEK-TIME IMPROVEMENT IN A RANDOM-ACCESS FILE BY APPLICATION OF AN ADAPTIVE ELEMENT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An Adaline (adaptive linear neuron) can be trained to distinguish between sets of inputs. In general, the quantized output is used. This report...investigates the usefulness of the analog output of Adaline for measuring the frequency of occurrence of a number of different events. Each event is more...or less arbitrarily associated with a pattern and it is shown that the degree to which Adaline has been trained to recognize any one of these patterns

  20. Trial-by-trial motor adaptation: a window into elemental neural computation.

    PubMed

    Thoroughman, Kurt A; Fine, Michael S; Taylor, Jordan A

    2007-01-01

    How does the brain compute? To address this question, mathematical modelers, neurophysiologists, and psychophysicists have sought behaviors that provide evidence of specific neural computations. Human motor behavior consists of several such computations [Shadmehr, R., Wise, S.P. (2005). MIT Press: Cambridge, MA], such as the transformation of a sensory input to a motor output. The motor system is also capable of learning new transformations to produce novel outputs; humans have the remarkable ability to alter their motor output to adapt to changes in their own bodies and the environment [Wolpert, D.M., Ghahramani, Z. (2000). Nat. Neurosci., 3: 1212-1217]. These changes can be long term, through growth and changing body proportions, or short term, through changes in the external environment. Here we focus on trial-by-trial adaptation, the transformation of individually sensed movements into incremental updates of adaptive control. These investigations have the promise of revealing important basic principles of motor control and ultimately guiding a new understanding of the neuronal correlates of motor behaviors.

  1. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two

  2. Element residues in food contact plastics and their migration into food simulants, measured by inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fordham, P J; Gramshaw, J W; Crews, H M; Castle, L

    1995-01-01

    Polymers intended for food contact use have been analysed for inorganic residues which can be attributed to a range of substances employed as polymerization aids (e.g. catalysts), or to additives incorporated into the polymer to fulfil a specific task (e.g. lubricants). The migration of these residues into food simulants was studied. Residues were determined by using the multi-element capability of Inductively-Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Semi-quantitative analysis was carried out on acid digests of polymer materials, obtained by microwave heating in sealed Teflon containers. Limits of detection in the polymer were generally less than 1 mg/kg. Migration experiments were carried out with three food simulants and under two sets of conditions. Analysis for element residues was performed directly or, in the case of olive oil, on an emulsion of the simulant. Migration of certain elements into aqueous simulants was observed: Zr from polystyrene (650 micrograms/kg), Sb from polyethylene terephthalate (4 micrograms/kg) and Mg from acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene copolymer (50 micrograms/kg). In all cases, where limits of detection permit, the levels which migrated from polymer to stimulant were less than proposed limits on migration.

  3. On computer simulation of dry particle systems using discrete element method and the development of DEM contact force-displacement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    Particle systems are involved in a lot of engineering processes. Particle science and technology deal with the production, characterization, modification, handling, and utilization of a wide variety of particles, in both dry and wet conditions. In investigations of the behavior of dry particle systems, considerations of cost, time, and equipment may prohibit experimental works. Even in the absence of these constraints, successful experiments often yield only limited information. Computer simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) can provide more information and can be performed more quickly and at a lower cost than that of experiments. A DEM simulation requires that the interactive forces between simulated particles must be evaluated accurately as the driving factor of the motion behavior of particle systems. Therefore, to obtain reliable simulation results efficiently, it is necessary to develop simple and accurate particle-particle interactive force-displacement (FD) models. Most existing FD models, however, implement oversimplified versions of contact mechanics and do not correctly account for the plastic deformation near the contact point between particles, thus result in inaccurate simulation results. We present here the DEM simulation algorithms, the geometric modelling of nonspherical particles, and the development of a set of realistic and consistent particle-particle contact FD models that can correctly account for the effect of both the elastic and plastic deformation. The DEM simulations, implemented with the present elasto-plastic FD models, can correctly predict the motion behavior of particles. In the development of the present elasto-plastic FD models, we carried out a series of finite element analyses (FEA) of nonlinear elasto-plastic contact problems. The modelling and results of these FEA, including the dynamic FEA of elasto-plastic sphere collisions, are also presented in this dissertation. We implemented the present FD models into DEM

  4. Higher-Order Adaptive Finite-Element Methods for Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-03

    employ the finite-temperature Fermi- Dirac smearing [3] to suppress the charge sloshing associated with degenerate or close to degenerate eigenstates...elements up to degree eight (HEX27, HEX125SPECT, HEX343SPECT, HEX729SPECT). The numbers following the words ‘TET’ and ‘HEX’ denote the number of nodes in...work are constructed as Lagrange polynomials interpolated through an optimal distribution of nodes corre- sponding to the roots of derivatives of

  5. A new approach to calibration and determination of selected trace elements in food contact polymers by LA-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Voss, Monica; Nunes, Matheus A G; Corazza, Gabriela; Flores, Erico M M; Müller, Edson I; Dressler, Valderi L

    2017-08-01

    A calibration strategy using porous nylon disks and reference solutions is proposed for the first time for matrix matching and determination of As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sr and Zn in polymers by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Polymer samples commonly used in contact with food were analyzed. The procedure consists on the use of porous nylon disks as support for a dried droplet reference solution. Calibration in the range of 0.50-190μgg(-1) for Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sr and Zn and from 0.30-9.0μgg(-1) for As was used. Laser and ICP-MS instrument conditions were evaluated in order to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio. The radiofrequency power and carrier gas flow rate were fixed at 1300W and 1.25Lmin(-1), respectively. Spot size, repetition rate, scan line speed and laser fluency were set to 100µm, 20Hz, 100µms(-1) and 17.9Jcm(-2), respectively, as the established conditions for analysis of standards and samples. By using these conditions, limits of detection, estimated considering B+3s (where B is the value of the blank and s is the standard deviation of 10 measurements of the blank), ranged from 0.09μgg(-1) ((208)Pb) to 1.09 ((53)Cr) and 0.05μgg(-1) ((208)Pb) to 2.10 ((53)Cr) for calibration with and without (13)C as internal standard (IS). In spite to the use of nylon for matrix matching of different polymeric matrices, the normalization with (13)C as IS was also evaluated. The precision of the method is relatively good (RSD<20%), and the accuracy of the method, evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials (CRM) and by comparison with results obtained from solution analysis by ICP-MS after sample decomposition by microwave induced combustion (MIC) is relatively good. The suitability of the proposed method resulted in direct and reliable analyses of polymer samples with a simplified or unnecessary sample preparation step. In addition, the calibration with dried droplet reference solutions may be considered a

  6. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  7. Protein and DNA contact surfaces that mediate the selective action of the Phox1 homeodomain at the c-fos serum response element.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, K J; Grueneberg, D A; Gilman, M

    1997-01-01

    The human homeodomain protein Phox1 can impart serum-responsive transcriptional activity to the c-fos serum response element (SRE) by interacting with serum response factor (SRF). This activity is shared with other Paired class homeodomains but not with more distantly related homeodomains. To understand the mechanism of action of Phox1 at the SRE and the basis for the selective activity of Paired class homeodomains in this context, we performed a detailed mutagenesis of the Phox1 homeodomain. We found that amino acid residues that contact the major groove of the DNA are required for SRE activation in vivo, suggesting an in vivo requirement for major-groove DNA contact by the homeodomain. In contrast, substitution of a lysine residue in the N-terminal arm of the Phox1 homeodomain appeared to abolish DNA binding without affecting activity in vivo. Certain substitutions on the exposed surfaces of helices 1 and 2, not required for DNA binding, abolished activity in vivo, suggesting that these surfaces contact an accessory protein(s) required for this activity. We also found that transfer of a single amino acid residue from the surface of Phox1 helix 1 to the corresponding position in the distantly related Deformed (Dfd) homeodomain imparts to Dfd the ability to activate the SRE in vivo. We propose that Phox1 interacts with one or more factors at the SRE, in addition to SRF, and that the specificity of this interaction is determined by residues on the surfaces of helices 1 and 2. PMID:9343429

  8. Assessment of the performance characteristics of a prototype 12-element capacitive contact flexible microstrip applicator (CFMA-12) for superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lee, W M; Gelvich, E A; van der Baan, P; Mazokhin, V N; van Rhoon, G C

    2004-09-01

    The electrical performance of the CFMA-12 operating at 433 MHz is assessed under laboratory conditions using a RF network analyser. From measurements of the scattering parameters of the CFMA-12 on both a multi-layered muscle- and fat/muscle-equivalent phantom, the optimal water bolus thickness, at which the transfer of the energy to the phantom configuration is maximal, is determined to be approximately 1 cm. The SAR distribution of the CFMA-12 in a multi-layered muscle-equivalent phantom is characterized using Schottky diode sheets and a TVS-600 IR camera. From the SAR measurements using the Schottky diode sheets it is shown that the contribution of the E(x) component to the SAR (SAR(x)) is maximal 7% of the contribution of the E(y)component to the SAR (SAR(y)) at different layers in both phantom configurations. The complete SAR distribution (SAR(tot)) at different depths is measured using the power pulse technique. From these measurements, it can be seen that SAR(y)at a depth of 0 cm in the muscle-equivalent phantom represents up to 80% of SAR(tot). At 1 and 2 cm depth, SAR(y) is up to 95% of SAR(tot). Therefore, in homogeneous muscle-equivalent phantoms, E(y) is the largest E-field component and measurement of SAR(y) distribution is sufficient to characterize SAR-steering performance of the CFMA-12. SAR steering measurements at 1 cm depth in the muscle-equivalent phantom show that the SAR maximum varies by 40% (1 SD) around the average value of 38.8 W kg(-1) (range 10-65 W kg(-1)) between single antenna elements. The effective fieldsize (E(50)) varies by 14% (1 SD) around the average value of 19.1 cm(2).

  9. Normal and shear forces in the contact patch of a braked racing tyre. Part 1: results from a finite-element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Patrick; Sharp, Robin S.; Crocombe, Andrew D.

    2012-02-01

    In this first part of a two-part article, a previously described and validated finite-element model of a racing-car tyre is developed further to yield detailed information on carcass deflections and contact pressure and shear stress distributions for a steady rolling, slipping, and cambered tyre. Variations in running conditions simulated include loads of 1500, 3000 and 4500 N, camber angles of 0° and -3°, and longitudinal slips from 0% to-20%. Special attention is paid to heavy braking, in which context the aligning moment is of great interest. Results generated are in broad agreement with limited experimental results from the literature and they provide considerable insight into how the tyre deforms and how the contact stresses are distributed as functions of the running conditions. Generally, each rib of the tyre behaves differently from the others, especially when the wheel is cambered. The results form a basis for the development of a simpler physical tyre model, the purpose of which is to retain accuracy over the full operating range while demanding much less computational resource. The physical tyre model is the topic of the second part of the article.

  10. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  11. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  12. An adaptive finite element Moreau-Yosida-based solver for a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, M.; Hinze, M.; Kahle, C.

    2013-02-01

    An adaptive a posteriori error estimator based finite element method for the numerical solution of a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system with a double-obstacle homogenous free (interfacial) energy density is proposed. A semi-implicit Euler scheme for the time-integration is applied which results in a system coupling a quasi-Stokes or Oseen-type problem for the fluid flow to a variational inequality for the concentration and the chemical potential according to the Cahn-Hilliard model [16]. A Moreau-Yosida regularization is employed which relaxes the constraints contained in the variational inequality and, thus, enables semi-smooth Newton solvers with locally superlinear convergence in function space. Moreover, upon discretization this yields a mesh independent method for a fixed relaxation parameter. For the finite dimensional approximation of the concentration and the chemical potential piecewise linear and globally continuous finite elements are used, and for the numerical approximation of the fluid velocity Taylor-Hood finite elements are employed. The paper ends by a report on numerical examples showing the efficiency of the new method.

  13. An Adaptive Finite Element Method for Initial-Boundary Value Problems for Partial Differential Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    with cubic elements on a uniform spacial mesh of width h and a uniform time step of duration At. We created this simple constant coefficient example...the boundary conditions are (4.6) b(0,t) = b(5,t) = 0, s (0,t) = 1. We solved this problem for 60/11 = 2 using cubic approximations, uniform time...7-7 MAR A1 S F DAVIS, J E FLAHERTY AFOSR-80-0192 UNCLASIFIEDm m om o mo El uuumuinouuun mhEmhshmhohEEI 11111!L132 12---5 HIl U .8 1111IL15N-- AFOSR

  14. Anisotropic mesh adaptation for solution of finite element problems using hierarchical edge-based error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Agouzal, Abdellatif; Vassilevski, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    We present a new technology for generating meshes minimizing the interpolation and discretization errors or their gradients. The key element of this methodology is construction of a space metric from edge-based error estimates. For a mesh with N{sub h} triangles, the error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1} and the gradient of error is proportional to N{sub h}{sup -1/2} which are optimal asymptotics. The methodology is verified with numerical experiments.

  15. An approximate waves-bordering algorithm for adaptive finite elements analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi Cecchi, M.; Marcuzzi, F.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper an Approximate Waves-Bordering algorithm (AWB) is presented. It computes the finite elements linear system solution-update after a refinement/unrefinement step. This is done taking into consideration only the equations that correspond to the nodes whose solution is modified above a certain tolerance and it appears to be very efficient. The algorithm considers an increasing set of equations that updates recursively and stops when the norm of the residual has gone under a user-defined threshold.

  16. Secondary contact and local adaptation contribute to genome-wide patterns of clinal variation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    BERGLAND, ALAN O.; TOBLER, RAY; GONZÁLEZ, JOSEFA; SCHMIDT, PAUL; PETROV, DMITRI

    2016-01-01

    Populations arrayed along broad latitudinal gradients often show patterns of clinal variation in phenotype and genotype. Such population differentiation can be generated and maintained by both historical demographic events and local adaptation. These evolutionary forces are not mutually exclusive and can in some cases produce nearly identical patterns of genetic differentiation among populations. Here, we investigate the evolutionary forces that generated and maintain clinal variation genome-wide among populations of Drosophila melanogaster sampled in North America and Australia. We contrast patterns of clinal variation in these continents with patterns of differentiation among ancestral European and African populations. Using established and novel methods we derive here, we show that recently derived North America and Australia populations were likely founded by both European and African lineages and that this hybridization event likely contributed to genome-wide patterns of parallel clinal variation between continents. The pervasive effects of admixture mean that differentiation at only several hundred loci can be attributed to the operation of spatially varying selection using an FST outlier approach. Our results provide novel insight into the well-studied system of clinal differentiation in D. melanogaster and provide a context for future studies seeking to identify loci contributing to local adaptation in a wide variety of organisms, including other invasive species as well as temperate endemics. PMID:26547394

  17. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  18. Development of lightweight mirror elements for a very large astronomical adaptive optic primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Shaffer, Joseph; Romeo, Robert C.; Chen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    New very large telescopes with apertures as large as 100 meters are being proposed. They will be made up of mirror segments only a meter or two in diameter and phased together. The diffraction-limited resolution of a mirror is directly proportional to its diameter, and the light-gathering-power is proportional to the square of the diameter. Near-diffraction-limited performance using adaptive optics would make such large mirrors very exciting. We have built two small prototype composite adaptive optic mirrors of graphite fiber impregnated cyanate ester resin driven by actuators spaced 4 cm apart and with a faceplate influence function of 5 cm. The second mirror assembly also makes possible a 2 cm actuator spacing. The overall figure is not yet as good as desired, but we believe that much of this problem can be corrected by mechanical adjustment of the actuator rest positions and use of low expansion mandrels. This mirror concept, when realized in primary mirror segments a meter or more in diameter, should make correction possible for atmospheric turbulence under almost any observatory seeing conditions. The composite optical faceplate in the most recent prototype had a roughness of 0.6 to 0.8 nm. Two centrifugal elutriation super-polishers, each over 1.2 meters in diameter, are in place to produce superpolished mandrels on which to form superpolished faceplates over a meter in diameter. Scattered light from such a mirror surface will be reduced by as much as a factor of ten, as compared to conventional fresh feed polishing. The name "transfer mirrors" rather than the widely recognized but poorer quality "replica mirrors" is given to such faceplates. They have an expansion coefficient comparable to ULE quartz or Zerodur, and are lightweight with 10-20, an aerial density of 17 kg/m2 for the mirror with a 4 cm actuator spacing or 34 kg/m2 for the mirror with 2 cm actuator spacing. In both cases the effect of gravitational sag is minimized. A 60 volt potential results

  19. [The possible role of the elements of protein secondary structure in adaptation to the action of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, L I; Pavlovskaia, T E

    1997-01-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of enzymes induced by gamma-rays 60Co at doses not exceeding one ionization per macromolecule were studied to elucidate a possible role of radiation-chemical processes in the evolution of proteins. The data on the comparative radioresistance of various types of secondary protein structures, alpha-helix, parallel and anti-parallel beta-structures, and beta-turn, were obtained by the method of circular dichroism. It was shown that beta-turns were resistant against radiation, alpha-helix was relatively stable, and beta-layer underwent significant changes. The importance of these structural types in the evolution of proteins is discussed. A special role of beta-turn as structural elements fixing the confirmation of macromolecules and therefore responsible for adaptation of the protein structure against a constant radiation background is proposed.

  20. Parallel three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using adaptive finite-element method. Part I: theory and synthetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a distributed magnetotelluric inversion scheme based on adaptive finite-element method (FEM). The key novel aspect of the introduced algorithm is the use of automatic mesh refinement techniques for both forward and inverse modelling. These techniques alleviate tedious and subjective procedure of choosing a suitable model parametrization. To avoid overparametrization, meshes for forward and inverse problems were decoupled. For calculation of accurate electromagnetic (EM) responses, automatic mesh refinement algorithm based on a goal-oriented error estimator has been adopted. For further efficiency gain, EM fields for each frequency were calculated using independent meshes in order to account for substantially different spatial behaviour of the fields over a wide range of frequencies. An automatic approach for efficient initial mesh design in inverse problems based on linearized model resolution matrix was developed. To make this algorithm suitable for large-scale problems, it was proposed to use a low-rank approximation of the linearized model resolution matrix. In order to fill a gap between initial and true model complexities and resolve emerging 3-D structures better, an algorithm for adaptive inverse mesh refinement was derived. Within this algorithm, spatial variations of the imaged parameter are calculated and mesh is refined in the neighborhoods of points with the largest variations. A series of numerical tests were performed to demonstrate the utility of the presented algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement based on the model resolution estimates provides an efficient tool to derive initial meshes which account for arbitrary survey layouts, data types, frequency content and measurement uncertainties. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable to deliver meshes suitable to resolve features on multiple scales while keeping number of unknowns low. However, such meshes exhibit dependency on an initial model guess. Additionally, it is demonstrated

  1. A spectral element method with adaptive segmentation for accurately simulating extracellular electrical stimulation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Calvin D; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2016-08-19

    The capacity to quickly and accurately simulate extracellular stimulation of neurons is essential to the design of next-generation neural prostheses. Existing platforms for simulating neurons are largely based on finite-difference techniques; due to the complex geometries involved, the more powerful spectral or differential quadrature techniques cannot be applied directly. This paper presents a mathematical basis for the application of a spectral element method to the problem of simulating the extracellular stimulation of retinal neurons, which is readily extensible to neural fibers of any kind. The activating function formalism is extended to arbitrary neuron geometries, and a segmentation method to guarantee an appropriate choice of collocation points is presented. Differential quadrature may then be applied to efficiently solve the resulting cable equations. The capacity for this model to simulate action potentials propagating through branching structures and to predict minimum extracellular stimulation thresholds for individual neurons is demonstrated. The presented model is validated against published values for extracellular stimulation threshold and conduction velocity for realistic physiological parameter values. This model suggests that convoluted axon geometries are more readily activated by extracellular stimulation than linear axon geometries, which may have ramifications for the design of neural prostheses.

  2. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  3. 3-D diffusion tensor MRI anisotropy content-adaptive finite element head model generation for bioelectromagnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, W H; Kim, T S; Kim, Andrew T; Lee, S Y

    2008-01-01

    Realistic finite element (FE) head models have been successfully applied to bioelectromagnetic problems due to a realistic representation of arbitrary head geometry with inclusion of anisotropic material properties. In this paper, we propose a new automatic FE mesh generation scheme to generate a diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) white matter anisotropy content-adaptive FE head model. We term this kind of mesh as wMesh. With this meshing technique, the anisotropic electrical conductivities derived from DT-MRIs can be best incorporated into the model. The influence of the white matter anisotropy on the EEG forward solutions has been studied via our wMesh head models. The scalp potentials computed from the anisotropic wMesh models against those of the isotropic models have been compared. The results describe that there are substantial changes in the scalp electrical potentials between the isotropic and anisotropic models, indicating that the inclusion of the white matter anisotropy is critical for accurate computation of E/MEG forward and inverse solutions. This fully automatic anisotropy-adaptive wMesh meshing scheme could be useful for modeling of individual-specific FE head models with better incorporation of the white matter anisotropic property towards bioelectromagnetic imaging.

  4. Multi-fault detection of rolling element bearings under harsh working condition using IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-10-28

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks.

  5. Local Heat Stroke Prevention Plans in Japan: Characteristics and Elements for Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Imai, Chisato; Masumo, Kanako

    2011-01-01

    The adverse health effects from hot weather and heat waves represent significant public health risks in vulnerable areas worldwide. Rising temperatures due to climate change are aggravating these risks in a context of fast urbanization, population growth and societal ageing. However, environmental heat-related health effects are largely preventable through adequate preparedness and responses. Public health adaptation to climate change will often require the implementation of heat wave warning systems and targeted preventive activities at different levels. While several national governments have established such systems at the country level, municipalities do not generally play a major role in the prevention of heat disorders. This paper analyzes selected examples of locally operated heat-health prevention plans in Japan. The analysis of these plans highlights their strengths, but also the need of local institutions for assistance to make the transition towards an effective public health management of high temperatures and heat waves. It can also provide useful elements for municipal governments in vulnerable areas, both in planning their climate change and health adaptation activities or to better protect their communities against current health effects from heat. PMID:22408589

  6. Multi-Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearings under Harsh Working Condition Using IMF-Based Adaptive Envelope Order Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks. PMID:25353982

  7. Design and adaptation of a novel supercritical extraction facility for operation in a glove box for recovery of radioactive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V. Suresh; Kumar, R.; Sivaraman, N.; Ravisankar, G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2010-09-15

    The design and development of a novel supercritical extraction experimental facility adapted for safe operation in a glove box for the recovery of radioactive elements from waste is described. The apparatus incorporates a high pressure extraction vessel, reciprocating pumps for delivering supercritical fluid and reagent, a back pressure regulator, and a collection chamber. All these components of the system have been specially designed for glove box adaptation and made modular to facilitate their replacement. Confinement of these materials must be ensured in a glove box to protect the operator and prevent contamination to the work area. Since handling of radioactive materials under high pressure (30 MPa) and temperature (up to 333 K) is involved in this process, the apparatus needs elaborate safety features in the design of the equipment, as well as modification of a standard glove box to accommodate the system. As a special safety feature to contain accidental leakage of carbon dioxide from the extraction vessel, a safety vessel has been specially designed and placed inside the glove box. The extraction vessel was enclosed in the safety vessel. The safety vessel was also incorporated with pressure sensing and controlling device.

  8. Real-time processor based on GPU for on-line performance evaluation of the 127-element adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Han; Zhou, Lu-chun

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a real-time on-line performance evaluation processor based on graphic processing unit (GPU) for adaptive optics (AO) system is presented, aiming to monitor the 127-element AO system during its close-loop work by quantifying its correction results, which can provide reference to improve the performance of the system. Since there is a contradiction between the heavy computation burden and the real-time processing requirement, we modified operations and algorithms to fit the CPU-GPU heterogeneous environment, in which GPU is used to handle the complex computation but simple logicality, and CPU is assigned to undertake data transportation between internal storage and video memory,as well as some small-scale computations. In the real-time processor, performance parameters to be computed include peak-valley (PV) and root-mean-square (RMS) of near-field wavefront phase, point spread function (PSF), full width half maximum (FWHM) of far-field image,modulation transfer function (MTF) and Strehl ratio (SR). And the inputs are residual slopes obtained from Hartmann wavefront sensor of 127-element AO system. By computation 4096 frames of parameters, the average rate by single precision is 4.11ms/frame.

  9. cAMP-responsive element binding protein: a vital link in embryonic hormonal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Maria; Fischer, Sünje; Thieme, René; Fischer, Bernd; Santos, Anne Navarrete

    2013-06-01

    The transcription factor cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and activating transcription factors (ATFs) are downstream components of the insulin/IGF cascade, playing crucial roles in maintaining cell viability and embryo survival. One of the CREB target genes is adiponectin, which acts synergistically with insulin. We have studied the CREB-ATF-adiponectin network in rabbit preimplantation development in vivo and in vitro. From the blastocyst stage onwards, CREB and ATF1, ATF3, and ATF4 are present with increasing expression for CREB, ATF1, and ATF3 during gastrulation and with a dominant expression in the embryoblast (EB). In vitro stimulation with insulin and IGF-I reduced CREB and ATF1 transcripts by approximately 50%, whereas CREB phosphorylation was increased. Activation of CREB was accompanied by subsequent reduction in adiponectin and adiponectin receptor (adipoR)1 expression. Under in vivo conditions of diabetes type 1, maternal adiponectin levels were up-regulated in serum and endometrium. Embryonic CREB expression was altered in a cell lineage-specific pattern. Although in EB cells CREB localization did not change, it was translocated from the nucleus into the cytosol in trophoblast (TB) cells. In TB, adiponectin expression was increased (diabetic 427.8 ± 59.3 pg/mL vs normoinsulinaemic 143.9 ± 26.5 pg/mL), whereas it was no longer measureable in the EB. Analysis of embryonic adipoRs showed an increased expression of adipoR1 and no changes in adipoR2 transcription. We conclude that the transcription factors CREB and ATFs vitally participate in embryo-maternal cross talk before implantation in a cell lineage-specific manner. Embryonic CREB/ATFs act as insulin/IGF sensors. Lack of insulin is compensated by a CREB-mediated adiponectin expression, which may maintain glucose uptake in blastocysts grown in diabetic mothers.

  10. Contact metamorphism surrounding the Alta stock: Finite element model simulation of heat- and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O mass-transport during prograde metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.J.; Bowman, J.R.; Forster, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Results of calcite-dolomite geothermometry and oxygen isotope studies of marbles in the southern portion of the contact aureole surrounding the Alta stock (Utah) provide evidence for extensive hydrothermal metamorphism in this part of the aureole. Simulation of these two independent data sets with two-dimensional, finite element fluid flow and heat transport models constrains the pattern of fluid flow, minimum permeability, and the permeability structure in this part of the aureole. Model results demonstrate that intrusion of the stock into a homogeneous, isotropic permeability medium yields peak metamorphic temperatures significantly lower than those measured in the marbles and significant {sup 18}O depletions both above and below the Alta-Grizzly thrust system. The latter contradicts the observations in the south aureole that {sup 18}O depletions in the marbles are restricted to marbles below the Alta-Grizzly thrust; dolomitic marbles above the thrust retain original sedimentary values up to the intrusive contact. Models with horizontal permeability barriers above the Alta-Grizzly thrust and extending over the top of the Alta stock are capable of reproducing the observed thermal and {delta}{sup 18}O profiles in the southern aureole. The presence of such horizontal barriers reduces the predominantly vertical fluid flow and heat transfer that would occur in a homogeneous and isotropic permeability medium, forcing fluid flow and heat transfer laterally away from the upper flanks of the stock. Such horizontal flow patterns are necessary to produce significant {sup 18}O depletion above the thrust, and to provide the necessary lateral heat transfer to duplicate the observed temperature profile. Best fit model results to the observed thermal and {delta}{sup 18}O profiles provide several new insights into the dynamics of fluid circulation and hydrogeologic characteristics of the southern Alta aureole during prograde metamorphism.

  11. Piezotronic effect in 1D van der Waals solid of elemental tellurium nanobelt for smart adaptive electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shengjie; Wang, Yixiu; Wang, Ruoxing; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-10-01

    Emerging technologies in wearable systems demand that functional devices can adaptively interact with the human body, where mechanical stimuli are ubiquitous and abundant. However, the electrical manipulation of charge carriers underpins the operations of state-of-the-art devices, and the effective control of interfacial energetics for charge carriers by the dynamic mechanical stimuli is still a relatively unexplored degree of freedom for semiconductor nanodevices. Piezotronic effect in nanostructured piezoelectric semiconductors offers exciting opportunities in addressing the above challenges. Here we report the first experimental exploration of piezotronic effect in 1D van der Waals solid of p-type tellurium nanobelt and systematically investigate the strain-gated charge carriers transport properties. The strain-induced polarization charges at the [10\\bar{1}0] surfaces of Te nanobelt can modulate the electronic transport through the interfacial effect on the Schottky contacts and the volumetric effect on the conducting channel. The competing phenomenon between interfacial and volumetric effects has been studied for the first time in piezotronics. Our research allows the access to a broad range of characterization and application of Te nanomaterials for piezotronics and could guide the future study of piezotronic effect in other materials. This progress in piezotronics, together with emerging methods for deterministic production and assembly of nanomaterials, leads to compelling opportunities for research from basic studies of piezoelectricity and semiconductor properties in functional nanomaterials to the development of ‘smarter’ electronics and optoelectronics.

  12. Assessment by self-organizing maps of element release from sediments in contact with acidified seawater in laboratory leaching test conditions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I; Martín-Torre, M C; Galán, B; Viguri, J R

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gaining interest as a significant global option to reduce emissions of CO2. CCS development requires an assessment of the potential risks associated with CO2 leakages from storage sites. Laboratory leaching tests have proved to be a useful tool to study the potential mobilization of metals from contaminated sediment in a decreased-pH environment that mimics such a leakage event. This work employs a self-organizing map (SOM) tool to interpret and analyze the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn from equilibrium, column, and pH-dependent leaching tests. In these tests, acidified seawater is used for simulating different CO2 leakage scenarios. Classification was carried out detailing the mobilization of contaminants for environments of varying pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and type of contact of the laboratory leaching tests. Component planes in the SOMs allow visualization of the results and the determination of the worst case of element release. The pH-dependent leaching test with initial addition of either base or acid was found to mobilize the highest concentrations of metals.

  13. Analyzing qPlus sensor assemblies for optimized simultaneous scanning tunneling and non-contact atomic force microscopy operation using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Schwarz, Udo

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are powerful methods that can not only visualize a surface's atomic structure, but also probe its electronic and chemical properties with picoampere, piconewton, and picometer resolution. Quartz tuning forks in qPlus configuration that have a metallic probe tip attached to the end of the free prong have gained considerable popularity in recent years for simultaneous high-resolution STM/NC-AFM experiments. Due to the small size of the tuning forks and the complexity of the sensor architecture, it is, however, not intuitive to judge how variations in the execution of the individual assembly steps affect the completed sensor's performance. In this presentation, we analyze the influence of each assembly step on the sensor's final performance using finite element method. The results show that when the tunneling current is collected using a separate wire, the exact realization of this wire connection has major effect on the sensor's performance. In addition, we show how other design choices such as the exact amount of epoxy used at key interfaces affects parameters such as spring constant, Q-factor, and resonance frequency.

  14. An adaptive transposable element insertion in the regulatory region of the EO gene in the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Yi-Hong; Han, Min-Jin; Cao, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Although there are many studies to show a key role of transposable elements (TEs) in adaptive evolution of higher organisms, little is known about the molecular mechanisms. In this study, we found that a partial TE (Taguchi) inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the silkworm ecdysone oxidase (EO) gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme to reduce the titer of molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E). The TE insertion occurred during domestication of silkworm and the frequency of the TE insertion in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori) is high, 54.24%. The linkage disequilibrium in the TE inserted strains of the domesticated silkworm was elevated. Molecular population genetics analyses suggest that this TE insertion is adaptive for the domesticated silkworm. Luminescent reporter assay shows that the TE inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene functions as a 20E-induced enhancer of the gene expression. Further, phenotypic bioassay indicates that the silkworm with the TE insertion exhibited more stable developmental phenotype than the silkworm without the TE insertion when suffering from food shortage. Thus, the inserted TE in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene increased developmental uniformity of silkworm individuals through regulating 20E metabolism, partially explaining transformation of a domestication developmental trait in the domesticated silkworm. Our results emphasize the exceptional role of gene expression regulation in developmental transition of domesticated animals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Adaptive Significance of Enamel Loss in the Mandibular Incisors of Cercopithecine Primates (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae): A Finite Element Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

    2014-01-01

    In several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual (tongue) side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion (peeling, scraping) of tough-skinned fruits. PMID:24831704

  16. The adaptive significance of enamel loss in the mandibular incisors of cercopithecine primates (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae): a finite element modelling study.

    PubMed

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

    2014-01-01

    In several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual (tongue) side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion (peeling, scraping) of tough-skinned fruits.

  17. Use of the kalamazoo essential elements communication checklist (adapted) in an institutional interpersonal and communication skills curriculum.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Barbara L; Steenbergh, Timothy; Scher, Eric

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Kalamazoo Essential Elements Communication Checklist (Adapted) (KEECC-A), which addresses 7 key elements of physician communication identified in the Kalamazoo Consensus Statement, in a sample of 135 residents in multiple specialties at a large urban medical center in 2008-2009. The KEECC-A was used by residents, standardized patients, and faculty as the assessment tool in a broader institutional curriculum initiative. Three separate KEECC-A scores (self-ratings, faculty ratings, and standardized patient ratings) were calculated for each resident to assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the checklist. In addition, we analyzed KEECC-A ratings by gender and US versus international medical graduates, and collected American Board of Internal Medicine Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) scores for a subsample of internal medicine residents (n  =  28) to examine the relationship between this measure and the KEECC-A ratings to provide evidence of convergent validity. The KEECC-A ratings generated by faculty, standardized patients, and the residents themselves demonstrated a high degree of internal consistency. Factor analyses of the 3 different sets of KEECC-A ratings produced a consistent single-factor structure. We could not examine the relationship between KEECC-A and the PSQ because of substantial range restriction in PSQ scores. No differences were seen in the communication scores of men versus women. Faculty rated US graduates significantly higher than international medical graduates. Our study provides evidence for the reliability and validity of the KEECC-A as a measure of physician communication skills. The KEECC-A appears to be a psychometrically sound, user-friendly communication tool, linked to an expert consensus statement, that can be quickly and accurately completed by multiple raters across diverse specialties.

  18. Friction and wear with a single-crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide in contact with iron base binary alloys in oil: Effects of alloying element and its content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-base binary alloys (alloying elements were Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Rh, and W) in contact with a rider of 0.025-millimeter-radius, single-crystal silicon carbide in mineral oil. Results indicate that atomic size and content of alloying element play a dominant role in controlling the abrasive-wear and -friction properties of iron-base binary alloys. The coefficient of friction and groove height (wear volume) general alloy decrease, and the contact pressure increases in solute content. There appears to be very good correlation of the solute to iron atomic radius ratio with the decreasing rate of coefficient of friction, the decreasing rate of groove height (wear volume), and the increasing rate of contact pressure with increasing solute content C. Those rates increase as the solute to iron atomic radius ratio increases from unity.

  19. Testing convergent and parallel adaptations in talpids humeral mechanical performance by means of geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Piras, P; Sansalone, G; Teresi, L; Kotsakis, T; Colangelo, P; Loy, A

    2012-07-01

    The shape and mechanical performance in Talpidae humeri were studied by means of Geometric Morphometrics and Finite Element Analysis, including both extinct and extant taxa. The aim of this study was to test whether the ability to dig, quantified by humerus mechanical performance, was characterized by convergent or parallel adaptations in different clades of complex tunnel digger within Talpidae, that is, Talpinae+Condylura (monophyletic) and some complex tunnel diggers not belonging to this clade. Our results suggest that the pattern underlying Talpidae humerus evolution is evolutionary parallelism. However, this insight changed to true convergence when we tested an alternative phylogeny based on molecular data, with Condylura moved to a more basal phylogenetic position. Shape and performance analyses, as well as specific comparative methods, provided strong evidence that the ability to dig complex tunnels reached a functional optimum in distantly related taxa. This was also confirmed by the lower phenotypic variance in complex tunnel digger taxa, compared to non-complex tunnel diggers. Evolutionary rates of phenotypic change showed a smooth deceleration in correspondence with the most recent common ancestor of the Talpinae+Condylura clade.

  20. An adaptive extended finite element method for the analysis of agglomeration of colloidal particles in a flowing fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Jorshari, Razzi Movassaghi; Djilali, Ned

    2015-03-10

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow-nanoparticle interaction in a colloidal suspension are presented using an extended finite element method (XFEM) in which the dynamics of the nanoparticles is solved in a fully-coupled manner with the flow. The method is capable of accurately describing solid-fluid interfaces without the need of boundary-fitted meshes to investigate the dynamics of particles in complex flows. In order to accurately compute the high interparticle shear stresses and pressures while minimizing computing costs, an adaptive meshing technique is incorporated with the fluid-structure interaction algorithm. The particle-particle interaction at the microscopic level is modeled using the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and the corresponding potential parameters are determined by a scaling procedure. The study is relevant to the preparation of inks used in the fabrication of catalyst layers for fuel cells. In this paper, we are particularly interested in investigating agglomeration of the nanoparticles under external shear flow in a sliding bi-periodic Lees-Edwards frame. The results indicate that the external shear has a crucial impact on the structure formation of colloidal particles in a suspension.

  1. Development and application of a multimesh auto-adaptive finite element method for the calculation of an electric arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Jean

    The feasibility of a two dimensional computation code for electric arc plasma is addressed. The nonstationary physics of a plasma arc can intervene at high gradients on all the variables, a high convection, as well as the considerable pressure variations (in space and time). Here the spatial finesse needed for the treatment of high gradient zones, is obtained by the use of a finite element method, improved by a mesh auto-adaptivity. The chosen time integration method is of the Runge-Kutta type with time step adjustment. This is presented, with the numerical methodology principles (multimesh, regularization, time step control). Results obtained in the study of classical partial differential equation systems, simplified versions of the Navier-Stokes equations (Burger equation, Dwyer-Sanders flame model), are presented. The numerical treatment of a confined arc plasma required the preliminary definition of a representative system of equations. This system is presented, with the thermal and dynamic modelings carried out. Different aspects of the models introduced are illustrated, and results obtained for an unstationary one dimensional arc plasma in industrial conditions are presented. Comparisons between these results and available experimental data are encouraging, but suggest that a better dynamic modeling is indispensable.

  2. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  3. A non-contacting approach for full field dynamic strain monitoring of rotating structures using the photogrammetry, finite element, and modal expansion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad

    deformation of the blades at target locations. The measured displacements were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the turbine to extract full-field dynamic strain on the structure. In order to validate the results for the rotating turbine, the predicted strain was compared to strain measured at four locations on the spinning blades using a wireless strain-gage system. The approach used in this work to predict the strain showed higher accuracy than measurements obtainable by using the digital image correlation technique. The new expansion approach is able to extract dynamic strain all over the entire structure, even inside the structure beyond the line of sight of the measurement system. Because the method is based on a non-contacting measurement approach, it can be readily applied to a variety of structures having different boundary and operating conditions, including rotating blades.

  4. Dual contact pogo pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Stephen McGarry

    2016-06-21

    A contact assembly includes a base and a pair of electrical contacts supported by the base. A first end of the first electrical contact corresponds to a first end of the base and is configured to engage a first external conductive circuit element. A first end of the second electrical contact also corresponds to the first end of the base and is configured to engage a second external conductive circuit element. The first contact and the second contact are electrically isolated from one another and configured to compress when engaging an external connector element. The base includes an aperture positioned on a second end of the base outboard of a second end of the first and second electrical contacts. The aperture presents a narrowing shape with a wide mouth distal the electrical contacts and a narrow internal through-hole proximate the electrical contacts.

  5. Dual contact pogo pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Stephen McGarry

    2015-01-20

    A contact assembly includes a base and a pair of electrical contacts supported by the base. A first end of the first electrical contact corresponds to a first end of the base and is configured to engage a first external conductive circuit element. A first end of the second electrical contact also corresponds to the first end of the base and is configured to engage a second external conductive circuit element. The first contact and the second contact are electrically isolated from one another and configured to compress when engaging an external connector element. The base includes an aperture positioned on a second end of the base outboard of a second end of the first and second electrical contacts. The aperture presents a narrowing shape with a wide mouth distal the electrical contacts and a narrow internal through-hole proximate the electrical contacts.

  6. Finite element analysis regarding patch size, stiffness, and contact condition to the endocardium in surgery for post infarction ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiaki; Hagiwara, Hiroaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Takenori

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a rational surgical design to minimize suture line stress of the patch and thus prevent residual leakage in surgery for post infarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR). A computer model that simulates surgery for VSR was developed. Stress force on the suture line of the patch was calculated at varying size, stiffness, and contact condition of the endocardial patch to the inner surface of the heart using a finite element analysis. Clinical results and echo findings of 34 consecutive patients with a mean age of 72.6 ± 9.5 (range 55-89) who underwent emergency surgery for VSR from 1995 to 2012 were reviewed. Suture line stress decreased by two-thirds as the size or stiffness of the patch increased in comparison with the basic conditions that mimic a pericardial patch fitted to the septal plane. On the other hand, suture line stress increased sixfold when there was a dead space beneath the patch. 30-day mortality was 12 %, and in-hospital mortality 18 %. On echocardiography, all three patients who had dead space beneath the patch had residual leak. Another patient who had huge posterior defect also showed residual leak. Clinical results were well matched to model results. 5-year survival rate of all patients who received operation was 68.7 ± 9.3 %. In endocardial patch type surgery for VSR, proper sizing of the patch to sufficiently fit to endocardial surface in a tension-free condition is the most important to avoid residual leak.

  7. Numerical simulations of rough contacts between viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinu, S.; Cerlinca, D.

    2017-08-01

    The durability of the mechanical contact is often plagued by surface-related phenomena like rolling contact fatigue, wear or crack propagation, which are linked to the important gradients of stress arising in the contacting bodies due to interaction at the asperity level. The semi-analytical computational approach adopted in this paper is based on a previously reported algorithm capable of simulating the contact between bodies with arbitrary limiting surfaces and viscoelastic behaviour, which is enhanced and adapted for the contact of real surfaces with microtopography. As steep slopes at the asperity level inevitably lead to localized plastic deformation at the tip of the asperities that are first brought into contact, the viscoelastic behaviour is amended by limiting the maximum value of the pressure on the contact area to that of the material hardness, according to the Tabor equation. In this manner, plasticity is considered in a simplified manner that assures the knowledge of the contact area and of the pressure distribution without estimation of the residual state. The main advantage of this approach is the preservation of the algorithmic complexity, allowing the simulation of very fine meshes capable of capturing particular features of the investigated contacting surface. The newly advanced model is expected to predict the contact specifics of rough surfaces as resulting from various manufacturing processes, thus assisting the design of durable machine elements using elastomers or rubbers.

  8. Evaluation of the Utility of Static and Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Idealized Tropical Cyclone Problems in a Spectral Element Shallow Water Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-09

    Laboratory,Marine Meteorology Division,Monterey,CA,93943 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...adaptive mesh refinement1 for idealized tropical cyclone problems in a spectral element2 shallow water model3 Eric A. Hendricks ∗ Marine Meteorology Division...CA, USA Melinda S. Peng, James D. Doyle, and Qingfang Jiang Marine Meteorology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA, USA Mon. Wea. Rev

  9. Mass Conservation of the Unified Continuous and Discontinuous Element-Based Galerkin Methods on Dynamically Adaptive Grids with Application to Atmospheric Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    that matter. [12] (with a later follow-up in [13]) addressed the conservation issue of the conforming continuous Galerkin method on the cubed -sphere...atmospheric dynamical core on the cubed -sphere grid, in: J. Phys. Conf. Ser., Vol. 78, IOP Publishing, 2007, p. 012074. [13] M. A. Taylor, A. Fournier, A...Discontinuous Element-Based Galerkin Methods on Dynamically Adaptive Grids with Application to Atmospheric Simulations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. Finite element analysis of the effect of medullary contact on fracture healing and remodeling in the intramedullary interlocking nail-fixed tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haosen; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu

    2017-04-01

    Intramedullary interlocking nail is an effective treatment for tibial diaphyseal fracture. The contact between medullary rod and diaphyseal cortex is able to enhance fracture stability. However, how and to what degree the contact affects fracture healing and subsequent bone remodeling is still unclear. To investigate this, fracture healing and remodeling algorithms were combined, improved, and used to simulate the healing and remodeling processes in a transverse tibial diaphyseal fracture fixed with an intramedullary interlocking nail device. Two different diaphyseal fracture statuses, three different initial loading levels, and two nail materials were considered. The results showed that the medullary contact could significantly enhance the fixation stability; the strain reduction was up to 80% in the initial granulation callus. However, low initial loading level was found to be a more potential risk factor for the insufficient loading-induced nonunion other than medullary contact and stiffer nail material. Furthermore, the stabilizing effect of medullary contact diminished when stiff bone tissue formed in the callus; thus, the remodeling in the long-term was not affected by medullary contact. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. ELECTRIC CONTACT MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Grear, J.W. Jr.

    1959-03-10

    A switch adapted to maintain electrical connections under conditions of vibration or acceleration is described. According to the invention, thc switch includes a rotatable arm carrying a conductive bar arranged to close against two contacts spaced in the same plane. The firm and continuous engagement of the conductive bar with the contacts is acheived by utilizeing a spring located betwenn the vbar and athe a rem frzme and slidable mounting the bar in channel between two arms suspendef from the arm frame.

  12. An adaptive Lagrangian boundary element approach for three-dimensional transient free-surface Stokes flow as applied to extrusion, thermoforming, and rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayat, Roger E.; Genouvrier, Delphine

    2001-05-01

    An adaptive (Lagrangian) boundary element approach is proposed for the general three-dimensional simulation of confined free-surface Stokes flow. The method is stable as it includes remeshing capabilities of the deforming free surface and thus can handle large deformations. A simple algorithm is developed for mesh refinement of the deforming free-surface mesh. Smooth transition between large and small elements is achieved without significant degradation of the aspect ratio of the elements in the mesh. Several flow problems are presented to illustrate the utility of the approach, particularly as encountered in polymer processing and rheology. These problems illustrate the transient nature of the flow during the processes of extrusion and thermoforming, the elongation of a fluid sample in an extensional rheometer, and the coating of a sphere. Surface tension effects are also explored. Copyright

  13. Carbon or graphite foam as a heating element and system thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Ronald D [Knoxville, TN; McMillan, April D [Knoxville, TN; Choudhury, Ashok [Oak Ridge, TN

    2004-05-04

    A temperature regulator includes at least one electrically conductive carbon foam element. The foam element includes at least two locations adapted for receiving electrical connectors thereto for heating a fluid, such as engine oil. A combustion engine includes an engine block and at least one carbon foam element, the foam element extending into the engine block or disposed in thermal contact with at least one engine fluid.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of a thermal dendrite using the phase field method with automatic anisotropic and unstructured adaptive finite element meshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkis, C.; Silva, L.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Plapp, M.

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic growth is computed with automatic adaptation of an anisotropic and unstructured finite element mesh. The energy conservation equation is formulated for solid and liquid phases considering an interface balance that includes the Gibbs-Thomson effect. An equation for a diffuse interface is also developed by considering a phase field function with constant negative value in the liquid and constant positive value in the solid. Unknowns are the phase field function and a dimensionless temperature, as proposed by [1]. Linear finite element interpolation is used for both variables, and discretization stabilization techniques ensure convergence towards a correct non-oscillating solution. In order to perform quantitative computations of dendritic growth on a large domain, two additional numerical ingredients are necessary: automatic anisotropic unstructured adaptive meshing [2,[3] and parallel implementations [4], both made available with the numerical platform used (CimLib) based on C++ developments. Mesh adaptation is found to greatly reduce the number of degrees of freedom. Results of phase field simulations for dendritic solidification of a pure material in two and three dimensions are shown and compared with reference work [1]. Discussion on algorithm details and the CPU time will be outlined.

  15. Telocyte's contacts.

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TC) are an interstitial cell type located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals. By means of homocellular contacts, TC build a scaffold whose meshes integrity and continuity are guaranteed by those contacts having a mechanical function; those contacts acting as sites of intercellular communication allow exchanging information and spreading signals. Heterocellular contacts between TC and a great variety of cell types give origin to mixed networks. TC, by means of all these types of contacts, their interaction with the extracellular matrix and their vicinity to nerve endings, are part of an integrated system playing tissue/organ-specific roles.

  16. Analysing the mechanical performance and growth adaptation of Norway spruce using a non-linear finite-element model and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Lundström, T; Jonas, T; Volkwein, A

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] trees of different size, age, and social status, and grown under varying conditions, were investigated to see how they react to complex natural static loading under summer and winter conditions, and how they have adapted their growth to such combinations of load and tree state. For this purpose a non-linear finite-element model and an extensive experimental data set were used, as well as a new formulation describing the degree to which the exploitation of the bending stress capacity is uniform. The three main findings were: material and geometric non-linearities play important roles when analysing tree deflections and critical loads; the strengths of the stem and the anchorage mutually adapt to the local wind acting on the tree crown in the forest canopy; and the radial stem growth follows a mechanically high-performance path because it adapts to prevailing as well as acute seasonal combinations of the tree state (e.g. frozen or unfrozen stem and anchorage) and load (e.g. wind and vertical and lateral snow pressure). Young trees appeared to adapt to such combinations in a more differentiated way than older trees. In conclusion, the mechanical performance of the Norway spruce studied was mostly very high, indicating that their overall growth had been clearly influenced by the external site- and tree-specific mechanical stress.

  17. Transposable elements and viruses as factors in adaptation and evolution: an expansion and strengthening of the TE-Thrust hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Keith R; Greene, Wayne K

    2012-11-01

    In addition to the strong divergent evolution and significant and episodic evolutionary transitions and speciation we previously attributed to TE-Thrust, we have expanded the hypothesis to more fully account for the contribution of viruses to TE-Thrust and evolution. The concept of symbiosis and holobiontic genomes is acknowledged, with particular emphasis placed on the creativity potential of the union of retroviral genomes with vertebrate genomes. Further expansions of the TE-Thrust hypothesis are proposed regarding a fuller account of horizontal transfer of TEs, the life cycle of TEs, and also, in the case of a mammalian innovation, the contributions of retroviruses to the functions of the placenta. The possibility of drift by TE families within isolated demes or disjunct populations, is acknowledged, and in addition, we suggest the possibility of horizontal transposon transfer into such subpopulations. "Adaptive potential" and "evolutionary potential" are proposed as the extremes of a continuum of "intra-genomic potential" due to TE-Thrust. Specific data is given, indicating "adaptive potential" being realized with regard to insecticide resistance, and other insect adaptations. In this regard, there is agreement between TE-Thrust and the concept of adaptation by a change in allele frequencies. Evidence on the realization of "evolutionary potential" is also presented, which is compatible with the known differential survivals, and radiations of lineages. Collectively, these data further suggest the possibility, or likelihood, of punctuated episodes of speciation events and evolutionary transitions, coinciding with, and heavily underpinned by, intermittent bursts of TE activity.

  18. Migration of 18 trace elements from ceramic food contact material: influence of pigment, pH, nature of acid and temperature.

    PubMed

    Demont, M; Boutakhrit, K; Fekete, V; Bolle, F; Van Loco, J

    2012-03-01

    The effect of pH, nature of acid and temperature on trace element migration from ceramic ware treated with 18 commercially available glazes was studied. Besides of the well-studied lead and cadmium, migration of other toxic and non toxic elements such as aluminum, boron, barium, cobalt, chrome, copper, iron, lithium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, antimony, tin, strontium, titanium, vanadium, zinc and zirconium was investigated in order to evaluate their potential health hazards. Trace element concentrations were determined with Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This study suggests that there is indeed a health risk concerning the possible migration of other elements than lead and cadmium. At low pH (2elements display a decreasing linear gradient. In ceramics used for this study (fired at 900 °C), a linear relationship between the migration and the temperature was observed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. NON-CONFORMING FINITE ELEMENTS; MESH GENERATION, ADAPTIVITY AND RELATED ALGEBRAIC MULTIGRID AND DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHODS IN MASSIVELY PARALLEL COMPUTING ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R; Pasciak, J; Jones, J

    2002-02-01

    Construction, analysis and numerical testing of efficient solution techniques for solving elliptic PDEs that allow for parallel implementation have been the focus of the research. A number of discretization and solution methods for solving second order elliptic problems that include mortar and penalty approximations and domain decomposition methods for finite elements and finite volumes have been investigated and analyzed. Techniques for parallel domain decomposition algorithms in the framework of PETC and HYPRE have been studied and tested. Hierarchical parallel grid refinement and adaptive solution methods have been implemented and tested on various model problems. A parallel code implementing the mortar method with algebraically constructed multiplier spaces was developed.

  20. Modelling the oscillations of the thermocline in a lake by means of a fully consistent and conservative 3D finite-element model with a vertically adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delandmeter, Philippe; Lambrechts, Jonathan; Vallaeys, Valentin; Naithani, Jaya; Remacle, Jean-François; Legat, Vincent; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Vertical discretisation is crucial in the modelling of lake thermocline oscillations. For finite element methods, a simple way to increase the resolution close to the oscillating thermocline is to use vertical adaptive coordinates. With an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation, the mesh can be adapted to increase the resolution in regions with strong shear or stratification. In such an application, consistency and conservativity must be strictly enforced. SLIM 3D, a discontinuous-Galerkin finite element model for shallow-water flows (www.climate.be/slim, e.g. Kärnä et al., 2013, Delandmeter et al., 2015), was designed to be strictly consistent and conservative in its discrete formulation. In this context, special care must be paid to the coupling of the external and internal modes of the model and the moving mesh algorithm. In this framework, the mesh can be adapted arbitrarily in the vertical direction. Two moving mesh algorithms were implemented: the first one computes an a-priori optimal mesh; the second one diffuses vertically the mesh (Burchard et al., 2004, Hofmeister et al., 2010). The criteria used to define the optimal mesh and the diffusion function are related to a suitable measure of shear and stratification. We will present in detail the design of the model and how the consistency and conservativity is obtained. Then we will apply it to both idealised benchmarks and the wind-forced thermocline oscillations in Lake Tanganyika (Naithani et al. 2002). References Tuomas Kärnä, Vincent Legat and Eric Deleersnijder. A baroclinic discontinuous Galerkin finite element model for coastal flows, Ocean Modelling, 61:1-20, 2013. Philippe Delandmeter, Stephen E Lewis, Jonathan Lambrechts, Eric Deleersnijder, Vincent Legat and Eric Wolanski. The transport and fate of riverine fine sediment exported to a semi-open system. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 167:336-346, 2015. Hans Burchard and Jean-Marie Beckers. Non-uniform adaptive vertical grids in

  1. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  2. The Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method-A New High-Resolution and Genuinely Multidimensional Paradigm for Solving Conservation Laws. 2; Numerical Simulation of Shock Waves and Contact Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1998-01-01

    Without resorting to special treatment for each individual test case, the 1D and 2D CE/SE shock-capturing schemes described previously (in Part I) are used to simulate flows involving phenomena such as shock waves, contact discontinuities, expansion waves and their interactions. Five 1D and six 2D problems are considered to examine the capability and robustness of these schemes. Despite their simple logical structures and low computational cost (for the 2D CE/SE shock-capturing scheme, the CPU time is about 2 micro-secs per mesh point per marching step on a Cray C90 machine), the numerical results, when compared with experimental data, exact solutions or numerical solutions by other methods, indicate that these schemes can accurately resolve shock and contact discontinuities consistently.

  3. Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses advances in knowledge of lubrication of nonconformal contacts in bearings and other machine elements. Reviews previous developments in theory of lubrication, presents advances in theory of lubrication to determine minimum film thickness, and describes experiments designed to investigate one of regimes of lubrication for ball bearings.

  4. An adaptive spectral/DG method for a reduced phase-space based level set approach to geometrical optics on curved elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Reitich, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    We present an adaptive spectral/discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method on curved elements to simulate high-frequency wavefronts within a reduced phase-space formulation of geometrical optics. Following recent work, the approach is based on the use of level sets defined by functions satisfying the Liouville equations in reduced phase-space and, in particular, it relies on the smoothness of these functions to represent them by rapidly convergent spectral expansions in the phase variables. The resulting (hyperbolic) system of equations for the coefficients in these expansions are then amenable to a high-order accurate treatment via DG approximations. In the present work, we significantly expand on the applicability and efficiency of the approach by incorporating mechanisms that allow for its use in scattering simulations and for a reduced overall computational cost. With regards to the former we demonstrate that the incorporation of curved elements is necessary to attain any kind of accuracy in calculations that involve scattering off non-flat interfaces. With regards to efficiency, on the other hand, we also show that the level-set formulation allows for a space p-adaptive scheme that under-resolves the level-set functions away from the wavefront without incurring in a loss of accuracy in the approximation of its location. As we show, these improvements enable simulations that are beyond the capabilities of previous implementations of these numerical procedures.

  5. Variational Multiscale Stabilization and p-adaptivity of High-Order Spectral Elements for the Convection-Diffusion Equation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-26

    the solution. The literature on the optimal selection of τ is vast, and we refer to [25, 26] for a comprehensive analysis of different definitions. 8...elements are used everywhere. Clearly, the algorithm can be easily optimized , but we present the pseudo-code below for the sake of clarity. The method was...resolution in the computation of solutions of linear and nonlinear equations, In Recent advances in numerical anal- ysis. Proceeding symposium mathematical

  6. Adaptive response of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to accumulation of elements and translocation in Phragmites australis affected by cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaochen; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Zhu, Shishu; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jieting; Yang, Jixian; Wang, Li

    2017-07-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been reported to play a central role in improving plant tolerance to cadmium (Cd)-contaminated sites. This is achieved by enhancing both the growth of host plants and the nutritive elements in plants. This study assessed potential regulatory effects of AM symbiosis with regard to nutrient uptake and transport, and revealed different response strategies to various Cd concentrations. Phragmites australis was inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis in the greenhouse cultivation system, where it was treated with 0-20 mg L(-1) of Cd for 21days to investigate growth parameters, as well as Cd and nutritive element distribution in response to AM fungus inoculation. Mycorrhizal plants showed a higher tolerance, particularly under high Cd-level stress in the substrate. Moreover, our results determined the roots as dominant Cd reservoirs in plants. The AM fungus improved Cd accumulation and saturated concentration in the roots, thus inhibiting Cd uptake to shoots. The observed distributions of nutritive elements and the interactions among these indicated the highest microelement contribution to roots, Ca contributed maximally in leaves, and K and P contributed similarly under Cd stress. In addition, AM fungus inoculation effectively impacted Mn and P uptake and accumulation while coping with Cd toxicity. This study also demonstrated translocation factor from metal concentration (TF) could be a good parameter to evaluate different transportation strategies induced by various Cd stresses in contrast to the bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor from metal accumulation (TF'). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Revision of genus Texoreddellia Wygodzinsky, 1973 (Hexapoda, Zygentoma, Nicoletiidae), a prominent element of the cave-adapted fauna of Texas.

    PubMed

    Espinasa, Luis; Bartolo, Nicole D; Centone, Danielle M; Haruta, Charisse S; Reddell, James R

    2016-06-17

    While many cave-adapted organisms tend to be endemic to single locations or restricted to single karstic regions, the troglobitic silverfish insects of genus Texoreddellia can be found in scores of different cave localities that cover a range of nearly 160,000 km2. They are among the most important and common representatives of the cave-adapted fauna of Texas and Coahuila, in northern Mexico. Using morphological and mitochondrial gene sequence data, we have corroborated the presence of at least six different species within the genus and provided species identifications to populations inhabiting 153 different cave locations. Results show that species ranges are larger than previously reported and that ranges tend to greatly overlap with each other. We have also found that different species of Texoreddellia commonly inhabit the same cave in sympatry. Data supports that some species of Texoreddellia can easily disperse through the extensive network of cracks, fissures and smaller cavities near the surface and epikarst.

  8. Assessment of Study Abroad Outcomes in Chinese as a Second Language: Gains in Cross-Cultural Adaptability, Language Contact and Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko; Xiao, Feng; Li, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Participants were 109 American college students studying Chinese in a study-abroad programme in Beijing. Following Kelley and Meyer, intercultural competence was defined as cross-cultural adaptability involving four dimensions (emotional resilience, flexibility/openness, perceptual acuity and personal autonomy) and was measured with a survey. A…

  9. Assessment of Study Abroad Outcomes in Chinese as a Second Language: Gains in Cross-Cultural Adaptability, Language Contact and Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko; Xiao, Feng; Li, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Participants were 109 American college students studying Chinese in a study-abroad programme in Beijing. Following Kelley and Meyer, intercultural competence was defined as cross-cultural adaptability involving four dimensions (emotional resilience, flexibility/openness, perceptual acuity and personal autonomy) and was measured with a survey. A…

  10. Modelling of fluid-solid interactions using an adaptive mesh fluid model coupled with a combined finite-discrete element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viré, Axelle; Xiang, Jiansheng; Milthaler, Frank; Farrell, Patrick Emmet; Piggott, Matthew David; Latham, John-Paul; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Pain, Christopher Charles

    2012-12-01

    Fluid-structure interactions are modelled by coupling the finite element fluid/ocean model `Fluidity-ICOM' with a combined finite-discrete element solid model `Y3D'. Because separate meshes are used for the fluids and solids, the present method is flexible in terms of discretisation schemes used for each material. Also, it can tackle multiple solids impacting on one another, without having ill-posed problems in the resolution of the fluid's equations. Importantly, the proposed approach ensures that Newton's third law is satisfied at the discrete level. This is done by first computing the action-reaction force on a supermesh, i.e. a function superspace of the fluid and solid meshes, and then projecting it to both meshes to use it as a source term in the fluid and solid equations. This paper demonstrates the properties of spatial conservation and accuracy of the method for a sphere immersed in a fluid, with prescribed fluid and solid velocities. While spatial conservation is shown to be independent of the mesh resolutions, accuracy requires fine resolutions in both fluid and solid meshes. It is further highlighted that unstructured meshes adapted to the solid concentration field reduce the numerical errors, in comparison with uniformly structured meshes with the same number of elements. The method is verified on flow past a falling sphere. Its potential for ocean applications is further shown through the simulation of vortex-induced vibrations of two cylinders and the flow past two flexible fibres.

  11. Methods for high-resolution anisotropic finite element modeling of the human head: automatic MR white matter anisotropy-adaptive mesh generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an advanced finite element (FE) head modeling technique through which high-resolution FE meshes adaptive to the degree of tissue anisotropy can be generated. Our adaptive meshing scheme (called wMesh) uses MRI structural information and fractional anisotropy maps derived from diffusion tensors in the FE mesh generation process, optimally reflecting electrical properties of the human brain. We examined the characteristics of the wMeshes through various qualitative and quantitative comparisons to the conventional FE regular-sized meshes that are non-adaptive to the degree of white matter anisotropy. We investigated numerical differences in the FE forward solutions that include the electrical potential and current density generated by current sources in the brain. The quantitative difference was calculated by two statistical measures of relative difference measure (RDM) and magnification factor (MAG). The results show that the wMeshes are adaptive to the anisotropic density of the WM anisotropy, and they better reflect the density and directionality of tissue conductivity anisotropy. Our comparison results between various anisotropic regular mesh and wMesh models show that there are substantial differences in the EEG forward solutions in the brain (up to RDM=0.48 and MAG=0.63 in the electrical potential, and RDM=0.65 and MAG=0.52 in the current density). Our analysis results indicate that the wMeshes produce different forward solutions that are different from the conventional regular meshes. We present some results that the wMesh head modeling approach enhances the sensitivity and accuracy of the FE solutions at the interfaces or in the regions where the anisotropic conductivities change sharply or their directional changes are complex. The fully automatic wMesh generation technique should be useful for modeling an individual-specific and high-resolution anisotropic FE head model incorporating realistic anisotropic conductivity distributions

  12. A tire contact solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielking, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating the contact boundary and interfacial pressure distribution was developed. This solution technique utilizes the discrete Fourier transform to establish an influence coefficient matrix for the portion of the pressurized tire surface that may be in the contact region. This matrix is used in a linear algebra algorithm to determine the contact boundary and the array of forces within the boundary that are necessary to hold the tire in equilibrium against a specified contact surface. The algorithm also determines the normal and tangential displacements of those points on the tire surface that are included in the influence coefficient matrix. Displacements within and outside the contact region are calculated. The solution technique is implemented with a finite-element tire model that is based on orthotropic, nonlinear shell of revolution elements which can respond to nonaxisymmetric loads. A sample contact solution is presented.

  13. Simulation of underresolved turbulent flows by adaptive filtering using the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flad, David; Beck, Andrea; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Scale-resolving simulations of turbulent flows in complex domains demand accurate and efficient numerical schemes, as well as geometrical flexibility. For underresolved situations, the avoidance of aliasing errors is a strong demand for stability. For continuous and discontinuous Galerkin schemes, an effective way to prevent aliasing errors is to increase the quadrature precision of the projection operator to account for the non-linearity of the operands (polynomial dealiasing, overintegration). But this increases the computational costs extensively. In this work, we present a novel spatially and temporally adaptive dealiasing strategy by projection filtering. We show this to be more efficient for underresolved turbulence than the classical overintegration strategy. For this novel approach, we discuss the implementation strategy and the indicator details, show its accuracy and efficiency for a decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the transitional Taylor-Green vortex and compare it to the original overintegration approach and a state of the art variational multi-scale eddy viscosity formulation.

  14. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    means to produce nanoscale device elements, such as carbon nanotube transistors [5] and high-density memory crossbar circuits [6]. Recently, the use of scanning tunnelling microscopes has broached a new field of research, which is currently attracting enormous interest—single molecule detection. In issue 25 of Nanotechnology researchers in Houston reported unprecedented sensitivities using localized surface plasmon resonance shifts of gold bipyramids to detect concentrations of substances down to the single molecule level [7]. In issue 26 a collaboration of researchers from the US and Czech Republic describe a different approach, namely tunnelling recognition. In their topical review they describe hydrogen-bond mediated tunnelling and the associated experimental methods that facilitate the detection of single molecules in a tunnel junction using chemically functionalized electrodes [8]. The nanoworld depicted by scanning probe microgaphs over 20 years ago may have looked as extraterrestrial as any science fiction generated alien terrain, but though study and analysis these nano-landscapes have become significantly less alien territory. The work so far to unveil the intricacies of electronic contact has been a story of progress in investigating this new territory and manipulating the mechanisms that govern it to formulate new devices and delve deeper into phenomena at the nanoscale. References [1] Binning G, Rohrer H, Gerber Ch and Weibel E 1982 Phys. Rev. Lett. 49 57-61 [2] X D Cui, X Zarate, J Tomfohr, O F Sankey, A Primak, A L Moore, T A Moore, D Gust, G~Harris and S M Lindsay 2002 Nanotechnology 13 5-14 [3] Martin C A, van Ruitenbeek J M and van der Zant S J H 2010 Nanotechnology 21 265201 [4] Davis J J and Hanyu Y 2010 Nanotechnology 21 265302 [5] Tans S J, Verschueren A R M and Dekker C 1998 Nature 393 49-52 [6] Chen Y, Jung G-Y, Ohlberg D A A, Li X, Stewart D R, Jeppesen J O, Nielsen K A, Stoddart J F and Williams R S 2003 Nanotechnology 14 462-8 [7] Mayer K M

  15. The sterol regulatory element binding proteins are essential for the metabolic programming of effector T cells and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kidani, Yoko; Elsaesser, Heidi; Hock, M Benjamin; Vergnes, Laurent; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Marbois, Beth N; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Wilson, Elizabeth B; Osborne, Timothy F; Graeber, Thomas G; Reue, Karen; Brooks, David G; Bensinger, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Newly activated CD8+ T cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the extraordinary biosynthetic demands of clonal expansion; however, the signals mediating metabolic reprogramming remain poorly defined. Herein, we demonstrate an essential role for sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) in the acquisition of effector cell metabolism. Without SREBP signaling, CD8+ T cells are unable to blast, resulting in markedly attenuated clonal expansion during viral infection. Mechanistic studies indicate that SREBPs are essential to meet the heightened lipid requirements of membrane synthesis during blastogenesis. SREBPs are dispensable for homeostatic proliferation, indicating a context-specific requirement for SREBPs in effector responses. These studies provide insights into the molecular signals underlying metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells during the transition from quiescence to activation. PMID:23563690

  16. Fully parallel adaptive finite element simulation using the simplified spherical harmonics approximations for frequency-domain fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C.; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging/tomography may play an important role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics as a type of optical molecular. Time- and frequency-domain measurement can acquire more measurement information, reducing the ill-posedness and improving the reconstruction quality of fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography. Although the diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively in optical imaging, high-order photon migration models must be further investigated for application to complex and small tissue volumes. In this paper, a frequency-domain fully parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with the simplified spherical harmonics (SPN) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SPN approximations, a fast tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using the convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. With simple and real digital mouse phantoms, the results show that the significant precision and speed improvements are obtained from the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy.

  17. Adaptation at Specific Loci. II. Demographic and Biochemical Elements in the Maintenance of the Colias Pgi Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Ward B.

    1983-01-01

    Demographically oriented sampling in the wild and biochemical study of allozymes in the laboratory have been used to probe maintenance of the phosphoglucose isomerase polymorphism of Colias butterflies.—The several alleles at this locus show negative or no covariation among their frequencies in the wild. This rules out Wahlund effects as a cause of observations of heterozygote excess at this locus in broods that fly as single cohorts. Unusually heavy mortality among adults, due to drought stress or other causes, can preclude manifestation of differential survivorship among phosphoglucose isomerase genotypes. In broods composed of overlapping cohorts, heterozygote deficiency, apparently due to Wahlund effects in time as cohorts of different survivorship experience mix, can be found. Heterozygotes at this locus fly under a broader range of weather conditions than other genotypes.—Previously detected kinetic differentiation among the genotypes extends in greater magnitude to the glycolytic reaction direction, as well as to a broader range of test conditions than examined before. The heterozygote 3/4 is strikingly heterotic for several measures of kinetic functional effectiveness. Other heterozygotes are sometimes heterotic, more often intermediate (but not exactly so, nor additive in any sense) in properties between homozygotes.—Predictions are made from the biochemical analysis and from the insects' thermal ecology concerning distributions of the genotypes in the wild. Some agree with facts already established. Others are tested and confirmed from data already on hand. Still others are to be tested as reported in an accompanying paper.—All available evidence points to a combination of heterozygote advantage and fluctuating-environment selection as responsible for maintaining this polymorphism. There is considerable evidence for the operation of protein-structural constraint on the range of adaptations possible at this locus. PMID:17246121

  18. Adaptation at Specific Loci. II. Demographic and Biochemical Elements in the Maintenance of the Colias Pgi Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Watt, W B

    1983-04-01

    Demographically oriented sampling in the wild and biochemical study of allozymes in the laboratory have been used to probe maintenance of the phosphoglucose isomerase polymorphism of Colias butterflies.-The several alleles at this locus show negative or no covariation among their frequencies in the wild. This rules out Wahlund effects as a cause of observations of heterozygote excess at this locus in broods that fly as single cohorts. Unusually heavy mortality among adults, due to drought stress or other causes, can preclude manifestation of differential survivorship among phosphoglucose isomerase genotypes. In broods composed of overlapping cohorts, heterozygote deficiency, apparently due to Wahlund effects in time as cohorts of different survivorship experience mix, can be found. Heterozygotes at this locus fly under a broader range of weather conditions than other genotypes.-Previously detected kinetic differentiation among the genotypes extends in greater magnitude to the glycolytic reaction direction, as well as to a broader range of test conditions than examined before. The heterozygote 3/4 is strikingly heterotic for several measures of kinetic functional effectiveness. Other heterozygotes are sometimes heterotic, more often intermediate (but not exactly so, nor additive in any sense) in properties between homozygotes.-Predictions are made from the biochemical analysis and from the insects' thermal ecology concerning distributions of the genotypes in the wild. Some agree with facts already established. Others are tested and confirmed from data already on hand. Still others are to be tested as reported in an accompanying paper.-All available evidence points to a combination of heterozygote advantage and fluctuating-environment selection as responsible for maintaining this polymorphism. There is considerable evidence for the operation of protein-structural constraint on the range of adaptations possible at this locus.

  19. Estimation of the daily soil/dust (SD) ingestion rate of children from Gansu Province, China via hand-to-mouth contact using tracer elements.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Pan, Li-Bo; Wang, Qin; Lin, Chun-Ye; Duan, Xiao-Li; Hou, Hong

    2016-12-19

    A total of 60 children (31 males and 29 females) between the ages of 3 and 12 years were randomly selected from Lanzhou City in Gansu Province, northwest China. Hand (soil/dust) SD samples from these children were collected using hand wipes. We determined the approximate amounts of hand SD and the concentrations of three tracer soil elements (Ce, Y, and V) in these samples. The approximate amounts of hand SD ranged from 42.28 to 173.76 mg, with a median value of 85.42 mg. In addition, the mean amounts of hand SD estimated using the concentrations of Ce, Y, and V in the samples were 4.63, 3.43, and 3.42 mg, respectively. The amount of hand SD varied greatly among the age groups: primary school children had more hand SD than kindergarten children, males had more hand SD than females, and children from rural areas had more hand SD than those from urban areas. The rates of daily ingestion of hand SD for kindergarten and primary school children were estimated to be 7.73 and 6.61 mg/day, respectively.

  20. Bidirectional Regulation of the Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein Encodes Spatial Map Alignment in Prism-Adapting Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience - hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 minutes of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or re-adapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB, and by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, while others a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the sub-region of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  1. Crystallographic analysis of an RNA polymerase σ-­subunit fragment complexed with −10 promoter element ssDNA: quadruplex formation as a possible tool for engineering crystal contacts in protein–ssDNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    Structural studies of −10 promoter element recognition by domain 2 of the RNA polymerase σ subunit [Feklistov & Darst (2011 ▶), Cell, 147, 1257–1269] reveal an unusual crystal-packing arrangement dominated by G-quartets. The 3′-terminal GGG motif of the oligonucleotide used in crystallization participates in G-quadruplex formation with GGG motifs from symmetry-related complexes. Stacking between neighboring G-quadruplexes results in the formation of pseudo-continuous four-stranded columns running throughout the length of the crystal (G-columns). Here, a new crystal form is presented with a different arrangement of G-columns and it is proposed that the fortuitous finding of G-­quartet packing could be useful in engineering crystal contacts in protein–ssDNA complexes. PMID:23989139

  2. Subsurface Stress Fields in FCC Single Crystal Anisotropic Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Knudsen, Erik; Swanson, Gregory R.; Duke, Gregory; Ham-Battista, Gilda

    2004-01-01

    Single crystal superalloy turbine blades used in high pressure turbomachinery are subject to conditions of high temperature, triaxial steady and alternating stresses, fretting stresses in the blade attachment and damper contact locations, and exposure to high-pressure hydrogen. The blades are also subjected to extreme variations in temperature during start-up and shutdown transients. The most prevalent high cycle fatigue (HCF) failure modes observed in these blades during operation include crystallographic crack initiation/propagation on octahedral planes, and non-crystallographic initiation with crystallographic growth. Numerous cases of crack initiation and crack propagation at the blade leading edge tip, blade attachment regions, and damper contact locations have been documented. Understanding crack initiation/propagation under mixed-mode loading conditions is critical for establishing a systematic procedure for evaluating HCF life of single crystal turbine blades. This paper presents analytical and numerical techniques for evaluating two and three dimensional subsurface stress fields in anisotropic contacts. The subsurface stress results are required for evaluating contact fatigue life at damper contacts and dovetail attachment regions in single crystal nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. An analytical procedure is presented for evaluating the subsurface stresses in the elastic half-space, based on the adaptation of a stress function method outlined by Lekhnitskii. Numerical results are presented for cylindrical and spherical anisotropic contacts, using finite element analysis (FEA). Effects of crystal orientation on stress response and fatigue life are examined. Obtaining accurate subsurface stress results for anisotropic single crystal contact problems require extremely refined three-dimensional (3-D) finite element grids, especially in the edge of contact region. Obtaining resolved shear stresses (RSS) on the principal slip planes also involves

  3. Boundary element solutions for broad-band 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems accelerated by an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a generalized and stable surface integral formula for 3-D uniform inducing field and plane wave electromagnetic induction problems, which works reliably over a wide frequency range. Vector surface electric currents and magnetic currents, scalar surface electric charges and magnetic charges are treated as the variables. This surface integral formula is successfully applied to compute the electromagnetic responses of 3-D topography to low frequency magnetotelluric and high frequency radio-magnetotelluric fields. The standard boundary element method which is used to solve this surface integral formula quickly exceeds the memory capacity of modern computers for problems involving hundreds of thousands of unknowns. To make the surface integral formulation applicable and capable of dealing with large-scale 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems, we have developed a matrix-free adaptive multilevel fast multipole boundary element solver. By means of the fast multipole approach, the time-complexity of solving the final system of linear equations is reduced to O(m log m) and the memory cost is reduced to O(m), where m is the number of unknowns. The analytical solutions for a half-space model were used to verify our numerical solutions over the frequency range 0.001-300 kHz. In addition, our numerical solution shows excellent agreement with a published numerical solution for an edge-based finite-element method on a trapezoidal hill model at a frequency of 2 Hz. Then, a high frequency simulation for a similar trapezoidal hill model was used to study the effects of displacement currents in the radio-magnetotelluric frequency range. Finally, the newly developed algorithm was applied to study the effect of moderate topography and to evaluate the applicability of a 2-D RMT inversion code that assumes a flat air-Earth interface, on RMT field data collected at Smørgrav, southern Norway. This paper constitutes the first part of a hybrid boundary element-finite element

  4. Contact hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baggish, M S; Barbot, J

    1983-06-01

    In 1907 innovations in optics and illumination made by Maximilian Nitze were applied to hysteroscopy by Charles David, who wrote a treatise of hysteroscopy. David improved illumination by placing an electric incandescent bulb at the intrauterine end of his endoscope and also sealed the distal end of the tube with a piece of glass. The history of the contact endoscope that the authors personally used is connected to the invention by Vulmiere (1952) of a revolutionary illumination process in endoscopy--the "cold light" process. The components of cold light consist of a powerful external light source that is transmitted via a special optical guide into the endometrial cavity. The 1st application of his principle (1963) was an optical trochar contained in a metallic sheath. This simple endoscope was perfected, and in 1973 Barbot and Parent, in France, began to use it to examine the uterine cavity. Discussion focuses on methods, instrumentation, method for examination (grasping the instrument, setup, light source, anesthesia, dilatation, technique, and normal endometrium); cervical neoplasia; nonneoplastic lesions of the endometrium (endometrial polyp, submucous myoma, endometrial hyperplasia); intrauterine device localization; neoplastic lesions of the endometrium; precursors (adenocarcinoma); hysteroscopy in pregnancy (embryoscopy, hydatidiform mole, postpartum hemorrhage, incomplete abortion, spontaneous abortion, induced abortions, and amnioscopy); and examinations of children and infants. The contact endoscope must make light contact with the structure to be viewed. The principles of contact endoscopy depend on an interpretation of color, contour, vascular pattern, and a sense of touch. These are computed together and a diagnosis is made on the basis of previously learned clinical pathologic correlations. The contact endoscope is composed of 3 parts: an optical guide; a cylindric chamber that collects and traps ambient light; and a magnifying eyepiece. The phase of

  5. Bidirectional regulation of the cAMP response element binding protein encodes spatial map alignment in prism-adapting barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2008-10-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience: hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 min of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific CREB (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging, and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or readapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB and, by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, whereas others received a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the subregion of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and were not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning.

  6. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  7. Contact Stress of Modified Curvilinear Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Gu, Ming-Lune

    2010-10-01

    The contact characteristics of a modified curvilinear gear set were investigated based on finite element analysis in this study. Firstly, the mathematical model of the modified curvilinear gears was developed based on the theory of gearing. Then a solid model of a modified curvilinear gear set was built by utilizing computer-aided design software. Finite element analysis enabled us to investigate the contact stress of a contact teeth pair. The variation and distribution of the contact stresses and bending stresses are also studied under different gear design parameters. Finally, illustrative examples were presented to demonstrate the contact characteristics of the modified curvilinear gears.

  8. Anisotropic 2.5D Inversion of Towed Streamer EM Data from Three North Sea Fields Using Parallel Adaptive Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, K.; Du, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We present anisotropic inversion results from towed streamer electromagnetic (EM) surveys of the Bressay, Bentley and Kraken (BBK) heavy oil fields in the North Sea. The BBK discoveries pose several challenges to conventional controlled-source EM surveying since the relatively shallow water dampens the anomaly magnitudes due to airwave coupling, and the reservoirs are in close proximity to other resistive features. The 160 m spacing of the 44 receiver bipoles on the towed streamer offers much higher data density than is typically achieved with conventional seafloor receiver surveys. We tested the resolving capabilities of the towed-streamer by inverting the survey data using a new code based on a 2.5D parallel goal-oriented adaptive finite element method and a modified implementation of the Occam inversion algorithm. The inversion successfully images the 1-2 km wide Bressay and ~5 km wide Bentley reservoirs, illustrating that the high data density of the towed streamer offers improved resolution over sparsely sampled nodal seafloor receiver data. The results also demonstrate the importance of allowing for anisotropy when inverting data from this region. Whereas anisotropic inversion clearly recovers the lateral edges of the known reservoirs, isotropic inversion results in inter-bedding of resistive and conductive layers that conceal the reservoirs.

  9. A new Control Volume Finite Element Method with Discontinuous Pressure Representation for Multi-phase Flow with Implicit Adaptive time Integration and Dynamic Unstructured mesh Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Pablo; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Adam, Alexander; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Christopher; Jackson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We present a new, high-order, control-volume-finite-element (CVFE) method with discontinuous representation for pressure and velocity to simulate multiphase flow in heterogeneous porous media. Time is discretized using an adaptive, fully implicit method. Heterogeneous geologic features are represented as volumes bounded by surfaces. Our approach conserves mass and does not require the use of CVs that span domain boundaries. Computational efficiency is increased by use of dynamic mesh optimization. We demonstrate that the approach, amongst other features, accurately preserves sharp saturation changes associated with high aspect ratio geologic domains, allowing efficient simulation of flow in highly heterogeneous models. Moreover, accurate solutions are obtained at lower cost than an equivalent fine, fixed mesh and conventional CVFE methods. The use of implicit time integration allows the method to efficiently converge using highly anisotropic meshes without having to reduce the time-step. The work is significant for two key reasons. First, it resolves a long-standing problem associated with the use of classical CVFE methods. Second, it reduces computational cost/increases solution accuracy through the use of dynamic mesh optimization and time-stepping with large Courant number. Funding for Dr P. Salinas from ExxonMobil is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Retroposition of the AFC family of SINEs (short interspersed repetitive elements) before and during the adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in Lake Malawi and related inferences about phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nishida, M; Yuma, M; Okada, N

    2001-01-01

    Lake Malawi is home to more than 450 species of endemic cichlids, which provide a spectacular example of adaptive radiation. To clarify the phylogenetic relationships among these fish, we examined the presence and absence of SINEs (short interspersed repetitive elements) at orthologous loci. We identified six loci at which a SINE sequence had apparently been specifically inserted by retroposition in the common ancestor of all the investigated species of endemic cichlids in Lake Malawi. At another locus, unique sharing of a SINE sequence was evident among all the investigated species of endemic non-Mbuna cichlids with the exception of Rhamphochromis sp. The relationships were in good agreement with those deduced in previous studies with various different markers, demonstrating that the SINE method is useful for the elucidation of phylogenetic relationships among cichlids in Lake Malawi. We also characterized a locus that exhibited transspecies polymorphism with respect to the presence or absence of the SINE sequence among non-Mbuna species. This result suggests that incomplete lineage sorting and/or interspecific hybridization might have occurred or be occurring among the species in this group, which might potentially cause misinterpretation of phylogenetic data, in particular when a single-locus marker, such as a sequence in the mitochondrial DNA, is used for analysis.

  11. Finite Element Model for Gap Contact Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    22 8.1 Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem ............................... 22 8.2 Flat Gap-Coarse Grid Problem...Axisymmetric Perfectly Plastic Problem . The purpose of the first example is to check the elastic-plastic capability of the SAAC program. This is done by

  12. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  13. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  14. New micro- and macroscopic models of contact and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tworzydlo, W. W.; Cecot, W.; Oden, J. T.; Yew, C. H.

    1993-11-01

    This is the final report for the three year research project dedicated to the development of new asperity-based models of frictional interfaces. The main concept is to combine statistical homogenization methods with a realistic nonlinear finite element analysis of surface micro-asperities, and thus produce new asperity-based models of contact and friction. Research in the project started with the development of a complete theory and software for the statistical homogenization of random surface parameters. The next stage focused on the development of a finite element code for modeling surface asperities. This code is based on a proprietary h/p adaptive finite element kernel, which has been customized for the analysis of elastic and elasto-viscoplastic asperities with contact, molecular-range adhesion, and sliding resistance. To verify the new asperity-based interface models, special experiments were designed and performed for custom-shaped asperities and for rough engineering surfaces. The results of these experiments compare favorably with asperity-based theoretical and numerical predictions, and thus confirm the feasibility and practical value of the new models developed in this project. These models will be applicable in the analysis and control of a broad range of contact and friction phenomena, such as friction-induced squeaks and noises, tribology of bearings, electrical and thermal connectors, the mechanism of wear, and many others.

  15. Upregulation of thioredoxin system via Nrf2-antioxidant responsive element pathway in adaptive-retinal neuroprotection in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanito, Masaki; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E

    2007-06-15

    We tested the hypothesis that stress responses mediated by the Nrf2-antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway are involved in the initiation of retinal neuroprotection provided by bright-cyclic-light rearing. Albino rats born and raised in dim (5 lux) or bright (400 lux) cyclic light were exposed to damaging light (3000 lux, 6 h). After exposure, the outer nuclear layer thickness and area and the electroretinogram a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the dim-light-reared rats compared to the bright-light-reared rats, demonstrating a light adaptation neuroprotection phenomenon. In bright-cyclic-light-reared rats, the retinal levels of thioredoxin (Trx) (2.4-fold), Trx reductase (TrxR) (2.9-fold), and proteins modified by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) (1.5-fold) were upregulated by Western blot analyses, and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 (2.2-fold) and the DNA binding activity of Nrf2, small Maf, and cJun to the ARE were increased as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In mouse photoreceptor-derived 661W cells, pretreatment with a sublethal dose of 4-HNE protected against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage. Treatment with 4-HNE upregulated cellular Trx, TrxR, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels in addition to DNA binding activity of Nrf2, small Maf, and cJun to the ARE. Downregulation of Nrf2 using RNA interference technology diminished 4-HNE-mediated upregulation of Trx and Trx reductase but did not affect the upregulation of HO-1 by 4-HNE. Cytoprotection by 4-HNE pretreatment against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage was not observed in 661W cells with a silenced Nrf2 gene. The results suggest that upregulation of the Trx system by 4-HNE via the Nrf2-ARE pathway may be involved in the molecular mechanism of the retinal neuroprotection phenomenon.

  16. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch.In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue-residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated.

  17. Simulation of 3D Resistivity Logging Measurements with a Parallel Implementation of 2D hp-Adaptive Goal-Oriented Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszyński, Maciej; Pardo, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2007-09-01

    The paper presents parallel simulations of 3D resistivity logging measurements. These simulations are performed with a new geometry-based formulation with a 2D self-adaptive goal-oriented hp-adaptive strategy combined with a Fourier series expansion in a non-orthogonal system of coordinates. Numerical simulations analyze 3D resistivity effects occuring on deviated wells. We present a parallel implementation based on both domain decomposition and functional decomposition paradigms.

  18. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Contact Lenses Sections Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Contact ... to Know About Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Leer en Español: Lentes ...

  19. MRCK_3D contact detonation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Munjiza, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Combined Finite-Discrete Element Methods (FEM-DEM) and Discrete Element Methods (DEM) simulations involving contact of a large number of separate bod ies need an efficient, robust and flexible contact detection algorithm. In this work the MRCK-3D search algorithm is outlined and its main CPU perfonnances are evaluated. One of the most important aspects of this newly developed search algorithm is that it is applicable to systems consisting of many bodies of different shapes and sizes.

  20. Contact material optimization and contact physics in metal-contact microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenyin

    Metal-contact MEMS switches hold great promise for implementing agile radio frequency (RF) systems because of their small size, low fabrication cost, low power consumption, wide operational band, excellent isolation and exceptionally low signal insertion loss. Gold is often utilized as a contact material for metal-contact MEMS switches due to its excellent electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance. However contact wear and stiction are the two major failure modes for these switches due to its material softness and high surface adhesion energy. To strengthen the contact material, pure gold was alloyed with other metal elements. We designed and constructed a new micro-contacting test facility that closely mimic the typical MEMS operation and utilized this facility to efficiently evaluate optimized contact materials. Au-Ni binary alloy system as the candidate contact material for MEMS switches was systematically investigated. A correlation between contact material properties (etc. microstructure, micro-hardness, electrical resistivity, topology, surface structures and composition) and micro-contacting performance was established. It was demonstrated nano-scale graded two-phase Au-Ni film could possibly yield an improved device performance. Gold micro-contact degradation mechanisms were also systematically investigated by running the MEMS switching tests under a wide range of test conditions. According to our quantitative failure analysis, field evaporation could be the dominant failure mode for highfield (> critical threshold field) hot switching; transient thermal-assisted wear could be the dominant failure mode for low-field hot switching; on the other hand, pure mechanical wear and steady current heating (1 mA) caused much less contact degradation in cold switching tests. Results from low-force (50 muN/micro-contact), low current (0.1 mA) tests on real MEMS switches indicated that continuous adsorbed films from ambient air could degrade the switch contact

  1. Adapting Authentic Materials for Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darian, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates the process of adapting authentic materials for use in the English-as-a-Second-language classroom. Focuses on four areas: semantic elements, lexical elements, syntactic elements, and discourse elements.(Author/VWL)

  2. Adapting Authentic Materials for Language Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darian, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates the process of adapting authentic materials for use in the English-as-a-Second-language classroom. Focuses on four areas: semantic elements, lexical elements, syntactic elements, and discourse elements.(Author/VWL)

  3. Mechanisms of rolling contact spalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Bhargava, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at analyzing the mechanical material interactions responsible for rolling contact spalling of the 440 C steel, high pressure oxygen turbopump bearings are presented. A coupled temperature displacement finite element analysis of the effects of friction heating under the contact is presented. The contact is modelled as a stationary, heat generating, 2 dimensional indent in an elastic perfectly plastic half-space with heat fluxes up to 8.6 x 10000 KW/m sq comparable to those generated in the bearing. Local temperatures in excess of 1000 C are treated. The calculations reveal high levels of residual tension after the contact is unloaded and cools. Efforts to promote Mode 2/Mode 3 fatigue crack growth under cyclic torsion in hardened 440 C steel are described. Spalls produced on 440 C steel by a 3 ball/rod rolling contact testing machine were studied with scanning microscopy. The shapes of the cyclic, stress strain hysteresis loops displayed by hardened 440 C steel in cyclic torsion at room temperature are defined for the plastic strain amplitudes encountered in rolling/sliding contact. Results of these analyses are discussed in detail.

  4. Alternative methods to model frictional contact surfaces using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Elongated (slotted) holes have been used extensively for the integration of equipment into Spacelab racks. In the past, this type of interface has been modeled assuming that there is not slippage between contact surfaces, or that there is no load transfer in the direction of the slot. Since the contact surfaces are bolted together, the contact friction provides a load path determined by the normal applied force (bolt preload) and the coefficient of friction. Three alternate methods that utilize spring elements, externally applied couples, and stress dependent elements are examined to model the contacted surfaces. Results of these methods are compared with results obtained from methods that use GAP elements and rigid elements.

  5. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  6. Rolling-Contact Rheostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Contact noise in rheostats and potentiometers reduced by rolling contact design. Smooth rolling action eliminates sporadic variations in resistance caused by bouncing and stick/slip motion of conventional sliding contacts.

  7. Asynchronous collision integrators: Explicit treatment of unilateral contact with friction and nodal restraints

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article presents asynchronous collision integrators and a simple asynchronous method treating nodal restraints. Asynchronous discretizations allow individual time step sizes for each spatial region, improving the efficiency of explicit time stepping for finite element meshes with heterogeneous element sizes. The article first introduces asynchronous variational integration being expressed by drift and kick operators. Linear nodal restraint conditions are solved by a simple projection of the forces that is shown to be equivalent to RATTLE. Unilateral contact is solved by an asynchronous variant of decomposition contact response. Therein, velocities are modified avoiding penetrations. Although decomposition contact response is solving a large system of linear equations (being critical for the numerical efficiency of explicit time stepping schemes) and is needing special treatment regarding overconstraint and linear dependency of the contact constraints (for example from double-sided node-to-surface contact or self-contact), the asynchronous strategy handles these situations efficiently and robust. Only a single constraint involving a very small number of degrees of freedom is considered at once leading to a very efficient solution. The treatment of friction is exemplified for the Coulomb model. Special care needs the contact of nodes that are subject to restraints. Together with the aforementioned projection for restraints, a novel efficient solution scheme can be presented. The collision integrator does not influence the critical time step. Hence, the time step can be chosen independently from the underlying time-stepping scheme. The time step may be fixed or time-adaptive. New demands on global collision detection are discussed exemplified by position codes and node-to-segment integration. Numerical examples illustrate convergence and efficiency of the new contact algorithm. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in

  8. Stresses and deformations in elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Topics presented deal with defining conformal and nonconformal surfaces, curvature sum and difference, and surface and subsurface stresses in elliptical contacts. Load-deflection relationships for nonconformal contacts are developed. The deformation within the contact is, among other things, a function of the ellipticity parameter and elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of the deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented.

  9. Optical contacting for gravity probe star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. J.; Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A star-tracker telescope, constructed entirely of fused silica elements optically contacted together, has been proposed to provide submilliarc-second pointing accuracy for Gravity Probe. A bibliography and discussion on optical contacting (the bonding of very flat, highly polished surfaces without the use of adhesives) are presented. Then results from preliminary experiments on the strength of optical contacts including a tensile strength test in liquid helium are discussed. Suggestions are made for further study to verify an optical contacting method for the Gravity Probe star-tracker telescope.

  10. Simulations numériques de différentes méthodes d'éléments finis pour les problèmes de contact avec frottementNumerical implementation of different finite element methods for contact problems with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillet, Laurent; Sassi, Taoufik

    2003-11-01

    In this Note, we propose an efficient numerical treatment for solving contact problems with friction between deformable bodies. The discretized normal and tangential constraints at the candidate contact interface are expressed by using either continuous piecewise linear or piecewise constant Lagrange multipliers. Several numerical studies corresponding to this choice are achieved in the PLAST2 code. To cite this article: L. Baillet, T. Sassi, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  11. Mixed formulation for frictionless contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Kim, Kyun O.

    1989-01-01

    Simple mixed finite element models and a computational precedure are presented for the solution of frictionless contact problems. The analytical formulation is based on a form of Reissner's large rotation theory of the structure with the effects of transverse shear deformation included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the internal forces (stress resultants), the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The element characteristic array are obtained by using a modified form of the two-field Hellinger-Reissner mixed variational principle. The internal forces and the Lagrange multipliers are allowed to be discontinuous at interelement boundaries. The Newton-Raphson iterative scheme is used for the solution of the nonlinear algebraic equations, and the determination of the contact area and the contact pressures.

  12. A Method of Self Adaptive Rezoning for the Case of Large Deformation Finite Element Problems Utilizing Rezoning Indicators Derived from Eigenvalue Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    From Eigenvalue Testing B. L. Croft rNp) TTISjCA, A c sio nl F orc DTiC TA3 [ By..... Dist NAVAL COMMAND, CONTROL AND OCEAN SURVEILLANCE CENTERRDT& E ...angle 3 for a plane stress element ... ........... .113 4.31 Derivative of strain energy density ratio with e respect to skew angle versus skew angle for...element solutions which utilize Lagrangian meshes for large 12 I deformation problems, the solution process tends to loose accuracy as the e ±ements become

  13. FUEL ELEMENT INTERLOCKING ARRANGEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1963-01-01

    This patent relates to a system for mutually interlocking a multiplicity of elongated, parallel, coextensive, upright reactor fuel elements so as to render a laterally selfsupporting bundle, while admitting of concurrent, selective, vertical withdrawal of a sizeable number of elements without any of the remaining elements toppling, Each element is provided with a generally rectangular end cap. When a rank of caps is aligned in square contact, each free edge centrally defines an outwardly profecting dovetail, and extremitally cooperates with its adjacent cap by defining a juxtaposed half of a dovetail- receptive mortise. Successive ranks are staggered to afford mating of their dovetails and mortises. (AEC)

  14. Edge effect in ohmic contacts on high-resistivity semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzin, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Current increase due to edge effect in ohmic contacts was calculated by finite-element software in three-dimensional devices. The emphasis in this study is on semi-intrinsic (SI) and compensated high resistivity semiconductors. It was found that the enhanced electric field around the contact edges may cause about twofold increase in the total contact current. For contact radii larger than the device thickness and nano scale contacts the impact is considerably reduced. In nanoscale contacts the edge effect does not control the electric field under the entire contact, but rather decreases. The introduction of velocity saturation model has a limited impact, and only in compensated semiconductors.

  15. How Do Tissues Respond and Adapt to Stresses Around a Prosthesis? A Primer on Finite Element Stress Analysis for Orthopaedic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Richard A; Stanford, Clark M; Swan, Colby C

    2003-01-01

    Joint implant design clearly affects long-term outcome. While many implant designs have been empirically-based, finite element analysis has the potential to identify beneficial and deleterious features prior to clinical trials. Finite element analysis is a powerful analytic tool allowing computation of the stress and strain distribution throughout an implant construct. Whether it is useful depends upon many assumptions and details of the model. Since ultimate failure is related to biological factors in addition to mechanical, and since the mechanical causes of failure are related to load history, rather than a few loading conditions, chief among them is whether the stresses or strains under limited loading conditions relate to outcome. Newer approaches can minimize this and the many other model limitations. If the surgeon is to critically and properly interpret the results in scientific articles and sales literature, he or she must have a fundamental understanding of finite element analysis. We outline here the major capabilities of finite element analysis, as well as the assumptions and limitations. PMID:14575244

  16. Identification of micro parameters for discrete element simulation of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palis, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Dosta, Maksym; Heinrich, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of solid particles like agglomerates, granules or crystals strongly depends on their micro structure, e.g. structural defects and porosity. In order to model the mechanical behaviour of these inhomogeneous media the discrete element method has been proven to be an appropriate tool. The model parameters used are typically micro parameters like bond stiffness, particle-particle contact stiffness, strength of the bonds. Due to the lack of general methods for a direct micro parameter determination, normally laborious parameter adaptation has to be done in order to fit experiment and simulation. In this contribution a systematic and automatic way for parameter adaptation using real experiments is proposed. Due to the fact, that discrete element models are typically systems of differential equations of very high order, gradient based methods are not suitable. Hence, the focus will be on derivative free methods.

  17. Metal-nanocarbon contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhite, Patrick; Vyas, Anshul A.; Tan, Jason; Tan, Jasper; Yamada, Toshishige; Wang, Phillip; Park, Jeongwon; Yang, Cary Y.

    2014-05-01

    To realize nanocarbons in general and carbon nanotube (CNT) in particular as on-chip interconnect materials, the contact resistance stemming from the metal-CNT interface must be well understood and minimized. Understanding the complex mechanisms at the interface can lead to effective contact resistance reduction. In this study, we compile existing published results and understanding for two metal-CNT contact geometries, sidewall or side contact and end contact, and address key performance characteristics which lead to low contact resistance. Side contacts typically result in contact resistances >1 kΩ, whereas end contacts, such as that for as-grown vertically aligned CNTs on a metal underlayer, can be substantially lower. The lower contact resistance for the latter is due largely to strong bonding between edge carbon atoms with atoms on the metal surface, while carrier transport across a side-contacted interface via tunneling is generally associated with high contact resistance. Analyses of high-resolution images of interface nanostructures for various metal-CNT structures, along with their measured electrical characteristics, provide the necessary knowledge for continuous improvements of techniques to reduce contact resistance. Such contact engineering approach is described for both side and end-contacted structures.

  18. An adaptive patient specific deformable registration for breast images of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cheng; Tang, Fuk-Hay

    2014-03-01

    A patient specific registration model based on finite element method was investigated in this study. Image registration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) has been studied a lot. Surface-based registration is extensively applied in medical imaging. We develop and evaluate a registration method combine surface-based registration with biomechanical modeling. .Four sample cases of patients with PET and MRI breast scans performed within 30 days were collected from hospital. K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment images into two parts, which is fat tissue and neoplasm [2]. Instead of placing extrinsic landmarks on patients' body which may be invasive, we proposed a new boundary condition to simulate breast deformation during two screening. Then a three dimensional model with meshes was built. Material properties were assigned to this model according to previous studies. The whole registration was based on a biomechanical finite element model, which could simulate deformation of breast under pressure.

  19. The h, p and h-p Versions of the Finite Element Method in 1 Dimension. Part 3. The Adaptive h-p Version.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    is present. The adaptive approaches are essential for solving complex problems, because the structure of the solution is not known a-priori. In...immediately that (vi) (v9) (4.15) p p , if v1 v2. We now claim that bS " ’ "’ ;- " ’. : . . ’ , ’ ’. , ’’ " .i m " a : " i " . . ."- n...computa- tional complexity as number of operations, data flow problems, etc. These aspects will be addressed in detail in [121 in the two dimensional

  20. [Correction of keratoconus with soft contact lenses].

    PubMed

    Koos, D; Bitea, M J

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their experience in using soft contact lenses in 33 eyes with keratoconus (18 patients). Adaptation was possible only when the doctor-patient collaboration was good. Visual acuity (VA) of 0.4-1 was obtained in 85% cases versus 42.5% when glasses were used. In the period under observation no case of VA decrease was recorded. The subjects tolerated well the contact lenses. The specialty literature contains data indicating not only the optical role of the contact lenses but also their therapeutic, tectorial role.

  1. Cosmetic Evaluation Methods Adapted to Asian Patients after Breast-Conserving Surgery and Examination of the Necessarily Elements for Cosmetic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hanamura, Noriko; Zaha, Hisamitsu; Kimura, Hiroko; Kashikura, Yumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Noro, Aya; Imai, Nao; Shibusawa, Mai; Ogawa, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although various strategies have been reported, there are no defined criteria for cosmetic evaluation methods after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Since Asians tend to have smaller breasts, indistinct inframammary folds, and conspicuous scars, differences in the cosmetic results are expected. So we examined two subjective methods and one objective method to determine the differences, and elements necessary for a cosmetic evaluation after BCS. Methods Frontal photographs of 190 Japanese were evaluated using the Harris scale (Harris) and the evaluation method proposed by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society Sawai group (Sawai group) as the subjective methods, and the Breast Cancer Conservation Treatment cosmetic results (BCCT.core) as the objective method, respectively. In order to examine the necessary elements for developing a new ideal method, 100 out of 190 were selected and assessed separately by six raters using both the Harris and modified Sawai group methods in the observer assessment. The correlation between the two methods was examined using the Spearman rank-correlation coefficient. Results The results of the BCCT.core and the other two methods were clearly different. In the observer assessment, the consensuses of the six raters were evaluated as follows: 27, 27, 26, and 20 cases were evaluated as "excellent," "good," "fair," and "poor," respectively. For the Spearman rank-correlation coefficient, values higher than 0.7 indicated a strong correlation, as seen by the values of 0.909 for the breast shape and 0.345 for the scar. The breast shape accounted for the most significant part of the evaluation, and the scar had very little correlation. Conclusion In this study, we recognized a clear difference between the subjective and objective evaluation methods, and identified the necessary elements for cosmetic evaluation. We would like to continue developing an ideal cosmetic evaluation that is similar to subjective one and is independent from raters

  2. Nanoparticle derived contacts for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.

    1999-10-20

    Contacts are becoming increasingly important as PV devices move to higher efficiency and lower cost. The authors present an approach to developing contacts using nanoparticle-based precursors. Both elemental, alloy and compound nanoparticles can be employed for contacts. Ink based approaches can be utilized at low temperatures and utilize direct write techniques such as ink jet and screen printing. The ability to control the composition of the nanoparticle allows improved control of the contact metallurgy and the potential for thermodynamically stable interfaces. A key requirement is the ability to control the interface between particles and between particles and the substrate. The authors illustrate some of these principals with recent results on Al, Cu and (Hg,Cu)Te. They show that for the elemental materials control of the surface can prevent oxide formation and act as glue to control the reactivity of the nanoparticles.

  3. Adapting Data Processing To Compare Model and Experiment Accurately: A Discrete Element Model and Magnetic Resonance Measurements of a 3D Cylindrical Fluidized Bed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Discrete element modeling is being used increasingly to simulate flow in fluidized beds. These models require complex measurement techniques to provide validation for the approximations inherent in the model. This paper introduces the idea of modeling the experiment to ensure that the validation is accurate. Specifically, a 3D, cylindrical gas-fluidized bed was simulated using a discrete element model (DEM) for particle motion coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to describe the flow of gas. The results for time-averaged, axial velocity during bubbling fluidization were compared with those from magnetic resonance (MR) experiments made on the bed. The DEM-CFD data were postprocessed with various methods to produce time-averaged velocity maps for comparison with the MR results, including a method which closely matched the pulse sequence and data processing procedure used in the MR experiments. The DEM-CFD results processed with the MR-type time-averaging closely matched experimental MR results, validating the DEM-CFD model. Analysis of different averaging procedures confirmed that MR time-averages of dynamic systems correspond to particle-weighted averaging, rather than frame-weighted averaging, and also demonstrated that the use of Gaussian slices in MR imaging of dynamic systems is valid. PMID:24478537

  4. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... contact lenses to any water: tap, bottled, distilled, lake or ocean water. Never use non-sterile water ( ... from bacteria in swimming pool water, hot tubs, lakes and the ocean Replace your contact lens storage ...

  5. Contact Us about Asbestos

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How to contact EPA for more information on asbestos, including state and regional contacts, EPA’s Asbestos Abatement/Management Ombudsman and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Assistance Information Service (TSCA Hotline).

  6. Secondary elements of blood pH variation can influence the effort effectiveness based on adaptive changes within a group of elite athletes

    PubMed Central

    MARTIN, ŞTEFAN ADRIAN; TOMESCU, VALERIU; VOIDĂZAN, SEPTIMIU

    2016-01-01

    Aim pH is the direct indicator of the body reaction following the activities performed. Establishing precise correlations between pH and blood biochemical parameters might support the balancing of values during periods of marked physical activity. Method We conducted a case study in a group of elite rowers. Twelve athletes were included in the study. Monitoring was carried out by collecting biological samples several times a day: in the morning, 80 minutes pre-workout, 12 hours after the last physical effort performed, at two different times, 10 days apart. Determinations were aimed at adapting the reported biochemical parameters depending on the effort performed. The following parameters were monitored: pH, HCO3, pCO2, pO2, BE, SBE, SBC, Ca++, Mg++, LDH, GPT, T-Pro, and Alb. Results The mean value of pH found in athletes was 7.41±0.024. The value obtained was significantly correlated to biochemical parameters such as BE (2.32±1.79), SBC (1.67±1.45), SBE (2.70±1.75). However, bicarbonate (HCO3) was statistically significantly related with SBE, SBC, SBE, and pO2, but did not present a strong association with the pH value (p=0.094). However, values such as Alb, Ca++, LDH, BE, SBC are related to pH value as a result of variations in the data submitted. Conclusions The processed data evidence the fact that blood pH, in this case, is significantly influenced by a number of indices that correlate energy system activity, individual adaptation to effort, and the recovery process. The parameters under investigation (SBE, SBC, SBE, CPK, LDH) are associated with pH changes that could confirm the recovery efficiency of the athlete, along with a possible metabolic acidosis/alkalosis. PMID:27857520

  7. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A What's in this ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  8. Contact Lenses on Submarines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    NAVAL SUBMARINE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY SUBMARINE BASE, GROTON, CONN. REPORT NUMBER 1048 CONTACT LENSES ON SUBMARINES... CONTACT LENSES ON SUBMARINES by James F. Socks, CDR, MSC, USN NAVAL SUBMARINE MEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY REPORT NUMBER 1048 NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH...DRSCHLAB Approved for public release; distribution unlimited SUMMARY PAGE PROBLEM To determine the feasibility of wearing contact lenses aboard

  9. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  10. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies.

    PubMed

    Bolis, A; Cantwell, C D; Moxey, D; Serson, D; Sherwin, S J

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  11. An adaptable parallel algorithm for the direct numerical simulation of incompressible turbulent flows using a Fourier spectral/hp element method and MPI virtual topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, A.; Cantwell, C. D.; Moxey, D.; Serson, D.; Sherwin, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid parallelisation technique for distributed memory systems is investigated for a coupled Fourier-spectral/hp element discretisation of domains characterised by geometric homogeneity in one or more directions. The performance of the approach is mathematically modelled in terms of operation count and communication costs for identifying the most efficient parameter choices. The model is calibrated to target a specific hardware platform after which it is shown to accurately predict the performance in the hybrid regime. The method is applied to modelling turbulent flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an axisymmetric pipe and square channel. The hybrid method extends the practical limitations of the discretisation, allowing greater parallelism and reduced wall times. Performance is shown to continue to scale when both parallelisation strategies are used.

  12. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  13. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  15. A space-compatible angular contact encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flew, A. R.

    1985-12-01

    An electromechanical digital position encoder, based on existing commercial technology, for spacecraft applications is described. The device contains electrical wiping contacts, a gear mechanism, and plain and rolling-element bearings all operating without wet lubrication. Designed to function continuously for 10 years, certain contacts will perform in excess of 20 million cycles. To investigate the performance of these contacts, automatic test equipment was designed to monitor the accuracy of 8192 separate output conditions on a regular basis throughout an accelerated-life thermal vacuum test. The equipment also checks for missing bits and edge noise and logs any errors that are found.

  16. A numerical strategy for finite element modeling of frictionless asymmetric vocal fold collision.

    PubMed

    Granados, Alba; Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Brunskog, Jonas; Visseq, Vincent; Erleben, Kenny

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of voice pathologies may require vocal fold models that include relevant features such as vocal fold asymmetric collision. The present study numerically addresses the problem of frictionless asymmetric collision in a self-sustained three-dimensional continuum model of the vocal folds. Theoretical background and numerical analysis of the finite-element position-based contact model are presented, along with validation. A novel contact detection mechanism capable to detect collision in asymmetric oscillations is developed. The effect of inexact contact constraint enforcement on vocal fold dynamics is examined by different variational methods for inequality constrained minimization problems, namely, the Lagrange multiplier method and the penalty method. In contrast to the penalty solution, which is related to classical spring-like contact forces, numerical examples show that the parameter-independent Lagrange multiplier solution is more robust and accurate in the estimation of dynamical and mechanical features at vocal fold contact. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the temporal integration schemes in relation to the contact problem, the results suggesting an advantage of highly diffusive schemes. Finally, vocal fold contact enforcement is shown to affect asymmetric oscillations. The present model may be adapted to existing vocal fold models, which may contribute to a better understanding of the effect of the nonlinear contact phenomenon on phonation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  18. Conformal Contact Problems of Ball-socket and Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhangang; Hao, Caizhe

    This paper focuses attention on non-conformal and almost conformal contact of ball and ball-socket. Two-dimensional finite element models are developed to calculate the normal contact stress distribution and contact area. The effects of geometry dimension and external load on the contact pressure distribution and contact region are presented, respectively. Meanwhile, the results of FEM and solutions of Hertz contact theory are compared. The results indicates that contact state of ball and ball-socket changes from point contact to area contact with the increasing of the dimensionless number-curvature radius coefficient f and the number of f =0.536 (≈0.54) is critical parameter causing the change.

  19. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element method for simulation of thermo-mechanical forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huetink, J.; Vanderlugt, J.

    1988-08-01

    A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element method is developed by which nodal point locations can be adapted independently from the actual material displacements. Numerical difficulties due to large element distortions, as many occur when the updated Lagrange method is applied, can be avoided by this method. Movement of (free) surfaces can be taken into account by adapting nodal surface points in a way that they remain on the surface. Hardening and other deformation path dependent properties are determined by incremental treatment of convective terms. A local and a weighed global smoothing procedure is introduced in order to avoid numerical instabilities. The method has been applied to simulations of an upsetting process, a wire drawing process and a cold rolling process. In the simulation of the rolling process, both workpiece and roll are simultaneously analyzed in order to predict the flattening of the roll. Special contact-slip elements are developed for the tool-workpiece interface.

  20. [Immunology of contact allergy].

    PubMed

    Martin, S F

    2011-10-01

    Contact allergy is a skin disease that is caused by the reaction of the immune system to low molecular weight chemicals. A hallmark of contact allergens is their chemical reactivity, which is not exhibited by toxic irritants. Covalent binding of contact allergens to or complex formation with proteins is essential for the activation of the immune system. As a consequence antigenic epitopes are formed, which are recognized by contact allergen-specific T cells. The generation of effector and memory T cells causes the high antigen specificity and the repeated antigen-specific skin reaction of contact allergy. New findings reveal that the less specific reaction of the innate immune system to contact allergens closely resembles the reaction to an infection. Therefore, contact allergy can be viewed as an immunologic misunderstanding since the skin contact with chemical allergens is interpreted as an infection. The growing understanding of the molecular and cellular pathologic mechanisms of contact allergy can aid the development of specific therapies and of in vitro alternatives to animal testing for the identification of contact allergens.

  1. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  2. Non-contact measurement of contact wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Ye, Xuemei; Li, Zhongke; Yue, Kaiduan

    2008-12-01

    The overhead contact system is the power supply unit of the electric locomotive. This article is to introduce our newly developed method to measure the height and pull out value of the contact wire. A carema dolly which can move on railway is applied to bear the weight of the measure equipment; two linear CCD cameras are installed on the dolly symmetrically about the midline of two rails. While the dolly move along the railway, two CCD cameras grasp the image synchronously, and a computer real-time process the images, the height and pull out value can be calculate out from the images.

  3. [Periorbital contact eczema].

    PubMed

    Worm, M; Sterry, W

    2005-11-01

    Periorbital contact eczema is most commonly the result of an allergic contact dermatitis whereas other eczematous skin diseases like atopic eczema or seborrheic eczema occur less frequently. Also, other diseases like autoimmune disorders or rosacea need to be considered. Allergic contact dermatitis is a T-cell-mediated immunological response towards ubiquitous contact allergens. Activated T-cells migrate through the vessels into the skin and produce several inflammatory mediators. Epicutaneous patch testing is an important tool for the diagnosis of contact allergy whereby the allergens are analysed in terms of their ability to induce eczematous skin reaction. Until now the short-term use of corticosteroids are is employed for the treatment of allergic contact eczema. Modern substances with an optimal therapeutic index should rather be used.

  4. Contact Relations with Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gunther; Berghammer, Rudolf

    Using relation algebra, we generalize Aumann’s notion of a contact relation and that of a closure operation from powersets to general membership relations and their induced partial orders. We also investigate the relationship between contacts and closures in this general setting and use contacts to establish a one-to-one correspondence between the column space and the row space of a relation.

  5. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  6. Soft contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, R. L.; VanLeeuwen, Wm. N.

    1972-01-01

    A series of 55 patients were fitted with a new type of hydrophilic soft contact lens. These were found more comfortable than hard contact lenses and they had a protective and pain-relieving action in cases of chronic corneal disease. Vision was not as good as with hard contact lenses and a greater potential danger of infection was found. They are preferred by many patients despite the noticeable thick edge and the difficulty of obtaining an identical replacement. PMID:5042887

  7. Fretting Wear Behavior of Tin Plated Contacts:. Influence on Contact Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Woo; Sankara Narayanan, T. S. N.; Lee, Kang Yong

    The fretting wear behavior of tin plated copper alloy contacts and its influence on the contact resistance are addressed in this paper. Based on the change in the area of contact zone as well as the wear depth as a function of fretting cycles, a model was proposed to explain the observed low and stable contact resistance. The extent of wear of tin coating and the formation of wear debris as a function of fretting cycles were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray line scanning (EDX), X-ray mapping, and EDX spot analysis were employed to characterize the nature of changes that occur at the contact zone. The study reveals that the fretted area increases linearly up to 8000 cycles due to the continuous removal of the tin coating and attains saturation when the fretting path length reaches a maximum. The observed low and stable contact resistance observed up to 8000 cycles is due to the common area of contact which provides an electrically conducting area. Surface analysis by SEM, EDX, and X-ray elemental mapping elucidate the nature of changes that occurred at the contact zone. Based on the change in contact resistance as a function of fretting cycles, the fretting wear and fretting corrosion dominant regimes are proposed. The interdependence of extent of wear and oxidation increases the complexity of the fretting corrosion behavior of tin plated contacts.

  8. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  9. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects.

  10. Contact-impact simulations on massively parallel SIMD supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J. ); Belytscko, T.; Chiang, H.Y. )

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of explicit finite element methods with contact-impact on massively parallel SIMD computers is described. The basic parallel finite element algorithm employs an exchange process which minimizes interprocessor communication at the expense of redundant computations and storage. The contact-impact algorithm is based on the pinball method in which compatibility is enforced by preventing interpenetration on spheres embedded in elements adjacent to surfaces. The enhancements to the pinball algorithm include a parallel assembled surface normal algorithm and a parallel detection of interpenetrating pairs. Some timings with and without contact-impact are given.

  11. Reduction technique for tire contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1995-04-01

    A reduction technique and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of the reduction technique, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface.

  12. Reduction technique for tire contact problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1995-01-01

    A reduction technique and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the tire contact response and evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of the different response quantities. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the contact response to variations in the geometric and material parameters of the tire. The tire is modeled using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory with the effects of variation in geometric and material parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities included. The contact conditions are incorporated into the formulation by using a perturbed Lagrangian approach with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the stress resultants, the generalized displacements, and the Lagrange multipliers associated with the contact conditions. The elemental arrays are obtained by using a modified two-field, mixed variational principle. For the application of the reduction technique, the tire finite element model is partitioned into two regions. The first region consists of the nodes that are likely to come in contact with the pavement, and the second region includes all the remaining nodes. The reduction technique is used to significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in the second region. The effectiveness of the computational procedure is demonstrated by a numerical example of the frictionless contact response of the space shuttle nose-gear tire, inflated and pressed against a rigid flat surface.

  13. Contact angle and contact angle hysteresis measurements using the capillary bridge technique.

    PubMed

    Restagno, Frédéric; Poulard, Christophe; Cohen, Céline; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Léger, Liliane

    2009-09-15

    A new experimental technique is proposed to easily measure both advancing and receding contact angles of a liquid on a solid surface, with unprecedented accuracy. The technique is based on the analysis of the evolution of a capillary bridge formed between a liquid bath and a solid surface (which needs to be spherical) when the distance between the surface and the liquid bath is slowly varied. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated using a low-energy perfluorinated surface with two different test liquids (water and hexadecane). A detailed description of both experimental procedures and computational modeling are given, allowing one to determine contact angle values. It is shown that the origin of the high accuracy of this technique relies on the fact that the contact angles are automatically averaged over the whole periphery of the contact. This method appears to be particularly adapted to the characterization of surfaces with very low contact angle hysteresis.

  14. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  15. Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, L D

    2006-05-10

    A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for

  16. Classification of Domain Movements in Proteins Using Dynamic Contact Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: “free”, “open-closed”, “anchored”, “sliding-twist”, and “see-saw.” A directed graph is introduced called the “Dynamic Contact Graph” which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified. PMID:24260562

  17. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  18. Semiconductor ohmic contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Contact formed on p-type surface of semiconductor laser has several advantages: highly conductive degenerate region and narrow band gap provides surface for good metal-to-semiconductor contact; lattice parameter of GaAs is 5.6533 A; improved lattice match eases interface strain which reduces interface cracking of semiconductor material.

  19. Factor XII Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Burillo, Elena; Blankenberg, Stefan; Butler, Lynn; Renné, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Contact activation is the surface-induced conversion of factor XII (FXII) zymogen to the serine protease FXIIa. Blood-circulating FXII binds to negatively charged surfaces and this contact to surfaces triggers a conformational change in the zymogen inducing autoactivation. Several surfaces that have the capacity for initiating FXII contact activation have been identified, including misfolded protein aggregates, collagen, nucleic acids, and platelet and microbial polyphosphate. Activated FXII initiates the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, leading to formation of bradykinin and thrombin, respectively. FXII contact activation is well characterized in vitro and provides the mechanistic basis for the diagnostic clotting assay, activated partial thromboplastin time. However, only in the past decade has the critical role of FXII contact activation in pathological thrombosis been appreciated. While defective FXII contact activation provides thromboprotection, excess activation underlies the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema type III. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of FXII contact activation and FXII contact activation-associated disease states.

  20. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  2. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  3. FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Simnad, M.T.

    1961-08-15

    A method of preventing diffusible and volatile fission products from diffusing through a fuel element container and contaminating reactor coolant is described. More specifically, relatively volatile and diffusible fission products either are adsorbed by or react with magnesium fluoride or difluoride to form stable, less volatile, less diffusible forms. The magnesium fluoride or difluoride is disposed anywhere inwardly from the outer surface of the fuel element container in order to be contacted by the fission products before they reach and contaminate the reactor coolant. (AEC)

  4. Contact-independent electrical conductance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Mentzel, Tamar S.; MacLean, Kenneth; Kastner, Marc A.; Ray, Nirat

    2017-01-24

    Electrical conductance measurement system including a one-dimensional semiconducting channel, with electrical conductance sensitive to electrostatic fluctuations, in a circuit for measuring channel electrical current. An electrically-conductive element is disposed at a location at which the element is capacitively coupled to the channel; a midpoint of the element aligned with about a midpoint of the channel, and connected to first and second electrically-conductive contact pads that are together in a circuit connected to apply a changing voltage across the element. The electrically-conductive contact pads are laterally spaced from the midpoint of the element by a distance of at least about three times a screening length of the element, given in SI units as (K.di-elect cons..sub.0/e.sup.2D(E.sub.F)).sup.1/2, where K is the static dielectric constant, .di-elect cons..sub.0 is the permittivity of free space, e is electron charge, and D(E.sub.F) is the density of states at the Fermi energy for the element.

  5. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  6. Interfacial contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Xia, Ying; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Hong, Jie; Ma, Yanhong

    2017-10-09

    In this work we describe a theoretical model that predicts the interfacial contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces by considering the effects of elastic and plastic deformations of the fractal asperities. We also develop an original test rig that simulates dovetail joints for turbo machinery blades, which can fine tune the normal contact load existing between the contacting surfaces of the blade root. The interfacial contact stiffness is obtained through an inverse identification method in which finite element simulations are fitted to the experimental results. Excellent agreement is observed between the contact stiffness predicted by the theoretical model and by the analogous experimental results. We demonstrate that the contact stiffness is a power law function of the normal contact load with an exponent α within the whole range of fractal dimension D(1 < D < 2). We also show that for 1 < D < 1.5 the Pohrt-Popov behavior (α = 1/(3 - D)) is valid, however for 1.5 < D < 2, the exponent α is different and equal to 2(D - 1)/D. The diversity between the model developed in the work and the Pohrt-Popov one is explained in detail.

  7. Allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Detlef

    2013-07-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a frequent inflammatory skin disease. The suspected diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, a plausible contact to allergens and a suitable history of dermatitis. Differential diagnoses should be considered only after careful exclusion of any causal contact sensitization. Hence, careful diagnosis by patch testing is of great importance. Modifications of the standardized test procedure are the strip patch test and the repeated open application test. The interpretation of the SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) patch test as well as testing with the patients' own products and working materials are potential sources of error. Accurate patch test reading is affected in particular by the experience and individual factors of the examiner. Therefore, a high degree of standardization and continuous quality control is necessary and may be supported by use of an online patch test reading course made available by the German Contact Dermatitis Research Group. A critical relevance assessment of allergic patch test reactions helps to avoid relapses and the consideration of differential diagnoses. Any allergic test reaction should be documented in an allergy ID card including the INCI name, if appropriate. The diagnostics of allergic contact dermatitis is endangered by a seriously reduced financing of patch testing by the German statutory health insurances. Restrictive regulations by the German Drug Law block the approval of new contact allergens for routine patch testing. Beside the consistent avoidance of allergen contact, temporary use of systemic and topical corticosteroids is the therapy of first choice.

  8. Adaptive Force Control in Compliant Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a manipulator in compliant motion while in contact with an environment having an unknown stiffness. Two classes of solutions are discussed: adaptive admittance control and adaptive compliance control. In both admittance and compliance control schemes, compensator adaptation is used to ensure a stable and uniform system performance.

  9. Solute transport across a contact interface in deformable porous media.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-04-05

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://www.febio.org).

  10. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  11. Optical contacting of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strength of the bond between optically contacted quartz surfaces was investigated. The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment to test the theories of general relativity requires extremely precise measurements. The quartz components of the instruments to make these measurements must be held together in a very stable unit. Optical contacting is suggested as a possible method of joining these components. The fundamental forces involved in optical contacting are reviewed and relates calculations of these forces to the results obtained in experiments.

  12. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Simulation of metal forming processes with a 3D adaptive remeshing procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeramdini, Bessam; Robert, Camille; Germain, Guenael; Pottier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a fully adaptive 3D numerical methodology based on a tetrahedral element was proposed in order to improve the finite element simulation of any metal forming process. This automatic methodology was implemented in a computational platform which integrates a finite element solver, 3D mesh generation and a field transfer algorithm. The proposed remeshing method was developed in order to solve problems associated with the severe distortion of elements subject to large deformations, to concentrate the elements where the error is large and to coarsen the mesh where the error is small. This leads to a significant reduction in the computation times while maintaining simulation accuracy. In addition, in order to enhance the contact conditions, this method has been coupled with a specific operator to maintain the initial contact between the workpiece nodes and the rigid tool after each remeshing step. In this paper special attention is paid to the data transfer methods and the necessary adaptive remeshing steps are given. Finally, a numerical example is detailed to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach and to compare the results for the different field transfer strategies.

  14. Modern industrial simulation tools: Kernel-level integration of high performance parallel processing, object-oriented numerics, and adaptive finite element analysis. Final report, July 16, 1993--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, M.K.; Kennon, S.R.

    1998-04-01

    A cooperative R&D effort between industry and the US government, this project, under the HPPP (High Performance Parallel Processing) initiative of the Dept. of Energy, started the investigations into parallel object-oriented (OO) numerics. The basic goal was to research and utilize the emerging technologies to create a physics-independent computational kernel for applications using adaptive finite element method. The industrial team included Computational Mechanics Co., Inc. (COMCO) of Austin, TX (as the primary contractor), Scientific Computing Associates, Inc. (SCA) of New Haven, CT, Texaco and CONVEX. Sandia National Laboratory (Albq., NM) was the technology partner from the government side. COMCO had the responsibility of the main kernel design and development, SCA had the lead in parallel solver technology and guidance on OO technologies was Sandia`s main expertise in this venture. CONVEX and Texaco supported the partnership by hardware resource and application knowledge, respectively. As such, a minimum of fifty-percent cost-sharing was provided by the industry partnership during this project. This report describes the R&D activities and provides some details about the prototype kernel and example applications.

  15. SAM Technical Contacts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These technical contacts are available to help with questions regarding method deviations, modifications, sample problems or interferences, quality control requirements, the use of alternative methods, or the need to address analytes or sample types.

  16. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  17. Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy; Zug, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in Europe and in North America. They can affect individuals at any age and elicit a spectrum of reactions from contact urticaria to systemic contact dermatitis. Growing recognition of the widespread use of fragrances in modern society has fueled attempts to prevent sensitization through improved allergen identification, labeling, and consumer education. This review provides an overview and update on fragrance allergy. Part 1 discusses the epidemiology and evaluation of suspected fragrance allergy. Part 2 reviews screening methods, emerging fragrance allergens, and management of patients with fragrance contact allergy. This review concludes by examining recent legislation on fragrances and suggesting potential additions to screening series to help prevent and detect fragrance allergy.

  18. "Contacting" the Fundamentals: A New Paradigm for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munjee, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Contact improvisation can serve as a way to access new understandings of Bartenieff Fundamentals. Inherent elements of contact improvisation such as thinking and feeling bodily in the moment, sensitivity to activated weight along with weight sharing and bearing, flow, whole-body organization, and immediacy of embodied presence provide fertile…

  19. "Contacting" the Fundamentals: A New Paradigm for Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munjee, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Contact improvisation can serve as a way to access new understandings of Bartenieff Fundamentals. Inherent elements of contact improvisation such as thinking and feeling bodily in the moment, sensitivity to activated weight along with weight sharing and bearing, flow, whole-body organization, and immediacy of embodied presence provide fertile…

  20. Analysis and Synthesis of Adaptive Neural Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-02

    nerve action potential with a simple rectangular pulse. This pulse approximation will be replaced with a Hodgkin - Huxley type membrane model which is...considerably more physiological. Dr. Baxter will help obtain the necessary parameter estimates for the Hodgkin - Huxley nodel from his voltage-clamp...ionic conductance mechanisms in individual neurons that are believed to contribute to neuronal plasticity and learning. Second, we have begun to develup a