Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive defense mechanisms

  1. Micropylar pollen tube guidance and burst: adapted from defense mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Márton, Mihaela L

    2009-12-01

    After the first description of fertilization in flowering plants some 125 years ago (Strasburger E: Neue-Untersuchungen über den Befruchtungsvorgang bei den Phanerogamen als Grundlage für eine Theorie der Zeugung. Gustav Fischer; 1884), we are finally beginning to understand the various molecular mechanisms leading to sperm delivery and discharge inside the hidden micropylar region of the female gametophyte (embryo sac). The last phase of pollen tube guidance culminating in tube burst and explosive release of tube contents requires extensive crosstalk between both male and female gametophytes. The first molecules identified that play key roles in these processes represent highly polymorphic proteins, similar to major components of the plant innate immune system. Here we summarize recent advances and briefly discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms also in respect to prezygotic barriers of reproductive isolation. PMID:19896414

  2. Defense Mechanisms: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This bibliography includes studies of defense mechanisms, in general, and studies of multiple mechanisms. Defense mechanisms, briefly and simply defined, are the unconscious ego defendants against unpleasure, threat, or anxiety. Sigmund Freud deserves the clinical credit for studying many mechanisms and introducing them in professional literature.…

  3. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host-Pathogen Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host-pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host-pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host-pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host-pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications. PMID:26881892

  4. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host–Pathogen Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host–pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host–pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host–pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host–pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications. PMID:26881892

  5. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  6. Protecting the Self: Defense Mechanisms in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Phebe

    2006-01-01

    Integrating theory, research, and practical applications, this book provides a comprehensive examination of defense mechanisms and their role in both normal development and psychopathology. The author describes how children and adults mobilize specific kinds of defenses to maintain their psychological equilibrium and preserve self-esteem,…

  7. Mechanisms of plant defense against insect herbivores

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; Ahmad, Tariq; Buhroo, Abdul Ahad; Hussain, Barkat; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory through various morphological, biochemicals, and molecular mechanisms to counter/offset the effects of herbivore attack. The biochemical mechanisms of defense against the herbivores are wide-ranging, highly dynamic, and are mediated both by direct and indirect defenses. The defensive compounds are either produced constitutively or in response to plant damage, and affect feeding, growth, and survival of herbivores. In addition, plants also release volatile organic compounds that attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. These strategies either act independently or in conjunction with each other. However, our understanding of these defensive mechanisms is still limited. Induced resistance could be exploited as an important tool for the pest management to minimize the amounts of insecticides used for pest control. Host plant resistance to insects, particularly, induced resistance, can also be manipulated with the use of chemical elicitors of secondary metabolites, which confer resistance to insects. By understanding the mechanisms of induced resistance, we can predict the herbivores that are likely to be affected by induced responses. The elicitors of induced responses can be sprayed on crop plants to build up the natural defense system against damage caused by herbivores. The induced responses can also be engineered genetically, so that the defensive compounds are constitutively produced in plants against are challenged by the herbivory. Induced resistance can be exploited for developing crop cultivars, which readily produce the inducible response upon mild infestation, and can act as one of components of integrated pest management for sustainable crop production. PMID:22895106

  8. Denial Defense Mechanism in Dialyzed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Zbigniew; Wańkowicz, Zofia; Laudanski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a struggle to identify the most adaptive coping strategies with disease-mediated stress. Here, we hypothesize that intensity of coping strategies, including denial, in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), varies with type of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Material/Methods We enrolled 60 in-center hemodialyzed patients (HD) and 55 patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). We administered the Coping Inventory with Stressful Situation, Profile of Mood States, and Stroop Anxiety Inventory to measure patient coping strategies in the context of their ESRD. Denial defense mechanism was measured via the IBS-R/ED. The Nottingham Health Profile was used to evaluate self-perceived quality of life. Serum potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphorus, calcium, albumin, and hematocrit were utilized as the measurements of adequacy of dialysis. Results HD patients had higher self-reported intensity of denial mechanism and avoidance-oriented strategies versus CAPD patients. Because a single strategy is almost never employed, we conducted cluster analysis. We identify 3 patterns of coping strategies using cluster analysis. “Repressors” employed denial and avoidance strategies and were predominant in HD. The second cluster consists of subjects employing predominantly task-oriented strategies with equal distribution among dialyzed patients. The third cluster encompassed a small group of patients who shared higher intensity of both denial and task-oriented strategies. Health-related outcome, anxiety, and mood profile were similar across all patients. Conclusions HD patients predominantly used “repressive” strategies. Patients on RRT utilized denial and avoidance-based strategies to achieve satisfactory outcome in terms of perceived quality of life. We conclude that these coping mechanisms that were previously thought to be inferior are beneficial to patient compliance with RRT. PMID:26094792

  9. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  10. Defense mechanisms of the respiratory membrane.

    PubMed

    Green, G M; Jakab, G J; Low, R B; Davis, G S

    1977-03-01

    The success or failure of pulmonary defense mechanisms largely determines the appearance of clinical lung disease. The lung is protected by interlucking systems of nonspecific and specific defenses. Inhaled substrances can be isolated by mechanical barriers or can be physically removed from the lung either by transport up the bronchial mucociliary escalator or by transport through interstitial and lymphatic channels leading to lymph nodes. Substances can be locally detoxified within the lung by interaction with secretory proteins, such as antibodies, or by neutralization and dissolution within phagocytic cells. The pulmonary alveolar macrophage is the central figure in the protection of the respiratory membrane, operating in all 3 of the nonspecific modes of defense and augmented by specific immunologic mechanisms as well. Alterations in macrophage function and physiology may be crucial in determining the effectiveness of pulmonary defense. Recent advances in the cell biology of the alveolar macrophage have led to a greater understanding of its complex funcition. The multiple origins of macrophages from local and circulating cell pools and the variability in their fate and lifespan reflect the multi-faceted role of this cell type. The importance of the interactions between macrophages, orther lung cells, and other defense mechanisms has become increasingly clear. As well as functioning as resident defender of the alveolus, the macrophage is an important effector of the pulmonary immune response and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, destructive, and fibrotic lung diseases. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses amplify and direct lung defenses against infection and may also participate in protection against other agents. Immunoglobulin A and G, microbial neutralizing and opsonizing anti-bodies, and macrophage-stimulating T lymphocytes are the major immunospecific forms of lung defense. Infectious agents, cigarette smoke, air

  11. Defense Mechanisms: Discussions and Bibliographies; General or Multiple, and Specific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This publication considers some Freudian ego mechanisms. The first discussion and bibliography concerns defense mechanisms, in general or in multiple; after which, the discussions and bibliographies concern specific defense mechanisms: denial; displacement, substitution, sublimation; fixation; identification, introjection, incorporation,…

  12. Mechanisms of intestinal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C; Levin, Marc S

    2016-04-01

    Following loss of functional small bowel surface area due to surgical resection for therapy of Crohn's disease, ischemia, trauma or other disorders, the remnant gut undergoes a morphometric and functional compensatory adaptive response which has been best characterized in preclinical models. Increased crypt cell proliferation results in increased villus height, crypt depth and villus hyperplasia, accompanied by increased nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption. Clinical observations suggest that functional adaptation occurs in humans. In the immediate postoperative period, patients with substantial small bowel resection have massive fluid and electrolyte loss with reduced nutrient absorption. For many patients, the adaptive response permits partial or complete weaning from parenteral nutrition (PN), within two years following resection. However, others have life-long PN dependence. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the gut adaptive response is critical for developing novel therapies for short bowel syndrome. Herein we present a summary of key studies that seek to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate post-resection adaptation, focusing on stem and crypt cell proliferation, epithelial differentiation, apoptosis, enterocyte function and the role of growth factors and the enteric nervous system. PMID:27086888

  13. Immune defense mechanisms of the dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Jontell, M; Okiji, T; Dahlgren, U; Bergenholtz, G

    1998-01-01

    Defense reactions of the dentin/pulp complex involve a variety of biological systems, in which the immune system plays a pivotal role. The knowledge of the organization and function of pulpal immunocompetent cells has been sparse, but in recent years a significant body of information of immune mechanisms in general has provided a footing for substantial new knowledge of the immune mechanisms of the dental pulp. The identification of pulpal dendritic cells (DCs) has generated research activities which have led to a concept of how an antigenic challenge may evoke a pulpal inflammatory response. Although DCs are not able to identify foreign antigens specifically, they provide necessary signals to activate T-lymphocytes which in turn will orchestrate other immunocompetent cells to mount the local immune defense of the dental pulp. The purpose of this review is to accent the organization and function of pulpal DCs and other tissue and cellular components and to provide a basis for how they may interact to instigate pulpal defense mechanisms. PMID:9603235

  14. Rock mechanics contributions from defense programs

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1992-02-01

    An attempt is made at illustrating the many contributions to rock mechanics from US defense programs, over the past 30-plus years. Large advances have been achieved in the technology-base area covering instrumentation, material properties, physical modeling, constitutive relations and numerical simulations. In the applications field, much progress has been made in understanding and being able to predict rock mass behavior related to underground explosions, cratering, projectile penetration, and defense nuclear waste storage. All these activities stand on their own merit as benefits to national security. But their impact is even broader, because they have found widespread applications in the non-defense sector; to name a few: the prediction of the response of underground structures to major earthquakes, the physics of the earth`s interior at great depths, instrumentation for monitoring mine blasting, thermo-mechanical instrumentation useful for civilian nuclear waste repositories, dynamic properties of earthquake faults, and transient large-strain numerical modeling of geological processes, such as diapirism. There is not pretense that this summary is exhaustive. It is meant to highlight success stories representative of DOE and DOD geotechnical activities, and to point to remaining challenges.

  15. Using Breaking Bad to teach about defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin M; Beresin, Eugene V; Stern, Theodore A

    2014-12-01

    Defense mechanisms represent an important component of medical education that should be taught to all medical students, psychiatry residents, and other mental health trainees. Teaching about defense mechanisms can become more engaging by analyzing popular media. Using Breaking Bad, a well-known television show, we recommend specific scenes and episodes that can be used in teaching about defense mechanisms. PMID:24906848

  16. An empirical study of defense mechanisms in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Busch, F N; Shear, M K; Cooper, A M; Shapiro, T; Leon, A C

    1995-05-01

    Psychodynamic factors have rarely been systematically studied in panic disorder, despite indications that these factors may be important in the understanding and treatment of panic. This is a report of a study using the Defense Mechanism Rating Scale to test the hypothesis that patients with panic disorder utilize particular defense mechanisms: reaction formation, undoing, and displacement. The use of defense mechanisms in 22 patients with primary panic disorder was compared with that of 22 patients with primary dysthymic disorder, based on Defense Mechanism Rating Scale ratings of psychodynamic interviews of these patients. Panic subjects scored significantly higher than dysthymics on the defenses of reaction formation and undoing, but not on the defense of displacement. The defense mechanisms found are consistent with a proposed psychodynamic formulation for panic disorder that emphasizes the panic patient's difficulty in tolerating angry feelings toward significant others. Knowledge of these defense mechanisms can be useful for various treatment approaches in panic disorder. PMID:7745383

  17. Adaptive behaviours of attacking futsal teams to opposition defensive formations.

    PubMed

    Travassos, B; Bourbousson, J; Esteves, P T; Marcelino, R; Pacheco, M; Davids, K

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated tendencies towards flexibility/stability of coordinated behaviours in international futsal teams, considered as complex collective systems, according to changes in opposition defensive formations. Six games of two international futsal teams (Spain and Portugal) were selected for Social Network Analysis to capture the coordination tendencies that emerge in the tactical behaviours of players when performing against different defensive formations. Ball trajectories in each offensive pattern of play were notated in an adjacency matrix where each entry accounted for the linkages between 12 spatial field areas. Each offensive play was coded according to the defensive formation of an opposing team (i.e. conservative or risky formation). Results revealed similar network properties between teams when competing against more risky defensive formations, while notable differences were observed against conservative defences. Effect of defensive formation of opponents on macro network properties was observed in both the Portuguese and Spanish teams. At a meso-level, only the Spanish national team exhibited notable changes, suggesting a greater level of adaptability to unfolding performance events. The observed flexibility in tactical behaviours of the Spanish team appeared to express their greater expertise levels. PMID:26918489

  18. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  19. Early Defensive Mechanisms against Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moerman-Herzog, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women and is almost exclusively caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is also frequently associated with other cancers arising from mucosal epithelium, including anal and oropharyngeal cancers, which are becoming more common in both men and women. Viral persistence and progression through precancerous lesion stages are prerequisites for HPV-associated cancer and reflect the inability of cell-mediated immune mechanisms to clear infections and eliminate abnormal cells in some individuals. Cell-mediated immune responses are initiated by innate pathogen sensing and subsequent secretion of soluble immune mediators and amplified by the recruitment and activation of effector T lymphocytes. This review discusses early defensive mechanisms of innate responders to natural HPV infection, their influence on response polarization, and the underappreciated role of keratinocytes in this process. PMID:26063238

  20. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars. PMID:26154741

  1. Emotional exhaustion and defense mechanisms in intensive therapy unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Regan, Anna; Howard, Ruth A; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-05-01

    Contrary to its original conceptualization, research has found that emotional demands do not lead to burnout in nurses. According to psychoanalytic theory, unconscious defense mechanisms may protect nurses from conscious awareness of work-related anxiety. This prevents self-report and may explain research findings. The maturity of defense style influences how anxiety is managed. Immature defenses prevent the conscious processing necessary for resolution of anxiety. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the use of immature defenses will lead to emotional exhaustion. This cross-sectional study used questionnaires to explore the defense mechanisms of 87 Intensive Therapy Unit nurses. Although the sample endorsed a predominantly mature defense style, the use of immature defenses predicted emotional exhaustion. Also, lower levels of reported stress associated with emotional demands predicted emotional exhaustion. Although this strongly implies the mediating role of immature defense mechanisms, the results were not statistically significant. PMID:19440106

  2. Change in Coping and Defense Mechanisms across Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings in a European-American Sample

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Manfred; Chui, Helena; Hay, Elizabeth L.; Lumley, Mark A.; Grühn, Daniel; Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal changes in coping and defense mechanisms in an age- and gender-stratified sample of 392 European-American adults. Nonlinear age-related changes were found for the coping mechanisms of sublimation and suppression and the defense mechanisms of intellectualization, doubt, displacement, and regression. The change trajectories for sublimation and suppression showed that their use increased from adolescence to late middle age and early old age, and remained mostly stable into late old age. The change trajectory for intellectualization showed that the use of this defense mechanism increased from adolescence to middle age, remained stable until late midlife, and started to decline thereafter. The defense mechanisms of doubt, displacement, and regression showed decreases from adolescence until early old age, with increases occurring again after the age of 65. Linear age-related decreases were found for the coping mechanism of ego regression and the defense mechanisms of isolation and rationalization. Gender and socioeconomic status were associated with the mean levels of several coping and defense mechanisms, but did not moderate age-related changes. Increases in ego level were associated with increased use of the defense mechanism intellectualization and decreased use of the defense mechanisms of doubt and displacement. Overall, these findings in a European-American sample suggest that most individuals showed development in the direction of more adaptive and less maladaptive coping and defense strategies from adolescence until late middle age or early old age. However, in late old age this development was reversed, presenting potential challenges to the adaptive capacity of older adults. PMID:23834293

  3. 75 FR 34988 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing Adaptability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing... meeting. SUMMARY: The Defense Science Board 2010 Summer Study on Enhancing Adaptability of our Military..., USAF, Defense Science Board, 3140 Defense Pentagon, Room 3B888A, Washington, DC 20301-3140, via...

  4. Hope, defense mechanisms, and adjustment: implications for false hope and defensive hopelessness.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Two studies replicated and expanded an earlier finding that defense style plays a crucial role in the relation between hope and dysphoria (Kwon, 2000). Lower hope and higher defense style immaturity were each associated with greater dysphoria, depression proneness, and maladjustment. Individuals with low hope and low defense immaturity did not have poor outcomes, supporting the existence of a subtype of low hope (defensive hopelessness) that may have adaptive value. The combination of high hope and high defense immaturity was not associated with maladaptive outcomes, arguing against the false hope construct. Additionally, the findings remained after controlling for levels of anxiety. Thus, it appears that the results are not attributable to general distress or negative affectivity. Finally, domain-specific hope was shown to correlate most strongly with matching areas of adjustment, providing evidence for the validity of the construct. PMID:11908846

  5. Adversity Quotient and Defense Mechanism of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikam, Vibhawari B.; Uplane, Megha M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the relationship between Adversity Quotient (AQ) and Defense Mechanism (DM) of secondary school students. The aim of the study was to ascertain relationship between Adversity Quotient and Defense mechanism i. e. Turning against object (TAO), Projection (PRO), Turning against self (TAS), Principalisation…

  6. Study of Defensive Methods and Mechanisms in Developmental, Emotional (Internalization), and Disruptive Behavior (Externalization) Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jamilian, H. R.; Zamani, N.; Darvishi, M.; Khansari, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    We need to find a way for adaptation with inherent unpleasantness of being human condition and conflicts that it caused, as we did not fail. Methods that we used for adaptation are named defense. This research have performed with the aim of study and compare defensive mechanisms and methods of Developmental, Emotional (Internalization), and Disruptive behavior (Externalization) disorders. Method, sample of this research included 390 family that are by available sampling method are selected. Tools of research were structured clinical interview of forth cognitive and statistical guide of psychopathic disorders for axis I and the way used for assess defensive mechanisms is defensive method 40 question’s questionnaires of Andrews (1993). The data are compared by statistical methods comparison of averages and one way variance analysis and HSD tests and results show that undeveloped defensive mechanisms in by developmental disorder family(25.2± 3.7) mean and standard deviation, it is most used mechanism and in disruptive behavior disorder family by (11.2 ±1.9) mean and standard deviation is used least mechanism and in developed mechanism of emotional disorder family by (7.8 ± 3.1) mean and standard deviation is most used mechanism and in developmental disorder family by (4.3 ±1.5) mean and standard deviation is least mechanism in neuroticism patient, social phobia affected emotional disorder family (15.6±2.6) and disruptive behavior disorder family have least mean and standard deviation(9.2±1.7) (p< 0.005). Recent research shows significant of study defensive mechanism in psychopathic family of disorder children that affecting on the way of life of persons and interpersonal and intrapersonal relations and method of solving problem in family of them in life, so defensive mechanisms require more attention. PMID:25363187

  7. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A; Anderson, James V; Morris, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  8. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, E. Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A.; Anderson, James V.; Morris, Craig F.

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  9. Effects of inhaled acids on respiratory tract defense mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, R B

    1985-01-01

    The respiratory tract is endowed with an interlocking array of nonspecific and specific defense mechanisms which protect it from the effects of inhaled microbes and toxicants, and reduce the risk of absorption of materials into the bloodstream, with subsequent systemic translocation. Ambient acids may compromise these defenses, perhaps providing a link between exposure and development of chronic and acute pulmonary disease. This paper reviews the effects of inhaled acids upon the nonspecific clearance system of the lungs. PMID:3908089

  10. Immune defense mechanisms in the Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells provide an essential line of defense for Caenorhabditis elegans against ingested pathogens. Because nematodes consume microorganisms as their food source, there has presumably been selection pressure to evolve and maintain immune defense mechanisms within the intestinal epithelium. Here we review recent advances that further define the immune signaling network within these cells and suggest mechanisms used by the nematode to monitor for infection. In reviewing studies of pathogenesis that use this simple model system, we hope to illustrate some of the basic principles of epithelial immunity that may also be of relevance in higher order hosts. PMID:22236697

  11. Mechanisms of temperature adaptation in poikilotherms.

    PubMed

    Guschina, Irina A; Harwood, John L

    2006-10-01

    For good function, membrane lipids have to be arranged appropriately and be in the correct physical state. In poikilotherms, exposure to cold stress or heat shock can alter membrane properties such that, unless they are corrected quickly, damage and, possibly, death can result. Low temperature stress is countered by modifying membrane lipids such that their average transition temperature is lowered. There are various ways in which this can be achieved but an increase in fatty acid unsaturation is the most common. For heat shock, various changes in lipids have been noted and some defensive strategies involving heat shock proteins noted. In this short review, we will describe recent results where adaptive lipid changes, as a result of temperature stress, have been found. Mechanisms for bringing about such alterations are discussed, together with the contrasting data for different organisms. PMID:16824520

  12. Grooming Behavior as a Mechanism of Insect Disease Defense

    PubMed Central

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna; Yanagawa, Aya; Forschler, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Grooming is a well-recognized, multipurpose, behavior in arthropods and vertebrates. In this paper, we review the literature to highlight the physical function, neurophysiological mechanisms, and role that grooming plays in insect defense against pathogenic infection. The intricate relationships between the physical, neurological and immunological mechanisms of grooming are discussed to illustrate the importance of this behavior when examining the ecology of insect-pathogen interactions. PMID:26462526

  13. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors. PMID:26801872

  14. Molecular mechanisms of temperature adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O

    2015-01-01

    Thermal perception is a fundamental physiological process pertaining to the vast majority of organisms. In vertebrates, environmental temperature is detected by the primary afferents of the somatosensory neurons in the skin, which express a ‘choir’ of ion channels tuned to detect particular temperatures. Nearly two decades of research have revealed a number of receptor ion channels that mediate the perception of several temperature ranges, but most still remain molecularly orphaned. Yet even within this well-researched realm, most of our knowledge largely pertains to two closely related species of rodents, mice and rats. While these are standard biomedical research models, mice and rats provide a limited perspective to elucidate the general principles that drive somatosensory evolution. In recent years, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanism of temperature adaptation in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and in organisms with acute thermal sensitivity. These studies have revealed the remarkable versatility of the somatosensory system and highlighted adaptations at the molecular level, which often include changes in biophysical properties of ion channels from the transient receptor potential family. Exploiting non-standard animal models has the potential to provide unexpected insights into general principles of thermosensation and thermoregulation, unachievable using the rodent model alone. PMID:25433072

  15. Molecular mechanisms of temperature adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Gracheva, Elena O

    2015-08-15

    Thermal perception is a fundamental physiological process pertaining to the vast majority of organisms. In vertebrates, environmental temperature is detected by the primary afferents of the somatosensory neurons in the skin, which express a 'choir' of ion channels tuned to detect particular temperatures. Nearly two decades of research have revealed a number of receptor ion channels that mediate the perception of several temperature ranges, but most still remain molecularly orphaned. Yet even within this well-researched realm, most of our knowledge largely pertains to two closely related species of rodents, mice and rats. While these are standard biomedical research models, mice and rats provide a limited perspective to elucidate the general principles that drive somatosensory evolution. In recent years, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanism of temperature adaptation in evolutionarily distant vertebrates and in organisms with acute thermal sensitivity. These studies have revealed the remarkable versatility of the somatosensory system and highlighted adaptations at the molecular level, which often include changes in biophysical properties of ion channels from the transient receptor potential family. Exploiting non-standard animal models has the potential to provide unexpected insights into general principles of thermosensation and thermoregulation, unachievable using the rodent model alone. PMID:25433072

  16. Gregarious pupation act as a defensive mechanism against cannibalism and intraguild predation.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Claudia; Fréchette, Bruno; Labrie, Geneviève; Dumont, François; Lucas, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Coccinellid pupae use an array of defensive strategies against their natural enemies. This study aims to assess the efficiency of gregarious pupation as a defensive mechanism against intraguild predators and cannibals in coccinellid. The study was designed specifically (i) to determine the natural occurrence of gregarious pupation in the field for different coccinellid species, and (ii) to evaluate the adaptive value of gregarious pupation as a defensive mechanism against 2 types of predators (i.e., cannibals and intraguild predators). In the field, gregarious pupation consisted of a group of 2-5 pupae. The proportion of gregarious pupation observed varied according to species, the highest rate being observed with Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae; 14.17%). Gregarious pupation had no impact on the probability that intraguild predators and cannibals locate pupae. Intraguild predation occurred more often in site with gregarious pupation, while cannibalism occurred as often in site with gregarious pupation as in site with isolated pupa. However, for a specific pupa, the mortality rate was higher for isolated pupae than for pupae located in a gregarious pupation site both in the presence of intraguild predators and in the presence of cannibals. The spatial location of pupae within the group had no impact on mortality rate. Since it reduces the risk of predation, it is proposed that gregarious pupation act as a defensive mechanism for H. axyridis pupae. PMID:25684624

  17. Induced defense mechanisms in an aquatic angiosperm to insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Fornoff, Felix; Gross, Elisabeth M

    2014-05-01

    In terrestrial angiosperms, defense and resistance mechanisms against herbivores have been studied extensively; yet this topic is poorly understood in aquatic angiosperms. We investigated induced response mechanisms in Myriophyllum spicatum to the generalist insect herbivore Acentria ephemerella in three independent experiments. Various morphological and chemical response variables were examined in grazed apical shoots and compared to undamaged controls. We further estimated plant palatability of induced and non-induced apices in choice assays, and assessed the growth response of Acentria larvae in no-choice feeding assays. Leaves of induced apices were splayed out horizontally and changed in color from green to red. The dry matter content and thus plant toughness increased by up to 19%, but silica levels stayed constant. Induced apices exhibited a decline in chlorophyll content of up to 34%, reflected also by a 10% decrease in nitrogen levels, while nitrogen increased by 14% in lower parts of grazed shoots. Also, herbivore-deterring total phenolic compounds increased by up to 20% in apices. In choice trials, Acentria larvae strongly avoided grazed tips, and growth was reduced by 25% on induced apices. In total, we observed five different induced resistance and defensive traits in grazed apices: changes in appearance, increased plant toughness, delocalization of N-containing metabolites, increased polyphenols, and reduced nutritional value. The observed changes prevent herbivore damage and loss of apical tissue, which are most valuable for plant fitness. Our study presents the first evidence of multiple, parallel defense strategies including constitutive and induced defense mechanisms in a freshwater angiosperm. PMID:24429525

  18. The strawberry plant defense mechanism: a molecular review.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2011-11-01

    Strawberry, a small fruit crop of great importance throughout the world, has been considered a model plant system for Rosaceae, and is susceptible to a large variety of phytopathogenic organisms. Most components and mechanisms of the strawberry defense network remain poorly understood. However, from current knowledge, it seems clear that the ability of a strawberry plant to respond efficiently to pathogens relies first on the physiological status of injured tissue (pre-formed mechanisms of defense) and secondly on the general ability to recognize and identify the invaders by surface plant receptors, followed by a broad range of induced mechanisms, which include cell wall reinforcement, production of reactive oxygen species, phytoalexin generation and pathogenesis-related protein accumulation. Dissection of these physiological responses at a molecular level will provide valuable information to improve future breeding strategies for new strawberry varieties and to engineer strawberry plants for durable and broad-spectrum disease resistance. In turn, this will lead to a reduction in use of chemicals and in environmental risks. Advances in the understanding of the molecular interplay between plant (mainly those considered model systems) and various classes of microbial pathogens have been made in the last two decades. However, major progress in the genetics and molecular biology of strawberry is still needed to uncover fully the way in which this elaborate plant innate immune system works. These fundamental insights will provide a conceptual framework for rational human intervention through new strawberry research approaches. In this review, we will provide a comprehensive overview and discuss recent advances in molecular research on strawberry defense mechanisms against pathogens. PMID:21984602

  19. Monocular and binocular mechanisms mediating flicker adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaohua; Shevell, Steven K

    2015-12-01

    Flicker adaptation reduces subsequent temporal contrast sensitivity. Recent studies show that this adaptation likely results from neural changes in the magnocellular visual pathway, but whether this adaptation occurs at a monocular or a binocular level, or both, is unclear. Here, two experiments address this question. The first experiment exploits the observation that flicker adaptation is stronger at higher than lower temporal frequencies. Observers' two eyes adapted to 3Hz flicker with an incremental pulse at 1/4 duty cycle, either in-phase or out-of-phase in the two eyes. At the binocular level, the flicker rate was 6Hz in the out-of-phase condition if the two eyes' pulse trains sum. Similar sensitivity reduction was found in both phase conditions, as expected for independent monocular adapting mechanisms. The second experiment tested for interocular transfer of adaptation between eyes. Results showed that (1) flicker adaptation was strongest with adapting and test fields in only the same eye, (2) adaptation can be partially transferred interocularly with adaptation in only the opposite eye, and (3) adaptation was weakened when both eyes were adapted simultaneously at different contrasts, compared to test-eye adaptation alone. Taken together, the findings are consistent with mechanisms of flicker adaptation at both the monocular and binocular level. PMID:26505684

  20. Drought Adaptation Mechanisms Should Guide Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew E; Medina, Viviana

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism, or hypothesis, of how a plant might be adapted to drought should strongly influence experimental design. For instance, an experiment testing for water conservation should be distinct from a damage-tolerance evaluation. We define here four new, general mechanisms for plant adaptation to drought such that experiments can be more easily designed based upon the definitions. A series of experimental methods are suggested together with appropriate physiological measurements related to the drought adaptation mechanisms. The suggestion is made that the experimental manipulation should match the rate, length, and severity of soil water deficit (SWD) necessary to test the hypothesized type of drought adaptation mechanism. PMID:27090148

  1. Biochemical defense strategies in sterilized seedlings of Nymphoides peltatum adapted to lead stress.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xuqiang; Shi, Guoxin; Yang, Xiaoke; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Xu, Xiaoying; Yang, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    In order to study potential antioxidant defense mechanisms, the effects of increasing concentrations of lead (Pb) on polyamines (PAs), various thiols, vitamins C and E, and proline contents in sterilized seedlings of Nymphoides peltata (S.G. mel.) Kuntze were investigated after 5 days of exposure. The levels of total putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), and spermine (Spm) decreased significantly, while the ratio of (Spd + Spm)/Put first increased but then declined as the concentration of Pb increased. The trends for free, perchloric acid soluble-conjugated (PS-conjugated), and perchloric acid insoluble-bound (PIS-bound) PAs were similar to the trend seen for total PAs. Moreover, reduced glutathione (GSH), nonprotein thiols (NP-SH), phytochelatins (PCs), and vitamin C were induced at high Pb concentrations. No significant change was observed in vitamin E. An initial decline in proline content was followed by an increase as the Pb concentration rose. The reduced level of Put and elevated contents of GSH, NP-SH, PCs, vitamin C, and proline were found to be associated with antioxidant efficiency, which supports the hypothesis that they could play a significant role in the adaptation mechanisms of N. peltatum under Pb stress. PMID:24705892

  2. Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The Defense High-Level Waste Leaching Mechanisms Program brought six major US laboratories together for three years of cooperative research. The participants reached a consensus that solubility of the leached glass species, particularly solubility in the altered surface layer, is the dominant factor controlling the leaching behavior of defense waste glass in a system in which the flow of leachant is constrained, as it will be in a deep geologic repository. Also, once the surface of waste glass is contacted by ground water, the kinetics of establishing solubility control are relatively rapid. The concentrations of leached species reach saturation, or steady-state concentrations, within a few months to a year at 70 to 90/sup 0/C. Thus, reaction kinetics, which were the main subject of earlier leaching mechanisms studies, are now shown to assume much less importance. The dominance of solubility means that the leach rate is, in fact, directly proportional to ground water flow rate. Doubling the flow rate doubles the effective leach rate. This relationship is expected to obtain in most, if not all, repository situations.

  3. Harnessing the Prokaryotic Adaptive Immune System as a Eukaryotic Antiviral Defense.

    PubMed

    Price, Aryn A; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S

    2016-04-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats - CRISPR-associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems - are sequence-specific RNA-directed endonuclease complexes that bind and cleave nucleic acids. These systems evolved within prokaryotes as adaptive immune defenses to target and degrade nucleic acids derived from bacteriophages and other foreign genetic elements. The antiviral function of these systems has now been exploited to combat eukaryotic viruses throughout the viral life cycle. Here we discuss current advances in CRISPR-Cas9 technology as a eukaryotic antiviral defense. PMID:26852268

  4. Heavy Metal Stress and Some Mechanisms of Plant Defense Response

    PubMed Central

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants. PMID:25688377

  5. Heavy metal stress and some mechanisms of plant defense response.

    PubMed

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants. PMID:25688377

  6. Co-adaptation mechanisms in plant-nematode systems.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, S V

    2014-01-01

    The review is aimed to analyze the biochemical and immune-breaking adaptive mechanisms established in evolution of plant parasitic nematodes. Plant parasitic nematodes are obligate, biotrophic pathogens of numerous plant species. These organisms cause dramatic changes in the morphology and physiology of their hosts. The group of sedentary nematodes which are among the most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes cause the formation of special organs called nematode feeding sites in the root tissue called syncytium (cyst nematodes, CN; Heterodera and Globodera spp.) or giant cells (root-knot nematodes, RKN; Meloidogyne spp.). The most pronounced morphological adaptations of nematodes for plant parasitism include a hollow, protrusible stylet (feeding spear) connected to three esophageal gland cells that express products secreted into plant tissues through the stylet. Several gene products secreted by the nematode during parasitism have been identified. The current battery of candidate parasitism proteins secreted by nematodes to modify plant tissues for parasitism includes cell-wall-modifying enzymes, multiple regulators of host cell cycle and metabolism, proteins that can localize near the plant cell nucleus, potential suppressors of host defense, and mimics of plant molecules. Plants are usually able to recognize and react to parasites by activating various defense responses. When the response of the plant is too weak or too late, a successful infection (compatible interaction) will result. A rapid and strong defense response (e. g. due to the presence of a resistance gene) will result in the resistant (incompatible) reaction. Defense responses include the production of toxic oxygen radicals and systemic signaling compounds as well as the activation of defense genes that lead to the production of structural barriers or other toxins. PMID:25272462

  7. Isolation of halimedatrial: chemical defense adaptation in the calcareous reef-building alga halimeda.

    PubMed

    Paul, V J; Fenical, W

    1983-08-19

    Halimedatrial, a structurally unprecedented diterpenoid trialdehyde, has been identified as the major secondary metabolite in six species of the calcareous reef-building alga Halimeda. In laboratory bioassays, halimedatrial is toxic toward reef fishes, significantly reduces feeding in herbivorous fishes, and has cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities. The widespread occurrence of halimedatrial and its potent biological activities suggest that this metabolite represents a chemical defense adaptation in this pantropical marine alga. PMID:17829534

  8. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects. PMID:27581362

  9. Transcriptional Analysis of The Adaptive Digestive System of The Migratory Locust in Response to Plant Defensive Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spit, Jornt; Holtof, Michiel; Badisco, Liesbet; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vogel, Elise; Knapen, Dries; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous insects evolved adaptive mechanisms to compensate for the presence of plant defensive protease inhibitors (PI) in their food. The underlying regulatory mechanisms of these compensatory responses remain largely elusive. In the current study, we investigated the initiation of this adaptive response in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, via microarray analysis of gut tissues. Four hours after dietary uptake of PIs, 114 and 150 transcripts were respectively found up- or downregulated. The results suggest a quick trade-off between compensating for potential loss of digestive activity on the one hand, and stress tolerance, defense, and structural integrity of the gut on the other hand. We additionally addressed the role of a group of related upregulated hexamerin-like proteins in the PI-induced response. Simultaneous knockdown of corresponding transcripts by means of RNA interference resulted in a reduced capacity of the locust nymphs to cope with the effects of PI. Moreover, since insect hexamerins have been shown to bind Juvenile Hormone (JH), we also investigated the effect of JH on the proteolytic digestion in L. migratoria. Our results indicate that JH has a stimulatory effect on the expression of three homologous chymotrypsin genes, while knocking down the JH receptor (methoprene tolerant) led to opposite effects. PMID:27581362

  10. Change in Coping and Defense Mechanisms across Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings in a European American Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Manfred; Chui, Helena; Hay, Elizabeth L.; Lumley, Mark A.; Grühn, Daniel; Labouvie-Vief, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal changes in coping and defense mechanisms in an age- and gender-stratified sample of 392 European American adults. Nonlinear age-related changes were found for the coping mechanisms of sublimation and suppression and the defense mechanisms of intellectualization, doubt, displacement, and regression. The change…

  11. Genome adaptations of a tripartite motif protein for retroviral defense in cattle and sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) genes encode proteins composed of RING, B-box, and coiled coil motif domains. Primate TRIM5' has been shown to be a primary determinant of retroviral host cell range restriction in primates. TRIM5 restriction was originally thought to be a primate-specific defense mechanism...

  12. [Probability mechanism of species adaptation].

    PubMed

    Kachevskiĭ, N V; Pavlovich, O N; Kachevskiĭ, D N

    2002-01-01

    A variant of mathematical description of the structure of a population was proposed. A possible mechanism of selection with respect to population structure was shown by a mathematical method. The dependence of the population heterogeneity on environmental factors and the relationship between heterogeneity and selection were considered. It is recommended to realize the conception of threshold values in each experiment of "dose-test-effect" type. PMID:12500581

  13. Coordination of frontline defense mechanisms under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amardeep; Van, Phu T; Busch, Courtney R; Robinson, Courtney K; Pan, Min; Pang, Wyming Lee; Reiss, David J; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Baliga, Nitin S

    2010-07-01

    Complexity of cellular response to oxidative stress (OS) stems from its wide-ranging damage to nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. We have constructed a systems model of OS response (OSR) for Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 in an attempt to understand the architecture of its regulatory network that coordinates this complex response. This has revealed a multi-tiered OS-management program to transcriptionally coordinate three peroxidase/catalase enzymes, two superoxide dismutases, production of rhodopsins, carotenoids and gas vesicles, metal trafficking, and various other aspects of metabolism. Through experimental validation of interactions within the OSR regulatory network, we show that despite their inability to directly sense reactive oxygen species, general transcription factors have an important function in coordinating this response. Remarkably, a significant fraction of this OSR was accurately recapitulated by a model that was earlier constructed from cellular responses to diverse environmental perturbations--this constitutes the general stress response component. Notwithstanding this observation, comparison of the two models has identified the coordination of frontline defense and repair systems by regulatory mechanisms that are triggered uniquely by severe OS and not by other environmental stressors, including sub-inhibitory levels of redox-active metals, extreme changes in oxygen tension, and a sub-lethal dose of gamma rays. PMID:20664639

  14. Mechanisms of Defense against Intracellular Pathogens Mediated by Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Barry R; Modlin, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    The key question our work has sought to address has been, "What are the necessary and sufficient conditions that engender protection from intracellular pathogens in the human host?" The origins of this work derive from a long-standing interest in the mechanisms of protection against two such paradigmatic intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, that have brilliantly adapted to the human host. It was obvious that these pathogens, which cause chronic diseases and persist in macrophages, must have acquired subtle strategies to resist host microbicidal mechanisms, yet since the vast majority of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis do not develop disease, there must be some potent human antimicrobial mechanisms. What follows is not a comprehensive review of the vast literature on the role of human macrophages in protection against infectious disease, but a summary of the research in our two laboratories with collaborators that we hope has contributed to some understanding of mechanisms of resistance and pathogenesis. While mouse models revealed some necessary conditions for protection, e.g., innate immunity, Th1 cells and their cytokines, and major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cells, here we emphasize multiple antimicrobial mechanisms that exist in human macrophages that differ from those of most experimental animals. Prominent here is the vitamin D-dependent antimicrobial pathway common to human macrophages activated by innate and acquired immune responses, mediated by antimicrobial peptides, e.g., cathelicidin, through an interleukin-15- and interleukin-32-dependent common pathway that is necessary for macrophage killing of M. tuberculosis in vitro. PMID:27337485

  15. Serine/threonine protein phosphatases: multi-purpose enzymes in control of defense mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatases are a group of enzymes involved in the regulation of defense mechanisms in plants. This paper describes the effects of an inhibitor of these enzymes on the expression of all of the genes associated with these defense mechanisms. The results suggest that inhibi...

  16. Influence of Defense Mechanisms on Moral Judgment Development: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Daniel; Chmiel, Susan

    1992-01-01

    At age 13, and for the next 20 years, male subjects were periodically interviewed about their moral judgments. Adolescents with mature use of defense mechanisms reasoned at higher stages of moral judgment 10 to 20 years after the initial interview than did those with immature use of defense mechanisms. (BC)

  17. Hyperphosphorylation as a defense mechanism to reduce TDP-43 aggregation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huei-Ying; Yeh, Po-An; Chiu, Hsiu-Chiang; Tang, Chiou-Yang; Tu, Benjamin Pang-hsien

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U) are characterized by inclusion bodies formed by TDP-43 (TDP). We established cell and transgenic Drosophila models expressing TDP carboxyl terminal fragment (ND251 and ND207), which developed aggregates recapitulating important features of TDP inclusions in ALS/FTLD-U, including hyperphosphorylation at previously reported serine(403,404,409,410) residues, polyubiquitination and colocalization with optineurin. These models were used to address the pathogenic role of hyperphosphorylation in ALS/FTLD-U. We demonstrated that hyperphosphorylation and ubiquitination occurred temporally later than aggregation in cells. Expression of CK2α which phosphorylated TDP decreased the aggregation propensity of ND251 or ND207; this effect could be blocked by CK2 inhibitor DMAT. Mutation of serines(379,403,404,409,410) to alanines (S5A) to eliminate phosphorylation increased the aggregation propensity and number of aggregates of TDP, but mutation to aspartic acids (S5D) or glutamic acids (S5E) to simulate hyperphosphorylation had the opposite effect. Functionally, ND251 or ND207 aggregates decreased the number of neurites of Neuro2a cells induced by retinoic acid or number of cells by MTT assay. S5A mutation aggravated, but S5E mutation alleviated these cytotoxic effects of aggregates. Finally, ND251 or ND251S5A developed aggregates in neurons, and salivary gland of transgenic Drosophila, but ND251S5E did not. Taken together, our data indicate that hyperphosphorylation may represent a compensatory defense mechanism to stop or prevent pathogenic TDP from aggregation. Therefore, enhancement of phosphorylation may serve as an effective therapeutic strategy against ALS/FTLD-U. PMID:21850253

  18. Adapting to Health Impacts of Climate Change in the Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes climate change as a threat to its mission and recently issued policy to implement climate change adaptation measures. However, the DoD has not conducted a comprehensive assessment of health-related climate change effects. To catalyze the needed assessment-a first step toward a comprehensive DoD climate change adaptation plan for health-this article discusses the DoD relevance of 3 selected climate change impacts: heat injuries, vector-borne diseases, and extreme weather that could lead to natural disasters. The author uses these examples to propose a comprehensive approach to planning for health-related climate change impacts in the DoD. PMID:27081888

  19. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2016-01-01

    Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues. PMID:27489584

  20. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues. PMID:27489584

  1. Unconscious vigilance: worldview defense without adaptations for terror, coalition, or uncertainty management.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Colin; Sousa, Paulo; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    Individuals subtly reminded of death, coalitional challenges, or feelings of uncertainty display exaggerated preferences for affirmations and against criticisms of their cultural in-groups. Terror management, coalitional psychology, and uncertainty management theories postulate this "worldview defense" effect as the output of mechanisms evolved either to allay the fear of death, foster social support, or reduce anxiety by increasing adherence to cultural values. In 4 studies, we report evidence for an alternative perspective. We argue that worldview defense owes to unconscious vigilance, a state of accentuated reactivity to affective targets (which need not relate to cultural worldviews) that follows detection of subtle alarm cues (which need not pertain to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty). In Studies 1 and 2, death-primed participants produced exaggerated ratings of worldview-neutral affective targets. In Studies 3 and 4, subliminal threat manipulations unrelated to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty evoked worldview defense. These results are discussed as they inform evolutionary interpretations of worldview defense and future investigations of the influence of unconscious alarm on judgment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:21644809

  2. Mechanism of high temperature adaptation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High temperature (HT) stress severely limits plant productivity and causes extensive economic loss to US agriculture. Understanding HT adaptation mechanisms in crop plants is crucial to the success of developing HT tolerant varieties to alleviate the negative impact of HT stress on plant growth and...

  3. Evidence for adaptive radiation from a phylogenetic study of plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Fishbein, Mark; Halitschke, Rayko; Hastings, Amy P; Rabosky, Daniel L; Rasmann, Sergio

    2009-10-27

    One signature of adaptive radiation is a high level of trait change early during the diversification process and a plateau toward the end of the radiation. Although the study of the tempo of evolution has historically been the domain of paleontologists, recently developed phylogenetic tools allow for the rigorous examination of trait evolution in a tremendous diversity of organisms. Enemy-driven adaptive radiation was a key prediction of Ehrlich and Raven's coevolutionary hypothesis [Ehrlich PR, Raven PH (1964) Evolution 18:586-608], yet has remained largely untested. Here we examine patterns of trait evolution in 51 North American milkweed species (Asclepias), using maximum likelihood methods. We study 7 traits of the milkweeds, ranging from seed size and foliar physiological traits to defense traits (cardenolides, latex, and trichomes) previously shown to impact herbivores, including the monarch butterfly. We compare the fit of simple random-walk models of trait evolution to models that incorporate stabilizing selection (Ornstein-Ulenbeck process), as well as time-varying rates of trait evolution. Early bursts of trait evolution were implicated for 2 traits, while stabilizing selection was implicated for several others. We further modeled the relationship between trait change and species diversification while allowing rates of trait evolution to vary during the radiation. Species-rich lineages underwent a proportionately greater decline in latex and cardenolides relative to species-poor lineages, and the rate of trait change was most rapid early in the radiation. An interpretation of this result is that reduced investment in defensive traits accelerated diversification, and disproportionately so, early in the adaptive radiation of milkweeds. PMID:19805160

  4. Unconscious Vigilance: Worldview Defense Without Adaptations for Terror, Coalition, or Uncertainty Management

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Colin; Sousa, Paulo; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Individuals subtly reminded of death, coalitional challenges, or feelings of uncertainty display exaggerated preferences for affirmations and against criticisms of their cultural in-groups. Terror management, coalitional psychology, and uncertainty management theories postulate this “worldview defense” effect as the output of mechanisms evolved either to allay the fear of death, foster social support, or reduce anxiety by increasing adherence to cultural values. In 4 studies, we report evidence for an alternative perspective. We argue that worldview defense owes to unconscious vigilance, a state of accentuated reactivity to affective targets (which need not relate to cultural worldviews) that follows detection of subtle alarm cues (which need not pertain to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty). In Studies 1 and 2, death-primed participants produced exaggerated ratings of worldview-neutral affective targets. In Studies 3 and 4, subliminal threat manipulations unrelated to death, coalitional challenges, or uncertainty evoked worldview defense. These results are discussed as they inform evolutionary interpretations of worldview defense and future investigations of the influence of unconscious alarm on judgment. PMID:21644809

  5. Statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian adaptive resolution simulations.

    PubMed

    Español, P; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Everaers, R; Potestio, R; Donadio, D; Kremer, K

    2015-02-14

    The Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) is a hybrid scheme that allows to treat a molecular system with different levels of resolution depending on the location of the molecules. The construction of a Hamiltonian based on the this idea (H-AdResS) allows one to formulate the usual tools of ensembles and statistical mechanics. We present a number of exact and approximate results that provide a statistical mechanics foundation for this simulation method. We also present simulation results that illustrate the theory. PMID:25681895

  6. Adaptive evolution of threonine deaminase in plant defense against insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales-Vigil, Eliana; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2011-11-07

    Gene duplication is a major source of plant chemical diversity that mediates plant-herbivore interactions. There is little direct evidence, however, that novel chemical traits arising from gene duplication reduce herbivory. Higher plants use threonine deaminase (TD) to catalyze the dehydration of threonine (Thr) to {alpha}-ketobutyrate and ammonia as the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine (Ile). Cultivated tomato and related Solanum species contain a duplicated TD paralog (TD2) that is coexpressed with a suite of genes involved in herbivore resistance. Analysis of TD2-deficient tomato lines showed that TD2 has a defensive function related to Thr catabolism in the gut of lepidopteran herbivores. During herbivory, the regulatory domain of TD2 is removed by proteolysis to generate a truncated protein (pTD2) that efficiently degrades Thr without being inhibited by Ile. We show that this proteolytic activation step occurs in the gut of lepidopteran but not coleopteran herbivores, and is catalyzed by a chymotrypsin-like protease of insect origin. Analysis of purified recombinant enzymes showed that TD2 is remarkably more resistant to proteolysis and high temperature than the ancestral TD1 isoform. The crystal structure of pTD2 provided evidence that electrostatic interactions constitute a stabilizing feature associated with adaptation of TD2 to the extreme environment of the lepidopteran gut. These findings demonstrate a role for gene duplication in the evolution of a plant defense that targets and co-opts herbivore digestive physiology.

  7. Risks, natural coastal defenses and the Economics of Climate Adaptation in the Gulf Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguero, B. G.; Beck, M.; Bresch, D.; Calil, J.; Meliane, I.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal Development and Climate Change are rapidly altering the world's coastal zones, dramatically increasing risks of catastrophic damage to coastal communities. Natural defenses are increasingly cited as an element of the solution. However, their use and widespread acceptance are still under debate and there are limited data on their cost effectiveness. Our goal is to provide comparable cost effectiveness estimates of 'green' and 'gray' approaches for risk reduction. We follow the Economics of Climate Adaptation (ECA) methodology and further integrates nature-based solutions in to this approach. We propose an ecosystem based risk mitigation perspective and integrate it into local decision making and risk models. A pilot case has been developed for the US Gulf Coast with special emphasis on (1) nature based measures, (2) an open-knowledge approach and (3) on a spatially explicit analyses. We examine potential damage to residential and commercial properties, infrastructure and assets. Our specific goals were to: Assess risks from hurricanes in the Gulf Coast in an holistic manner from hazards to damages and possible solutions Define how cost- effective ecosystems are for coastal defense in the Gulf Coast Quantify how and where natural solutions may reduce risks accounting for coastal engineering indicators Analyze and compare different scenarios including additional risks from climate change such as sea-level rise, potential coastal policy responses and economic growth

  8. Evolution and development of gastropod larval shell morphology: experimental evidence for mechanical defense and repair.

    PubMed

    Hickman, C S

    2001-01-01

    The structural diversity of gastropod veliger larvae offers an instructive counterpoint to the view of larval forms as conservative archetypes. Larval structure, function, and development are fine-tuned for survival in the plankton. Accordingly, the study of larval adaptation provides an important perspective for evolutionary-developmental biology as an integrated science. Patterns of breakage and repair in the field, as well as patterns of breakage in arranged encounters with zooplankton under laboratory conditions, are two powerful sources of data on the adaptive significance of morphological and microsculptural features of the gastropod larval shell. Shells of the planktonic veliger larvae of the caenogastropod Nassarius paupertus [GOULD] preserve multiple repaired breaks, attributed to unsuccessful zooplankton predators. In culture, larvae isolated from concentrated zooplankton samples rapidly repaired broken apertural margins and restored the "ideal" apertural form, in which an elaborate projection or "beak" covers the head of the swimming veliger. When individuals with repaired apertures were reintroduced to a concentrated mixture of potential zooplankton predators, the repaired margins were rapidly chipped and broken back. The projecting beak of the larval shell is the first line of mechanical defense, covering the larval head and mouth and potentially the most vulnerable part of the shell to breakage. Patterns of mechanical failure show that spiral ridges do reinforce the beak and retard breakage. The capacity for rapid shell repair and regeneration, and the evolution of features that resist or retard mechanical damage, may play a more prominent role than previously thought in enhancing the ability of larvae to survive in the plankton. PMID:11256430

  9. Amino acids and our genetic code: a highly adaptive and interacting defense system.

    PubMed

    Verheesen, R H; Schweitzer, C M

    2012-04-01

    Since the discovery of the genetic code, Mendel's heredity theory and Darwin's evolution theory, science believes that adaptations to the environment are processes in which the adaptation of the genes is a matter of probability, in which finally the specie will survive which is evolved by chance. We hypothesize that evolution and the adaptation of the genes is a well-organized fully adaptive system in which there is no rigidity of the genes. The dividing of the genes will take place in line with the environment to be expected, sensed through the mother. The encoding triplets can encode for more than one amino acid depending on the availability of the amino acids and the needed micronutrients. Those nutrients can cause disease but also prevent diseases, even cancer and auto immunity. In fact we hypothesize that auto immunity is an effective process of the organism to clear suboptimal proteins, formed due to amino acid and micronutrient deficiencies. Only when deficiencies sustain, disease will develop, otherwise the autoantibodies will function as all antibodies function, in a protective way. Furthermore, we hypothesize that essential amino acids are less important than nonessential amino acid (NEA). Species developed the ability to produce the nonessential amino acids themselves because they were not provided by food sufficiently. In contrast essential amino acids are widely available, without any evolutionary pressure. Since we can only produce small amounts of NEA and the availability in food can be reasoned to be too low they are still our main concern in amino acid availability. In conclusion, we hypothesize that increasing health will only be possible by improving our natural environment and living circumstances, not by changing the genes, since they are our last line of defense in surviving our environmental changes. PMID:22289341

  10. Change in children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems: the role of defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Phebe

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the relation of defense mechanism to children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems, as assessed from mothers' report at age 9 and 12 years, based on archival data. The defense mechanisms of denial, projection, and identification were assessed from Thematic Apperception Test stories told by the children at age 9 years, using the Defense Mechanism Manual (Cramer, The development of defense mechanisms: Theory, research and assessment. New York: Springer-Verlag, 1991a; Protecting the self: Defense mechanisms in action. New York: Guilford Press, 2006). The results showed that the use of identification predicted a decrease in externalizing behaviors between age 9 and 12 years. In contrast, change in internalizing behaviors was not predicted by defense use, but the use of projection was related to fewer internalizing behaviors at both ages. These findings are consistent with the idea that behavioral intervention stressing self-regulation can be effective in reducing externalizing problems, but internalizing problems require an intervention that is sensitive to the underlying behavioral inhibition in these children. PMID:25668653

  11. Human Host Defense Peptide LL-37 Stimulates Virulence Factor Production and Adaptive Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor. PMID:24349231

  12. Human host defense peptide LL-37 stimulates virulence factor production and adaptive resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Strempel, Nikola; Neidig, Anke; Nusser, Michael; Geffers, Robert; Vieillard, Julien; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Overhage, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of different virulence factors as well as the ability to rapidly adapt to adverse environmental conditions are important features for the high pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both virulence and adaptive resistance are tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network and respond to external stimuli, such as host signals or antibiotic stress, in a highly specific manner. Here, we demonstrate that physiological concentrations of the human host defense peptide LL-37 promote virulence factor production as well as an adaptive resistance against fluoroquinolone and aminoglycoside antibiotics in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Microarray analyses of P. aeruginosa cells exposed to LL-37 revealed an upregulation of gene clusters involved in the production of quorum sensing molecules and secreted virulence factors (PQS, phenazine, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), elastase and rhamnolipids) and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification as well as an induction of genes encoding multidrug efflux pumps MexCD-OprJ and MexGHI-OpmD. Accordingly, we detected significantly elevated levels of toxic metabolites and proteases in bacterial supernatants after LL-37 treatment. Pre-incubation of bacteria with LL-37 for 2 h led to a decreased susceptibility towards gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Quantitative Realtime PCR results using a PAO1-pqsE mutant strain present evidence that the quinolone response protein and virulence regulator PqsE may be implicated in the regulation of the observed phenotype in response to LL-37. Further experiments with synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides IDR-1018, 1037 and HHC-36 showed no induction of pqsE expression, suggesting a new role of PqsE as highly specific host stress sensor. PMID:24349231

  13. How does our brain constitute defense mechanisms? First-person neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Northoff, Georg; Bermpohl, Felix; Schoeneich, Frank; Boeker, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Current progress in the cognitive and affective neurosciences is constantly influencing the development of psychoanalytic theory and practice. However, despite the emerging dialogue between neuroscience and psychoanalysis, the neuronal processes underlying psychoanalytic constructs such as defense mechanisms remain unclear. One of the main problems in investigating the psychodynamic-neuronal relationship consists in systematically linking the individual contents of first-person subjective experience to third-person observation of neuronal states. We therefore introduced an appropriate methodological strategy, 'first-person neuroscience', which aims at developing methods for systematically linking first- and third-person data. The utility of first-person neuroscience can be demonstrated by the example of the defense mechanism of sensorimotor regression as paradigmatically observed in catatonia. Combined psychodynamic and imaging studies suggest that sensorimotor regression might be associated with dysfunction in the neural network including the orbitofrontal, the medial prefrontal and the premotor cortices. In general sensorimotor regression and other defense mechanisms are psychoanalytic constructs that are hypothesized to be complex emotional-cognitive constellations. In this paper we suggest that specific functional mechanisms which integrate neuronal activity across several brain regions (i.e. neuronal integration) are the physiological substrates of defense mechanisms. We conclude that first-person neuroscience could be an appropriate methodological strategy for opening the door to a better understanding of the neuronal processes of defense mechanisms and their modulation in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. PMID:17426413

  14. In Defense of a Heuristic Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the presentation of quantum mechanics found in traditional textbooks is intellectually well founded, it suffers from a number of deficiencies. Specifically introducing quantum mechanics as a solution to the arcane dilemma, the ultraviolet catastrophe, does little to impress a nonscientific audience of the tremendous paradigmatic shift…

  15. A shared mechanism of defense against predators and parasites: chitin regulation and its implications for life-history theory

    PubMed Central

    Beckerman, Andrew P; de Roij, Job; Dennis, Stuart R; Little, Tom J

    2013-01-01

    Defenses against predators and parasites offer excellent illustrations of adaptive phenotypic plasticity. Despite vast knowledge about such induced defenses, they have been studied largely in isolation, which is surprising, given that predation and parasitism are ubiquitous and act simultaneously in the wild. This raises the possibility that victims must trade-off responses to predation versus parasitism. Here, we propose that arthropod responses to predators and parasites will commonly be based on the endocrine regulation of chitin synthesis and degradation. The proposal is compelling because many inducible defenses are centered on temporal or spatial modifications of chitin-rich structures. Moreover, we show how the chitin synthesis pathway ends in a split to carapace or gut chitin, and how this form of molecular regulation can be incorporated into theory on life-history trade-offs, specifically the Y-model. Our hypothesis thus spans several biological scales to address advice from Stearns that “Endocrine mechanisms may prove to be only the tip of an iceberg of physiological mechanisms that modulate the expression of genetic covariance”. PMID:24455141

  16. Melatonin in relation to cellular antioxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J; Carneiro, R C; Oh, C S

    1997-08-01

    macromolecules that occurs during strenuous exercise or ischemia-reperfusion. In experimental models which are used to study neurodegenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson disease, melatonin was found to be effective in reducing neuronal damage. Its lack of toxicity and the ease with which melatonin crosses morphophysiological barriers and enters subcellular compartments are essential features of this antioxidant. Thus far, most frequently pharmacological levels of melatonin have been used to combat oxygen toxicity. The role of physiological levels of melatonin, which are known to decrease with age, is being investigated as to their importance in the total antioxidative defense capacity of the organism. PMID:9288572

  17. Pseudechis australis venomics: adaptation for a defense against microbial pathogens and recruitment of body transferrin.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Dessislava; Seifert, Jana; Öhler, Michaela; von Bergen, Martin; Spencer, Patrick; Arni, Raghuvir K; Genov, Nicolay; Betzel, Christian

    2011-05-01

    The venom composition of Pseudechis australis, a widely distributed in Australia reptile, was analyzed by 2-DE and mass spectrometric analysis. In total, 102 protein spots were identified as venom toxins. The gel is dominated by horizontal trains of spots with identical or very similar molecular masses but differing in the pI values. This suggests possible post-translational modifications of toxins, changing their electrostatic charge. The results demonstrate a highly specialized biosynthesis of toxins destroying the hemostasis (P-III metalloproteases, SVMPs), antimicrobial proteins (L-amino acid oxidases, LAAOs, and transferrin-like proteins, TFLPs), and myotoxins (phospholipase A(2)s, PLA(2)s). The three transferrin isoforms of the Australian P. australis (Elapidae snake) venom are highly homologous to the body transferrin of the African Lamprophis fuliginosus (Colubridae), an indication for the recruitment of body transferrin. The venomic composition suggests an adaptation for a defense against microbial pathogens from the prey. Transferrins have not previously been reported as components of elapid or other snake venoms. Ecto-5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTDs), nerve growth factors (VNGFs), and a serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) were also identified. The venom composition and enzymatic activities explain the clinical manifestation of the king brown snakebite. The results can be used for medical, scientific, and biotechnological purposes. PMID:21417486

  18. Mechanisms of Sensorimotor Adaptation to Centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Wood, S. J.; Kaufman, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    We postulate that centripetal acceleration induced by centrifugation can be used as an inflight sensorimotor countermeasure to retain and/or promote appropriate crewmember responses to sustained changes in gravito-inertial force conditions. Active voluntary motion is required to promote vestibular system conditioning, and both visual and graviceptor sensory feedback are critical for evaluating internal representations of spatial orientation. The goal of our investigation is to use centrifugation to develop an analog to the conflicting visual/gravito-inertial force environment experienced during space flight, and to use voluntary head movements during centrifugation to study mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravity environments. We address the following two hypotheses: (1) Discordant canal-otolith feedback during head movements in a hypergravity tilted environment will cause a reorganization of the spatial processing required for multisensory integration and motor control, resulting in decreased postural stability upon return to normal gravity environment. (2) Adaptation to this "gravito-inertial tilt distortion" will result in a negative after-effect, and readaptation will be expressed by return of postural stability to baseline conditions. During the third year of our grant we concentrated on examining changes in balance control following 90-180 min of centrifugation at 1.4 9. We also began a control study in which we exposed subjects to 90 min of sustained roll tilt in a static (non-rotating) chair. This allowed us to examine adaptation to roll tilt without the hypergravity induced by centrifugation. To these ends, we addressed the question: Is gravity an internal calibration reference for postural control? The remainder of this report is limited to presenting preliminary findings from this study.

  19. Adaptive mechanically controlled lubrication mechanism found in articular joints.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Banquy, Xavier; Lee, Dong Woog; Lowrey, Daniel D; Yu, Jing; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-03-29

    Articular cartilage is a highly efficacious water-based tribological system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads (pressures) and sliding velocities that must last over a lifetime. Although many different lubrication mechanisms have been proposed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the tribological performance of cartilage cannot be attributed to a single mechanism acting alone but on the synergistic action of multiple "modes" of lubrication that are adapted to provide optimum lubrication as the normal loads, shear stresses, and rates change. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is abundant in cartilage and synovial fluid and widely thought to play a principal role in joint lubrication although this role remains unclear. HA is also known to complex readily with the glycoprotein lubricin (LUB) to form a cross-linked network that has also been shown to be critical to the wear prevention mechanism of joints. Friction experiments on porcine cartilage using the surface forces apparatus, and enzymatic digestion, reveal an "adaptive" role for an HA-LUB complex whereby, under compression, nominally free HA diffusing out of the cartilage becomes mechanically, i.e., physically, trapped at the interface by the increasingly constricted collagen pore network. The mechanically trapped HA-LUB complex now acts as an effective (chemically bound) "boundary lubricant"--reducing the friction force slightly but, more importantly, eliminating wear damage to the rubbing/shearing surfaces. This paper focuses on the contribution of HA in cartilage lubrication; however, the system as a whole requires both HA and LUB to function optimally under all conditions. PMID:21383143

  20. 6-Benzylaminopurine inhibits growth of Monilinia fructicola and induces defense-related mechanism in peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Zeng, Lizhen; Yang, Jiali; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2015-11-15

    This study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), the first generation synthetic cytokinin, on the invasion of Monilinia fructicola in peach fruit and the possible mechanism involved for the first time. Our results suggested that BAP treatment had a 63% lower disease incidence and approximately 10 times lower lesion diameter compared to the control throughout the incubation period. In vitro BAP showed a direct inhibitory effect on M. fructicola spore germination. BAP could prevent fruit texture deterioration and protect the cell membrane from oxidative stress, while no adverse effects were observed on fruit quality maintenance. Analysis of defense-related enzymes activities indicated that the use of BAP induced higher specific polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activities which triggered stronger host defensive responses. Thus, our results verified the proposed mechanism of BAP in controlling M. fructicola by direct inhibitory effect, delay peach senescence and activation of defensive enzymes. PMID:25977018

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae: elusive mechanisms of the body's defense systems.

    PubMed

    Bondi, T; Canessa, C; Lippi, F; Iacopelli, J; Nieddu, F; Azzari, C

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most important human pathogens. It represents the most frequent cause of pneumonia, meningitis, sinusitis and otitis. After the PCV7 vaccine introduction, a serotypic switch was noticed. This phenomenon led to the replacement of the seven serotypes contained in the vaccine with other less common ones, some of which are invasive or characterised by antibiotic-resistance. This replacement is only partially due to the vaccination. Many causes have been suggested to explain this effect: apearance of new serotypes, diffusion of minority serotypes and replacement of common serotypes due to natural secular trend. Pneumococcus has a promiscuous "sex life", characterized by homologous recombinations within the same species and also between different species. This fact can unlock the secret of how these pathogens can develop antibiotic or vaccine-resistance. The serotypic switch involves big loci that are responsible for capsular polysaccharide synthesis. The most important region of the genome involved in this process is near the gene tetM. The same mechanisms are also responsible for antibiotic resistance. In recent years the growth of penicillin, macrolides and clindamycine resistance has been noticed. It is also important to underline that multidrug-resistant bacteria isolation has increased. In conclusion, to obtain more information about bacteria composition and evolution, antibiotic-resistance and vaccine response, it is fundamental to improve the epidemiological surveillance of pneumococcal infections using modern molecular diagnostic techinques. PMID:23240166

  2. Adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of cellular priming.

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, D R; Cleveland, J C; Moore, E E; Partrick, D A; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mechanisms of cellular priming resulting in both adaptive and maladaptive responses to subsequent injury and strategies for manipulating this priming to constructive therapeutic advantage are explored. BACKGROUND DATA: A cell is prepared or educated by an initial insult (priming stimulus). Investigations in both laboratory animals and humans indicate that cells, organs, and perhaps even whole patients respond differently to a proximal second insult ("second hit") by virtue of this prior environmental history. The opportunity to achieve the primed state appears to be conserved across almost all cell types. The initial stimulus transmits a message to the cellular machinery that influences the cell's response to a subsequent challenge. This response may result in an exaggerated inflammatory response in the case of the neutrophil (an often maladaptive process) or an improved tolerance to injury by the myocyte (adaptive response). Our global hypothesis is that cellular priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process that invokes common intracellular targets across multiple cell types. We further postulate that these targets create a language based on the transient phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular enzymes that is therapeutically accessible. CONCLUSIONS: Priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process transduced by means of intracellular targets across multiple cell types. The potential therapeutic strategies outlined involve the receptor-mediated manipulation of cellular events. These events are transmitted through an intracellular language that instructs the cell regarding its behavior in response to subsequent stimulation. Understanding these intracellular events represents a realistic goal of priming and preconditioning biology and will likely lead to clinical control of the primed state. PMID:9389392

  3. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of "neurotic" type; their goal is to lead to a "split", either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  4. Effects of Sex, Social Desirability, and Birth Order on the Defense Mechanisms Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Gary E.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated effects of sex difference, social desirability instructions, and birth order of respondents on defense mechanisms inventory (DMI). Sex difference was found in projection only. Social desirability effects were found in turning-against-others, projection, principalization, and reversal. Thus, an interpretive caution is in order…

  5. Brief Report: The Defense Mechanisms of Homophobic Adolescent Males--A Descriptive Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Andrew J.; White, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of defense mechanisms in homophobic attitudes of older male adolescents aged 17-18 years. A cross-sectional survey collected data from final year high school students (N = 86) attending an all male school in a regional centre in Victoria, Australia. The school was identified by teachers as having a problematic culture…

  6. Learning to Recognize Ego Defense Mechanisms: Results of a Structured Teaching Experience for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beresford, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Ego defense mechanism (EDM) recognition can offer a powerful and practical tool in clinical psychiatry. However, recognition skill learning can be difficult to assess and may account for the lack of formal EDM recognition training in residency courses. Method: This study hypothesized that mean test scores would increase significantly…

  7. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of “neurotic” type; their goal is to lead to a “split”, either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders. PMID:26491330

  8. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  9. Preconditioning of heart by repeated stunning. Adaptive modification of antioxidative defense system.

    PubMed

    Das, D K; Prasad, M R; Lu, D; Jones, R M

    1992-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that preconditioning of a heart by repeated stunning can reduce the cellular injury to the heart from subsequent acute ischemic insult. To examine the possible biochemical mechanism for such myocardial preservation afforded by preconditioning, swine heart was subjected to four episodes of 5 min. stunning by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), followed by 10 min. of reperfusion after each stunning. Heart was then made regionally ischemic for 60 min. by LAD occlusion, followed by 6 hrs. reperfusion. Control heart was perfused for 60 min., followed by 60 min. ischemia and 6 hrs. reperfusion. The results of our studies indicated the stimulation of a number of antioxidative enzymes, including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, after repeated stunning and reperfusion. In addition, a number of new proteins were expressed after preconditioning the heart, including some oxidative-stress related proteins and 72 kDa heat-shock protein. These results suggest that preconditioning of a heart by repeated stunning may lead to strengthening of the oxidative defense system of the heart, which is likely to play a role in myocardial preservation during subsequent ischemic and reperfusion injury. PMID:1472901

  10. Adaptive mechanically controlled lubrication mechanism found in articular joints

    PubMed Central

    Greene, George W.; Banquy, Xavier; Lee, Dong Woog; Lowrey, Daniel D.; Yu, Jing; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly efficacious water-based tribological system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads (pressures) and sliding velocities that must last over a lifetime. Although many different lubrication mechanisms have been proposed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the tribological performance of cartilage cannot be attributed to a single mechanism acting alone but on the synergistic action of multiple “modes” of lubrication that are adapted to provide optimum lubrication as the normal loads, shear stresses, and rates change. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is abundant in cartilage and synovial fluid and widely thought to play a principal role in joint lubrication although this role remains unclear. HA is also known to complex readily with the glycoprotein lubricin (LUB) to form a cross-linked network that has also been shown to be critical to the wear prevention mechanism of joints. Friction experiments on porcine cartilage using the surface forces apparatus, and enzymatic digestion, reveal an “adaptive” role for an HA-LUB complex whereby, under compression, nominally free HA diffusing out of the cartilage becomes mechanically, i.e., physically, trapped at the interface by the increasingly constricted collagen pore network. The mechanically trapped HA-LUB complex now acts as an effective (chemically bound) “boundary lubricant”—reducing the friction force slightly but, more importantly, eliminating wear damage to the rubbing/shearing surfaces. This paper focuses on the contribution of HA in cartilage lubrication; however, the system as a whole requires both HA and LUB to function optimally under all conditions. PMID:21383143

  11. Exploring the association of ego defense mechanisms with problematic internet use in a Pakistani medical school.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Ahmed; Rehman, Abdul; Malik, Aamenah; Aftab, Ramsha; Allah Yar, Aroosa; Allah Yar, Arooj; Rai, Aitzaz Bin Sultan

    2016-09-30

    The present study was designed to analyze association between problematic internet use and use of ego defense mechanisms in medical students. This cross-sectional study was undertaken at CMH Lahore Medical College (CMH LMC) in Lahore, Pakistan from 1st March, 2015 to 30th May, 2015. 522 medical and dental students were included in the study. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: a) demographic characteristics of respondent b) the Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40) and c) the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). All data were analyzed in SPSS v20. Chi square, Independent sample t test and One Way ANOVA were run to analyze association of different variables with scores on IAT. Multiple regression analysis was used to delineate ego defenses as predictors of problematic internet use. A total of 32 (6.1%) students reported severe problems with internet usage. Males had higher scores on IAT i.e had more problematic use of internet. Scores on internet addiction test (IAT) were negatively associated with sublimation and positively associated with projection, denial, autistic fantasy, passive aggression and displacement. There was a high prevalence of problematic use of internet among medical and dental students. It had significant associations with several defense mechanisms. PMID:27504797

  12. Anatomy and function of the ptychoid defensive mechanism in the mite Euphthiracarus cooki (Acari: Oribatida).

    PubMed

    Sanders, Francis H; Norton, Roy A

    2004-02-01

    Ptychoidy is a defensive adaptation of several groups of oribatid mites in which legs and coxisternum can be fully retracted into the opisthosoma and protected by a ventrally deflected prodorsum, resulting in a seed-like appearance. Using Euphthiracarus cooki as a model, we examined details of exoskeletal and muscular anatomy in combination with studies of live individuals to provide the first functional analysis of ptychoidy. There are two main functional components: the first is a set of exoskeletal and muscular adaptations, mostly of the podosoma and prodorsum, that combine to effect leg withdrawal and prodorsal deflection; the second comprises adaptations of the opisthosoma that allow control of hydrostatic pressure during the large hemocoel volume adjustments associated with ptychoidy. Adaptations important in the closing process (enptychosis) are found in four body regions. Much of the podosomal exoskeleton (especially pleural) is unsclerotized, which facilitates leg retraction and prodorsal deflection during enptychosis. The coxisternum has several flexible furrows along which it folds in order to bring legs into a tightly parallel arrangement. The prodorsum has specialized attachment surfaces (manubrium and inferior retractor process) for retractor muscles and a paired bothridial scale that participates in prodorsal alignment during enptychosis. The subcapitulum has a prominent capitular apodeme on which important retractor muscles insert. The mineralized notogaster has an anterior "collar" that accommodates the retracted prodorsum; it includes paired notches and receptacles that accommodate the bothridial scales, thereby creating a temporary fixed axis for rotation of the prodorsum in a "lazy hinge" mechanism. Specialized muscles form the retractor system; most conspicuous are the large coxisternal retractors and prodorsal retractors, both of which originate on the notogaster. Other components have adjustor roles; among them are muscles of the endosternal

  13. Parallel Adaptive Multi-Mechanics Simulations using Diablo

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, D; Solberg, J

    2004-12-03

    Coupled multi-mechanics simulations (such as thermal-stress and fluidstructure interaction problems) are of substantial interest to engineering analysts. In addition, adaptive mesh refinement techniques present an attractive alternative to current mesh generation procedures and provide quantitative error bounds that can be used for model verification. This paper discusses spatially adaptive multi-mechanics implicit simulations using the Diablo computer code. (U)

  14. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  15. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Contrast adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2007-08-01

    Are effects of background contrast on color appearance and sensitivity controlled by the same mechanism of adaptation? We examined the effects of background color contrast on color appearance and on color-difference sensitivity under well-matched conditions. We linked the data using Fechner's hypothesis that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to sensitivity and examined a family of parametric models of adaptation. Our results show that both appearance and discrimination are consistent with the same mechanism of adaptation.

  16. Investigating Aggressive Styles and Defense Mechanisms in Bipolar Patients and in their Parents.

    PubMed

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Pezzoni, Franca; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a very common mental health disorder, whose etiology concerning aggressive styles and defense mechanisms is still poorly known despite the efforts dedicated to develop psychological and biological theories. After obtaining written signed informed consent, this study will recruit inpatients with a clinical diagnosis of BD, based on Structured Clinical Interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, and their parents. The Bus-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Defense Style Questionnaire 40, the Symptom check list SCL-90-R, developed by DeRogatis will be administered to the participants, together with a semi-structured questionnaire concerning demographic data (age, gender, employment, education) and only for the patients clinical information (onset year of the disorder, presence of co-morbidities, alcohol and drug use, suicide tendencies, kind of treatment). All the questionnaires are in the Italian validated version. The successful completion of this study will shed light on the relationship between aggressive styles and defensive mechanisms in bipolar inpatients and in their parents, helping the clinicians to develop ad hoc psychological interventions. PMID:26973942

  17. Mechanics and applications of pressure adaptive honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof

    A novel adaptive aerostructure is presented that relies on certified aerospace materials and can therefore be applied in conventional passenger aircraft. This structure consists of a honeycomb material which' cells extend over a significant length perpendicular to the plane of the cells. Each of the cells contains an inelastic pouch (or bladder) that forms a circular tube when the cell forms a perfect hexagon. By changing the cell differential pressure (CDP) the stiffness of the honeycomb can be altered. Using an external force or the elastic force within the honeycomb material, the honeycomb can be deformed such that the cells deviate from their perfect-hexagonal shape. It can be shown that by increasing the CDP, the structure eventually returns to a perfect hexagon. By doing so, a fully embedded pneumatic actuator is created that can perform work and substitute conventional low-bandwidth flight control actuators. It is shown that two approaches can be taken to regulate the stiffness of this embedded actuator: (1) The first approach relies on the pouches having a fixed amount of air in them and stiffness is altered by a change in ambient pressure. Coupled to the ambient pressure-altitude cycle that aircraft encounter during each flight, this approach yields a true adaptive aerostructure that operates independently of pilot input and is controlled solely by the altitude the aircraft is flying at. (2) The second approach relies on a controlled constant CDP. This CDP could be supplied from one of the compressor stages of the engine as a form of bleed air. Because of the air-tight pouches there would essentially be no mass flow, meaning engine efficiency would not be significantly affected due to this application. By means of a valve system the pilot could have direct control over the pressure and, consequently, the stiffness of the structure. This allows for much higher CDPs (on the order of 1MPa) than could physically be achieved by relying on the ambient pressure

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Statistics Analysis Reveals the Defense Response Mechanism in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhichao; Zhao, Yunjie; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    As the main protein of the bacterial flagella, flagellin plays an important role in perception and defense response. The newly discovered locus, FLS2, is ubiquitously expressed. FLS2 encodes a putative receptor kinase and shares many homologies with some plant resistance genes and even with some components of immune system of mammals and insects. In Arabidopsis, FLS2 perception is achieved by the recognition of epitope flg22, which induces FLS2 heteromerization with BAK1 and finally the plant immunity. Here we use both analytical methods such as Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations to get a better understanding of the defense mechanism of FLS2. This may facilitate a redesign of flg22 or de-novo design for desired specificity and potency to extend the immune properties of FLS2 to other important crops and vegetables.

  19. Mechanism of bystander-blaming: defensive attribution, counterfactual thinking, and gender.

    PubMed

    Levy, Inna; Ben-David, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary victimology recognizes that an understanding of the mechanism of blaming requires a comprehensive approach that includes the victim, the offender, and the bystander. However, most of the existing research on blaming focuses on the victim and the offender, ignoring the issue of bystander-blaming. This study highlights the bystander and investigates bystander-blaming by exploring some theoretical explanations, including counterfactual thinking, defensive attribution, and gender differences. The study included 363 young male and female participants, who read vignettes describing the behavior of the victim and the bystander in a rape scenario and answered questions regarding bystander-blaming. The results show that both counterfactual thinking and defensive attribution play a role in bystander-blaming. This article addresses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:24052599

  20. Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, I-Chun; Lin, Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and biological significance of the study of fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) has markedly increased. However, the explicit pathogenic and invasive mechanisms of such host-pathogen interactions have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the essential functional modules involved in C. albicans-zebrafish interactions were investigated in this study. Adopting a systems biology approach, the early-stage and late-stage protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for both C. albicans and zebrafish were constructed. By comparing PPI networks at the early and late stages of the infection process, several critical functional modules were identified in both pathogenic and defensive mechanisms. Functional modules in C. albicans, like those involved in hyphal morphogenesis, ion and small molecule transport, protein secretion, and shifts in carbon utilization, were seen to play important roles in pathogen invasion and damage caused to host cells. Moreover, the functional modules in zebrafish, such as those involved in immune response, apoptosis mechanisms, ion transport, protein secretion, and hemostasis-related processes, were found to be significant as defensive mechanisms during C. albicans infection. The essential functional modules thus determined could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions during the infection process and thereby devise potential therapeutic strategies to treat C. albicans infection. PMID:24757665

  1. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  2. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of “dispensable” mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  3. Of Amoebae and Men: Extracellular DNA Traps as an Ancient Cell-Intrinsic Defense Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the formation of DNA-based extracellular traps (ETs) by neutrophils as an innate immune defense mechanism (1), hundreds of articles describe the involvement of ETs in physiological and pathological human and animal conditions [reviewed in Ref. (2), and the previous Frontiers Research Topic on NETosis: http://www.frontiersin.org/books/NETosis_At_the_Intersection_of_Cell_Biology_Microbiology_and_Immunology/195]. Interestingly, a few reports reveal that ETs can be formed by immune cells of more ancient organisms, as far back as the common ancestor of vertebrates and invertebrates (3). Recently, we reported that the Sentinel cells of the multicellular slug of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum also produce ETs to trap and kill slug-invading bacteria [see Box 1; and Figure 1 Ref. (4)]. This is a strong evidence that DNA-based cell-intrinsic defense mechanisms emerged much earlier than thought, about 1.3 billion years ago. Amazingly, using extrusion of DNA as a weapon to capture and kill uningestable microbes has its rationale. During the emergence of multicellularity, a primitive innate immune system developed in the form of a dedicated set of specialized phagocytic cells. This professionalization of immunity allowed the evolution of sophisticated defense mechanisms including the sacrifice of a small set of cells by a mechanism related to NETosis. This altruistic behavior likely emerged in steps, starting from the release of "dispensable" mitochondrial DNA by D. discoideum Sentinel cells. Grounded in this realization, one can anticipate that in the near future, many more examples of the invention and fine-tuning of ETs by early metazoan ancestors will be identified. Consequently, it can be expected that this more complete picture of the evolution of ETs will impact our views of the involvement and pathologies linked to ETs in human and animals. PMID:27458458

  4. Contribution of Patient Defense Mechanisms and Therapist Interventions to the Development of Early Therapeutic Alliance in a Brief Psychodynamic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Despland, Jean-Nicolas; de Roten, Yves; Despars, Josée; Stigler, Michael; Perry, J. Christopher

    2001-01-01

    This preliminary study examined how patients' defense mechanisms and psychotherapists' techniques influence early alliance formation. The authors assessed the relationships among defense mechanisms, therapist interventions, and the development of alliance in a sample of 12 patients undergoing Brief Psychodynamic Investigation (4 sessions). Alliance development occurred rapidly and was clearly established by the third session. Neither defensive functioning nor supportive or exploratory interventions alone differentiated early alliance development. However, the degree of adjustment of therapists' interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning discriminated a low alliance from both improving and high alliances. The adjustment of therapeutic interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning is a promising predictor of alliance development and should be examined further, alongside other predictors of outcome. PMID:11402078

  5. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Contrast adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Are effects of background contrast on color appearance and sensitivity controlled by the same mechanism of adaptation? We examined the effects of background color contrast on color appearance and on color-difference sensitivity under well-matched conditions. We linked the data using Fechner’s hypothesis that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to sensitivity and examined a family of parametric models of adaptation. Our results show that both appearance and discrimination are consistent with the same mechanism of adaptation. PMID:17621318

  6. Psychological defense, ideological hideaway, or rational reckoning? The role of uncertainty in local adaptation to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    As adaptation planning is rising rapidly on the agenda of decision-makers, the need for adequate information to inform those decisions is growing. Locally relevant climate change (as well as related impacts and vulnerability) information, however, is difficult to obtain and that which can be obtained carries the burden of significant scientific uncertainty. This paper aims to assess how important such uncertainty is in adaptation planning, decision-making, and related stakeholder engagement. Does uncertainty actually hinder adaptation planning? Is scientific uncertainty used to postpone decisions reflecting ideologically agendas? Or is it a convenient defense against cognitive and affective engagement with the emerging and projected - and in some cases daunting - climate change risks? To whom does such uncertainty matter and how important is it relative to other challenges decision-makers and stakeholders face? The paper draws on four sources of information to answer these questions: (1) a statewide survey of California coastal managers conducted in summer 2011, (2) years of continual engagement with, and observation of, decision-makers in local adaptation efforts, (3) findings from focus groups with lay individuals in coastal California; and (4) a review of relevant adaptation literature to guide and contextualize the empirical research. The findings entail some "inconvenient truths" for those claiming critical technical or political importance. Rather, the insights suggest that some uncertainties matter more than others; they matter at certain times, but not at others; and they matter to some decision-makers, but not to others. Implications for scientists communicating and engaging with communities are discussed.

  7. A synaptic mechanism for retinal adaptation to luminance and contrast.

    PubMed

    Jarsky, Tim; Cembrowski, Mark; Logan, Stephen M; Kath, William L; Riecke, Hermann; Demb, Jonathan B; Singer, Joshua H

    2011-07-27

    The gain of signaling in primary sensory circuits is matched to the stimulus intensity by the process of adaptation. Retinal neural circuits adapt to visual scene statistics, including the mean (background adaptation) and the temporal variance (contrast adaptation) of the light stimulus. The intrinsic properties of retinal bipolar cells and synapses contribute to background and contrast adaptation, but it is unclear whether both forms of adaptation depend on the same cellular mechanisms. Studies of bipolar cell synapses identified synaptic mechanisms of gain control, but the relevance of these mechanisms to visual processing is uncertain because of the historical focus on fast, phasic transmission rather than the tonic transmission evoked by ambient light. Here, we studied use-dependent regulation of bipolar cell synaptic transmission evoked by small, ongoing modulations of membrane potential (V(M)) in the physiological range. We made paired whole-cell recordings from rod bipolar (RB) and AII amacrine cells in a mouse retinal slice preparation. Quasi-white noise voltage commands modulated RB V(M) and evoked EPSCs in the AII. We mimicked changes in background luminance or contrast, respectively, by depolarizing the V(M) or increasing its variance. A linear systems analysis of synaptic transmission showed that increasing either the mean or the variance of the presynaptic V(M) reduced gain. Further electrophysiological and computational analyses demonstrated that adaptation to mean potential resulted from both Ca channel inactivation and vesicle depletion, whereas adaptation to variance resulted from vesicle depletion alone. Thus, background and contrast adaptation apparently depend in part on a common synaptic mechanism. PMID:21795549

  8. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  9. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  10. Contrasting Potato Foliage and Tuber Defense Mechanisms against the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liangliang; Bradeen, James M

    2016-01-01

    The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. When inoculated with P. infestans, foliage of nontransformed 'Russet Burbank' (WT) develops late blight disease while that of transgenic 'Russet Burbank' line SP2211 (+RB) does not. We compared the foliar transcriptome responses of these two lines to P. infestans inoculation using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 515 million paired end RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of 29,970 genes. We also compared the differences and similarities of defense mechanisms against P. infestans in potato foliage and tubers. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins were identified to show similarities and differences in foliage and tuber defense mechanisms. Our results suggest that R gene dosage and shared biochemical pathways (such as ethylene and stress bins) contribute to RB-mediated incompatible potato-P. infestans interactions in both the foliage and tubers. Certain ontology bins such as cell wall and lipid metabolisms are potentially organ-specific. PMID:27441721

  11. Contrasting Potato Foliage and Tuber Defense Mechanisms against the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Bradeen, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. When inoculated with P. infestans, foliage of nontransformed ‘Russet Burbank’ (WT) develops late blight disease while that of transgenic ‘Russet Burbank’ line SP2211 (+RB) does not. We compared the foliar transcriptome responses of these two lines to P. infestans inoculation using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 515 million paired end RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of 29,970 genes. We also compared the differences and similarities of defense mechanisms against P. infestans in potato foliage and tubers. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins were identified to show similarities and differences in foliage and tuber defense mechanisms. Our results suggest that R gene dosage and shared biochemical pathways (such as ethylene and stress bins) contribute to RB-mediated incompatible potato-P. infestans interactions in both the foliage and tubers. Certain ontology bins such as cell wall and lipid metabolisms are potentially organ-specific. PMID:27441721

  12. Trichoderma viride Laccase Plays a Crucial Role in Defense Mechanism against Antagonistic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Divya, Lakshmanan; Sadasivan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal laccases are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as delignification, morphogenesis, and parasitism. In addition to these functions, we suggest that fungal laccases are involved in defense mechanisms. When the laccase secreting Trichoderma viride was grown in the presence of a range of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi, laccase secretion was enhanced in response to antagonistic organisms alone. In addition, growth of antagonistic microbes was restricted by the secreting fungi. Besides, our study for the first time shows the inability of the secreting fungi (T. viride) to compete with antagonistic organism when laccase activity is inhibited, further emphasizing its involvement in rendering a survival advantage to the secreting organism. When laccase inhibitor was added to the media, the zone of inhibition exerted by the antagonist organism was more pronounced and consequently growth of T. viride was significantly restricted. Based on these observations we accentuate that, laccase plays an important role in defense mechanism and provides endurance to the organism when encountered with an antagonistic organism in its surrounding. PMID:27242756

  13. Association of Ego Defense Mechanisms with Academic Performance, Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Ahmed; Malik, Aamenah; Muhammad, Umer; Khan, Sarah; Mahmood, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ego defense mechanisms are unconscious psychological processes that help an individual to prevent anxiety when exposed to a stressful situation. These mechanisms are important in psychiatric practice to assess an individual’s personality dynamics, psychopathologies, and modes of coping with stressful situations, and hence, to design appropriate individualized treatment. Our study delineates the relationship of ego defense mechanisms with anxiety, depression, and academic performance of Pakistani medical students. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done at CMH Lahore Medical College and Fatima Memorial Hospital Medical and Dental College, both in Lahore, Pakistan, from December 1, 2014 to January 15, 2015. Convenience sampling was used and only students who agreed to take part in this study were included. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: 1) Demographics, documenting demographic data and academic scores on participants’ most recent exams; 2) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); and 3) Defense Style Questionnaire-40 (DSQ-40). The data were analyzed with SPSS v. 20. Mean scores and frequencies were calculated for demographic variables and ego defense mechanisms. Bivariate correlations, one-way ANOVA, and multiple linear regression were used to identify associations between academic scores, demographics, ego defense mechanisms, anxiety, and depression. Results: A total of 409 medical students participated, of whom 286 (70%) were females and 123 (30%) were males. Mean percentage score on the most recent exams was 75.6% in medical students. Bivariate correlation revealed a direct association between mature and neurotic ego defense mechanisms and academic performance, and an indirect association between immature mechanisms and academic performance. One-way ANOVA showed that moderate levels of anxiety (P < .05) and low levels of depression (P < .05) were associated with higher academic performance. Conclusion: There was a

  14. Systemic Acquired Resistance in Moss: Further Evidence for Conserved Defense Mechanisms in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter S.; Bowman, Collin E.; Villani, Philip J.; Dolan, Thomas E.; Hauck, Nathanael R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular plants possess multiple mechanisms for defending themselves against pathogens. One well-characterized defense mechanism is systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In SAR, a plant detects the presence of a pathogen and transmits a signal throughout the plant, inducing changes in the expression of various pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Once SAR is established, the plant is capable of mounting rapid responses to subsequent pathogen attacks. SAR has been characterized in numerous angiosperm and gymnosperm species; however, despite several pieces of evidence suggesting SAR may also exist in non-vascular plants6–8, its presence in non-vascular plants has not been conclusively demonstrated, in part due to the lack of an appropriate culture system. Here, we describe and use a novel culture system to demonstrate that the moss species Amblystegium serpens does initiate a SAR-like reaction upon inoculation with Pythium irregulare, a common soil-borne oomycete. Infection of A. serpens gametophores by P. irregulare is characterized by localized cytoplasmic shrinkage within 34 h and chlorosis and necrosis within 7 d of inoculation. Within 24 h of a primary inoculation (induction), moss gametophores grown in culture became highly resistant to infection following subsequent inoculation (challenge) by the same pathogen. This increased resistance was a response to the pathogen itself and not to physical wounding. Treatment with β-1,3 glucan, a structural component of oomycete cell walls, was equally effective at triggering SAR. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that this important defense mechanism exists in a non-vascular plant, and, together with previous studies, suggest that SAR arose prior to the divergence of vascular and non-vascular plants. In addition, this novel moss – pathogen culture system will be valuable for future characterization of the mechanism of SAR in moss, which is necessary for a better understanding of the evolutionary history of SAR

  15. Microwear, mechanics and the feeding adaptations of Australopithecus africanus.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Weber, Gerhard W; Constantino, Paul; Lucas, Peter W; Richmond, Brian G; Spencer, Mark A; Dechow, Paul C; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R; Wright, Barth W; Wood, Bernard A; Wang, Qian; Byron, Craig; Slice, Dennis E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of dental microwear and craniofacial mechanics have yielded contradictory interpretations regarding the feeding ecology and adaptations of Australopithecus africanus. As part of this debate, the methods used in the mechanical studies have been criticized. In particular, it has been claimed that finite element analysis has been poorly applied to this research question. This paper responds to some of these mechanical criticisms, highlights limitations of dental microwear analysis, and identifies avenues of future research. PMID:22130183

  16. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  17. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T.; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  18. The nature of antioxidant defense mechanisms: a lesson from transgenic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Y S; Magnenat, J L; Gargano, M; Cao, J

    1998-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many clinical disorders such as adult respiratory distress syndrome, ischemia-reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Genetically engineered animal models have been used as a tool for understanding the function of various antioxidant enzymes in cellular defense mechanisms against various types of oxidant tissue injury. Transgenic mice overexpressing three isoforms of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and the cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) in various tissues show an increased tolerance to ischemia-reperfusion heart and brain injury, hyperoxia, cold-induced brain edema, adriamycin, and paraquat toxicity. These results have provided for the first time direct evidence demonstrating the importance of each of these antioxidant enzymes in protecting the animals against the injury resulting from these insults, as well as the effect of an enhanced level of antioxidant in ameliorating the oxidant tissue injury. To evaluate further the nature of these enzymes in antioxidant defense, gene knockout mice deficient in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and GSHPx-1 have also been generated in our laboratory. These mice developed normally and showed no marked pathologic changes under normal physiologic conditions. In addition, a deficiency in these genes had no effects on animal survival under hyperoxida. However, these knockout mice exhibited a pronounced susceptibility to paraquat toxicity and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, female mice lacking CuZnSOD also displayed a marked increase in postimplantation embryonic lethality. These animals should provide a useful model for uncovering the identity of ROS that participate in the pathogenesis of various clinical disorders and for defining the role of each antioxidant enzyme in cellular defense against oxidant-mediated tissue injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9788901

  19. Monuments of memory: defensive mechanisms of the collective psyche and their manifestation in the memorialization process.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Malgorzata

    2012-09-01

    The paper searches for insight in the area of collective memory as a part of collective consciousness, a phenomenon understood as a stabilizing factor for a society's self-image and identity. Collective memories are seen as originating from shared communications transmitting and creating the meaning of the past in the form of narrative, symbols and signs. As such, they contain the individual, embodied and lived side of our relations to the past. As well as the identity-building and meaning-making functions of collective memories, their defensive function is discussed with a focus on commemorative practices taking place in a transitional space between psychic and social life. Fears of a lack of collective identity and coherence have contributed to the way Polish commemorative practices have been shaped. This is considered in relation to the Smolensk catastrophe in 2010, viewed in the context of the Jungian concept of the collective psyche and the psychoanalytical understanding of defensive group mechanisms against trauma, especially those relating to loss and mourning. It leads to a consideration of how historical experiences and the experience of history can be accessed, as well as their meaning for individual and group development. PMID:22954041

  20. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. PMID:27316765

  1. The Splitting Index: construction of a scale measuring the defense mechanism of splitting.

    PubMed

    Gould, J R; Prentice, N M; Ainslie, R C

    1996-04-01

    The Splitting Index (SI), a self-report scale based on the writings of Kernberg (e.g., 1976) on self and object representations and the defense mechanism of splitting, was constructed. After development over the course of 6 pilot studies, the SI was validated through 2 further studies. Factor analyses revealed a 24-item scale with three 8-item subscales, measuring the splitting of self, family, and others' images. The SI and its subscales were demonstrated to be internally consistent and stable over a 4-week period. Convergent validity was supported by significant correlations with measures of borderline and narcissistic personality disorders, self-image stability, self-esteem, depression, and negative affectivity. Discriminant validity was demonstrated by near-zero correlations with two measures of cognitive complexity. Contrary to predictions, the SI was significantly correlated with the Dogmatism Scale (Rokeach, 1960), a third measure of cognitive complexity. Research and clinical applications of the SI are discussed. PMID:8869581

  2. Mechanical Properties of Sialic Foamed Ceramic and Applications in Defense Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Yang; Li, Yong-Chi; Zhao, Kai; Gao, Guang-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties of a closed-cellular sialic foamed ceramic are investigated by compressive tests. The sialic foamed ceramic under uniaxial stress compression shows brittleness and the flow stress increases with the strain rate. The engineering stress-engineering strain curve under uniaxial strain compression could be divided into three stages: linear elasticity, collapsed plateau and densification. The unloading elastic modulus, Poisson ratio and energy absorption ability are discussed. Shelly cellular material made by sialic foamed ceramic is applied into the stress distribution layer in the defense structure. Field explosion experiments are performed for the sand based stress distribution layer and shelly cellular material based layer. Compared with sand, the shelly cellular material reduces the peak stress of the blast wave.

  3. [The defense and regulatory mechanisms during development of legume-Rhizobium symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Glian'ko, A K; Akimova, G P; Sokolova, M G; Makarova, L E; Vasil'eva, G G

    2007-01-01

    The roles of indolylacetic acid, the peroxidase system, catalase, active oxygen species, and phenolic compounds in the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the autoregulation of nodulation in the developing legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were studied. It was inferred that the concentration of indolylacetic acid in the roots of inoculated plants, controlled by the enzymes of the peroxidase complex, is the signal permitting or limiting nodulation at the initial stages of symbiotic interaction. Presumably, the change in the level of active oxygen species is determined by an antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. During the development of symbiosis, phytohormones, antioxidant enzymes, and active oxygen species may be involved in the regulation of infection via both a direct antibacterial action and regulation of functional activity of the host plant defense systems. PMID:17619575

  4. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans. PMID:26210184

  5. Effect of Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis on the Pulmonary Defense Mechanisms of Guinea Pig Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, George J.; Green, Gareth M.

    1973-01-01

    Many edemagenic and consolidating inflammatory diseases, such as virus pneumonias, of the lung are complicated by bacterial infection. Previous literature has stressed that edema and consolidation may promote bacterial proliferation by interfering with phagocytosis. To test that hypothesis, lung defense mechanisms were studied in guinea pigs with tuberculin-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis, a noninfectious edemagenic, and consolidating inflammatory disease. Pulmonary bactericidal activity and particle clearance were measured with a mixed aerosol of 32P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus and35S-labeled Proteus mirabilis. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis enhanced the bactericidal activity of the lung but had no effect on particle clearance despite the presence of consolidation and edema. These data indicate that altered host resistance to bacterial infection in acute inflammatory lung diseases can not be attributed to edema, inflammation, consolidation, changes in lung weight, etc., per se and that causes must be sought in functional changes in the bactericidal system of the lung rather than in specific histopathological changes. Images PMID:4632134

  6. Stress defense mechanisms of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) in plants.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Barman, Dhirendra Nath; Kim, Min Gab; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Plants establish highly and systemically organized stress defense mechanisms against unfavorable living conditions. To interpret these environmental stimuli, plants possess communication tools, referred as secondary messengers, such as Ca(2+) signature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) wave. Maintenance of ROS is an important event for whole lifespan of plants, however, in special cases, toxic ROS molecules are largely accumulated under excess stresses and diverse enzymes played as ROS scavengers. Arabidopsis and rice contain 3 NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) which transfer reducing power to Thioredoxin/Peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system for scavenging ROS. However, due to functional redundancy between cytosolic and mitochondrial NTRs (NTRA and NTRB, respectively), their functional involvements under stress conditions have not been well characterized. Recently, we reported that cytosolic NTRA confers the stress tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses via regulation of ROS amounts using NTRA-overexpressing plants. With these findings, mitochondrial NTRB needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26039478

  7. Defense mechanisms in congenital and acquired facial disfigurement: a clinical-empirical study.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Marijke E P; Versnel, Sarah L; Perry, J Christopher; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J

    2012-04-01

    It is of clinical interest to investigate the degree to which patients with facial disfigurement use defense styles. Therefore, 59 adults born with rare facial clefts, 59 patients with facial deformities acquired at an adult age, and a reference group of 141 adults without facial disfigurements completed standardized questionnaires. There was a significant difference between the group with and the group without disfigurements on immature defense styles, with the disfigured group using the immature style more frequently. There was a trend for the nondisfigured group to use more mature defense styles. No difference between congenital and acquired groups was seen on individual types of defense style. Self-esteem had the strength to differentiate mature and immature defense styles within our disfigured groups. The association of low self-esteem and the utilization of immature defense styles suggests that professional help may tailor treatment on discussing immature defense style and problems triggering or maintaining this style. PMID:22456586

  8. When Do Adaptive Developmental Mechanisms Yield Maladaptive Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Del Giudice, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses 3 ways in which adaptive developmental mechanisms may produce maladaptive outcomes. First, natural selection may favor risky strategies that enhance fitness on average but which have detrimental consequences for a subset of individuals. Second, mismatch may result when organisms experience environmental change during…

  9. An adaptive neural swarm approach for intrusion defense in ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannady, James

    2011-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) and mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) are being increasingly deployed in critical applications due to the flexibility and extensibility of the technology. While these networks possess numerous advantages over traditional wireless systems in dynamic environments they are still vulnerable to many of the same types of host-based and distributed attacks common to those systems. Unfortunately, the limited power and bandwidth available in WSNs and MANETs, combined with the dynamic connectivity that is a defining characteristic of the technology, makes it extremely difficult to utilize traditional intrusion detection techniques. This paper describes an approach to accurately and efficiently detect potentially damaging activity in WSNs and MANETs. It enables the network as a whole to recognize attacks, anomalies, and potential vulnerabilities in a distributive manner that reflects the autonomic processes of biological systems. Each component of the network recognizes activity in its local environment and then contributes to the overall situational awareness of the entire system. The approach utilizes agent-based swarm intelligence to adaptively identify potential data sources on each node and on adjacent nodes throughout the network. The swarm agents then self-organize into modular neural networks that utilize a reinforcement learning algorithm to identify relevant behavior patterns in the data without supervision. Once the modular neural networks have established interconnectivity both locally and with neighboring nodes the analysis of events within the network can be conducted collectively in real-time. The approach has been shown to be extremely effective in identifying distributed network attacks.

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E; Enríquez, José A; Sancho, David

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism after being activated, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we found that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased assembly of the ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing super-complexes and switched the relative contributions of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by phagosomal NADPH oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during infection with Escherichia coli normalized serum concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to those in mice treated with dead bacteria and impaired control of bacteria. We have thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immunological-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:27348412

  11. Structural antioxidant defense mechanisms in the mammalian and nonmammalian kidney: different solutions to the same problem?

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Paul M; Evans, Roger G

    2010-09-01

    Tissue oxygen levels are tightly regulated in all organs. This poses a challenge for the kidney, as its function requires blood flow, and thus, oxygen delivery to greatly exceed its metabolic requirements. Because superoxide production in the kidney is dependent on oxygen availability, tissue hyperoxia could drive oxidative stress. In the mammalian renal cortex, this problem may have been solved, in part, through a structural antioxidant defense mechanism. That is, arteries and veins are closely associated in a countercurrent arrangement, facilitating diffusional arterial-to-venous (AV) oxygen shunting. Because of this mechanism, a proportion of the oxygen delivered in the renal artery never reaches kidney tissue but instead diffuses to the closely associated renal veins, thus limiting oxygen transport to tissue. In the nonmammalian kidney, arteries and veins are not arranged in an intimate countercurrent fashion as in mammals; thus AV oxygen shunting is likely less important in regulation of kidney oxygenation in these species. Instead, the kidney's blood supply is predominately of venous origin. This likely has a similar impact on tissue oxygenation as AV oxygen shunting, of limiting delivery of oxygen to renal tissue. Thus, we hypothesize the evolution of structural antioxidant mechanisms that are anatomically divergent but functionally homologous in the mammalian and nonmammalian kidney. PMID:20660108

  12. In vivo NMR metabolic profiling of Fabrea salina reveals sequential defense mechanisms against ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Roberto; Paris, Debora; Melck, Dominique; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Colombetti, Giuliano; Motta, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fabrea salina is a hypersaline ciliate that is known to be among the strongest ultraviolet (UV)-resistant microorganisms; however, the molecular mechanisms of this resistance are almost unknown. By means of in vivo NMR spectroscopy, we determined the metabolic profile of living F. salina cells exposed to visible light and to polychromatic UV-B + UV-A + Vis radiation for several different exposure times. We used unsupervised pattern-recognition analysis to compare these profiles and discovered some metabolites whose concentration changed specifically upon UV exposure and in a dose-dependent manner. This variation was interpreted in terms of a two-phase cell reaction involving at least two different pathways: an early response consisting of degradation processes, followed by a late response activating osmoprotection mechanisms. The first step alters the concentration of formate, acetate, and saturated fatty-acid metabolites, whereas the osmoprotection modifies the activity of betaine moieties and other functionally related metabolites. In the latter pathway, alanine, proline, and sugars suggest a possible incipient protein synthesis as defense and/or degeneration mechanisms. We conclude that NMR spectroscopy on in vivo cells is an optimal approach for investigating the effect of UV-induced stress on the whole metabolome of F. salina because it minimizes the invasiveness of the measurement. PMID:21190674

  13. Aneuploidy as a mechanism of adaptation to telomerase insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Millet, Caroline; Makovets, Svetlana

    2016-08-01

    Cells' survival is determined by their ability to adapt to constantly changing environment. Adaptation responses involve global changes in transcription, translation, and posttranslational modifications of proteins. In recent years, karyotype changes in adapting populations of single cell organisms have been reported in a number of studies. More recently, we have described aneuploidy as an adaptation mechanism used by populations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to survive telomerase insufficiency induced by elevated growth temperature. Genetic evidence suggests that telomerase insufficiency is caused by decreased levels of the telomerase catalytic subunit Est2. Here, we present experiments arguing that the underlying cause of this phenomenon may be within the telomerase RNA TLC1: changes in the expression of TLC1 as well as mutations in the TLC1 template region affect telomere length equilibrium and the temperature threshold for the induction of telomerase insufficiency. We discuss what lies at the root of telomerase insufficiency, how cell populations overcome it through aneuploidy and whether reversible aneuploidy could be an adaptation mechanism for a variety of environmental stresses. PMID:26758992

  14. Defense mechanisms of sargassacean species against the epiphytic red alga Neosiphonia harveyi.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Noboru; Ohki, Kaori; Kamiya, Mitsunobu

    2015-08-01

    Flora diversity and abundance of epiphytes are specific to their basiphyte species and may relate to variations in the defensive abilities of basiphytes. Thus, investigating the interactions between epiphytes and basiphytes is useful for a better understanding of the biological impact of epiphytism and the survival strategies of basiphytes. We examined the epiphyte density on five sargassacean species at six locations between two study sites, which showed that the epiphytic red alga Neosiphonia harveyi was remarkably less abundant on Sargassum siliquastrum at all locations. To assess its defense mechanism against N. harveyi, we performed bioassays of phlorotannins, which are considered effective in deterring fouling, by culturing sargassacean blades with N. harveyi carpospores and observed the process by which sargassacean blades remove epiphytes. When the carpospores were incubated with various concentrations of dissolved phlorotannins, settlement and germination were inhibited only at the highest concentrations (>0.1 g · L(-1) ), and this effect did not significantly differ among the five sargassacean species. When the carpospores were combined with blades from the five species, many of the spores attached and germinated on every blade. Because N. harveyi penetrated rhizoids into basiphyte tissues, cuticle peeling observed in all five sargassacean species could not remove this epiphyte after germination. However, in S. siliquastrum, the blade tissues around the germlings became swollen and disintegrative, and were removed together with the germlings. The spores normally grew on the dead blades, suggesting that the tissue degradation of S. siliquastrum is triggered by the infection of N. harveyi. PMID:26986791

  15. Microbial Signature-Triggered Plant Defense Responses and Early Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shujing; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that microbial elicitors can trigger various cellular responses in plants. Microbial elicitors have recently been referred to as pathogen or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) and remarkable progress has been made on research of their corresponding receptors, signaling mechanisms and critical involvement in disease resistance. Plants also generate endogenous signals due to the damage or wounds caused by microbes. These signals were originally called endogenous elicitors and subsequently renamed damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that serve as warning signals for infections. The cellular responses induced by PAMPs and DAMPs include medium alkalinization, ion fluxes across the membrane, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ethylene production. They collectively contribute to plant pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and play an important role in plant basal defense against a broad spectrum of microbial infections. In this review, we provide an update on multiple PTI responses and early signaling mechanisms and discuss its potential applications to improve crop disease resistance. PMID:25438792

  16. Hepcidin-Induced Hypoferremia Is a Critical Host Defense Mechanism Against the Siderophilic Bacterium Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Arezes, João; Jung, Grace; Gabayan, Victoria; Valore, Erika; Ruchala, Piotr; Gulig, Paul A.; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bulut, Yonca

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease caused by a deficiency in the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin, is associated with lethal infections by siderophilic bacteria. To elucidate the mechanisms of this susceptibility, we infected wild-type and hepcidin-deficient mice with the siderophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus, and found that hepcidin deficiency results in increased bacteremia and decreased survival of infected mice, which can be partially ameliorated by dietary iron depletion. Additionally, timely administration of hepcidin agonists to hepcidin-deficient mice induces hypoferremia that decreases bacterial loads and rescues these mice from death, regardless of initial iron levels. Studies of Vibrio vulnificus growth ex vivo show that high iron sera from hepcidin-deficient mice support extraordinarily rapid bacterial growth, and that this is inhibited in hypoferremic sera. Our findings demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated hypoferremia is a host defense mechanism against siderophilic pathogens and suggest that hepcidin agonists may improve infection outcomes in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis or thalassemia. PMID:25590758

  17. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R.; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C.; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms. PMID:26046933

  18. Phenotypic Plasticity and Selection: Nonexclusive Mechanisms of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, S.; Barre, P.; Litrico, I.

    2016-01-01

    Selection and plasticity are two mechanisms that allow the adaptation of a population to a changing environment. Interaction between these nonexclusive mechanisms must be considered if we are to understand population survival. This review discusses the ways in which plasticity and selection can interact, based on a review of the literature on selection and phenotypic plasticity in the evolution of populations. The link between selection and phenotypic plasticity is analysed at the level of the individual. Plasticity can affect an individual's response to selection and so may modify the end result of genetic diversity evolution at population level. Genetic diversity increases the ability of populations or communities to adapt to new environmental conditions. Adaptive plasticity increases individual fitness. However this effect must be viewed from the perspective of the costs of plasticity, although these are not easy to estimate. It is becoming necessary to engage in new experimental research to demonstrate the combined effects of selection and plasticity for adaptation and their consequences on the evolution of genetic diversity. PMID:27313957

  19. Visual-adaptation-mechanism based underwater object extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Huibin; Xu, Lizhong; Shen, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Due to the major obstacles originating from the strong light absorption and scattering in a dynamic underwater environment, underwater optical information acquisition and processing suffer from effects such as limited range, non-uniform lighting, low contrast, and diminished colors, causing it to become the bottleneck for marine scientific research and projects. After studying and generalizing the underwater biological visual mechanism, we explore its advantages in light adaption which helps animals to precisely sense the underwater scene and recognize their prey or enemies. Then, aiming to transform the significant advantage of the visual adaptation mechanism into underwater computer vision tasks, a novel knowledge-based information weighting fusion model is established for underwater object extraction. With this bionic model, the dynamical adaptability is given to the underwater object extraction task, making them more robust to the variability of the optical properties in different environments. The capability of the proposed method to adapt to the underwater optical environments is shown, and its outperformance for the object extraction is demonstrated by comparison experiments.

  20. Physiologically responsive, mechanically adaptive bio-nanocomposites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Roberts, Matthew N; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    We report mechanically adaptive bionanocomposites based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), whose mechanical properties change significantly upon exposure to simulated physiological conditions. These nanocomposites were made using CNCs derived from tunicates (t-CNCs) and cotton (c-CNCs) to explore how aspect ratio, surface charge density, and filler content influence the mechanical properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis data reveal a significant enhancement of the tensile storage modulus (E') upon introduction of CNCs, which scaled with the CNC type and content. For example, in the dry, glassy state at 25 °C, E' increased up to 23% (for c-CNCs) and 88% (for t-CNCs) compared to the neat polymer. Exposing the materials to simulated physiological conditions caused a drastic softening of the materials, from 9.0 GPa to 1 MPa for c-CNCs and from 13.7 GPa to 160 MPa for t-CNCs. The data show that the swelling characteristics of the nanocomposites and the extent of mechanical switching could be influenced via the amount and type of CNCs and also the processing conditions. The high stiffness in the dry state and the ability to tailor the mechanical contrast via composition and processing makes the new materials particularly useful as basis for adaptive biomedical implants. PMID:23379302

  1. Apoptosis as a host defense mechanism in Crassostrea virginica and its modulation by Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Foster, Brent; Grewal, Snimar; Sokolova, Inna M

    2010-08-01

    Dermo disease caused by the obligatory intracellular protozoan Perkinsus marinus causes extensive oyster mortalities leading to tremendous losses in the oyster industry and damage to estuarine ecosystems. To better understand the mechanisms of the parasite's evasion of the host immune defense system, we have investigated the molecular mechanisms of P.marinus-induced inhibition of apoptosis in oyster cells as a potential parasite's survival strategy. We found that P. marinus modulates apoptosis of oyster immune cells (hemocytes) in a way that may help the parasite to establish infection. We found an increase in apoptosis in the initial stages of infection in vitro and in vivo, consistent with a host response to this intracellular parasite. During infection with highly virulent strains of P. marinus, this was followed by suppression and a return of apoptosis to basal levels 8-24 h post-infection, strongly indicating the parasite-induced inhibition of the immune response. In contrast, during infections with intermediate or low virulence strains of P. marinus, a transient suppression of apoptosis 4-8 h post-infection was followed by sustained elevation of hemocyte apoptosis at later stages, indicating that hemocytes were able to overcome the parasite-induced suppression and successfully combat the infection. Studies of the mechanisms of P. marinus-induced apoptosis indicated that the early post-infection stimulation of apoptosis is caspase-independent. However, this process can be driven (although to a lesser degree) by the killed parasite, suggesting that oyster hemocytes respond to cell surface molecules of P. marinus. Overall, this study provides novel insights into pathogen-induced modulation of apoptosis and its role in parasite virulence and establishment of infections. PMID:20371290

  2. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  3. Genome analysis of three Pneumocystis species reveals adaptation mechanisms to life exclusively in mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Zehua; Huang, Da Wei; Kutty, Geetha; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wang, Honghui; Abouelleil, Amr; Bishop, Lisa; Davey, Emma; Deng, Rebecca; Deng, Xilong; Fan, Lin; Fantoni, Giovanna; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gogineni, Emile; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Handley, Grace; Hu, Xiaojun; Huber, Charles; Jiao, Xiaoli; Jones, Kristine; Levin, Joshua Z; Liu, Yueqin; Macdonald, Pendexter; Melnikov, Alexandre; Raley, Castle; Sassi, Monica; Sherman, Brad T; Song, Xiaohong; Sykes, Sean; Tran, Bao; Walsh, Laura; Xia, Yun; Yang, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zheng, Xin; Stephens, Robert; Nusbaum, Chad; Birren, Bruce W; Azadi, Parastoo; Lempicki, Richard A; Cuomo, Christina A; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major cause of life-threatening pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients including transplant recipients and those with HIV/AIDS, yet surprisingly little is known about the biology of this fungal pathogen. Here we report near complete genome assemblies for three Pneumocystis species that infect humans, rats and mice. Pneumocystis genomes are highly compact relative to other fungi, with substantial reductions of ribosomal RNA genes, transporters, transcription factors and many metabolic pathways, but contain expansions of surface proteins, especially a unique and complex surface glycoprotein superfamily, as well as proteases and RNA processing proteins. Unexpectedly, the key fungal cell wall components chitin and outer chain N-mannans are absent, based on genome content and experimental validation. Our findings suggest that Pneumocystis has developed unique mechanisms of adaptation to life exclusively in mammalian hosts, including dependence on the lungs for gas and nutrients and highly efficient strategies to escape both host innate and acquired immune defenses. PMID:26899007

  4. Genome analysis of three Pneumocystis species reveals adaptation mechanisms to life exclusively in mammalian hosts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Zehua; Huang, Da Wei; Kutty, Geetha; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wang, Honghui; Abouelleil, Amr; Bishop, Lisa; Davey, Emma; Deng, Rebecca; Deng, Xilong; Fan, Lin; Fantoni, Giovanna; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gogineni, Emile; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Handley, Grace; Hu, Xiaojun; Huber, Charles; Jiao, Xiaoli; Jones, Kristine; Levin, Joshua Z.; Liu, Yueqin; Macdonald, Pendexter; Melnikov, Alexandre; Raley, Castle; Sassi, Monica; Sherman, Brad T.; Song, Xiaohong; Sykes, Sean; Tran, Bao; Walsh, Laura; Xia, Yun; Yang, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zheng, Xin; Stephens, Robert; Nusbaum, Chad; Birren, Bruce W.; Azadi, Parastoo; Lempicki, Richard A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major cause of life-threatening pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients including transplant recipients and those with HIV/AIDS, yet surprisingly little is known about the biology of this fungal pathogen. Here we report near complete genome assemblies for three Pneumocystis species that infect humans, rats and mice. Pneumocystis genomes are highly compact relative to other fungi, with substantial reductions of ribosomal RNA genes, transporters, transcription factors and many metabolic pathways, but contain expansions of surface proteins, especially a unique and complex surface glycoprotein superfamily, as well as proteases and RNA processing proteins. Unexpectedly, the key fungal cell wall components chitin and outer chain N-mannans are absent, based on genome content and experimental validation. Our findings suggest that Pneumocystis has developed unique mechanisms of adaptation to life exclusively in mammalian hosts, including dependence on the lungs for gas and nutrients and highly efficient strategies to escape both host innate and acquired immune defenses. PMID:26899007

  5. A Proteomics Perspective on Viral DNA Sensors in Host Defense and Viral Immune Evasion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Marni S.; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion. PMID:25728651

  6. Cisplatin Resistance: A Cellular Self-Defense Mechanism Resulting from Multiple Epigenetic and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  7. Triiodothyronine and melatonin influence antioxidant defense mechanism in a teleost Anabas testudineus (Bloch): in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Beyo, R S; Divya, L; Vijayasree, A S; Manju, M; Oommen, O V

    2007-06-01

    The effect of the hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and melatonin on antioxidant defense system was studied in 6-propyl thiouracil (6-PTU)-treated or photoperiod-exposed teleost Anabas testudineus. 6-PTU (2 microg/g) treatment or photoperiod exposure (24 h) increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes (CD) concentrations, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the experimental conditions. T3 or melatonin (10(-6) M) treatment for 15 min in vitro in PTU-treated fish reversed the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione content. T3-treated group showed no change in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, whereas melatonin treatment decreased its activity. T3 inhibited glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Photoperiod exposure (physiological pinealotomy) induced a stressful situation in this teleost, as evidenced by LPO products and antioxidant enzyme activities. Melatonin and T3 treatment for 15 min in vitro also reversed the effect of photoperiod on peroxidation products and the SOD and catalase activities. GR activity decreased in photoperiod-exposed group and melatonin and T3 treatment reversed the activities. The antioxidant enzymes responded to the stress situation after 6-PTU treatment and photoperiod exposure by altering their activities. The study suggested an independent effect of T3 and melatonin on antioxidant defence mechanism in different physiological situations in fish. PMID:17650585

  8. In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J P; Hess, A E; Rowan, S J; Weder, C; Zorman, C A; Tyler, D J; Capadona, J R

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced a series of stimuli-responsive, mechanically-adaptive polymer nanocomposites. Here, we report the first application of these bio-inspired materials as substrates for intracortical microelectrodes. Our hypothesis is that the ideal electrode should be initially stiff to facilitate minimal trauma during insertion into the cortex, yet becomes mechanically compliant to match the stiffness of the brain tissue and minimize forces exerted on the tissue, attenuating inflammation. Microprobes created from mechanically reinforced nanocomposites demonstrated a significant advantage compared to model microprobes composed of neat polymer only. The nanocomposite microprobes exhibit a higher storage modulus (E’ = ~5 GPa) than the neat polymer microprobes (E’ = ~2 GPa) and could sustain higher loads (~17 mN), facilitating penetration through the pia mater and insertion into the cerebral cortex of a rat. In contrast, the neat polymer microprobes mechanically failed under lower loads (~7 mN) before they were capable of inserting into cortical tissue. Further, we demonstrated the material’s ability to morph while in the rat cortex to more closely match the mechanical properties of the cortical tissue. Nanocomposite microprobes that were implanted into the rat cortex for up to 8 weeks demonstrated increased cell density at the microelectrode-tissue interface and a lack of tissue necrosis or excessive gliosis. This body of work introduces our nanocomposite-based microprobes as adaptive substrates for intracortical microelectrodes and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:21654037

  9. Defense Mechanisms Reported by Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Axis II Comparison Subjects Over 16 Years of Prospective Follow-up: Description and Prediction of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the defensive functioning of 290 borderline patients and compared it to that of 72 patients with other forms of axis II psychopathology over 16 years of prospective follow-up. It also assessed the relationship between time-varying defenses and recovery from borderline personality disorder. Method The Defense Style Questionnaire, a self-report measure with demonstrated criterion validity and internal consistency, was initially administered at study entry. It was readministered at eight contiguous two-year long follow-up periods. Results Borderline patients had significantly lower scores than axis II comparison subjects on one mature defense mechanism (suppression) and significantly higher scores on seven of the other 18 defenses studied. More specifically, borderline patients had significantly higher scores on one neurotic-level defense (undoing), four immature defenses (acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, passive aggression, and projection), and two image-distorting/borderline defenses (projective identification and splitting). In terms of change, borderline patients were found to have had significant improvement on 13 of the 19 defenses studied. More specifically, they had significantly higher scores over time on one mature defense (anticipation) and significantly lower scores on two neurotic defenses (isolation and undoing), all immature defenses, and all image-distorting/borderline defenses except primitive idealization. In addition, four time-varying defense mechanisms were found to predict time-to-recovery: humor, acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, and projection. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the longitudinal defensive functioning of borderline patients is both distinct and improves substantially over time. They also suggest that immature defenses are the best predictors of time-to-recovery. PMID:23223866

  10. UVR defense mechanisms in eurytopic and invasive Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Nyberg, Cecilia D; Wulff, Angela

    2012-10-01

    The invasive success of Gracilaria vermiculophylla has been attributed to its wide tolerance range to different abiotic factors, but its response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is yet to be investigated. In the laboratory, carpospores and vegetative thalli of an Atlantic population were exposed to different radiation treatments consisting of high PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) only (P), PAR+UV-A (PA) and PAR+UV-A+UV-B (PAB). Photosynthesis of carpospores was photoinhibited under different radiation treatments but photosystem II (PSII) function was restored after 12 h under dim white light. Growth of vegetative thalli was significantly higher under radiation supplemented with UVR. Decrease in chlorophyll a (Chl a) under daily continuous 16-h exposure to 300 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) of PAR suggests preventive accumulation of excited chlorophyll molecules within the antennae to minimize the generation of dangerous reactive oxygen species. Moreover, an increase in total carotenoids and xanthophyll cycle pigments (i.e. violaxanthin, antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin) further suggests effective photoprotection under UVR. The presence of the ketocarotenoid β-cryptoxanthin also indicates protection against UVR and oxidative stress. The initial concentration of total mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in freshly-released spores increased approximately four times after 8-h laboratory radiation treatments. On the other hand, initial specific MAAs in vegetative thalli changed in composition after 7-day exposure to laboratory radiation conditions without affecting the total concentration. The above responses suggest that G. vermiculophylla have multiple UVR defense mechanisms to cope with the dynamic variation in light quantity and quality encountered in its habitat. Beside being eurytopic, the UVR photoprotective mechanisms likely contribute to the current invasive success of the species in shallow lagoons and estuaries exposed to high solar radiation. PMID:22420775

  11. Iron acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores by human phagocytes: an additional mechanism of host defense through iron sequestration?

    PubMed

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Olakanmi, O; Cox, C D

    2000-03-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  12. Iron Acquisition from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Siderophores by Human Phagocytes: an Additional Mechanism of Host Defense through Iron Sequestration?

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, Bradley E.; Rasmussen, George T.; Olakanmi, Oyebode; Cox, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Chelation of iron to iron-binding proteins is a strategy of host defense. Some pathogens counter this via the secretion of low-molecular-weight iron-chelating agents (siderophores). Human phagocytes possess a high-capacity mechanism for iron acquisition from low-molecular-weight iron chelates. Efficient acquisition and sequestration of iron bound to bacterial siderophores by host phagocytes could provide a secondary mechanism to limit microbial access to iron. In the present work we report that human neutrophils, macrophages, and myeloid cell lines can acquire iron from the two Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophores. Analogous to iron acquisition from other low-molecular-weight chelates, iron acquisition from the siderophores is ATP independent, induced by multivalent cationic metals, and unaffected by inhibitors of endocytosis and pinocytosis. In vivo, this process could serve as an additional mechanism of host defense to limit iron availability to invading siderophore-producing microbes. PMID:10678937

  13. Mechanism of Thermal Adaptation in the Lactate Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Chang, Eric; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2015-12-10

    The mechanism of thermal adaptation of enzyme function at the molecular level is poorly understood but is thought to lie within the structure of the protein or its dynamics. Our previous work on pig heart lactate dehydrogenase (phLDH) has determined very high resolution structures of the active site, via isotope edited IR studies, and has characterized its dynamical nature, via laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) relaxation spectroscopy on the Michaelis complex. These particular probes are quite powerful at getting at the interplay between structure and dynamics in adaptation. Hence, we extend these studies to the psychrophilic protein cgLDH (Champsocephalus gunnari; 0 °C) and the extreme thermophile tmLDH (Thermotoga maritima LDH; 80 °C) for comparison to the mesophile phLDH (38-39 °C). Instead of the native substrate pyruvate, we utilize oxamate as a nonreactive substrate mimic for experimental reasons. Using isotope edited IR spectroscopy, we find small differences in the substate composition that arise from the detailed bonding patterns of oxamate within the active site of the three proteins; however, we find these differences insufficient to explain the mechanism of thermal adaptation. On the other hand, T-jump studies of reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) emission reveal that the most important parameter affecting thermal adaptation appears to be enzyme control of the specific kinetics and dynamics of protein motions that lie along the catalytic pathway. The relaxation rate of the motions scale as cgLDH > phLDH > tmLDH in a way that faithfully matches kcat of the three isozymes. PMID:26556099

  14. [Molecular mechanisms of tissue hypoxia and organism adaptation].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, L D

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism for participation of aerobic energy metabolism in formation of urgent and long-term adaptation to hypoxia is under consideration. It is stated that changes in kinetic properties of mitochondrial enzyme complexes (MEC), primarily enzymes of the respiratory chain substrate region (MEC I), in response to oxygen shortage underlie diverse stages of bioenergetic (tissue) hypoxia. It was shown that economization of energy metabolism in adaptation to hypoxia occurs due to formation of a new mitochondrial population. The mitochondria possess lesser size and decreased content of cytochromes; however, they are characterized by higher activities of enzymes and lower affinity of the enzymes to their substrates as well as high efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore the amount of mitochondria increases in the cell. It was demonstrated that oxygen shortage can both directly affect the bioenergetic apparatus of cell and indirectly influence it via stress activation of the neuro-humoral system. The latter triggers a non-specific cascade of functional and metabolic responses and eventually disturbs oxygen delivery to cells, which also promotes bioenergetic hypoxia. Genotypically determined differences in kinetic properties of MEC are established, which play a leading role in formation of the functional and metabolic "portrait" of resistant and non-resistant to hypoxia animals and also in development of urgent and long-term mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia. It was shown that these mechanisms can be used not only for development of the tactics and strategy for pharmacological correction of hypoxic states, but also for optimization of non-drug methods for enhancing the non-specific resistance of the organism. PMID:12918247

  15. Application of flexure structures to active and adaptive opto-mechanical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, Lorenzo; Genequand, Pierre M.; Kjelberg, Ivar; Morschel, Joseph

    1997-03-01

    Active and adaptive structures, also commonly called 'smart' structures, combine in one integrated system various functions such as load carrying and structural function, mechanical (cinematic) functions, sensing, control and actuating. Originally developed for high accuracy opto-mechanical applications, CSEM's technology of flexure structures and flexible mechanisms is particularly suited to solve many structural and mechanical issues found in such active/adaptive mechanisms. The paper illustrates some recent flexure structures developments at CSEM and outlines the comprehensive know-how involved in this technology. This comprises in particular the elaboration of optimal design guidelines, related to the geometry, kinematics and dynamics issues (for instance, the minimization of spurious high frequency effects), the evaluation and predictability of all performance quantities relevant to the utilization of flexure structures in space (reliability, fatigue, static and dynamic modeling, etc.). material issues and manufacturing procedures.

  16. Adaptation of core mechanisms to generate cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W. James

    2012-01-01

    Cell polarity is defined as asymmetry in cell shape, protein distributions and cell functions. It is characteristic of single-cell organisms, including yeast and bacteria, and cells in tissues of multi-cell organisms such as epithelia in worms, flies and mammals. This diversity raises several questions: do different cell types use different mechanisms to generate polarity, how is polarity signalled, how do cells react to that signal, and how is structural polarity translated into specialized functions? Analysis of evolutionarily diverse cell types reveals that cell-surface landmarks adapt core pathways for cytoskeleton assembly and protein transport to generate cell polarity. PMID:12700771

  17. Compressive adaptive ghost imaging via sharing mechanism and fellow relationship.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yaoran; He, Hongjie; Chen, Fan

    2016-04-20

    For lower sampling rate and better imaging quality, a compressive adaptive ghost imaging is proposed by adopting the sharing mechanism and fellow relationship in the wavelet tree. The sharing mechanisms, including intrascale and interscale sharing mechanisms, and fellow relationship are excavated from the wavelet tree and utilized for sampling. The shared coefficients, which are part of the approximation subband, are localized according to the parent coefficients and sampled based on the interscale sharing mechanism and fellow relationship. The sampling rate can be reduced owing to the fact that some shared coefficients can be calculated by adopting the parent coefficients and the sampled sum of shared coefficients. According to the shared coefficients and parent coefficients, the proposed method predicts the positions of significant coefficients and samples them based on the intrascale sharing mechanism. The ghost image, reconstructed by the significant coefficients and the coarse image at the given largest scale, achieves better quality because the significant coefficients contain more detailed information. The simulations demonstrate that the proposed method improves the imaging quality at the same sampling rate and also achieves a lower sampling rate for the same imaging quality for different types of target object images in noise-free and noisy environments. PMID:27140111

  18. MECHANISMS OF STATIONARY PHASE MUTATION: A Decade of Adaptive Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A decade of research on adaptive mutation has revealed a plethora of mutagenic mechanisms that may be important in evolution. The DNA synthesis associated with recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation in cells that are not proliferating. The movement of insertion elements can be responsive to environmental conditions. Insertion elements not only activate and inactivate genes, they also provide sequence homology that allows large-scale genomic rearrangements. Some conjugative plasmids can recombine with their host’s chromosome, and may acquire chromosomal genes that could then spread through the population and even to other species. Finally, a subpopulation of transient hypermutators could be a source of multiple variant alleles, providing a mechanism for rapid evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10690404

  19. Adaptive and injury response of bone to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sarah H; Silva, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Bone responds to supraphysiological mechanical loads by increasing bone formation. Depending on the applied strain magnitude (and other loading parameters) the response can be either adaptive (mostly lamellar bone) or injury (mostly woven bone). Seminal studies of Hert, Lanyon and Rubin originally established the basic 'rules' of bone mechanosensitivity. These were reinforced by subsequent studies using noninvasive rodent loading models, most notably by Turner et al. More recent works with these models have been able to explore the structural, transcriptional and molecular mechanisms which distinguish the two responses (lamellar vs woven). Wnt/Lrp signaling has emerged as a key mechanoresponsive pathway for lamellar bone. However, there is still much to study with regard to effects of ageing, osteocytes, other signaling pathways, and the molecular regulation that modulates lamellar vs woven bone formation. This review summarizes not only the historical findings but also the current data for these topics. PMID:23505338

  20. Adaptive mechanisms of Campylobacter jejuni to erythromycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Macrolide is the drug of choice to treat human campylobacteriosis, but Campylobacter resistance to this antibiotic is rising. The mechanisms employed by Campylobacter jejuni to adapt to erythromycin treatment remain unknown and are examined in this study. The transcriptomic response of C. jejuni NCTC 11168 to erythromycin (Ery) treatment was determined by competitive microarray hybridizations. Representative genes identified to be differentially expressed were further characterized by constructing mutants and assessing their involvement in antimicrobial susceptibility, oxidative stress tolerance, and chicken colonization. Results Following the treatment with an inhibitory dose of Ery, 139 genes were up-regulated and 119 were down-regulated. Many genes associated with flagellar biosynthesis and motility was up-regulated, while many genes involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, and ribonucleotide biosynthesis were down-regulated. Exposure to a sub-inhibitory dose of Ery resulted in differential expression of much fewer genes. Interestingly, two putative drug efflux operons (cj0309c-cj0310c and cj1173-cj1174) were up-regulated. Although mutation of the two operons did not alter the susceptibility of C. jejuni to antimicrobials, it reduced Campylobacter growth under high-level oxygen. Another notable finding is the consistent up-regulation of cj1169c-cj1170c, of which cj1170c encodes a known phosphokinase, an important regulatory protein in C. jejuni. Mutation of the cj1169c-cj1170c rendered C. jejuni less tolerant to atmospheric oxygen and reduced Campylobacter colonization and transmission in chickens. Conclusions These findings indicate that Ery treatment elicits a range of changes in C. jejuni transcriptome and affects the expression of genes important for in vitro and in vivo adaptation. Up-regulation of motility and down-regulation of energy metabolism likely facilitate Campylobacter to survive during Ery treatment. These findings

  1. Automated mechanical ventilation: adapting decision making to different disease states.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Zahonero, S; Gottlieb, D; Haberthür, C; Guttmann, J; Möller, K

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a novel methodology for adapting and upgrading decision-making strategies concerning mechanical ventilation with respect to different disease states into our fuzzy-based expert system, AUTOPILOT-BT. The special features are: (1) Extraction of clinical knowledge in analogy to the daily routine. (2) An automated process to obtain the required information and to create fuzzy sets. (3) The controller employs the derived fuzzy rules to achieve the desired ventilation status. For demonstration this study focuses exclusively on the control of arterial CO(2) partial pressure (p(a)CO(2)). Clinical knowledge from 61 anesthesiologists was acquired using a questionnaire from which different disease-specific fuzzy sets were generated to control p(a)CO(2). For both, patients with healthy lung and with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the fuzzy sets show different shapes. The fuzzy set "normal", i.e., "target p(a)CO(2) area", ranges from 35 to 39 mmHg for healthy lungs and from 39 to 43 mmHg for ARDS lungs. With the new fuzzy sets our AUTOPILOT-BT reaches the target p(a)CO(2) within maximal three consecutive changes of ventilator settings. Thus, clinical knowledge can be extended, updated, and the resulting mechanical ventilation therapies can be individually adapted, analyzed, and evaluated. PMID:21069471

  2. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide. PMID:24954803

  3. Growth, photosynthesis, and defense mechanism of antimony (Sb)-contaminated Boehmeria nivea L.

    PubMed

    Chai, Li-Yuan; Mubarak, Hussani; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Yong, Wang; Tang, Chong-Jian; Mirza, Nosheen

    2016-04-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) is the oldest cash fiber crop in China and is widely grown in antimony (Sb) mining areas. To evaluate the extent of Sb resistance and tolerance, the growth, tolerance index (TI), Sb content in plant parts and in Hoagland solution, bioaccumulation factor (BF), photosynthesis, and physiological changes in Sb-contaminated B. nivea (20, 40, 80, and 200 mg L(-1) Sb) grown hydroponically were investigated. The Sb tolerance and resistance of ramie were clearly revealed by growth inhibition, a TI between 13 and 99 %, non-significant changes in the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem (F v /F m ), energy-harvesting efficiency (photosystem II (PSII)) and single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) value, a significant increase in Sb in plant parts, BF >1, and an increase in catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) at 200 mg L(-1) Sb. Under increasing Sb stress, nearly the same non-significant decline in the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem (F v /F m ), energy-harvesting efficiency (PSII), relative quantum yield of photosystem II (φPSII), and photochemical quenching (qP), except for F v /F m at 20 mg L(-1) Sb, were recorded. SPAD values for chlorophyll under Sb stress showed an increasing trend, except for a slight decrease, i.e., <2 %, than the control SPAD value at 200 mg L(-1) Sb. With a continuous increase in MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and CAT activities were suppressed under Sb addition up to 40 mg L(-1) Sb and the addition of Sb enhanced enzyme production at 80 and 200 mg L(-1) Sb. A continuous decrease in SOD, POD, and CAT up to 40 mg L(-1) Sb and enhancements at ≥80 mg L(-1), along with the continuous enhancement of MDA activity and inhibited biomass production, clearly reveal the roles of these enzymes in detoxifying Sb stress and the defense mechanism of ramie at 80 mg L(-1) Sb. Thus, B. nivea constitutes a promising candidate for Sb phytoremediation at mining sites. PMID:26711292

  4. Zinc triggers signaling mechanisms and defense responses promoting resistance to Alternaria brassicicola in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Cabot, Catalina; Llugany, Mercè; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    According to the elemental defense hypothesis the accumulation of trace elements by plants may substitute for organic defenses, while the joint effects hypothesis proposes that trace elements and organic defenses can have additive or synergistic effects against pathogens or herbivores. To evaluate these hypotheses the response of the pathosystem Alternaria brassicicola-Arabidopsis thaliana to control (2μM) and surplus (12μM) Zn was evaluated using the camalexin deficient mutant pad3-1 and mtp1-1, a mutant with impaired Zn vacuolar storage, along with the corresponding wildtypes. In vitro, a 50% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved by 440μM Zn. A. thaliana leaves could accumulate equivalent concentrations without harm. In fact, surplus Zn enhanced the resistance of A. thaliana to fungal attack in Columbia (Col-0), Wassilewskija (WS), and mtp1-1. However, surplus Zn was unable to protect pad3-1 demonstrating that Zn cannot substitute for camalexin, the main organic defense in A. thaliana. High, non phytotoxic leaf Zn concentrations enhanced the resistance to A. brassicicola of A. thaliana genotypes able to produce camalexin. This was mainly due to Zn-induced enhancement of the JA/ETH signaling pathway leading to enhanced PAD3 expression. These results support the joint effects hypothesis and highlight the importance of adequate Zn supply for reinforced pathogen resistance. PMID:27297986

  5. A proposed mechanism for rapid adaptation to spectrally distorted speech.

    PubMed

    Azadpour, Mahan; Balaban, Evan

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying perceptual adaptation to severely spectrally-distorted speech were studied by training participants to comprehend spectrally-rotated speech, which is obtained by inverting the speech spectrum. Spectral-rotation produces severe distortion confined to the spectral domain while preserving temporal trajectories. During five 1-hour training sessions, pairs of participants attempted to extract spoken messages from the spectrally-rotated speech of their training partner. Data on training-induced changes in comprehension of spectrally-rotated sentences and identification/discrimination of spectrally-rotated phonemes were used to evaluate the plausibility of three different classes of underlying perceptual mechanisms: (1) phonemic remapping (the formation of new phonemic categories that specifically incorporate spectrally-rotated acoustic information); (2) experience-dependent generation of a perceptual "inverse-transform" that compensates for spectral-rotation; and (3) changes in cue weighting (the identification of sets of acoustic cues least affected by spectral-rotation, followed by a rapid shift in perceptual emphasis to favour those cues, combined with the recruitment of the same type of "perceptual filling-in" mechanisms used to disambiguate speech-in-noise). Results exclusively support the third mechanism, which is the only one predicting that learning would specifically target temporally-dynamic cues that were transmitting phonetic information most stably in spite of spectral-distortion. No support was found for phonemic remapping or for inverse-transform generation. PMID:26233005

  6. High Level Resistance against Rhizomania Disease by Simultaneously Integrating Two Distinct Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pavli, Ourania I.; Tampakaki, Anastasia P.; Skaracis, George N.

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of achieving durable resistance against rhizomania disease of sugar beet, the employment of different sources of resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus was pursued. To this purpose, Nicotiana benthamiana transgenic plants that simultaneously produce dsRNA originating from a conserved region of the BNYVV replicase gene and the HrpZPsph protein in a secreted form (SP/HrpZPsph) were produced. The integration and expression of both transgenes as well as proper production of the harpin protein were verified in all primary transformants and selfed progeny (T1, T2). Transgenic resistance was assessed by BNYVV-challenge inoculation on T2 progeny by scoring disease symptoms and DAS-ELISA at 20 and 30 dpi. Transgenic lines possessing single transformation events for both transgenes as well as wild type plants were included in inoculation experiments. Transgenic plants were highly resistant to virus infection, whereas in some cases immunity was achieved. In all cases, the resistant phenotype of transgenic plants carrying both transgenes was superior in comparison with the ones carrying a single transgene. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for a first time, that the combination of two entirely different resistance mechanisms provide high level resistance or even immunity against the virus. Such a novel approach is anticipated to prevent a rapid virus adaptation that could potentially lead to the emergence of isolates with resistance breaking properties. PMID:23284692

  7. Brief Report: Self-Harm Is Associated with Immature Defense Mechanisms but Not Substance Use in a Nonclinical Scottish Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Stuart; Carson, Carron Maryjane

    2012-01-01

    It has been unclear whether adolescent deliberate self-harm (DSH) is more associated with substance use or with characterological impairments. Multivariate determination of (N = 114 Scottish adolescents) ever engaging in DSH (Youth Risk Behavior Survey) from alcohol use, other substance use, and immature defense mechanism use (Defense Style…

  8. When do adaptive developmental mechanisms yield maladaptive outcomes?

    PubMed

    Frankenhuis, Willem E; Del Giudice, Marco

    2012-05-01

    This article discusses 3 ways in which adaptive developmental mechanisms may produce maladaptive outcomes. First, natural selection may favor risky strategies that enhance fitness on average but which have detrimental consequences for a subset of individuals. Second, mismatch may result when organisms experience environmental change during ontogeny, for instance, because they move from one environment to another. Third, organisms may learn about their environment in order to develop an appropriate phenotype; when cues indicate the environmental state probabilistically, as opposed to deterministically, sampling processes may produce mismatch. For each source of maladaptation, we present a selection of the relevant empirical research and illustrate how models from evolutionary biology can be used to make predictions about maladaptation. We also discuss what data can be collected to test these models in humans. Our goal is to show that evolutionary approaches not only yield insights into adaptive outcomes but can also illuminate the conditions leading to maladaptation. This perspective provides additional nuance to the dialectic between the developmental psychopathology model and evolutionary developmental psychology. PMID:21967567

  9. Adaptive mechanical properties of topologically interlocking material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, S.; Siegmund, T.; Cipra, R. J.; Bolton, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    Topologically interlocked material systems are two-dimensional granular crystals created as ordered and adhesion-less assemblies of unit elements of the shape of platonic solids. The assembly resists transverse forces due to the interlocking geometric arrangement of the unit elements. Topologically interlocked material systems yet require an external constraint to provide resistance under the action of external load. Past work considered fixed and passive constraints only. The objective of the present study is to consider active and adaptive external constraints with the goal to achieve variable stiffness and energy absorption characteristics of the topologically interlocked material system through an active control of the in-plane constraint conditions. Experiments and corresponding model analysis are used to demonstrate control of system stiffness over a wide range, including negative stiffness, and energy absorption characteristics. The adaptive characteristics of the topologically interlocked material system are shown to solve conflicting requirements of simultaneously providing energy absorption while keeping loads controlled. Potential applications can be envisioned in smart structure enhanced response characteristics as desired in shock absorption, protective packaging and catching mechanisms.

  10. Adaptive control of vibrissae-like mechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behn, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    This paper is a contribution to the modeling and the adaptive control of bio-inspired sensors which have the animal vibrissae as a paradigm. Mice and rats employ a sophisticated tactile sensory system to explore their environment in addition to their visual and auditory sense. Vibrissae in the mystical pad (region around the mouth) are used both passively to sense environmental influences (wind, objects) and actively to detect surface and object structures. Inspired by this particular version of tactile sense we consider the following three stages of a sensory system: perception, transduction and processing of information. We model this system in combining two existing mechanical models and obtain an uncertain nonlinear control system. An applied adaptive controller implements the ability of the animals to employ their vibrissae actively as well as passively. Numerical simulations show that the developed nonlinear model compensates noise signals and reacts strongly to sudden perturbations while guaranteeing a pre-specified control objective (working in active or passive mode).

  11. Adaptive information interactive mechanism for multi-UAV visual navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Dai, Qionghai

    2012-06-01

    Multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) cooperative communication for visual navigation has recently generated significant concern. It has large amounts of visual information to be transmitted and processed among UAVs with realtime requirements. And the UAV clusters have self-organized, time-varying and high dynamic characteristics. Considering the above conditions, we propose an adaptive information interactive mechanism (AIIM) for multi-UAV visual navigation. In the mechanism, the function modules for UAV inter-communication interface are designed, the mobility-based link lifetime is established and the information interactive protocol is presented. Thus we combine the mobility of UAVs with the corresponding communication requirements to make effective information interaction for UAVs. Task-oriented distributed control is adopted to improve the collaboration flexibility in the multi-UAV visual navigation system. In order to timely obtain the necessary visual information, each UAV can cooperate with other relevant UAVs which meet some certain terms such as situation, task or environmental conditions. Simulation results are presented to show the validity of the proposed mechanism in terms of end-to-end delay and links stability.

  12. Multiple representations and mechanisms for visuomotor adaptation in young children.

    PubMed

    Tahej, Pierre-Karim; Ferrel-Chapus, Carole; Olivier, Isabelle; Ginhac, Dominique; Rolland, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we utilized transformed spatial mappings to perturb visuomotor integration in 5-yr-old children and adults. The participants were asked to perform pointing movements under five different conditions of visuomotor rotation (from 0° to 180°), which were designed to reveal explicit vs. implicit representations as well as the mechanisms underlying the visual-motor mapping. Several tests allowed us to separately evaluate sensorimotor (i.e., the dynamic dimension of movement) and cognitive (i.e., the explicit representations of target position and the strategies used by the participants) representations of visuo-proprioceptive distortion. Our results indicate that children do not establish representations in the same manner as adults and that children exhibit multiple visuomotor representations. Sensorimotor representations were relatively precise, presumably due to the recovery of proprioceptive information and efferent copy. Furthermore, a bidirectional mechanism was used to re-map visual and motor spaces. In contrast, cognitive representations were supplied with visual information and followed a unidirectional visual-motor mapping. Therefore, it appears that sensorimotor mechanisms develop before the use of explicit strategies during development, and young children showed impaired visuomotor adaptation when confronted with large distortions. PMID:22704964

  13. Mechanisms of Cardiopulmonary Adaptation to Microgravity. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA1 includes short reports covering: (1) Indices of Baroreceptor Reflex Sensitivity: The Use in Rehabilitation Medicine and Space Cardiology; (2) +Gz and +Gx Tolerance of Healthy Persons of Non-Flying Trades at Primary Selection of the Centrifuge; (3) Effect of Dry Immersion on Calf Blood Supply During Sustained Contraction and Upright Exercise in Man; (4) Cardiovascular and Valsalva Responses during Parabolic flight; (5) An Analysis of the Cardiovascular Responses under Hyper- and Hypo-Gravity Environments using a Mathematical model; (6) Effect of Very Gradual Onset Rate +Gz Exposures on the Cardiovascular System; and (7) NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Integrated Physiology: Mechanisms of Physiological Adaptations to Microgravity.

  14. Adaptive Broadcasting Mechanism for Bandwidth Allocation in Mobile Services

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Gwo-Jiun; Wang, Chi-Hsuan; Chou, Chih-Lun

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a tree-based adaptive broadcasting (TAB) algorithm for data dissemination to improve data access efficiency. The proposed TAB algorithm first constructs a broadcast tree to determine the broadcast frequency of each data and splits the broadcast tree into some broadcast wood to generate the broadcast program. In addition, this paper develops an analytical model to derive the mean access latency of the generated broadcast program. In light of the derived results, both the index channel's bandwidth and the data channel's bandwidth can be optimally allocated to maximize bandwidth utilization. This paper presents experiments to help evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the proposed mechanism is feasible in practice. PMID:25057509

  15. Dealing with environmental challenges: mechanisms of adaptation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan parasites have a significant impact upon global health, infecting millions of people around the world. With limited therapeutic options and no vaccines available, research efforts are focused upon unraveling cellular mechanisms essential for parasite survival. During its life cycle, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease, is exposed to multiple external conditions and different hosts. Environmental cues are linked to the differentiation process allowing the parasite to complete its life cycle. Successful transmission depends on the ability of the cells to trigger adaptive responses and cope with stressors while regulating proliferation and transition to different life stages. This review focuses upon different aspects of the stress response in T. cruzi, proposing new hypotheses regarding cross-talk and cross-tolerance with respect to environmental changes and discussing open questions and future directions. PMID:24508488

  16. Synaptic mechanisms of adaptation and sensitization in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Anton; Leung, Kin-Mei; Odermatt, Benjamin; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Sensory systems continually adjust the way stimuli are processed. What are the circuit mechanisms underlying this plasticity? We investigated how synapses in the retina of zebrafish adjust to changes in the temporal contrast of a visual stimulus by imaging activity in vivo. Following an increase in contrast, bipolar cell synapses with strong initial responses depressed, whereas synapses with weak initial responses facilitated. Depression and facilitation predominated in different strata of the inner retina, where bipolar cell output was anticorrelated with the activity of amacrine cell synapses providing inhibitory feedback. Pharmacological block of GABAergic feedback converted facilitating bipolar cell synapses into depressing ones. These results indicate that depression intrinsic to bipolar cell synapses causes adaptation of the ganglion cell response to contrast, whereas depression in amacrine cell synapses causes sensitization. Distinct microcircuits segregating to different layers of the retina can cause simultaneous increases or decreases in the gain of neural responses. PMID:23685718

  17. Glucose and Stress Independently Regulate Source and Sink Metabolism and Defense Mechanisms via Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehness, R.; Ecker, M.; Godt, D. E.; Roitsch, T.

    1997-01-01

    In higher plants, sugars are required not only to sustain heterotrophic growth but also to regulate the expression of a variety of genes. Environmental stresses, such as pathogen infection and wounding, activate a cascade of defense responses and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, the relationship between sugar- and stress-activated signal transduction pathways and the underlying regulatory mechanism was analyzed. Photoautotrophically growing suspension culture cells of Chenopodium rubrum were used as a model system to study the effects of the metabolic regulator D-glucose and of different stress-related stimuli on photosynthesis, sink metabolism, and defense response by analyzing the regulation of mRNAs for representative enzymes of these pathways. Glucose as well as the fungal elicitor chitosan, the phosphatase inhibitor endothall, and benzoic acid were shown to result in a coordinated regulatory mechanism. The mRNAs for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key enzyme of defense response, and for the sink-specific extracellular invertase were induced. In contrast, the mRNA for the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was repressed. This inverse regulatory pattern was also observed in experiments with wounded leaves of C. rubrum plants. The differential effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA regulation demonstrates that the carbohydrate signal and the stress-related stimuli independently activate different intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately are integrated to coordinately regulate source and sink metabolism and activate defense responses. The various stimuli triggered the transient and rapid activation of protein kinases that phosphorylate the myelin basic protein. The involvement of phosphorylation in signal transduction is further supported by the effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA levels. PMID:12237349

  18. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  19. Block-adaptive quantum mechanics: an adaptive divide-and-conquer approach to interactive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Maël; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel Block-Adaptive Quantum Mechanics (BAQM) approach to interactive quantum chemistry. Although quantum chemistry models are known to be computationally demanding, we achieve interactive rates by focusing computational resources on the most active parts of the system. BAQM is based on a divide-and-conquer technique and constrains some nucleus positions and some electronic degrees of freedom on the fly to simplify the simulation. As a result, each time step may be performed significantly faster, which in turn may accelerate attraction to the neighboring local minima. By applying our approach to the nonself-consistent Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization Molecular Orbital theory, we demonstrate interactive rates and efficient virtual prototyping for systems containing more than a thousand of atoms on a standard desktop computer. PMID:23108532

  20. Molecular mechanisms involved in plant adaptation to low K(+) availability.

    PubMed

    Chérel, Isabelle; Lefoulon, Cécile; Boeglin, Martin; Sentenac, Hervé

    2014-03-01

    Potassium is a major inorganic constituent of the living cell and the most abundant cation in the cytosol. It plays a role in various functions at the cell level, such as electrical neutralization of anionic charges, protein synthesis, long- and short-term control of membrane polarization, and regulation of the osmotic potential. Through the latter function, K(+) is involved at the whole-plant level in osmotically driven functions such as cell movements, regulation of stomatal aperture, or phloem transport. Thus, plant growth and development require that large amounts of K(+) are taken up from the soil and translocated to the various organs. In most ecosystems, however, soil K(+) availability is low and fluctuating, so plants have developed strategies to take up K(+) more efficiently and preserve vital functions and growth when K(+) availability is becoming limited. These strategies include increased capacity for high-affinity K(+) uptake from the soil, K(+) redistribution between the cytosolic and vacuolar pools, ensuring cytosolic homeostasis, and modification of root system development and architecture. Our knowledge about the mechanisms and signalling cascades involved in these different adaptive responses has been rapidly growing during the last decade, revealing a highly complex network of interacting processes. This review is focused on the different physiological responses induced by K(+) deprivation, their underlying molecular events, and the present knowledge and hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for K(+) sensing and signalling. PMID:24293613

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields.

    PubMed

    Piraneo, Tara G; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A; Lavine, Laura C; Walsh, Douglas B; Zhu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies. PMID:26621458

  2. Molecular mechanisms of genetic adaptation to xenobiotic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, J R; de Vos, W M; Harayama, S; Zehnder, A J

    1992-01-01

    Microorganisms in the environment can often adapt to use xenobiotic chemicals as novel growth and energy substrates. Specialized enzyme systems and metabolic pathways for the degradation of man-made compounds such as chlorobiphenyls and chlorobenzenes have been found in microorganisms isolated from geographically separated areas of the world. The genetic characterization of an increasing number of aerobic pathways for degradation of (substituted) aromatic compounds in different bacteria has made it possible to compare the similarities in genetic organization and in sequence which exist between genes and proteins of these specialized catabolic routes and more common pathways. These data suggest that discrete modules containing clusters of genes have been combined in different ways in the various catabolic pathways. Sequence information further suggests divergence of catabolic genes coding for specialized enzymes in the degradation of xenobiotic chemicals. An important question will be to find whether these specialized enzymes evolved from more common isozymes only after the introduction of xenobiotic chemicals into the environment. Evidence is presented that a range of genetic mechanisms, such as gene transfer, mutational drift, and genetic recombination and transposition, can accelerate the evolution of catabolic pathways in bacteria. However, there is virtually no information concerning the rates at which these mechanisms are operating in bacteria living in nature and the response of such rates to the presence of potential (xenobiotic) substrates. Quantitative data on the genetic processes in the natural environment and on the effect of environmental parameters on the rate of evolution are needed. PMID:1480115

  3. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields

    PubMed Central

    Piraneo, Tara G.; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A.; Lavine, Laura C.; Walsh, Douglas B.; Zhu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies. PMID:26621458

  4. Plant Defense Mechanisms Are Activated during Biotrophic and Necrotrophic Development of Colletotricum graminicola in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Walter A.; Martín, José M. Sanz; Rech, Gabriel E.; Rivera, Lina P.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Thon, Michael R.; Sukno, Serenella A.

    2012-01-01

    Hemibiotrophic plant pathogens first establish a biotrophic interaction with the host plant and later switch to a destructive necrotrophic lifestyle. Studies of biotrophic pathogens have shown that they actively suppress plant defenses after an initial microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered activation. In contrast, studies of the hemibiotrophs suggest that they do not suppress plant defenses during the biotrophic phase, indicating that while there are similarities between the biotrophic phase of hemibiotrophs and biotrophic pathogens, the two lifestyles are not analogous. We performed transcriptomic, histological, and biochemical studies of the early events during the infection of maize (Zea mays) with Colletotrichum graminicola, a model pathosystem for the study of hemibiotrophy. Time-course experiments revealed that mRNAs of several defense-related genes, reactive oxygen species, and antimicrobial compounds all begin to accumulate early in the infection process and continue to accumulate during the biotrophic stage. We also discovered the production of maize-derived vesicular bodies containing hydrogen peroxide targeting the fungal hyphae. We describe the fungal respiratory burst during host infection, paralleled by superoxide ion production in specific fungal cells during the transition from biotrophy to a necrotrophic lifestyle. We also identified several novel putative fungal effectors and studied their expression during anthracnose development in maize. Our results demonstrate a strong induction of defense mechanisms occurring in maize cells during C. graminicola infection, even during the biotrophic development of the pathogen. We hypothesize that the switch to necrotrophic growth enables the fungus to evade the effects of the plant immune system and allows for full fungal pathogenicity. PMID:22247271

  5. Caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Ileana; Droguett, Daniel; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Muñoz, Lorena; Maya, Juan Diego; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Congenital Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that must cross the placental barrier during transmission. The trophoblast constitutes the first tissue in contact with the maternal-blood circulating parasite. Importantly, the congenital transmission rates are low, suggesting the presence of local placental defense mechanisms. Cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptotic cell death are induced by the parasite and constitute part of the epithelial turnover of the trophoblast, which has been suggested to be part of those placental defenses. On the other hand, caspase-8 is an essential molecule in the modulation of trophoblast turnover by apoptosis and by epithelial differentiation. As an approach to study whether T. cruzi induced trophoblast turnover and infection is mediated by caspase-8, we infected BeWo cells (a trophoblastic cell line) with the parasite and determined in the infected cells the expression and enzymatic activity of caspase-8, DNA synthesis (as proliferation marker), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) (as differentiation marker) and activity of Caspase-3 (as apoptotic death marker). Parasite load in BeWo cells was measured by DNA quantification using qPCR and cell counting. Our results show that T. cruzi induces caspase-8 activity and that its inhibition increases trophoblast cells infection while decreases parasite induced cellular differentiation and apoptotic cell death, but not cellular proliferation. Thus, caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against T. cruzi infection. Together with our previous results, we suggest that the trophoblast turnover is part of local placental anti-parasite mechanisms. PMID:27328973

  6. Proteome and Phosphoproteome Characterization Reveals New Response and Defense Mechanisms of Brachypodium distachyon Leaves under Salt Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dong-Wen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Min; Yan, Xing; Li, Xiaohui; Appels, Rudi; Sun, Dong-Fa; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant growth and development. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of salt response and defense in plants will help in efforts to improve the salt tolerance of crops. Brachypodium distachyon is a new model plant for wheat, barley, and several potential biofuel grasses. In the current study, proteome and phosphoproteome changes induced by salt stress were the focus. The Bd21 leaves were initially treated with salt in concentrations ranging from 80 to 320 mm and then underwent a recovery process prior to proteome analysis. A total of 80 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 60 unique proteins were identified. The sample treated with a median salt level of 240 mm and the control were selected for phosphopeptide purification using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS for phosphoproteome analysis to identify the phosphorylation sites and phosphoproteins. A total of 1509 phosphoproteins and 2839 phosphorylation sites were identified. Among them, 468 phosphoproteins containing 496 phosphorylation sites demonstrated significant changes at the phosphorylation level. Nine phosphorylation motifs were extracted from the 496 phosphorylation sites. Of the 60 unique differentially expressed proteins, 14 were also identified as phosphoproteins. Many proteins and phosphoproteins, as well as potential signal pathways associated with salt response and defense, were found, including three 14-3-3s (GF14A, GF14B, and 14-3-3A) for signal transduction and several ABA signal-associated proteins such as ABF2, TRAB1, and SAPK8. Finally, a schematic salt response and defense mechanism in B. distachyon was proposed. PMID:24335353

  7. Pterostilbene Decreases the Antioxidant Defenses of Aggressive Cancer Cells In Vivo: A Physiological Glucocorticoids- and Nrf2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch, María; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Rodriguez, María L.; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Alcácer, Javier; Pellicer, José A.; Salvador, Rosario; Cerdá, Concha; Sáez, Guillermo T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Polyphenolic phytochemicals have anticancer properties. However, in mechanistic studies, lack of correlation with the bioavailable concentrations is a critical issue. Some reports had suggested that these molecules downregulate the stress response, which may affect growth and the antioxidant protection of malignant cells. Initially, we studied this potential underlying mechanism using different human melanomas (with genetic backgrounds correlating with most melanomas), growing in nude mice as xenografts, and pterostilbene (Pter, a natural dimethoxylated analog of resveratrol). Results: Intravenous administration of Pter decreased human melanoma growth in vivo. However, Pter, at levels measured within the tumors, did not affect melanoma growth in vitro. Pter inhibited pituitary production of the adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), decreased plasma levels of corticosterone, and thereby downregulated the glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant defense system in growing melanomas. Exogenous corticosterone or genetically induced Nrf2 overexpression in melanoma cells prevented the inhibition of tumor growth and decreased antioxidant defenses in these malignant cells. These effects and mechanisms were also found in mice bearing different human pancreatic cancers. Glutathione depletion (selected as an antimelanoma strategy) facilitated the complete elimination by chemotherapy of melanoma cells isolated from mice treated with Pter. Innovation: Although bioavailability-related limitations may preclude direct anticancer effects in vivo, natural polyphenols may also interfere with the growth and defense of cancer cells by downregulating the pituitary gland-dependent ACTH synthesis. Conclusions: Pter downregulates glucocorticoid production, thus decreasing the glucocorticoid receptor and Nrf2-dependent signaling/transcription and the antioxidant protection of melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells

  8. Mechanisms of Adaptation to Nitrosative Stress in Bacillus subtilis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rogstam, Annika; Larsson, Jonas T.; Kjelgaard, Peter; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria use a number of mechanisms for coping with the toxic effects exerted by nitric oxide (NO) and its derivatives. Here we show that the flavohemoglobin encoded by the hmp gene has a vital role in an adaptive response to protect the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis from nitrosative stress. We further show that nitrosative stress induced by the nitrosonium cation donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) leads to deactivation of the transcriptional repressor NsrR, resulting in derepression of hmp. Nitrosative stress induces the sigma B-controlled general stress regulon. However, a sigB null mutant did not show increased sensitivity to SNP, suggesting that the sigma B-dependent stress proteins are involved in a nonspecific protection against stress whereas the Hmp flavohemoglobin plays a central role in detoxification. Mutations in the yjbIH operon, which encodes a truncated hemoglobin (YjbI) and a predicted 34-kDa cytosolic protein of unknown function (YjbH), rendered B. subtilis hypersensitive to SNP, suggesting roles in nitrosative stress management. PMID:17293416

  9. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Liao, Hong; Lucas, William J

    2014-03-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobilization and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed locally by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of developmental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to globally regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies. PMID:24417933

  10. Adaptation and detoxification mechanisms of Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) growing on gold mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Melato, F A; Mokgalaka, N S; McCrindle, R I

    2016-01-01

    Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) was investigated for its potential use in the rehabilitation of gold mine tailings, its ability to extract and accumulate toxic metals from the tailings and its metal tolerant strategies. Vetiver grass was grown on gold mine tailings soil, in a hothouse, and monitored for sixteen weeks. The mine tailings were highly acidic and had high electrical conductivity. Vetiver grass was able to grow and adapt well on gold mine tailings. The results showed that Vetiver grass accumulated large amounts of metals in the roots and restricted their translocation to the shoots. This was confirmed by the bioconcentration factor of Zn, Cu, and Ni of >1 and the translocation factor of <1 for all the metals. This study revealed the defense mechanisms employed by Vetiver grass against metal stress that include: chelation of toxic metals by phenolics, glutathione S-tranferase, and low molecular weight thiols; sequestration and accumulation of metals within the cell wall that was revealed by the scanning electron microscopy that showed closure of stomata and thickened cell wall and was confirmed by high content of cell wall bound phenolics. Metal induced reactive oxygen species are reduced or eliminated by catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase dismutase. PMID:26588814

  11. Antimicrobial terpenes from oleoresin of ponderosa pine tree Pinus ponderosa: A defense mechanism against microbial invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Himejima, Masaki; Hobson, K.R.; Otsuka, Toshikazu; Wood, D.L.; Kubo, Isao )

    1992-10-01

    The oleoresin of the ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa (Pinaceae) exhibited broad antimicrobial activity. In order to identify the active compounds, the oleoresin was steam distilled to give a distillate and residue. The distillate contained mainly monoterpenes and some sesquiterpenes, while the residue consisted chiefly of four structurally related diterpene acids. An antimicrobial assay with the pure compounds indicated that the monoterpenes were active primarily against fungi, but there was also some activity against gram-positive bacteria. The diterpene acids, in contrast, only exhibited activity against gram-positive bacteria. Although not all of the identified sesquiterpenes could be tested, longifolene showed activity only against gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, it appears that the oleoresin of P. ponderosa functions as a biochemical defense against microbial invasion.

  12. Effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics on airway defense mechanisms in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kazimierová, I; Jošková, M; Pecháňová, O; Šutovská, M; Fraňová, S

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies show that provinol, a polyphenolic compound, has anti-inflammatory activity during allergic inflammation. In the present study we investigated the effects of provinol and its combinations with clinically used antiasthmatics: budesonide or theophylline on airway defense mechanisms during experimental allergic asthma. Separate groups of guinea pigs were treated during the course of 21-day ovalbumin sensitization with provinol (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.), or budesonide (1 mM by inhalation), or theophylline (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.), and with a half-dose combination of provinol+budesonide or provinol+theophylline. Airways defense mechanisms: cough reflex and specific airway resistance (sRaw) were evaluated in vivo. Tracheal smooth muscle reactivity and mucociliary clearance were examined in vitro. The findings were that provinol caused significant decreases in sRaw and in tracheal smooth muscle contractility, a suppression of cough reflex, and positively modulated ciliary beat frequency. The bronchodilatory and antitussive effects of provinol were comparable with those of budesonide and theophylline. Provinol given as add-on treatment significantly potentiated the effects of budesonide or theophylline, although the doses of each were halved. We conclude that provinol not only has bronchodilatory and antitussive effects, but also potentiates similar effects exerted by budesonide and theophylline. PMID:25315622

  13. The Transcriptome and Terpene Profile of Eucalyptus grandis Reveals Mechanisms of Defense Against the Insect Pest, Leptocybe invasa.

    PubMed

    Oates, Caryn N; Külheim, Carsten; Myburg, Alexander A; Slippers, Bernard; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2015-07-01

    Plants have evolved complex defenses that allow them to protect themselves against pests and pathogens. However, there is relatively little information regarding the Eucalyptus defensome. Leptocybe invasa is one of the most damaging pests in global Eucalyptus forestry, and essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing the interaction between the pest and host. The aim of the study was to investigate changes in the transcriptional landscape and terpene profile of a resistant and susceptible Eucalyptus genotype in an effort to improve our understanding of this interaction. We used RNA-seqencing to investigate transcriptional changes following L. invasa oviposition. Expression levels were validated using real-time quantitative PCR. Terpene profiles were investigated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectometry on uninfested and oviposited leaves. We found 698 and 1,115 significantly differentially expressed genes from the resistant and susceptible interactions, respectively. Gene Ontology enrichment and Mapman analyses identified putative defense mechanisms including cell wall reinforcement, protease inhibitors, cell cycle suppression and regulatory hormone signaling pathways. There were significant differences in the mono- and sesquiterpene profiles between genotypes and between control and infested material. A model of the interaction between Eucalyptus and L. invasa was proposed from the transcriptomic and chemical data. PMID:25948810

  14. Skeletal adaptation to external loads optimizes mechanical properties: fact or fiction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    The skeleton adapts to a changing mechanical environment but the widely held concept that bone cells are programmed to respond to local mechanical loads to produce an optimal mechanical structure is not consistent with the high frequency of bone fractures. Instead, the author suggests that other important functions of bone compete with mechanical adaptation to determine structure. As a consequence of competing demands, bone architecture never achieves an optimal mechanical structure. c2001 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  15. Defense mechanisms against herbivory in Picea: sequence evolution and expression regulation of gene family members in the phenylpropanoid pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    the evolution of plant defense mechanisms against insect pests and provide substantial potential for the functional characterization of several not yet resolved alternative pathways in plant defenses. PMID:22177423

  16. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates adaptation mechanism against chronic stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of continuous life stress (chronic stress) often causes gastric symptoms. Although central oxytocin has antistress effects, the role of central oxytocin in stress-induced gastric dysmotility remains unknown. Solid gastric emptying was measured in rats receiving acute restraint stress, 5 consecutive days of repeated restraint stress (chronic homotypic stress), and 7 consecutive days of varying types of stress (chronic heterotypic stress). Oxytocin and oxytocin receptor antagonist were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and oxytocin mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. The changes of oxytocinergic neurons in the PVN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Acute stress delayed gastric emptying, and the delayed gastric emptying was completely restored after 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, delayed gastric emptying persisted following chronic heterotypic stress. The restored gastric emptying following chronic homotypic stress was antagonized by icv injection of an oxytocin antagonist. Icv injection of oxytocin restored delayed gastric emptying induced by chronic heterotypic stress. CRF mRNA expression, which was significantly increased in response to acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress, returned to the basal levels following chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, oxytocin mRNA expression was significantly increased following chronic homotypic stress. The number of oxytocin-immunoreactive cells was increased following chronic homotypic stress at the magnocellular part of the PVN. Icv injection of oxytocin reduced CRF mRNA expression induced by acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress. It is suggested that the adaptation mechanism to chronic stress may involve the upregulation of oxytocin expression in the hypothalamus, which in turn attenuates CRF expression. PMID:20689056

  17. Hypothalamic oxytocin mediates adaptation mechanism against chronic stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of continuous life stress (chronic stress) often causes gastric symptoms. Although central oxytocin has antistress effects, the role of central oxytocin in stress-induced gastric dysmotility remains unknown. Solid gastric emptying was measured in rats receiving acute restraint stress, 5 consecutive days of repeated restraint stress (chronic homotypic stress), and 7 consecutive days of varying types of stress (chronic heterotypic stress). Oxytocin and oxytocin receptor antagonist were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and oxytocin mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. The changes of oxytocinergic neurons in the PVN were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Acute stress delayed gastric emptying, and the delayed gastric emptying was completely restored after 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, delayed gastric emptying persisted following chronic heterotypic stress. The restored gastric emptying following chronic homotypic stress was antagonized by icv injection of an oxytocin antagonist. Icv injection of oxytocin restored delayed gastric emptying induced by chronic heterotypic stress. CRF mRNA expression, which was significantly increased in response to acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress, returned to the basal levels following chronic homotypic stress. In contrast, oxytocin mRNA expression was significantly increased following chronic homotypic stress. The number of oxytocin-immunoreactive cells was increased following chronic homotypic stress at the magnocellular part of the PVN. Icv injection of oxytocin reduced CRF mRNA expression induced by acute stress and chronic heterotypic stress. It is suggested that the adaptation mechanism to chronic stress may involve the upregulation of oxytocin expression in the hypothalamus, which in turn attenuates CRF expression. PMID:20689056

  18. A novel mechanism for NETosis provides antimicrobial defense at the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Sjögren, Jonathan; Kahn, Fredrik; Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Fisker, Niels; Assing, Kristian; Mörgelin, Matthias; Bengtsson, Anders A; Borregaard, Niels; Sørensen, Ole E

    2015-10-29

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense at the oral mucosa and neutropenia or functional neutrophil defects lead to disordered oral homeostasis. We found that neutrophils from the oral mucosa harvested from morning saliva had released neutrophil extracellular traps (undergone NETosis) in vivo. The NETosis was mediated through intracellular signals elicited by binding of sialyl Lewis(X) present on salival mucins to l-selectin on neutrophils. This led to rapid loss of nuclear membrane and intracellular release of granule proteins with subsequent neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release independent of elastase and reduced NAD phosphate-oxidase activation. The saliva-induced NETs were more DNase-resistant and had higher capacity to bind and kill bacteria than NETs induced by bacteria or by phorbol-myristate acetate. Furthermore, saliva/sialyl Lewis(X) mediated signaling enhanced intracellular killing of bacteria by neutrophils. Saliva from patients with aphthous ulcers and Behçet disease prone to oral ulcers failed to induce NETosis, but for different reasons it demonstrated that disordered homeostasis in the oral cavity may result in deficient saliva-mediated NETosis. PMID:26243777

  19. Do pathogen-specific defense mechanisms contribute to wound-induced resistance in tomato?

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Doriana; Demaria, Daniele; Calderini, Ornella; Ferraris, Lucia; Valentino, Danila; Arcioni, Sergio; Tamietti, Giacomo

    2008-01-01

    A network of shared intermediates/components and/or common molecular outputs in biotic and abiotic stress signaling has long been known, but the possibility of effective influence between differently triggered stresses (co-protection) is less studied. Recent observations show that wounding induces transient protection in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to four pathogens with a range of lifestyles, locally and systemically. The contribution of ethylene (ET) in basal but also in wound-induced resistance to each pathogen, although dispensable, is demonstrated to be positive (Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora capsici) or negative (Fusarium oxysporum, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato). Furthermore, the expression of several defense markers is influenced locally and/or systemically by wounding and ET, and might be part of that core of conserved molecular responses whereby an abiotic stress such as wounding imparts co-resistance to biotic stress. In this addendum, we speculate on some of the physiological responses to wounding that might contribute to the modulation of resistance in a more pathogen-specific manner. PMID:19841665

  20. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. PMID:26735168

  1. Identification of a key role for permeability glycoprotein in enhancing the cellular defense mechanisms of fertilized oocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jacinta H; Nixon, Brett; Lord, Tessa; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Aitken, R John

    2016-09-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) are highly damaging DNA lesions that can destabilize the genome and generate a suite of adverse physiological outcomes in the oocyte and early embryo. While it is therefore likely that these cells possess a sophisticated suite of protective mechanisms to ameliorate such damage, the precise nature of these defense systems are yet to be fully elucidated. This study characterizes the sensitivity of the oocyte to etoposide, a chemotherapeutic agent with the ability to elicit DSBs. We demonstrate significant developmental changes in etoposide vulnerability, with fertilization of the oocyte leading to an enhancement of its cellular defense machinery. Using a parthenogenic model we show that this response is mediated, at least in part, by permeability glycoprotein (PGP), an endogenous multidrug efflux transporter that is up-regulated, translocated to the oolemma and phosphorylated upon oocyte activation. Moreover, evidence from dye exclusion assays in the presence of a specific PGP pharmacological inhibitor (PSC833), illustrates that these events effectively increase oocyte efflux activity, thereby enhancing the ability of these cells to exclude genotoxicants capable of eliciting DSB formation. PMID:27397031

  2. De novo Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Defense Mechanisms by Young and Mature Leaves of Hevea brasiliensis (Para Rubber Tree).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yongjun; Mei, Hailiang; Zhou, Binhui; Xiao, Xiaohu; Yang, Meng; Huang, Yacheng; Long, Xiangyu; Hu, Songnian; Tang, Chaorong

    2016-01-01

    Along with changes in morphology in the course of maturation, leaves of Hevea brasiliensis become more resistant to leaf diseases, including the South American Leaf Blight (SALB), a devastating fungal disease of this economically important tree species. To understand the underlying mechanisms of this defense, and to identify the candidate genes involved, we sequenced the Hevea leaf transcriptome at four developmental stages (I to IV) by Illumina sequencing. A total of 62.6 million high-quality reads were generated, and assembled into 98,796 unique transcripts. We identified 3,905 differentially expressed genes implicated in leaf development, 67.8% (2,651) of which were during the transition to leaf maturation. The genes involved in cyanogenic metabolism, lignin and anthocyanin biosynthesis were noteworthy for their distinct patterns of expression between developing leaves (stages I to III) and mature leaves (stage IV), and the correlation with the change in resistance to SALB and the Oidium/Colletotrichum leaf fall. The results provide a first profile of the molecular events that relate to the dynamics of leaf morphology and defense strategies during Hevea leaf development. This dataset is beneficial to devising strategies to engineer resistance to leaf diseases as well as other in-depth studies in Hevea tree. PMID:27619402

  3. Adaptation of spatiotemporal mechanisms by increment and decrement stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkiss, Todd J.; Demarco, Paul J.

    2002-08-01

    Sawtooth modulation has been used in the past to examine visual sensitivity to luminance increments and decrements. The threshold elevation caused by adaptation depends on the spatial profile of the stimulus field and the polarities of the adaptation and test stimuli. We hypothesized that the adaptation effects reflect a change in the sensitivity of the spatiotemporal channels that detect the stimuli. We used a 2-deg disk centered in a larger surround field. Five levels of contrast between the test field and surround were investigated: equiluminant, three intermediate levels, and dark. At each contrast, observers adapted for 5 s to 2-Hz sawtooth modulation (rapid-on or rapid-off). Immediately after adaptation, thresholds were measured for detection of a single cycle of either a rapid-on or a rapid-off waveform. Varying the contrast of the surround affected observers sensitivity to the polarity of the sawtooth stimulus to the extent that the pattern of sensitivity with the equiluminant surround was the opposite of that with the dark surround. To examine temporal factors, we measured thresholds for slow (500-ms ramps) and fast (8.3-ms pulses) test stimuli. The adaptation effect was preserved with the ramp stimuli but not with the pulse stimuli. Blurring the edge between the test and surround fields in the equiluminant surround condition raised thresholds for all sawtooth test stimuli, suggesting that spatiotemporal channels sensitive to high spatial frequencies and low temporal frequencies facilitate detection in that condition. These findings suggest that adaptation to sawtooth modulation can differentially effect the sensitivity of ON and OFF pathways, but the relative desensitization of each pathway depends on an interaction with the adaptation state of spatiotemporal channels that are involved in detection. 2002 Optical Society of America

  4. Viewpoints: feeding mechanics, diet, and dietary adaptations in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Daegling, David J; Judex, Stefan; Ozcivici, Engin; Ravosa, Matthew J; Taylor, Andrea B; Grine, Frederick E; Teaford, Mark F; Ungar, Peter S

    2013-07-01

    Inference of feeding adaptation in extinct species is challenging, and reconstructions of the paleobiology of our ancestors have utilized an array of analytical approaches. Comparative anatomy and finite element analysis assist in bracketing the range of capabilities in taxa, while microwear and isotopic analyses give glimpses of individual behavior in the past. These myriad approaches have limitations, but each contributes incrementally toward the recognition of adaptation in the hominin fossil record. Microwear and stable isotope analysis together suggest that australopiths are not united by a single, increasingly specialized dietary adaptation. Their traditional (i.e., morphological) characterization as "nutcrackers" may only apply to a single taxon, Paranthropus robustus. These inferences can be rejected if interpretation of microwear and isotopic data can be shown to be misguided or altogether erroneous. Alternatively, if these sources of inference are valid, it merely indicates that there are phylogenetic and developmental constraints on morphology. Inherently, finite element analysis is limited in its ability to identify adaptation in paleobiological contexts. Its application to the hominin fossil record to date demonstrates only that under similar loading conditions, the form of the stress field in the australopith facial skeleton differs from that in living primates. This observation, by itself, does not reveal feeding adaptation. Ontogenetic studies indicate that functional and evolutionary adaptation need not be conceptually isolated phenomena. Such a perspective helps to inject consideration of mechanobiological principles of bone formation into paleontological inferences. Finite element analysis must employ such principles to become an effective research tool in this context. PMID:23794331

  5. Chemical and Mechanical Defenses Vary among Maternal Lines and Leaf Ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and Reduce Palatability to a Generalist Insect

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Christina; Bowers, M. Deane; Blumenthal, Dana; Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, in turn, herbivore foraging decisions mediate plant fitness. In particular, variation in defenses against herbivores, both among and within plants, shapes herbivore behavior. If variation in defenses is genetically based, it can respond to natural selection by herbivores. We quantified intra-specific variation in iridoid glycosides, trichome length, and leaf strength in common mullein (Verbascum thapsus L, Scrophulariaceae) among maternal lines within a population and among leaves within plants, and related this variation to feeding preferences of a generalist herbivore, Trichopulsia ni Hübner. We found significant variation in all three defenses among maternal lines, with T. ni preferring plants with lower investment in chemical, but not mechanical, defense. Within plants, old leaves had lower levels of all defenses than young leaves, and were strongly preferred by T. ni. Caterpillars also preferred leaves with trichomes removed to leaves with trichomes intact. Differences among maternal lines indicate that phenotypic variation in defenses likely has a genetic basis. Furthermore, these results reveal that the feeding behaviors of T. ni map onto variation in plant defense in a predictable way. This work highlights the importance of variation in host-plant quality in driving interactions between plants and their herbivores. PMID:25127229

  6. Mechanisms of Motor Adaptation in Reactive Balance Control

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Torrence D. J.; Ting, Lena H.

    2014-01-01

    Balance control must be rapidly modified to provide stability in the face of environmental challenges. Although changes in reactive balance over repeated perturbations have been observed previously, only anticipatory postural adjustments preceding voluntary movements have been studied in the framework of motor adaptation and learning theory. Here, we hypothesized that adaptation occurs in task-level balance control during responses to perturbations due to central changes in the control of both anticipatory and reactive components of balance. Our adaptation paradigm consisted of a Training set of forward support-surface perturbations, a Reversal set of novel countermanding perturbations that reversed direction, and a Washout set identical to the Training set. Adaptation was characterized by a change in a motor variable from the beginning to the end of each set, the presence of aftereffects at the beginning of the Washout set when the novel perturbations were removed, and a return of the variable at the end of the Washout to a level comparable to the end of the Training set. Task-level balance performance was characterized by peak center of mass (CoM) excursion and velocity, which showed adaptive changes with repetitive trials. Only small changes in anticipatory postural control, characterized by body lean and background muscle activity were observed. Adaptation was found in the evoked long-latency muscular response, and also in the sensorimotor transformation mediating that response. Finally, in each set, temporal patterns of muscle activity converged towards an optimum predicted by a trade-off between maximizing motor performance and minimizing muscle activity. Our results suggest that adaptation in balance, as well as other motor tasks, is mediated by altering central sensitivity to perturbations and may be driven by energetic considerations. PMID:24810991

  7. Mechanisms of motor adaptation in reactive balance control.

    PubMed

    Welch, Torrence D J; Ting, Lena H

    2014-01-01

    Balance control must be rapidly modified to provide stability in the face of environmental challenges. Although changes in reactive balance over repeated perturbations have been observed previously, only anticipatory postural adjustments preceding voluntary movements have been studied in the framework of motor adaptation and learning theory. Here, we hypothesized that adaptation occurs in task-level balance control during responses to perturbations due to central changes in the control of both anticipatory and reactive components of balance. Our adaptation paradigm consisted of a Training set of forward support-surface perturbations, a Reversal set of novel countermanding perturbations that reversed direction, and a Washout set identical to the Training set. Adaptation was characterized by a change in a motor variable from the beginning to the end of each set, the presence of aftereffects at the beginning of the Washout set when the novel perturbations were removed, and a return of the variable at the end of the Washout to a level comparable to the end of the Training set. Task-level balance performance was characterized by peak center of mass (CoM) excursion and velocity, which showed adaptive changes with repetitive trials. Only small changes in anticipatory postural control, characterized by body lean and background muscle activity were observed. Adaptation was found in the evoked long-latency muscular response, and also in the sensorimotor transformation mediating that response. Finally, in each set, temporal patterns of muscle activity converged towards an optimum predicted by a trade-off between maximizing motor performance and minimizing muscle activity. Our results suggest that adaptation in balance, as well as other motor tasks, is mediated by altering central sensitivity to perturbations and may be driven by energetic considerations. PMID:24810991

  8. Strength and power training: physiological mechanisms of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, W J; Fleck, S J; Evans, W J

    1996-01-01

    Adaptations in resistance training are focused on the development and maintenance of the neuromuscular unit needed for force production [97, 136]. The effects of training, when using this system, affect many other physiological systems of the body (e.g., the connective tissue, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems) [16, 18, 37, 77, 83]. Training programs are highly specific to the types of adaptation that occur. Activation of specific patterns of motor units in training dictate what tissue and how other physiological systems will be affected by the exercise training. The time course of the development of the neuromuscular system appears to be dominated in the early phase by neural factors with associated changes in the types of contractile proteins. In the later adaptation phase, muscle protein increases, and the contractile unit begins to contribute the most to the changes in performance capabilities. A host of other factors can affect the adaptations, such as functional capabilities of the individual, age, nutritional status, and behavioral factors (e.g., sleep and health habits). Optimal adaptation appears to be related to the use of specific resistance training programs to meet individual training objectives. PMID:8744256

  9. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  10. A review of adaptive mechanisms in cell responses towards oxidative stress caused by dental resin monomers.

    PubMed

    Krifka, Stephanie; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. Monomers like triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or 2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) are cytotoxic via apoptosis, induce genotoxic effects, and delay the cell cycle. Monomers also influence the response of cells of the innate immune system, inhibit specific odontoblast cell functions, or delay the odontogenic differentiation and mineralization processes in pulp-derived cells including stem cells. These observations indicate that resin monomers act as environmental stressors which inevitably disturb regulatory cellular networks through interference with signal transduction pathways. We hypothesize that an understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena will provide a better estimation of the consequences associated with dental therapy using composite materials, and lead to innovative therapeutic strategies and improved materials being used at tissue interfaces within the oral cavity. Current findings strongly suggest that monomers enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is most likely the cause of biological reactions activated by dental composites and resin monomers. The aim of the present review manuscript is to discuss adaptive cell responses to oxidative stress caused by monomers. The particular significance of a tightly controlled network of non-enzymatic as well as enzymatic antioxidants for the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant defense in monomer-exposed cells will be addressed. The expression of ROS-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1/2), and catalase in cells exposed to monomers will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role

  11. The brain--the organ of the psychic (the lesions/ the defense mechanisms).

    PubMed

    Rotarescu, Virginia; Ciurea, A V

    2010-01-01

    The article is based on the Leopold Szondi theory (March 11, 1893 - January 24, 1986), who was a Hungarian psychiatrist. He is known for the psychological tool that bears his name, the Szondi test. He developed a form of depth psychology that had some prominence in Europe in the mid-20th century, but has been ignored for the most part), the study seeks to correlate the szondian test results with the imagistic ones on a wide-range pathology. In the Neurosurgery Department, patients are investigated using modern exploration methods (MRI, CTscan, and computed EEG, etc.) in order to identify possible somatic lesions. The study's subjects selected during 2000-2004 from the patients admitted and investigated for neurosurgical conditions; they were divided into two subgroups, based on whether the organic lesions were or were not present (the independent variable). The exclusion criterion was a lesion due to external causes. Statistically meaningful there are seven types of Ego profiles, in relation with the lesion: the archaic ego [0 -], the inhibited ego [- +], the adaptive ego [- -], the narcissist ego [+ +], the identified ego [+/- 0], the fugitive ego [+/- -] and the possessed ego [0 +]. The nexus in the destiny's analysis description highlights the dialectic between the Ego's functions and the drived dangers when facing the demands of the concrete reality. PMID:20945811

  12. The brain–the organ of the psychic (The lesions / the defense mechanisms)

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, AV

    2010-01-01

    The article is based on the Leopold Szondi theory (March 11, 1893 – January 24, 1986), who was a Hungarian psychiatrist. He is known for the psychological tool that bears his name, the Szondi test. He developed a form of depth psychology that had some prominence in Europe in the mid–20th century, but has been ignored for the most part), the study seeks to correlate the szondian test results with the imagistic ones on a wide–range pathology. In the Neurosurgery Department, patients are investigated using modern exploration methods (MRI, CTscan, and computed EEG, etc.) in order to identify possible somatic lesions. The study's subjects selected during 2000–2004 from the patients admitted and investigated for neurosurgical conditions; they were divided into two subgroups, based on whether the organic lesions were or were not present (the independent variable). The exclusion criterion was a lesion due to external causes. Statistically meaningful there are seven types of Ego profiles, in relation with the lesion: the archaic ego [0 –], the inhibited ego [– +], the adaptive ego [– –], the narcissist ego [+ +], the identified ego [+/– 0], the fugitive ego [+/– –] and the possessed ego [0 +]. The nexus in the destiny's analysis description highlights the dialectic between the Ego's functions and the drived dangers when facing the demands of the concrete reality. PMID:20945811

  13. Crosstalk of Signaling Mechanisms Involved in Host Defense and Symbiosis Against Microorganisms in Rice.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Akira; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops, feeding about half population in the world. Rice pathogens cause enormous damage to rice production worldwide. In plant immunity research, considerable progress has recently been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity. Using genome sequencing and molecular techniques, a number of new MAMPs and their receptors have been identified in the past two decades. Notably, the mechanisms for chitin perception via the lysine motif (LysM) domain-containing receptor OsCERK1, as well as the mechanisms for bacterial MAMP (e.g. flg22, elf18) perception via the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain-containing receptors FLS2 and EFR, have been clarified in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. In chitin signaling in rice, two direct substrates of OsCERK1, Rac/ROP GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor OsRacGEF1 and receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase OsRLCK185, have been identified as components of the OsCERK1 complex and are rapidly phosphorylated by OsCERK1 in response to chitin. Interestingly, OsCERK1 also participates in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in rice and plays a role in the recognition of short-chitin molecules (CO4/5), which are symbiotic signatures included in AMF germinated spore exudates and induced by synthetic strigolactone. Thus, OsCERK1 contributes to both immunity and symbiotic responses. In this review, we describe recent studies on pathways involved in rice immunity and symbiotic signaling triggered by interactions with microorganisms. In addition, we describe recent advances in genetic engineering by using plant immune receptors and symbiotic microorganisms to enhance disease resistance of rice. PMID:27499679

  14. Neuroinflammatory contributions to pain after SCI: roles for central glial mechanisms and nociceptor-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Walters, Edgar T

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) is common, often intractable, and can be severely debilitating. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for this pain, which are discussed briefly, along with methods for revealing SCI pain in animal models, such as the recently applied conditioned place preference test. During the last decade, studies of animal models have shown that both central neuroinflammation and behavioral hypersensitivity (indirect reflex measures of pain) persist chronically after SCI. Interventions that reduce neuroinflammation have been found to ameliorate pain-related behavior, such as treatment with agents that inhibit the activation states of microglia and/or astroglia (including IL-10, minocycline, etanercept, propentofylline, ibudilast, licofelone, SP600125, carbenoxolone). Reversal of pain-related behavior has also been shown with disruption by an inhibitor (CR8) and/or genetic deletion of cell cycle-related proteins, deletion of a truncated receptor (trkB.T1) for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), or reduction by antisense knockdown or an inhibitor (AMG9810) of the activity of channels (TRPV1 or Nav1.8) important for electrical activity in primary nociceptors. Nociceptor activity is known to drive central neuroinflammation in peripheral injury models, and nociceptors appear to be an integral component of host defense. Thus, emerging results suggest that spinal and systemic effects of SCI can activate nociceptor-mediated host defense responses that interact via neuroinflammatory signaling with complex central consequences of SCI to drive chronic pain. This broader view of SCI-induced neuroinflammation suggests new targets, and additional complications, for efforts to develop effective treatments for neuropathic SCI pain. PMID:25017887

  15. Adaptive camouflage in the VIS and IR spectral range: main principles and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a survey of main applicable technical principles and mechanisms for adaptive camouflage in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) spectral ranges. All principles are described by their operation method and technical data such as the active spectral range, the degree and speed of adaptation, weight, power consumption, robustness, usability, lifetime, technology readiness level (TRL) etc.. The paper allows to compare the different principles and to assess them with regard to an application to an adaptive camouflage system.

  16. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  17. Application of an Improved Proteomics Method for Abundant Protein Cleanup: Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms Study in Plant Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2013-01-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  18. Overlapping and complementary oxidative stress defense mechanisms in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Baker, Beth D; Munson, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative commensal bacterium nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) can cause respiratory tract diseases that include otitis media, sinusitis, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchitis. During colonization and infection, NTHI withstands oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by the host, and by other copathogens and flora. These reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals, whose killing is amplified by iron via the Fenton reaction. We previously identified genes that encode proteins with putative roles in protection of the NTHI isolate strain 86-028NP against oxidative stress. These include catalase (HktE), peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin (PgdX), and a ferritin-like protein (Dps). Strains were generated with mutations in hktE, pgdX, and dps. The hktE mutant and a pgdX hktE double mutant were more sensitive than the parent to killing by H2O2. Conversely, the pgdX mutant was more resistant to H2O2 due to increased catalase activity. Supporting the role of killing via the Fenton reaction, binding of iron by Dps significantly mitigated the effect of H2O2-mediated killing. NTHI thus utilizes several effectors to resist oxidative stress, and regulation of free iron is critical to this protection. These mechanisms will be important for successful colonization and infection by this opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:25368297

  19. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  20. Multi-dimensional LADAR tracking and adaptive grasping for spaceborne assembly of SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Randy W.; Bohlin, John A.

    1990-02-01

    The most successful approaches to both machine target recognition and robot arm manipulation have been those where tasks are completely pre-specified. In such systems there is little room for deviations in robot path motion or target location and orientation. A novel approach to robotic implementation such as spaceborne assembly of SDI platforms are too difficult for existing robots because random occurrences and large numbers of external variables preclude the complete specification of tasks off-line. The proposed system has strong adaptability due to the following innovations: Registered video and range laser radar sensing (i.e., a one-to-one correspondence between visual and range data). This allows fast, accurate 3D target recognition as part of an autonomous CAD model based recognition system for Phase 2, or as input to teleoperator control in Phase 1. Closed loop range and video feedback for grasper guidance using the pose matching concept where target and grasper are both in the field of view, and CAD derived track points are used for position and orientation error signals.

  1. Immune-Related Transcriptome of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki Workers: The Defense Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abid; Li, Yi-Feng; Cheng, Yu; Liu, Yang; Chen, Chuan-Cheng; Wen, Shuo-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, live socially in microbial-rich habitats. To understand the molecular mechanism by which termites combat pathogenic microbes, a full-length normalized cDNA library and four Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed from termite workers infected with entomopathogenic fungi (Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana), Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and the libraries were analyzed. From the high quality normalized cDNA library, 439 immune-related sequences were identified. These sequences were categorized as pattern recognition receptors (47 sequences), signal modulators (52 sequences), signal transducers (137 sequences), effectors (39 sequences) and others (164 sequences). From the SSH libraries, 27, 17, 22 and 15 immune-related genes were identified from each SSH library treated with M. anisopliae, B. bassiana, B. thuringiensis and E. coli, respectively. When the normalized cDNA library was compared with the SSH libraries, 37 immune-related clusters were found in common; 56 clusters were identified in the SSH libraries, and 259 were identified in the normalized cDNA library. The immune-related gene expression pattern was further investigated using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Important immune-related genes were characterized, and their potential functions were discussed based on the integrated analysis of the results. We suggest that normalized cDNA and SSH libraries enable us to discover functional genes transcriptome. The results remarkably expand our knowledge about immune-inducible genes in C. formosanus Shiraki and enable the future development of novel control strategies for the management of Formosan subterranean termites. PMID:23874972

  2. Lead tolerance mechanism in Conyza canadensis: subcellular distribution, ultrastructure, antioxidative defense system, and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Luo, Jiewen; Hou, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-03-01

    We used hydroponic experiments to examine the effects of different concentrations of lead (Pb) on the performance of the Pb-tolerable plant Conyza canadensis. In these experiments, most of the Pb was accumulated in the roots; there was very little Pb accumulated in stems and leaves. C. canadensis is able to take up significant amounts of Pb whilst greatly restricting its transportation to specific parts of the aboveground biomass. High Pb concentrations inhibited plant growth, increased membrane permeability, elevated antioxidant enzyme activity in roots, and caused a significant increase in root H2O2 and malondialdehyde content. Analysis of Pb content at the subcellular level showed that most Pb was associated with the cell wall fraction, followed by the nucleus-rich fraction, and with a minority present in the mitochondrial and soluble fractions. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis of root cells revealed that the cell wall and intercellular space in C. canadensis roots are the main locations of Pb accumulation. Additionally, high Pb concentrations adversely affected the cellular structure of C. canadensis roots. The increased enzyme activity suggests that the antioxidant system may play an important role in eliminating or alleviating Pb toxicity in C. canadensis roots. However, the levels of non-protein sulfhydryl compounds, glutathione, and phytochelatin did not significantly change in either the roots or leaves under Pb-contaminated treatments. Our results provide strong evidence that cell walls restrict Pb uptake into the root and act as an important barrier protecting root cells, while demonstrating that antioxidant enzyme levels are correlated with Pb exposure. These findings demonstrate the roles played by these detoxification mechanisms in supporting Pb tolerance in C. canadensis. PMID:26733305

  3. Identification of several inducible defense-related genes in mechanically damaged soybean (glycine max l. merr) stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple defense-related genes have been identified in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr), however, research has primarily focused on the plant leaves, and despite the numerous insects and pathogens that feed on soybean stem tissues, relatively little is known about the stem defense response. In the curr...

  4. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Danielle J; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K; Gow, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 μg/g body weight) 20 and 110 nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110 nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  5. Root developmental adaptation to Fe toxicity: Mechanisms and management

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangjie; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Shi, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. To cope with Fe excess, plants have evolved complex adaptive responses that include morphological and physiological modifications. The highly dynamic adjustments in overall root system architecture (RSA) determine root plasticity and allow plants to efficiently adapt to environmental constraints. However, the effects of Fe excess on RSA are poorly understood. Recently, we showed that excess Fe treatment in Arabidopsis not only directly impairs primary root (PR) growth but also arrests lateral root (LR) formation by acting at the tip of the growing primary root. Such a change is believed to help RSA adjust and restrict excessive Fe absorption in the part of the rhizosphere subject to acute toxicity while maintaining the absorption of other nutrients in the less stressed components of the root system. We further showed that the suppression of PR growth and LR formation under excess Fe is alleviated by K+ addition, providing useful insight into the effectiveness of nutrient management to improve RSA and alleviate Fe toxicity symptoms in the field. PMID:26619064

  6. Root developmental adaptation to Fe toxicity: Mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjie; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. To cope with Fe excess, plants have evolved complex adaptive responses that include morphological and physiological modifications. The highly dynamic adjustments in overall root system architecture (RSA) determine root plasticity and allow plants to efficiently adapt to environmental constraints. However, the effects of Fe excess on RSA are poorly understood. Recently, we showed that excess Fe treatment in Arabidopsis not only directly impairs primary root (PR) growth but also arrests lateral root (LR) formation by acting at the tip of the growing primary root. Such a change is believed to help RSA adjust and restrict excessive Fe absorption in the part of the rhizosphere subject to acute toxicity while maintaining the absorption of other nutrients in the less stressed components of the root system. We further showed that the suppression of PR growth and LR formation under excess Fe is alleviated by K(+) addition, providing useful insight into the effectiveness of nutrient management to improve RSA and alleviate Fe toxicity symptoms in the field. PMID:26619064

  7. Mechanisms of Cardiopulmonary Adaptation to Microgravity. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP1 contains short reports concerning: (1) Autonomic Regulation of Circulation and Mechanical Function of Heart at Different Stages of 14th Month Space Flight; (2) Cardiovascular Oxygen Transport in Exercising Humans in Microgravity; (3) Venous Hemodynamic Changes Assessed by Air Plethysmography During a 16-Day Space Flight; (4) Respiratory Mechanics After 180 Days Space Mission (EUROMIR'95); (5) Assessment of the Sympathetic and the Parasympathetic Nervous Activity During Parabolic Flight by Pupillary Light Reflex; and(6) Vascular Response to Different Gravity.

  8. Sex-dependent liver colonization of human melanoma in SCID mice--role of host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Judit; Mohos, Anita; Tóvári, József; Rásó, Erzsébet; Lőrincz, Tamás; Zádori, Gergely; Tímár, József; Ladányi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The possibility that endocrine factors may influence the clinical course of malignant melanoma is suggested by the superior survival data of women. In preclinical models we observed a higher rate of colony formation by human melanoma cells in male compared to female SCID mice, but only in the case of the liver and not in other organs. The gender difference could be seen at an early phase of colony formation. On the other hand, in our human melanoma cell lines we failed to detect steroid receptor protein expression, and treatment with sex hormones did not considerably influence their in vitro behavior. Investigating the possible contribution of host cells to the observed gender difference, we performed in vivo blocking experiments applying pretreatment of the animals with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride and the NK cell inhibitor anti-asialo GM1 antibody. While Kupffer cell blockade enhanced melanoma liver colonization equally in the two sexes, a more prominent increase was observed in female than in male mice in the case of NK cell inhibition. Further supporting the importance of NK cells in the lower liver colonization efficiency of melanoma cells in females, gender difference in colony formation was lost in NSG mice lacking NK activity. Although in humans no organ selectivity of gender difference in melanoma progression has been observed according to data in the literature, our results possibly indicate a contribution of natural host defense mechanisms to gender difference in survival of patients with melanoma or other tumor types as well. PMID:23203681

  9. Characterization of Hg-phytochelatins complexes in vines (Vitis vinifera cv Malbec) as defense mechanism against metal stress.

    PubMed

    Spisso, Adrian A; Cerutti, Soledad; Silva, Fernanda; Pacheco, Pablo H; Martinez, Luis D

    2014-06-01

    An approach to understand vines (Vitis vinifera) defense mechanism against heavy metal stress by isolation and determination of Hg-phytochelatins (PCs) complexes was performed. PCs are important molecules involved in the control of metal concentration in plants. PCs complex toxic metals through -SH groups and stores them inside cells vacuole avoiding any toxic effect of free metals in the cytosol. The Hg-PCs identification was achieved by determination of Hg and S as hetero-tagged atoms. A method involving two-dimensional chromatographic analysis coupled to atomic spectrometry and confirmation by tandem mass spectrometry is proposed. An approach involving size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on roots, stems, and leaves extracts describing Hg distribution according to molecular weight and sulfur associations is proposed for the first time. Medium-low molecular weight Hg-S associations of 29-100 kDa were found, suggesting PCs presence. A second approach employing reversed-phase chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis allowed the determination of Hg-PCs complexes within the mentioned fractions. Chromatograms showed Hg-PC2, Hg-PC3 and Hg-PC4 presence only in roots. Hg-PCs presence in roots was confirmed by ESI-MS/MS analysis. PMID:24715273

  10. A mechanical plant defense defines the opening of a phenological window for gall induction by Asphondylia aucubae (Cecidomyiidae: Diptera).

    PubMed

    Imai, Kensuke; Ohsaki, Naota

    2009-04-01

    Many insect herbivores can only use hosts during a specific phenological stage, i.e., a phenological window. Previous studies have primarily examined the effects of these windows on insect herbivores, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms controlling the phenological windows. In most gall insect systems, phenological windows have been attributed to the short duration of physiologically active plant tissues that induce gall formation (reactive plant tissue). In the fruit gall midge, Asphondylia aucubae Yukawa and Ohsaki, and the host plant (i.e., Aucuba japonica) system, the disappearance of reactive plant tissue closes the phenological window, but its presence does not define the opening of the window. The hard endocarp of the fruit covers most potential oviposition sites just before the midge emergence season, but decreases in proportional cover during the emergence season. We experimentally manipulated the timing of oviposition relative to fruit development. Midges that emerged earliest and attacked fruits during their earliest developmental stages were unable to oviposit because of intact, hard endocarps, whereas their counterparts that emerged later could oviposit more readily through cracks in the endocarp. We noted possible oviposition avoidance behavior and the necessity of more frequent (repeated) ovipositor insertions to intensively stimulate the decreased reactive tissues during the latter half of the emergence season. Overall, our results indicated that the fragmentation of the defensive, hard endocarp of the host plant defines the opening of the phenological window in this plant-herbivore system. PMID:19389289

  11. Contextual control of inhibition with reinforcement: Adaptation and timing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Frohardt, Russell J.; Sunsay, Ceyhun; Waddell, Jaylyn; Morris, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments with rats studied the effects of switching the context after Pavlovian conditioning. In three conditioned suppression experiments, a large number of conditioning trials created “inhibition with reinforcement” (IWR), in which fear of the conditional stimulus (CS) reached a maximum and then declined despite continued CS – unconditional stimulus pairings. When IWR occurred, a context switch augmented fear of the CS; IWR and augmentation were highly correlated. Neither IWR nor augmentation resulted from inhibition of delay (IOD): In conditioned suppression, IWR and augmentation occurred without IOD (Experiment 3), and in appetitive conditioning (Experiment 4), IOD occurred without IWR or augmentation. IWR may occur in conditioned suppression because the animal adapts to fear of the CS in a context-specific manner. We discuss several implications. PMID:18426305

  12. Self-* and Adaptive Mechanisms for Large Scale Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, P.; Mastroianni, C.; Montero, R.; Andrjezak, A.; Kondo, D.

    Large-scale distributed computing systems and infrastructure, such as Grids, P2P systems and desktop Grid platforms, are decentralized, pervasive, and composed of a large number of autonomous entities. The complexity of these systems is such that human administration is nearly impossible and centralized or hierarchical control is highly inefficient. These systems need to run on highly dynamic environments, where content, network topologies and workloads are continuously changing. Moreover, they are characterized by the high degree of volatility of their components and the need to provide efficient service management and to handle efficiently large amounts of data. This paper describes some of the areas for which adaptation emerges as a key feature, namely, the management of computational Grids, the self-management of desktop Grid platforms and the monitoring and healing of complex applications. It also elaborates on the use of bio-inspired algorithms to achieve self-management. Related future trends and challenges are described.

  13. Induction of osmoadaptive mechanisms and modulation of cellular physiology help Bacillus licheniformis strain SSA 61 adapt to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sangeeta; Aggarwal, Chetana; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Bandeppa, G S; Khan, Md Aslam; Pearson, Lauren M; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Giometti, Carol S; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis strain SSA 61, originally isolated from Sambhar salt lake, was observed to grow even in the presence of 25 % salt stress. Osmoadaptive mechanisms of this halotolerant B. licheniformis strain SSA 61, for long-term survival and growth under salt stress, were determined. Proline was the preferentially accumulated compatible osmolyte. There was also increased accumulation of antioxidants ascorbic acid and glutathione. Among the different antioxidative enzymes assayed, superoxide dismutase played the most crucial role in defense against salt-induced stress in the organism. Adaptation to stress by the organism involved modulation of cellular physiology at various levels. There was enhanced expression of known proteins playing essential roles in stress adaptation, such as chaperones DnaK and GroEL, and general stress protein YfkM and polynucleotide phosphorylase/polyadenylase. Proteins involved in amino acid biosynthetic pathway, ribosome structure, and peptide elongation were also overexpressed. Salt stress-induced modulation of expression of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism was observed. There was up-regulation of a number of enzymes involved in generation of NADH and NADPH, indicating increased cellular demand for both energy and reducing power. PMID:25561404

  14. Toward a new task assignment and path evolution (TAPE) for missile defense system (MDS) using intelligent adaptive SOM with recurrent neural networks (RNNs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsu; Chen, Chun-Yao; Hung, Kun-Neng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a new adaptive self-organizing map (SOM) with recurrent neural network (RNN) controller is proposed for task assignment and path evolution of missile defense system (MDS). We address the problem of N agents (defending missiles) and D targets (incoming missiles) in MDS. A new RNN controller is designed to force an agent (or defending missile) toward a target (or incoming missile), and a monitoring controller is also designed to reduce the error between RNN controller and ideal controller. A new SOM with RNN controller is then designed to dispatch agents to their corresponding targets by minimizing total damaging cost. This is actually an important application of the multiagent system. The SOM with RNN controller is the main controller. After task assignment, the weighting factors of our new SOM with RNN controller are activated to dispatch the agents toward their corresponding targets. Using the Lyapunov constraints, the weighting factors for the proposed SOM with RNN controller are updated to guarantee the stability of the path evolution (or planning) system. Excellent simulations are obtained using this new approach for MDS, which show that our RNN has the lowest average miss distance among the several techniques. PMID:25148679

  15. Gestational diabetes mellitus impairs Nrf2-mediated adaptive antioxidant defenses and redox signaling in fetal endothelial cells in utero.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinghua; Chapple, Sarah J; Patel, Bijal; Puszyk, William; Sugden, David; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Siow, Richard C M; Mann, Giovanni E

    2013-12-01

    In utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We examined the effects of GDM on the proteome, redox status, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant gene expression in human fetal endothelial cells. Proteomic analysis revealed that proteins involved in redox homeostasis were significantly altered in GDM and associated with increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, protein oxidation, DNA damage, and diminished glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In GDM cells, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) failed to induce nuclear Nrf2 accumulation and mRNA and/or protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), Bach1, cystine/glutamate transporter, and glutamate cysteine ligase. Although methylation of CpG islands in Nrf2 or NQO1 promoters was unaltered by GDM, decreased DJ-1 and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β levels may account for impaired Nrf2 signaling. HNE-induced increases in GSH and NQO1 levels were abrogated by Nrf2 small interfering RNA in normal cells, and overexpression of Nrf2 in GDM cells partially restored NQO1 induction. Dysregulation of Nrf2 in fetal endothelium may contribute to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in offspring. PMID:23974919

  16. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Nrf2-Mediated Adaptive Antioxidant Defenses and Redox Signaling in Fetal Endothelial Cells In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinghua; Chapple, Sarah J.; Patel, Bijal; Puszyk, William; Sugden, David; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Siow, Richard C.M.; Mann, Giovanni E.

    2013-01-01

    In utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in later life, yet the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We examined the effects of GDM on the proteome, redox status, and nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant gene expression in human fetal endothelial cells. Proteomic analysis revealed that proteins involved in redox homeostasis were significantly altered in GDM and associated with increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, protein oxidation, DNA damage, and diminished glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In GDM cells, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) failed to induce nuclear Nrf2 accumulation and mRNA and/or protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), Bach1, cystine/glutamate transporter, and glutamate cysteine ligase. Although methylation of CpG islands in Nrf2 or NQO1 promoters was unaltered by GDM, decreased DJ-1 and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β levels may account for impaired Nrf2 signaling. HNE-induced increases in GSH and NQO1 levels were abrogated by Nrf2 small interfering RNA in normal cells, and overexpression of Nrf2 in GDM cells partially restored NQO1 induction. Dysregulation of Nrf2 in fetal endothelium may contribute to the increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in offspring. PMID:23974919

  17. Mechanisms of β-cell functional adaptation to changes in workload.

    PubMed

    Wortham, M; Sander, M

    2016-09-01

    Insulin secretion must be tightly coupled to nutritional state to maintain blood glucose homeostasis. To this end, pancreatic β-cells sense and respond to changes in metabolic conditions, thereby anticipating insulin demands for a given physiological context. This is achieved in part through adjustments of nutrient metabolism, which is controlled at several levels including allosteric regulation, post-translational modifications, and altered expression of metabolic enzymes. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of β-cell metabolic and functional adaptation in the context of two physiological states that alter glucose-stimulated insulin secretion: fasting and insulin resistance. We review current knowledge of metabolic changes that occur in the β-cell during adaptation and specifically discuss transcriptional mechanisms that underlie β-cell adaptation. A more comprehensive understanding of how β-cells adapt to changes in nutrient state could identify mechanisms to be co-opted for therapeutically modulating insulin secretion in metabolic disease. PMID:27615135

  18. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  19. Plant Defense against Insect Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar. Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight, defense compounds. These bioactive specialized plant defense compounds may repel or intoxicate insects, while defense proteins often interfere with their digestion. Volatiles are released upon herbivory to repel herbivores, attract predators or for communication between leaves or plants, and to induce defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects have adapted to resist plant defenses, and in some cases even sequester the compounds and reuse them in their own defense. Both plant defense and insect adaptation involve metabolic costs, so most plant-insect interactions reach a stand-off, where both host and herbivore survive although their development is suboptimal. PMID:23681010

  20. Defense styles of pedophilic offenders.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, Martin; Beretta, Véronique; de Roten, Yves; Koerner, Annett; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    This pilot study investigated the defense styles of pedophile sexual offenders. Interviews with 20 pedophiles and 20 controls were scored using the Defense Mechanisms Rating Scales. Results showed that pedophiles had a significantly lower overall defensive functioning score than the controls. Pedophiles used significantly fewer obsessional-level defenses but more major image-distorting and action-level defenses. Results also suggested differences in the prevalence of individual defenses where pedophiles used more dissociation, displacement, denial, autistic fantasy, splitting of object, projective identification, acting out, and passive aggressive behavior but less intellectualization and rationalization. PMID:17875603

  1. Genome and Transcriptome Analyses Provide Insight into the Euryhaline Adaptation Mechanism of Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Li, Li; She, Zhicai; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, has developed special mechanisms to regulate its osmotic balance to adapt to fluctuations of salinities in coastal zones. To understand the oyster’s euryhaline adaptation, we analyzed salt stress effectors metabolism pathways under different salinities (salt 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40 for 7 days) using transcriptome data, physiology experiment and quantitative real-time PCR. Results Transcriptome data uncovered 189, 480, 207 and 80 marker genes for monitoring physiology status of oysters and the environment conditions. Three known salt stress effectors (involving ion channels, aquaporins and free amino acids) were examined. The analysis of ion channels and aquaporins indicated that 7 days long-term salt stress inhibited voltage-gated Na+/K+ channel and aquaporin but increased calcium-activated K+ channel and Ca2+ channel. As the most important category of osmotic stress effector, we analyzed the oyster FAAs metabolism pathways (including taurine, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, proline and arginine) and explained FAAs functional mechanism for oyster low salinity adaptation. FAAs metabolism key enzyme genes displayed expression differentiation in low salinity adapted individuals comparing with control which further indicated that FAAs played important roles for oyster salinity adaptation. A global metabolic pathway analysis (iPath) of oyster expanded genes displayed a co-expansion of FAAs metabolism in C. gigas compared with seven other species, suggesting oyster’s powerful ability regarding FAAs metabolism, allowing it to adapt to fluctuating salinities, which may be one important mechanism underlying euryhaline adaption in oyster. Additionally, using transcriptome data analysis, we uncovered salt stress transduction networks in C. gigas. Conclusions Our results represented oyster salt stress effectors functional mechanisms under salt stress conditions and explained the expansion of FAAs metabolism pathways as

  2. Molecular mechanisms underlying the exceptional adaptations of batoid fins

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Klomp, Jeff; Pieretti, Joyce; Schneider, Igor; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Shubin, Neil H.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme novelties in the shape and size of paired fins are exemplified by extinct and extant cartilaginous and bony fishes. Pectoral fins of skates and rays, such as the little skate (Batoid, Leucoraja erinacea), show a strikingly unique morphology where the pectoral fin extends anteriorly to ultimately fuse with the head. This results in a morphology that essentially surrounds the body and is associated with the evolution of novel swimming mechanisms in the group. In an approach that extends from RNA sequencing to in situ hybridization to functional assays, we show that anterior and posterior portions of the pectoral fin have different genetic underpinnings: canonical genes of appendage development control posterior fin development via an apical ectodermal ridge (AER), whereas an alternative Homeobox (Hox)–Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)–Wingless type MMTV integration site family (Wnt) genetic module in the anterior region creates an AER-like structure that drives anterior fin expansion. Finally, we show that GLI family zinc finger 3 (Gli3), which is an anterior repressor of tetrapod digits, is expressed in the posterior half of the pectoral fin of skate, shark, and zebrafish but in the anterior side of the pelvic fin. Taken together, these data point to both highly derived and deeply ancestral patterns of gene expression in skate pectoral fins, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms behind the evolution of novel fin morphologies. PMID:26644578

  3. Molecular mechanisms underlying the exceptional adaptations of batoid fins.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tetsuya; Klomp, Jeff; Pieretti, Joyce; Schneider, Igor; Gehrke, Andrew R; Shubin, Neil H

    2015-12-29

    Extreme novelties in the shape and size of paired fins are exemplified by extinct and extant cartilaginous and bony fishes. Pectoral fins of skates and rays, such as the little skate (Batoid, Leucoraja erinacea), show a strikingly unique morphology where the pectoral fin extends anteriorly to ultimately fuse with the head. This results in a morphology that essentially surrounds the body and is associated with the evolution of novel swimming mechanisms in the group. In an approach that extends from RNA sequencing to in situ hybridization to functional assays, we show that anterior and posterior portions of the pectoral fin have different genetic underpinnings: canonical genes of appendage development control posterior fin development via an apical ectodermal ridge (AER), whereas an alternative Homeobox (Hox)-Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)-Wingless type MMTV integration site family (Wnt) genetic module in the anterior region creates an AER-like structure that drives anterior fin expansion. Finally, we show that GLI family zinc finger 3 (Gli3), which is an anterior repressor of tetrapod digits, is expressed in the posterior half of the pectoral fin of skate, shark, and zebrafish but in the anterior side of the pelvic fin. Taken together, these data point to both highly derived and deeply ancestral patterns of gene expression in skate pectoral fins, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms behind the evolution of novel fin morphologies. PMID:26644578

  4. Defenseive Structuring and Environmental Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Bernard J.

    1970-01-01

    This essay explores a kind of adaptation, referred to as defenseive structuring, that recurs with great regularity among groups that perceive themselves as exposed to environmental stress of long duration with which they cannot cope directly and aggressively." (Author)

  5. Herbivores can select for mixed defensive strategies in plants.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Diego; Fornoni, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance are the most important defense mechanisms against herbivores. Initial theoretical studies considered both mechanisms functionally redundant, but more recent empirical studies suggest that these mechanisms may complement each other, favoring the presence of mixed defense patterns. However, the expectation of redundancy between tolerance and resistance remains unsupported. In this study, we tested this assumption following an ecological genetics field experiment in which the presence/absence of two herbivores (Lema daturaphila and Epitrix parvula) of Datura stramonium were manipulated. In each of three treatments, genotypic selection analyses were performed and selection patterns compared. Our results indicated that selection on resistance and tolerance was significantly different between the two folivores. Tolerance and resistance are not redundant defense strategies in D. stramonium but instead functioned as complementary defenses against both beetle species, favoring the evolution of a mixed defense strategy. Although each herbivore was selected for different defense strategies, the observed average tolerance and resistance were closer to the adaptive peak predicted against E. parvula and both beetles together. In our experimental population, natural selection imposed by herbivores can favor the evolution of mixed defense strategies in plants, accounting for the presence of intermediate levels of tolerance and resistance. PMID:23171270

  6. Adaptive implicit-explicit finite element algorithms for fluid mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, T. E.; Liou, J.

    1988-01-01

    The adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE) approach is presented for the finite-element solution of various problems in computational fluid mechanics. In the AIE approach, the elements are dynamically (adaptively) arranged into differently treated groups. The differences in treatment could be based on considerations such as the cost efficiency, the type of spatial or temporal discretization employed, the choice of field equations, etc. Several numerical tests are performed to demonstrate that this approach can achieve substantial savings in CPU time and memory.

  7. Bone-free: soft mechanics for adaptive locomotion.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, B A; Lin, Huai-ti

    2014-12-01

    Muscular hydrostats (such as mollusks), and fluid-filled animals (such as annelids), can exploit their constant-volume tissues to transfer forces and displacements in predictable ways, much as articulated animals use hinges and levers. Although larval insects contain pressurized fluids, they also have internal air tubes that are compressible and, as a result, they have more uncontrolled degrees of freedom. Therefore, the mechanisms by which larval insects control their movements are expected to reveal useful strategies for designing soft biomimetic robots. Using caterpillars as a tractable model system, it is now possible to identify the biomechanical and neural strategies for controlling movements in such highly deformable animals. For example, the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, can stiffen its body by increasing muscular tension (and therefore body pressure) but the internal cavity (hemocoel) is not iso-barometric, nor is pressure used to directly control the movements of its limbs. Instead, fluid and tissues flow within the hemocoel and the body is soft and flexible to conform to the substrate. Even the gut contributes to the biomechanics of locomotion; it is decoupled from the movements of the body wall and slides forward within the body cavity at the start of each step. During crawling the body is kept in tension for part of the stride and compressive forces are exerted on the substrate along the axis of the caterpillar, thereby using the environment as a skeleton. The timing of muscular activity suggests that crawling is coordinated by proleg-retractor motoneurons and that the large segmental muscles produce anterograde waves of lifting that do not require precise timing. This strategy produces a robust form of locomotion in which the kinematics changes little with orientation. In different species of caterpillar, the presence of prolegs on particular body segments is related to alternative kinematics such as "inching." This suggests a mechanism for the

  8. Adaptive Spontaneous Transitions between Two Mechanisms of Numerical Averaging.

    PubMed

    Brezis, Noam; Bronfman, Zohar Z; Usher, Marius

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism with which humans estimate numerical averages. Participants were presented with 4, 8 or 16 (two-digit) numbers, serially and rapidly (2 numerals/second) and were instructed to convey the sequence average. As predicted by a dual, but not a single-component account, we found a non-monotonic influence of set-size on accuracy. Moreover, we observed a marked decrease in RT as set-size increases and RT-accuracy tradeoff in the 4-, but not in the 16-number condition. These results indicate that in accordance with the normative directive, participants spontaneously employ analytic/sequential thinking in the 4-number condition and intuitive/holistic thinking in the 16-number condition. When the presentation rate is extreme (10 items/sec) we find that, while performance still remains high, the estimations are now based on intuitive processing. The results are accounted for by a computational model postulating population-coding underlying intuitive-averaging and working-memory-mediated symbolic procedures underlying analytical-averaging, with flexible allocation between the two. PMID:26041580

  9. Adaptive Spontaneous Transitions between Two Mechanisms of Numerical Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Brezis, Noam; Bronfman, Zohar Z.; Usher, Marius

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism with which humans estimate numerical averages. Participants were presented with 4, 8 or 16 (two-digit) numbers, serially and rapidly (2 numerals/second) and were instructed to convey the sequence average. As predicted by a dual, but not a single-component account, we found a non-monotonic influence of set-size on accuracy. Moreover, we observed a marked decrease in RT as set-size increases and RT-accuracy tradeoff in the 4-, but not in the 16-number condition. These results indicate that in accordance with the normative directive, participants spontaneously employ analytic/sequential thinking in the 4-number condition and intuitive/holistic thinking in the 16-number condition. When the presentation rate is extreme (10 items/sec) we find that, while performance still remains high, the estimations are now based on intuitive processing. The results are accounted for by a computational model postulating population-coding underlying intuitive-averaging and working-memory-mediated symbolic procedures underlying analytical-averaging, with flexible allocation between the two. PMID:26041580

  10. Local adaptive mechanism and hierarchic social entropy in opinion formation on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Hu, Yanqing; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study the opinion formation using co-evolution model, in which network's structure interacts with the nodes' opinion. A local adaptive model is proposed to investigate the effects of local information on the opinion formation, including local rewiring and influencing mechanism. The results show that under the local adaptive mechanism, systems could reach steady state of consensus or fragmentation. Considering the local influencing factor only, we find that transition occurs under proper condition and local parameter affects the transition point. At last, the diversity of opinions is considered, and hierarchic social entropy is used as a macroscopic measurement which is proved to be well.

  11. Mid-humerus adaptation in fast pitch softballers and the impact of throwing mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bogenschutz, Elizabeth D.; Smith, Heather D.; Warden, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Throwing is a vigorous activity that generates large internal loads. There is limited evidence of the effect of these loads on bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate the: 1) magnitude of bone adaptation within the midshaft humerus of female fast-pitch softball players and 2) influence of throwing mechanics (windmill vs. overhand throwing) on the magnitude of adaptation. Methods Midshaft humeral bone mass, structure and estimated strength were assessed via peripheral quantitative computed tomography in fast-pitch softball players (throwers; n=15) and matched controls (controls; n=15). The effect of throwing was examined by comparing dominant-to-nondominant differences in throwers to controls, while the influence of mechanics was determined by comparing dominant-to-nondominant differences in throwers who primarily play as pitcher (windmill thrower), catcher (overhand thrower) or fielder (overhand thrower). Results Throwers had greater dominant-to-nondominant difference in midshaft humeral bone mass, structure and estimated strength relative to controls (all P<0.05). The largest effect was for estimated torsional strength with throwers having a mean dominant-to-nondominant difference of 22.5% (range, 6.7% to 43.9%) compared to 4.4% (range, -8.3% to 17.5%) in controls (P<0.001). Throwing mechanics appeared to influence the magnitude of skeletal adaptation, with overhand throwers having more than double dominant-to-nondominant difference in midshaft humeral bone mass, structure and estimated strength than windmill throwers (all P<0.05). Conclusion Throwing induces substantial skeletal adaptation at the midshaft humerus of the dominant upper extremity. Throwing mechanics appears to the influence the magnitude of adaptation as catchers and fielders (overhand throwers) had twice as much adaptation as pitchers (windmill throwers). The latter finding may have implications for skeletal injury risk at the midshaft humerus in throwing athletes. PMID

  12. Two separate mechanisms of enforced viral replication balance innate and adaptive immune activation.

    PubMed

    Shaabani, Namir; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Zhou, Fan; Tur, Rita Ferrer; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Tumanov, Alexei V; Hardt, Cornelia; Pinschewer, Daniel; Christen, Urs; Lang, Philipp A; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Karl S

    2016-02-01

    The induction of innate and adaptive immunity is essential for controlling viral infections. Limited or overwhelming innate immunity can negatively impair the adaptive immune response. Therefore, balancing innate immunity separately from activating the adaptive immune response would result in a better antiviral immune response. Recently, we demonstrated that Usp18-dependent replication of virus in secondary lymphatic organs contributes to activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Whether specific mechanisms can balance innate and adaptive immunity separately remains unknown. In this study, using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and replication-deficient single-cycle LCMV vectors, we found that viral replication of the initial inoculum is essential for activating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits is necessary for inducing systemic levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Although enforced virus replication is driven primarily by Usp18, B cell-derived lymphotoxin beta contributes to the extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits. Therefore, lymphotoxin beta regulates IFN-I induction independently of CD8(+) T-cell activity. We found that two separate mechanisms act together in the spleen to guarantee amplification of virus during infection, thereby balancing the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:26553386

  13. Protein kinase Cδ mediates trimethyltin-induced neurotoxicity in mice in vivo via inhibition of glutathione defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Tu, Thu-Hien Thi; Lim, Yong Kwang; Wie, Myung-Bok; Kim, Dae-Joong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neurotoxicity. TMT treatment (2.8 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased PKCδ expression out of PKC isozymes (i.e., α, βI, βII, δ, and ς) in the hippocampus of wild-type (WT) mice. Consistently, treatment with TMT resulted in significant increases in cleaved PKCδ expression. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition (PKCδ knockout or rottlerin) was less susceptible to TMT-induced seizures than WT mice. TMT treatment increased glutathione oxidation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and levels of reactive oxygen species. These effects were more pronounced in the WT mice than in PKCδ knockout mice. In addition, the ability of TMT to induce nuclear translocation of Nrf2, Nrf2 DNA-binding activity, and upregulation of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase was significantly increased in the PKCδ knockout mice and rottlerin (10 or 20 mg/kg, p.o. × 6)-treated WT mice. Furthermore, neuronal degeneration (as shown by nuclear chromatin clumping and TUNEL staining) in WT mice was most pronounced 2 days after TMT. At the same time, TMT-induced inhibition of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling was evident, thereby decreasing phospho-Bad, expression of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, and the interaction between phospho-Bad and 14-3-3 protein, and increasing Bax expression and caspase-3 cleavage were observed. Rottlerin or PKCδ knockout significantly protected these changes in anti- and pro-apoptotic factors. Importantly, treatment of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (0.8 or 1.6 µg, i.c.v.) 4 h before TMT counteracted protective effects (i.e., Nrf-2-dependent glutathione induction and pro-survival phenomenon) of rottlerin. Therefore, our results suggest that down-regulation of PKCδ and up-regulations of Nrf2-dependent glutathione defense mechanism and PI3K/Akt signaling are critical for attenuating TMT neurotoxicity. PMID:25895139

  14. Mechanism of HSV infection through soluble adapter-mediated virus bridging to the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Tahara, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2011-04-25

    Herpes simplex virus entry into cells requires the binding of envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to an entry receptor. Depending on the cell, entry occurs by different mechanisms, including fusion at the cell surface or endocytosis. Here we examined the entry mechanism through a non-HSV receptor mediated by a soluble bi-specific adapter protein composed of recognition elements for gD and the EGF receptor (EGFR). Virus entered into endosomes using either EGF or an EGFR-specific single chain antibody (scFv) for receptor recognition. Infection was less efficient with the EGF adapter which could be attributed to its weaker binding to a viral gD. Infection mediated by the scFv adapter was pH sensitive, indicating that gD-EGFR bridging alone was insufficient for capsid release from endosomes. We also show that the scFv adapter enhanced infection of EGFR-expressing tumor tissue in vivo. Our results indicate that adapters may retarget HSV infection without drastically changing the entry mechanism.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Long Bone Adaptation due to Mechanical Loading: Correlation with Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Natarajan Chennimalai; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Jasiuk, Iwona M.; Robling, Alex G.; Turner, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The process of external bone adaptation in cortical bone is modeled mathematically using finite element (FE) stress analysis coupled with an evolution model, in which adaptation response is triggered by mechanical stimulus represented by strain energy density. The model is applied to experiments in which a rat ulna is subjected to cyclic loading, and the results demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the bone adaptation response. The FE mesh is generated from micro-computed tomography (μCT) images of the rat ulna, and the stress analysis is carried out using boundary and loading conditions on the rat ulna obtained from the experiments [Robling, A. G., F. M. Hinant, D. B. Burr, and C. H. Turner. J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002]. The external adaptation process is implemented in the model by moving the surface nodes of the FE mesh based on an evolution law characterized by two parameters: one that captures the rate of the adaptation process (referred to as gain); and the other characterizing the threshold value of the mechanical stimulus required for adaptation (referred to as threshold-sensitivity). A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the effect of these two parameters on the adaptation response. We show, following comparison of results from the simulations to the experimental observations of Robling et al. (J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002), that splitting the loading cycles into different number of bouts affects the threshold-sensitivity but not the rate of adaptation. We also show that the threshold-sensitivity parameter can quantify the mechanosensitivity of the osteocytes. PMID:20013156

  16. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  17. Microbial community succession mechanism coupling with adaptive evolution of adsorption performance in chalcopyrite bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    The community succession mechanism of Acidithiobacillus sp. coupling with adaptive evolution of adsorption performance were systematically investigated. Specifically, the μmax of attached and free cells was increased and peak time was moved ahead, indicating both cell growth of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was promoted. In the mixed strains system, the domination courses of A. thiooxidans was dramatically shortened from 22th day to 15th day, although community structure finally approached to the normal system. Compared to A. ferrooxidans, more positive effects of adaptive evolution on cell growth of A. thiooxidans were shown in either single or mixed strains system. Moreover, higher concentrations of sulfate and ferric ions indicated that both sulfur and iron metabolism was enhanced, especially of A. thiooxidans. Consistently, copper ion production was improved from 65.5 to 88.5 mg/L. This new adaptive evolution and community succession mechanism may be useful for guiding similar bioleaching processes. PMID:25978855

  18. Molecular dynamics modelling of mechanical properties of polymers for adaptive aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Drikakis, Dimitris; Asproulis, Nikolaos

    2015-02-01

    The features of adaptive structures depend on the properties of the supporting materials. For example, morphing wing structures require wing skin materials, such as rubbers that can withstand the forces imposed by the internal mechanism while maintaining the required aerodynamic properties of the aircraft. In this study, Molecular Dynamics and Minimization simulations are being used to establish well-equilibrated models of Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) elastomer systems and investigate their mechanical properties.

  19. Evolution of time-keeping mechanisms: early emergence and adaptation to photoperiod

    PubMed Central

    Hut, R. A.; Beersma, D. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Virtually all species have developed cellular oscillations and mechanisms that synchronize these cellular oscillations to environmental cycles. Such environmental cycles in biotic (e.g. food availability and predation risk) or abiotic (e.g. temperature and light) factors may occur on a daily, annual or tidal time scale. Internal timing mechanisms may facilitate behavioural or physiological adaptation to such changes in environmental conditions. These timing mechanisms commonly involve an internal molecular oscillator (a ‘clock’) that is synchronized (‘entrained’) to the environmental cycle by receptor mechanisms responding to relevant environmental signals (‘Zeitgeber’, i.e. German for time-giver). To understand the evolution of such timing mechanisms, we have to understand the mechanisms leading to selective advantage. Although major advances have been made in our understanding of the physiological and molecular mechanisms driving internal cycles (proximate questions), studies identifying mechanisms of natural selection on clock systems (ultimate questions) are rather limited. Here, we discuss the selective advantage of a circadian system and how its adaptation to day length variation may have a functional role in optimizing seasonal timing. We discuss various cases where selective advantages of circadian timing mechanisms have been shown and cases where temporarily loss of circadian timing may cause selective advantage. We suggest an explanation for why a circadian timing system has emerged in primitive life forms like cyanobacteria and we evaluate a possible molecular mechanism that enabled these bacteria to adapt to seasonal variation in day length. We further discuss how the role of the circadian system in photoperiodic time measurement may explain differential selection pressures on circadian period when species are exposed to changing climatic conditions (e.g. global warming) or when they expand their geographical range to different latitudes or

  20. Auxin promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae via a mechanism independent of suppression of salicylic acid-mediated defenses.

    PubMed

    Mutka, Andrew M; Fawley, Stephen; Tsao, Tiffany; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2013-06-01

    Auxin is a key plant growth regulator that also impacts plant-pathogen interactions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae manipulates auxin physiology in Arabidopsis thaliana to promote pathogenesis. Pseudomonas syringae strategies to alter host auxin biology include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and production of virulence factors that alter auxin responses in host cells. The application of exogenous auxin enhances disease caused by P. syringae strain DC3000. This is hypothesized to result from antagonism between auxin and salicylic acid (SA), a major regulator of plant defenses, but this hypothesis has not been tested in the context of infected plants. We further investigated the role of auxin during pathogenesis by examining the interaction of auxin and SA in the context of infection in plants with elevated endogenous levels of auxin. We demonstrated that elevated IAA biosynthesis in transgenic plants overexpressing the YUCCA 1 (YUC1) auxin biosynthesis gene led to enhanced susceptibility to DC3000. Elevated IAA levels did not interfere significantly with host defenses, as effector-triggered immunity was active in YUC1-overexpressing plants, and we observed only minor effects on SA levels and SA-mediated responses. Furthermore, a plant line carrying both the YUC1-overexpression transgene and the salicylic acid induction deficient 2 (sid2) mutation, which impairs SA synthesis, exhibited additive effects of enhanced susceptibility from both elevated auxin levels and impaired SA-mediated defenses. Thus, in IAA overproducing plants, the promotion of pathogen growth occurs independently of suppression of SA-mediated defenses. PMID:23521356

  1. A Neural Mechanism for Time-Window Separation Resolves Ambiguity of Adaptive Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, K. Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R. Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task—namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal—but detrimental for another—the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  2. A neural mechanism for time-window separation resolves ambiguity of adaptive coding.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, K Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task--namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal-but detrimental for another--the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  3. Molecular mechanisms of adaptation emerging from the physics and evolution of nucleic acids and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Ma, Bin-Guang; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2014-01-01

    DNA, RNA and proteins are major biological macromolecules that coevolve and adapt to environments as components of one highly interconnected system. We explore here sequence/structure determinants of mechanisms of adaptation of these molecules, links between them, and results of their mutual evolution. We complemented statistical analysis of genomic and proteomic sequences with folding simulations of RNA molecules, unraveling causal relations between compositional and sequence biases reflecting molecular adaptation on DNA, RNA and protein levels. We found many compositional peculiarities related to environmental adaptation and the life style. Specifically, thermal adaptation of protein-coding sequences in Archaea is characterized by a stronger codon bias than in Bacteria. Guanine and cytosine load in the third codon position is important for supporting the aerobic life style, and it is highly pronounced in Bacteria. The third codon position also provides a tradeoff between arginine and lysine, which are favorable for thermal adaptation and aerobicity, respectively. Dinucleotide composition provides stability of nucleic acids via strong base-stacking in ApG dinucleotides. In relation to coevolution of nucleic acids and proteins, thermostability-related demands on the amino acid composition affect the nucleotide content in the second codon position in Archaea. PMID:24371267

  4. A genomic perspective on the important genetic mechanisms of upland adaptation of rice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultivated rice consists of two important ecotypes, upland and irrigated, that have respectively adapted to either dry land or irrigated cultivation. Upland rice, widely adopted in rainfed upland areas in virtue of its little water requirement, contains abundant untapped genetic resources, such as genes for drought adaptation. With water shortage exacerbated and population expanding, the need for breeding crop varieties with drought adaptation becomes more and more urgent. However, a previous oversight in upland rice research reveals little information regarding its genetic mechanisms for upland adaption, greatly hindering progress in harnessing its genetic resources for breeding and cultivation. Results In this study, we selected 84 upland and 82 irrigated accessions from all over the world, phenotyped them under both irrigated and dry land environments, and investigated the phylogenetic relations and population structure of the upland ecotype using whole genome variation data. Further comparative analysis yields a list of differentiated genes that may account for the phenotypic and physiological differences between upland and irrigated rice. Conclusions This study represents the first genomic investigation in a large sample of upland rice, providing valuable gene list for understanding upland rice adaptation, especially drought-related adaptation, and its subsequent utilization in modern agriculture. PMID:24920279

  5. Current Status of Proteomic Studies on Defense Responses in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xifeng; Bhadauria, Vijai; Ma, Bojun

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stresses are constraints to plant growth and development negatively impacting crop production. To counter such stresses, plants have developed stress-specific adaptations as well as simultaneous responses. The efficacy and magnitude of inducible adaptive responses are dependent on activation of signaling pathways and intracellular networks by modulating expression, or abundance, and/or post-translational modification of proteins associated with defense mechanisms. Proteomics plays an important role in elucidating plant defense mechanisms by mining the differential regulation of proteins to various biotic stresses. Rice, one of the most widely cultivated food crops in world, is constantly challenged by a variety of biotic stresses, and high-throughput proteomics approaches have been employed to unravel the molecular mechanism of the biotic stresses-response in rice. In this review, we summarize the latest advances of proteomic studies on defense responses and discuss the potential relevance of the proteins identified by proteomic means in rice defense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide perspective for proteomics in unraveling the molecular mechanism of rice immunity. PMID:26364119

  6. A Complexity-Aware Video Adaptation Mechanism for Live Streaming Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng-Ting; Yao, Jason J.; Chen, Homer H.

    2007-12-01

    The paradigm shift of network design from performance-centric to constraint-centric has called for new signal processing techniques to deal with various aspects of resource-constrained communication and networking. In this paper, we consider the computational constraints of a multimedia communication system and propose a video adaptation mechanism for live video streaming of multiple channels. The video adaptation mechanism includes three salient features. First, it adjusts the computational resource of the streaming server block by block to provide a fine control of the encoding complexity. Second, as far as we know, it is the first mechanism to allocate the computational resource to multiple channels. Third, it utilizes a complexity-distortion model to determine the optimal coding parameter values to achieve global optimization. These techniques constitute the basic building blocks for a successful application of wireless and Internet video to digital home, surveillance, IPTV, and online games.

  7. The Role of Adaptation in Body Load-Regulating Mechanisms During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Holt, Christopher; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Body loading is a fundamental parameter that modulates motor output during locomotion, and is especially important for controlling the generation of stepping patterns, dynamic balance, and termination of locomotion. Load receptors that regulate and control posture and stance in locomotion include the Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles at the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the Ruffini endings and the Pacinian corpuscles in the soles of the feet. Increased body weight support (BWS) during locomotion results in an immediate reorganization of locomotor control, such as a reduction in stance and double support duration and decreased hip, ankle, and knee angles during the gait cycle. Previous studies on the effect during exposure to increased BWS while walking showed a reduction in lower limb joint angles and gait cycle timing that represents a reorganization of locomotor control. Until now, no studies have investigated how locomotor control responds after a period of exposure to adaptive modification in the body load sensing system. The goal of this research was to determine the adaptive properties of body load-regulating mechanisms in locomotor control during locomotion. We hypothesized that body load-regulating mechanisms contribute to locomotor control, and adaptive changes in these load-regulating mechanisms require reorganization to maintain forward locomotion. Head-torso coordination, lower limb movement patterns, and gait cycle timing were evaluated before and after a 30-minute adaptation session during which subjects walked on a treadmill at 5.4 km/hr with 40% body weight support (BWS). Before and after the adaptation period, head-torso and lower limb 3D kinematic data were obtained while performing a goal directed task during locomotion with 0% BWS using a video-based motion analysis system, and gait cycle timing parameters were collected by foot switches positioned under the heel and toe of the subjects shoes. Subjects showed adaptive modification in

  8. [Mechanisms of natural variability at adaptation of human physiological systems to conditions of space flight].

    PubMed

    Larina, I M; Nosovskiĭ, A M; Grigor'ev, A I

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the physiological data using the principle of invariant relationships, to reveal the mechanisms of adaptive variability. It was used physical-chemical, biochemical, and hormonal blood parameters of cosmonauts who have committed short-term and long space flights. These results suggest that application of the methods of fractal geometry to quantitative estimates of homeostasis allows to allocate the processes depending on the increase/decrease of adaptive variability and fix the state of stability or instability of certain physiological regulatory subsystems, due to mobility and to reduce the level of stability which remains stable internal structure of relationships throughout the body. PMID:22679800

  9. Analysis of the Molecular Dialogue Between Gray Mold (Botrytis cinerea) and Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) Reveals a Clear Shift in Defense Mechanisms During Berry Ripening.

    PubMed

    Kelloniemi, Jani; Trouvelot, Sophie; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Simon, Adeline; Dalmais, Bérengère; Frettinger, Patrick; Cimerman, Agnès; Fermaud, Marc; Roudet, Jean; Baulande, Sylvain; Bruel, Christophe; Choquer, Mathias; Couvelard, Linhdavanh; Duthieuw, Mathilde; Ferrarini, Alberto; Flors, Victor; Le Pêcheur, Pascal; Loisel, Elise; Morgant, Guillaume; Poussereau, Nathalie; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Rascle, Christine; Trdá, Lucie; Poinssot, Benoit; Viaud, Muriel

    2015-11-01

    Mature grapevine berries at the harvesting stage (MB) are very susceptible to the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea, while veraison berries (VB) are not. We conducted simultaneous microscopic and transcriptomic analyses of the pathogen and the host to investigate the infection process developed by B. cinerea on MB versus VB, and the plant defense mechanisms deployed to stop the fungus spreading. On the pathogen side, our genome-wide transcriptomic data revealed that B. cinerea genes upregulated during infection of MB are enriched in functional categories related to necrotrophy, such as degradation of the plant cell wall, proteolysis, membrane transport, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and detoxification. Quantitative-polymerase chain reaction on a set of representative genes related to virulence and microscopic observations further demonstrated that the infection is also initiated on VB but is stopped at the penetration stage. On the plant side, genome-wide transcriptomic analysis and metabolic data revealed a defense pathway switch during berry ripening. In response to B. cinerea inoculation, VB activated a burst of ROS, the salicylate-dependent defense pathway, the synthesis of the resveratrol phytoalexin, and cell-wall strengthening. On the contrary, in infected MB, the jasmonate-dependent pathway was activated, which did not stop the fungal necrotrophic process. PMID:26267356

  10. Adaptive Response in Animals Exposed to Non-Ionizing Radiofrequency Fields: Some Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Tong, Jian

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, our research group has been investigating the phenomenon of adaptive response in animals exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields. The results from several separate studies indicated a significant increase in survival, decreases in genetic damage as well as oxidative damage and, alterations in several cellular processes in mice pre-exposed to radiofrequency fields and subsequently subjected to sub-lethal or lethal doses of γ-radiation or injected with bleomycin, a radiomimetic chemical mutagen. These observations indicated the induction of adaptive response providing the animals the ability to resist subsequent damage. Similar studies conducted by independent researchers in mice and rats have supported our observation on increased survival. In this paper, we have presented a brief review of all of our own and other independent investigations on radiofrequency fields-induced adaptive response and some underlying mechanisms discussed. PMID:24758897

  11. Terrain Adaptability Mechanism of Large Ruminants' Feet on the Kinematics View

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qun; Ding, Xilun; Xu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Ruminants live in various parts of land. Similar cloven hooves assist ruminants in adapting to different ground environment during locomotion. This paper analyzes the general terrain adaptability of the feet of ruminants using kinematics of the equivalent mechanism model based on screw theory. Cloven hooves could adjust attitude by changing relative positions between two digits in swing phase. This function helps to choose better landing orientation. “Grasping” or “holding” a rock or other object on the ground passively provides extra adhesion force in stance phase. Ruminants could adjust the position of the metacarpophalangeal joint or metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP or MCP) with no relative motion between the tip of feet and the ground, which ensures the adhesion and dexterity in stance phase. These functions are derived from an example from chamois' feet and several assumptions, which are believed to demonstrate the foundation of adaptation of ruminants and ensure a stable and continuous movement. PMID:27019579

  12. Mechanics of pressure-adaptive honeycomb and its application to wing morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Roelof; Barrett, Ron

    2011-09-01

    Current, highly active classes of adaptive materials have been considered for use in many different aerospace applications. From adaptive flight control surfaces to wing surfaces, shape-memory alloy (SMA), piezoelectric and electrorheological fluids are making their way into wings, stabilizers and rotor blades. Despite the benefits which can be seen in many classes of aircraft, some profound challenges are ever present, including low power and energy density, high power consumption, high development and installation costs and outright programmatic blockages due to a lack of a materials certification database on FAR 23/25 and 27/29 certified aircraft. Three years ago, a class of adaptive structure was developed to skirt these daunting challenges. This pressure-adaptive honeycomb (PAH) is capable of extremely high performance and is FAA/EASA certifiable because it employs well characterized materials arranged in ways that lend a high level of adaptivity to the structure. This study is centered on laying out the mechanics, analytical models and experimental test data describing this new form of adaptive material. A directionally biased PAH system using an external (spring) force acting on the PAH bending structure was examined. The paper discusses the mechanics of pressure adaptive honeycomb and describes a simple reduced order model that can be used to simplify the geometric model in a finite element environment. The model assumes that a variable stiffness honeycomb results in an overall deformation of the honeycomb. Strains in excess of 50% can be generated through this mechanism without encountering local material (yield) limits. It was also shown that the energy density of pressure-adaptive honeycomb is akin to that of shape-memory alloy, while exhibiting strains that are an order of magnitude greater with an energy efficiency close to 100%. Excellent correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated in a number of tests. A proof-of-concept wing section

  13. Fibrin Networks Support Recurring Mechanical Loads by Adapting their Structure across Multiple Scales.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Vos, Bart E; Biebricher, Andreas; Wuite, Gijs J L; Peterman, Erwin J G; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-01

    Tissues and cells sustain recurring mechanical loads that span a wide range of loading amplitudes and timescales as a consequence of exposure to blood flow, muscle activity, and external impact. Both tissues and cells derive their mechanical strength from fibrous protein scaffolds, which typically have a complex hierarchical structure. In this study, we focus on a prototypical hierarchical biomaterial, fibrin, which is one of the most resilient naturally occurring biopolymers and forms the structural scaffold of blood clots. We show how fibrous networks composed of fibrin utilize irreversible changes in their hierarchical structure at different scales to maintain reversible stress stiffening up to large strains. To trace the origin of this paradoxical resilience, we systematically tuned the microstructural parameters of fibrin and used a combination of optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy to measure the interactions of single fibrin fibers for the first time, to our knowledge. We demonstrate that fibrin networks adapt to moderate strains by remodeling at the network scale through the spontaneous formation of new bonds between fibers, whereas they adapt to high strains by plastic remodeling of the fibers themselves. This multiscale adaptation mechanism endows fibrin gels with the remarkable ability to sustain recurring loads due to shear flows and wound stretching. Our findings therefore reveal a microscopic mechanism by which tissues and cells can balance elastic nonlinearity and plasticity, and thus can provide microstructural insights into cell-driven remodeling of tissues. PMID:27602730

  14. Selection on defensive traits in a sterile caste - caste evolution: a mechanism to overcome life-history trade-offs?

    PubMed

    Roux, Estelle A; Roux, Maurice; Korb, Judith

    2009-01-01

    During development and evolution individuals generally face a trade-off between the development of weapons and gonads. In termites, characterized by reproductive division of labor, a caste evolved-the soldiers-which is completely sterile and which might be released from developmental trade-offs between weapons and testes. These soldiers are exclusively dedicated to defense. First, we investigated whether defensive traits are under selection in sterile termite soldiers using allometric analyses. In soldiers of the genus Cryptotermes phragmotic traits such as a sculptured and foreshortened head evolve rapidly but were also lost twice. Second, we compared the scaling relationships of these weapons with those in solitary insects facing a trade-off between weapons and gonads. Defensive traits consistently had lower slopes than nondefensive traits which supports the existence of stabilizing selection on soldier phragmotic traits in order to plug galleries. Moreover, soldier head widths were colony specific and correlated with the minimum gallery diameter of a colony. This can proximately be explained by soldiers developing from different instars. The scaling relationships of these termite soldiers contrast strikingly with those of weapons of solitary insects, which are generally exaggerated (i.e., overscaling) male traits. These differences may provide important insights into trait evolution. Trade-offs constraining the development of individuals may have been uncoupled in termites by evolving different castes, each specialized for one function. When individuals in social insect are "released" from developmental constraints through the evolution of castes, this certainly contributed to the ecological and evolutionary success of social insects. PMID:19196335

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cell lines show stress defense mechanisms and mitochondrial regulation similar to those of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lyle; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Saretzki, Gabriele; Atkinson, Stuart P; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Moreno, Ruben; Przyborski, Stefan; Lako, Majlinda

    2010-04-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has enormous potential for the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are able to defend their genomic integrity by maintaining low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through a combination of enhanced removal capacity and limited production of these molecules. Such limited ROS production stems partly from the small number of mitochondria present in hESC; thus, it was important to determine that human iPSC (hiPSC) generation is able to eliminate the extra mitochondria present in the parental fibroblasts (reminiscent of "bottleneck" situation after fertilization) and to show that hiPSC have antioxidant defenses similar to hESC. We were able to generate seven hiPSC lines from adult human dermal fibroblasts and have fully characterized two of those clones. Both hiPSC clones express pluripotency markers and are able to differentiate in vitro into cells belonging to all three germ layers. One of these clones is able to produce fully differentiated teratoma, whereas the other hiPSC clone is unable to silence the viral expression of OCT4 and c-MYC, produce fully differentiated teratoma, and unable to downregulate the expression of some of the pluripotency genes during the differentiation process. In spite of these differences, both clones show ROS stress defense mechanisms and mitochondrial biogenesis similar to hESC. Together our data suggest that, during the reprogramming process, certain cellular mechanisms are in place to ensure that hiPSC are provided with the same defense mechanisms against accumulation of ROS as the hESC. PMID:20073085

  16. Light regulation of plant defense.

    PubMed

    Ballaré, Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    Precise allocation of limited resources between growth and defense is critical for plant survival. In shade-intolerant species, perception of competition signals by informational photoreceptors activates shade-avoidance responses and reduces the expression of defenses against pathogens and insects. The main mechanism underlying defense suppression is the simultaneous downregulation of jasmonate and salicylic acid signaling by low ratios of red:far-red radiation. Inactivation of phytochrome B by low red:far-red ratios appears to suppress jasmonate responses by altering the balance between DELLA and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins in favor of the latter. Solar UVB radiation is a positive modulator of plant defense, signaling through jasmonate-dependent and jasmonate-independent pathways. Light, perceived by phytochrome B and presumably other photoreceptors, helps plants concentrate their defensive arsenals in photosynthetically valuable leaves. The discovery of connections between photoreceptors and defense signaling is revealing novel mechanisms that control key resource allocation decisions in plant canopies. PMID:24471835

  17. Adaptation as a mechanism for gain control in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2012-02-01

    In many sensory systems adaptation acts as a gain control mechanism that optimizes sensory performance by trading increased sensitivity to low stimulus intensity for decreased sensitivity to high stimulus intensity. Adaptation of insect antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) has been studied for strong odour concentrations, either pulsed or constant. Here, we report that during slowly oscillating changes in the concentration of the odour of lemon oil, the ON and OFF ORNs on the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana adapt to the actual odour concentration and the rate at which concentration changes. When odour concentration oscillates rapidly with brief periods, adaptation improves gain for instantaneous odour concentration and reduces gain for the rate of concentration change. Conversely, when odour concentration oscillates slowly with long periods, adaptation increases gain for the rate of change at the expense of instantaneous concentration. Without this gain control the ON and OFF ORNs would, at brief oscillation periods, soon reach their saturation level and become insensitive to further concentration increments and decrements. At long oscillation periods, on the other hand, the cue would simply be that the discharge begins to change. Because of the high gain for the rate of change, the cockroach will receive creeping changes in odour concentration, even if they persist in one direction. Gain control permits a high degree of precision at small rates when it counts most, without sacrificing the range of detection and without extending the measuring scale. PMID:22304687

  18. Fungal evolutionary genomics provides insight into the mechanisms of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, Pierre; Ropars, Jeanne; Badouin, Hélène; Branca, Antoine; Aguileta, Gabriela; de Vienne, Damien M; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Branco, Sara; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-02-01

    Fungi are ideal model organisms for dissecting the genomic bases of adaptive divergence in eukaryotes. They have simple morphologies and small genomes, occupy contrasting, well-identified ecological niches and tend to have short generation times, and many are amenable to experimental approaches. Fungi also display diverse lifestyles, from saprotrophs to pathogens or mutualists, and they play extremely important roles in both ecosystems and human activities, as wood decayers, mycorrhizal fungi, lichens, endophytes, plant and animal pathogens, and in fermentation or drug production. We review here recent insights into the patterns and mechanisms of adaptive divergence in fungi, including sources of divergence, genomic variation and, ultimately, speciation. We outline the various ecological sources of divergent selection and genomic changes, showing that gene loss and changes in gene expression and in genomic architecture are important adaptation processes, in addition to the more widely recognized processes of amino acid substitution and gene duplication. We also review recent findings regarding the interspecific acquisition of genomic variation and suggesting an important role for introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfers (HGTs). We show that transposable elements can mediate several of these genomic changes, thus constituting important factors for adaptation. Finally, we review the consequences of divergent selection in terms of speciation, arguing that genetic incompatibilities may not be as widespread as generally thought and that pleiotropy between adaptation and reproductive isolation is an important route of speciation in fungal pathogens. PMID:24341913

  19. Deciphering the salinity adaptation mechanism in Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus from mangrove.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Prem Lal; Rai, Anuradha; Singh, Ruchi; Chakdar, Hillol; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliopsis clavariiformis AP, a rare salt tolerant fungus reported for the first time from India was identified through polyphasic taxonomy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the fungus has unique features such as biverticillate penicilli bearing masses of oval to ellipsoidal conidia. The fungus has been characterized for salt tolerance and to understand the relevance of central carbon metabolism in salt stress adaptation. It showed optimal growth at 24 °C and able to tolerate up to 10% (w/v) NaCl. To understand the mechanism of adaptation to high salinity, activities of the key enzymes regulating glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle were investigated under normal (0% NaCl) and saline stress environment (10% NaCl). The results revealed a re-routing of carbon metabolism away from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), served as a cellular stress-resistance mechanism in fungi under saline environment. The detection and significant expression of fungus genes (Hsp98, Hsp60, HTB, and RHO) under saline stress suggest that these halotolerance conferring genes from the fungus could have a role in fungus protection and adaptation under saline environment. Overall, the present findings indicate that the rearrangement of the metabolic fluxes distribution and stress related genes play an important role in cell survival and adaptation under saline environment. PMID:26663001

  20. Mitigation of climate change impacts on raptors by behavioural adaptation: ecological buffering mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Matthias C.; Groeneveld, Jürgen; Jeltsch, Florian; Grimm, Volker

    2005-07-01

    The predicted climate change causes deep concerns on the effects of increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns on species viability and, in turn, on biodiversity. Models of Population Viability Analysis (PVA) provide a powerful tool to assess the risk of species extinction. However, most PVA models do not take into account the potential effects of behavioural adaptations. Organisms might adapt to new environmental situations and thereby mitigate negative effects of climate change. To demonstrate such mitigation effects, we use an existing PVA model describing a population of the tawny eagle ( Aquila rapax) in the southern Kalahari. This model does not include behavioural adaptations. We develop a new model by assuming that the birds enlarge their average territory size to compensate for lower amounts of precipitation. Here, we found the predicted increase in risk of extinction due to climate change to be much lower than in the original model. However, this "buffering" of climate change by behavioural adaptation is not very effective in coping with increasing interannual variances. We refer to further examples of ecological "buffering mechanisms" from the literature and argue that possible buffering mechanisms should be given due consideration when the effects of climate change on biodiversity are to be predicted.

  1. Mechanical Strain Causes Adaptive Change in Bronchial Fibroblasts Enhancing Profibrotic and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Smart, David E.; Noto, Antonio; Bucchieri, Fabio; Haitchi, Hans Michael; Holgate, Stephen T.; Howarth, Peter H.; Davies, Donna E.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by periodic episodes of bronchoconstriction and reversible airway obstruction; these symptoms are attributable to a number of factors including increased mass and reactivity of bronchial smooth muscle and extracellular matrix (ECM) in asthmatic airways. Literature has suggested changes in cell responses and signaling can be elicited via modulation of mechanical stress acting upon them, potentially affecting the microenvironment of the cell. In this study, we hypothesized that mechanical strain directly affects the (myo)fibroblast phenotype in asthma. Therefore, we characterized responses of bronchial fibroblasts, from 6 normal and 11 asthmatic non-smoking volunteers, exposed to cyclical mechanical strain using flexible silastic membranes. Samples were analyzed for proteoglycans, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), collagens I and III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 & 9 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by qRT-PCR, Western blot, zymography and ELISA. Mechanical strain caused a decrease in αSMA mRNA but no change in either αSMA protein or proteoglycan expression. In contrast the inflammatory mediator IL-8, MMPs and interstitial collagens were increased at both the transcriptional and protein level. The results demonstrate an adaptive response of bronchial fibroblasts to mechanical strain, irrespective of donor. The adaptation involves cytoskeletal rearrangement, matrix remodelling and inflammatory cytokine release. These results suggest that mechanical strain could contribute to disease progression in asthma by promoting inflammation and remodelling responses. PMID:27101406

  2. The primary cilium is a self-adaptable, integrating nexus for mechanical stimuli and cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, An M.; Young, Y.-N.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanosensation is crucial for cells to sense and respond to mechanical signals within their local environment. While adaptation allows a sensor to be conditioned by stimuli within the environment and enables its operation in a wide range of stimuli intensities, the mechanisms behind adaptation remain controversial in even the most extensively studied mechanosensor, bacterial mechanosensitive channels. Primary cilia are ubiquitous sensory organelles. They have emerged as mechanosensors across diverse tissues, including kidney, liver and the embryonic node, and deflect with mechanical stimuli. Here, we show that both mechanical and chemical stimuli can alter cilium stiffness. We found that exposure to flow stiffens the cilium, which deflects less in response to subsequent exposures to flow. We also found that through a process involving acetylation, the cell can biochemically regulate cilium stiffness. Finally, we show that this altered stiffness directly affects the responsiveness of the cell to mechanical signals. These results demonstrate a potential mechanism through which the cell can regulate its mechanosensing apparatus. PMID:26603473

  3. Mycobacterial escape from macrophage phagosomes to the cytoplasm represents an alternate adaptation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Mehrotra, Parul; Singh, Archana; Siddiqui, Zaved; Basu, Atanu; Rao, Kanury V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) within the host macrophage is mediated through pathogen-dependent inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, which enables bacteria to persist within the immature phagosomal compartment. By employing ultrastructural examination of different field isolates supported by biochemical analysis, we found that some of the Mtb strains were in fact poorly adapted for subsistence within endocytic vesicles of infected macrophages. Instead, through a mechanism involving activation of host cytosolic phospholipase A2, these bacteria rapidly escaped from phagosomes, and established residence in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Interestingly, by facilitating an enhanced suppression of host cellular autophagy, this translocation served as an alternate virulence acquisition mechanism. Thus, our studies reveal plasticity in the adaptation strategies employed by Mtb, for survival in the host macrophage. PMID:26980157

  4. Rule-based mechanisms of learning for intelligent adaptive flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handelman, David A.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    How certain aspects of human learning can be used to characterize learning in intelligent adaptive control systems is investigated. Reflexive and declarative memory and learning are described. It is shown that model-based systems-theoretic adaptive control methods exhibit attributes of reflexive learning, whereas the problem-solving capabilities of knowledge-based systems of artificial intelligence are naturally suited for implementing declarative learning. Issues related to learning in knowledge-based control systems are addressed, with particular attention given to rule-based systems. A mechanism for real-time rule-based knowledge acquisition is suggested, and utilization of this mechanism within the context of failure diagnosis for fault-tolerant flight control is demonstrated.

  5. [Defensive Medicine: Defensive Medicine: Overview of the literature].

    PubMed

    Panella, Massimiliano; Leigheb, Fabrizio; Rinaldi, Carmela; Donnarumma, Chiara; Tozzi, Quinto; Di Stanislao, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A literature review was performed on the subject of defensive medicine, in order to gather information and evidence for identifying a shared definition of this phenomenon, identify its causes, quantify its frequency and its economic impact.Results show that defensive medicine is primarily the result of medical professionals adapting to the pressure of litigation risks, and whose behaviour is motivated by fear of malpractice claims rather than by the patient's health. Defensive medicine seems to have become a diffuse phenomenon, afflicting all diagnostic-therapeutic areas and some disciplines to a greater degree, and leading to a large waste of human, organizational and economic resources. PMID:26241515

  6. Adaptive kanban control mechanism for a single-stage hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korugan, Aybek; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a hybrid manufacturing system with two discrete production lines. Here the output of either production line can satisfy the demand for the same type of product without any penalties. The interarrival times for demand occurrences and service completions are exponentially distributed i.i.d. variables. In order to control this type of manufacturing system we suggest a single stage pull type control mechanism with adaptive kanbans and state independent routing of the production information.

  7. Preferential Osmolyte Accumulation: a Mechanism of Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Diazotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Magdy A.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Smith, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    A common cellular mechanism of osmotic-stress adaptation is the intracellular accumulation of organic solutes (osmolytes). We investigated the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in the diazotrophic bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are adversely affected by high osmotic strength (i.e., soil salinity and/or drought). We used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify all the osmolytes accumulating in these strains during osmotic stress generated by 0.5 M NaCl. Evidence is presented for the accumulation of trehalose and glutamate in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4, proline and glutamate in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6, and trehalose and proline in K. pneumoniae. Glycine betaine was accumulated in all strains grown in culture media containing yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source. Alternative nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4Cl or casamino acids) in the culture medium did not result in measurable glycine betaine accumulation. We suggest that the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in these organisms entails the accumulation of osmolytes in hyperosmotically stressed cells resulting from either enhanced uptake from the medium (of glycine betaine, proline, and glutamate) or increased net biosynthesis (of trehalose, proline, and glutamate) or both. The preferred osmolyte in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4 shifted from glutamate to trehalose as a consequence of a prolonged osmotic stress. Also, the dominant osmolyte in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6 shifted from glutamate to proline accumulation as the osmotic strength of the medium increased. PMID:16348295

  8. Strategies for adding adaptive learning mechanisms to rule-based diagnostic expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, D. C.; Sabharwal, C. L.; Bond, W. E.; Hacke, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Rule-based diagnostic expert systems can be used to perform many of the diagnostic chores necessary in today's complex space systems. These expert systems typically take a set of symptoms as input and produce diagnostic advice as output. The primary objective of such expert systems is to provide accurate and comprehensive advice which can be used to help return the space system in question to nominal operation. The development and maintenance of diagnostic expert systems is time and labor intensive since the services of both knowledge engineer(s) and domain expert(s) are required. The use of adaptive learning mechanisms to increment evaluate and refine rules promises to reduce both time and labor costs associated with such systems. This paper describes the basic adaptive learning mechanisms of strengthening, weakening, generalization, discrimination, and discovery. Next basic strategies are discussed for adding these learning mechanisms to rule-based diagnostic expert systems. These strategies support the incremental evaluation and refinement of rules in the knowledge base by comparing the set of advice given by the expert system (A) with the correct diagnosis (C). Techniques are described for selecting those rules in the in the knowledge base which should participate in adaptive learning. The strategies presented may be used with a wide variety of learning algorithms. Further, these strategies are applicable to a large number of rule-based diagnostic expert systems. They may be used to provide either immediate or deferred updating of the knowledge base.

  9. An epidemic spreading model on adaptive scale-free networks with feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xiongding; Wu, Jie; Wan, Chen; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei

    2016-05-01

    A SIRS epidemic model with feedback mechanism on adaptive scale-free networks is presented. Using the mean field theory the spreading dynamics of the epidemic is studied in detail. The basic reproductive number and equilibriums are derived. Theoretical results indicate that the basic reproductive number is significantly dependent on the topology of the underlying networks. The existence of equilibriums is determined by the basic reproductive number. The global stability of disease-free equilibrium and the epidemic permanence are proved in detail. The feedback mechanism cannot change the basic reproductive number, but it can reduce the endemic level and weaken the epidemic spreading. Numerical simulations confirmed the analytical results.

  10. Selection of candidate genes involved in the defense mechanisms of Phytophthora infestans against fungicides by EST analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary research using a functional genomics approach was conducted to gain insights on how P. infestans responds to fungicides and the possible implications of these responses on its ability to adapt to such selection pressure. Two isolates with subtle differences in mefenoxam resistance were e...

  11. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  12. Gene duplication as a mechanism of genomic adaptation to a changing environment

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Fyodor A.

    2012-01-01

    A subject of extensive study in evolutionary theory has been the issue of how neutral, redundant copies can be maintained in the genome for long periods of time. Concurrently, examples of adaptive gene duplications to various environmental conditions in different species have been described. At this point, it is too early to tell whether or not a substantial fraction of gene copies have initially achieved fixation by positive selection for increased dosage. Nevertheless, enough examples have accumulated in the literature that such a possibility should be considered. Here, I review the recent examples of adaptive gene duplications and make an attempt to draw generalizations on what types of genes may be particularly prone to be selected for under certain environmental conditions. The identification of copy-number variation in ecological field studies of species adapting to stressful or novel environmental conditions may improve our understanding of gene duplications as a mechanism of adaptation and its relevance to the long-term persistence of gene duplications. PMID:22977152

  13. Environmentally-controlled Microtensile Testing of Mechanically-adaptive Polymer Nanocomposites for ex vivo Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Allison E.; Potter, Kelsey A.; Tyler, Dustin J.; Zorman, Christian A.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable microdevices are gaining significant attention for several biomedical applications1-4. Such devices have been made from a range of materials, each offering its own advantages and shortcomings5,6. Most prominently, due to the microscale device dimensions, a high modulus is required to facilitate implantation into living tissue. Conversely, the stiffness of the device should match the surrounding tissue to minimize induced local strain7-9. Therefore, we recently developed a new class of bio-inspired materials to meet these requirements by responding to environmental stimuli with a change in mechanical properties10-14. Specifically, our poly(vinyl acetate)-based nanocomposite (PVAc-NC) displays a reduction in stiffness when exposed to water and elevated temperatures (e.g. body temperature). Unfortunately, few methods exist to quantify the stiffness of materials in vivo15, and mechanical testing outside of the physiological environment often requires large samples inappropriate for implantation. Further, stimuli-responsive materials may quickly recover their initial stiffness after explantation. Therefore, we have developed a method by which the mechanical properties of implanted microsamples can be measured ex vivo, with simulated physiological conditions maintained using moisture and temperature control13,16,17. To this end, a custom microtensile tester was designed to accommodate microscale samples13,17 with widely-varying Young's moduli (range of 10 MPa to 5 GPa). As our interests are in the application of PVAc-NC as a biologically-adaptable neural probe substrate, a tool capable of mechanical characterization of samples at the microscale was necessary. This tool was adapted to provide humidity and temperature control, which minimized sample drying and cooling17. As a result, the mechanical characteristics of the explanted sample closely reflect those of the sample just prior to explantation. The overall goal of this method is to quantitatively assess

  14. Design of a knee joint mechanism that adapts to individual physiology.

    PubMed

    Jiun-Yih Kuan; Pasch, Kenneth A; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a new knee joint mechanism, called the Adaptive Coupling Joint (ACJ). The new mechanism has an adaptive trajectory of the center of rotations (COR) that automatically matches those of the attached biological joint. The detailed design is presented as well as characterization results of the ACJ. Conventional exoskeleton and assistive devices usually consider limb joints as a one to three degrees of freedom (DOFs) joint synthesized by multiple one-DOF hinge joints in a single plane. However, the biological joints are complex and usually rotate with respect to a changing COR. As a result, the mismatch between limb joint motion and mechanical interface motion can lead to forces that cause undesired ligament and muscle length changes and internal mechanical changes. These undesired changes contribute to discomfort, as well as to the slippage and sluggish interaction between humans and devices. It is shown that the ACJ can transmit planetary torques from either active or passive devices to the limbs without altering the normal biological joint motion. PMID:25570389

  15. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of NDM-1 Klebsiella pneumoniae in spaceflight reveal mechanisms underlying environmental adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Ge, Pupu; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yan, Jinghua; Zhao, Yanlin; Gao, George F.; Liu, Cui Hua; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains has caused a great concern worldwide. To better understand the mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation of those highly drug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains, we took advantage of the China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft mission to conduct comparative genomic and transcriptomic analysis of a NDM-1 K. pneumoniae strain (ATCC BAA-2146) being cultivated under different conditions. The samples were recovered from semisolid medium placed on the ground (D strain), in simulated space condition (M strain), or in Shenzhou 10 spacecraft (T strain) for analysis. Our data revealed multiple variations underlying pathogen adaptation into different environments in terms of changes in morphology, H2O2 tolerance and biofilm formation ability, genomic stability and regulation of metabolic pathways. Additionally, we found a few non-coding RNAs to be differentially regulated. The results are helpful for better understanding the adaptive mechanisms of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:25163721

  16. Thickening of the knee joint cartilage in elite weightlifters as a potential adaptation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grzelak, Piotr; Domzalski, Marcin; Majos, Agata; Podgórski, Michal; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Krochmalski, Marek; Polguj, Michal

    2014-09-01

    Thickening and increase of area of cartilage have been proposed as two alternative mechanisms of cartilage functional adaptation. The latter has been reported in endurance sportsmen. In weightlifters, extreme strain applied to the articular surfaces can result in other forms of adaptation. The aim of this research is to determine whether cartilage thickness is greater in elite weightlifters than in physically inactive men. Weightlifters (13) and 20 controls [age and body mass index (BMI) matched] underwent knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A single sagittal slice of the knee was taken and cartilage thickness was measured in five and six regions of the medial and lateral femoral condyles, respectively. The analyzed segments represented weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing regions. The tibia cartilage in the weight-bearing area was also measured. The time of training onset and its duration in the weightlifter group were recorded. The cartilage was found to be significantly thicker in weightlifters in most of the analyzed regions. The distribution of cartilage thickness on the medial and lateral femoral condyles was similar in both groups. The duration of training was not associated with cartilage thickness, but the time of training onset correlated inversely with cartilage thickness. It is possible that in high-strain sports, joint cartilage can undergo functional adaptation by thickening. Thus, mechanical loading history could exert a postnatal influence on cartilage morphology. PMID:24648385

  17. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of NDM-1 Klebsiella pneumoniae in spaceflight reveal mechanisms underlying environmental adaptability.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Ge, Pupu; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yan, Jinghua; Zhao, Yanlin; Gao, George F; Liu, Cui Hua; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains has caused a great concern worldwide. To better understand the mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation of those highly drug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains, we took advantage of the China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft mission to conduct comparative genomic and transcriptomic analysis of a NDM-1 K. pneumoniae strain (ATCC BAA-2146) being cultivated under different conditions. The samples were recovered from semisolid medium placed on the ground (D strain), in simulated space condition (M strain), or in Shenzhou 10 spacecraft (T strain) for analysis. Our data revealed multiple variations underlying pathogen adaptation into different environments in terms of changes in morphology, H2O2 tolerance and biofilm formation ability, genomic stability and regulation of metabolic pathways. Additionally, we found a few non-coding RNAs to be differentially regulated. The results are helpful for better understanding the adaptive mechanisms of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:25163721

  18. Tissue mechanics govern the rapidly adapting and symmetrical response to touch

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Amy L.; Sanzeni, Alessandro; Petzold, Bryan C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Vergassola, Massimo; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions with the physical world are deeply rooted in our sense of touch and depend on ensembles of somatosensory neurons that invade and innervate the skin. Somatosensory neurons convert the mechanical energy delivered in each touch into excitatory membrane currents carried by mechanoelectrical transduction (MeT) channels. Pacinian corpuscles in mammals and touch receptor neurons (TRNs) in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes are embedded in distinctive specialized accessory structures, have low thresholds for activation, and adapt rapidly to the application and removal of mechanical loads. Recently, many of the protein partners that form native MeT channels in these and other somatosensory neurons have been identified. However, the biophysical mechanism of symmetric responses to the onset and offset of mechanical stimulation has eluded understanding for decades. Moreover, it is not known whether applied force or the resulting indentation activate MeT channels. Here, we introduce a system for simultaneously recording membrane current, applied force, and the resulting indentation in living C. elegans (Feedback-controlled Application of mechanical Loads Combined with in vivo Neurophysiology, FALCON) and use it, together with modeling, to study these questions. We show that current amplitude increases with indentation, not force, and that fast stimuli evoke larger currents than slower stimuli producing the same or smaller indentation. A model linking body indentation to MeT channel activation through an embedded viscoelastic element reproduces the experimental findings, predicts that the TRNs function as a band-pass mechanical filter, and provides a general mechanism for symmetrical and rapidly adapting MeT channel activation relevant to somatosensory neurons across phyla and submodalities. PMID:26627717

  19. Tissue mechanics govern the rapidly adapting and symmetrical response to touch.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Amy L; Sanzeni, Alessandro; Petzold, Bryan C; Park, Sung-Jin; Vergassola, Massimo; Pruitt, Beth L; Goodman, Miriam B

    2015-12-15

    Interactions with the physical world are deeply rooted in our sense of touch and depend on ensembles of somatosensory neurons that invade and innervate the skin. Somatosensory neurons convert the mechanical energy delivered in each touch into excitatory membrane currents carried by mechanoelectrical transduction (MeT) channels. Pacinian corpuscles in mammals and touch receptor neurons (TRNs) in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes are embedded in distinctive specialized accessory structures, have low thresholds for activation, and adapt rapidly to the application and removal of mechanical loads. Recently, many of the protein partners that form native MeT channels in these and other somatosensory neurons have been identified. However, the biophysical mechanism of symmetric responses to the onset and offset of mechanical stimulation has eluded understanding for decades. Moreover, it is not known whether applied force or the resulting indentation activate MeT channels. Here, we introduce a system for simultaneously recording membrane current, applied force, and the resulting indentation in living C. elegans (Feedback-controlled Application of mechanical Loads Combined with in vivo Neurophysiology, FALCON) and use it, together with modeling, to study these questions. We show that current amplitude increases with indentation, not force, and that fast stimuli evoke larger currents than slower stimuli producing the same or smaller indentation. A model linking body indentation to MeT channel activation through an embedded viscoelastic element reproduces the experimental findings, predicts that the TRNs function as a band-pass mechanical filter, and provides a general mechanism for symmetrical and rapidly adapting MeT channel activation relevant to somatosensory neurons across phyla and submodalities. PMID:26627717

  20. Mechanisms for Rapid Adaptive Control of Motion Processing in Macaque Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Pamela M.; Ahmed, Bashir; Kohn, Adam; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of neural networks is their ability to rapidly adjust their function, including signal gain and temporal dynamics, in response to changes in sensory inputs. These adjustments are thought to be important for optimizing the sensitivity of the system, yet their mechanisms remain poorly understood. We studied adaptive changes in temporal integration in direction-selective cells in macaque primary visual cortex, where specific hypotheses have been proposed to account for rapid adaptation. By independently stimulating direction-specific channels, we found that the control of temporal integration of motion at one direction was independent of motion signals driven at the orthogonal direction. We also found that individual neurons can simultaneously support two different profiles of temporal integration for motion in orthogonal directions. These findings rule out a broad range of adaptive mechanisms as being key to the control of temporal integration, including untuned normalization and nonlinearities of spike generation and somatic adaptation in the recorded direction-selective cells. Such mechanisms are too broadly tuned, or occur too far downstream, to explain the channel-specific and multiplexed temporal integration that we observe in single neurons. Instead, we are compelled to conclude that parallel processing pathways are involved, and we demonstrate one such circuit using a computer model. This solution allows processing in different direction/orientation channels to be separately optimized and is sensible given that, under typical motion conditions (e.g., translation or looming), speed on the retina is a function of the orientation of image components. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many neurons in visual cortex are understood in terms of their spatial and temporal receptive fields. It is now known that the spatiotemporal integration underlying visual responses is not fixed but depends on the visual input. For example, neurons that respond selectively to

  1. L-ALLIANCE: a mechanism for adaptive action selection in heterogeneous multi-robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-11-01

    In practical applications of robotics, it is usually quite difficult, if not impossible, for the system designer to fully predict the environmental states in which the robots will operate. The complexity of the problem is further increased when dealing with teams of robots which themselves may be incompletely known and characterized in advance. It is thus highly desirable for robot teams to be able to adapt their performance during the mission due to changes in the environment, or to changes in other robot team members. In previous work, we introduced a behavior-based mechanism called the ALLIANCE architecture -- that facilitates the fault tolerant cooperative control of multi-robot teams. However, this previous work did not address the issue of how to dynamically update the control parameters during a mission to adapt to ongoing changes in the environment or in the robot team, and to ensure the efficiency of the collective team actions. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing the L-ALLIANCE mechanism, which defines an automated method whereby robots can use knowledge learned from previous experience to continually improve their collective action selection when working on missions composed of loosely coupled, discrete subtasks. This ability to dynamically update robotic control parameters provides a number of distinct advantages: it alleviates the need for human tuning of control parameters, it facilitates the use of custom-designed multi-robot teams for any given application, it improves the efficiency of the mission performance, and It allows robots to continually adapt their performance over time due to changes in the robot team and/or the environment. We describe the L-ALLIANCE mechanism, present the results of various alternative update strategies we investigated, present the formal model of the L-ALLIANCE mechanism, and present the results of a simple proof of concept implementation on a small team of heterogeneous mobile robots.

  2. Molecular Adaptation Mechanisms Employed by Ethanologenic Bacteria in Response to Lignocellulose-derived Inhibitory Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Omodele; Ndimba, Bongani K.

    2013-01-01

    Current international interest in finding alternative sources of energy to the diminishing supplies of fossil fuels has encouraged research efforts in improving biofuel production technologies. In countries which lack sufficient food, the use of sustainable lignocellulosic feedstocks, for the production of bioethanol, is an attractive option. In the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic feedstocks for ethanol production, various chemicals and/or enzymatic processes are employed. These methods generally result in a range of fermentable sugars, which are subjected to microbial fermentation and distillation to produce bioethanol. However, these methods also produce compounds that are inhibitory to the microbial fermentation process. These compounds include products of sugar dehydration and lignin depolymerisation, such as organic acids, derivatised furaldehydes and phenolic acids. These compounds are known to have a severe negative impact on the ethanologenic microorganisms involved in the fermentation process by compromising the integrity of their cell membranes, inhibiting essential enzymes and negatively interact with their DNA/RNA. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions, and the mechanisms by which these microorganisms show increased adaptation to such inhibitors. Presented here is a concise overview of the molecular adaptation mechanisms of ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds. These include general stress response and tolerance mechanisms, which are typically those that maintain intracellular pH homeostasis and cell membrane integrity, activation/regulation of global stress responses and inhibitor substrate-specific degradation pathways. We anticipate that understanding these adaptation responses will be essential in the design of 'intelligent' metabolic engineering strategies for the generation of hyper-tolerant fermentation bacteria strains. PMID:23847442

  3. Molecular adaptation mechanisms employed by ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Omodele; Ndimba, Bongani K

    2013-01-01

    Current international interest in finding alternative sources of energy to the diminishing supplies of fossil fuels has encouraged research efforts in improving biofuel production technologies. In countries which lack sufficient food, the use of sustainable lignocellulosic feedstocks, for the production of bioethanol, is an attractive option. In the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic feedstocks for ethanol production, various chemicals and/or enzymatic processes are employed. These methods generally result in a range of fermentable sugars, which are subjected to microbial fermentation and distillation to produce bioethanol. However, these methods also produce compounds that are inhibitory to the microbial fermentation process. These compounds include products of sugar dehydration and lignin depolymerisation, such as organic acids, derivatised furaldehydes and phenolic acids. These compounds are known to have a severe negative impact on the ethanologenic microorganisms involved in the fermentation process by compromising the integrity of their cell membranes, inhibiting essential enzymes and negatively interact with their DNA/RNA. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions, and the mechanisms by which these microorganisms show increased adaptation to such inhibitors. Presented here is a concise overview of the molecular adaptation mechanisms of ethanologenic bacteria in response to lignocellulose-derived inhibitory compounds. These include general stress response and tolerance mechanisms, which are typically those that maintain intracellular pH homeostasis and cell membrane integrity, activation/regulation of global stress responses and inhibitor substrate-specific degradation pathways. We anticipate that understanding these adaptation responses will be essential in the design of 'intelligent' metabolic engineering strategies for the generation of hyper-tolerant fermentation bacteria strains. PMID:23847442

  4. Network bursting dynamics in excitatory cortical neuron cultures results from the combination of different adaptive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Timothée; Deco, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, synchronization among cells of an assembly is a common phenomenon, and thought to be functionally relevant. Here we used an in vitro experimental model of cell assemblies, cortical cultures, combined with numerical simulations of a spiking neural network (SNN) to investigate how and why spontaneous synchronization occurs. In order to deal with excitation only, we pharmacologically blocked GABAAergic transmission using bicuculline. Synchronous events in cortical cultures tend to involve almost every cell and to display relatively constant durations. We have thus named these "network spikes" (NS). The inter-NS-intervals (INSIs) proved to be a more interesting phenomenon. In most cortical cultures NSs typically come in series or bursts ("bursts of NSs", BNS), with short (~1 s) INSIs and separated by long silent intervals (tens of s), which leads to bimodal INSI distributions. This suggests that a facilitating mechanism is at work, presumably short-term synaptic facilitation, as well as two fatigue mechanisms: one with a short timescale, presumably short-term synaptic depression, and another one with a longer timescale, presumably cellular adaptation. We thus incorporated these three mechanisms into the SNN, which, indeed, produced realistic BNSs. Next, we systematically varied the recurrent excitation for various adaptation timescales. Strong excitability led to frequent, quasi-periodic BNSs (CV~0), and weak excitability led to rare BNSs, approaching a Poisson process (CV~1). Experimental cultures appear to operate within an intermediate weakly-synchronized regime (CV~0.5), with an adaptation timescale in the 2-8 s range, and well described by a Poisson-with-refractory-period model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the INSI statistics are indeed informative: they allowed us to infer the mechanisms at work, and many parameters that we cannot access experimentally. PMID:24146781

  5. Antipredator defenses predict diversification rates

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Kevin; Speed, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The “escape-and-radiate” hypothesis predicts that antipredator defenses facilitate adaptive radiations by enabling escape from constraints of predation, diversified habitat use, and subsequently speciation. Animals have evolved diverse strategies to reduce the direct costs of predation, including cryptic coloration and behavior, chemical defenses, mimicry, and advertisement of unprofitability (conspicuous warning coloration). Whereas the survival consequences of these alternative defenses for individuals are well-studied, little attention has been given to the macroevolutionary consequences of alternative forms of defense. Here we show, using amphibians as the first, to our knowledge, large-scale empirical test in animals, that there are important macroevolutionary consequences of alternative defenses. However, the escape-and-radiate hypothesis does not adequately describe them, due to its exclusive focus on speciation. We examined how rates of speciation and extinction vary across defensive traits throughout amphibians. Lineages that use chemical defenses show higher rates of speciation as predicted by escape-and-radiate but also show higher rates of extinction compared with those without chemical defense. The effect of chemical defense is a net reduction in diversification compared with lineages without chemical defense. In contrast, acquisition of conspicuous coloration (often used as warning signals or in mimicry) is associated with heightened speciation rates but unchanged extinction rates. We conclude that predictions based on the escape-and-radiate hypothesis must incorporate the effect of traits on both speciation and extinction, which is rarely considered in such studies. Our results also suggest that knowledge of defensive traits could have a bearing on the predictability of extinction, perhaps especially important in globally threatened taxa such as amphibians. PMID:26483488

  6. Antipredator defenses predict diversification rates.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Kevin; Speed, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    The "escape-and-radiate" hypothesis predicts that antipredator defenses facilitate adaptive radiations by enabling escape from constraints of predation, diversified habitat use, and subsequently speciation. Animals have evolved diverse strategies to reduce the direct costs of predation, including cryptic coloration and behavior, chemical defenses, mimicry, and advertisement of unprofitability (conspicuous warning coloration). Whereas the survival consequences of these alternative defenses for individuals are well-studied, little attention has been given to the macroevolutionary consequences of alternative forms of defense. Here we show, using amphibians as the first, to our knowledge, large-scale empirical test in animals, that there are important macroevolutionary consequences of alternative defenses. However, the escape-and-radiate hypothesis does not adequately describe them, due to its exclusive focus on speciation. We examined how rates of speciation and extinction vary across defensive traits throughout amphibians. Lineages that use chemical defenses show higher rates of speciation as predicted by escape-and-radiate but also show higher rates of extinction compared with those without chemical defense. The effect of chemical defense is a net reduction in diversification compared with lineages without chemical defense. In contrast, acquisition of conspicuous coloration (often used as warning signals or in mimicry) is associated with heightened speciation rates but unchanged extinction rates. We conclude that predictions based on the escape-and-radiate hypothesis must incorporate the effect of traits on both speciation and extinction, which is rarely considered in such studies. Our results also suggest that knowledge of defensive traits could have a bearing on the predictability of extinction, perhaps especially important in globally threatened taxa such as amphibians. PMID:26483488

  7. Common medial frontal mechanisms of adaptive control in humans and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael J.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe how common brain networks within the medial frontal cortex facilitate adaptive behavioral control in rodents and humans. We demonstrate that low frequency oscillations below 12 Hz are dramatically modulated after errors in humans over mid-frontal cortex and in rats within prelimbic and anterior cingulate regions of medial frontal cortex. These oscillations were phase-locked between medial frontal cortex and motor areas in both rats and humans. In rats, single neurons that encoded prior behavioral outcomes were phase-coherent with low-frequency field oscillations particularly after errors. Inactivating medial frontal regions in rats led to impaired behavioral adjustments after errors, eliminated the differential expression of low frequency oscillations after errors, and increased low-frequency spike-field coupling within motor cortex. Our results describe a novel mechanism for behavioral adaptation via low-frequency oscillations and elucidate how medial frontal networks synchronize brain activity to guide performance. PMID:24141310

  8. COMET-AR User's Manual: COmputational MEchanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moas, E. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The COMET-AR User's Manual provides a reference manual for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed with Adaptive Refinement (COMET-AR), a software system developed jointly by Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and NASA Langley Research Center under contract NAS1-18444. The COMET-AR system is an extended version of an earlier finite element based structural analysis system called COMET, also developed by Lockheed and NASA. The primary extensions are the adaptive mesh refinement capabilities and a new "object-like" database interface that makes COMET-AR easier to extend further. This User's Manual provides a detailed description of the user interface to COMET-AR from the viewpoint of a structural analyst.

  9. Fine-scale temporal adaptation within a salmonid population: mechanism and consequences.

    PubMed

    Gharrett, Anthony J; Joyce, John; Smoker, William W

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate a clear example of local adaptation of seasonal timing of spawning and embryo development. The consequence is a population of pink salmon that is segmented into spawning groups that use the same limited habitat. We synthesize published observations with results of new analyses to demonstrate that genetic variation of these traits results in survival differentials related to that variation, and that density-dependent embryo mortality and seasonally variable juvenile mortality are a mechanism of selection. Most examples of local adaptation in natural systems depend on observed correlations between environments and fitness traits, but do not fully demonstrate local adaptation: that the trait is genetically determined, exhibits different fitness in common environments or across different environments, and its variation is mechanistically connected to fitness differences. The geographic or temporal scales of local adaptation often remain obscure. Here, we show that heritable, fine-scale differences of timing of reproductive migration in a pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) resulted in temporal structure that persisted several generations; the differences enable a density-dependent population to pack more spawners into limited spawning habitat, that is, enhance its fitness. A balanced trade-off of survivals results because embryos from early-migrating fish have a lower freshwater survival (harsh early physical conditions and disturbance by late spawners), but emigrant fry from late-migrating fish have lower marine survivals (timing of their vernal emergence into the estuarine environment). Such fine-scale local adaptations increase the genetic portfolio of the populations and may provide a buffer against the impacts of climate change. PMID:23980763

  10. The role of training in the development of adaptive mechanisms in freedivers.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Andrzej; Strzała, Marek; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Juszkiewicz, Mirosław; Pilch, Wanda; Maszczyk, Adam

    2012-05-01

    Freediving is a sport in which athletes aim to achieve the longest or the deepest breath-hold dive. Divers are at risk of gradually increasing hypoxia and hypercapnia due to a long time spent underwater and additionally of increasing hyperoxia while depth diving. Exceeding the limits of hypoxia endurance leads to loss of consciousness or even to death whithout immediate first aid. Often enhanced world records indicate the ability to shape specific to the discipline adaptive mechanisms of cardio-pulmonary system which are individually conditioned. During stay underwater heartbeats decelerating called bradycardia, increase in blood pressure, peripheral blood vessels narrowing and blood centralization in freediver's organism. These mechanisms enhance blood oxygen management as well as transporting it first of all to essential for survival organs, i.e. brain and heart. These mechanisms are supported by spleen and adrenal glands hormonal reactions. PMID:23487544

  11. Lessons in Fundamental Mechanisms and Diverse Adaptations from the 2015 Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Prüβ, Birgit M.; Liu, Jun; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2015-01-01

    In response to rapid changes in their environment, bacteria control a number of processes, including motility, cell division, biofilm formation, and virulence. Research presented in January 2015 at the biennial Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST) meeting in Tucson, AZ, illustrates the elegant complexity of the nanoarrays, nanomachines, and networks of interacting proteins that mediate such processes. Studies employing an array of biophysical, genetic, cell biology, and mathematical methods are providing an increasingly detailed understanding of the mechanisms of these systems within well-studied bacteria. Furthermore, comparisons of these processes in diverse bacterial species are providing insight into novel regulatory and functional mechanisms. This review summarizes research presented at the BLAST meeting on these fundamental mechanisms and diverse adaptations, including findings of importance for applications involving bacteria of medical or agricultural relevance. PMID:26195592

  12. The Role of Training in the Development of Adaptive Mechanisms in Freedivers

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Andrzej; Strzała, Marek; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Juszkiewicz, Mirosław; Pilch, Wanda; Maszczyk, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Freediving is a sport in which athletes aim to achieve the longest or the deepest breath-hold dive. Divers are at risk of gradually increasing hypoxia and hypercapnia due to a long time spent underwater and additionally of increasing hyperoxia while depth diving. Exceeding the limits of hypoxia endurance leads to loss of consciousness or even to death whithout immediate first aid. Often enhanced world records indicate the ability to shape specific to the discipline adaptive mechanisms of cardio-pulmonary system which are individually conditioned. During stay underwater heartbeats decelerating called bradycardia, increase in blood pressure, peripheral blood vessels narrowing and blood centralization in freediver’s organism. These mechanisms enhance blood oxygen management as well as transporting it first of all to essential for survival organs, i.e. brain and heart. These mechanisms are supported by spleen and adrenal glands hormonal reactions. PMID:23487544

  13. Evolution of plant growth and defense in a continental introduction.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Hastings, Amy P; Bradburd, Gideon S; Woods, Ellen C; Züst, Tobias; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Bukovinszky, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Substantial research has addressed adaptation of nonnative biota to novel environments, yet surprisingly little work has integrated population genetic structure and the mechanisms underlying phenotypic differentiation in ecologically important traits. We report on studies of the common milkweed Asclepias syriaca, which was introduced from North America to Europe over the past 400 years and which lacks most of its specialized herbivores in the introduced range. Using 10 populations from each continent grown in a common environment, we identified several growth and defense traits that have diverged, despite low neutral genetic differentiation between continents. We next developed a Bayesian modeling approach to account for relationships between molecular and phenotypic differences, confirming that continental trait differentiation was greater than expected from neutral genetic differentiation. We found evidence that growth-related traits adaptively diverged within and between continents. Inducible defenses triggered by monarch butterfly herbivory were substantially reduced in European populations, and this reduction in inducibility was concordant with altered phytohormonal dynamics, reduced plant growth, and a trade-off with constitutive investment. Freedom from the community of native and specialized herbivores may have favored constitutive over induced defense. Our replicated analysis of plant growth and defense, including phenotypically plastic traits, suggests adaptive evolution following a continental introduction. PMID:26098351

  14. The mouse fibula as a suitable bone for the study of functional adaptation to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Alaa; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Saxon, Leanne K.; Zaman, Gul; Sunters, Andrew; Armstrong, Victoria J.; Javaheri, Behzad; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Bones' functionally adaptive responses to mechanical loading can usefully be studied in the tibia by the application of loads between the knee and ankle in normal and genetically modified mice. Such loading also deforms the fibula. Our present study was designed to ascertain whether the fibula adapts to loading in a similar way to the tibia and could thus provide an additional bone in which to study functional adaptation. The right tibiae/fibulae in C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a single period of axial loading (40 cycles at 10 Hz with 10-second intervals between each cycle; approximately 7 min/day, 3 alternate days/week, 2 weeks). The left tibiae/fibulae were used as non-loaded, internal controls. Both left and right fibulae and tibiae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography at the levels of the mid-shaft of the fibula and 25% from its proximal and distal ends. We also investigated the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) on the (re)modelling response to 2-weeks of loading and the effect of 2-consecutive days of loading on osteocytes' sclerostin expression. These in vivo experiments confirmed that the fibula showed similar loading-related (re)modelling responses to those previously documented in the tibia and similar synergistic increases in osteogenesis between loading and iPTH. The numbers of sclerostin-positive osteocytes at the proximal and middle fibulae were markedly decreased by loading. Collectively, these data suggest that the mouse fibula, as well as the tibia and ulna, is a useful bone in which to assess bone cells' early responses to mechanical loading and the adaptive (re)modelling that this engenders. PMID:19442626

  15. Disentangling Detoxification: Gene Expression Analysis of Feeding Mountain Pine Beetle Illuminates Molecular-Level Host Chemical Defense Detoxification Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jeanne A.; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R.; Yuen, Macaire M. S.; Keeling, Christopher I.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P. W.

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle. PMID:24223726

  16. Current understanding of grapevine defense mechanisms against the biotrophic fungus (Erysiphe necator), the causal agent of powdery mildew disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wenping; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The most economically important disease of cultivated grapevines worldwide is powdery mildew (PM) caused by the ascomycete fungus Erysiphe necator. The majority of grapevine cultivars used for wine, table grape, and dried fruit production are derived from the Eurasian grape species Vitis vinifera because of its superior aroma and flavor characteristics. However, this species has little genetic resistance against E. necator meaning that grape production is highly dependent on the frequent use of fungicides. The integration of effective genetic resistance into cultivated grapevines would lead to significant financial and environmental benefits and represents a major challenge for viticultural industries and researchers worldwide. This review will outline the strategies being used to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of V. vinifera susceptibility to this fungal pathogen. It will summarize our current knowledge of different resistance loci/genes that have evolved in wild grapevine species to restrict PM infection and assess the potential application of these defense genes in the generation of PM-resistant grapevine germplasm. Finally, it addresses future research priorities which will be important in the rapid identification, evaluation, and deployment of new PM resistance genes which are capable of conferring effective and durable resistance in the vineyard. PMID:26504571

  17. The Interplay Between Strategic And Adaptive Control Mechanisms In Plastic Recalibration Of Locomotor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, J. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that viewing simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill locomotion causes immediate strategic modifications (Richards et al. 2004) as well as an after effect reflecting adaptive modification of the control of position and trajectory during over-ground locomotion (Mulavara et al. 2005). The process of sensorimotor adaptation is comprised of both strategic and adaptive control mechanisms. Strategic control involves cognitive, on-line corrections to limb movements once one is aware of a sensory discordance. Over an extended period of exposure to the sensory discordance, new strategic sensorimotor coordination patterns are reinforced until they become more automatic, and therefore adaptive, in nature. The objective of this study was to investigate how strategic changes in trunk control during exposure to simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill walking influences adaptive modification of locomotor heading direction during over-ground stepping. Subjects (n = 10) walked on a motorized linear treadmill while viewing a wide field-of-view virtual scene for 24 minutes. The scene was static for the first 4 minutes and then, for the last 20 minutes, depicted constant rate self-motion equivalent to walking in a counter-clockwise, circular path around the perimeter of a room. Subjects performed five stepping trials both before and after the exposure period to assess after effects. Results from our previous study showed a significant change in heading direction (HD) during post-exposure step tests that was opposite the direction in which the scene rotated during the adaptation period. For the present study, we quantified strategic modifications in trunk movement control during scene exposure using normalized root mean square (R(sub p)) variation of the subject's 3D trunk positions and normalized sum of standard deviations (R(sub o)) variation of 3D trunk orientations during scene rotation relative to that during static scene presentation

  18. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  19. Mechanical anisotropy and adaptation of metastatic cells probed by magnetic microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Shi, Yanhui; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2010-02-01

    Metastatic cells have the ability to break through the basal lamina, enter the blood vessels, circulate through the vasculature, exit at distant sites, and form secondary tumors. This multi-step process, therefore, clearly indicates the inherent ability of metastatic cells to sense, process, and adapt to the mechanical forces in different surrounding environments. We describe a magnetic probing device that is useful in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells along arbitrary two-dimensional directions. Magnetic force, with the advantages of biocompatibility and specificity, was produced by magnetic poles placed in an octupole configuration and applied to fibronectin-coated magnetic microbeads attached on cell membrane. Cell deformation in response to the applied force was then recorded through the displacement of the microbeads. The motion of the beads was measured by computer processing the video images acquired by a high-speed CMOS camera. Rotating force vectors with constant magnitude while pointing to directions of all 360 degrees were applied to study the mechanical anisotropy of metastatic breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. The temporal changes in magnitude and directionality of the cellular responses were then analyzed to investigate the cellular adaptation to force stimulation. This probing technology thus has the potential to provide us a better understanding of the mechano-signatures of cells.

  20. Multiple Symbiont Acquisition Strategies as an Adaptive Mechanism in the Coral Stylophora pistillata

    PubMed Central

    Byler, Kristen A.; Carmi-Veal, Maya; Fine, Maoz; Goulet, Tamar L.

    2013-01-01

    In obligate symbioses, the host’s survival relies on the successful acquisition and maintenance of symbionts. Symbionts can either be transferred from parent to offspring via direct inheritance (vertical transmission) or acquired anew each generation from the environment (horizontal transmission). With vertical symbiont transmission, progeny benefit by not having to search for their obligate symbionts, and, with symbiont inheritance, a mechanism exists for perpetuating advantageous symbionts. But, if the progeny encounter an environment that differs from that of their parent, they may be disadvantaged if the inherited symbionts prove suboptimal. Conversely, while in horizontal symbiont acquisition host survival hinges on an unpredictable symbiont source, an individual host may acquire genetically diverse symbionts well suited to any given environment. In horizontal acquisition, however, a potentially advantageous symbiont will not be transmitted to subsequent generations. Adaptation in obligate symbioses may require mechanisms for both novel symbiont acquisition and symbiont inheritance. Using denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR, we identified the dinoflagellate symbionts (genus Symbiodinium) hosted by the Red Sea coral Stylophora pistillata throughout its ontogenesis and over depth. We present evidence that S. pistillata juvenile colonies may utilize both vertical and horizontal symbiont acquisition strategies. By releasing progeny with maternally derived symbionts, that are also capable of subsequent horizontal symbiont acquisition, coral colonies may acquire physiologically advantageous novel symbionts that are then perpetuated via vertical transmission to subsequent generations. With symbiont inheritance, natural selection can act upon the symbiotic variability, providing a mechanism for coral adaptation. PMID:23555721

  1. Adaptation of muscle coordination to altered task mechanics during steady-state cycling.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Herzog, W

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this work was to increase our understanding of how motor patterns are produced during movement tasks by quantifying adaptations in muscle coordination in response to altered task mechanics. We used pedaling as our movement paradigm because it is a constrained cyclical movement that allows for a controlled investigation of test conditions such as movement speed and effort. Altered task mechanics were introduced using an elliptical chainring. The kinematics of the crank were changed from a relatively constant angular velocity using a circular chainring to a widely varying angular velocity using an elliptical chainring. Kinetic, kinematic and muscle activity data were collected from eight competitive cyclists using three different chainrings--one circular and two different orientations of an elliptical chainring. We tested the hypotheses that muscle coordination patterns (EMG timing and magnitude), specifically the regions of active muscle force production, would shift towards regions in the crank cycle in which the crank angular velocity, and hence muscle contraction speeds, were favorable to produce muscle power as defined by the skeletal muscle power-velocity relationship. The results showed that our hypothesis with regards to timing was not supported. Although there were statistically significant shifts in muscle timing, the shifts were minor in absolute terms and appeared to be the result of the muscles accounting for the activation dynamics associated with muscle force development (i.e. the delay in muscle force rise and decay). But, significant changes in the magnitude of muscle EMG during regions of slow crank angular velocity for the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris were observed. Thus, the nervous system used adaptations to the muscle EMG magnitude, rather than the timing, to adapt to the altered task mechanics. The results also suggested that cyclists might work on the descending limb of the power-velocity relationship when pedaling at

  2. Mechanisms of regulation of olfactory transduction and adaptation in the olfactory cilium.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca(2+))-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca(2+), and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca(2+) response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control

  3. Mechanisms of Regulation of Olfactory Transduction and Adaptation in the Olfactory Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca2+)-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca2+, and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca2+ response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control GPCR

  4. The estimated mechanical advantage of the prosimian ankle joint musculature, and implications for locomotor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Ryosuke; Kumakura, Hiroo

    2013-05-01

    In this study we compared the power arm lengths and mechanical advantages attributed to 12 lower leg muscles across three prosimian species. The origins and insertions of the lower leg muscles in Garnett's galago, the ring-tailed lemur, and the slow loris were quantified and correlated with positional behaviour. The ankle joint of the galago has a speed-oriented mechanical system, in contrast to that of the slow loris, which exhibits more power-oriented mechanics. The lemur ankle joint exhibited intermediate power arm lengths and an intermediate mechanical advantage relative to the other primates. This result suggests that the mechanical differences in the ankle between the galago and the lemur, taxa that exhibit similar locomotory repertoires, reflect a difference in the kinematics and kinetics of leaping (i.e. generalised vs. specialised leapers). In contrast to leaping primates, lorises have developed a more power-oriented mechanical system as a foot adaptation for positional behaviours such as bridging or cantilevering in their arboreal habitat. PMID:23489408

  5. The Contribution of Experimental in vivo Models to Understanding the Mechanisms of Adaptation to Mechanical Loading in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Lee B.; Price, Joanna S.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading. Jiri Hert introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gages to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced. Experiments combining strain gage instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats, and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (re)modeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice, which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles, and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of rest between them

  6. Hybrid numerical method with adaptive overlapping meshes for solving nonstationary problems in continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burago, N. G.; Nikitin, I. S.; Yakushev, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    Techniques that improve the accuracy of numerical solutions and reduce their computational costs are discussed as applied to continuum mechanics problems with complex time-varying geometry. The approach combines shock-capturing computations with the following methods: (1) overlapping meshes for specifying complex geometry; (2) elastic arbitrarily moving adaptive meshes for minimizing the approximation errors near shock waves, boundary layers, contact discontinuities, and moving boundaries; (3) matrix-free implementation of efficient iterative and explicit-implicit finite element schemes; (4) balancing viscosity (version of the stabilized Petrov-Galerkin method); (5) exponential adjustment of physical viscosity coefficients; and (6) stepwise correction of solutions for providing their monotonicity and conservativeness.

  7. Photorespiration and carbon concentrating mechanisms: two adaptations to high O2, low CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Moroney, James V; Jungnick, Nadine; Dimario, Robert J; Longstreth, David J

    2013-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the two ways that cyanobacteria, algae, and plants have adapted to high O2 and low CO2 concentrations in the environment. First, the process of photorespiration enables photosynthetic organisms to recycle phosphoglycolate formed by the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Second, there are a number of carbon concentrating mechanisms that increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco which increases the carboxylase reaction enhancing CO2 fixation. This review also presents possibilities for the beneficial modification of these processes with the goal of improving future crop yields. PMID:23771683

  8. Neurobiological mechanisms of adaptative plasticity. A possible contribution to cybernetic studies.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, S

    1990-10-01

    Cybernetics can take advantages of future development in the field of Plasticity. The adaptative abilities of the nervous tissue, which is capable to modify its own functional organization and cope with pathological events, are triggered by communication within a network carrying memorized variations in the functional activity of the system induced by external inputs. Plasticity is served by anatomical modifications, as well as by neurophysiological processes. Regeneration, reactive synaptogenesis, functional reorganization, redundancy, equipotentiality are discussed. Some of these mechanisms are still unclear in the human and probably far-fetched. Personal EEG contribution argues against redundancy and equipotentiality. PMID:2082721

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinases in a Sea Urchin Ligament with Adaptable Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana R.; Barbaglio, Alice; Oliveira, Maria J.; Ribeiro, Cristina C.; Wilkie, Iain C.; Candia Carnevali, Maria D.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs) of echinoderms show reversible changes in tensile properties (mutability) that are initiated and modulated by the nervous system via the activities of cells known as juxtaligamental cells. The molecular mechanism underpinning this mechanical adaptability has still to be elucidated. Adaptable connective tissues are also present in mammals, most notably in the uterine cervix, in which changes in stiffness result partly from changes in the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). There have been no attempts to assess the potential involvement of MMPs in the echinoderm mutability phenomenon, apart from studies dealing with a process whose relationship to the latter is uncertain. In this investigation we used the compass depressor ligaments (CDLs) of the sea-urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The effect of a synthetic MMP inhibitor - galardin - on the biomechanical properties of CDLs in different mechanical states (“standard”, “compliant” and “stiff”) was evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis, and the presence of MMPs in normal and galardin-treated CDLs was determined semi-quantitatively by gelatin zymography. Galardin reversibly increased the stiffness and storage modulus of CDLs in all three states, although its effect was significantly lower in stiff than in standard or compliant CDLs. Gelatin zymography revealed a progressive increase in total gelatinolytic activity between the compliant, standard and stiff states, which was possibly due primarily to higher molecular weight components resulting from the inhibition and degradation of MMPs. Galardin caused no change in the gelatinolytic activity of stiff CDLs, a pronounced and statistically significant reduction in that of standard CDLs, and a pronounced, but not statistically significant, reduction in that of compliant CDLs. Our results provide evidence that MMPs may contribute to the variable tensility of the

  10. Natural History of Innate Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Linde, A; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Dib, L; Ross, C; Tamayo, A R; Blecha, F; Melgarejo, T

    2009-12-01

    Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDPs). Most studies on HDPs have focused on humans, domestic and laboratory animals. More than a thousand different sequences have been identified, yet data on HDPs in wild-living animals are sparse. The biological functions of HDPs include broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and immunomodulation. Natural selection and coevolutionary host-pathogen arms race theory suggest that the extent and specificity of the microbial load influences the spectrum and potency of HDPs in different species. Individuals of extant species-that have lived for an extended period in evolutionary history amid populations with intact processes of natural selection-likely possess the most powerful and well-adapted "natural antibiotics". Research on the evolutionary history of the innate defense system and the host in context of the consequences of challenges as well as the efficacy of the innate immune system under natural conditions is therefore of immediate interest. This review focuses on evolutionary aspects of immunophysiology, with emphasis on innate effector molecules. Studies on host defense in wild-living animals may significantly enhance our understanding of inborn immune mechanisms, and help identify molecules that may assist us to cope better with the increasing microbial challenges that likely follow from the continuous amplification of biodiversity levels on Earth. PMID:26783164

  11. Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Defense Responses by Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wan, L Y M; Chen, Z J; Shah, N P; El-Nezami, H

    2016-12-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in food confer numerous health benefits. In previous studies about beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to health, particularly in the fields of intestinal mucosa defense responses, specific probiotics, in a strain-dependent manner, show certain degree of potential to reinforce the integrity of intestinal epithelium and/or regulate some immune components. The mechanism of probiotic action is an area of interest. Among all possible routes of modulation by probiotics of intestinal epithelial cell-mediated defense responses, modulations of intestinal barrier function, innate, and adaptive mucosal immune responses, as well as signaling pathways are considered to play important role in the intestinal defense responses against pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria to intestinal health together with the mechanisms affected by probiotic bacteria: barrier function, innate, and adaptive defense responses such as secretion of mucins, defensins, trefoil factors, immunoglobulin A (IgA), Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines, gut associated lymphoid tissues, and signaling pathways. PMID:25629818

  12. Adaptive Transgenerational Plasticity in Plants: Case Studies, Mechanisms, and Implications for Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jacob J.; Sultan, Sonia E.

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to environmental conditions not only by plastic changes to their own development and physiology, but also by altering the phenotypes expressed by their offspring. This transgenerational plasticity was initially considered to entail only negative effects of stressful parental environments, such as production of smaller seeds by resource- or temperature-stressed parent plants, and was therefore viewed as environmental noise. Recent evolutionary ecology studies have shown that in some cases, these inherited environmental effects can include specific growth adjustments that are functionally adaptive to the parental conditions that induced them, which can range from contrasting states of controlled laboratory environments to the complex habitat variation encountered by natural plant populations. Preliminary findings suggest that adaptive transgenerational effects can be transmitted by means of diverse mechanisms including changes to seed provisioning and biochemistry, and epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation that can persist across multiple generations. These non-genetically inherited adaptations can influence the ecological breadth and evolutionary dynamics of plant taxa and promote the spread of invasive plants. Interdisciplinary studies that join mechanistic and evolutionary ecology approaches will be an important source of future insights. PMID:22639624

  13. Biological Co-Adaptation of Morphological and Composition Traits Contributes to Mechanical Functionality and Skeletal Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Tommasini, Steven M; Nasser, Philip; Hu, Bin; Jepsen, Karl J

    2008-01-01

    A path analysis was conducted to determine whether functional interactions exist among morphological, compositional, and microstructural traits for young adult human tibias. Data provided evidence that bone traits are co-adapted during ontogeny so that the sets of traits together satisfy physiological loading demands. However, certain sets of traits are expected to perform poorly under extreme load conditions. Introduction Previous data from inbred mouse strains suggested that biological processes within bone co-adapt morphological and compositional traits during ontogeny to satisfy physiological loading demands. Similar work in young adult humans showed that cortical tissue from slender tibias was stiffer, less ductile, and more susceptible to accumulating damage. Here we tested whether the relationships among morphology and tissue level mechanical properties were the result of biological processes that co-adapt physical traits, similar to those observed for the mouse skeleton. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional morphology, bone slenderness (Tt.Ar/Le), and tissue level mechanical properties were measured from tibias from 14 female (22–46 yr old) and 17 male (17–46 yr old) donors. Physical bone traits measured included tissue density, ash content, water content, porosity, and the area fractions of osteonal, interstitial, and circumferential lamellar tissues. Bivariate relationships among traits were determined using linear regression analysis. A path analysis was conducted to test the hypothesis that Tt.Ar/Le is functionally related to mineralization (ash content) and the proportion of total area occupied by cortical bone. Results Ash content correlated negatively with several traits including Tt.Ar/Le and marrow area, indicating that slender bones were constructed of tissue with higher mineralization. Path analysis revealed that slender tibias were compensated by higher mineralization and a greater area fraction of bone. Conclusions The results suggest that

  14. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, Bill; Dixon, Joe; Neuville, John R.

    2012-07-01

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  15. Dual 5-HT mechanisms in basolateral and central nuclei of amygdala in the regulation of the defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Carlos Eduardo; Castilho, Vanessa Moreno; de Souza e Silva, Maria Angélica; Brandão, Marcus L

    2002-11-30

    Regulatory mechanisms in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) serves as a filter for unconditioned and conditioned aversive information that ascend to higher structures from the brainstem whereas the central nucleus (CeA) is the main output for the resultant defense reaction. We have shown that neural substrates in the inferior colliculus are activated by threatening stimuli of acoustic nature and have important functional links with the amygdala. In this work, we examined the influence of lesions with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) of these nuclei of amygdala on the aversive responses induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Thus, rats were implanted with an electrode in the CeA of the inferior colliculus for the determination of the thresholds of alertness, freezing and escape responses. Each rat also bore a cannula implanted in the BLA or CeA for injection of 5,7-DHT (8.0 microg/0.8 microl) or its vehicle. The data obtained show that CeA lesions increase the thresholds of aversive responses whereas BLA lesions decrease the thresholds of these responses. From this evidence it is suggested that defensive behavior induced by activation of the neural substrates of aversion in the inferior colliculus seems to depend on the integrity of the amygdala. BLA regulates the input and CeA functions as the output for these aversive states generated at brainstem level. It is likely that aversive information ascending from the inferior colliculus may receive either inhibitory or excitatory influences of 5-HT mechanisms in the BLA or CeA, respectively. PMID:12431748

  16. Induction of Nrf2-mediated cellular defenses and alteration of phase I activities as mechanisms of chemoprotective effects of coffee in the liver.

    PubMed

    Cavin, C; Marin-Kuan, M; Langouët, S; Bezençon, C; Guignard, G; Verguet, C; Piguet, D; Holzhäuser, D; Cornaz, R; Schilter, B

    2008-04-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a significant decrease in the risk of developing chronic diseases such as Parkinson disease, diabetes type-2 and several types of cancers (e.g. colon, liver). In the present study, a coffee-dependent induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic detoxification processes was observed in rat liver and primary hepatocytes. In addition, coffee was found to induce the mRNA and protein expression of enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defenses. These inductions were correlated with the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor as shown using an ARE-reporter luciferase assay. The induction of detoxifying enzymes GSTs and AKR is compatible with a protection against both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This hypothesis was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo test systems, where coffee reduced both AFB1-DNA and protein adducts. Interestingly, coffee was also found to inhibit cytochrome CYP1A1/2, indicating that other mechanisms different from a stimulation of detoxification may also play a significant role in the chemoprotective effects of coffee. Further investigations in either human liver cell line and primary hepatocytes indicated that the chemoprotective effects of coffee against AFB1 genotoxicity are likely to be of relevance for humans. These data strongly suggest that coffee may protect against the adverse effects of AFB1. In addition, the coffee-mediated stimulation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulting in increased endogenous defense mechanisms against electrophilic but also oxidative insults further support that coffee may be associated with a protection against various types of chemical stresses. PMID:17976884

  17. Korean red ginseng extract rejuvenates testicular ineffectiveness and sperm maturation process in aged rats by regulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kopalli, Spandana Rajendra; Hwang, Seock-Yeon; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Sung-Won; Cha, Kyu-Min; Han, Chang-Kyun; Hong, Jae-Yup; Kim, Si-Kwan

    2015-09-01

    Distortion of intracellular oxidant and antioxidant balances appears to be a common feature that underlies in age-related male sexual impairment. Therefore regulating oxidative defense mechanisms might be an ideal approach in improving male sexual dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of Korean red ginseng aqueous extract (KRG) on age-induced testicular dysfunction in rats was investigated. KRG (200mg/kg) mixed with regular pellet diet was administered orally for six months and the morphological, spermatogenic and antioxidant enzyme status in testis of aged rats (18months) were evaluated. Data indicated a significant change in morphology and decrease in spermatogenesis-related parameters in aged rats (AC) compared with young rats (YC). Sperm number, germ cell count, Sertoli cell count and Sertoli cell index were significantly (p<0.05) restored in KRG-treated aged rat groups (G-AC). Further the increased lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde (p<0.05), and altered enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) antioxidants (p<0.05) were attenuated by KRG treatment in aged rats to near normal levels as in YC groups. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated differential expression of selected proteins such as phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, fatty acid binding protein-9, triosephosphate isomerase-1 and aldehyde (aldose) reductase-1in aged rats was significantly (p<0.05) protected by KRG treatment. In conclusion, long-term administration of KRG restored aging-induced testicular ineffectiveness in rats by modulating redox proteins and oxidative defense mechanisms. PMID:25980653

  18. Adaptive properties of living beings: proposal for a generic mechanism. (Self-programming machines III).

    PubMed

    Moulin, Jean-Paul

    2006-03-01

    Living systems are capable to have appropriate responses to unpredictable environment. This kind of self-organization seems to operate as a self-programming machine, i.e. an organization able to modify itself. Until now the models of self-organization of living beings proposed are functions solutions of differential systems or transition functions of automata. These functions are fixed and these models are therefore unable to modify their organization. On the other hand, computer science propose a lot of models having the properties of adaptive systems of living beings, but all these models depend on the comparison between a goal and the results and ingenious choices of parameters by programmers, whereas there are no programmer's intention nor choice in the living systems. From two best known examples of adaptive systems of living beings, nervous system and immune system that have in common that the external signals modify the rewriting of their organization and therefore work as self-organizing machines, we devised machines with a finite set of inputs, based upon a recurrence, are able to rewrite their organization (Self-programming machines or m(sp)) whenever external conditions vary and have striking properties of adaptation. M(sp) have similar properties whatever the operation defining the recurrence maybe. These results bring us to make the following statement: adaptive properties of living systems can be explained by their ability to rewrite their organization whenever external conditions vary under the only assumption that the rewriting mechanism be a deterministic constant recurrence in a finite state set. PMID:16545754

  19. Adaptations for economical bipedal running: the effect of limb structure on three-dimensional joint mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rubenson, Jonas; Lloyd, David G; Heliams, Denham B; Besier, Thor F; Fournier, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanical adaptations linked to economical locomotion in cursorial bipeds. We addressed this question by comparing mass-matched humans and avian bipeds (ostriches), which exhibit marked differences in limb structure and running economy. We hypothesized that the nearly 50 per cent lower energy cost of running in ostriches is a result of: (i) lower limb-swing mechanical power, (ii) greater stance-phase storage and release of elastic energy, and (iii) lower total muscle power output. To test these hypotheses, we used three-dimensional joint mechanical measurements and a simple model to estimate the elastic and muscle contributions to joint work and power. Contradictory to our first hypothesis, we found that ostriches and humans generate the same amounts of mechanical power to swing the limbs at a similar self-selected running speed, indicating that limb swing probably does not contribute to the difference in energy cost of running between these species. In contrast, we estimated that ostriches generate 120 per cent more stance-phase mechanical joint power via release of elastic energy compared with humans. This elastic mechanical power occurs nearly exclusively at the tarsometatarso-phalangeal joint, demonstrating a shift of mechanical power generation to distal joints compared with humans. We also estimated that positive muscle fibre power is 35 per cent lower in ostriches compared with humans, and is accounted for primarily by higher capacity for storage and release of elastic energy. Furthermore, our analysis revealed much larger frontal and internal/external rotation joint loads during ostrich running than in humans. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that a primary limb structure specialization linked to economical running in cursorial species is an elevated storage and release of elastic energy in tendon. In the ostrich, energy-saving specializations may also include passive frontal and internal

  20. Epigenetic Control of Defense Signaling and Priming in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Espinas, Nino A.; Saze, Hidetoshi; Saijo, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or effectors leads to defense activation at the pathogen challenged sites. This is followed by systemic defense activation at distant non-challenged sites, termed systemic acquired resistance (SAR). These inducible defenses are accompanied by extensive transcriptional reprogramming of defense-related genes. SAR is associated with priming, in which a subset of these genes is kept at a poised state to facilitate subsequent transcriptional regulation. Transgenerational inheritance of defense-related priming in plants indicates the stability of such primed states. Recent studies have revealed the importance and dynamic engagement of epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications that are closely linked to chromatin reconfiguration, in plant adaptation to different biotic stresses. Herein we review current knowledge regarding the biological significance and underlying mechanisms of epigenetic control for immune responses in plants. We also argue for the importance of host transposable elements as critical regulators of interactions in the evolutionary “arms race” between plants and pathogens. PMID:27563304

  1. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  2. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  3. [A mechanism conjugating cellular and individual adaptations could be produced from space biology].

    PubMed

    Atomi, Y

    2001-03-01

    To know a basic mechanism of biological organism on the earth, we can have a standard point to space. An example is hindlimb suspension model that could induce muscle atrophy. This model mimics adaptational changes under zero gravity; in turn the effect of gravity on the biological system developing on the earth. We can understand gravity is a stress from the specific changes of stress protein induced by mechanical stimuli depending on gravity. Recent development of fluorescent microscopy and time-lapse visual system brought us a possibility of analysis to see visualization of dynamic properties of molecular and cellular events in living cells. Especially dynamic fluctuation of cytoskeleton may include new ideas of biological strategy of living organism on the earth and possibly may suggest subtle changes in space. PMID:12101374

  4. Adaptation of Gabor filters for simulation of human preattentive mechanism for a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Naren; Naghdy, Golshah A.

    1993-08-01

    Vision guided mobile robot navigation is complex and requires analysis of tremendous amounts of information in real time. In order to simplify the task and reduce the amount of information, human preattentive mechanism can be adapted [Nag90]. During the preattentive search the scene is analyzed rapidly but in sufficient detail for the attention to be focused on the `area of interest.' The `area of interest' can further be scrutinized in more detail for recognition purposes. This `area of interest' can be a text message to facilitate navigation. Gabor filters and an automated turning mechanism are used to isolate the `area of interest.' These regions are subsequently processed with optimal spatial resolution for perception tasks. This method has clear advantages over the global operators in that, after an initial search, it scans each region of interest with optimum resolution. This reduces the volume of information for recognition stages and ensures that no region is over or under estimated.

  5. Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels with Adaptable Mechanical and Degradation Properties for Use in Biomedical Applicationsa

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Matthew; Reichert, Sarah; Barney, Neal

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of hydrogels for drug delivery, wound dressings, and surgical implantation can be extensive, including suitable mechanical properties and tailorable degradation time frames. Herein, an adaptable PEG-based hydrogel, whose mechanical properties and degradation rate can be systematically adjusted to meet these criteria by altering simple variables such as the PEG molecular weight, is described. The performance of these hydrogels in three physical manipulations (pushing, pulling, and folding), representative of manipulations that they may undergo during typical biomedical use, is also assessed. While not all of these formulations can withstand these manipulations, a subset did, and it is intended to further optimize these formulations for specific clinical applications. Additionally, the outcomes of the physical manipulation tests indicate that simply having a high modulus does not correlate with biomedical applicability. PMID:24949497

  6. Influence of background size, luminance and eccentricity on different adaptation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gloriani, Alejandro H; Matesanz, Beatriz M; Barrionuevo, Pablo A; Arranz, Isabel; Issolio, Luis; Mar, Santiago; Aparicio, Juan A

    2016-08-01

    Mechanisms of light adaptation have been traditionally explained with reference to psychophysical experimentation. However, the neural substrata involved in those mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Our study analyzed links between psychophysical measurements and retinal physiological evidence with consideration for the phenomena of rod-cone interactions, photon noise, and spatial summation. Threshold test luminances were obtained with steady background fields at mesopic and photopic light levels (i.e., 0.06-110cd/m(2)) for retinal eccentricities from 0° to 15° using three combinations of background/test field sizes (i.e., 10°/2°, 10°/0.45°, and 1°/0.45°). A two-channel Maxwellian view optical system was employed to eliminate pupil effects on the measured thresholds. A model based on visual mechanisms that were described in the literature was optimized to fit the measured luminance thresholds in all experimental conditions. Our results can be described by a combination of visual mechanisms. We determined how spatial summation changed with eccentricity and how subtractive adaptation changed with eccentricity and background field size. According to our model, photon noise plays a significant role to explain contrast detection thresholds measured with the 1/0.45° background/test size combination at mesopic luminances and at off-axis eccentricities. In these conditions, our data reflect the presence of rod-cone interaction for eccentricities between 6° and 9° and luminances between 0.6 and 5cd/m(2). In spite of the increasing noise effects with eccentricity, results also show that the visual system tends to maintain a constant signal-to-noise ratio in the off-axis detection task over the whole mesopic range. PMID:27210038

  7. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    PubMed Central

    CASSELLI, Denise Sá Maia; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CASSELLI, Henrique; MARTINS, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB)] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL)]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification). The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0). After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5ºC±2ºC followed by 55ºC±2ºC - T1) and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz - T2). Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (a=0.05). Results: The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. PMID:23559115

  8. Human monocytes and macrophages differ in their mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory arthritis is a progressive disease with chronic inflammation of joints, which is mainly characterized by the infiltration of immune cells and synovial hyperproliferation. Monocytes migrate towards inflamed areas and differentiate into macrophages. In inflamed tissues, much lower oxygen levels (hypoxia) are present in comparison to the peripheral blood. Hence, a metabolic adaptation process must take place. Other studies suggest that Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) may regulate this process, but the mechanism involved for human monocytes is not yet clear. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and function of HIF-1α in monocytes and macrophages, but also considered alternative pathways involving nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB). Methods Isolated human CD14+ monocytes were incubated under normoxia and hypoxia conditions with or without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation, respectively. Nuclear and cytosolic fractions were prepared in order to detect HIF-1α and NFκB by immunoblot. For the experiments with macrophages, primary human monocytes were differentiated into human monocyte derived macrophages (hMDM) using human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hM-CSF). The effects of normoxia and hypoxia on gene expression were compared between monocytes and hMDMs using quantitative PCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Results We demonstrate, using primary human monocytes and hMDM, that the localization of transcription factor HIF-1α during the differentiation process is shifted from the cytosol (in monocytes) into the nucleus (in macrophages), apparently as an adaptation to a low oxygen environment. For this localization change, protein kinase C alpha/beta 1 (PKC-α/β1 ) plays an important role. In monocytes, it is NFκB1, and not HIF-1α, which is of central importance for the expression of hypoxia-adjusted genes. Conclusions These data demonstrate that

  9. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  10. Identifying core features of adaptive metabolic mechanisms for chronic heat stress attenuation contributing to systems robustness.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jenny; Weber, Katrin; Klemp, Elisabeth; Winters, Gidon; Franssen, Susanne U; Wienpahl, Isabell; Huylmans, Ann-Kathrin; Zecher, Karsten; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Weber, Andreas P M

    2012-05-01

    The contribution of metabolism to heat stress may play a significant role in defining robustness and recovery of systems; either by providing the energy and metabolites required for cellular homeostasis, or through the generation of protective osmolytes. However, the mechanisms by which heat stress attenuation could be adapted through metabolic processes as a stabilizing strategy against thermal stress are still largely unclear. We address this issue through metabolomic and transcriptomic profiles for populations along a thermal cline where two seagrass species, Zostera marina and Zostera noltii, were found in close proximity. Significant changes captured by these profile comparisons could be detected, with a larger response magnitude observed in northern populations to heat stress. Sucrose, fructose, and myo-inositol were identified to be the most responsive of the 29 analyzed organic metabolites. Many key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways also showed significant differential expression. The reported comparison suggests that adaptive mechanisms are involved through metabolic pathways to dampen the impacts of heat stress, and interactions between the metabolome and proteome should be further investigated in systems biology to understand robust design features against abiotic stress. PMID:22402787

  11. [PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF ADAPTIVE MECHANISMS TO SALINITY STRESS IN MARINE GASTROPODS LITTORINA SAXATILIS].

    PubMed

    Muraeva, O A; Maltseva, A L; Mikhailova, N A; Granovitch, A I

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the most important abiotic environmental factors affecting marine animals. If salinity deviate from optimum, adaptive mechanisms switch on to maintain organism's physiological activity. In this study, the reaction of the snails Littorina saxatilis from natural habitats and in response to experimental salinity decreasing was analyzed on proteomic level. The isolation of all snails inside their shells and gradually declining mortality was observed under acute experimental salinity decrease (down to 10 per hundred). Proteomic changes were evaluated in the surviving experimental mollusks compared to control individual using differential 2D gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) and subsequent LC-MS/MS-identification of proteins. Approximately 10% of analyzed proteins underwent up- or down regulation during the experiment. Proteins of folding, antioxidant response, intercellular matrix, cell adhesion, cell signaling and metabolic enzymes were identified among them. Proteome changes observed in experimental hypoosmotic stress partially reproduced in the proteomes of mollusks that live in conditions of natural freshening (estuaries). Possible mechanisms involved in the adaptation process of L. saxatilis individuals to hypo-osmotic stress are discussed. PMID:26995971

  12. Social transmission of a host defense against cuckoo parasitism.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicholas B; Welbergen, Justin A

    2009-06-01

    Coevolutionary arms races between brood parasites and hosts involve genetic adaptations and counter-adaptations. However, hosts sometimes acquire defenses too rapidly to reflect genetic change. Our field experiments show that observation of cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) mobbing by neighbors on adjacent territories induced reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) to increase the mobbing of cuckoos but not of parrots (a harmless control) on their own territory. In contrast, observation of neighbors mobbing parrots had no effect on reed warblers' responses to either cuckoos or parrots. These results indicate that social learning provides a mechanism by which hosts rapidly increase their nest defense against brood parasites. Such enemy-specific social transmission enables hosts to track fine-scale spatiotemporal variation in parasitism and may influence the coevolutionary trajectories and population dynamics of brood parasites and hosts. PMID:19498167

  13. Mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximity of neuronal cell bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. P.; Capadona, J. R.; Miller, R. H.; Healy, B. C.; Shanmuganathan, K.; Rowan, S. J.; Weder, C.; Tyler, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    The hypothesis is that the mechanical mismatch between brain tissue and microelectrodes influences the inflammatory response. Our unique, mechanically adaptive polymer nanocomposite enabled this study within the cerebral cortex of rats. The initial tensile storage modulus of 5 GPa decreases to 12 MPa within 15 min under physiological conditions. The response to the nanocomposite was compared to surface-matched, stiffer implants of traditional wires (411 GPa) coated with the identical polymer substrate and implanted on the contralateral side. Both implants were tethered. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry labeling examined neurons, intermediate filaments, macrophages, microglia and proteoglycans. We demonstrate, for the first time, a system that decouples the mechanical and surface chemistry components of the neural response. The neuronal nuclei density within 100 µm of the device at four weeks post-implantation was greater for the compliant nanocomposite compared to the stiff wire. At eight weeks post-implantation, the neuronal nuclei density around the nanocomposite was maintained, but the density around the wire recovered to match that of the nanocomposite. The glial scar response to the compliant nanocomposite was less vigorous than it was to the stiffer wire. The results suggest that mechanically associated factors such as proteoglycans and intermediate filaments are important modulators of the response of the compliant nanocomposite.

  14. Ectomycorrhizal fungi decompose soil organic matter using oxidative mechanisms adapted from saprotrophic ancestors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Firoz; Nicolás, César; Bentzer, Johan; Ellström, Magnus; Smits, Mark; Rineau, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Floudas, Dimitrios; Carleer, Robert; Lackner, Gerald; Braesel, Jana; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Henrissat, Bernard; Ahrén, Dag; Johansson, Tomas; Hibbett, David S; Martin, Francis; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2016-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are thought to have a key role in mobilizing organic nitrogen that is trapped in soil organic matter (SOM). However, the extent to which ectomycorrhizal fungi decompose SOM and the mechanism by which they do so remain unclear, considering that they have lost many genes encoding lignocellulose-degrading enzymes that are present in their saprotrophic ancestors. Spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling were used to examine the mechanisms by which five species of ectomycorrhizal fungi, representing at least four origins of symbiosis, decompose SOM extracted from forest soils. In the presence of glucose and when acquiring nitrogen, all species converted the organic matter in the SOM extract using oxidative mechanisms. The transcriptome expressed during oxidative decomposition has diverged over evolutionary time. Each species expressed a different set of transcripts encoding proteins associated with oxidation of lignocellulose by saprotrophic fungi. The decomposition 'toolbox' has diverged through differences in the regulation of orthologous genes, the formation of new genes by gene duplications, and the recruitment of genes from diverse but functionally similar enzyme families. The capacity to oxidize SOM appears to be common among ectomycorrhizal fungi. We propose that the ancestral decay mechanisms used primarily to obtain carbon have been adapted in symbiosis to scavenge nutrients instead. PMID:26527297

  15. Influence of resveratrol release on the tissue response to mechanically adaptive cortical implants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jessica K; Jorfi, Mehdi; Buchanan, Kelly L; Park, Daniel J; Foster, E Johan; Tyler, Dustin J; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    The stability and longevity of recordings obtained from intracortical microelectrodes continues to remain an area of concern for neural interfacing applications. The limited longevity of microelectrode performance has been associated with the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the neuroinflammatory response to the microelectrode. Here, we report the investigation of an additive approach that targets both mechanical and chemical factors believed to contribute to chronic BBB instability and the neuroinflammatory response associated with implanted intracortical microelectrodes. The implants investigated were based on a mechanically adaptive, compliant nanocomposite (NC), which reduces the tissue response and tissue strain. This material was doped with various concentrations of the antioxidant resveratrol with the objective of local and rapid delivery. In vitro analysis of resveratrol release, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxicity suggested that a resveratrol content of 0.01% was optimal for in vivo assessment. Thus, probes made from the neat NC reference and probes containing resveratrol (NC Res) were implanted into the cortical tissue of rats for up to sixteen weeks. Histochemical analysis suggested that at three days post-implantation, neither materials nor therapeutic approaches (independently or in combination) could alter the initial wound healing response. However, at two weeks post-implantation, the NC Res implant showed a reduction in activated microglia/macrophages and improvement in neuron density at the tissue-implant interface when compared to the neat NC reference. However, sixteen weeks post-implantation, when the antioxidant was exhausted, NC Res and the neat NC reference exhibited similar tissue responses. The data show that NC Res provides short-term, short-lived benefits due to the antioxidant release, and a long-term reduction in neuroinflammation on account of is mechanical adaptive, compliant nature. Together, these results

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Adaptive Regulation of Intestinal Riboflavin Uptake Process

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Ghosal, Abhisek; Kapadia, Rubina; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal absorption process of vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) is carrier-mediated, and all three known human RF transporters, i.e., hRFVT-1, -2, and -3 (products of the SLC52A1, 2 & 3 genes, respectively) are expressed in the gut. We have previously shown that the intestinal RF uptake process is adaptively regulated by substrate level, but little is known about the molecular mechanism(s) involved. Using human intestinal epithelial NCM460 cells maintained under RF deficient and over-supplemented (OS) conditions, we now show that the induction in RF uptake in RF deficiency is associated with an increase in expression of the hRFVT-2 & -3 (but not hRFVT-1) at the protein and mRNA levels. Focusing on hRFVT-3, the predominant transporter in the intestine, we also observed an increase in the level of expression of its hnRNA and activity of its promoter in the RF deficiency state. An increase in the level of expression of the nuclear factor Sp1 (which is important for activity of the SLC52A3 promoter) was observed in RF deficiency, while mutating the Sp1/GC site in the SLC52A3 promoter drastically decreased the level of induction in SLC52A3 promoter activity in RF deficiency. We also observed specific epigenetic changes in the SLC52A3 promoter in RF deficiency. Finally, an increase in hRFVT-3 protein expression at the cell surface was observed in RF deficiency. Results of these investigations show, for the first time, that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are involved in the adaptive regulation of intestinal RF uptake by the prevailing substrate level. PMID:26121134

  17. Kluyveromyces lactis: A Suitable Yeast Model to Study Cellular Defense Mechanisms against Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    González Siso, M. Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    Studies about hypoxia-induced oxidative stress in human health disorders take advantage from the use of unicellular eukaryote models. A widely extended model is the fermentative yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this paper, we describe an overview of the molecular mechanisms induced by a decrease in oxygen availability and their interrelationship with the oxidative stress response in yeast. We focus on the differential characteristics between S. cerevisiae and the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, a complementary emerging model, in reference to multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:22928082

  18. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation to Life in Hydrogen Sulfide-Rich Environments.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joanna L; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Patacsil Martin, Dorrelyn; Yee, Muh-Ching; Bustamante, Carlos D; Tobler, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent toxicant interfering with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and creating extreme environmental conditions in aquatic ecosystems. The mechanistic basis of adaptation to perpetual exposure to H2S remains poorly understood. We investigated evolutionarily independent lineages of livebearing fishes that have colonized and adapted to springs rich in H2S and compared their genome-wide gene expression patterns with closely related lineages from adjacent, nonsulfidic streams. Significant differences in gene expression were uncovered between all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Variation in the number of differentially expressed genes among population pairs corresponded to differences in divergence times and rates of gene flow, which is consistent with neutral drift driving a substantial portion of gene expression variation among populations. Accordingly, there was little evidence for convergent evolution shaping large-scale gene expression patterns among independent sulfide spring populations. Nonetheless, we identified a small number of genes that was consistently differentially expressed in the same direction in all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Functional annotation of shared differentially expressed genes indicated upregulation of genes associated with enzymatic H2S detoxification and transport of oxidized sulfur species, oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism, and pathways involved in responses to oxidative stress. Overall, our results suggest that modification of processes associated with H2S detoxification and toxicity likely complement each other to mediate elevated H2S tolerance in sulfide spring fishes. Our analyses allow for the development of novel hypotheses about biochemical and physiological mechanisms of adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:26861137

  19. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation to Life in Hydrogen Sulfide–Rich Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Joanna L.; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Patacsil Martin, Dorrelyn; Yee, Muh-Ching; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Tobler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent toxicant interfering with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria and creating extreme environmental conditions in aquatic ecosystems. The mechanistic basis of adaptation to perpetual exposure to H2S remains poorly understood. We investigated evolutionarily independent lineages of livebearing fishes that have colonized and adapted to springs rich in H2S and compared their genome-wide gene expression patterns with closely related lineages from adjacent, nonsulfidic streams. Significant differences in gene expression were uncovered between all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Variation in the number of differentially expressed genes among population pairs corresponded to differences in divergence times and rates of gene flow, which is consistent with neutral drift driving a substantial portion of gene expression variation among populations. Accordingly, there was little evidence for convergent evolution shaping large-scale gene expression patterns among independent sulfide spring populations. Nonetheless, we identified a small number of genes that was consistently differentially expressed in the same direction in all sulfidic and nonsulfidic population pairs. Functional annotation of shared differentially expressed genes indicated upregulation of genes associated with enzymatic H2S detoxification and transport of oxidized sulfur species, oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism, and pathways involved in responses to oxidative stress. Overall, our results suggest that modification of processes associated with H2S detoxification and toxicity likely complement each other to mediate elevated H2S tolerance in sulfide spring fishes. Our analyses allow for the development of novel hypotheses about biochemical and physiological mechanisms of adaptation to extreme environments. PMID:26861137

  20. Indirect adaptive output feedback control of a biorobotic AUV using pectoral-like mechanical fins.

    PubMed

    Naik, Mugdha S; Singh, Sahjendra N; Mittal, Rajat

    2009-06-01

    This paper treats the question of servoregulation of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in the yaw plane using pectoral-like mechanical fins. The fins attached to the vehicle have oscillatory swaying and yawing motion. The bias angle of the angular motion of the fin is used for the purpose of control. Of course, the design approach considered here is applicable to AUVs for other choices of oscillation patterns of the fins, which produce periodic forces and moments. It is assumed that the vehicle parameters, hydrodynamic coefficients, as well the fin forces and moments are unknown. For the trajectory control of the yaw angle, a sampled-data indirect adaptive control system using output (yaw angle) feedback is derived. The control system has a modular structure, which includes a parameter identifier and a stabilizer. For the control law derivation, an internal model of the exosignals (reference signal (constant or ramp) and constant disturbance) is included. Unlike the direct adaptive control scheme, the derived control law is applicable to minimum as well as nonminimum phase biorobotic AUVs (BAUVs). This is important, because for most of the fin locations on the vehicle, the model is a nonminimum phase. In the closed-loop system, the yaw angle trajectory tracking error converges to zero and the remaining state variables remain bounded. Simulation results are presented which show that the derived modular control system accomplishes precise set point yaw angle control and turning maneuvers in spite of the uncertainties in the system parameters using only yaw angle feedback. PMID:19276512

  1. Integrated physiological mechanisms of exercise performance, adaptation, and maladaptation to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Michael N; Leon, Lisa R; Montain, Scott J; Sonna, Larry A

    2011-10-01

    This article emphasizes significant recent advances regarding heat stress and its impact on exercise performance, adaptations, fluid electrolyte imbalances, and pathophysiology. During exercise-heat stress, the physiological burden of supporting high skin blood flow and high sweating rates can impose considerable cardiovascular strain and initiate a cascade of pathophysiological events leading to heat stroke. We examine the association between heat stress, particularly high skin temperature, on diminishing cardiovascular/aerobic reserves as well as increasing relative intensity and perceptual cues that degrade aerobic exercise performance. We discuss novel systemic (heat acclimation) and cellular (acquired thermal tolerance) adaptations that improve performance in hot and temperate environments and protect organs from heat stroke as well as other dissimilar stresses. We delineate how heat stroke evolves from gut underperfusion/ischemia causing endotoxin release or the release of mitochondrial DNA fragments in response to cell necrosis, to mediate a systemic inflammatory syndrome inducing coagulopathies, immune dysfunction, cytokine modulation, and multiorgan damage and failure. We discuss how an inflammatory response that induces simultaneous fever and/or prior exposure to a pathogen (e.g., viral infection) that deactivates molecular protective mechanisms interacts synergistically with the hyperthermia of exercise to perhaps explain heat stroke cases reported in low-risk populations performing routine activities. Importantly, we question the "traditional" notion that high core temperature is the critical mediator of exercise performance degradation and heat stroke. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:23733692

  2. An Adaptive Jitter Mechanism for Reactive Route Discovery in Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Juan Antonio; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of jitter when applied to route discovery in reactive (on-demand) routing protocols. In multi-hop non-synchronized wireless networks, jitter—a small, random variation in the timing of message emission—is commonly employed, as a means to avoid collisions of simultaneous transmissions by adjacent routers over the same channel. In a reactive routing protocol for sensor and ad hoc networks, jitter is recommended during the route discovery process, specifically, during the network-wide flooding of route request messages, in order to avoid collisions. Commonly, a simple uniform jitter is recommended. Alas, this is not without drawbacks: when applying uniform jitter to the route discovery process, an effect called delay inversion is observed. This paper, first, studies and quantifies this delay inversion effect. Second, this paper proposes an adaptive jitter mechanism, designed to alleviate the delay inversion effect and thereby to reduce the route discovery overhead and (ultimately) allow the routing protocol to find more optimal paths, as compared to uniform jitter. This paper presents both analytical and simulation studies, showing that the proposed adaptive jitter can effectively decrease the cost of route discovery and increase the path quality. PMID:25111238

  3. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  4. An adaptive jitter mechanism for reactive route discovery in sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Juan Antonio; Yi, Jiazi; Clausen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of jitter when applied to route discovery in reactive (on-demand) routing protocols. In multi-hop non-synchronized wireless networks, jitter--a small, random variation in the timing of message emission--is commonly employed, as a means to avoid collisions of simultaneous transmissions by adjacent routers over the same channel. In a reactive routing protocol for sensor and ad hoc networks, jitter is recommended during the route discovery process, specifically, during the network-wide flooding of route request messages, in order to avoid collisions. Commonly, a simple uniform jitter is recommended. Alas, this is not without drawbacks: when applying uniform jitter to the route discovery process, an effect called delay inversion is observed. This paper, first, studies and quantifies this delay inversion effect. Second, this paper proposes an adaptive jitter mechanism, designed to alleviate the delay inversion effect and thereby to reduce the route discovery overhead and (ultimately) allow the routing protocol to find more optimal paths, as compared to uniform jitter. This paper presents both analytical and simulation studies, showing that the proposed adaptive jitter can effectively decrease the cost of route discovery and increase the path quality. PMID:25111238

  5. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R.; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi–yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts’ genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts. PMID:26108467

  6. Local adaptation: Mechanical fit between floral ecotypes of Nerine humilis (Amaryllidaceae) and pollinator communities.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ethan; Manning, John; Anderson, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in floral morphology is often assumed to reflect geographic variation in pollinator communities and associated divergence in selective pressures. We studied populations of Nerine humilis (Amaryllidaceae) to assess whether geographic variation in floral form is the result of local adaptation to different pollinator communities. We first tested for associations between floral traits and visitor communities, and found that populations with similar floral morphologies were visited by similar insect communities. Mean style length in each population was also closely associated with the mean body length of the local visitor community. A reciprocal translocation experiment demonstrated that native phenotypes set more seed than translocated phenotypes. Single visitation experiments showed that native flowers received more pollen, and set more seed per visit, than introduced phenotypes in both populations. This suggests that the effectiveness of pollinator visits is determined by the degree of mechanical fit between flowers and visitors. We provide strong evidence that the observed among-population variation in floral traits is an adaptive response to geographic variation in the pollinator community. PMID:26194119

  7. CHANNEL MODULATION AND THE MECHANISM OF LIGHT ADAPTATION IN MOUSE RODS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeannie; Woodruff, Michael L.; Wang, Tian; Concepcion, Francis A.; Tranchina, Daniel; Fain, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are thought to adapt to light by a change in Ca2+, which is postulated to mediate modulation of (1) excited rhodopsin (Rh*) by Ca2+-dependent binding of recoverin, (2) guanylyl cyclase activity via Ca2+-dependent GCAP proteins, and (3) cyclic nucleotide-gated channels by binding of Ca2+-calmodulin. Previous experiments genetically deleted recoverin and the GCAPs and showed that significant regulation of sensitivity survives removal of (1) and (2). We genetically deleted the channel Ca2+-calmodulin binding site in the mouse Mus musculus and find that removal of (3) alters response waveform, but removal of (3) or of (2) and (3) together still leaves much of adaptation intact. These experiments demonstrate that an important additional mechanism is required, which other experiments indicate may be regulation of phosphodiesterase (PDE6). We therefore constructed a kinetic model in which light produces a Ca2+-mediated decrease in PDE6 decay rate, with the novel feature that both spontaneously activated and light-activated PDE6 are modulated. This model together with Ca2+-dependent acceleration of guanylyl cyclase can successfully account for changes in sensitivity and response waveform in background light. PMID:21123569

  8. Mechanisms of adaptation to chronic respiratory acidosis in the rabbit proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Krapf, R

    1989-01-01

    The hyperbicarbonatemia of chronic respiratory acidosis is maintained by enhanced bicarbonate reabsorption in the proximal tubule. To investigate the cellular mechanisms involved in this adaptation, cell and luminal pH were measured microfluorometrically using (2",7')-bis(carboxyethyl)-(5,6)-carboxyfluorescein in isolated, microperfused S2 proximal convoluted tubules from control and acidotic rabbits. Chronic respiratory acidosis was induced by exposure to 10% CO2 for 52-56 h. Tubules from acidotic rabbits had a significantly lower luminal pH after 1-mm perfused length (7.03 +/- 0.09 vs. 7.26 +/- 0.06 in controls, perfusion rate = 10 nl/min). Chronic respiratory acidosis increased the initial rate of cell acidification (dpHi/dt) in response to luminal sodium removal by 63% and in response to lowering luminal pH (7.4-6.8) by 69%. Chronic respiratory acidosis also increased dpHi/dt in response to peritubular sodium removal by 63% and in response to lowering peritubular pH by 73%. In conclusion, chronic respiratory acidosis induces a parallel increase in the rates of the luminal Na/H antiporter and the basolateral Na/(HCO3)3 cotransporter. Therefore, the enhanced proximal tubule reabsorption of bicarbonate in chronic respiratory acidosis may be, at least in part, mediated by a parallel adaptation of these transporters. PMID:2537851

  9. Intra-plastid protein trafficking; how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition

    PubMed Central

    Celedon, Jose M.; Cline, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involves a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to the organelle to avoid aggregation in the aqueous compartments. Soluble proteins faced a different kind of problem since some had to be transported across three membranes to reach their destination. Early studies suggested that chloroplasts addressed these issues by adapting ancient-prokaryotic machineries and integrating them with novel-eukaryotic systems, a process called ‘conservative sorting’. In the last decade, detailed biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have unraveled the mechanisms of protein targeting and localization in chloroplasts, suggesting a highly integrated scheme where ancient and novel systems collaborate at different stages of the process. In this review we focus on the differences and similarities between chloroplast ancestral translocases and their prokaryotic relatives to highlight known modifications that adapted them to the eukaryotic situation. PMID:22750312

  10. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have identified peak cyclic forces, number of loading cycles, and loading rate as contributors to the regulation of bone metabolism. We have proposed a theoretical model that relates bone density to a mechanical stimulus derived from average daily cumulative peak cyclic 'effective' tissue stresses. In order to develop a non-invasive experimental model to test the theoretical model we need to: (1) monitor daily cumulative loading on a bone, (2) compute the internal stress state(s) resulting from the imposed loading, and (3) image volumetric bone density accurately, precisely, and reproducibly within small contiguous volumes throughout the bone. We have chosen the calcaneus (heel) as an experimental model bone site because it is loaded by ligament, tendon and joint contact forces in equilibrium with daily ground reaction forces that we can measure; it is a peripheral bone site and therefore more easily and accurately imaged with computed tomography; it is composed primarily of cancellous bone; and it is a relevant site for monitoring bone loss and adaptation in astronauts and the general population. This paper presents an overview of our recent advances in the areas of monitoring daily ground reaction forces, biomechanical modeling of the forces on the calcaneus during gait, mathematical modeling of calcaneal bone adaptation in response to cumulative daily activity, accurate and precise imaging of the calcaneus with quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and application to long duration space flight.

  11. (1)H NMR and GC-MS Based Metabolomics Reveal Defense and Detoxification Mechanism of Cucumber Plant under Nano-Cu Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Huang, Yuxiong; Hu, Jerry; Zhou, Hongjun; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-02-16

    Because copper nanoparticles are being increasingly used in agriculture as pesticides, it is important to assess their potential implications for agriculture. Concerns have been raised about the bioaccumulation of nano-Cu and their toxicity to crop plants. Here, the response of cucumber plants in hydroponic culture at early development stages to two concentrations of nano-Cu (10 and 20 mg/L) was evaluated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics. Changes in mineral nutrient metabolism induced by nano-Cu were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results showed that nano-Cu at both concentrations interferes with the uptake of a number of micro- and macro-nutrients, such as Na, P, S, Mo, Zn, and Fe. Metabolomics data revealed that nano-Cu at both levels triggered significant metabolic changes in cucumber leaves and root exudates. The root exudate metabolic changes revealed an active defense mechanism against nano-Cu stress: up-regulation of amino acids to sequester/exclude Cu/nano-Cu; down-regulation of citric acid to reduce the mobilization of Cu ions; ascorbic acid up-regulation to combat reactive oxygen species; and up-regulation of phenolic compounds to improve antioxidant system. Thus, we demonstrate that nontargeted (1)H NMR and GC-MS based metabolomics can successfully identify physiological responses induced by nanoparticles. Root exudates metabolomics revealed important detoxification mechanisms. PMID:26751164

  12. A graph-based approach to developing adaptive representations of complex reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    He, Kaiyuan; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2008-12-15

    An effective adaptive mechanism reduction approach based on flux graph clustering is proposed in this paper. The instantaneous element flux is quantified and considered as a proxy for describing the reactive propensities of the system. Our underlying hypothesis is that even though particular conditions may be characterized by a multitude of combinations of species mass fraction, T, and P, the essential chemistry, and hence the reaction propensity of the mixture that is active under this family of conditions, is the same. Therefore, we opt to use the instantaneous fluxes through the active reactions as an intrinsic property of the system. Flux graphs are first constructed for the chemical reaction system under numerous conditions aiming at capturing the attainable region. Similarity between flux graphs is quantified through the distances between corresponding vectors, using the cosine coefficient and a novel graph-distance metric taking into account the magnitude of each flux and the activity distribution of different fluxes. A hierarchical clustering algorithm is implemented to group similar instantaneous flux graphs into clusters, and consequently a reduced mechanism is generated for each cluster. A search algorithm is defined afterward to assign a new query point to a particular flux graph cluster, and subsequently the reduced mechanism associated with this cluster is used to describe the system at this time point. Finally, the methodology is demonstrated using n-pentane combustion in an adiabatic plug flow reactor model and a pairwise mixing stirred reactor model. (author)

  13. Simultaneous optimization of actuator position and control parameter for adaptive mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian-Toralf; Gabbert, Ulrich; Enzmann, Marc R.

    1998-07-01

    The design of adaptive mechanical structures is divided into three parts: the structural design, the controller design and the placement of actuators and sensors. The objective of the design is to create a mechanical structure, which corresponds with the physical and technical requirements. The controller design includes the definition of the optimal controller law and the parameters required to create an actuator adjustment from the perceptible signals of the structural answer. The placement of the actuators and of the sensors give an answer to the question about the optimal distribution of the actuators and sensors in the structure. The sensor placement determines which signals are available to the automatic controller. The position of the actuators in the mechanical structure determines at which points control forces may act to influence the structural behavior in a suitable manner. The determination of the optimal position of the actuators require information about the controller design, the sensor position and the layout and the behavior of the structure. Based on the ideas of the shape optimization and topology optimization, a procedure will be presented, to handle simultaneously the discrete positions of the actuators and the continuous parameters of the controller. The method is based on an augmented Lagrangian function to include additional conditions and the discontinuity of the discrete variables into the objective function. The method will be demonstrated by an test example.

  14. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-01-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels. PMID:27109499

  15. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension.

    PubMed

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-01-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels. PMID:27109499

  16. Genomic Mechanisms Accounting for the Adaptation to Parasitism in Nematode-Trapping Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Meerupati, Tejashwari; Andersson, Karl-Magnus; Friman, Eva; Kumar, Dharmendra; Tunlid, Anders; Ahrén, Dag

    2013-01-01

    Orbiliomycetes is one of the earliest diverging branches of the filamentous ascomycetes. The class contains nematode-trapping fungi that form unique infection structures, called traps, to capture and kill free-living nematodes. The traps have evolved differently along several lineages and include adhesive traps (knobs, nets or branches) and constricting rings. We show, by genome sequencing of the knob-forming species Monacrosporium haptotylum and comparison with the net-forming species Arthrobotrys oligospora, that two genomic mechanisms are likely to have been important for the adaptation to parasitism in these fungi. Firstly, the expansion of protein domain families and the large number of species-specific genes indicated that gene duplication followed by functional diversification had a major role in the evolution of the nematode-trapping fungi. Gene expression indicated that many of these genes are important for pathogenicity. Secondly, gene expression of orthologs between the two fungi during infection indicated that differential regulation was an important mechanism for the evolution of parasitism in nematode-trapping fungi. Many of the highly expressed and highly upregulated M. haptotylum transcripts during the early stages of nematode infection were species-specific and encoded small secreted proteins (SSPs) that were affected by repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). An active RIP mechanism was revealed by lack of repeats, dinucleotide bias in repeats and genes, low proportion of recent gene duplicates, and reduction of recent gene family expansions. The high expression and rapid divergence of SSPs indicate a striking similarity in the infection mechanisms of nematode-trapping fungi and plant and insect pathogens from the crown groups of the filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina). The patterns of gene family expansions in the nematode-trapping fungi were more similar to plant pathogens than to insect and animal pathogens. The observation of RIP activity

  17. Grid coupling mechanism in the semi-implicit adaptive Multi-Level Multi-Domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Tronci, C.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) method is a semi-implicit adaptive method for Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. It has been demonstrated in the past in simulations of Maxwellian plasmas, electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, plasma expansion in vacuum, magnetic reconnection [1, 2, 3]. In multiple occasions, it has been commented on the coupling between the coarse and the refined grid solutions. The coupling mechanism itself, however, has never been explored in depth. Here, we investigate the theoretical bases of grid coupling in the MLMD system. We obtain an evolution law for the electric field solution in the overlap area of the MLMD system which highlights a dependance on the densities and currents from both the coarse and the refined grid, rather than from the coarse grid alone: grid coupling is obtained via densities and currents.

  18. Ca2+-Dependent Regulations and Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: From Electro-Mechanical Coupling to Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca2+ is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca2+ regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca2+-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca2+ ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca2+ ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca2+-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  19. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  20. Induction of multixenobiotic defense mechanisms in resistant Daphnia magna clones as a general cellular response to stress.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Rita; Campos, Bruno; Lemos, Marco F L; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Tauler, Romà; Barata, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Multixenobiotic resistance mechanisms (MXR) were recently identified in Daphnia magna. Previous results characterized gene transcripts of genes encoding and efflux activities of four putative ABCB1 and ABCC transporters that were chemically induced but showed low specificity against model transporter substrates and inhibitors, thus preventing us from distinguishing between activities of different efflux transporter types. In this study we report on the specificity of induction of ABC transporters and of the stress protein hsp70 in clones selected to be genetically resistant to ABCB1 chemical substrates. Clones resistant to mitoxantrone, ivermectin and pentachlorophenol showed distinctive transcriptional responses of transporter protein coding genes and of putative transporter dye activities. Expression of hsp70 proteins also varied across resistant clones. Clones resistant to mitoxantrone and pentachlorophenol showed high constitutive levels of hsp70. Transcriptional levels of the abcb1 gene transporter and of putative dye transporter activity were also induced to a greater extent in the pentachlorophenol resistant clone. Observed higher dye transporter activities in individuals from clones resistant to mitoxantrone and ivermectin were unrelated with transcriptional levels of the studied four abcc and abcb1 transporter genes. These findings suggest that Abcb1 induction in D. magna may be a part of a general cellular stress response. PMID:27039215

  1. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  2. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  3. The CRISPR system: small RNA-guided defense in bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    All cellular systems evolve ways to combat predators and genomic parasites. In bacteria and archaea, numerous resistance mechanisms have developed against phage. Our understanding of this defensive repertoire has recently been expanded to include the CRISPR system of Clustered, Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. In this remarkable pathway, short sequence tags from invading genetic elements are actively incorporated into the host's CRISPR locus, to be transcribed and processed into a set of small RNAs that guide the destruction of foreign genetic material. Here, we review the inner workings of this adaptable and heritable immune system and draw comparisons to small RNA-guided defense mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. PMID:20129051

  4. Adaptive response of bacteria: Multiple hurdles, cross-tolerance and tools to illustrate underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramythiotis, Spyridon; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2015-01-01

    A basic principle in the bacterial resistance against lethal stresses is that exposure of microbial cells to a sublethal hurdle (e.g., pH 5.0, 3% NaCl, or 48°C) may induce resistance to lethal level of the same or different stress. The latter is called "cross-tolerance" and the bacteria experiencing such situations are termed "stress-hardened". The majority of scientific reports on the adaptive responses of bacteria to stresses have recently addressed the need to elucidate the underlying mechanisms controlling bacterial stress response. This in turn, will assist in the efficient application of the multiple hurdle approach, e.g., by selecting specific sanitizers, combining stress treatments or antimicrobials, especially in mild processing, against specific cellular targets, eliminating the possibility of the development of stress adapted cells. Common scientific approaches for studying the link between phenotype (e.g., inactivation, survival, or growth) and physiology is the assessment of global transcriptional changes (up- or down-regulation) or those of certain genes, as well as of proteins involved in certain metabolic pathways, occurring during exposure to stress. This may also be performed in parallel to comparative evaluation of the phenotypic response of wild and mutant strains. The post-genomics research on foodborne pathogens has extended our knowledge beyond their phenotypic behavior and may offer mechanistic insights in the following: (i) the top-down approach (induction), which is the search of the underlying mechanisms (low level) responsible for a specific phenotype based on "-omic" studies; and (ii) the bottom-up approach (deduction), which starts from intracellular level and forms a mechanistic (functional) basis for the cellular response. All these may eventually enable the development of mechanistic microbial models and efficient strategies for controlling survival and growth of pathogens in foods.

  5. Time Course of Pathogenic and Adaptation Mechanisms in Cystinotic Mouse Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P.; Janssens, Virginie; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N’Kuli, Francisca; Nevo, Nathalie; Guiot, Yves; Levtchenko, Elena; Marbaix, Etienne; Pierreux, Christophe E.; Cherqui, Stéphanie; Antignac, Corinne; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Cystinosis, a main cause of Fanconi syndrome, is reproduced in congenic C57BL/6 cystinosin knockout (KO) mice. To identify the sequence of pathogenic and adaptation mechanisms of nephropathic cystinosis, we defined the onset of Fanconi syndrome in KO mice between 3 and 6 months of age and analyzed the correlation with structural and functional changes in proximal tubular cells (PTCs), with focus on endocytosis of ultrafiltrated disulfide-rich proteins as a key source of cystine. Despite considerable variation between mice at the same age, typical event sequences were delineated. At the cellular level, amorphous lysosomal inclusions preceded cystine crystals and eventual atrophy without crystals. At the nephron level, lesions started at the glomerulotubular junction and then extended distally. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence revealed progressive loss of expression of megalin, cubilin, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2, and type IIa sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, suggesting apical dedifferentiation accounting for Fanconi syndrome before atrophy. Injection of labeled proteins revealed that defective endocytosis in S1 PTCs led to partial compensatory uptake by S3 PTCs, suggesting displacement of endocytic load and injury by disulfide-rich cargo. Increased PTC apoptosis allowed luminal shedding of cystine crystals and was partially compensated for by tubular proliferation. We conclude that lysosomal storage triggered by soluble cystine accumulation induces apical PTC dedifferentiation, which causes transfer of the harmful load of disulfide-rich proteins to more distal cells, possibly explaining longitudinal progression of swan-neck lesions. Furthermore, our results suggest that subsequent adaptation mechanisms include lysosomal clearance of free and crystalline cystine into urine and ongoing tissue repair. PMID:24525030

  6. Dopamine as a potent inducer of cellular glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in PC12 neuronal cells: a potential adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhu, Hong; Misra, Bhaba R; Li, Yunbo; Misra, Hara P

    2008-11-01

    Dopamine auto-oxidation and the consequent formation of reactive oxygen species and electrophilic quinone molecules have been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. We reported here that in PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations (50-150 muM) potently induced cellular glutathione (GSH) and the phase 2 enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two critical cellular defenses in detoxification of ROS and electrophilic quinone molecules. Incubation of PC12 cells with dopamine also led to a marked increase in the mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and NQO1. In addition, treatment of PC12 cells with dopamine resulted in a significant elevation of GSH content in the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether treatment with dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations, which upregulated the cellular defenses could protect the neuronal cells against subsequent lethal oxidative and electrophilic injury, PC12 cells were pretreated with dopamine (150 muM) for 24 h and then exposed to various cytotoxic concentrations of dopamine or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with dopamine at a noncytotoxic concentration led to a remarkable protection against cytotoxicity caused by dopamine or 6-OHDA at lethal concentrations, as detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay. In view of the critical roles of GSH and NQO1 in protecting against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, the above findings implicate that upregulation of both GSH and NQO1 by dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations may serve as an important adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection. PMID:18368484

  7. Adaptive approaches to biosecurity governance.

    PubMed

    Cook, David C; Liu, Shuang; Murphy, Brendan; Lonsdale, W Mark

    2010-09-01

    This article discusses institutional changes that may facilitate an adaptive approach to biosecurity risk management where governance is viewed as a multidisciplinary, interactive experiment acknowledging uncertainty. Using the principles of adaptive governance, evolved from institutional theory, we explore how the concepts of lateral information flows, incentive alignment, and policy experimentation might shape Australia's invasive species defense mechanisms. We suggest design principles for biosecurity policies emphasizing overlapping complementary response capabilities and the sharing of invasive species risks via a polycentric system of governance. PMID:20561262

  8. Multifractal entropy based adaptive multiwavelet construction and its application for mechanical compound-fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuilong; Chen, Jinglong; Zhou, Zitong; Zi, Yanyang; Wang, Yanxue; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Compound-fault diagnosis of mechanical equipment is still challenging at present because of its complexity, multiplicity and non-stationarity. In this work, an adaptive redundant multiwavelet packet (ARMP) method is proposed for the compound-fault diagnosis. Multiwavelet transform has two or more base functions and many excellent properties, making it suitable for detecting all the features of compound-fault simultaneously. However, on the other hand, the fixed basis function used in multiwavelet transform may decrease the accuracy of fault extraction; what's more, the multi-resolution analysis of multiwavelet transform in low frequency band may also leave out the useful features. Thus, the minimum sum of normalized multifractal entropy is adopted as the optimization criteria for the proposed ARMP method, while the relative energy ratio of the characteristic frequency is utilized as an effective way in automatically selecting the sensitive frequency bands. Then, The ARMP technique combined with Hilbert transform demodulation analysis is then applied to detect the compound-fault of bevel gearbox and planetary gearbox. The results verify that the proposed method can effectively identify and detect the compound-fault of mechanical equipment.

  9. Animal activity around the clock with no overt circadian rhythms: patterns, mechanisms and adaptive value

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Barnes, Brian M.; Gerkema, Menno P.; Helm, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in many organisms. Animals that are forced to be active around the clock typically show reduced performance, health and survival. Nevertheless, we review evidence of animals showing prolonged intervals of activity with attenuated or nil overt circadian rhythms and no apparent ill effects. We show that around-the-clock and ultradian activity patterns are more common than is generally appreciated, particularly in herbivores, in animals inhabiting polar regions and habitats with constant physical environments, in animals during specific life-history stages (such as migration or reproduction), and in highly social animals. The underlying mechanisms are diverse, but studies suggest that some circadian pacemakers continue to measure time in animals active around the clock. The prevalence of around-the-clock activity in diverse animals and habitats, and an apparent diversity of underlying mechanisms, are consistent with convergent evolution. We suggest that the basic organizational principles of the circadian system and its complexity encompass the potential for chronobiological plasticity. There may be trade-offs between benefits of persistent daily rhythms versus plasticity, which for reasons still poorly understood make overt daily arrhythmicity functionally adaptive only in selected habitats and for selected lifestyles. PMID:23825202

  10. Mechanisms of sensing and adaptive responses to low oxygen conditions in mammals and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Trendeleva, T A; Aliverdieva, D A; Zvyagilskaya, R A

    2014-08-01

    Oxygen is required for effective production of ATP and plays a key role in the maintenance of life for all organisms, excepting strict anaerobes. The ability of aerobic organisms to sense and respond to changes in oxygen level is a basic requirement for their survival. Eukaryotes have developed adaptive mechanisms to sense and respond to decreased oxygen concentrations (hypoxia) through adjustment of oxygen homeostasis by upregulating hypoxic and downregulating aerobic nuclear genes. This review summarizes recent data on mechanisms of cells sensing and responding to changes in oxygen availability in mammals and in yeasts. In the first part of the review, prominence is given to functional regulation and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), HIF-mediated regulation of electron transport flux and repression of lipogenesis, as well as to hypoxia-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (pore) opening, cell death, and autophagy. In the second part of the review emphasis is placed on oxygen sensing in nonpathogenic yeasts by heme, unsaturated fatty acids, and sterols, as well as on responses to hypoxia in fungal pathogens. PMID:25365485

  11. Mechanisms Underlying the Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity by Vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ran; Christakos, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical actions of vitamin D were first suggested over 30 years ago when receptors for the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), were detected in various tissues and cells that are not associated with the regulation of calcium homeostasis, including activated human inflammatory cells. The question that remained was the biological significance of the presence of vitamin D receptors in the different tissues and cells and, with regard to the immune system, whether or not vitamin D plays a role in the normal immune response and in modifying immune mediated diseases. In this article findings indicating that vitamin D is a key factor regulating both innate and adaptive immunity are reviewed with a focus on the molecular mechanisms involved. In addition, the physiological significance of vitamin D action, as suggested by in vivo studies in mouse models is discussed. Together, the findings indicate the importance of 1,25(OH)2D3 as a regulator of key components of the immune system. An understanding of the mechanisms involved will lead to potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of immune mediated diseases. PMID:26404359

  12. Evolution of the fruit endocarp: molecular mechanisms underlying adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dardick, Chris; Callahan, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant evolution is largely driven by adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies that allow diversification into new niches. This is evident by the tremendous variation in flowering and fruiting structures present both across and within different plant lineages. Within a single plant family a staggering variety of fruit types can be found such as fleshy fruits including berries, pomes, and drupes and dry fruit structures like achenes, capsules, and follicles. What are the evolutionary mechanisms that enable such dramatic shifts to occur in a relatively short period of time? This remains a fundamental question of plant biology today. On the surface it seems that these extreme differences in form and function must be the consequence of very different developmental programs that require unique sets of genes. Yet as we begin to decipher the molecular and genetic basis underlying fruit form it is becoming apparent that simple genetic changes in key developmental regulatory genes can have profound anatomical effects. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of fruit endocarp tissue differentiation that have contributed to species diversification within three plant lineages. PMID:25009543

  13. Animal activity around the clock with no overt circadian rhythms: patterns, mechanisms and adaptive value.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Barnes, Brian M; Gerkema, Menno P; Helm, Barbara

    2013-08-22

    Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in many organisms. Animals that are forced to be active around the clock typically show reduced performance, health and survival. Nevertheless, we review evidence of animals showing prolonged intervals of activity with attenuated or nil overt circadian rhythms and no apparent ill effects. We show that around-the-clock and ultradian activity patterns are more common than is generally appreciated, particularly in herbivores, in animals inhabiting polar regions and habitats with constant physical environments, in animals during specific life-history stages (such as migration or reproduction), and in highly social animals. The underlying mechanisms are diverse, but studies suggest that some circadian pacemakers continue to measure time in animals active around the clock. The prevalence of around-the-clock activity in diverse animals and habitats, and an apparent diversity of underlying mechanisms, are consistent with convergent evolution. We suggest that the basic organizational principles of the circadian system and its complexity encompass the potential for chronobiological plasticity. There may be trade-offs between benefits of persistent daily rhythms versus plasticity, which for reasons still poorly understood make overt daily arrhythmicity functionally adaptive only in selected habitats and for selected lifestyles. PMID:23825202

  14. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discrimination experiments, a pedestal spot was presented in one interval and a pedestal + test in a second. Observers indicated which interval contained the test. In the appearance experiments, observers matched the appearance of test spots across a change in background. We analyzed the data using a variant of Fechner's proposal, that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to visual sensitivity. We found that saturating visual response functions together with a model of adaptation that included multiplicative gain control and a subtractive term accounted for data from both tasks. This result suggests that effects of the contexts we studied on color appearance and discriminability are controlled by the same underlying mechanism. PMID:16277280

  15. Electronics and mechanisms control system for FRIDA (inFRared Imager and Dissector for Adaptive optics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Meza, R.; Cuevas, S.; Díaz, J. J.; Espejo, C.; Keiman, C.; Lara, G.; Sánchez, B.; Uribe, J.

    2012-09-01

    FRIDA will be a common-user near infrared imager and integral field spectrograph covering the wavelength range from 0.9 to 2.5 microns. Primary observing modes driven the instrument design are two: direct imaging and integral field spectroscopy. FRIDA will be installed at the Nasmyth-B platform of the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) behind the GTC Adaptive Optics (GTCAO) system. Instrument will use diffraction-limited optics to avoid degrading the high Strehl ratios derived by the GTCAO system in the near infrared. High-performance astronomical instruments with a high reconfiguration degree as FRIDA, not only depends on optical and mechanical efficient designs but also on the good quality of its electronics and control systems design. In fact, astronomical instruments operating performance on telescope greatly relies on electronics and control system. This paper describes the main design topics for the FRIDA electronics and mechanisms control system, pointing on the development that these areas have reached on the project status. FRIDA Critical Design Review (CDR) was held on September 2011.

  16. Do common mechanisms of adaptation mediate color discrimination and appearance? Uniform backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillis, James M.; Brainard, David H.

    2005-10-01

    Color vision is useful for detecting surface boundaries and identifying objects. Are the signals used to perform these two functions processed by common mechanisms, or has the visual system optimized its processing separately for each task? We measured the effect of mean chromaticity and luminance on color discriminability and on color appearance under well-matched stimulus conditions. In the discrimination experiments, a pedestal spot was presented in one interval and a pedestal + test in a second. Observers indicated which interval contained the test. In the appearance experiments, observers matched the appearance of test spots across a change in background. We analyzed the data using a variant of Fechner's proposal, that the rate of apparent stimulus change is proportional to visual sensitivity. We found that saturating visual response functions together with a model of adaptation that included multiplicative gain control and a subtractive term accounted for data from both tasks. This result suggests that effects of the contexts we studied on color appearance and discriminability are controlled by the same underlying mechanism.

  17. Adaptive HIV-Specific B Cell-Derived Humoral Immune Defenses of the Intestinal Mucosa in Children Exposed to HIV via Breast-Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Sandrine; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Gody, Jean Chrysostome; Léal, Josiane; Grésenguet, Gérard; Le Faou, Alain; Bélec, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated whether B cell-derived immune defenses of the gastro-intestinal tract are activated to produce HIV-specific antibodies in children continuously exposed to HIV via breast-feeding. Methods Couples of HIV-1-infected mothers (n = 14) and their breastfed non HIV-infected (n = 8) and HIV-infected (n = 6) babies, and healthy HIV-negative mothers and breastfed babies (n = 10) as controls, were prospectively included at the Complexe Pédiatrique of Bangui, Central African Republic. Immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG and IgM) and anti-gp160 antibodies from mother’s milk and stools of breastfed children were quantified by ELISA. Immunoaffinity purified anti-gp160 antibodies were characterized functionally regarding their capacity to reduce attachment and/or infection of R5- and X4- tropic HIV-1 strains on human colorectal epithelial HT29 cells line or monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDM). Results The levels of total IgA and IgG were increased in milk of HIV-infected mothers and stools of HIV-exposed children, indicating the activation of B cell-derived mucosal immunity. Breast milk samples as well as stool samples from HIV-negative and HIV-infected babies exposed to HIV by breast-feeding, contained high levels of HIV-specific antibodies, mainly IgG antibodies, less frequently IgA antibodies, and rarely IgM antibodies. Relative ratios of excretion by reference to lactoferrin calculated for HIV-specific IgA, IgG and IgM in stools of HIV-exposed children were largely superior to 1, indicating active production of HIV-specific antibodies by the intestinal mucosa. Antibodies to gp160 purified from pooled stools of HIV-exposed breastfed children inhibited the attachment of HIV-1NDK on HT29 cells by 63% and on MDM by 77%, and the attachment of HIV-1JRCSF on MDM by 40%; and the infection of MDM by HIV-1JRCSF by 93%. Conclusions The intestinal mucosa of children exposed to HIV by breast-feeding produces HIV-specific antibodies harbouring in vitro major

  18. Evidence for Retromutagenesis as a Mechanism for Adaptive Mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morreall, Jordan; Kim, Alice; Liu, Yuan; Degtyareva, Natalya; Weiss, Bernard; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Adaptive mutation refers to the continuous outgrowth of new mutants from a non-dividing cell population during selection, in apparent violation of the neo-Darwinian principle that mutation precedes selection. One explanation is that of retromutagenesis, in which a DNA lesion causes a transcriptional mutation that yields a mutant protein, allowing escape from selection. This enables a round of DNA replication that establishes heritability. Because the model requires that gene expression precedes DNA replication, it predicts that during selection, new mutants will arise from damage only to the transcribed DNA strand. As a test, we used a lacZ amber mutant of Escherichia coli that can revert by nitrous acid-induced deamination of adenine residues on either strand of the TAG stop codon, each causing different DNA mutations. When stationary-phase, mutagenized cells were grown in rich broth before being plated on lactose-selective media, only non-transcribed strand mutations appeared in the revertants. This result was consistent with the known high sensitivity to deamination of the single-stranded DNA in a transcription bubble, and it provided an important control because it demonstrated that the genetic system we would use to detect transcribed-strand mutations could also detect a bias toward the non-transcribed strand. When residual lacZ transcription was blocked beforehand by catabolite repression, both strands were mutated about equally, but if revertants were selected immediately after nitrous acid exposure, transcribed-strand mutations predominated among the revertants, implicating retromutagenesis as the mechanism. This result was not affected by gene orientation. Retromutagenesis is apt to be a universal method of evolutionary adaptation, which enables the emergence of new mutants from mutations acquired during counterselection rather than beforehand, and it may have roles in processes as diverse as the development of antibiotic resistance and neoplasia. PMID

  19. Structures and Mechanisms Design Concepts for Adaptive Deployable Entry Placement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yount, Bryan C.; Arnold, James O.; Gage, Peter J.; Mockelman, Jeffrey; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    System studies have shown that large deployable aerodynamic decelerators such as the Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) concept can revolutionize future robotic and human exploration missions involving atmospheric entry, descent and landing by significantly reducing the maximum heating rate, total heat load, and deceleration loads experienced by the spacecraft during entry [1-3]. ADEPT and the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) [4] share the approach of stowing the entry system in the shroud of the launch vehicle and deploying it to a much larger diameter prior to entry. The ADEPT concept provides a low ballistic coefficient for planetary entry by employing an umbrella-like deployable structure consisting of ribs, struts and a fabric cover that form an aerodynamic decelerator capable of undergoing hypersonic flight. The ADEPT "skin" is a 3-D woven carbon cloth that serves as a thermal protection system (TPS) and as a structural surface that transfers aerodynamic forces to the underlying ribs [5]. This paper focuses on design activities associated with integrating ADEPT components (cloth, ribs, struts and mechanisms) into a system that can function across all configurations and environments of a typical mission concept: stowed during launch, in-space deployment, entry, descent, parachute deployment and separation from the landing payload. The baseline structures and mechanisms were selected via trade studies conducted during the summer and fall of 2012. They are now being incorporated into the design of a ground test article (GTA) that will be fabricated in 2013. It will be used to evaluate retention of the stowed configuration in a launch environment, mechanism operation for release, deployment and locking, and static strength of the deployed decelerator. Of particular interest are the carbon cloth interfaces, underlying hot structure, (Advanced Carbon- Carbon ribs) and other structural components (nose cap, struts, and

  20. Secured network sensor-based defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sixiao; Shen, Dan; Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Blasch, Erik P.; Pham, Khanh D.; Chen, Genshe

    2015-05-01

    Network sensor-based defense (NSD) systems have been widely used to defend against cyber threats. Nonetheless, if the adversary finds ways to identify the location of monitor sensors, the effectiveness of NSD systems can be reduced. In this paper, we propose both temporal and spatial perturbation based defense mechanisms to secure NSD systems and make the monitor sensor invisible to the adversary. The temporal-perturbation based defense manipulates the timing information of published data so that the probability of successfully recognizing monitor sensors can be reduced. The spatial-perturbation based defense dynamically redeploys monitor sensors in the network so that the adversary cannot obtain the complete information to recognize all of the monitor sensors. We carried out experiments using real-world traffic traces to evaluate the effectiveness of our proposed defense mechanisms. Our data shows that our proposed defense mechanisms can reduce the attack accuracy of recognizing detection sensors.

  1. Defense Mechanisms of Conifers 1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Gijzen, Mark; Savage, Thomas J.; Croteau, Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from Pinus ponderosa Lawson (ponderosa pine) and Pinus sylvestris L. (Scotch pine) wood exhibited high levels of monoterpene synthase (cyclase) activity, whereas bark extracts of these species contained no detectable activity, and they inhibited cyclase activity when added to extracts from wood, unless polyvinylpyrrolidone was included in the preparation. The molecular mass of the polyvinylpyrrolidone added was of little consequence; however, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (a cross-linked insoluble form of the polymer) was ineffective in protecting enzyme activity. Based on these observations, methods were developed for the efficient extraction and assay of monoterpene cyclase activity from conifer stem (wood and bark) tissue. The level of monoterpene cyclase activity for a given conifer species was shown to correlate closely with the monoterpene content of the oleoresin and with the degree of anatomical complexity of the specialized resin-secreting structures. Cyclase activity and monoterpene content were lowest in the stems of species containing only isolated resin cells, such as western red cedar (Thuja plicata D. Don). Increasing levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were observed in advancing from species with multicellular resin blisters (true firs [Abies]) to those with organized resin passages, such as western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.), Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Engelm.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco). The highest levels of cyclase activity and oleoresin monoterpenes were noted in Pinus species that contain the most highly developed resin duct systems. The relationship between biosynthetic capacity, as measured by cyclase activity, monoterpene content, and the degree of organization of the secretory structures for a given species, may reflect the total number of specialized resin-producing cells per unit mass of stem tissue. PMID:16668182

  2. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  3. Segregation of tracked and wheeled ground vehicle mobility mechanisms through in-situ adaptation of seismic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Christopher G.; Fitzgerald, James; Power, Dennis

    2008-04-01

    The ability to perform generalized ground vehicle classification by unattended ground sensors (UGS) is an important facet of data analysis performed by modern unattended sensor systems. Large variation in seismic signature propagation from one location to another renders exploiting seismic measurements to classify vehicles a significant challenge. This paper presents the results of using an adaptive methodology to distinguish between tracked and wheeled ground vehicle mobility mechanisms. The methodology is a passive in-situ learning process that does not rely upon an explicit calibration process but does require an estimated range to the target. Furthermore, the benefits of the seismic feature adaptation are realized with a sparse information set. There exist scenarios in which the adaptation fails to provide information when implemented as an independent process. These situations, however, may be mitigated by sharing information with other classification algorithms. Once properly initialized, the in-situ adaptation process correctly categorizes over 95% of ground vehicles.

  4. Saccade Adaptation Abnormalities Implicate Dysfunction of Cerebellar-Dependent Learning Mechanisms in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosconi, Matthew W.; Luna, Beatriz; Kay-Stacey, Margaret; Nowinski, Caralynn V.; Rubin, Leah H.; Scudder, Charles; Minshew, Nancy; Sweeney, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellar vermis (lobules VI-VII) has been implicated in both postmortem and neuroimaging studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This region maintains the consistent accuracy of saccadic eye movements and plays an especially important role in correcting systematic errors in saccade amplitudes such as those induced by adaptation paradigms. Saccade adaptation paradigms have not yet been used to study ASD. Fifty-six individuals with ASD and 53 age-matched healthy controls performed an intrasaccadic target displacement task known to elicit saccadic adaptation reflected in an amplitude reduction. The rate of amplitude reduction and the variability of saccade amplitude across 180 adaptation trials were examined. Individuals with ASD adapted slower than healthy controls, and demonstrated more variability of their saccade amplitudes across trials prior to, during and after adaptation. Thirty percent of individuals with ASD did not significantly adapt, whereas only 6% of healthy controls failed to adapt. Adaptation rate and amplitude variability impairments were related to performance on a traditional neuropsychological test of manual motor control. The profile of impaired adaptation and reduced consistency of saccade accuracy indicates reduced neural plasticity within learning circuits of the oculomotor vermis that impedes the fine-tuning of motor behavior in ASD. These data provide functional evidence of abnormality in the cerebellar vermis that converges with previous reports of cellular and gross anatomic dysmorphology of this brain region in ASD. PMID:23704934

  5. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key pointsChanges in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury.Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention.Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport. PMID:26957929

  6. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  7. Use of Ultrasound to Monitor Biceps Femoris Mechanical Adaptations after Injury in a Professional Soccer Player

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Chrysanthou, Chrysanthos; Kofotolis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the use of ultrasound to monitor changes in the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) architecture of aprofessional soccer player with acute first-time hamstring strain. The player followed a 14 session physiotherapy treatment until return to sport. The pennation angle and aponeurosis strain of the long head of the biceps femoris (BF) were monitored at 6 occasions (up until 1 year) after injury. The size of the scar / hematoma was reduced by 63.56% (length) and 67.9% (width) after the intervention and it was almost non-traceable one year after injury. The pennation angle of the fascicles underneath the scar showed a decline of 51.4% at the end of the intervention while an increase of 109.2% of the fascicles which were closer to deep aponeurosis was observed. In contrast, pennation angle of fascicles located away from the injury site were relatively unaffected. The treatment intervention resulted in a 57.9% to 77.3% decline of maximum strain per unit of MVC moment and remained similar one year after the intervention. This study provided an example of the potential use of ultrasound-based parameters to link the mechanical adaptations of the injured muscle to specific therapeutic intervention. Key points Changes in fascicle orientation after biceps femoris mild tear were reduced after a 28 day intervention and remained similar one year after injury. Tendon/aponeurosis strain per unit of moment of force decreased during the course of the therapeutic intervention. Future studies could utilize ultrasonography to monitor mechanical responses after various types of hamstring injury and interventions in order to improve criteria for a safe return to sport. PMID:26957929

  8. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  9. Values as Defenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultman, Kenneth E.

    1976-01-01

    The author outlines a cognitive approach for explaining how and why people use values as defenses. He examines the relationship between defensive values and irrational beliefs, suggests a number of criteria for diagnosing the presence of defensive values, and proposes some strategies for dealing with defensive values in counseling. (Author)

  10. NaCl-induced physiological and biochemical adaptative mechanisms in the ornamental Myrtus communis L. plants.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Motos, José Ramón; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Álvarez, Sara; Fernández-García, Nieves; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús; Hernández, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Physiological and biochemical changes in Myrtus communis L. plants after being subjected to different solutions of NaCl (44, and 88 mM) for up to 30 days (Phase I) and after recovery from the salinity period (Phase II) were studied. Myrtle plants showed salinity tolerance by displaying a series of adaptative mechanisms to cope with salt-stress, including controlled ion homeostasis, the increase in root/shoot ratio, the reduction of water potentials and stomatal conductance to limit water loss. In addition, they displayed different strategies to protect the photosynthetic machinery, including limiting toxic ion accumulation in leaves, increase in chlorophyll content, and changes in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, leaf anatomy and increases in catalase activity. Anatomical modifications in leaves, including a decrease in spongy parenchyma and increased intercellular spaces, allow CO2 diffusion in a situation of reduced stomatal aperture. In spite of all these changes, salinity produced oxidative stress in myrtle plants as monitored by increases in oxidative stress parameter values. The post-recovery period is perceived as a new stress situation, as observed through effects on plant growth and alterations in non-photochemical quenching parameters and lipid peroxidation values. PMID:26074356

  11. Oxygen sensing by the carotid body: mechanisms and role in adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    López-Barneo, José; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gao, Lin; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Pardal, Ricardo; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia

    2016-04-15

    Oxygen (O2) is fundamental for cell and whole-body homeostasis. Our understanding of the adaptive processes that take place in response to a lack of O2(hypoxia) has progressed significantly in recent years. The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the acute cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation) triggered by hypoxia. The CB is composed of clusters of cells (glomeruli) in close contact with blood vessels and nerve fibers. Glomus cells, the O2-sensitive elements in the CB, are neuron-like cells that contain O2-sensitive K(+)channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia. This leads to cell depolarization, Ca(2+)entry, and the release of transmitters to activate sensory fibers terminating at the respiratory center. The mechanism whereby O2modulates K(+)channels has remained elusive, although several appealing hypotheses have been postulated. Recent data suggest that mitochondria complex I signaling to membrane K(+)channels plays a fundamental role in acute O2sensing. CB activation during exposure to low Po2is also necessary for acclimatization to chronic hypoxia. CB growth during sustained hypoxia depends on the activation of a resident population of stem cells, which are also activated by transmitters released from the O2-sensitive glomus cells. These advances should foster further studies on the role of CB dysfunction in the pathogenesis of highly prevalent human diseases. PMID:26764048

  12. Adaptive Physiological Response to Perceived Scarcity as a Mechanism of Sensory Modulation of Life Span.

    PubMed

    Waterson, Michael J; Chan, Tammy P; Pletcher, Scott D

    2015-09-01

    Chemosensation is a potent modulator of organismal physiology and longevity. In Drosophila, loss of recognition of diverse tastants has significant and bidirectional life-span effects. Recently published results revealed that when flies were unable to taste water, they increased its internal generation, which may have subsequently altered life span. To determine whether similar adaptive responses occur in other contexts, we explored the impact of sensory deficiency of other metabolically important molecules. Trehalose is a major circulating carbohydrate in the fly that is recognized by the gustatory receptor Gr5a. Gr5a mutant flies are short lived, and we found that they specifically increased whole-body and circulating levels of trehalose, but not other carbohydrates, likely through upregulation of de novo synthesis. dILP2 transcript levels were increased in Gr5a mutants, a possible response intended to reduce hypertrehalosemia, and likely a contributing factor to their reduced life span. Together, these data suggest that compensatory physiological responses to perceived environmental scarcity, which are designed to alleviate the ostensive shortage, may be a common outcome of sensory manipulation. We suggest that future investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory modulation of aging may benefit by focusing on direct or indirect consequences of physiological changes that are designed to correct perceived disparity with the environment. PMID:25878032

  13. Exploration of intraclonal adaptation mechanisms of Pseudomonas brassicacearum facing cadmium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Delphine; Sanchez, Lisa; Conrod, Sandrine; Gidrol, Xavier; Fekete, Agnes; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Heulin, Thierry; Achouak, Wafa

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas brassicacearum forms phenotypic variants in vitro as well as in planta during root colonization under natural conditions, leading to subpopulations (phase I and II cells) that differ in colony morphology and production of exoenzymes/secondary metabolites. The maximal concentration of cadmium allowing both variants growth was 25 μM; however, phase II cells accumulated fivefold higher Cd than phase I cells, even though both variants showed the same growth rate and kinetics, comprising a long stasis period (50 h). The whole transcriptome analysis of both variants in response to Cd was investigated using the home-made DNA microarrays. This analysis revealed completely different adaptation mechanisms developed by each variant to withstand and grow in the presence of the toxic. A re-organization of the cell wall to limit Cd entrance was noticed for phase I cells, as genes encoding levan exopolymers were downregulated at the expense of an upregulation of genes encoding alginate, and an upregulation of transporters such as cadA, and a downregulation of copper transporters. Phase II cells were unable to prevent Cd entrance and recruited genes under the control of oxyR and soxR regulation to face osmotic and oxidant stresses generated by Cd. Putrescine and spermidine metabolism appeared to play a central role in Cd tolerance. Microarray data were validated by biological analyses such as motility, oxidative stress assay, metabolite profiling with ICR-FT/MS and UPLC, capillary electrophoresis analysis of biogenic amines. PMID:17922765

  14. From tetrapods to primates: conserved developmental mechanisms in diverging ecological adaptations.

    PubMed

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Montiel, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Primates are endowed with a brain about twice the size that of a mammal with the same body size, and humans have the largest brain relative to body size of all animals. This increase in brain size may be related to the acquisition of higher cognitive skills that permitted more complex social interactions, the evolution of culture, and the eventual ability to manipulate the environment. Nevertheless, in its internal structure, the primate brain shares a very conserved design with other mammals, being covered by a six-layered neocortex that, although expands disproportionately to other brain components, it does so following relatively well-defined allometric trends. Thus, the most fundamental events generating the basic design of the primate and human brain took place before the appearance of the first primate-like animal. Presumably, the earliest mammals already displayed a brain morphology radically different from that of their ancestors and that of their sister group, the reptiles, being characterized by the presence of an incipient neocortex that underwent an explosive growth in subsequent mammal evolution. In this chapter, we propose an integrative hypothesis for the origin of the mammalian neocortex, by considering the developmental modifications, functional networks, and ecological adaptations involved in the generation of this structure during the cretaceous period. Subsequently, the expansion of the primate brain is proposed to have relied on the amplification of the same, or very similar, developmental mechanisms as those involved in its primary origins, even in different ecological settings. PMID:22230620

  15. Facets and mechanisms of adaptive pain behavior: predictive regulation and action

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, India; Perini, Irene; Dunham, James

    2013-01-01

    Neural mechanisms underlying nociception and pain perception are considered to serve the ultimate goal of limiting tissue damage. However, since pain usually occurs in complex environments and situations that call for elaborate control over behavior, simple avoidance is insufficient to explain a range of mammalian pain responses, especially in the presence of competing goals. In this integrative review we propose a Predictive Regulation and Action (PRA) model of acute pain processing. It emphasizes evidence that the nervous system is organized to anticipate potential pain and to adjust behavior before the risk of tissue damage becomes critical. Regulatory processes occur on many levels, and can be dynamically influenced by local interactions or by modulation from other brain areas in the network. The PRA model centers on neural substrates supporting the predictive nature of pain processing, as well as on finely-calibrated yet versatile regulatory processes that ultimately affect behavior. We outline several operational categories of pain behavior, from spinally-mediated reflexes to adaptive voluntary action, situated at various neural levels. An implication is that neural processes that track potential tissue damage in terms of behavioral consequences are an integral part of pain perception. PMID:24348358

  16. Adaptation of Grapevine Flowers to Cold Involves Different Mechanisms Depending on Stress Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Jeanson, Etienne; Celiz, Vanessa; Clément, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Grapevine flower development and fruit set are influenced by cold nights in the vineyard. To investigate the impact of cold stress on carbon metabolism in the inflorescence, we exposed the inflorescences of fruiting cuttings to chilling and freezing temperatures overnight and measured fluctuations in photosynthesis and sugar content. Whatever the temperature, after the stress treatment photosynthesis was modified in the inflorescence, but the nature of the alteration depended on the intensity of the cold stress. At 4°C, photosynthesis in the inflorescence was impaired through non-stomatal limitations, whereas at 0°C it was affected through stomatal limitations. A freezing night (−3°C) severely deregulated photosynthesis in the inflorescence, acting primarily on photosystem II. Cold nights also induced accumulation of sugars. Soluble carbohydrates increased in inflorescences exposed to −3°C, 0°C and 4°C, but starch accumulated only in inflorescences of plants treated at 0 and −3°C. These results suggest that inflorescences are able to cope with cold temperatures by adapting their carbohydrate metabolism using mechanisms that are differentially induced according to stress intensity. PMID:23071684

  17. Neural Mechanisms Behind Identification of Leptokurtic Noise and Adaptive Behavioral Response

    PubMed Central

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Bossaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale human interaction through, for example, financial markets causes ceaseless random changes in outcome variability, producing frequent and salient outliers that render the outcome distribution more peaked than the Gaussian distribution, and with longer tails. Here, we study how humans cope with this evolutionary novel leptokurtic noise, focusing on the neurobiological mechanisms that allow the brain, 1) to recognize the outliers as noise and 2) to regulate the control necessary for adaptive response. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging, while participants tracked a target whose movements were affected by leptokurtic noise. After initial overreaction and insufficient subsequent correction, participants improved performance significantly. Yet, persistently long reaction times pointed to continued need for vigilance and control. We ran a contrasting treatment where outliers reflected permanent moves of the target, as in traditional mean-shift paradigms. Importantly, outliers were equally frequent and salient. There, control was superior and reaction time was faster. We present a novel reinforcement learning model that fits observed choices better than the Bayes-optimal model. Only anterior insula discriminated between the 2 types of outliers. In both treatments, outliers initially activated an extensive bottom-up attention and belief network, followed by sustained engagement of the fronto-parietal control network. PMID:26850528

  18. Reproductive trade-offs in extant hunter-gatherers suggest adaptive mechanism for the Neolithic expansion.

    PubMed

    Page, Abigail E; Viguier, Sylvain; Dyble, Mark; Smith, Daniel; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Thompson, James; Vinicius, Lucio; Mace, Ruth; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2016-04-26

    The Neolithic demographic transition remains a paradox, because it is associated with both higher rates of population growth and increased morbidity and mortality rates. Here we reconcile the conflicting evidence by proposing that the spread of agriculture involved a life history quality-quantity trade-off whereby mothers traded offspring survival for increased fertility, achieving greater reproductive success despite deteriorating health. We test this hypothesis by investigating fertility, mortality, health, and overall reproductive success in Agta hunter-gatherers whose camps exhibit variable levels of sedentarization, mobility, and involvement in agricultural activities. We conducted blood composition tests in 345 Agta and found that viral and helminthic infections as well as child mortality rates were significantly increased with sedentarization. Nonetheless, both age-controlled fertility and overall reproductive success were positively affected by sedentarization and participation in cultivation. Thus, we provide the first empirical evidence, to our knowledge, of an adaptive mechanism in foragers that reconciles the decline in health and child survival with the observed demographic expansion during the Neolithic. PMID:27071109

  19. The local enhancement conundrum: in search of the adaptive value of a social learning mechanism.

    PubMed

    Arbilly, Michal; Laland, Kevin N

    2014-02-01

    Social learning mechanisms are widely thought to vary in their degree of complexity as well as in their prevalence in the natural world. While learning the properties of a stimulus that generalize to similar stimuli at other locations (stimulus enhancement) prima facie appears more useful to an animal than learning about a specific stimulus at a specific location (local enhancement), empirical evidence suggests that the latter is much more widespread in nature. Simulating populations engaged in a producer-scrounger game, we sought to deploy mathematical models to identify the adaptive benefits of reliance on local enhancement and/or stimulus enhancement, and the alternative conditions favoring their evolution. Surprisingly, we found that while stimulus enhancement readily evolves, local enhancement is advantageous only under highly restricted conditions: when generalization of information was made unreliable or when error in social learning was high. Our results generate a conundrum over how seemingly conflicting empirical and theoretical findings can be reconciled. Perhaps the prevalence of local enhancement in nature is due to stimulus enhancement costs independent of the learning task itself (e.g. predation risk), perhaps natural habitats are often characterized by unreliable yet highly rewarding payoffs, or perhaps local enhancement occurs less frequently, and stimulus enhancement more frequently, than widely believed. PMID:24044984

  20. Amphibian macrophage development and antiviral defenses.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage lineage cells represent the cornerstone of vertebrate physiology and immune defenses. In turn, comparative studies using non-mammalian animal models have revealed that evolutionarily distinct species have adopted diverse molecular and physiological strategies for controlling macrophage development and functions. Notably, amphibian species present a rich array of physiological and environmental adaptations, not to mention the peculiarity of metamorphosis from larval to adult stages of development, involving drastic transformation and differentiation of multiple new tissues. Thus it is not surprising that different amphibian species and their respective tadpole and adult stages have adopted unique hematopoietic strategies. Accordingly and in order to establish a more comprehensive view of these processes, here we review the hematopoietic and monopoietic strategies observed across amphibians, describe the present understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving amphibian, an in particular Xenopus laevis macrophage development and functional polarization, and discuss the roles of macrophage-lineage cells during ranavirus infections. PMID:26705159

  1. Curcumin-releasing mechanically adaptive intracortical implants improve the proximal neuronal density and blood-brain barrier stability.

    PubMed

    Potter, Kelsey A; Jorfi, Mehdi; Householder, Kyle T; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-05-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neuroinflammatory pathways respond to and propagate the reactive tissue response to intracortical microelectrodes remain active areas of research. We previously demonstrated that both the mechanical mismatch between rigid implants and the much softer brain tissue, as well as oxidative stress, contribute to the neurodegenerative reactive tissue response to intracortical implants. In this study, we utilize physiologically responsive, mechanically adaptive polymer implants based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), with the capability to also locally administer the antioxidant curcumin. The goal of this study is to investigate if the combination of two independently effective mechanisms - softening of the implant and antioxidant release - leads to synergistic effects in vivo. Over the first 4weeks of the implantation, curcumin-releasing, mechanically adaptive implants were associated with higher neuron survival and a more stable blood-brain barrier at the implant-tissue interface than the neat PVA controls. 12weeks post-implantation, the benefits of the curcumin release were lost, and both sets of compliant materials (with and without curcumin) had no statistically significant differences in neuronal density distribution profiles. Overall, however, the curcumin-releasing softening polymer implants cause minimal implant-mediated neuroinflammation, and embody the new concept of localized drug delivery from mechanically adaptive intracortical implants. PMID:24468582

  2. Ecological genetics and genomics of plant defenses: Evidence and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jill T.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Herbivores exert significant selection on plants, and plants have evolved a variety of constitutive and inducible defenses to resist and tolerate herbivory. Assessing the genetic mechanisms that influence defenses against herbivores will deepen our understanding of the evolution of essential phenotypic traits. Ecogenomics is a powerful interdisciplinary approach that can address fundamental questions about the ecology and evolutionary biology of species, such as: which evolutionary forces maintain variation within a population? and What is the genetic architecture of adaptation? This field seeks to identify gene regions that influence ecologically-important traits, assess the fitness consequences under natural conditions of alleles at key quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and test how the abiotic and biotic environment affects gene expression. Here, we review ecogenomics techniques and emphasize how this framework can address long-standing and emerging questions relating to anti-herbivore defenses in plants. For example, ecogenomics tools can be used to investigate: inducible vs. constitutive defenses; tradeoffs between resistance and tolerance; adaptation to the local herbivore community; selection on alleles that confer resistance and tolerance in natural populations; and whether different genes are activated in response to specialist vs. generalist herbivores and to different types of damage. Ecogenomic studies can be conducted with model species, such as Arabidopsis, or their relatives, in which case myriad molecular tools are already available. Burgeoning sequence data will also facilitate ecogenomic studies of non-model species. Throughout this paper, we highlight approaches that are particularly suitable for ecological studies of non-model organisms, discuss the benefits and disadvantages of specific techniques, and review bioinformatic tools for analyzing data. We focus on established and promising techniques, such as QTL mapping with pedigreed

  3. [Urbanization mechanisms in bird species: population systems transformations or adaptations at the individual level?].

    PubMed

    Fridman, V S; Eremkin, G S; Zakharova-Kubareva, N Iu

    2008-01-01

    The present research deals with urbanization of wild bird and mammal species. Forms and mechanisms of population steadiness in the urban landscape have been examined. The urbanization process turned out to be a directed change of the population system forming de novo in the urbolandscape leading to a sustainable organization peculiar for the particular environment. The population organization of different types in urbolandscape is found to provide its stability under conditions of directed and fast changes accompanied with instability and heterogenous structure of habitats. It is shown that the same type of population organization meets the corresponding demands among different species settling in the urban environment. Its features are "openness" and "flowage" of the groups, far order of settlement levels and other units of population system, constant movements of the individuals between the groups as a respond to the signals of urboenvironment significant changes. The "urban" variant of the population system organization turns out to be opposite to that of the same species in the non-urban habitats. After formation of the urban types by the species and successful developing of the town, the urban population becomes separated from the maternal local population and begins to exist independently in the urban landscape. The variety of adaptation aberrations in ecology, behavior, and mode of life of urban birds is the population system stability function in the urban landscape and is not a results of individual selection. It is shown that the urbanization process of the species goes firstly on the population level being the system structure transformation developed by the species towards the most stable state in the town (city) territory. Only after the appearance of stable urban population, the urban individuals show the rapid growth of different changes in ecology, behavior, mode of life that was traditionally described by naturalists as species adaptation to the

  4. The reproductive toxicity on the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis induced by BDE-47 and studies on the effective mechanism based on antioxidant defense system changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Tang, Xuexi; Sha, Jingjing; Chen, Hongmei; Sun, Tianli; Wang, You

    2015-09-01

    2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a low-brominated Tetra-BDE that is widely distributed in the marine ecosystem, was selected to investigate the reproductive toxicity on the rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, and the possible mechanism based on antioxidant defense system changes were studied. The results showed the following: (1) A low concentration of BDE-47 had a slight effect on the egg production of individual females and the egg production rate (EPR) of the population. In fact, BDE-47 exerted reproductive inhibition effects in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The obtained life tables indicated that BDE-47 at a high concentration prolonged the generation time, whereas low and moderate concentrations of BDE-47 had the opposite effects. BDE-47 at a medium concentration significantly decreased the life expectancy and net reproductive rate (P<0.05). Additionally, a high concentration of BDE-47 markedly decreased the net reproductive rate and intrinsic increase rate (P<0.05). The ultra-structure of the ovary showed that BDE-47 severely damaged the ovary. (2) BDE-47 stress elevated the ROS level in B. plicatilis. The GST activity was induced significantly by the low concentration of BDE-47 and inhibited by the highest concentration tested. The GPx activity and GSH content were significant decreased in all the tested groups, and GR activity was induced. GST and GSH appeared to be sensitive to oxidative stress, and all of the glutathione-related enzymes were found to play an important role in maintaining the antioxidant/pro-oxidant balance based on Pearson's correlation analysis. The results indicated that BDE-47 causes reproductive toxicity in B. plicatilis and that the ROS-mediated pathway is responsible for the observed toxicity. PMID:25950406

  5. Contribution of transcription factor, SP1, to the promotion of HB-EGF expression in defense mechanism against the treatment of irinotecan in ovarian clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kohei; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Nam, Sung Ouk; Odawara, Takashi; Manabe, Sadao; Ishikawa, Toyokazu; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Kigawa, Junzo; Takada, Shuji; Asahara, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is a worst histological subtype than other ovarian malignant tumor. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of HB-EGF–targeted therapy for OCCC and to identify the transcription factor that contributed to the induction of HB-EGF by SN38 treatment in OCCC cells. HB-EGF was highly expressed in OCCC cells, and an increase of HB-EGF was induced by SN38 which had only antitumor effect among conventional anticancer agents on OCCC. A specific inhibitor of HB-EGF, a cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), led to a synergistic increase in the number of apoptotic OCCC cells with the treatment of SN38. The luciferase assay with 5′-deletion promoter constructs identified a GC-rich element between −125 and −178 (the distal transcription start site was denoted +1) as a cis-regulatory region, and the treatment of SN38 induced luciferase activity in this region. An in silico and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis estimated that SP1 bound to the cis-regulatory region of HB-EGF in OCCC cells. Real-time PCR and cell viability assays showed that the transfection of a small interfering RNA targeting SP1 suppressed the expression of HB-EGF induced by SN38, resulting in the enhanced sensitivity of SN38. Taken together, these results indicate that induction of HB-EGF expression contributed to defense mechanism against treatment of SN38 through the transcriptional activity of SP1 in OCCC cells. PMID:25060396

  6. Protective effect of AVS073, a polyherbal formula, against UVA-induced melanogenesis through a redox mechanism involving glutathione-related antioxidant defense

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ayurved Siriraj Brand Wattana formula (AVS073), a Thai herbal formula, has traditionally been used for health promotion and prevention of age-related problems. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is recognized to play a vital role in stimulation of melanin synthesis responsible for abnormal skin pigmentation possibly mediated by photooxidative stress. We thus aimed to study the inhibitory effect of AVS073 extracts on UVA-induced melanogenesis via a redox mechanism involving glutathione (GSH) synthesis and glutathione S-transferase (GST) using human melanoma (G361) cell culture. Methods The standardization of AVS073 extracts was carried out by TLC and UHPLC to obtain fingerprinting profiles of the formula, which identified several phenolic compounds including gallic acid (GA) in the formula. Antimelanogenic actions of AVS073 (up to 60 μg/ml) and GA (up to 10 μg/ml) were investigated by measuring tyrosinase activity and mRNA as well as melanin level in G361 cells irradiated with UVA. Moreover, antioxidant actions of the herbal formula and GA were determined by evaluating oxidant formation and modulation of GSH-related antioxidant defenses including GSH content, GST activity and mRNA level of γ-glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (γ-GCLC) and modifier (γ-GCLM) subunit and GST. Results AVS073 extracts and GA, used as a reference compound, suppressed UVA-augmented tyrosinase activity and mRNA and melanin formation. In addition, pretreatment with AVS073 and GA was able to inhibit cellular oxidative stress, GSH depletion, GST inactivation and downregulation of γ-GCLC, γ-GCLM and GST mRNA in G361 cells exposed to UVA radiation. Conclusions AVS073 formula exerted antimelanogenic effects possibly through improving the redox state by upregulation of GSH and GST. Moreover, pharmacological activity of the polyherbal formula would be attributed to combined action of different phenolic compounds present in the formula. PMID:23826868

  7. Mistakes were made: neural mechanisms for the adaptive control of action initiation by the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Mark; Caetano, Marcelo S; Narayanan, Nandakumar S

    2015-01-01

    Studies in rats, monkeys and humans have established that the medial prefrontal cortex is crucial for the ability to exert adaptive control over behavior. Here, we review studies on the role of the rat medial prefrontal cortex in adaptive control, with a focus on simple reaction time tasks that can be easily used across species and have clinical relevance. The performance of these tasks is associated with neural activity in the medial prefrontal cortex that reflects stimulus detection, action timing, and outcome monitoring. We describe rhythmic neural activity that occurs when animals initiate a temporally extended action. Such rhythmic activity is coterminous with major changes in population spike activity. Testing animals over a series of sessions with varying pre-stimulus intervals showed that the signals adapt to the current temporal demands of the task. Disruptions of rhythmic neural activity occur on error trials (premature responding) and lead to a persistent encoding of the error and a subsequent change in behavioral performance (i.e. post-error slowing). Analysis of simultaneously recorded spike activity suggests that the presence of strong theta rhythms is coterminous with altered network dynamics, and might serve as a mechanism for adaptive control. Computational modeling suggests that these signals may enable learning from errors. Together, our findings contribute to an emerging literature and provide a new perspective on the neuronal mechanisms for the adaptive control of action. PMID:25636373

  8. [Transsexual defense].

    PubMed

    Pfäfflin, F

    1994-01-01

    The prevalent approach to the treatment of patients displaying transsexual symptoms is one that favours somatic intervention of either a hormonal or surgical nature. Normally these patients refuse to avail themselves of the possibility of psychotherapy and are indeed regarded by many therapists as largely inaccessible to therapy of this kind. Pfäfflin looks into the factors involved in the disinclination displayed by both patients and therapists to embark upon such a process. He discusses the unconscious defence mechanisms operative in this disinclination with particular reference to the incipient stages of a course of treatment extending over a number of years and involving a patient initially determined to undergo a surgical "sex change". The patient's insistence on being acknowledged as a woman is regarded here as a creative defence against a major diffusion of identity from a genetically earlier phase, connected with incomplete separation and individuation. In the author's opinion the patient's ability to relinquish this defence will depend largely on the therapist's ability to acknowledge its creativity. PMID:7972887

  9. Blockade of adaptive defensive changes in cholesterol uptake and synthesis in AML by the addition of pravastatin to idarubicin + high-dose Ara-C: a phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Deborah E.; Stirewalt, Derek; Shen, Danny; Lemker, Elizabeth; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Cortes, Jorge; Beran, Miloslav; Jackson, C. Ellen; Chen, Wenjing; Estey, Elihu; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2007-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts elevate cellular cholesterol in a defensive adaptation that increases chemoresistance, but blockade of HMG-CoA reductase with statins restores chemosensitivity in vitro. This phase 1 study evaluated adding pravastatin (PV) (40-1680 mg/day, days 1-8) to idarubicin (Ida) ([12 mg/(M2 · day), days 4-6]) + high-dose cytarabine (Ara-C; HDAC) [1.5 g/(M2 · day) by CI, days 4-7] in 15 newly diagnosed and 22 salvage patients with unfavorable (n = 26) or intermediate (n = 10) prognosis cytogenetics. Compared with historical experience with Ida-HDAC, the duration of neutropenia and throbmbocytopenia and the toxicity profile were unaffected by the addition of PV. During PV loading (day 0-4) serum triglyceride and total and LDL cholesterol levels decreased in nearly all patients. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated higher and more sustained serum PV levels with PV doses above 1280 mg/day. CR/CRp was obtained in 11 of 15 new patients, including 8 of 10 with unfavorable cytogenetics, and 9 of 22 salvage patients. An MTD for PV + Ida-HDAC was not reached. Addition of PV to Ida-HDAC was safe, and the encouraging response rates support conducting further trials evaluating the effect of cholesterol modulation on response in AML. PMID:17158228

  10. Strategic defense initiative: critical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    The objectives of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) as outlined by President Reagan are discussed. The principal objective for SDI is as a defense against ballistic missiles. Soviet objections and a summary of US-USSR dialogue on the subject are reviewed. Most US studies have been critical of SDI. Four critical issues are addressed in depth: are defense weapons technologically feasible which have high economic leverage relative to offensive ballistic missiles; would the defense feasibility and leverage be degraded or enhanced in the technological race between weapons innovation and countermeasures; could stability be achieved during and after the transition to the defense dominated world envisioned by SDI proponents; would the deployment of high leverage defensive weapons increase or decrease the security of NATO Europe, and the probability of major conventional or nuclear wars. The issue of SDI may lead to a paradox that contains the seeds of catastrophe. The author concludes by warning that nuclear disarmament may eliminate the highly successful deterrent mechanism for avoiding another major world war. In a world made safe for major conventional wars by the apparent ''elimination'' of nuclear weapons, the leaders in a conventional World War III - involving unimaginable suffering, hatred, terror, and death - would be strongly motivated to introduce nuclear weapons in the crucial decisive battles. Even if diplomacy could ''eliminate'' nuclear weapons, man's knowledge of nuclear weapons can never be eliminated. The paradox is the attempt to eliminate nuclear weapons may maximize the probability of their use. (DMC)

  11. Design of an Adaptive Power Regulation Mechanism and a Nozzle for a Hydroelectric Power Plant Turbine Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Burak; Aytac, Zeynep; Tascioglu, Yigit; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the design of a power regulation mechanism for a Hydroelectric Power Plant (HEPP) model turbine test system which is designed to test Francis type hydroturbines up to 2 MW power with varying head and flow(discharge) values. Unlike the tailor made regulation mechanisms of full-sized, functional HEPPs; the design for the test system must be easily adapted to various turbines that are to be tested. In order to achieve this adaptability, a dynamic simulation model is constructed in MATLAB/Simulink SimMechanics. This model acquires geometric data and hydraulic loading data of the regulation system from Autodesk Inventor CAD models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis respectively. The dynamic model is explained and case studies of two different HEPPs are performed for validation. CFD aided design of the turbine guide vanes, which is used as input for the dynamic model, is also presented. This research is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  12. Oncology clinicians' defenses and adherence to communication skills training with simulated patients: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Mathieu; de Roten, Yves; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; Stiefel, Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to assess the impact of clinicians' defense mechanisms-defined as self-protective psychological mechanisms triggered by the affective load of the encounter with the patient-on adherence to a communication skills training (CST). The population consisted of oncology clinicians (N=31) who participated in a CST. An interview with simulated cancer patients was recorded prior and 6 months after CST. Defenses were measured before and after CST and correlated with a prototype of an ideally conducted interview based on the criteria of CST-teachers. Clinicians who used more adaptive defense mechanisms showed better adherence to communication skills after CST than clinicians with less adaptive defenses (F(1, 29) =5.26, p=0.03, d=0.42). Improvement in communication skills after CST seems to depend on the initial levels of defenses of the clinician prior to CST. Implications for practice and training are discussed. Communication has been recognized as a central element of cancer care [1]. Ineffective communication may contribute to patients' confusion, uncertainty, and increased difficulty in asking questions, expressing feelings, and understanding information [2, 3], and may also contribute to clinicians' lack of job satisfaction and emotional burnout [4]. Therefore, communication skills trainings (CST) for oncology clinicians have been widely developed over the last decade. These trainings should increase the skills of clinicians to respond to the patient's needs, and enhance an adequate encounter with the patient with efficient exchange of information [5]. While CSTs show a great diversity with regard to their pedagogic approaches [6, 7], the main elements of CST consist of (1) role play between participants, (2) analysis of videotaped interviews with simulated patients, and (3) interactive case discussion provided by participants. As recently stated in a consensus paper [8], CSTs need to be taught in small groups (up to 10

  13. Agricultural Intensification as a Mechanism of Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, P.; Calvin, K. V.; le Page, Y.; Patel, P.; West, T. O.; Wise, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The research, policy, and NGO communities have devoted significant attention to the potential for agricultural intensification, or closure of "yield gaps," to alleviate future global hunger, poverty, climate change impacts, and other threats. However, because the research to this point has focused on biophysically attainable yields—assuming optimal choices under ideal conditions—the presently available work has not yet addressed the likely responses of the agricultural sector to real-world conditions in the future. This study investigates endogenous agricultural intensification in response to global climate change impacts—that is, intensification independent of policies or other exogenous interventions to promote yield gap closure. The framework for the analysis is a set of scenarios to 2100 in the GCAM global integrated assessment model, enhanced to include endogenous irrigation, fertilizer application, and yields, in each of 283 land use regions, with maximum yields based on the 95th percentile of attainable yields in a recent global assessment. We assess three levels of agricultural climate impacts, using recent global gridded crop model datasets: none, low (LPJmL), and high (Pegasus). Applying formulations for decomposition of climate change impacts response developed in prior AgMIP work, we find that at the global level, availability of high-yielding technologies mitigates price shocks and shifts the agricultural sector's climate response modestly towards intensification, away from cropland expansion and reduced production. At the regional level, the behavior is more complex; nevertheless, availability of high-yielding production technologies enhances the inter-regional shifts in agricultural production that are induced by climate change, complemented by commensurate changes in trade patterns. The results highlight the importance of policies to facilitate yield gap closure and inter-regional trade as mechanisms for adapting to climate change

  14. Adaptation of the Black Yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to Ionizing Radiation: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kelly L.; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A.; Soto, Carissa M.; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F.; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  15. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kelly L; Mostaghim, Anahita; Cuomo, Christina A; Soto, Carissa M; Lebedev, Nikolai; Bailey, Robert F; Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual genes

  16. Innate and adaptive T cells in asthmatic patients: Relationship to severity and disease mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Timothy S.C.; Zhou, Xiaoying; Staples, Karl J.; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Manta, Alexander; Petrossian, Tanya; Lum, Pek Y.; Smith, Caroline G.; Ward, Jon A.; Howarth, Peter H.; Walls, Andrew F.; Gadola, Stephan D.; Djukanović, Ratko

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease involving diverse cells and mediators whose interconnectivity and relationships to asthma severity are unclear. Objective We performed a comprehensive assessment of TH17 cells, regulatory T cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, other T-cell subsets, and granulocyte mediators in asthmatic patients. Methods Sixty patients with mild-to-severe asthma and 24 control subjects underwent detailed clinical assessment and provided induced sputum, endobronchial biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage, and blood samples. Adaptive and invariant T-cell subsets, cytokines, mast cells, and basophil mediators were analyzed. Results Significant heterogeneity of T-cell phenotypes was observed, with levels of IL-13–secreting T cells and type 2 cytokines increased at some, but not all, asthma severities. TH17 cells and γδ-17 cells, proposed drivers of neutrophilic inflammation, were not strongly associated with asthma, even in severe neutrophilic forms. MAIT cell frequencies were strikingly reduced in both blood and lung tissue in relation to corticosteroid therapy and vitamin D levels, especially in patients with severe asthma in whom bronchoalveolar lavage regulatory T-cell numbers were also reduced. Bayesian network analysis identified complex relationships between pathobiologic and clinical parameters. Topological data analysis identified 6 novel clusters that are associated with diverse underlying disease mechanisms, with increased mast cell mediator levels in patients with severe asthma both in its atopic (type 2 cytokine–high) and nonatopic forms. Conclusion The evidence for a role for TH17 cells in patients with severe asthma is limited. Severe asthma is associated with a striking deficiency of MAIT cells and high mast cell mediator levels. This study provides proof of concept for disease mechanistic networks in asthmatic patients with clusters that could inform the development of new therapies. PMID:25746968

  17. Musical training generalises across modalities and reveals efficient and adaptive mechanisms for reproducing temporal intervals.

    PubMed

    Aagten-Murphy, David; Cappagli, Giulia; Burr, David

    2014-03-01

    Expert musicians are able to time their actions accurately and consistently during a musical performance. We investigated how musical expertise influences the ability to reproduce auditory intervals and how this generalises across different techniques and sensory modalities. We first compared various reproduction strategies and interval length, to examine the effects in general and to optimise experimental conditions for testing the effect of music, and found that the effects were robust and consistent across different paradigms. Focussing on a 'ready-set-go' paradigm subjects reproduced time intervals drawn from distributions varying in total length (176, 352 or 704 ms) or in the number of discrete intervals within the total length (3, 5, 11 or 21 discrete intervals). Overall, Musicians performed more veridical than Non-Musicians, and all subjects reproduced auditory-defined intervals more accurately than visually-defined intervals. However, Non-Musicians, particularly with visual stimuli, consistently exhibited a substantial and systematic regression towards the mean interval. When subjects judged intervals from distributions of longer total length they tended to regress more towards the mean, while the ability to discriminate between discrete intervals within the distribution had little influence on subject error. These results are consistent with a Bayesian model that minimizes reproduction errors by incorporating a central tendency prior weighted by the subject's own temporal precision relative to the current distribution of intervals. Finally a strong correlation was observed between all durations of formal musical training and total reproduction errors in both modalities (accounting for 30% of the variance). Taken together these results demonstrate that formal musical training improves temporal reproduction, and that this improvement transfers from audition to vision. They further demonstrate the flexibility of sensorimotor mechanisms in adapting to

  18. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez Quezada, Landys A.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL). Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases. PMID:21670886

  19. Neural adaptations to resistive exercise: mechanisms and recommendations for training practices.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, David A; Kamen, Gary; Frost, Gail

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neural factors play an important role in muscle strength gains. This article reviews the neural adaptations in strength, with the goal of laying the foundations for practical applications in sports medicine and rehabilitation. An increase in muscular strength without noticeable hypertrophy is the first line of evidence for neural involvement in acquisition of muscular strength. The use of surface electromyographic (SEMG) techniques reveal that strength gains in the early phase of a training regimen are associated with an increase in the amplitude of SEMG activity. This has been interpreted as an increase in neural drive, which denotes the magnitude of efferent neural output from the CNS to active muscle fibres. However, SEMG activity is a global measure of muscle activity. Underlying alterations in SEMG activity are changes in motor unit firing patterns as measured by indwelling (wire or needle) electrodes. Some studies have reported a transient increase in motor unit firing rate. Training-related increases in the rate of tension development have also been linked with an increased probability of doublet firing in individual motor units. A doublet is a very short interspike interval in a motor unit train, and usually occurs at the onset of a muscular contraction. Motor unit synchronisation is another possible mechanism for increases in muscle strength, but has yet to be definitely demonstrated. There are several lines of evidence for central control of training-related adaptation to resistive exercise. Mental practice using imagined contractions has been shown to increase the excitability of the cortical areas involved in movement and motion planning. However, training using imagined contractions is unlikely to be as effective as physical training, and it may be more applicable to rehabilitation. Retention of strength gains after dissipation of physiological effects demonstrates a strong practice effect. Bilateral contractions are

  20. Diversity of CRISPR-Cas-Mediated Mechanisms of Adaptive Immunity in Prokaryotes and Their Application in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Savitskaya, E E; Musharova, O S; Severinov, K V

    2016-07-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems of adaptive immunity in prokaryotes consist of CRISPR arrays (clusters of short repeated genomic DNA fragments separated by unique spacer sequences) and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes that provide cells with resistance against bacteriophages and plasmids containing protospacers, i.e. sequences complementary to CRISPR array spacers. CRISPR-Cas systems are responsible for two different cellular phenomena: CRISPR adaptation and CRISPR interference. CRISPR adaptation is cell genome modification by integration of new spacers that represents a unique case of Lamarckian inheritance. CRISPR interference involves specific recognition of protospacers in foreign DNA followed by introduction of breaks into this DNA and its destruction. According to the mechanisms of action, CRISPR-Cas systems have been subdivided into two classes, five types, and numerous subtypes. The development of techniques based on CRISPR interference mediated by the Type II system Cas9 protein has revolutionized the field of genome editing because it allows selective, efficient, and relatively simple introduction of directed breaks into target DNA loci. However, practical applications of CRISPR-Cas systems are not limited only to genome editing. In this review, we focus on the variety of CRISPR interference and CRISPR adaptation mechanisms and their prospective use in biotechnology. PMID:27449612

  1. RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    RNase 7 belongs to the RNase A superfamily and exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. RNase 7 is expressed in human skin, and expression in keratinocytes can be induced by cytokines and microbes. These properties suggest that RNase 7 participates in innate cutaneous defense. In this review, we provide an overview about the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense with focus on the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, the regulation of RNase 7 expression, and the role of RNase 7 in skin diseases. PMID:27089327

  2. Chemical and mechanical defenses vary among maternal lines and leaf ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and reduce palatability to a generalist insect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, because of this, can feed back to shape plant fitness. In particular, among- and within plant variation in defense shapes herbivore behavior, and if genetically based, may respond to natural selection by herbivo...

  3. Adaptive mechanisms of insect pests against plant protease inhibitors and future prospects related to crop protection: a review.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria L R; de Oliveira, Caio F R; Costa, Poliene M; Castelhano, Elaine C; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-01-01

    The overwhelming demand for food requires the application of technology on field. An important issue that limits the productivity of crops is related to insect attacks. Hence, several studies have evaluated the application of different compounds to reduce the field losses, especially insecticide compounds from plant sources. Among them, plant protease inhibitors (PIs) have been studied in both basic and applied researches, displaying positive results in control of some insects. However, certain species are able to bypass the insecticide effects exerted by PIs. In this review, we disclosed the adaptive mechanisms showed by lepidopteran and coleopteran insects, the most expressive insect orders related to crop predation. The structural aspects involved in adaptation mechanisms are presented as well as the newest alternatives for pest control. The application of biotechnological tools in crop protection will be mandatory in agriculture, and it will be up to researchers to find the best candidates for effective control in long-term. PMID:25329404

  4. Insights into Mechanisms and Proteomic Characterisation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Adaptation to a Novel Antimicrobial Substance

    PubMed Central

    Cierniak, Peter; Jübner, Martin; Müller, Stefan; Bender, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has been reported since the introduction of synthetic antibiotics. Bacteria, such as one of the most common nosocomial pathogens P. aeruginosa, adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions, due to their short generation time. Thus microevolutional changes can be monitored in situ. In this study, the microevolutional process of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 resistance against a recently developed novel antibacterial zinc Schiff-base (ZSB) was investigated at the proteome level. After extended exposure to ZSB the passaged strain differed in tolerance against ZSB, with the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 exhibiting 1.6 times higher minimal inhibitory concentration. Using Two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis, the changes in the proteome of ZSB adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 were examined by comparison with the non-adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1. The proteome of the adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain differed significantly from the non-adapted in the abundance of two proteins when both strains were grown under stressing conditions. One protein could be identified as the outer membrane protein D that plays a role in uptake of basic amino acids as well as in carbapeneme resistance. The second protein has been identified as alkyl peroxide reductase subunit F. Our data indicated a slight increase in abundance of alkyl peroxide reductase F (AhpF) in the case of ZSB passaged P. aeruginosa PAO1. Higher abundance of Ahp has been discussed in the literature as a promoter of accelerated detoxification of benzene derivatives. The observed up-regulated AhpF thus appears to be connected to an increased tolerance against ZSB. Changes in the abundance of proteins connected to oxidative stress were also found after short-time exposure of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to the ZSB. Furthermore, adapted P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed increased tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and, in addition, showed accelerated degradation of ZSB, as determined by HPLC measurements. PMID:23869205

  5. Defense styles in Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Puhalla, Alexander A; McCloskey, Michael S; Brickman, Lauren J; Fauber, Robert; Coccaro, Emil F

    2016-04-30

    The overreliance on immature and/or neurotic defense mechanisms, as opposed to more mature defensive functioning has been linked to several psychiatric disorders. However, to date, the role of defense styles among individuals with Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED) has not been examined. Given that individuals with IED display difficulties controlling their anger and aggression, one might expect these individuals to exhibit more immature and less mature defense styles. The current study compared participants with IED to a personality disorder (PD) comparison group, as well as to healthy volunteers (HV) on the Defense Style Questionnaire, a self-report measure that assesses the extent to which individuals endorse using mature, immature, and neurotic defense styles. Subjects with IED had significantly higher scores than both comparison groups on immature defense styles and exhibited lower scores on mature defense mechanisms. Hierarchical regression of significant defense style subscales showed that higher levels of acting out and lower levels of sublimation uniquely discriminated participants with IED from the PD and HV comparison groups. PMID:27086223

  6. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  7. Mechanical, hormonal, and hypertrophic adaptations to 10 weeks of eccentric and stretch-shortening cycle exercise training in old males.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Márk; Nagy, Szilvia A; Kőszegi, Tamás; Ambrus, Míra; Bogner, Péter; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Tóth, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2014-10-01

    The growth promoting effects of eccentric (ECC) contractions are well documented but it is unknown if the rate of stretch per se plays a role in such muscular responses in healthy aging human skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training of the quadriceps muscle with low rate ECC and high rate ECC contractions in the form of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) but at equal total mechanical work would produce rate-specific adaptations in healthy old males age 60-70. Both training programs produced similar improvements in maximal voluntary isometric (6%) and ECC torque (23%) and stretch-shortening cycle function (reduced contraction duration [24%] and enhanced elastic energy storage [12%]) (p<0.05). The rate of torque development increased 30% only after SSC exercise (p<0.05). Resting testosterone and cortisol levels were unchanged but after each program the acute exercise-induced cortisol levels were 12-15% lower (p<0.05). Both programs increased quadriceps size 2.5% (p<0.05). It is concluded that both ECC and SSC exercise training produces favorable adaptations in healthy old males' quadriceps muscle. Although the rate of muscle tension during the SSC vs. ECC contractions was about 4-fold greater, the total mechanical work seems to regulate the hypetrophic, hormonal, and most of the mechanical adaptations. However, SSC exercise was uniquely effective in improving a key deficiency of aging muscle, i.e., its ability to produce force rapidly. PMID:25064038

  8. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  9. Density-dependent adjustment of inducible defenses

    PubMed Central

    Tollrian, Ralph; Duggen, Sonja; Weiss, Linda C.; Laforsch, Christian; Kopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a major factor driving evolution, and organisms have evolved adaptations increasing their survival chances. However, most defenses incur trade-offs between benefits and costs. Many organisms save costs by employing inducible defenses as responses to fluctuating predation risk. The level of defense often increases with predator densities. However, individual predation risk should not only depend on predator density but also on the density of conspecifics. If the predator has a saturating functional response one would predict a negative correlation between prey density and individual predation risk and hence defense expression. Here, we tested this hypothesis using six model systems, covering a taxonomic range from protozoa to rotifers and crustaceans. In all six systems, we found that the level of defense expression increased with predator density but decreased with prey density. In one of our systems, i.e. in Daphnia, we further show that the response to prey density is triggered by a chemical cue released by conspecifics and congeners. Our results indicate that organisms adjust the degree of defense to the acute predation risk, rather than merely to predators’ densities. Our study suggests that density-dependent defense expression reflects accurate predation-risk assessment and is a general principle in many inducible-defense systems. PMID:26235428

  10. Mechanism of Cell Culture Adaptation of an Enteric Calicivirus, the Porcine Sapovirus Cowden Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongyan; Yokoyama, Masaru; Chen, Ning; Oka, Tomoichiro; Jung, Kwonil; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Annamalai, Thavamathi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The porcine sapovirus (SaV) (PoSaV) Cowden strain is one of only a few culturable enteric caliciviruses. Compared to the wild-type (WT) PoSaV Cowden strain, tissue culture-adapted (TC) PoSaV has two conserved amino acid substitutions in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and six in the capsid protein (VP1). By using the reverse-genetics system, we identified that 4 amino acid substitutions in VP1 (residues 178, 289, 324, and 328), but not the substitutions in the RdRp region, were critical for the cell culture adaptation of the PoSaV Cowden strain. The other two substitutions in VP1 (residues 291 and 295) reduced virus replication in vitro. Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis of VP1 showed that residue 178 was located near the dimer-dimer interface, which may affect VP1 assembly and oligomerization; residues 289, 291, 324, and 328 were located at protruding subdomain 2 (P2) of VP1, which may influence virus binding to cellular receptors; and residue 295 was located at the interface of two monomeric VP1 proteins, which may influence VP1 dimerization. Although reversion of the mutation at residue 291 or 295 from that of the TC strain to that of the WT reduced virus replication in vitro, it enhanced virus replication in vivo, and the revertants induced higher-level serum and mucosal antibody responses than those induced by the TC PoSaV Cowden strain. Our findings reveal the molecular basis for PoSaV adaptation to cell culture. These findings may provide new, critical information for the cell culture adaptation of other PoSaV strains and human SaVs or noroviruses. IMPORTANCE The tissue culture-adapted porcine sapovirus Cowden strain is one of only a few culturable enteric caliciviruses. We discovered that 4 amino acid substitutions in VP1 (residues 178, 289, 324, and 328) were critical for its adaptation to LLC-PK cells. Two substitutions in VP1 (residues 291 and 295) reduced virus replication in vitro but enhanced virus replication and induced

  11. Evolution of the fruit endocarp: molecular mechanisms underlying adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant evolution is largely driven by adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies that allow diversification into new niches. This is evident by the tremendous variation in flowering and fruiting structures present both across and within different plant lineages. Within a single plant f...

  12. Light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of Myrmecia ants that occupy discrete temporal niches.

    PubMed

    Narendra, Ajay; Greiner, Birgit; Ribi, Willi A; Zeil, Jochen

    2016-08-15

    Ants of the Australian genus Myrmecia partition their foraging niche temporally, allowing them to be sympatric with overlapping foraging requirements. We used histological techniques to study the light and dark adaptation mechanisms in the compound eyes of diurnal (Myrmecia croslandi), crepuscular (M. tarsata, M. nigriceps) and nocturnal ants (M. pyriformis). We found that, except in the day-active species, all ants have a variable primary pigment cell pupil that constricts the crystalline cone in bright light to control for light flux. We show for the nocturnal M. pyriformis that the constriction of the crystalline cone by the primary pigment cells is light dependent whereas the opening of the aperture is regulated by an endogenous rhythm. In addition, in the light-adapted eyes of all species, the retinular cell pigment granules radially migrate towards the rhabdom, a process that in both the day-active M. croslandi and the night-active M. pyriformis is driven by ambient light intensity. Visual system properties thus do not restrict crepuscular and night-active ants to their temporal foraging niche, while day-active ants require high light intensities to operate. We discuss the ecological significance of these adaptation mechanisms and their role in temporal niche partitioning. PMID:27535985

  13. Utilizing micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) micro-shutter designs for adaptive coded aperture imaging (ACAI) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledet, Mary M.; Starman, LaVern A.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Rogers, Stanley

    2009-08-01

    Coded aperture imaging (CAI) has been used in both the astronomical and medical communities for years due to its ability to image light at short wavelengths and thus replacing conventional lenses. Where CAI is limited, adaptive coded aperture imaging (ACAI) can recover what is lost. The use of photonic micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) for creating adaptive coded apertures has been gaining momentum since 2007. Successful implementation of micro-shutter technologies would potentially enable the use of adaptive coded aperture imaging and non-imaging systems in current and future military surveillance and intelligence programs. In this effort, a prototype of MEMS microshutters has been designed and fabricated onto a 3 mm x 3 mm square of silicon substrate using the PolyMUMPSTM process. This prototype is a line-drivable array using thin flaps of polysilicon to cover and uncover an 8 x 8 array of 20 μm apertures. A characterization of the micro-shutters to include mechanical, electrical and optical properties is provided. This prototype, its actuation scheme, and other designs for individual microshutters have been modeled and studied for feasibility purposes. In addition, microshutters fabricated from an Al-Au alloy on a quartz wafer were optically tested and characterized with a 632 nm HeNe laser.

  14. Transcriptomes reveal the genetic mechanisms underlying ionic regulatory adaptations to salt in the crab-eating frog

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhong, Li; Hong, Mei-Ling; Chen, Hong-Man; Murphy, Robert W.; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Che, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The crab-eating frog, Fejervarya cancrivora, is the only frog that lives near seas. It tolerates increased environmental concentrations of sodium, chloride and potassium partly by raising ion and urea levels in its blood plasma. The molecular mechanism of the adaptation remains rarely documented. Herein, we analyze transcriptomes of the crab-eating frog and its closely related saline-intolerant species, F. limnocharis, to explore the molecular basis of adaptations to such extreme environmental conditions. Analyses reveal the potential genetic mechanism underlying the adaptation to salinity for the crab-eating frog. Genes in categories associated with ion transport appear to have evolved rapidly in F. cancrivora. Both positively selected and differentially expressed genes exhibit enrichment in the GO category regulation of renal sodium excretion. In this category, the positively selected sites of ANPEP and AVPR2 encode CD13 and V2 receptors, respectively; they fall precisely on conserved domains. More differentially expressed rapidly evolved genes occur in the kidney of F. cancrivora than in F. limnocharis. Four genes involved in the regulation of body fluid levels show signs of positive selection and increased expression. Significant up-regulation occurs in several genes of F. cancrivora associated with renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathways, which relate to osmotic regulation. PMID:26619819

  15. Transcriptomes reveal the genetic mechanisms underlying ionic regulatory adaptations to salt in the crab-eating frog.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhong, Li; Hong, Mei-Ling; Chen, Hong-Man; Murphy, Robert W; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Che, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The crab-eating frog, Fejervarya cancrivora, is the only frog that lives near seas. It tolerates increased environmental concentrations of sodium, chloride and potassium partly by raising ion and urea levels in its blood plasma. The molecular mechanism of the adaptation remains rarely documented. Herein, we analyze transcriptomes of the crab-eating frog and its closely related saline-intolerant species, F. limnocharis, to explore the molecular basis of adaptations to such extreme environmental conditions. Analyses reveal the potential genetic mechanism underlying the adaptation to salinity for the crab-eating frog. Genes in categories associated with ion transport appear to have evolved rapidly in F. cancrivora. Both positively selected and differentially expressed genes exhibit enrichment in the GO category regulation of renal sodium excretion. In this category, the positively selected sites of ANPEP and AVPR2 encode CD13 and V2 receptors, respectively; they fall precisely on conserved domains. More differentially expressed rapidly evolved genes occur in the kidney of F. cancrivora than in F. limnocharis. Four genes involved in the regulation of body fluid levels show signs of positive selection and increased expression. Significant up-regulation occurs in several genes of F. cancrivora associated with renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathways, which relate to osmotic regulation. PMID:26619819

  16. Defense Responses in Two Ecotypes of Lotus japonicus against Non-Pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Bordenave, Cesar D.; Escaray, Francisco J.; Menendez, Ana B.; Serna, Eva; Carrasco, Pedro; Ruiz, Oscar A.; Gárriz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model legume broadly used to study many important processes as nitrogen fixing nodule formation and adaptation to salt stress. However, no studies on the defense responses occurring in this species against invading microorganisms have been carried out at the present. Understanding how this model plant protects itself against pathogens will certainly help to develop more tolerant cultivars in economically important Lotus species as well as in other legumes. In order to uncover the most important defense mechanisms activated upon bacterial attack, we explored in this work the main responses occurring in the phenotypically contrasting ecotypes MG-20 and Gifu B-129 of L. japonicus after inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 pv. tomato. Our analysis demonstrated that this bacterial strain is unable to cause disease in these accessions, even though the defense mechanisms triggered in these ecotypes might differ. Thus, disease tolerance in MG-20 was characterized by bacterial multiplication, chlorosis and desiccation at the infiltrated tissues. In turn, Gifu B-129 plants did not show any symptom at all and were completely successful in restricting bacterial growth. We performed a microarray based analysis of these responses and determined the regulation of several genes that could play important roles in plant defense. Interestingly, we were also able to identify a set of defense genes with a relative high expression in Gifu B-129 plants under non-stress conditions, what could explain its higher tolerance. The participation of these genes in plant defense is discussed. Our results position the L. japonicus-P. syringae interaction as a interesting model to study defense mechanisms in legume species. PMID:24349460

  17. Robust adaptive control modeling of human arm movements subject to altered gravity and mechanical loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryfonidis, Michail

    It has been observed that during orbital spaceflight the absence of gravitation related sensory inputs causes incongruence between the expected and the actual sensory feedback resulting from voluntary movements. This incongruence results in a reinterpretation or neglect of gravity-induced sensory input signals. Over time, new internal models develop, gradually compensating for the loss of spatial reference. The study of adaptation of goal-directed movements is the main focus of this thesis. The hypothesis is that during the adaptive learning process the neural connections behave in ways that can be described by an adaptive control method. The investigation presented in this thesis includes two different sets of experiments. A series of dart throwing experiments took place onboard the space station Mir. Experiments also took place at the Biomechanics lab at MIT, where the subjects performed a series of continuous trajectory tracking movements while a planar robotic manipulandum exerted external torques on the subjects' moving arms. The experimental hypothesis for both experiments is that during the first few trials the subjects will perform poorly trying to follow a prescribed trajectory, or trying to hit a target. A theoretical framework is developed that is a modification of the sliding control method used in robotics. The new control framework is an attempt to explain the adaptive behavior of the subjects. Numerical simulations of the proposed framework are compared with experimental results and predictions from competitive models. The proposed control methodology extends the results of the sliding mode theory to human motor control. The resulting adaptive control model of the motor system is robust to external dynamics, even those of negative gain, uses only position and velocity feedback, and achieves bounded steady-state error without explicit knowledge of the system's nonlinearities. In addition, the experimental and modeling results demonstrate that

  18. RNA Sequencing of Populus x canadensis Roots Identifies Key Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Physiological Adaption to Excess Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ariani, Andrea; Di Baccio, Daniela; Romeo, Stefania; Lombardi, Lara; Andreucci, Andrea; Lux, Alexander; Horner, David Stephen; Sebastiani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Populus x canadensis clone I-214 exhibits a general indicator phenotype in response to excess Zn, and a higher metal uptake in roots than in shoots with a reduced translocation to aerial parts under hydroponic conditions. This physiological adaptation seems mainly regulated by roots, although the molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are still poorly understood. Here, differential expression analysis using RNA-sequencing technology was used to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the response to excess Zn in root. In order to maximize specificity of detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes, we consider the intersection of genes identified by three distinct statistical approaches (61 up- and 19 down-regulated) and validate them by RT-qPCR, yielding an agreement of 93% between the two experimental techniques. Gene Ontology (GO) terms related to oxidation-reduction processes, transport and cellular iron ion homeostasis were enriched among DE genes, highlighting the importance of metal homeostasis in adaptation to excess Zn by P. x canadensis clone I-214. We identified the up-regulation of two Populus metal transporters (ZIP2 and NRAMP1) probably involved in metal uptake, and the down-regulation of a NAS4 gene involved in metal translocation. We identified also four Fe-homeostasis transcription factors (two bHLH38 genes, FIT and BTS) that were differentially expressed, probably for reducing Zn-induced Fe-deficiency. In particular, we suggest that the down-regulation of FIT transcription factor could be a mechanism to cope with Zn-induced Fe-deficiency in Populus. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in adaption to excess Zn in Populus spp., but could also constitute a starting point for the identification and characterization of molecular markers or biotechnological targets for possible improvement of phytoremediation performances of poplar trees. PMID:25671786

  19. Adaptive engineering of a hyperthermophilic archaeon on CO and discovering the underlying mechanism by multi-omics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong Hyuk; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kim, Tae Wan; Bae, Seung Seob; Lee, Sung-Mok; Jung, Hae Chang; Yang, Tae-Jun; Choi, Ae Ran; Cho, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2016-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 can grow and produce H2 on carbon monoxide (CO) and its H2 production rates have been improved through metabolic engineering. In this study, we applied adaptive evolution to enhance H2 productivity. After over 150 serial transfers onto CO medium, cell density, CO consumption rate and H2 production rate increased. The underlying mechanism for those physiological changes could be explained by using multi-omics approaches including genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. A putative transcriptional regulator was newly identified to regulate the expression levels of genes related to CO oxidation. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the transcript levels of genes belonging to the categories of transcription, translation and energy metabolism. Our study presents the first genome-scale methylation pattern of hyperthermophilic archaea. Adaptive evolution led to highly enhanced H2 productivity at high CO flow rates using synthesis gas produced from coal gasification. PMID:26975345

  20. Adaptive engineering of a hyperthermophilic archaeon on CO and discovering the underlying mechanism by multi-omics analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Hyuk; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kim, Tae Wan; Bae, Seung Seob; Lee, Sung-Mok; Jung, Hae Chang; Yang, Tae-Jun; Choi, Ae Ran; Cho, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2016-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 can grow and produce H2 on carbon monoxide (CO) and its H2 production rates have been improved through metabolic engineering. In this study, we applied adaptive evolution to enhance H2 productivity. After over 150 serial transfers onto CO medium, cell density, CO consumption rate and H2 production rate increased. The underlying mechanism for those physiological changes could be explained by using multi-omics approaches including genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. A putative transcriptional regulator was newly identified to regulate the expression levels of genes related to CO oxidation. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the transcript levels of genes belonging to the categories of transcription, translation and energy metabolism. Our study presents the first genome-scale methylation pattern of hyperthermophilic archaea. Adaptive evolution led to highly enhanced H2 productivity at high CO flow rates using synthesis gas produced from coal gasification. PMID:26975345

  1. Vocal learning beyond imitation: mechanisms of adaptive vocal development in songbirds and human infants

    PubMed Central

    Tchernichovski, Ofer; Marcus, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Studies of vocal learning in songbirds typically focus on the acquisition of sensory templates for song imitation and on the consequent process of matching song production to templates. However, functional vocal development also requires the capacity to adaptively diverge from sensory templates, and to flexibly assemble vocal units. Examples of adaptive divergence include the corrective imitation of abnormal songs, and the decreased tendency to copy overabundant syllables. Such frequency-dependent effects might mirror tradeoffs between the assimilation of group identity (culture) while establishing individual and flexibly expressive songs. Intriguingly, although the requirements for vocal plasticity vary across songbirds, and more so between birdsong and language, the capacity to flexibly assemble vocal sounds develops in a similar, stepwise manner across species. Therefore, universal features of vocal learning go well beyond the capacity to imitate. PMID:25005823

  2. Mechanisms of thermal adaptation revealed from the genomes of the Antarctic

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Neil F.W.; Thomas, Torsten; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mattick, John S.; Kuczek, Elizabeth; Slade, Rob; Davis, John; Franzmann, Peter; Boone, David; Rusterholtz, Karl; Feldman, Robert; Gates, Chris; Bench, Shellie; Sowers, Kevin; Kadner, Kristen; Aerts, Andrea; Dehal, Paramvir; Detter, Chris; Glavina, Tijana; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Larimer, Frank; Hauser , Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Cavicchioli, Richard

    2003-03-01

    We generated draft genome sequences for two cold-adapted Archaea, Methanogenium frigidum and Methanococcoides burtonii, to identify genotypic characteristics that distinguish them from Archaea with a higher optimal growth temperature (OGT). Comparative genomics revealed trends in amino acid and tRNA composition, and structural features of proteins. Proteins from the cold-adapted Archaea are characterized by a higher content of non-charged polar amino acids, particularly Gln and Thr and a lower content of hydrophobic amino acids, particularly Leu. Sequence data from nine methanogen genomes (OGT 15-98 C) was used to generate 1 111 modeled protein structures. Analysis of the models from the cold-adapted Archaea showed a strong tendency in the solvent accessible area for more Gln, Thr an hydrophobic residues and fewer charged residues. A cold shock domain (CSD) protein (CspA homolog) was identified in M. frigidum, two hypothetical proteins with CSD-folds in M. burtonii, and a unique winged helix DNA-binding domain protein in M. burtonii. This suggests that these types of nucleic acid binding proteins have a critical role in cold-adapted Archaea. Structural analysis of tRNA sequences from the Archaea indicated that GC content is the major factor influencing tRNA stability in hyperthermophiles, but not in the psychrophiles, mesophiles or moderate thermophiles. Below an OGT of 60 C, the GC content in tRNA was largely unchanged, indicating that any requirement for flexibility of tRNA in psychrophiles is mediated by other means. This is the first time that comparisons have been performed with genome data from Archaea spanning the growth temperature extremes from psychrophiles to hyperthermophiles.

  3. Studying citizen science through adaptive management and learning feedbacks as mechanisms for improving conservation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rebecca; Gray, Steven; Sorensen, Amanda; Newman, Greg; Mellor, David; Newman, Greg; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; LaDeau, Shannon; Biehler, Dawn; Crall, Alycia

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science has generated a growing interest among scientists and community groups, and citizen science programs have been created specifically for conservation. We examined collaborative science, a highly interactive form of citizen science, which we developed within a theoretically informed framework. In this essay, we focused on 2 aspects of our framework: social learning and adaptive management. Social learning, in contrast to individual-based learning, stresses collaborative and generative insight making and is well-suited for adaptive management. Adaptive-management integrates feedback loops that are informed by what is learned and is guided by iterative decision making. Participants engaged in citizen science are able to add to what they are learning through primary data collection, which can result in the real-time information that is often necessary for conservation. Our work is particularly timely because research publications consistently report a lack of established frameworks and evaluation plans to address the extent of conservation outcomes in citizen science. To illustrate how our framework supports conservation through citizen science, we examined how 2 programs enacted our collaborative science framework. Further, we inspected preliminary conservation outcomes of our case-study programs. These programs, despite their recent implementation, are demonstrating promise with regard to positive conservation outcomes. To date, they are independently earning funds to support research, earning buy-in from local partners to engage in experimentation, and, in the absence of leading scientists, are collecting data to test ideas. We argue that this success is due to citizen scientists being organized around local issues and engaging in iterative, collaborative, and adaptive learning. PMID:26585836

  4. Placental, Matrilineal, and Epigenetic Mechanisms Promoting Environmentally Adaptive Development of the Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Kevin D.; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of intrauterine development, vivipary, and placentation in eutherian mammals has introduced new possibilities and constraints in the regulation of neural plasticity and development which promote neural function that is adaptive to the environment that a developing brain is likely to encounter in the future. A range of evolutionary adaptations associated with placentation transfers disproportionate control of this process to the matriline, a period unique in mammalian development in that there are three matrilineal genomes interacting in the same organism at the same time (maternal, foetal, and postmeiotic oocytes). The interactions between the maternal and developing foetal hypothalamus and placenta can provide a template by which a mother can transmit potentially adaptive information concerning potential future environmental conditions to the developing brain. In conjunction with genomic imprinting, it also provides a template to integrate epigenetic information from both maternal and paternal lineages. Placentation also hands ultimate control of genomic imprinting and intergenerational epigenetic information transfer to the matriline as epigenetic markers undergo erasure and reprogramming in the developing oocyte. These developments, in conjunction with an expanded neocortex, provide a unique evolutionary template by which matrilineal transfer of maternal care, resources, and culture can be used to promote brain development and infant survival. PMID:27069693

  5. The Child as Psychologist: Attributions and Evaluations of Defensive Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollinger, Stephen J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Studied children's attributions and evaluations concerning defense mechanisms used by other children. Children negatively evaluated the blame-externalizing defense of projection and viewed it as a masculine characteristic. The internalizing defense of self-blame was evaluated more positively and viewed as a feminine characteristic. (Author/DB)

  6. Amplifying effect of a release mechanism for fast adaptation in the hair bundle.

    PubMed

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H

    2009-07-01

    A "release" mechanism, which has been experimentally observed as the fast component in the hair bundle's response to mechanical stimulation, appears similar to common mechanical relaxation with a damping effect. This observation is puzzling because such a response is expected to have an amplifying role in the mechanoelectrical transduction process in hair cells. Here it is shown that a release mechanism can indeed have a role in amplification, if it is associated with negative stiffness due to the gating of the mechonoelectric transducer channel. PMID:19603855

  7. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: A route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles; Azdoud, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe "volume" damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a "surface" degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  8. Utilizing Matrix-Filler Interactions in the Design of Stimuli-Responsive, Mechanically-Adaptive Electrospun Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanasekara, Nandula; Stone, David; Wnek, Gary; Korley, Lashanda

    2013-03-01

    A new class of all-organic, stimuli-responsive and mechanically-adaptive electrospun nanocomposites, which have the ability to alter their stiffness upon hydration, were developed. These materials were fabricated by incorporating an electrospun mat of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as the filler in a polymeric matrix consisting of either poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) or ethylene oxide-epicholorohydrin copolymer (EO-EPI). The incorporation of high stiffness, high aspect ratio PVA filler mat significantly enhanced the tensile storage modulus of EO-EPI based composites, while modulus enhancement was only noticed above the glass transition for PVAc-based composites. Composite materials based on a rubbery EO-EPI host polymer and PVA filler exhibit an irreversible reduction by a factor of 12 of the tensile modulus upon hydration. In contrast, composites comprised of PVAc show a reversible reduction of modulus by a factor of 280 upon water uptake. The mechanical morphing of the electrospun composites is the result of the filler crystallinity, and matrix-filler interactions facilitated by the surface hydroxyl groups of the PVA filler. The choice of polymer matrix and electrospun nanofiber fillers allow control of matrix-filler interactions in a new series of all-organic composites to achieve desired stimuli-responsiveness and mechanical-adaptability upon exposure to various stimuli.

  9. Genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids in eukaryotes by non-coding DNA occurs through CRISPR-like mechanisms in the cytosol and the bodyguard protection in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Guo-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this review, the protective function of the abundant non-coding DNA in the eukaryotic genome is discussed from the perspective of genome defense against exogenous nucleic acids. Peripheral non-coding DNA has been proposed to act as a bodyguard that protects the genome and the central protein-coding sequences from ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. In the proposed mechanism of protection, the radicals generated by water radiolysis in the cytosol and IR energy are absorbed, blocked and/or reduced by peripheral heterochromatin; then, the DNA damage sites in the heterochromatin are removed and expelled from the nucleus to the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes, most likely through the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA. To strengthen this hypothesis, this review summarizes the experimental evidence supporting the protective function of non-coding DNA against exogenous nucleic acids. Based on these data, I hypothesize herein about the presence of an additional line of defense formed by small RNAs in the cytosol in addition to their bodyguard protection mechanism in the nucleus. Therefore, exogenous nucleic acids may be initially inactivated in the cytosol by small RNAs generated from non-coding DNA via mechanisms similar to the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system. Exogenous nucleic acids may enter the nucleus, where some are absorbed and/or blocked by heterochromatin and others integrate into chromosomes. The integrated fragments and the sites of DNA damage are removed by repetitive non-coding DNA elements in the heterochromatin and excluded from the nucleus. Therefore, the normal eukaryotic genome and the central protein-coding sequences are triply protected by non-coding DNA against invasion by exogenous nucleic acids. This review provides evidence supporting the protective role of non-coding DNA in genome defense. PMID:27036064

  10. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ainslie, Philip N.; Hughes, Michael G.; Stöhr, Eric J.; Cotter, James D.; Nio, Amanda Q. X.; Shave, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function. PMID:24876358

  11. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Nio, Amanda Q X; Shave, Rob

    2014-08-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function. PMID:24876358

  12. Genome Sequencing of the Perciform Fish Larimichthys crocea Provides Insights into Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Stress Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiong; Zhu, Lv-Yun; Li, Ting; Ding, Yang; Nie, Li; Li, Qiuhua; Dong, Wei-ren; Jiang, Liang; Sun, Bing; Zhang, XinHui; Li, Mingyu; Zhang, Hai-Qi; Xie, ShangBo; Zhu, YaBing; Jiang, XuanTing; Wang, Xianhui; Mu, Pengfei; Chen, Wei; Yue, Zhen; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Jun; Shao, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    The large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea (L. crocea) is one of the most economically important marine fish in China and East Asian countries. It also exhibits peculiar behavioral and physiological characteristics, especially sensitive to various environmental stresses, such as hypoxia and air exposure. These traits may render L. crocea a good model for investigating the response mechanisms to environmental stress. To understand the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the adaptation and response of L. crocea to environmental stress, we sequenced and assembled the genome of L. crocea using a bacterial artificial chromosome and whole-genome shotgun hierarchical strategy. The final genome assembly was 679 Mb, with a contig N50 of 63.11 kb and a scaffold N50 of 1.03 Mb, containing 25,401 protein-coding genes. Gene families underlying adaptive behaviours, such as vision-related crystallins, olfactory receptors, and auditory sense-related genes, were significantly expanded in the genome of L. crocea relative to those of other vertebrates. Transcriptome analyses of the hypoxia-exposed L. crocea brain revealed new aspects of neuro-endocrine-immune/metabolism regulatory networks that may help the fish to avoid cerebral inflammatory injury and maintain energy balance under hypoxia. Proteomics data demonstrate that skin mucus of the air-exposed L. crocea had a complex composition, with an unexpectedly high number of proteins (3,209), suggesting its multiple protective mechanisms involved in antioxidant functions, oxygen transport, immune defence, and osmotic and ionic regulation. Our results reveal the molecular and genetic basis of fish adaptation and response to hypoxia and air exposure. The data generated by this study will provide valuable resources for the genetic improvement of stress resistance and yield potential in L. crocea. PMID:25835551

  13. The complete genome and proteome of Laribacter hongkongensis reveal potential mechanisms for adaptations to different temperatures and habitats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Tse, Herman; Teng, Jade L L; Curreem, Shirly O T; Tsang, Alan K L; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Wong, Gilman K M; Huang, Yi; Loman, Nicholas J; Snyder, Lori A S; Cai, James J; Huang, Jian-Dong; Mak, William; Pallen, Mark J; Lok, Si; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-03-01

    Laribacter hongkongensis is a newly discovered Gram-negative bacillus of the Neisseriaceae family associated with freshwater fish-borne gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea. The complete genome sequence of L. hongkongensis HLHK9, recovered from an immunocompetent patient with severe gastroenteritis, consists of a 3,169-kb chromosome with G+C content of 62.35%. Genome analysis reveals different mechanisms potentially important for its adaptation to diverse habitats of human and freshwater fish intestines and freshwater environments. The gene contents support its phenotypic properties and suggest that amino acids and fatty acids can be used as carbon sources. The extensive variety of transporters, including multidrug efflux and heavy metal transporters as well as genes involved in chemotaxis, may enable L. hongkongensis to survive in different environmental niches. Genes encoding urease, bile salts efflux pump, adhesin, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and other putative virulence factors-such as hemolysins, RTX toxins, patatin-like proteins, phospholipase A1, and collagenases-are present. Proteomes of L. hongkongensis HLHK9 cultured at 37 degrees C (human body temperature) and 20 degrees C (freshwater habitat temperature) showed differential gene expression, including two homologous copies of argB, argB-20, and argB-37, which encode two isoenzymes of N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK)-NAGK-20 and NAGK-37-in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. NAGK-20 showed higher expression at 20 degrees C, whereas NAGK-37 showed higher expression at 37 degrees C. NAGK-20 also had a lower optimal temperature for enzymatic activities and was inhibited by arginine probably as negative-feedback control. Similar duplicated copies of argB are also observed in bacteria from hot springs such as Thermus thermophilus, Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, and Roseiflexus castenholzii, suggesting that similar mechanisms for temperature adaptation may be employed by other