Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive developmental regulations

  1. Riboflavin transporter-2 (rft-2) of Caenorhabditis elegans: Adaptive and developmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Krishnan; Karthi, Sellamuthu; Manimaran, Paramasivam; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2015-06-01

    Riboflavin transporters (rft-1 and rft-2), orthologous to human riboflavin transporter-3 (hRVFT-3), are identified and characterized in Caenorhabditis elegans. However, studies pertaining to functional contribution of rft-2 in maintaining body homeostatic riboflavin levels and its regulation are very limited. In this study, the expression pattern of rft-2 at different life stages of C. elegans was studied through real-time PCR, and found to be consistent from larval to adult stages that demonstrate its involvement in maintaining the body homeostatic riboflavin levels at whole animal level all through its life. A possible regulation of rft-2 expression at mRNA levels at whole animal was studied after adaptation to low and high concentrations of riboflavin. Abundance of rft-2 transcript was upregulated in riboflavin-deficient conditions (10 nM), while it was downregulated with riboflavin-supplemented conditions (2 mM) as compared with control (10 meu M). Further, the 5'-regulatory region of the rft-2 gene was cloned, and transgenic nematodes expressing transcriptional rft-2 promoter::GFP fusion constructs were generated. The expression of rft-2 was found to be adaptively regulated in vivo when transgenic worms were maintained under different extracellular riboflavin levels, which was also mediated partly via changes in the rft-2 levels that directs towards the possible involvement of transcriptional regulatory events.

  2. Cold adaptation overrides developmental regulation of sarcolipin expression in mice skeletal muscle: SOS for muscle-based thermogenesis?

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Bal, Naresh C; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal mice have a greater thermogenic need than adult mice and may require additional means of heat production, other than the established mechanism of brown adipose tissue (BAT). We and others recently discovered a novel mediator of skeletal muscle-based thermogenesis called sarcolipin (SLN) that acts by uncoupling sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). In addition, we have shown that SLN expression is downregulated during neonatal development in rats. In this study we probed two questions: (1) is SLN expression developmentally regulated in neonatal mice?; and (2) if so, will cold adaptation override this? Our data show that SLN expression is higher during early neonatal stages and is gradually downregulated in fast twitch skeletal muscles. Interestingly, we demonstrate that cold acclimation of neonatal mice can prevent downregulation of SLN expression. This observation suggests that SLN-mediated thermogenesis can be recruited to a greater extent during extreme physiological need, in addition to BAT.

  3. Developmental trends in adaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Smeets, Tom; Garner, Sarah R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that memory is enhanced when information is processed for fitness-related purposes. The main objective of the current experiments was to test developmental trends in the evolutionary foundation of memory using different types of stimuli and paradigms. In Experiment 1, 11-year-olds and adults were presented with neutral, negative, and survival-related DRM word lists. We found a memory benefit for the survival-related words and showed that false memories were more likely to be elicited for the survival-related word lists than for the other lists. Experiment 2 examined developmental trends in the survival processing paradigm using neutral, negative, and survival-related pictures. A survival processing advantage was found for survival-related pictures in adults, for negative pictures in 11/12-year-olds, and for neutral pictures in 7/8-year-olds. In Experiment 3, 11/12-year-olds and adults had to imagine the standard survival scenario or an adapted survival condition (or pleasantness condition) that was designed to reduce the possibilities for elaborative processing. We found superior memory retention for both survival scenarios in children and adults. Collectively, our results evidently show that the survival processing advantage is developmentally invariant and that certain proximate mechanisms (elaboration and distinctiveness) underlie these developmental trends.

  4. Reconceptualizing Family Adaptation to Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anita L; Crnic, Keith A; Baker, Bruce L; Blacher, Jan

    2015-07-01

    This study explores accurate conceptualization of the adaptation construct in families of children with developmental delay aged 3 to 8 years. Parents' self-reported measures of adaptation and observed dyadic relationship variables were examined. Confirmatory factor analysis and longitudinal growth modeling were used to evaluate the nature of adaptational processes. Results indicate that adaptational processes vary across adaptation index, child developmental level, and parent gender. Adaptation indices did not load onto a single construct at any time point. Several adaptational processes remained stable across time, although others showed linear or quadratic change. The findings of the current study indicate that it is time for a change in how adaptation is conceived for families of children with developmental delay.

  5. Developmental adaptations in cytosolic phosphate content and pH regulation in the sheep heart in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Portman, M A; Ning, X H

    1990-01-01

    This study examines adaptations in myocardial cytosolic phosphate content and buffering capacity that occur in vivo as a function of development. Phosphate metabolites were monitored in an open chest sheep preparation using a 31P magnetic resonance surface coil over the left ventricle. Newborn lambs (aged 4-9 d, n = 5) underwent exchange transfusion with adult blood to reduce blood-borne 2,3-diphosphoglycerate contamination of the heart monophosphate and phosphomonoester resonances, thus allowing determination of these phosphate concentrations. The blood-exchanged newborns and mature controls (aged 30-60 d, n = 5) were infused with 0.4 N hydrochloric acid to decrease pH from greater than 7.35 to less than 7.00. Simultaneously, intracellular and extracellular pH were determined from the chemical shifts of the respective phosphate peaks and compared to arterial blood pH. Findings were as follows: (a) diphosphoglycerate contribution to the cardiac spectrum was found to be negligible, (b) significant decreases in cytosolic phosphate (P less than 0.03) and phosphomonoester (P less than 0.01) content occurred with maturation, and (c) large decreases in extracellular pH (greater than 0.5 U) in both groups were similarly associated with only small changes in intracellular pH (less than 0.1 U). Change in cytosolic phosphate content implies that alterations occur in the phosphorylation potential with resulting effects on regulation of myocardial respiration, and cardiac energetics. PMID:2254447

  6. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species.

  7. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species. PMID:26920882

  8. Epigenetic and developmental regulation in plant polyploids.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingxin; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication occurs in some animals and many flowering plants, including many important crops such as wheat, cotton and oilseed rape. The prevalence of polyploidy in the plant kingdom suggests it as an important evolutionary feature for plant speciation and crop domestication. Studies of natural and synthetic polyploids have revealed rapid and dynamic changes in genomic structure and gene expression after polyploid formation. Growing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications can alter homoeologous gene expression and reprogram gene expression networks, which allows polyploids to establish new cytotypes, grow vigorously and promote adaptation in local environments. Sequence and gene expression changes in polyploids have been well documented and reviewed elsewhere. This review is focused on developmental regulation and epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in polyploids.

  9. Epigenetic and developmental regulation in plant polyploids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qingxin; Chen, Z. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication occurs in some animals and many flowering plants, including many important crops such as wheat, cotton and oilseed rape. The prevalence of polyploidy in the plant kingdom suggests it as an important evolutionary feature for plant speciation and crop domestication. Studies of natural and synthetic polyploids have revealed rapid and dynamic changes in genomic structure and gene expression after polyploid formation. Growing evidence suggests that epigenetic modifications can alter homoeologous gene expression and reprogram gene expression networks, which allows polyploids to establish new cytotypes, grow vigorously and adapt in local environments. Sequence and gene expression changes in polyploids have been well documented and reviewed elsewhere. This review is focused on developmental regulation and epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone modifications in polyploids. PMID:25765928

  10. Developmental functional adaptation to high altitude: review.

    PubMed

    Frisancho, A Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to understand the origins of the functional traits that characterize the Andean high-altitude native. Based on the conceptual framework of developmental functional adaptation which postulates that environmental influences during the period of growth and development have long lasting effects that may be expressed during adulthood, we initiated a series of studies addressed at determining the pattern of physical growth and the contribution of growth and development to the attainment of full functional adaptation to high-altitude of low and high altitude natives living under rural and urban conditions. Current research indicate that: (a) the pattern of growth at high altitude due to limited nutritional resources, physical growth in body size is delayed but growth in lung volumes is accelerated because of hypoxic stress); (b) low-altitude male and female urban natives can attain a full functional adaptation to high altitude by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia during the period of growth and development; (c) both experimental studies on animals and comparative human studies indicate that exposure to high altitude during the period of growth and development results in the attainment of a large residual lung volume; (d) this developmentally acquired enlarged residual lung volume and its associated increase in alveolar area when combined with the increased tissue capillarization and moderate increase in red blood cells and hemoglobin concentration contributes to the successful functional adaptation of the Andean high-altitude native to hypoxia; and (e) any specific genetic traits that are related to the successful functional adaptation of Andean high-altitude natives have yet to be identified.

  11. Critical Thinking, Developmental Learning, and Adaptive Flexibility in Organizational Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, Robert E., Jr.

    A study examined how developmental learning and adaptive flexibility relate to critical thinking though a survey of 119 organizational leaders (of 341) who had attended a 5-day Leadership Development Program. A questionnaire adapted from the Center for Creative Leadership's Job Challenge Profile measured developmental learning, the Adaptive Style…

  12. Modeling Developmental Transitions in Adaptive Resonance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Neural networks are applied to a theoretical subject in developmental psychology: modeling developmental transitions. Two issues that are involved will be discussed: discontinuities and acquiring qualitatively new knowledge. We will argue that by the appearance of a bifurcation, a neural network can show discontinuities and may acquire…

  13. Developmental regulation of embryonic genes in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Borkird, C.; Choi, Jung, H.; Jin, Zhenghua; Franz, G.; Hatzopoulos, P.; Chorneaus, R.; Bonas, U.; Pelegri, F.; Sung, Z.R.

    1988-09-01

    Somatic embryogenesis from cultured carrot cells progresses through successive morphogenetic stages termed globular, heart, and torpedo. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying plant embryogenesis, the authors isolated two genes differentially expressed during embryo development. The expression of these two genes is associated with heart-stage embryogenesis. By altering the culture conditions and examining their expressions in a developmental variant cell line, they found that these genes were controlled by the developmental program of embryogenesis and were not directly regulated by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, the growth regulator that promotes unorganized growth of cultured cells and suppresses embryo morphogenesis. These genes are also expressed in carrot zygotic embryos but not in seedlings or mature plants.

  14. Negative regulation and developmental competence in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Lee, Im-Soon; Jung, Seunho; Kim, Sun-Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Asexual development (conidiation) in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is governed by orchestrated gene expression. The three key negative regulators of conidiation SfgA, VosA, and NsdD act at different control point in the developmental genetic cascade. Here, we have revealed that NsdD is a key repressor affecting the quantity of asexual spores in Aspergillus. Moreover, nullifying both nsdD and vosA results in abundant formation of the development specific structure conidiophores even at 12 h of liquid culture, and near constitutive activation of conidiation, indicating that acquisition of developmental competence involves the removal of negative regulation exerted by both NsdD and VosA. NsdD’s role in repressing conidiation is conserved in other aspergilli, as deleting nsdD causes enhanced and precocious activation of conidiation in Aspergillus fumigatus or Aspergillus flavus. In vivo NsdD-DNA interaction analyses identify three NsdD binding regions in the promoter of the essential activator of conidiation brlA, indicating a direct repressive role of NsdD in conidiation. Importantly, loss of flbC or flbD encoding upstream activators of brlA in the absence of nsdD results in delayed activation of brlA, suggesting distinct positive roles of FlbC and FlbD in conidiation. A genetic model depicting regulation of conidiation in A. nidulans is presented. PMID:27364479

  15. Developmental adaptations to gravity in animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    Terrestrial animals have adapted to a constant gravitational stress over millions of years. Tissues of the cardiovascular system and lumbar spine in tall species of animals such as the giraffe are particularly well adapted to high and variable vectors of gravitational force. Swelling of the leg tissues in the giraffe is prevented by a variety of physiological mechanisms including (1) a natural 'antigravity suit', (2) impermeable capillaries, (3) arterial-wall hypertrophy, (4) variable blood pressures during normal activity, and (5) a large-capacity lymphatic system. These adaptations, as well as a natural hypertension, maintain blood perfusion to the giraffe's brain. The intervertebral disk is another tissue that is uniquely adapted to gravitational stress. Tall and large terrestrial animals have higher swelling pressures than their smaller or aquatic counterparts. Finally, the meniscus of the rabbit knee provides information on the effects of aging and load-bearing on cartilaginous tissues. Such tissues within the joints of animals are important for load-bearing on Earth; these connective tissues may degenerate during long-duration space flight.

  16. When Do Adaptive Developmental Mechanisms Yield Maladaptive Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Del Giudice, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses 3 ways in which adaptive developmental mechanisms may produce maladaptive outcomes. First, natural selection may favor risky strategies that enhance fitness on average but which have detrimental consequences for a subset of individuals. Second, mismatch may result when organisms experience environmental change during…

  17. Developmental Pathways of Emotion Regulation in Childhood: A Neuropsychological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltering, Steven; Lewis, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a model featuring two types of emotion regulation--reactive and deliberate--and discusses the developmental trajectory of both types. We argue that the later-developing capacity for deliberate control builds on and coevolves with earlier-developing reactive control. Findings from the field of developmental neuroscience are…

  18. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the “obstetrical dilemma” hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25–30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female’s lifetime. PMID:27114515

  19. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S

    2016-05-10

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the "obstetrical dilemma" hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25-30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female's lifetime. PMID:27114515

  20. Inflammatory and Immune Activation in Intestinal Myofibroblasts Is Developmentally Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Zawahir, Sharmila; Li, Guanghui; Banerjee, Aditi; Shiu, Jessica; Blanchard, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that intestinal myofibroblasts from immature tissue produce excessive IL-8 in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to cells from mature tissue. However, it is unknown whether other cytokines and TLR agonists contribute to this developmentally regulated response. The aim of this study was to further characterize differences in inflammatory signaling in human primary intestinal fibroblasts from fetal (FIF) and infant (IIF) tissue and examine their potential to activate the adaptive immune response in vitro. Cytokine profiles of LPS-stimulated FIF and IIF were assessed by cytokine profile array. IL-8, IL-6, and IL-10 production in response to TLR2, TLR2/6, TLR4, and TLR5 agonists was determined by quantitative ELISA. The potential of activated myofibroblasts to activate adaptive immunity was determined by measuring surface class II MHC expression using flow cytometry. LPS-stimulated FIF produced a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile consisting of MCP-1, GRO-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 expression. FIF produced significant IL-8 and IL-6 in response to TLR4 agonist. IIF produced significant levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in the presence of TLR5 and TLR2 agonists. IFN-γ-treated FIF expressed greater HLA-DR levels compared to unstimulated controls and IFN-γ- and LPS-treated IIF. Activated FIF produce a more diverse inflammatory cytokine profile and greater levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in response to TLR4 stimulation compared to IIF. FIF express class II MHC proteins associated with activation of the adaptive immune response. These data suggest that FIF may contribute to bacterial-associated gut inflammation in the immature intestine. PMID:26101946

  1. Developmental Regulation across the Life Span: Toward a New Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Claudia M.; Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    How can individuals regulate their own development to live happy, healthy, and productive lives? Major theories of developmental regulation across the life span have been proposed (e.g., dual-process model of assimilation and accommodation; motivational theory of life-span development; model of selection, optimization, and compensation), but they…

  2. Understanding developmental and adaptive cues in pine through metabolite profiling and co-expression network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Rafael A.; Canales, Javier; Muñoz-Hernández, Carmen; Granados, Jose M.; Ávila, Concepción; García-Martín, María L.; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Conifers include long-lived evergreen trees of great economic and ecological importance, including pines and spruces. During their long lives conifers must respond to seasonal environmental changes, adapt to unpredictable environmental stresses, and co-ordinate their adaptive adjustments with internal developmental programmes. To gain insights into these responses, we examined metabolite and transcriptomic profiles of needles from naturally growing 25-year-old maritime pine (Pinus pinaster L. Aiton) trees over a year. The effect of environmental parameters such as temperature and rain on needle development were studied. Our results show that seasonal changes in the metabolite profiles were mainly affected by the needles’ age and acclimation for winter, but changes in transcript profiles were mainly dependent on climatic factors. The relative abundance of most transcripts correlated well with temperature, particularly for genes involved in photosynthesis or winter acclimation. Gene network analysis revealed relationships between 14 co-expressed gene modules and development and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Novel Myb transcription factors were identified as candidate regulators during needle development. Our systems-based analysis provides integrated data of the seasonal regulation of maritime pine growth, opening new perspectives for understanding the complex regulatory mechanisms underlying conifers’ adaptive responses. Taken together, our results suggest that the environment regulates the transcriptome for fine tuning of the metabolome during development. PMID:25873654

  3. Effects of Ordinary and Adaptive Toys on Pre-School Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Toys help children in mastering developmental tasks. This study investigated toy effect on children with developmental disabilities as they engage in using ordinary and adaptive toys. A single-subject design was used to identify the effects on their toy play abilities. Differences in toy effects between playing ordinary and adaptive toys were…

  4. Developmental Gene Regulation and Mechanisms of Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Marine Biological Laboratory and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have established a cooperative agreement with the formation of a Center for Advanced Studies 'in the Space Life Sciences (CASSLS) at the MBL. This Center serves as an interface between NASA and the basic science community, addressing issues of mutual interest. The Center for Advanced Studies 'in the Space Life Sciences provides a forum for scientists to think and discuss, often for the first time, the role that gravity and aspects of spaceflight may play 'in fundamental cellular and physiologic processes. In addition the Center will sponsor discussions on evolutionary biology. These interactions will inform the community of research opportunities that are of interest to NASA. This workshop is one of a series of symposia, workshops and seminars that will be held at the MBL to advise NASA on a wide variety of topics in the life sciences, including cell biology, developmental biology, mg evolutionary biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, plant biology and systems biology.

  5. Developmental regulation of X-chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Payer, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    With the emergence of sex-determination by sex chromosomes, which differ in composition and number between males and females, appeared the need to equalize X-chromosomal gene dosage between the sexes. Mammals have devised the strategy of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), in which one of the two X-chromosomes is rendered transcriptionally silent in females. In the mouse, the best-studied model organism with respect to XCI, this inactivation process occurs in different forms, imprinted and random, interspersed by periods of X-chromosome reactivation (XCR), which is needed to switch between the different modes of XCI. In this review, I describe the recent advances with respect to the developmental control of XCI and XCR and in particular their link to differentiation and pluripotency. Furthermore, I review the mechanisms, which influence the timing and choice, with which one of the two X-chromosomes is chosen for inactivation during random XCI. This has an impact on how females are mosaics with regard to which X-chromosome is active in different cells, which has implications on the severity of diseases caused by X-linked mutations.

  6. Crim1-, a regulator of developmental organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Swati; Pennisi, David J; Piper, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The regulation of growth factor localization, availability and activity is critical during embryogenesis to ensure appropriate organogenesis. This process is regulated through the coordinated expression of growth factors and their cognate receptors, as well as via proteins that can bind, sequester or localize growth factors to distinct locations. One such protein is the transmembrane protein Crim1. This protein has been shown to be expressed broadly within the developing embryo, and to regulate organogenesis within the eye, kidney and placenta. Mechanistically, Crim1 has been revealed to mediate organogenesis via its interaction with growth factors including TGFβs, BMPs, VEGFs and PDFGs. More recently, Crim1 has been shown to influence cardiac development, providing further insights into the function of this protein. This review will provide an overview of the role of Crim1 in organogenesis, largely focusing on how this protein regulates growth factor signaling in the nascent heart. Moreover, we will address the challenges ahead relating to further elucidating how Crim1 functions during development. PMID:27044529

  7. Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue: Novel Regulation by Developmental Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jerde, Travis J.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a critical cell endogenous inhibitor of phosphoinositide signaling in mammalian cells. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphoinositide trisphosphate (PIP3), and by so doing PTEN has the function of negative regulation of Akt, thereby inhibiting this key intracellular signal transduction pathway. In numerous cell types, PTEN loss-of-function mutations result in unopposed Akt signaling, producing numerous effects on cells. Numerous reports exist regarding mutations in PTEN leading to unregulated Akt and human disease, most notably cancer. However, less is commonly known about nonmutational regulation of PTEN. This review focuses on an emerging literature on the regulation of PTEN at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels. Specifically, a focus is placed on the role developmental signaling pathways play in PTEN regulation; this includes insulin-like growth factor, NOTCH, transforming growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, wnt, and hedgehog signaling. The regulation of PTEN by developmental mediators affects critical biological processes including neuronal and organ development, stem cell maintenance, cell cycle regulation, inflammation, response to hypoxia, repair and recovery, and cell death and survival. Perturbations of PTEN regulation consequently lead to human diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes, developmental abnormalities, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. PMID:26339505

  8. Developmental College Student Self-Regulation: Results from Two Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dawn; Ley, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    This study compared 34 lower-achieving (developmental) first-time college students' self-reported self-regulation strategies from a Likert scale to those they reported in structured interviews. Likert scales have offered convenient administration and evaluation and have been used to identify what and how learners study. The reported study activity…

  9. Self-Regulated Strategy Instruction in College Developmental Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, Charles A.; Philippakos, Zoi A.; Ianetta, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a curriculum for college developmental writing classes, developed in prior design research and based on self-regulated strategy instruction. Students learned strategies for planning, drafting, and revising compositions with an emphasis on using knowledge of genre organization to guide…

  10. Adaptive Function in Preschoolers in Relation to Developmental Delay and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Susan L.; McDonald, Jenny L.; Comino, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between developmental ability, autism and adaptive skills in preschoolers. Adaptive function was assessed in 152 preschoolers with autism, with and without developmental delay, and without autism, with and without developmental delay. Their overall adaptive function, measured by the general adaptive…

  11. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis.

  12. Adaptation to a Myocardial Infarction from a Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Explored the interactional effect between victims' (N=30) adult developmental stage and their coping and emotional reactions following a myocardial infarction (MI). The findings point to the usefulness of adult developmental psychology in understanding the divergent emotional and coping reactions of MI patients across the life-cycle. (Author/JAC)

  13. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of a Developmental Assessment for Arabic-Speaking Children with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macrine, Sheila L.; Heji, Hayat; Sabri, Amel; Dalton, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Developmental screening has become an established component of child health programs in many developed countries. The research objective of this project was to translate and adapt a developmental assessment (Oregon Project Skills Inventory) for use with young children with visual impairments who speak Arabic. The study was prompted by the lack of…

  14. School Readiness and Self-Regulation: A Developmental Psychobiological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Clancy; Raver, C. Cybele

    2015-01-01

    Research on the development of self-regulation in young children provides a unifying framework for the study of school readiness. Self-regulation abilities allow for engagement in learning activities and provide the foundation for adjustment to school. A focus on readiness as self-regulation does not supplant interest in the development of acquired ability, such as early knowledge of letters and numbers; it sets the stage for it. In this article, we review research and theory indicating that self-regulation and consequently school readiness are the product of integrated developmental processes at the biological and behavioral levels that are shaped by the contexts in which development is occurring. In doing so, we illustrate the idea that research on self-regulation powerfully highlights ways in which gaps in school readiness and later achievement are linked to poverty and social and economic inequality and points the way to effective approaches to counteract these conditions. PMID:25148852

  15. Physiological Self-Regulation and Adaptive Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzell, Lawrence J.; Pope, Alan T.; Freeman, Frederick G.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive automation has been proposed as a solution to current problems of human-automation interaction. Past research has shown the potential of this advanced form of automation to enhance pilot engagement and lower cognitive workload. However, there have been concerns voiced regarding issues, such as automation surprises, associated with the use of adaptive automation. This study examined the use of psychophysiological self-regulation training with adaptive automation that may help pilots deal with these problems through the enhancement of cognitive resource management skills. Eighteen participants were assigned to 3 groups (self-regulation training, false feedback, and control) and performed resource management, monitoring, and tracking tasks from the Multiple Attribute Task Battery. The tracking task was cycled between 3 levels of task difficulty (automatic, adaptive aiding, manual) on the basis of the electroencephalogram-derived engagement index. The other two tasks remained in automatic mode that had a single automation failure. Those participants who had received self-regulation training performed significantly better and reported lower National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores than participants in the false feedback and control groups. The theoretical and practical implications of these results for adaptive automation are discussed.

  16. Callose homeostasis at plasmodesmata: molecular regulators and developmental relevance

    PubMed Central

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata are membrane-lined channels that are located in the plant cell wall and that physically interconnect the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of adjacent cells. Operating as controllable gates, plasmodesmata regulate the symplastic trafficking of micro- and macromolecules, such as endogenous proteins [transcription factors (TFs)] and RNA-based signals (mRNA, siRNA, etc.), hence mediating direct cell-to-cell communication and long distance signaling. Besides this physiological role, plasmodesmata also form gateways through which viral genomes can pass, largely facilitating the pernicious spread of viral infections. Plasmodesmatal trafficking is either passive (e.g., diffusion) or active and responses both to developmental and environmental stimuli. In general, plasmodesmatal conductivity is regulated by the controlled build-up of callose at the plasmodesmatal neck, largely mediated by the antagonistic action of callose synthases (CalSs) and β-1,3-glucanases. Here, in this theory and hypothesis paper, we outline the importance of callose metabolism in PD SEL control, and highlight the main molecular factors involved. In addition, we also review other proteins that regulate symplastic PD transport, both in a developmental and stress-responsive framework, and discuss on their putative role in the modulation of PD callose turn-over. Finally, we hypothesize on the role of structural sterols in the regulation of (PD) callose deposition and outline putative mechanisms by which this regulation may occur. PMID:24795733

  17. Resilience as Regulation of Developmental and Family Processes

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, David; Lunkenheimer, Erika; Riggs, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Resilience can be defined as establishing equilibrium subsequent to disturbances to a system caused by significant adversity. When families experience adversity or transitions, multiple regulatory processes may be involved in establishing equilibrium, including adaptability, regulation of negative affect, and effective problem-solving skills. The authors’ resilience-as-regulation perspective integrates insights about the regulation of individual development with processes that regulate family systems. This middle-range theory of family resilience focuses on regulatory processes across levels that are involved in adaptation: whole-family systems such as routines and sense of coherence; coregulation of dyads involving emotion regulation, structuring, and reciprocal influences between social partners; and individual self-regulation. Insights about resilience-as-regulation are then applied to family-strengthening interventions that are designed to promote adaptation to adversity. Unresolved issues are discussed in relation to resilience-as-regulation in families, in particular how risk exposure is assessed, interrelations among family regulatory mechanisms, and how families scaffold the development of children’s resilience. PMID:26568647

  18. Genome fluctuations in cyanobacteria reflect evolutionary, developmental and adaptive traits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria belong to an ancient group of photosynthetic prokaryotes with pronounced variations in their cellular differentiation strategies, physiological capacities and choice of habitat. Sequencing efforts have shown that genomes within this phylum are equally diverse in terms of size and protein-coding capacity. To increase our understanding of genomic changes in the lineage, the genomes of 58 contemporary cyanobacteria were analysed for shared and unique orthologs. Results A total of 404 protein families, present in all cyanobacterial genomes, were identified. Two of these are unique to the phylum, corresponding to an AbrB family transcriptional regulator and a gene that escapes functional annotation although its genomic neighbourhood is conserved among the organisms examined. The evolution of cyanobacterial genome sizes involves a mix of gains and losses in the clade encompassing complex cyanobacteria, while a single event of reduction is evident in a clade dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria. Genome sizes and gene family copy numbers evolve at a higher rate in the former clade, and multi-copy genes were predominant in large genomes. Orthologs unique to cyanobacteria exhibiting specific characteristics, such as filament formation, heterocyst differentiation, diazotrophy and symbiotic competence, were also identified. An ancestral character reconstruction suggests that the most recent common ancestor of cyanobacteria had a genome size of approx. 4.5 Mbp and 1678 to 3291 protein-coding genes, 4%-6% of which are unique to cyanobacteria today. Conclusions The different rates of genome-size evolution and multi-copy gene abundance suggest two routes of genome development in the history of cyanobacteria. The expansion strategy is driven by gene-family enlargment and generates a broad adaptive potential; while the genome streamlining strategy imposes adaptations to highly specific niches, also reflected in their different functional capacities. A few

  19. Developmental regulation of fear learning and anxiety behavior by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, T T-Y; Hill, M N; Lee, F S

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain undergoes substantial maturation into adulthood and the development of specific neural structures occurs on differing timelines. Transient imbalances between developmental trajectories of corticolimbic structures, which are known to contribute to regulation over fear learning and anxiety, can leave an individual susceptible to mental illness, particularly anxiety disorders. There is a substantial body of literature indicating that the endocannabinoid (eCB) system critically regulates stress responsivity and emotional behavior throughout the life span, making this system a novel therapeutic target for stress- and anxiety-related disorders. During early life and adolescence, corticolimbic eCB signaling changes dynamically and coincides with different sensitive periods of fear learning, suggesting that eCB signaling underlies age-specific fear learning responses. Moreover, perturbations to these normative fluctuations in corticolimbic eCB signaling, such as stress or cannabinoid exposure, could serve as a neural substrate contributing to alterations to the normative developmental trajectory of neural structures governing emotional behavior and fear learning. In this review, we first introduce the components of the eCB system and discuss clinical and rodent models showing eCB regulation of fear learning and anxiety in adulthood. Next, we highlight distinct fear learning and regulation profiles throughout development and discuss the ontogeny of the eCB system in the central nervous system, and models of pharmacological augmentation of eCB signaling during development in the context of fear learning and anxiety.

  20. Developmental regulation of fear learning and anxiety behavior by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, T T-Y; Hill, M N; Lee, F S

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain undergoes substantial maturation into adulthood and the development of specific neural structures occurs on differing timelines. Transient imbalances between developmental trajectories of corticolimbic structures, which are known to contribute to regulation over fear learning and anxiety, can leave an individual susceptible to mental illness, particularly anxiety disorders. There is a substantial body of literature indicating that the endocannabinoid (eCB) system critically regulates stress responsivity and emotional behavior throughout the life span, making this system a novel therapeutic target for stress- and anxiety-related disorders. During early life and adolescence, corticolimbic eCB signaling changes dynamically and coincides with different sensitive periods of fear learning, suggesting that eCB signaling underlies age-specific fear learning responses. Moreover, perturbations to these normative fluctuations in corticolimbic eCB signaling, such as stress or cannabinoid exposure, could serve as a neural substrate contributing to alterations to the normative developmental trajectory of neural structures governing emotional behavior and fear learning. In this review, we first introduce the components of the eCB system and discuss clinical and rodent models showing eCB regulation of fear learning and anxiety in adulthood. Next, we highlight distinct fear learning and regulation profiles throughout development and discuss the ontogeny of the eCB system in the central nervous system, and models of pharmacological augmentation of eCB signaling during development in the context of fear learning and anxiety. PMID:26419643

  1. Regulation of priority carcinogens and reproductive or developmental toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, K.; LaDou, J.; Rosenbaum, J.S.; Book, S.A. )

    1992-01-01

    In California, 370 carcinogens and 112 reproductive/developmental toxicants have been identified as a result of the State's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986. They include pesticides, solvents, metals, industrial intermediates, environmental mixtures, and reactive agents. Occupational, environmental, and consumer product exposures that involve these agents are regulated under the Act. At levels of concern, businesses must provide warnings for and limit discharges of those chemicals. The lists of chemicals were compiled following systematic review of published data, including technical reports from the U.S. Public Health Service--National Toxicology Program (NTP), and evaluation of recommendations from authoritative bodies such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Given the large number of chemicals that are carcinogens or reproductive/developmental toxicants, regulatory concerns should focus on those that have high potential for human exposure, e.g., widely distributed or easily absorbed solvents, metals, environmental mixtures, or reactive agents. In this paper, we present a list of 33 potential priority carcinogens and reproductive/developmental toxicants, including alcoholic beverages, asbestos, benzene, chlorinated solvents, formaldehyde, glycol ethers, lead, tobacco smoke, and toluene.

  2. Regulation of priority carcinogens and reproductive or developmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Hooper, K; LaDou, J; Rosenbaum, J S; Book, S A

    1992-01-01

    In California, 370 carcinogens and 112 reproductive/developmental toxicants have been identified as a result of the State's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986. They include pesticides, solvents, metals, industrial intermediates, environmental mixtures, and reactive agents. Occupational, environmental, and consumer product exposures that involve these agents are regulated under the Act. At levels of concern, businesses must provide warnings for and limit discharges of those chemicals. The lists of chemicals were compiled following systematic review of published data, including technical reports from the U.S. Public Health Service--National Toxicology Program (NTP), and evaluation of recommendations from authoritative bodies such as the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Given the large number of chemicals that are carcinogens or reproductive/developmental toxicants, regulatory concerns should focus on those that have high potential for human exposure, e.g., widely distributed or easily absorbed solvents, metals, environmental mixtures, or reactive agents. In this paper, we present a list of 33 potential priority carcinogens and reproductive/developmental toxicants, including alcoholic beverages, asbestos, benzene, chlorinated solvents, formaldehyde, glycol ethers, lead, tobacco smoke, and toluene. PMID:1463026

  3. DNA Methylation is Developmentally Regulated for Genes Essential for Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alyssa A.; Lin, Mingyan; Lister, Rolanda L.; Maslov, Alex A.; Wang, Yidong; Suzuki, Masako; Wu, Bingruo; Greally, John M.; Zheng, Deyou; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism altering gene expression in development and disease. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression during heart development is incompletely understood. The aim of this study is to reveal DNA methylation in mouse embryonic hearts and its role in regulating gene expression during heart development. Methods and Results We performed the genome‐wide DNA methylation profiling of mouse embryonic hearts using methyl‐sensitive, tiny fragment enrichment/massively parallel sequencing to determine methylation levels at ACGT sites. The results showed that while global methylation of 1.64 million ACGT sites in developing hearts remains stable between embryonic day (E) 11.5 and E14.5, a small fraction (2901) of them exhibit differential methylation. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these sites are enriched at genes involved in heart development. Quantitative real‐time PCR analysis of 350 genes with differential DNA methylation showed that the expression of 181 genes is developmentally regulated, and 79 genes have correlative changes between methylation and expression, including hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2). Required for heart valve formation, Has2 expression in the developing heart valves is downregulated at E14.5, accompanied with increased DNA methylation in its enhancer. Genetic knockout further showed that the downregulation of Has2 expression is dependent on DNA methyltransferase 3b, which is co‐expressed with Has2 in the forming heart valve region, indicating that the DNA methylation change may contribute to the Has2 enhancer's regulating function. Conclusions DNA methylation is developmentally regulated for genes essential to heart development, and abnormal DNA methylation may contribute to congenital heart disease. PMID:24947998

  4. Entry behavior and emotion regulation abilities of developmentally delayed boys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B J

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the social deficits of developmentally delayed children. Participants were 48 five-year-old to eight-year-old boys. Delayed children (n = 20) were compared with nondelayed children of similar chronological age (CA nondelayed; n = 20) and of similar mental age (n = 8). The behavior and emotion regulation strategies of participants were assessed in an analogue entry situation. Delayed children were just as able as nondelayed children to understand the play themes of others but were more intrusive in delivering their entry attempts. Delayed children appeared to have less effective emotion regulation strategies for coping with entry failure and were more likely to increase their use of disruptive entry strategies over time than CA nondelayed children. PMID:9923476

  5. Adaptive Developmental Delay in Chagas Disease Vectors: An Evolutionary Ecology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Menu, Frédéric; Ginoux, Marine; Rajon, Etienne; Lazzari, Claudio R.; Rabinovich, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The developmental time of vector insects is important in population dynamics, evolutionary biology, epidemiology and in their responses to global climatic change. In the triatomines (Triatominae, Reduviidae), vectors of Chagas disease, evolutionary ecology concepts, which may allow for a better understanding of their biology, have not been applied. Despite delay in the molting in some individuals observed in triatomines, no effort was made to explain this variability. Methodology We applied four methods: (1) an e-mail survey sent to 30 researchers with experience in triatomines, (2) a statistical description of the developmental time of eleven triatomine species, (3) a relationship between development time pattern and climatic inter-annual variability, (4) a mathematical optimization model of evolution of developmental delay (diapause). Principal Findings 85.6% of responses informed on prolonged developmental times in 5th instar nymphs, with 20 species identified with remarkable developmental delays. The developmental time analysis showed some degree of bi-modal pattern of the development time of the 5th instars in nine out of eleven species but no trend between development time pattern and climatic inter-annual variability was observed. Our optimization model predicts that the developmental delays could be due to an adaptive risk-spreading diapause strategy, only if survival throughout the diapause period and the probability of random occurrence of “bad” environmental conditions are sufficiently high. Conclusions/Significance Developmental delay may not be a simple non-adaptive phenotypic plasticity in development time, and could be a form of adaptive diapause associated to a physiological mechanism related to the postponement of the initiation of reproduction, as an adaptation to environmental stochasticity through a spreading of risk (bet-hedging) strategy. We identify a series of parameters that can be measured in the field and laboratory to test

  6. Adaptive developmental plasticity: what is it, how can we recognize it and when can it evolve?

    PubMed

    Nettle, Daniel; Bateson, Melissa

    2015-08-01

    Developmental plasticity describes situations where a specific input during an individual's development produces a lasting alteration in phenotype. Some instances of developmental plasticity may be adaptive, meaning that the tendency to produce the phenotype conditional on having experienced the developmental input has been under positive selection. We discuss the necessary assumptions and predictions of hypotheses concerning adaptive developmental plasticity (ADP) and develop guidelines for how to test empirically whether a particular example is adaptive. Central to our analysis is the distinction between two kinds of ADP: informational, where the developmental input provides information about the future environment, and somatic state-based, where the developmental input enduringly alters some aspect of the individual's somatic state. Both types are likely to exist in nature, but evolve under different conditions. In all cases of ADP, the expected fitness of individuals who experience the input and develop the phenotype should be higher than that of those who experience the input and do not develop the phenotype, while the expected fitness of those who do not experience the input and do not develop the phenotype should be higher than those who do not experience the input and do develop the phenotype. We describe ancillary predictions that are specific to just one of the two types of ADP and thus distinguish between them. PMID:26203000

  7. Adaptive developmental plasticity: what is it, how can we recognize it and when can it evolve?

    PubMed Central

    Nettle, Daniel; Bateson, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Developmental plasticity describes situations where a specific input during an individual's development produces a lasting alteration in phenotype. Some instances of developmental plasticity may be adaptive, meaning that the tendency to produce the phenotype conditional on having experienced the developmental input has been under positive selection. We discuss the necessary assumptions and predictions of hypotheses concerning adaptive developmental plasticity (ADP) and develop guidelines for how to test empirically whether a particular example is adaptive. Central to our analysis is the distinction between two kinds of ADP: informational, where the developmental input provides information about the future environment, and somatic state-based, where the developmental input enduringly alters some aspect of the individual's somatic state. Both types are likely to exist in nature, but evolve under different conditions. In all cases of ADP, the expected fitness of individuals who experience the input and develop the phenotype should be higher than that of those who experience the input and do not develop the phenotype, while the expected fitness of those who do not experience the input and do not develop the phenotype should be higher than those who do not experience the input and do develop the phenotype. We describe ancillary predictions that are specific to just one of the two types of ADP and thus distinguish between them. PMID:26203000

  8. Robust adaptive regulation without persistent excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozano-Leal, Rogelio

    1988-01-01

    A globally convergent adaptive regulator for minimum or nonminimum phase systems subject to bounded distrubances and unmodeled dynamics is presented. The control strategy is designed for a particular input-output representation obtained from the state space representation of the system. The leading coefficient of the new representation is the product of the observability and controllability matrices of the system. The controller scheme uses a Least Squares identification algorithm with a dead zone. The dead zone is chosen to obtain convergence properties on the estimates and on the covariance matrix as well. This allows the definition of modified estimates which secure well-conditioned matrices in the adaptive control law. Explicit bounds on the plant output are given.

  9. Robust adaptive regulation without persistent excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozano-Leal, Rogelio

    1989-01-01

    A globally convergent adaptive regulator for minimum- or nonminimum-phase systems subject to bounded disturbances and unmodeled dynamics is presented. The control strategy is designed for a particular input-output representation obtained from the state space representation of the system. The leading coefficient of the representation is the product of the observability and controllability matrices of the system. The controller scheme uses a Least-Squares identification algorithm a with dead zone. The dead zone is chosen to obtain convergence properties on the estimates and on the covariance matrix as well. This allows the definition of modified estimates which secure well-conditioned matrices in the adaptive control law. Explicit bounds on the plant output are given.

  10. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology. PMID:25210408

  11. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M

    2014-10-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology.

  12. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M

    2014-10-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology. PMID:25210408

  13. p63 regulates proliferation and differentiation of developmentally mature keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Amy B.; Kretz, Markus; Ridky, Todd W.; Kimmel, Robin; Khavari, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    p63 is a multi-isoform p53 family member required for epidermal development. Contrasting roles for p63 in either the initial commitment to the stratified epithelial cell fate or in stem cell-based self-renewal have been proposed. To investigate p63 function in a post-developmental context, we used siRNAs directed against p63 to down-regulate p63 expression in regenerating human epidermis. Loss of p63 resulted in severe tissue hypoplasia and inhibited both stratification and differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. Although p63-deficient cells exhibited hypoproliferation, differentiation defects were not due to tissue hypoplasia. Simultaneous p63 and p53 knockdown rescued the cell proliferation defect of p63 knockdown alone but failed to restore differentiation, suggesting that defects in epidermal proliferation and differentiation are mediated via p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. Furthermore, ΔNp63 isoforms are the main mediators of p63 effects, although TAp63 isoforms may contribute to late differentiation. These data indicate that p63 is required for both the proliferative and differentiation potential of developmentally mature keratinocytes. PMID:17114587

  14. VEGF expression is developmentally regulated during human brain angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Virgintino, Daniela; Errede, Mariella; Robertson, David; Girolamo, Francesco; Masciandaro, Antonio; Bertossi, Mirella

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic factor working as an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and exerting a trophic effect on neurons and glial cells, both these activities being essential during central nervous system vascularisation, development and repair. The vascularisation of human telencephalon takes place by means of an angiogenic mechanism, which starts at the beginning of corticogenesis and actively proceeds up to the last neuronal migration, when the basic scheme of the vascular network has been drawn. Our study focused on VEGF during this critical developmental period with the aim of identifying the cells that express VEGF and of correlating the events of angiogenesis with the main events of cerebral cortex formation. The results show that in fetal human brain VEGF protein is located on multiple cell types, cells proper to the nervous tissue, neuroepithelial cells, neuroblasts and radial glia cells, and non-neuronal cells, endothelial and periendothelial cells. In these cells VEGF expression appears developmentally regulated and is correlated with angiogenesis, which in turn responds to the high metabolic demands of the differentiating neocortex.

  15. Special Physical Education: Adapted, Individualized, Developmental. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John M.

    This text on physical education for children and adolescents with disabilities attempts to bring together current research findings and best educational practices from the fields of adapted physical education, special education, psychology, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation. The book is organized into…

  16. The Formative Method for Adapting Psychotherapy (FMAP): A community-based developmental approach to culturally adapting therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wei-Chin

    2010-01-01

    How do we culturally adapt psychotherapy for ethnic minorities? Although there has been growing interest in doing so, few therapy adaptation frameworks have been developed. The majority of these frameworks take a top-down theoretical approach to adapting psychotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a community-based developmental approach to modifying psychotherapy for ethnic minorities. The Formative Method for Adapting Psychotherapy (FMAP) is a bottom-up approach that involves collaborating with consumers to generate and support ideas for therapy adaptation. It involves 5-phases that target developing, testing, and reformulating therapy modifications. These phases include: (a) generating knowledge and collaborating with stakeholders (b) integrating generated information with theory and empirical and clinical knowledge, (c) reviewing the initial culturally adapted clinical intervention with stakeholders and revising the culturally adapted intervention, (d) testing the culturally adapted intervention, and (e) finalizing the culturally adapted intervention. Application of the FMAP is illustrated using examples from a study adapting psychotherapy for Chinese Americans, but can also be readily applied to modify therapy for other ethnic groups. PMID:20625458

  17. Developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamazaki, Yumi; Yamashita, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavones play important roles in plant-microbe interactions in rhizospheres. Soybean roots secrete daidzein and genistein to attract rhizobia. Despite the importance of isoflavones in plant-microbe interactions, little is known about the developmental and nutritional regulation of isoflavone secretion from soybean roots. In this study, soybeans were grown in hydroponic culture, and isoflavone contents in tissues, isoflavone secretion from the roots, and the expression of isoflavone conjugates hydrolyzing beta-glucosidase (ICHG) were investigated. Isoflavone contents did not show strong growth-dependent changes, while secretion of daidzein from the roots dramatically changed, with higher secretion during vegetative stages. Coordinately, the expression of ICHG also peaked at vegetative stages. Nitrogen deficiency resulted in 8- and 15-fold increases in secretion of daidzein and genistein, respectively, with no induction of ICHG. Taken together, these results suggest that large amounts of isoflavones were secreted during vegetative stages via the hydrolysis of (malonyl)glucosides with ICHG. PMID:26168358

  18. Developmental Regulation of the Plastid Protein Import Apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, C; Cline, K

    1991-01-01

    Plastid development involves the programmed accumulation of proteins. Most plastid proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and imported into the organelle by an envelope-based protein import apparatus. Previous studies have shown that developmental rates of protein accumulation correspond to mRNA levels. Here, we examined the relationship between plastid development and the activity of the protein import apparatus. Developing plastids, primarily from wheat leaves, were analyzed for their protein import capability in vitro. Import capability, initially high in proplastids, declined as much as 20-fold as plastid development approached either the mature etioplast or the mature chloroplast. The observed decline was not due to senescence, nonspecific inhibitors, or protein turnover. Furthermore, the import capability of mature etioplasts, initially very low, was transiently reactivated during light-mediated redifferentiation into chloroplasts. These results suggest that plant cells regulate the import apparatus in concert with the protein demands of the developing plastids. PMID:12324584

  19. Regulation of plant developmental processes by a novel splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gul Shad; Palusa, Saiprasad G; Golovkin, Maxim; Prasad, Jayendra; Manley, James L; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2007-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play important roles in constitutive and alternative splicing and other aspects of mRNA metabolism. We have previously isolated a unique plant SR protein (SR45) with atypical domain organization. However, the biological and molecular functions of this novel SR protein are not known. Here, we report biological and molecular functions of this protein. Using an in vitro splicing complementation assay, we showed that SR45 functions as an essential splicing factor. Furthermore, the alternative splicing pattern of transcripts of several other SR genes was altered in a mutant, sr45-1, suggesting that the observed phenotypic abnormalities in sr45-1 are likely due to altered levels of SR protein isoforms, which in turn modulate splicing of other pre-mRNAs. sr45-1 exhibited developmental abnormalities, including delayed flowering, narrow leaves and altered number of petals and stamens. The late flowering phenotype was observed under both long days and short days and was rescued by vernalization. FLC, a key flowering repressor, is up-regulated in sr45-1 demonstrating that SR45 influences the autonomous flowering pathway. Changes in the alternative splicing of SR genes and the phenotypic defects in the mutant were rescued by SR45 cDNA, further confirming that the observed defects in the mutant are due to the lack of SR45. These results indicate that SR45 is a novel plant-specific splicing factor that plays a crucial role in regulating developmental processes. PMID:17534421

  20. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  1. Nitric oxide regulates vascular adaptive mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Knaub, Leslie A; Olivera-Fragoso, Luis F; Keller, Amy C; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Watson, Peter A; Reusch, Jane E B

    2013-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and physical inactivity, are all correlated with impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function and decreased nitric oxide (NO) production. NO-mediated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been established in many tissues, yet the role of eNOS in vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is unclear. We hypothesized that genetic eNOS deletion and 3-day nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents would result in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defunct fission/fusion and autophagy profiles within the aorta. We observed a significant, eNOS expression-dependent decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunits from complexes I, II, III, and V in eNOS heterozygotes and eNOS null mice compared with age-matched controls. In response to NOS inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment in Sprague Dawley rats, significant decreases were observed in ETC protein subunits from complexes I, III, and IV as well as voltage-dependent anion channel 1. Decreased protein content of upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, cAMP response element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, were observed in response to 3-day L-NAME treatment. Both genetic eNOS deletion and NOS inhibition resulted in decreased manganese superoxide dismutase protein. L-NAME treatment resulted in significant changes to mitochondrial dynamic protein profiles with decreased fusion, increased fission, and minimally perturbed autophagy. In addition, L-NAME treatment blocked mitochondrial adaptation to an exercise intervention in the aorta. These results suggest that eNOS/NO play a role in basal and adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis in the vasculature and regulation of mitochondrial turnover. PMID:23585138

  2. My Solar System: A Developmentally Adapted Eco-Mapping Technique for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Jennifer R.; Fazio-Griffith, Laura J.; Rohr, Shannon N.

    2008-01-01

    Counseling children requires specific skills and techniques, such as play therapy and expressive arts, to address developmental manifestations and to facilitate the understanding of presenting problems. This article outlines an adapted eco-mapping activity that can be used as a creative counseling technique with children in order to promote…

  3. Developmental Structuralist Approach to the Classification of Adaptive and Pathologic Personality Organizations: Infancy and Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stanley I.; Lourie, Reginald S.

    This paper applies a developmental structuralist approach to the classification of adaptive and pathologic personality organizations and behavior in infancy and early childhood, and it discusses implications of this approach for preventive intervention. In general, as development proceeds, the structural capacity of the developing infant and child…

  4. The Nature and Control of Postural Adaptations of Boys with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Przysucha, Eryk P.; Taylor, M. Jane; Weber, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the nature of postural adaptations and control tendencies, between 7 (n = 9) and 11-year-old boys (n = 10) with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and age-matched, younger (n = 10) and older (n = 9) peers in a leaning task. Examination of anterior-posterior, medio-lateral, maximum and mean area of sway, and path length…

  5. Adaptive Force Control in Grasping as a Function of Level of Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, R. L.; Deutsch, K. M.; Newell, K. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The adaptation to the task demands of grasping (grip mode and object mass) was investigated as a function of level of developmental disability. Methods: Subjects grasped objects of different grip widths and masses that were instrumented to record grip forces. Results: Proportionally, fewer participants from the profound compared with…

  6. Root developmental adaptation to Fe toxicity: Mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjie; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. To cope with Fe excess, plants have evolved complex adaptive responses that include morphological and physiological modifications. The highly dynamic adjustments in overall root system architecture (RSA) determine root plasticity and allow plants to efficiently adapt to environmental constraints. However, the effects of Fe excess on RSA are poorly understood. Recently, we showed that excess Fe treatment in Arabidopsis not only directly impairs primary root (PR) growth but also arrests lateral root (LR) formation by acting at the tip of the growing primary root. Such a change is believed to help RSA adjust and restrict excessive Fe absorption in the part of the rhizosphere subject to acute toxicity while maintaining the absorption of other nutrients in the less stressed components of the root system. We further showed that the suppression of PR growth and LR formation under excess Fe is alleviated by K(+) addition, providing useful insight into the effectiveness of nutrient management to improve RSA and alleviate Fe toxicity symptoms in the field.

  7. Core Mechanisms Regulating Developmentally Timed and Environmentally Triggered Abscission.

    PubMed

    Patharkar, O Rahul; Walker, John C

    2016-09-01

    Drought-triggered abscission is a strategy used by plants to avoid the full consequences of drought; however, it is poorly understood at the molecular genetic level. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) can be used to elucidate the pathway controlling drought-triggered leaf shedding. We further show that much of the pathway regulating developmentally timed floral organ abscission is conserved in regulating drought-triggered leaf abscission. Gene expression of HAESA (HAE) and INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) is induced in cauline leaf abscission zones when the leaves become wilted in response to limited water and HAE continues to accumulate in the leaf abscission zones through the abscission process. The genes that encode HAE/HAESA-LIKE2, IDA, NEVERSHED, and MAPK KINASE4 and 5 are all necessary for drought-induced leaf abscission. Our findings offer a molecular mechanism explaining drought-triggered leaf abscission. Furthermore, the ability to study leaf abscission in Arabidopsis opens up a new avenue to tease apart mechanisms involved in abscission that have been difficult to separate from flower development as well as for understanding the mechanistic role of water and turgor pressure in abscission. PMID:27468996

  8. Aphid polyphenisms: trans-generational developmental regulation through viviparity

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kota; Miura, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Polyphenism, in which multiple discrete phenotypes develop from a single genotype, is considered to have contributed to the evolutionary success of aphids. Of the various polyphenisms observed in the complex life cycle of aphids, the reproductive and wing polyphenisms seen in most aphid species are conspicuous. In reproductive polyphenism, the reproductive modes can change between viviparous parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction in response to the photoperiod. Under short-day conditions in autumn, sexual morphs (males and oviparous females) are produced parthenogenetically. Winged polyphenism is observed in viviparous generations during summer, when winged or wingless (flightless) aphids are produced depending on a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., density, predators). Here, we review the physiological mechanisms underlying reproductive and wing polyphenism in aphids. In reproductive polyphenism, morph determination (male, oviparous or viviparous female) within mother aphids is regulated by juvenile hormone (JH) titers in the mothers. In wing polyphenism, although JH is considered to play an important role in phenotype determination (winged or wingless), the role is still controversial. In both cases, the acquisition of viviparity in Aphididae is considered to be the basis for maternal regulation of these polyphenisms, and through which environmental cues can be transferred to developing embryos through the physiological state of the mother. Although the mechanisms by which mothers alter the developmental programs of their progeny have not yet been clarified, continued developments in molecular biology will likely unravel these questions. PMID:24478714

  9. Developmental regulation of the Tetrahymena thermophila origin recognition complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The Tetrahymena thermophila DNA replication machinery faces unique demands due to the compartmentalization of two functionally distinct nuclei within a single cytoplasm, and complex developmental program. Here we present evidence for programmed changes in ORC and MCM abundance that are not consistent with conventional models for DNA replication. As a starting point, we show that ORC dosage is critical during the vegetative cell cycle and development. A moderate reduction in Orc1p induces genome instability in the diploid micronucleus, aberrant division of the polyploid macronucleus, and failure to generate a robust intra-S phase checkpoint response. In contrast to yeast ORC2 mutants, replication initiation is unaffected; instead, replication forks elongation is perturbed, as Mcm6p levels decline in parallel with Orc1p. Experimentally induced down-regulation of ORC and MCMs also impairs endoreplication and gene amplification, consistent with essential roles during development. Unexpectedly Orc1p and Mcm6p levels fluctuate dramatically in developing wild type conjugants, increasing for early cycles of conventional micronuclear DNA replication and macronuclear anlagen replication (endoreplication phase I, rDNA gene amplification). This increase does not reflect the DNA replication load, as much less DNA is synthesized during this developmental window compared to vegetative S phase. Furthermore, although Orc1p levels transiently increase prior to endoreplication phase II, Orc1p and Mcm6p levels decline when the replication load increases and unconventional DNA replication intermediates are produced. We propose that replication initiation is re-programmed to meet different requirements or challenges during the successive stages of Tetrahymena development.

  10. Developmental Regulation of the Tetrahymena thermophila Origin Recognition Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The Tetrahymena thermophila DNA replication machinery faces unique demands due to the compartmentalization of two functionally distinct nuclei within a single cytoplasm, and complex developmental program. Here we present evidence for programmed changes in ORC and MCM abundance that are not consistent with conventional models for DNA replication. As a starting point, we show that ORC dosage is critical during the vegetative cell cycle and development. A moderate reduction in Orc1p induces genome instability in the diploid micronucleus, aberrant division of the polyploid macronucleus, and failure to generate a robust intra-S phase checkpoint response. In contrast to yeast ORC2 mutants, replication initiation is unaffected; instead, replication forks elongation is perturbed, as Mcm6p levels decline in parallel with Orc1p. Experimentally induced down-regulation of ORC and MCMs also impairs endoreplication and gene amplification, consistent with essential roles during development. Unexpectedly Orc1p and Mcm6p levels fluctuate dramatically in developing wild type conjugants, increasing for early cycles of conventional micronuclear DNA replication and macronuclear anlagen replication (endoreplication phase I, rDNA gene amplification). This increase does not reflect the DNA replication load, as much less DNA is synthesized during this developmental window compared to vegetative S phase. Furthermore, although Orc1p levels transiently increase prior to endoreplication phase II, Orc1p and Mcm6p levels decline when the replication load increases and unconventional DNA replication intermediates are produced. We propose that replication initiation is re-programmed to meet different requirements or challenges during the successive stages of Tetrahymena development. PMID:25569357

  11. Developmental Pathways among Adaptive Functioning and Externalizing and Internalizing Behavioral Problems: Cascades from Childhood into Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Marc H; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Suwalsky, Joan T D

    2013-01-01

    A developmental cascade describes a longitudinal cross-domain unique relation. Here, a 3-wave multivariate design and developmental cascade analysis were used to investigate pathways among adaptive functioning and externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems in a community sample of 134 children seen at 4, 10, and 14 years. Children, mothers, and teachers provided data. Nested path analytic models tested the plausible cascades among the three domains apart from their covariation at each age and rank-order stability across age. Adaptive functioning in early adolescence was predicted by early childhood adaptive functioning and externalizing behavioral problems, with both effects mediated by late childhood adaptive functioning and internalizing behavioral problems; externalizing behavioral problems in early adolescence were predicted by early childhood internalizing behavioral problems with the effect mediated by late childhood externalizing behavioral problems. These developmental cascades obtained independent of child intelligence; child age and maternal education and social desirability were also considered but were not related to any outcome variables. The findings suggest that strategically timed and targeted interventions designed to address young children's behavioral problems may return investment in terms of an enhanced epidemiology of adaptively functioning teens. PMID:23585713

  12. Developmental Pathways among Adaptive Functioning and Externalizing and Internalizing Behavioral Problems: Cascades from Childhood into Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Suwalsky, Joan T. D.

    2013-01-01

    A developmental cascade describes a longitudinal cross-domain unique relation. Here, a 3-wave multivariate design and developmental cascade analysis were used to investigate pathways among adaptive functioning and externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems in a community sample of 134 children seen at 4, 10, and 14 years. Children, mothers, and teachers provided data. Nested path analytic models tested the plausible cascades among the three domains apart from their covariation at each age and rank-order stability across age. Adaptive functioning in early adolescence was predicted by early childhood adaptive functioning and externalizing behavioral problems, with both effects mediated by late childhood adaptive functioning and internalizing behavioral problems; externalizing behavioral problems in early adolescence were predicted by early childhood internalizing behavioral problems with the effect mediated by late childhood externalizing behavioral problems. These developmental cascades obtained independent of child intelligence; child age and maternal education and social desirability were also considered but were not related to any outcome variables. The findings suggest that strategically timed and targeted interventions designed to address young children’s behavioral problems may return investment in terms of an enhanced epidemiology of adaptively functioning teens. PMID:23585713

  13. Thermal plasticity of growth and development varies adaptively among alternative developmental pathways.

    PubMed

    Kivelä, Sami M; Svensson, Beatrice; Tiwe, Alma; Gotthard, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Polyphenism, the expression of discrete alternative phenotypes, is often a consequence of a developmental switch. Physiological changes induced by a developmental switch potentially affect reaction norms, but the evolution and existence of alternative reaction norms remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that, in the butterfly Pieris napi (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), thermal reaction norms of several life history traits vary adaptively among switch-induced alternative developmental pathways of diapause and direct development. The switch was affected both by photoperiod and temperature, ambient temperature during late development having the potential to override earlier photoperiodic cues. Directly developing larvae had higher development and growth rates than diapausing ones across the studied thermal gradient. Reaction norm shapes also differed between the alternative developmental pathways, indicating pathway-specific selection on thermal sensitivity. Relative mass increments decreased linearly with increasing temperature and were higher under direct development than diapause. Contrary to predictions, population phenology did not explain trait variation or thermal sensitivity, but our experimental design probably lacks power for finding subtle phenology effects. We demonstrate adaptive differentiation in thermal reaction norms among alternative phenotypes, and suggest that the consequences of an environmentally dependent developmental switch primarily drive the evolution of alternative thermal reaction norms in P. napi.

  14. The biology of developmental plasticity and the Predictive Adaptive Response hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Patrick; Gluckman, Peter; Hanson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Many forms of developmental plasticity have been observed and these are usually beneficial to the organism. The Predictive Adaptive Response (PAR) hypothesis refers to a form of developmental plasticity in which cues received in early life influence the development of a phenotype that is normally adapted to the environmental conditions of later life. When the predicted and actual environments differ, the mismatch between the individual's phenotype and the conditions in which it finds itself can have adverse consequences for Darwinian fitness and, later, for health. Numerous examples exist of the long-term effects of cues indicating a threatening environment affecting the subsequent phenotype of the individual organism. Other examples consist of the long-term effects of variations in environment within a normal range, particularly in the individual's nutritional environment. In mammals the cues to developing offspring are often provided by the mother's plane of nutrition, her body composition or stress levels. This hypothetical effect in humans is thought to be important by some scientists and controversial by others. In resolving the conflict, distinctions should be drawn between PARs induced by normative variations in the developmental environment and the ill effects on development of extremes in environment such as a very poor or very rich nutritional environment. Tests to distinguish between different developmental processes impacting on adult characteristics are proposed. Many of the mechanisms underlying developmental plasticity involve molecular epigenetic processes, and their elucidation in the context of PARs and more widely has implications for the revision of classical evolutionary theory. PMID:24882817

  15. Zebrafish rest regulates developmental gene expression but not neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kok, Fatma O; Taibi, Andrew; Wanner, Sarah J; Xie, Xiayang; Moravec, Cara E; Love, Crystal E; Prince, Victoria E; Mumm, Jeff S; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2012-10-01

    The transcriptional repressor Rest (Nrsf) recruits chromatin-modifying complexes to RE1 'silencer elements', which are associated with hundreds of neural genes. However, the requirement for Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation of embryonic development and cell fate is poorly understood. Conflicting views of the role of Rest in controlling cell fate have emerged from recent studies. To address these controversies, we examined the developmental requirement for Rest in zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene targeting. We discovered that germ layer specification progresses normally in rest mutants despite derepression of target genes during embryogenesis. This analysis provides the first evidence that maternal rest is essential for repression of target genes during blastula stages. Surprisingly, neurogenesis proceeds largely normally in rest mutants, although abnormalities are observed within the nervous system, including defects in oligodendrocyte precursor cell development and a partial loss of facial branchiomotor neuron migration. Mutants progress normally through embryogenesis but many die as larvae (after 12 days). However, some homozygotes reach adulthood and are viable. We utilized an RE1/NRSE transgenic reporter system to dynamically monitor Rest activity. This analysis revealed that Rest is required to repress gene expression in mesodermal derivatives including muscle and notochord, as well as within the nervous system. Finally, we demonstrated that Rest is required for long-term repression of target genes in non-neural tissues in adult zebrafish. Our results point to a broad role for Rest in fine-tuning neural gene expression, rather than as a widespread regulator of neurogenesis or cell fate. PMID:22951640

  16. Developmental Trajectories of Regulating Attentional Selection Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to “pay attention” and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  17. Developmental trajectories of regulating attentional selection over time.

    PubMed

    Heim, Sabine; Keil, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in learning environments requires both the maintenance of an attentional focus on a task-set and suppression of distracting stimuli. This may be especially difficult when the competing information is more appealing than the target event. The aptitude to "pay attention" and resist distraction has often been noted as an important prerequisite of successful acquisition of intellectual abilities in children. This focused review draws on research that highlights interindividual differences in the temporal dynamics of attentional engagement and disengagement under competition, and their relation with age and cognitive/academic skills. Although basic strategies of attention control are present in very young children, the more refined ability to manage attentional resources over time in an economic and adaptive fashion appears during early school years, dramatically improves until the early teen years, and continues to develop into late adolescence. Across studies, parameters of attention control over time predict specific aspects of academic performance, rather than general intellectual ability. We conclude that the ability to strategically regulate the dynamic allocation of attention at rapid rates may represent an important element of cognitive and academic development. PMID:22905028

  18. Autoimmunity, Not a Developmental Defect, is the Cause for Subfertility of Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Kekäläinen, E; Pöntynen, N; Meri, S; Arstila, T P; Jarva, H

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune regulator's (AIRE) best characterized role is in the generation immunological tolerance, but it is also involved in many other processes such as spermatogenesis. Loss-of-function mutations in AIRE cause a disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy (APECED; also called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1, APS-1) that is dominated by various autoimmune manifestations, mainly endocrinopathies. Both patients with APECED and Aire(-/-) mice suffer from varying levels of infertility, but it is not clear if it is a result of an autoimmune tissue damage or more of a developmental defect. In this study, we wanted to resolve whether or not the reduced fertility of Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on the adaptive immune system and therefore a manifestation of autoimmunity in these mice. We generated lymphopenic mice without Aire expression that were devoid of the autoimmune manifestations previously reported in immunocompetent Aire(-/-) mice. These Aire(-/-) Rag1(-/-) mice regained full fertility. This confirms that the development of infertility in Aire(-/-) mice requires a functional adaptive immune system. We also show that only the male Aire(-/-) mice are subfertile, whereas Aire(-/-) females produce litters normally. Moreover, the male subfertility can be adoptively transferred with lymphocytes from Aire(-/-) donor mice to previously fertile lymphopenic Aire(-/-) recipients. Our data show that subfertility in Aire(-/-) mice is dependent on a functional adaptive immune system thus confirming its autoimmune aetiology.

  19. Developmental regulation of human truncated nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, P.S.; Clagett-Dame, M.; Chelsea, D.M.; Loy, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated XIF1 and IIIG5) recognizing distinct epitopes of the human truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-Rt) were used in a two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay to monitor levels of NGF-Rt in human urine as a function of age. Urine samples were collected from 70 neurologically normal subjects ranging in age from 1 month to 68 years. By using this sensitive two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay, NGF-Rt levels were found to be highest in urine from 1-month old subjects. By 2.5 months, NGF-Rt values were half of those seen at 1 month and decreased more gradually between 0.5 and 15 years. Between 15 and 68 years, urine NGF-Rt levels were relatively constant at 5% of 1-month values. No evidence for diurnal variation of adult NGF-Rt was apparent. Pregnant women in their third trimester showed significantly elevated urine NGF-Rt values compared with age-matched normals. Affinity labeling of NGF-Rt with 125I-NGF followed by immunoprecipitation with ME20.4-IgG and gel autoradiography indicated that neonatal urine contained high amounts of truncated receptor (Mr = 50 kd); decreasingly lower amounts of NGF-Rt were observed on gel autoradiograms with development, indicating that the two-site radiometric immunosorbent assay correlated well with the affinity labeling technique for measuring NGF-Rt. NGF-Rt in urines from 1-month-old and 36-year-old subjects showed no differences in affinities for NGF or for the monoclonal antibody IIIG5. These data show that NGF-Rt is developmentally regulated in human urine, and are discussed in relation to the development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  20. Adolescent Family Adversity and Mental Health Problems: The Role of Adaptive Self-Regulation Capacities. The TRAILS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Martin Paul; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent family adversity is a considerable adaptive challenge in an increasingly turbulent developmental period. Using data from a prospective population cohort of 2230 Dutch adolescents, we tested risk-buffering interactions between adolescent family adversity and self-regulation capacities on mental health. We used two adaptive…

  1. The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Social Problems of Boys with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Beverly J.; Fernandes-Richards, Siobhan; Aarskog, Cyrena; Osborn, Teresa; Capetillo, Darla

    2007-01-01

    Parents and teachers reported that 6- to 8-year-old boys with developmental delays were less able to regulate their emotions than nondelayed boys matched on chronological age. Compared to nondelayed boys, boys with developmental delays had more social problems, which persisted and increased over a 3-year period. Children's ability to regulate…

  2. Leptin receptors are developmentally regulated in rat pituitary and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morash, Barbara A; Imran, Ali; Wilkinson, Diane; Ur, Ehud; Wilkinson, Michael

    2003-11-28

    We have previously reported that leptin is expressed in adult rat brain and pituitary gland, though the role of leptin in these sites has not been determined. Leptin mRNA is developmentally regulated in the brain and pituitary of male and female rats during early postnatal development, suggesting a role in the maturation of the brain-pituitary system. Here, we sought to extend our previous studies by evaluating (1) the ontogeny of leptin receptor mRNA levels in rat brain and pituitary and (2) pituitary leptin protein levels in neonatal and pre-pubertal rats. Pituitary leptin concentration was highest shortly after birth (postnatal day (PD) 4, 25 ng/mg protein) and fell significantly throughout postnatal development and into adulthood (PD 60, 3.5 ng/mg protein; P<0.005) coincident with a decline in pituitary leptin mRNA levels. Significant age-related effects on leptin receptor mRNA levels were also observed in the pituitary and the hypothalamus of male and female rats using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. In the pituitary, the short form (OBRa) mRNA levels were highest in neonatal rats (PD 4) but declined throughout postnatal development (PD 4-22) paralleling the fall in pituitary leptin mRNA and protein levels. The long form (OBRb) mRNA levels were unaffected by age between PD 4 and 22. In contrast, hypothalamic, levels of OBRb mRNA were very low to undetectable shortly after birth (PD 4) and rose significantly between PD 4 and 14/22 while levels of OBRa mRNA were not significantly different between PD 4 and 22. Immunohistochemical detection of leptin receptor immunoreactivity (all forms) revealed the presence of OBR-like protein in pituitary and hypothalamus as early as PD 4. Cortical leptin receptor mRNA levels were similar throughout early postnatal development. No gender-related differences in leptin receptor mRNA levels were noted in brain or pituitary. In conclusion, these data, together with our previous work, indicate that the neonatal pituitary gland

  3. Why ontogeny matters during adaptation: developmental niche construction and pleiotorpy across the life cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This case study of adaptation in Arabidopsis thaliana shows that natural selection on early life stages can be intense and can influence the evolution of subsequent traits. Two mechanisms contribute to this influence: pleiotropy across developmental stages and developmental niche construction. Examples are given of pleiotropy of environmentally cued development across life stages, and potential ways that pleiotropy can be relieved are discussed. In addition, this case study demonstrates how the timing of prior developmental transitions determines the seasonal environment experienced subsequently, and that such developmental niche construction alters phenotypic expression of subsequent traits, the expression of genetic variation of those traits, and natural selection on those traits and alleles associated with them. As such, developmental niche construction modifies pleiotropic relationships across the life cycle in ways that influence the dynamics of adaptation. Understanding the genetic basis of life-cycle variation therefore requires consideration of environmental effects on pleiotropy.

  4. Shifting habitats, morphology, and selective pressures: developmental polyphenism in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian spiders.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Michael S; Carter, Rebecca A; Croucher, Peter J P; Gillespie, Rosemary G

    2015-01-01

    Particularly intriguing examples of adaptive radiation are those in which lineages show parallel or convergent evolution, suggesting utilization of similar genetic or developmental pathways. The current study focuses on an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian "spiny-leg" spiders in which diversification is associated with repeated convergent evolution leading to similar sets of ecomorphs on each island. However, two species on the oldest islands in the archipelago exhibit variability, occurring as two different ecomorphs. More derived species on the younger islands show much less variability, any one species displaying a single ecomorph. We measured ecomorphological features within individuals over time to determine the nature of the variability. Then, using transcriptomes, we conducted lineage-based tests for selection under varying models and analyses of gene tree versus species tree incongruencies. Our results provide strong evidence that variability in color in Tetragnatha kauaiensis and T. polychromata is associated with development within individuals (polyphenism). Moreover, a total of 28 loci showed a signature of selection associated with loss of the color-changing phenotype, and 37 loci showed a signature of selection associated with the colonization of a new environment. The results illustrate how developmental polyphenism might provide an avenue for the repeated evolution of ecomorphs during adaptive radiation.

  5. Unique pattern of dietary adaptation in the dentition of Carnivora: its advantage and developmental origin

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Kishida, Takushi; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Carnivora is a successful taxon in terms of dietary diversity. We investigated the dietary adaptations of carnivoran dentition and the developmental background of their dental diversity, which may have contributed to the success of the lineage. A developmental model was tested and extended to explain the unique variability and exceptional phenotypes observed in carnivoran dentition. Carnivorous mammalian orders exhibited two distinct patterns of dietary adaptation in molars and only Carnivora evolved novel variability, exhibiting a high correlation between relative molar size and the shape of the first molar. Studies of Bmp7-hetero-deficient mice, which may exhibit lower Bmp7 expression, suggested that Bmp7 has pleiotropic effects on these two dental traits. Its effects are consistent with the pattern of dietary adaptation observed in Carnivora, but not that observed in other carnivorous mammals. A molecular evolutionary analysis revealed that Bmp7 sequence evolved by natural selection during ursid evolution, suggesting that it plays an evolutionary role in the variation of carnivoran dentition. Using mouse experiments and a molecular evolutionary analysis, we extrapolated the causal mechanism of the hitherto enigmatic ursid dentition (larger M2 than M1 and M3). Our results demonstrate how carnivorans acquired novel dental variability that benefits their dietary divergence.

  6. The diapause decision as a cascade switch for adaptive developmental plasticity in body mass in a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Gotthard, Karl; Berger, D

    2010-06-01

    Switch-induced developmental plasticity, such as the diapause decision in insects, is a major form of adaptation to variable environments. As individuals that follow alternative developmental pathways will experience different selective environments the diapause decision may evolve to a cascade switch that induces additional adaptive developmental differences downstream of the diapause decision. Here, we show that individuals following alternative developmental pathways in a Swedish population of the butterfly, Pararge aegeria, display differential optimization of adult body mass as a likely response to predictable differences in thermal conditions during reproduction. In a more northern population where this type of selection is absent no similar difference in adult mass among pathways was found. We conclude that the diapause decision in the southern population appears to act as a cascade switch, coordinating development downstream of the diapause decision, to produce adult phenotypes adapted to the typical thermal conditions of their expected reproductive period.

  7. Effects of Risperidone and Parent Training on Adaptive Functioning in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Serious Behavioral Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scahill, Lawrence; McDougle, Christopher J.; Aman, Michael G.; Johnson, Cynthia; Handen, Benjamin; Bearss, Karen; Dziura, James; Butter, Eric; Swiezy, Naomi G.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Sukhodolsky, Denis D.; Lecavalier, Luc; Pozdol, Stacie L.; Nikolov, Roumen; Hollway, Jill A.; Korzekwa, Patricia; Gavaletz, Allison; Kohn, Arlene E.; Koenig, Kathleen; Grinnon, Stacie; Mulick, James A.; Yu, Sunkyung; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) have social interaction deficits, delayed communication, and repetitive behaviors as well as impairments in adaptive functioning. Many children actually show a decline in adaptive skills compared with age mates over time. Method: This 24-week, three-site, controlled clinical trial…

  8. Driving Skills of Young Adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Regulating Speed and Coping with Distraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Wann, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we used an automatic car simulator to examine the steering control, speed regulation and response to hazards of young adults with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and limited driving experience. In Experiment 1 participants either used the accelerator pedal to regulate their speed, or used the brake pedal when they…

  9. Epigenetics: a key regulator of platyhelminth developmental biology?

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kathrin K; Hoffmann, Karl F

    2012-01-01

    The Platyhelminthes (flukes/flatworms) are a large group of derived metazoans beautifully adapted for existence in diversely challenging ecosystems. As tractable examples of development and self-regeneration or as causative agents of aquacultural, veterinary and biomedically-relevant parasitic diseases, the platyhelminths are subject to intensive inter-disciplinary research. Given the complex lifestyles exhibited by individuals within this phylum, we postulate that epigenetic processes feature in many aspects of platyhelminth lifecycle diversity, development and environmentally-driven adaptations.

  10. Regulation of the adaptation to zinc deficiency in plants

    PubMed Central

    Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark GM

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which plants sense their micronutrient status, and adapt to their environment in order to ensure a sufficient micronutrient supply, are poorly understood. Zinc is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms. when facing a shortage in zinc supply, plants adapt by enhancing the zinc uptake capacity. The molecular regulators controlling this adaptation were recently identified. in this mini-review, we highlight recent progress in understanding the adaptation to zinc deficiency in plants and discuss the future challenges to fully unravel its molecular basis. PMID:21139426

  11. The roles of antisocial history and emerging adulthood developmental adaption in predicting adult antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Alink, Lenneke R A; Egeland, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Different trajectories of antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence have been identified by several researchers. However, more needs to be known about the development of antisocial behavior in adulthood and about factors that account for continuity and change. In this study, we investigated the developmental course into adulthood of different trajectories of antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence. Second, we examined the role of developmental adaptation in emerging adulthood in accounting for the continuity and change of antisocial behavior. The participants (N = 162) were drawn from an ongoing 28-year longitudinal study. Trajectory groups (EOP: Early Onset/Persistent, n = 30; AO: Adolescent Onset, n = 32; Other, n = 100) were based on measures of externalizing behavior assessed at six time points in childhood and adolescence. Through interviews and questionnaires in adulthood, the quality of romantic relationships and the participants' work ethic (age 23), duration of unemployment (between ages 23 and 26 years), the level of externalizing problems (ages 23 and 26), and the number of antisocial personality disorder symptoms (age 28) were assessed. Results indicated that individuals in the EOP group showed the highest levels of antisocial behavior throughout emerging and early adulthood. Negative experiences in the work and romantic relationship domains was related to the continuity of antisocial behavior in the EOP group. For the AO group, a shorter duration of unemployment was related to lower levels of antisocial behavior. This study shows that early history plays an important role in the development of antisocial behavior and in the way developmental adaptation in emerging adulthood accounts for continuity and change of antisocial behavior.

  12. Adaptive immune regulation in autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Concetta; La Cava, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. This review discusses how adaptive immunoregulatory T cells contribute to the modulation of the development and evolution of T1D, together with potential approaches that target these cells for new therapies in the disease. PMID:26631820

  13. Placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment: implications for fetal growth and developmental programming.

    PubMed

    Sandovici, Ionel; Hoelle, Katharina; Angiolini, Emily; Constância, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The placenta is a transient organ found in eutherian mammals that evolved primarily to provide nutrients for the developing fetus. The placenta exchanges a wide array of nutrients, endocrine signals, cytokines and growth factors with the mother and the fetus, thereby regulating intrauterine development. Recent studies show that the placenta is not just a passive organ mediating maternal-fetal exchange. It can adapt its capacity to supply nutrients in response to intrinsic and extrinsic variations in the maternal-fetal environment. These dynamic adaptations are thought to occur to maximize fetal growth and viability at birth in the prevailing conditions in utero. However, some of these adaptations may also affect the development of individual fetal tissues, with patho-physiological consequences long after birth. Here, this review summarizes current knowledge on the causes, possible mechanisms and consequences of placental adaptive responses, with a focus on the regulation of transporter-mediated processes for nutrients. This review also highlights the emerging roles that imprinted genes and epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation may play in placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment.

  14. Developmental changes in Ca2+ channel subtypes regulating endocytosis at the calyx of Held.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Okamoto, Yuji; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2014-08-15

    At the mammalian central synapse, Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+) channels triggers neurotransmitter release by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, which fuse with the presynaptic membrane and are subsequently retrieved by endocytosis. At the calyx of Held terminal, P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels mainly mediate exocytosis, while N- and R-type channels have a minor role in young terminals (postnatal days 8-11). The role of each Ca(2+) channel subtype in endocytosis remains to be elucidated; therefore, we examined the role of each type of Ca(2+) channel in endocytosis, by using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in conjunction with capacitance measurement techniques. We found that at the young calyx terminal, when R-type Ca(2+) channels were blocked, the slow mode of endocytosis was further slowed, while blocking of either P/Q- or N-type Ca(2+) channels had no major effect. In more mature terminals (postnatal days 14-17), the slow mode of endocytosis was mainly triggered by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, suggesting developmental changes in the regulation of the slow mode of endocytosis by different Ca(2+) channel subtypes. In contrast, a fast mode of endocytosis was observed after strong stimulation in young terminals that was mediated mainly by P/Q-type, but not R- or N-type Ca(2+) channels. These results suggest that different types of Ca(2+) channels regulate the two different modes of endocytosis. The results may also suggest that exo- and endocytosis are regulated independently at different sites in young animals but are more tightly coupled in older animals, allowing more efficient synaptic vesicle cycling adapted for fast signalling.

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Adaptive NK Cell Diversification.

    PubMed

    Tesi, Bianca; Schlums, Heinrich; Cichocki, Frank; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were previously considered to represent short-lived, innate lymphocytes. However, mouse models have revealed expansion and persistence of differentiated NK cell subsets in response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, paralleling antigen-specific T cell differentiation. Congruently, analyses of humans have uncovered CMV-associated NK cell subsets characterized by epigenetic diversification processes that lead to altered target cell specificities and functional capacities. Here, focusing on responses to viruses, we review similarities and differences between mouse and human adaptive NK cells, identifying molecular analogies that may be key to transcriptional reprogramming and functional alterations. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic diversification and hypothesize that processes driving epigenetic diversification may represent a more widespread mechanism for fine-tuning and optimization of cellular immunity.

  16. Cell-Cycle Control of Developmentally Regulated Transcription Factors Accounts for Heterogeneity in Human Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar M.; Chappell, James; Trost, Robert; Lin, Li; Wang, Tao; Tang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Shaying; Jin, Peng; Dalton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Heterogeneity within pluripotent stem cell (PSC) populations is indicative of dynamic changes that occur when cells drift between different states. Although the role of metastability in PSCs is unclear, it appears to reflect heterogeneity in cell signaling. Using the Fucci cell-cycle indicator system, we show that elevated expression of developmental regulators in G1 is a major determinant of heterogeneity in human embryonic stem cells. Although signaling pathways remain active throughout the cell cycle, their contribution to heterogeneous gene expression is restricted to G1. Surprisingly, we identify dramatic changes in the levels of global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an unanticipated source of epigenetic heterogeneity that is tightly linked to cell-cycle progression and the expression of developmental regulators. When we evaluated gene expression in differentiating cells, we found that cell-cycle regulation of developmental regulators was maintained during lineage specification. Cell-cycle regulation of developmentally regulated transcription factors is therefore an inherent feature of the mechanisms underpinning differentiation. PMID:24371808

  17. The GATA transcription factor GtaC regulates early developmental gene expression dynamics in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Balaji; Cai, Huaqing; Devreotes, Peter N.; Shaulsky, Gad; Katoh-Kurasawa, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    In many systems, including the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, development is often marked by dynamic morphological and transcriptional changes orchestrated by key transcription factors. However, efforts to examine sequential genome-wide changes of gene regulation in developmental processes have been fairly limited. Here we report the developmental regulatory dynamics of GtaC, a GATA-type zinc-finger transcription factor, through the analyses of serial ChIP- and RNA-sequencing data. GtaC is essential for developmental progression, decoding extracellular cAMP pulses during early development and may play a role in mediating cell-type differentiation at later stages. We find that GtaC exhibits temporally distinctive DNA-binding patterns concordant with each developmental stage. We identify direct GtaC targets and observe cotemporaneous GtaC-binding and developmental expression regulation. Our results suggest that GtaC regulates multiple physiological processes as Dictyostelium transitions from a group of unicellular amoebae to an integrated multicellular organism. PMID:26144553

  18. Development of a digital adaptive optimal linear regulator flight controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, P.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Digital adaptive controllers have been proposed as a means for retaining uniform handling qualities over the flight envelope of a high-performance aircraft. Towards such an implementation, an explicit adaptive controller, which makes direct use of online parameter identification, has been developed and applied to the linearized lateral equations of motion for a typical fighter aircraft. The system is composed of an online weighted least-squares parameter identifier, a Kalman state filter, and a model following control law designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Simulation experiments with realistic measurement noise indicate that the proposed adaptive system has the potential for onboard implementation.

  19. From tetrapods to primates: conserved developmental mechanisms in diverging ecological adaptations.

    PubMed

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Montiel, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Primates are endowed with a brain about twice the size that of a mammal with the same body size, and humans have the largest brain relative to body size of all animals. This increase in brain size may be related to the acquisition of higher cognitive skills that permitted more complex social interactions, the evolution of culture, and the eventual ability to manipulate the environment. Nevertheless, in its internal structure, the primate brain shares a very conserved design with other mammals, being covered by a six-layered neocortex that, although expands disproportionately to other brain components, it does so following relatively well-defined allometric trends. Thus, the most fundamental events generating the basic design of the primate and human brain took place before the appearance of the first primate-like animal. Presumably, the earliest mammals already displayed a brain morphology radically different from that of their ancestors and that of their sister group, the reptiles, being characterized by the presence of an incipient neocortex that underwent an explosive growth in subsequent mammal evolution. In this chapter, we propose an integrative hypothesis for the origin of the mammalian neocortex, by considering the developmental modifications, functional networks, and ecological adaptations involved in the generation of this structure during the cretaceous period. Subsequently, the expansion of the primate brain is proposed to have relied on the amplification of the same, or very similar, developmental mechanisms as those involved in its primary origins, even in different ecological settings. PMID:22230620

  20. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  1. Hemodynamic forces regulate developmental patterning of atrial conduction.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Michael C; Louie, Jonathan D; Mikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous action potential conduction through the atrial chambers of the heart can lead to severe cardiac arrhythmia. To date, however, little is known regarding the mechanisms that pattern proper atrial conduction during development. Here we demonstrate that atrial muscle functionally diversifies into at least two heterogeneous subtypes, thin-walled myocardium and rapidly conducting muscle bundles, during a developmental window just following cardiac looping. During this process, atrial muscle bundles become enriched for the fast conduction markers Cx40 and Nav1.5, similar to the precursors of the fast conduction Purkinje fiber network located within the trabeculae of the ventricles. In contrast to the ventricular trabeculae, however, atrial muscle bundles display an increased proliferation rate when compared to the surrounding myocardium. Interestingly, mechanical loading of the embryonic atrial muscle resulted in an induction of Cx40, Nav1.5 and the cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, while decreasing atrial pressure via in vivo ligation of the vitelline blood vessels results in decreased atrial conduction velocity. Taken together, these data establish a novel model for atrial conduction patterning, whereby hemodynamic stretch coordinately induces proliferation and fast conduction marker expression, which in turn promotes the formation of large diameter muscle bundles to serve as preferential routes of conduction.

  2. Dynamic and Coordinated Epigenetic Regulation of Developmental Transitions in the Cardiac Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Wamstad, Joseph A.; Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Truty, Rebecca M.; Shrikumar, Avanti; Li, Fugen; Eilertson, Kirsten E.; Ding, Huiming; Wylie, John N.; Pico, Alexander R.; Capra, John A.; Erwin, Genevieve; Kattman, Steven J.; Keller, Gordon M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Levine, Stuart S.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Boyer, Laurie A.; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Heart development is exquisitely sensitive to the precise temporal regulation of thousands of genes that govern developmental decisions during differentiation. However, we currently lack a detailed understanding of how chromatin and gene expression patterns are coordinated during developmental transitions in the cardiac lineage. Here, we interrogated the transcriptome and several histone modifications across the genome during defined stages of cardiac differentiation. We find distinct chromatin patterns that are coordinated with stage-specific expression of functionally related genes, including many human disease-associated genes. Moreover, we discover a novel pre-activation chromatin pattern at the promoters of genes associated with heart development and cardiac function. We further identify stage-specific distal enhancer elements and find enriched DNA binding motifs within these regions that predict sets of transcription factors that orchestrate cardiac differentiation. Together, these findings form a basis for understanding developmentally regulated chromatin transitions during lineage commitment and the molecular etiology of congenital heart disease. PMID:22981692

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid acts as a nutrient-derived developmental cue to regulate early hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haisen; Yue, Rui; Wei, Bin; Gao, Ge; Du, Jiulin; Pei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Primitive hematopoiesis occurs in the yolk sac blood islands during vertebrate embryogenesis, where abundant phosphatidylcholines (PC) are available as important nutrients for the developing embryo. However, whether these phospholipids also generate developmental cues to promote hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we show that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a signaling molecule derived from PC, regulated hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Pharmacological and genetic blockage of LPA receptor 1 (LPAR1) or autotoxin (ATX), a secretory lysophospholipase that catalyzes LPA production, inhibited hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and impaired the formation of hemangioblasts. Mechanistic experiments revealed that the regulatory effect of ATX-LPA signaling was mediated by PI3K/Akt-Smad pathway. Furthermore, during in vivo embryogenesis in zebrafish, LPA functioned as a developmental cue for hemangioblast formation and primitive hematopoiesis. Taken together, we identified LPA as an important nutrient-derived developmental cue for primitive hematopoiesis as well as a novel mechanism of hemangioblast regulation. PMID:24829209

  4. Developmental regulation of aromatase activity in the rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Lephart, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    The brain of all mammalian species studied thus far contain an enzymatic activity (aromatase) that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens. The activity is highest during prenatal development and contributes to the establishment of sex differences which determine adult gonadotropin secretion patterns and reproductive behavior. The studies presented in this dissertation represent a systematic effort to elucidate the mechanism(s) that control the initiation of and contribute to maintaining rat hypothalamic aromatase activity during pre- and postnatal development. Aromatase enzyme activity was measured by the {sup 3}H{sub 2}O release assay or by traditional estrogen product isolation. Brain aromatase mRNA was detected by hybridization to a cDNA encoding rat aromatase cytochrome P-450. In both males and females the time of puberty was associated with a decline in hypothalamic aromatase activity. This decline may represent a factor underlying the peri-pubertal decrease in the sensitivity to gonadal steroid feedback that accompanies completion of puberty. The results also indicate that androgens regulate brain aromatase levels during both the prepubertal and peri-pubertal stages of sexual development and that this regulation is transiently lost in young adults. Utilizing a hypothalamic organotypic culture system, aromatase activity in vitro was maintained for as long as two days. The results of studies of a variety of hormonal and metabolic regulators suggest that prenatal aromatase activity is regulated by factor(s) that function independently from the classical cyclic AMP and protein kinase C trans-membrane signaling pathways.

  5. The anuran Bauplan: a review of the adaptive, developmental, and genetic underpinnings of frog and tadpole morphology.

    PubMed

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Wassersug, Richard J

    2007-02-01

    Anurans (frogs, toads, and their larvae) are among the most morphologically derived of vertebrates. While tightly conserved across the order, the anuran Bauplan (body plan) diverges widely from that of other vertebrates, particularly with respect to the skeleton. Here we address the adaptive, ontogenetic, and genetic bases of three such hallmark anuran features: (1) the absence of discrete caudal vertebrae, (2) a truncated axial skeleton, and (3) elongate hind limbs. We review the functional significance of each as it relates to the anuran lifestyle, which includes locomotor adaptations to both aquatic and terrestrial environments. We then shift our focus to the proximal origins of each feature, namely, ontogeny and its molecular regulation. Drawing on relatively limited data, we detail the development of each character and then, by extrapolating from comparative vertebrate data, propose molecular bases for these processes. Cast in this light, the divergent morphology of anurans emerges as a product of evolutionary modulation of the generalised vertebrate developmental machinery. Specifically, we hypothesise that: (1) the formation of caudal vertebrae is precluded due to a failure of sclerotomes to form cartilaginous condensations, perhaps resulting from altered expression of a suite of genes, including Pax1, Pax9, Msx1, Uncx-4.1, Sonic hedgehog, and noggin; (2) anteriorised Hox gene expression in the paraxial mesoderm has led to a rostral shift of morphological boundaries of the vertebral column; and, (3) spatial and temporal shifts in Hox expression may underlie the expanded tarsal elements of the anuran hind limb. Technology is currently in place to investigate each of these scenarios in the African clawed frog Xenopus. Experimental corroboration will further our understanding of the molecular regulation of the anuran Bauplan and provide insight into the origin of vertebrate morphological diversity as well as the role of development in evolution.

  6. Dietary and developmental regulation of intestinal sugar transport.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, R P

    2001-01-01

    The Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter SGLT1 and the facilitated fructose transporter GLUT5 absorb sugars from the intestinal lumen across the brush-border membrane into the cells. The activity of these transport systems is known to be regulated primarily by diet and development. The cloning of these transporters has led to a surge of studies on cellular mechanisms regulating intestinal sugar transport. However, the small intestine can be a difficult organ to study, because its cells are continuously differentiating along the villus, and because the function of absorptive cells depends on both their state of maturity and their location along the villus axis. In this review, I describe the typical patterns of regulation of transport activity by dietary carbohydrate, Na(+) and fibre, how these patterns are influenced by circadian rhythms, and how they vary in different species and during development. I then describe the molecular mechanisms underlying these regulatory patterns. The expression of these transporters is tightly linked to the villus architecture; hence, I also review the regulatory processes occurring along the crypt-villus axis. Regulation of glucose transport by diet may involve increased transcription of SGLT1 mainly in crypt cells. As cells migrate to the villus, the mRNA is degraded, and transporter proteins are then inserted into the membrane, leading to increases in glucose transport about a day after an increase in carbohydrate levels. In the SGLT1 model, transport activity in villus cells cannot be modulated by diet. In contrast, GLUT5 regulation by the diet seems to involve de novo synthesis of GLUT5 mRNA synthesis and protein in cells lining the villus, leading to increases in fructose transport a few hours after consumption of diets containing fructose. In the GLUT5 model, transport activity can be reprogrammed in mature enterocytes lining the villus column. Innovative experimental approaches are needed to increase our understanding of sugar

  7. A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective on ADHD and Comorbid Conditions: The Role of Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth A; Drabick, Deborah A G

    2015-12-01

    Research investigating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and co-occurring disorders such as oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety, and depression has surged in popularity; however, the developmental relations between ADHD and these comorbid conditions remain poorly understood. The current paper uses a developmental psychopathology perspective to examine conditions commonly comorbid with ADHD during late childhood through adolescence. First, we present evidence for ADHD and comorbid disorders. Next, we discuss emotion regulation and its associations with ADHD. The role of parenting behaviors in the development and maintenance of emotion regulation difficulties and comorbid disorders among children with ADHD is explored. An illustrative example of emotion regulation and parenting over the course of development is provided to demonstrate bidirectional relations among these constructs. We then present an integrated conceptual model of emotion regulation as a shared risk process that may lead to different comorbid conditions among children with ADHD. Implications and directions for future research are presented.

  8. New Directions in Developmental Emotion Regulation Research across the Life Span: Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Peter; Thompson, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the development of emotion regulation has become a prominent topic in developmental science covering a broad age range from infancy to old age because of its theoretical importance and practical implications. This introductory essay of this special section includes reflections on some of the conceptual themes of this research field and…

  9. Developmental Regulation with Progressive Vision Loss: Use of Control Strategies and Affective Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Oliver K.; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Boerner, Kathrin; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.; Cimarolli, Verena R.; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Heckhausen, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses older adults' developmental regulation when faced with progressive and irreversible vision loss. We used the motivational theory of life span development as a conceptual framework and examined changes in older adults' striving for control over everyday goal achievement, and their association with affective well-being,…

  10. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  11. SNAT2 and LAT1 transporter abundance is developmentally regulated in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we demonstrated that the insulin and amino acid–induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated an important role of the System A transporters (SNAT2 and SLC1A5) and the L transporter...

  12. Self-Regulated Strategy Instruction in Developmental Writing: A Design Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, Charles A.; Philippakos, Zoi A.

    2013-01-01

    This design research project developed and evaluated curriculum for developmental writing classes in community colleges. The core of the curriculum was self-regulated strategy instruction, which has been shown to be effective with adolescents who are struggling as writers. In the curriculum, students learned strategies for planning, drafting, and…

  13. Developmental regulation of nucleolus size during Drosophila eye differentiation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicholas E

    2013-01-01

    When cell cycle withdrawal accompanies terminal differentiation, biosynthesis and cellular growth are likely to change also. In this study, nucleolus size was monitored during cell fate specification in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc using fibrillarin antibody labeling. Nucleolus size is an indicator of ribosome biogenesis and can correlate with cellular growth rate. Nucleolar size was reduced significantly during cell fate specification and differentiation, predominantly as eye disc cells entered a cell cycle arrest that preceded cell fate specification. This reduction in nucleolus size required Dpp and Hh signaling. A transient enlargement of the nucleolus accompanied cell division in the Second Mitotic Wave. Nucleoli continued to diminish in postmitotic cells following fate specification. These results suggest that cellular growth is regulated early in the transition from proliferating progenitor cells to terminal cell fate specification, contemporary with regulation of the cell cycle, and requiring the same extracellular signals.

  14. 77 FR 66287 - Adaptation of Regulations To Incorporate Swaps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-02

    ... in a final rule in a separate release. \\4\\ Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps, 76 FR... Commission Merchants, 77 FR 20128 (Apr. 3, 2012) (adopting for SDs and MSPs reporting and recordkeeping... General Provisions and Core Principles, 76 FR 69334 (Nov. 8, 2011). \\18\\ Requirements for DCOs, DCMs,...

  15. Adaptations to walking on an uneven terrain for individuals with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentle, J; Barnett, A L; Wilmut, K

    2016-10-01

    Given the importance of walking in everyday life, understanding why this is challenging for some populations is particularly important. Studies focusing on gait patterns of individuals with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have shown that whilst increased variability is characteristic of walking patterns for this group, differences in spatio-temporal gait variables seem only to arise when task demands increase. However, these differences occur under rather artificial conditions, for example using a treadmill. The aim of this study, therefore was to examine the step characteristics of individuals with and without DCD whilst walking along an irregular terrain. Thirty-five individuals with DCD aged 8-32years and 35 age and gender-matched controls participated in this study. Participants were divided into 3 age groups; 8-12years (n=12), 13-17years (n=12) and 18-32years (n=11). Participants walked up and down a 6m walkway for two minutes on two terrains: level and irregular. VICON 3D motion analysis was used to extract measures of foot placement, velocity and angle of the head and trunk. Results showed that both groups adapted their gait to negotiate the irregular terrain, but the DCD group was more affected than their TD peers; walking significantly slower with shorter, wider steps and inclining their head more towards the ground. This suggests an adaptive approach used by individuals with DCD to preserve stability and increase visual sampling whilst negotiating an irregular terrain.

  16. Therapeutic adherence and competence scales for Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy for adolescents with PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Gutermann, Jana; Schreiber, Franziska; Matulis, Simone; Stangier, Ulrich; Rosner, Rita; Steil, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of therapeutic adherence and competence is often neglected in psychotherapy research, particularly in children and adolescents; however, both variables are crucial for the interpretation of treatment effects. Objective Our aim was to develop, adapt, and pilot two scales to assess therapeutic adherence and competence in a recent innovative program, Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy (D-CPT), for adolescents suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childhood abuse. Method Two independent raters assessed 30 randomly selected sessions involving 12 D-CPT patients (age 13–20 years, M age=16.75, 91.67% female) treated by 11 therapists within the pilot phase of a multicenter study. Results Three experts confirmed the relevance and appropriateness of each item. All items and total scores for adherence (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC]=0.76–1.00) and competence (ICC=0.78–0.98) yielded good to excellent inter-rater reliability. Cronbach's alpha was 0.59 for the adherence scale and 0.96 for the competence scale. Conclusions The scales reliably assess adherence and competence in D-CPT for adolescent PTSD patients. The ratings can be helpful in the interpretation of treatment effects, the assessment of mediator variables, and the identification and training of therapeutic skills that are central to achieving good treatment outcomes. Both adherence and competence will be assessed as possible predictor variables for treatment success in future D-CPT trials. PMID:25791915

  17. Adaptations to walking on an uneven terrain for individuals with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentle, J; Barnett, A L; Wilmut, K

    2016-10-01

    Given the importance of walking in everyday life, understanding why this is challenging for some populations is particularly important. Studies focusing on gait patterns of individuals with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) have shown that whilst increased variability is characteristic of walking patterns for this group, differences in spatio-temporal gait variables seem only to arise when task demands increase. However, these differences occur under rather artificial conditions, for example using a treadmill. The aim of this study, therefore was to examine the step characteristics of individuals with and without DCD whilst walking along an irregular terrain. Thirty-five individuals with DCD aged 8-32years and 35 age and gender-matched controls participated in this study. Participants were divided into 3 age groups; 8-12years (n=12), 13-17years (n=12) and 18-32years (n=11). Participants walked up and down a 6m walkway for two minutes on two terrains: level and irregular. VICON 3D motion analysis was used to extract measures of foot placement, velocity and angle of the head and trunk. Results showed that both groups adapted their gait to negotiate the irregular terrain, but the DCD group was more affected than their TD peers; walking significantly slower with shorter, wider steps and inclining their head more towards the ground. This suggests an adaptive approach used by individuals with DCD to preserve stability and increase visual sampling whilst negotiating an irregular terrain. PMID:27591489

  18. Using a Multicomponent Adapted Power Card Strategy to Decrease Latency during Interactivity Transitions for Three Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Maureen E.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Watts, Emily H.; Blum, Craig

    2011-01-01

    An adapted Power Card strategy was examined to determine effectiveness in decreasing latency in responding to teacher cues to initiate interactivity transitions in the classroom among three students, aged 10 to 11 years, with developmental disabilities (i.e., one with autism and two with intellectual disability). The Power Card strategy, a form of…

  19. Parental Adaptation to Out-of-Home Placement of a Child with Severe or Profound Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jeffrey B.; Roper, Susanne Olsen

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing grounded theory qualitative research methods, a model was developed for describing parental adaptation after voluntary placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities in out-of-home care. Interviews of parents from 20 families were analyzed. Parents' cognitive appraisals of placement outcomes were classified…

  20. Developmental regulation of molecular signalling in fetal and neonatal diaphragm protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong; Pillow, J Jane

    2013-08-01

    -κB signal transduction. The finding provides new insights into developmental regulation of protein metabolism within development. The implication of these postnatal events for diaphragm adaptation to the ex utero environment needs further investigation. PMID:23828585

  1. Early development of Moniliophthora perniciosa basidiomata and developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is the causal agent of Witches' broom, a disease of Theobroma cacao. The pathogen life cycle ends with the production of basidiocarps in dead tissues of the infected host. This structure generates millions of basidiospores that reinfect young tissues of the same or other plants. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sexual phase of this fungus may help develop chemical, biological or genetic strategies to control the disease. Results Mycelium was morphologically analyzed prior to emergence of basidiomata by stereomicroscopy, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphological changes in the mycelium before fructification show a pattern similar to other members of the order Agaricales. Changes and appearance of hyphae forming a surface layer by fusion were correlated with primordia emergence. The stages of hyphal nodules, aggregation, initial primordium and differentiated primordium were detected. The morphological analysis also allowed conclusions on morphogenetic aspects. To analyze the genes involved in basidiomata development, the expression of some selected EST genes from a non-normalized cDNA library, representative of the fruiting stage of M. perniciosa, was evaluated. A macroarray analysis was performed with 192 selected clones and hybridized with two distinct RNA pools extracted from mycelium in different phases of basidiomata formation. This analysis showed two groups of up and down-regulated genes in primordial phases of mycelia. Hydrophobin coding, glucose transporter, Rho-GEF, Rheb, extensin precursor and cytochrome p450 monooxygenase genes were grouped among the up-regulated. In the down-regulated group relevant genes clustered coding calmodulin, lanosterol 14 alpha demethylase and PIM1. In addition, 12 genes with more detailed expression profiles were analyzed by RT-qPCR. One aegerolysin gene had a peak of expression in mycelium with primordia and a

  2. Developmental regulation of chromatin conformation by Hox proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Agelopoulos, Marios; McKay, Daniel J.; Mann, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present a strategy to examine the chromatin conformation of individual loci in specific cell types during Drosophila embryogenesis. Regulatory DNA is tagged with binding sites (lacO) for LacI, which is used to immunopreciptiate the tagged chromatin from specific cell types. We applied this approach to Distalless (Dll), a gene required for limb development in Drosophila. We show that the local chromatin conformation at Dll depends on the cell type: in cells that express Dll, the 5’ regulatory region is in close proximity to the Dll promoter. In Dll nonexpressing cells this DNA is in a more extended configuration. In addition, transcriptional activators and repressors are bound to Dll regulatory DNA in a cell type specific manner. The pattern of binding by GAGA factor and the variant histone H2Av suggest that they play a role in the regulation of Dll chromatin conformation in expressing and non-expressing cell types, respectively. PMID:22523743

  3. Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation: A Balancing Act in Two Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Boker, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    An equilibrium involves a balancing of forces. Just as one maintains upright posture in standing or walking, many self-regulatory and interpersonal behaviors can be framed as a balancing act between an ever changing environment and within-person processes. The emerging balance between person and environment, the equilibria, are dynamic and adaptive in response to development and learning. A distinction is made between equilibrium achieved solely due to a short timescale balancing of forces and a longer timescale preferred equilibrium which we define as a state towards which the system slowly adapts. Together, these are developed into a framework that this article calls Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation (ÆR), which separates a regulatory process into two timescales: a faster regulation that automatically balances forces and a slower timescale adaptation process that reconfigures the fast regulation so as to move the system towards its preferred equilibrium when an environmental force persists over the longer timescale. This way of thinking leads to novel models for the interplay between multiple timescales of behavior, learning, and development. PMID:27066197

  4. Developmental Regulation of the Growth Plate and Cranial Synchondrosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, X; Hu, M; Mishina, Y; Liu, F

    2016-10-01

    Long bones and the cranial base are both formed through endochondral ossification. Elongation of long bones is primarily through the growth plate, which is a cartilaginous structure at the end of long bones made up of chondrocytes. Growth plate chondrocytes are organized in columns along the longitudinal axis of bone growth. The cranial base is the growth center of the neurocranium. Synchondroses, consisting of mirror-image growth plates, are critical for cranial base elongation and development. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in determining the roles of the parathyroid hormone-related protein, Indian hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and Wnt signaling pathways in various aspects of skeletal development. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates the important role of the primary cilia signaling pathway in bone elongation. Here, we review the development of the growth plate and cranial synchondrosis and the regulation by the above-mentioned signaling pathways, highlighting the similarities and differences between these 2 structures. PMID:27250655

  5. GABAergic inhibition regulates developmental synapse elimination in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hisako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Kitamura, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2012-04-26

    Functional neural circuit formation during development involves massive elimination of redundant synapses. In the cerebellum, one-to-one connection from excitatory climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell (PC) is established by elimination of early-formed surplus CFs. This process depends on glutamatergic excitatory inputs, but contribution of GABAergic transmission remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate impaired CF synapse elimination in mouse models with diminished GABAergic transmission by mutation of a single allele for the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, by conditional deletion of GAD67 from PCs and GABAergic interneurons or by pharmacological inhibition of cerebellar GAD activity. The impaired CF synapse elimination was rescued by enhancing GABA(A) receptor sensitivity in the cerebellum by locally applied diazepam. Our electrophysiological and Ca2+ imaging data suggest that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition onto the PC soma from molecular layer interneurons influences CF-induced Ca2+ transients in the soma and regulates CF synapse elimination from postnatal day 10 (P10) to around P16. PMID:22542190

  6. Developmental mechanisms that regulate retinal ganglion cell dendritic morphology

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ning

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental features of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is that dendrites of individual RGCs are confined to one or a few narrow strata within the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and each RGC synapses only with a small group of presynaptic bipolar and amacrine cells with axons/dendrites ramified in the same strata to process distinct visual features. The underlying mechanisms which control the development of this laminar-restricted distribution pattern of RGC dendrites have been extensively studied, and it is still an open question whether the dendritic pattern of RGCs is determined by molecular cues or by activity-dependent refinement. Accumulating evidence suggests that both molecular cues and activity-dependent refinement might regulate RGC dendrites in a cell subtype-specific manner. However, identification of morphological subtypes of RGCs before they have achieved their mature dendritic pattern is a major challenge in the study of RGC dendritic development. This problem is now being circumvented through the use of molecular markers in genetically engineered mouse lines to identify RGC subsets early during development. Another unanswered fundamental question in the study of activity-dependent refinement of RGC dendrites is how changes in synaptic activity lead to the changes in dendritic morphology. Recent studies have started to shed light on the molecular basis of activity-dependent dendritic refinement of RGCs by showing that some molecular cascades control the cytoskeleton reorganization of RGCs. PMID:21542137

  7. Should I stay or should I go? Identification of novel nutritionally regulated developmental checkpoints in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Adam J; Sherwood, David R

    2014-01-01

    After embryogenesis, developing organisms typically secure their own nutrients to enable further growth. The fitness of an organism depends on developing when food is abundant and slowing or stopping development during periods of scarcity. Although several key pathways that link nutrition with development have been identified, a mechanistic understanding of how these pathways coordinate growth with nutritional conditions is lacking. We took advantage of the stereotyped development and experimental accessibility of C. elegans to study nutritional control of late larval development. We discovered that C. elegans larval development is punctuated by precisely time checkpoints that globally arrest growth when nutritional conditions are unfavorable. Arrest at the checkpoints is regulated by insulin- and insulin-like signaling and steroid hormone signaling. These pathways are conserved in mammals, suggesting that similar mechanisms could regulate growth and development in humans. We highlight several implications of our research, including quiescence of diverse cellular behaviors as an adaptive response to unfavorable growth conditions, the existence of oscillatory checkpoints that coordinate development across tissues, and the connections between systemic and cell-autonomous regulators of nutritional response. Together, our findings describe a fascinating developmental strategy in C. elegans that we expect will not only provide insight into nutritional regulation of development, but also into poorly understood cellular processes such as quiescence and aging. PMID:26430552

  8. Abnormal FMRI adaptation to unfamiliar faces in a case of developmental prosopamnesia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark A; Berberovic, Nadja; Mattingley, Jason B

    2007-07-17

    In rare cases, damage to the temporal lobe causes a selective impairment in the ability to learn new faces, a condition known as prosopamnesia [1]. Here we present the case of an individual with prosopamnesia in the absence of any acquired structural lesion. "C" shows intact processing of simple and complex nonface objects, but her ability to learn new faces is severely impaired. We used a neural marker of perceptual learning known as repetition suppression to examine functioning within C's fusiform face area (FFA), a region of cortex involved in face perception [2]. For comparison, we examined repetition suppression in the scene-selective parahippocampal place area (PPA) [3]. As expected, normal controls showed significant region-specific attenuation of neural activity across repetitions of each stimulus class. C also showed normal attenuation within the PPA to familiar and unfamiliar scenes, and within the FFA to familiar faces. Critically, however, she failed to show any adaptive change within the FFA for repeated unfamiliar faces, despite a face-specific blood-oxygen-dependent response (BOLD) response in her FFA during viewing of face stimuli. Our findings suggest that in developmental prosopamnesia, the FFA cannot maintain stable representations of new faces for subsequent recall or recognition.

  9. Circadian and light-driven regulation of rod dark adaptation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q; Corbo, Joseph C; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2015-12-02

    Continuous visual perception and the dark adaptation of vertebrate photoreceptors after bright light exposure require recycling of their visual chromophore through a series of reactions in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE visual cycle). Light-driven chromophore consumption by photoreceptors is greater in daytime vs. nighttime, suggesting that correspondingly higher activity of the visual cycle may be required. However, as rod photoreceptors are saturated in bright light, the continuous turnover of their chromophore by the visual cycle throughout the day would not contribute to vision. Whether the recycling of chromophore that drives rod dark adaptation is regulated by the circadian clock and light exposure is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that mouse rod dark adaptation is slower during the day or after light pre-exposure. This surprising daytime suppression of the RPE visual cycle was accompanied by light-driven reduction in expression of Rpe65, a key enzyme of the RPE visual cycle. Notably, only rods in melatonin-proficient mice were affected by this daily visual cycle modulation. Our results demonstrate that the circadian clock and light exposure regulate the recycling of chromophore in the RPE visual cycle. This daily melatonin-driven modulation of rod dark adaptation could potentially protect the retina from light-induced damage during the day.

  10. Developmental regulation of CYCA2s contributes to tissue-specific proliferation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Steffen; Coppens, Frederik; Lee, Eunkyoung; Donner, Tyler J; Xie, Zidian; Van Isterdael, Gert; Dhondt, Stijn; De Winter, Freya; De Rybel, Bert; Vuylsteke, Marnik; De Veylder, Lieven; Friml, Jiří; Inzé, Dirk; Grotewold, Erich; Scarpella, Enrico; Sack, Fred; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Beeckman, Tom

    2011-07-19

    In multicellular organisms, morphogenesis relies on a strict coordination in time and space of cell proliferation and differentiation. In contrast to animals, plant development displays continuous organ formation and adaptive growth responses during their lifespan relying on a tight coordination of cell proliferation. How developmental signals interact with the plant cell-cycle machinery is largely unknown. Here, we characterize plant A2-type cyclins, a small gene family of mitotic cyclins, and show how they contribute to the fine-tuning of local proliferation during plant development. Moreover, the timely repression of CYCA2;3 expression in newly formed guard cells is shown to require the stomatal transcription factors FOUR LIPS/MYB124 and MYB88, providing a direct link between developmental programming and cell-cycle exit in plants. Thus, transcriptional downregulation of CYCA2s represents a critical mechanism to coordinate proliferation during plant development.

  11. Hedonic Hotspots Regulate Cingulate-driven Adaptation to Cognitive Demands.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Henk; Band, Guido P H; Hommel, Bernhard; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-07-01

    Positive hedonic states are known to attenuate the impact of demanding events on our body and brain, supporting adaptive behavior in response to changes in the environment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural mechanism of this hedonic regulation. The effect of hedonic state (as induced by funny vs. neutral cartoons) on flexible behavioral and neural adaptation to cognitive demands was assessed in a flanker task in female volunteers. Behavioral results showed that humor reduced the compensatory adjustments to cognitive demands, as observed in sequential adaptations. This modulation was also reflected in midcingulate cortex (MCC; also known as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) activation. Furthermore, hedonic context increased activation in ventral striatum (VS) and ventral pallidum (VP). These hedonic hotspots attenuated the medial prefrontal cortex response to the cognitive demands in the ACC (also known as the rostral ACC). Activity in the ACC proved predictive of subsequent behavioral adaptation. Moreover, psychophysiological interaction analyses revealed that the MCC and the ACC were functionally connected with VS and VP, respectively. These observations reveal how MCC-VS and VP-ACC interactions are involved in the detection and hedonic modulation of behavioral adaptations to cognitive demands, which supports behavioral flexibility.

  12. Established epigenetic modifications determine the expression of developmentally regulated globin genes in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanworth, S J; Roberts, N A; Sharpe, J A; Sloane-Stanley, J A; Wood, W G

    1995-01-01

    Somatic cell hybrids generated from transgenic mouse cells have been used to examine the developmental regulation of human gamma-to-beta-globin gene switching. In hybrids between mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and transgenic erythroblasts taken at various stages of development, there was regulated expression of the human fetal gamma and adult beta genes, reproducing the in vivo pattern prior to fusion. Hybrids formed from embryonic blood cells produced predominantly gamma mRNA, whereas beta gene expression was observed in adult hybrids and a complete range of intermediate patterns was found in fetal liver hybrids. The adult environment of the MEL cells, therefore, did not appear to influence selective transcription from this gene complex. Irradiation of the embryonic erythroid cells prior to fusion resulted in hybrids containing only small fragments of donor chromosomes, but the pattern of gene expression did not differ from that of unirradiated hybrids. This finding suggests that continued expression of trans-acting factors from the donor erythroblasts is not necessary for continued expression of the human gamma gene in MEL cells. These results contrast with the lack of developmental regulation of the cluster after transfection of naked DNA into MEL cells and suggest that epigenetic processes established during normal development result in the gene cluster adopting a developmental stage-specific, stable conformation which is maintained through multiple rounds of replication and transcription in the MEL cell hybrids. On prolonged culture, hybrids that initially expressed only the gamma transgene switched to beta gene expression. The time period of switching, from approximately 10 to > 40 weeks, was similar to that seen previously in human fetal erythroblast x MEL cell hybrids but in this case bore no relationship to the time of in vivo switching. It seems unlikely, therefore, that switching in these hybrids is regulated by a developmental clock. PMID:7623793

  13. Developmental Stability and Change in Self-Regulation from Childhood to Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Marcela; Crockett, Lisa J.; Shen, Yuh-Ling

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the developmental course of self-regulation in a cohort of children from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The longitudinal sample included 646 children (48% girls; 52% boys; 36.2% Black, 23.4% Hispanic, 40.4% White) who were 4 to 5 years old in 1986 and who were followed up at ages 8 to 9 and ages 12 to 13. Levels of…

  14. Lifespan Development of Neuromodulation of Adaptive Control and Motivation as an Ontogenetic Mechanism for Developmental Niche Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Instead of viewing organisms and individuals as passive recipients of their biological, ecological, and cultural inheritances, the developmental niche construction theory and the biocultural co-construction framework both emphasize that the individual's agency plays a key role in regulating how environmental and sociocontextual influences may…

  15. Developmental Trajectories of Adaptive Behaviors from Early Childhood to Adolescence in a Cohort of 152 Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghdadli, Amaria; Assouline, Brigitte; Sonie, Sandrine; Pernon, Eric; Darrou, Celine; Michelon, Cecile; Picot, Marie-Christine; Aussilloux, Charles; Pry, Rene

    2012-01-01

    This study examines change in 152 children over an almost 10-year period (T1: 4.9 (plus or minus 1.3) years; T2: 8.1 (plus or minus 1.3) years; T3: 15(plus or minus 1.6) years) using a group-based, semi-parametric method in order to identify distinct developmental trajectories. Important deficits remain at adolescence in the adaptive abilities of…

  16. Feeding state-dependent regulation of developmental plasticity via CaMKI and neuroendocrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Scott J; Takeishi, Asuka; O'Donnell, Michael P; Park, JiSoo; Hong, Myeongjin; Butcher, Rebecca A; Kim, Kyuhyung; Sengupta, Piali

    2015-01-01

    Information about nutrient availability is assessed via largely unknown mechanisms to drive developmental decisions, including the choice of Caenorhabditis elegans larvae to enter into the reproductive cycle or the dauer stage. In this study, we show that CMK-1 CaMKI regulates the dauer decision as a function of feeding state. CMK-1 acts cell-autonomously in the ASI, and non cell-autonomously in the AWC, sensory neurons to regulate expression of the growth promoting daf-7 TGF-β and daf-28 insulin-like peptide (ILP) genes, respectively. Feeding state regulates dynamic subcellular localization of CMK-1, and CMK-1-dependent expression of anti-dauer ILP genes, in AWC. A food-regulated balance between anti-dauer ILP signals from AWC and pro-dauer signals regulates neuroendocrine signaling and dauer entry; disruption of this balance in cmk-1 mutants drives inappropriate dauer formation under well-fed conditions. These results identify mechanisms by which nutrient information is integrated in a small neuronal network to modulate neuroendocrine signaling and developmental plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10110.001 PMID:26335407

  17. Synchronization of developmental processes and defense signaling by growth regulating transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyi; Rice, J Hollis; Chen, Nana; Baum, Thomas J; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Growth regulating factors (GRFs) are a conserved class of transcription factor in seed plants. GRFs are involved in various aspects of tissue differentiation and organ development. The implication of GRFs in biotic stress response has also been recently reported, suggesting a role of these transcription factors in coordinating the interaction between developmental processes and defense dynamics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GRFs mediate the overlaps between defense signaling and developmental pathways are elusive. Here, we report large scale identification of putative target candidates of Arabidopsis GRF1 and GRF3 by comparing mRNA profiles of the grf1/grf2/grf3 triple mutant and those of the transgenic plants overexpressing miR396-resistant version of GRF1 or GRF3. We identified 1,098 and 600 genes as putative targets of GRF1 and GRF3, respectively. Functional classification of the potential target candidates revealed that GRF1 and GRF3 contribute to the regulation of various biological processes associated with defense response and disease resistance. GRF1 and GRF3 participate specifically in the regulation of defense-related transcription factors, cell-wall modifications, cytokinin biosynthesis and signaling, and secondary metabolites accumulation. GRF1 and GRF3 seem to fine-tune the crosstalk between miRNA signaling networks by regulating the expression of several miRNA target genes. In addition, our data suggest that GRF1 and GRF3 may function as negative regulators of gene expression through their association with other transcription factors. Collectively, our data provide new insights into how GRF1 and GRF3 might coordinate the interactions between defense signaling and plant growth and developmental pathways. PMID:24875638

  18. Developmental regulation of a proinsulin messenger RNA generated by intron retention

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Alicia; López-Sánchez, Carmen; de la Rosa, Enrique J; García-Martínez, Virginio; Martínez-Salas, Encarna; de Pablo, Flora; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina

    2005-01-01

    Proinsulin gene expression regulation and function during early embryonic development differ remarkably from those found in postnatal organisms. The embryonic proinsulin protein content decreased from gastrulation to neurulation in contrast with the overall proinsulin messenger RNA increase. This is due to increasing levels of a proinsulin mRNA variant generated by intron 1 retention in the 5′ untranslated region. Inclusion of intron 1 inhibited proinsulin translation almost completely without affecting nuclear export or cytoplasmic decay. The novel proinsulin mRNA isoform expression was developmentally regulated and tissue specific. The proportion of intron retention increased from gastrulation to organogenesis, was highest in the heart tube and presomitic region, and could not be detected in the pancreas. Notably, proinsulin addition induced cardiac marker gene expression in the early embryonic stages when the translationally active transcript was expressed. We propose that regulated unproductive splicing and translation is a mechanism that regulates proinsulin expression in accordance with specific requirements in developing vertebrates. PMID:16179943

  19. Are there major developmentally regulated H4 gene classes in Xenopus?

    PubMed Central

    Woodland, H R; Warmington, J R; Ballantine, J E; Turner, P C

    1984-01-01

    Primer extension analysis has been used to study the principal H4 mRNAs present at different developmental stages and in several adult tissues of Xenopus borealis and X. laevis. In X. borealis a single sequence class predominates in oocytes, tadpoles and cultured fibroblasts. There is also a polymorphic minor type which shows no developmental regulation. The primer extension bands obtained from adult liver and kidney RNA appear to be the same as ovary and therefore these tissues almost certainly contain the same major H4 mRNA species. This is confirmed by S1 mapping of the 3' end of the mRNA. Thus for H4 genes in X. borealis there is no evidence of the kind of switches in histone gene expression seen in sea urchins or certain protostomes. The situation in X. laevis is complicated by considerably higher gene variability both within and between individuals. Nevertheless, in this species, as in X. borealis, there seems to be no major developmental switch in the regulation of H4 gene expression, a conclusion that also holds for an H1C and an H3 gene. Images PMID:6330691

  20. Rigidity sensing and adaptation through regulation of integrin types

    PubMed Central

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Bazellières, Elsa; Allen, Michael D.; Andreu, Ion; Oria, Roger; Sunyer, Raimon; Gomm, Jennifer J.; Marshall, John F.; Jones, J. Louise; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Tissue rigidity regulates processes in development, cancer and wound healing. However, how cells detect rigidity, and thereby modulate their behaviour, remains unknown. Here, we show that sensing and adaptation to matrix rigidity in breast myoepithelial cells is determined by the bond dynamics of different integrin types. Cell binding to fibronectin through either α5β1 integrins (constitutively expressed) or αvβ6 integrins (selectively expressed in cancer and development) adapts force generation, actin flow, and integrin recruitment to rigidities associated with healthy or malignant tissue, respectively. In vitro experiments and theoretical modelling further demonstrate that this behaviour is explained by the different binding and unbinding rates of both integrin types to fibronectin. Moreover, rigidity sensing through differences in integrin bond dynamics applies both when integrins bind separately and when they compete for binding to fibronectin. PMID:24793358

  1. Rigidity sensing and adaptation through regulation of integrin types.

    PubMed

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Bazellières, Elsa; Allen, Michael D; Andreu, Ion; Oria, Roger; Sunyer, Raimon; Gomm, Jennifer J; Marshall, John F; Jones, J Louise; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2014-06-01

    Tissue rigidity regulates processes in development, cancer and wound healing. However, how cells detect rigidity, and thereby modulate their behaviour, remains unknown. Here, we show that sensing and adaptation to matrix rigidity in breast myoepithelial cells is determined by the bond dynamics of different integrin types. Cell binding to fibronectin through either α5β1 integrins (constitutively expressed) or αvβ6 integrins (selectively expressed in cancer and development) adapts force generation, actin flow and integrin recruitment to rigidities associated with healthy or malignant tissue, respectively. In vitro experiments and theoretical modelling further demonstrate that this behaviour is explained by the different binding and unbinding rates of both integrin types to fibronectin. Moreover, rigidity sensing through differences in integrin bond dynamics applies both when integrins bind separately and when they compete for binding to fibronectin. PMID:24793358

  2. Developmental regulation of human cortex transcription and its clinical relevance at base resolution

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Andrew E.; Shin, Jooheon; Collado-Torres, Leonardo; Leek, Jeffrey T.; Tao, Ran; Li, Chao; Gao, Yuan; Jia, Yankai; Maher, Brady J.; Hyde, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of human brain provides fundamental insight about development and disease, but largely relies on existing annotation. We sequenced transcriptomes of 72 prefrontal cortex samples across six life stages, and identified 50,650 differentially expression regions (DERs) associated with developmental and aging, agnostic of annotation. While many DERs annotated to non-exonic sequence (41.1%), most were similarly regulated in cytosolic mRNA extracted from independent samples. The DERs were developmentally conserved across 16 brain regions and within the developing mouse cortex, and were expressed in diverse cell and tissue types. The DERs were further enriched for active chromatin marks and clinical risk for neurodevelopmental disorders like schizophrenia. Lastly, we demonstrate quantitatively that these DERs associate with a changing neuronal phenotype related to differentiation and maturation. These data highlight conserved molecular signatures of transcriptional dynamics across brain development, some potential clinical relevance and the incomplete annotation of the human brain transcriptome. PMID:25501035

  3. Size and shape: the developmental regulation of static allometry in insects.

    PubMed

    Shingleton, Alexander W; Frankino, W Anthony; Flatt, Thomas; Nijhout, H Frederik; Emlen, Douglas J

    2007-06-01

    Among all organisms, the size of each body part or organ scales with overall body size, a phenomenon called allometry. The study of shape and form has attracted enormous interest from biologists, but the genetic, developmental and physiological mechanisms that control allometry and the proportional growth of parts have remained elusive. Recent progress in our understanding of body-size regulation provides a new synthetic framework for thinking about the mechanisms and the evolution of allometric scaling. In particular, insulin/IGF signaling, which plays major roles in longevity, diabetes and the regulation of cell, organ and body size, might also be centrally involved in regulating organismal shape. Here we review recent advances in the fields of growth regulation and endocrinology and use them to construct a developmental model of static allometry expression in insects. This model serves as the foundation for a research program that will result in a deeper understanding of the relationship between growth and form, a question that has fascinated biologists for centuries.

  4. Homeostatic Regulation of Memory Systems and Adaptive Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Mizumori, Sheri JY; Jo, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that many brain areas process mnemonic information, understanding how their interactions result in continuously adaptive behaviors has been a challenge. A homeostatic-regulated prediction model of memory is presented that considers the existence of a single memory system that is based on a multilevel coordinated and integrated network (from cells to neural systems) that determines the extent to which events and outcomes occur as predicted. The “multiple memory systems of the brain” have in common output that signals errors in the prediction of events and/or their outcomes, although these signals differ in terms of what the error signal represents (e.g., hippocampus: context prediction errors vs. midbrain/striatum: reward prediction errors). The prefrontal cortex likely plays a pivotal role in the coordination of prediction analysis within and across prediction brain areas. By virtue of its widespread control and influence, and intrinsic working memory mechanisms. Thus, the prefrontal cortex supports the flexible processing needed to generate adaptive behaviors and predict future outcomes. It is proposed that prefrontal cortex continually and automatically produces adaptive responses according to homeostatic regulatory principles: prefrontal cortex may serve as a controller that is intrinsically driven to maintain in prediction areas an experience-dependent firing rate set point that ensures adaptive temporally and spatially resolved neural responses to future prediction errors. This same drive by prefrontal cortex may also restore set point firing rates after deviations (i.e. prediction errors) are detected. In this way, prefrontal cortex contributes to reducing uncertainty in prediction systems. An emergent outcome of this homeostatic view may be the flexible and adaptive control that prefrontal cortex is known to implement (i.e. working memory) in the most challenging of situations. Compromise to any of the prediction circuits should result

  5. Enhancer of zeste acts as a major developmental regulator of Ciona intestinalis embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Le Goff, Emilie; Martinand-Mari, Camille; Martin, Marianne; Feuillard, Jérôme; Boublik, Yvan; Godefroy, Nelly; Mangeat, Paul; Baghdiguian, Stephen; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The paradigm of developmental regulation by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins posits that they maintain silencing outside the spatial expression domains of their target genes, particularly of Hox genes, starting from mid embryogenesis. The Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] PcG protein is the catalytic subunit of the PRC2 complex, which silences its targets via deposition of the H3K27me3 mark. Here, we studied the ascidian Ciona intestinalis counterpart of E(z). Ci-E(z) is detected by immunohistochemistry as soon as the 2- and 4-cell stages as a cytoplasmic form and becomes exclusively nuclear thereafter, whereas the H3K27me3 mark is detected starting from the gastrula stage and later. Morpholino invalidation of Ci-E(z) leads to the total disappearance of both Ci-E(z) protein and its H3K27me3 mark. Ci-E(z) morphants display a severe phenotype. Strikingly, the earliest defects occur at the 4-cell stage with the dysregulation of cell positioning and mitotic impairment. At later stages, Ci-E(z)-deficient embryos are affected by terminal differentiation defects of neural, epidermal and muscle tissues, by the failure to form a notochord and by the absence of caudal nerve. These major phenotypic defects are specifically rescued by injection of a morpholino-resistant Ci-E(z) mRNA, which restores expression of Ci-E(z) protein and re-deposition of the H3K27me3 mark. As observed by qPCR analyses, Ci-E(z) invalidation leads to the early derepression of tissue-specific developmental genes, whereas late-acting developmental genes are generally down-regulated. Altogether, our results suggest that Ci-E(z) plays a major role during embryonic development in Ciona intestinalis by silencing early-acting developmental genes in a Hox-independent manner. PMID:26276097

  6. The interferon-related developmental regulator 1 is used by human papillomavirus to suppress NFκB activation

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Bart; Goedemans, Renske; Pelascini, Laetitia P. L.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; van Esch, Edith M. G.; Meyers, Craig; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Boer, Judith M.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) infect keratinocytes and successfully evade host immunity despite the fact that keratinocytes are well equipped to respond to innate and adaptive immune signals. Using non-infected and freshly established or persistent hrHPV-infected keratinocytes we show that hrHPV impairs the acetylation of NFκB/RelA K310 in keratinocytes. As a consequence, keratinocytes display a decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and immune cell attraction in response to stimuli of the innate or adaptive immune pathways. HPV accomplishes this by augmenting the expression of interferon-related developmental regulator 1 (IFRD1) in an EGFR-dependent manner. Restoration of NFκB/RelA acetylation by IFRD1 shRNA, cetuximab treatment or the HDAC1/3 inhibitor entinostat increases basal and induced cytokine expression. Similar observations are made in IFRD1-overexpressing HPV-induced cancer cells. Thus, our study reveals an EGFR–IFRD1-mediated viral immune evasion mechanism, which can also be exploited by cancer cells. PMID:26055519

  7. Active Inference, homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Rigoli, Francesco; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    We review a theory of homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control within the Active Inference framework. Our aim is to connect two research streams that are usually considered independently; namely, Active Inference and associative learning theories of animal behaviour. The former uses a probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation of perception and action, while the latter calls on multiple (Pavlovian, habitual, goal-directed) processes for homeostatic and behavioural control. We offer a synthesis these classical processes and cast them as successive hierarchical contextualisations of sensorimotor constructs, using the generative models that underpin Active Inference. This dissolves any apparent mechanistic distinction between the optimization processes that mediate classical control or learning. Furthermore, we generalize the scope of Active Inference by emphasizing interoceptive inference and homeostatic regulation. The ensuing homeostatic (or allostatic) perspective provides an intuitive explanation for how priors act as drives or goals to enslave action, and emphasises the embodied nature of inference. PMID:26365173

  8. Responding to color: the regulation of complementary chromatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, David M; Gutu, Andrian

    2006-01-01

    The acclimation of photosynthetic organisms to changes in light color is ubiquitous and may be best illustrated by the colorful process of complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA). During CCA, cyanobacterial cells change from brick red to bright blue green, depending on their light color environment. The apparent simplicity of this spectacular, photoreversible event belies the complexity of the cellular response to changes in light color. Recent results have shown that the regulation of CCA is also complex and involves at least three pathways. One is controlled by a phytochrome-class photoreceptor that is responsive to green and red light and a complex two-component signal transduction pathway, whereas another is based on sensing redox state. Studies of CCA are uncovering the strategies used by photosynthetic organisms during light acclimation and the means by which they regulate these responses.

  9. Active Inference, homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Rigoli, Francesco; Friston, Karl

    2015-11-01

    We review a theory of homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control within the Active Inference framework. Our aim is to connect two research streams that are usually considered independently; namely, Active Inference and associative learning theories of animal behaviour. The former uses a probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation of perception and action, while the latter calls on multiple (Pavlovian, habitual, goal-directed) processes for homeostatic and behavioural control. We offer a synthesis these classical processes and cast them as successive hierarchical contextualisations of sensorimotor constructs, using the generative models that underpin Active Inference. This dissolves any apparent mechanistic distinction between the optimization processes that mediate classical control or learning. Furthermore, we generalize the scope of Active Inference by emphasizing interoceptive inference and homeostatic regulation. The ensuing homeostatic (or allostatic) perspective provides an intuitive explanation for how priors act as drives or goals to enslave action, and emphasises the embodied nature of inference. PMID:26365173

  10. Identification of new developmentally regulated genes involved in Streptomyces coelicolor sporulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The sporulation of aerial hyphae of Streptomyces coelicolor is a complex developmental process. Only a limited number of the genes involved in this intriguing morphological differentiation programme are known, including some key regulatory genes. The aim of this study was to expand our knowledge of the gene repertoire involved in S. coelicolor sporulation. Results We report a DNA microarray-based investigation of developmentally controlled gene expression in S. coelicolor. By comparing global transcription patterns of the wild-type parent and two mutants lacking key regulators of aerial hyphal sporulation, we found a total of 114 genes that had significantly different expression in at least one of the two mutants compared to the wild-type during sporulation. A whiA mutant showed the largest effects on gene expression, while only a few genes were specifically affected by whiH mutation. Seven new sporulation loci were investigated in more detail with respect to expression patterns and mutant phenotypes. These included SCO7449-7451 that affect spore pigment biogenesis; SCO1773-1774 that encode an L-alanine dehydrogenase and a regulator-like protein and are required for maturation of spores; SCO3857 that encodes a protein highly similar to a nosiheptide resistance regulator and affects spore maturation; and four additional loci (SCO4421, SCO4157, SCO0934, SCO1195) that show developmental regulation but no overt mutant phenotype. Furthermore, we describe a new promoter-probe vector that takes advantage of the red fluorescent protein mCherry as a reporter of cell type-specific promoter activity. Conclusion Aerial hyphal sporulation in S. coelicolor is a technically challenging process for global transcriptomic investigations since it occurs only as a small fraction of the colony biomass and is not highly synchronized. Here we show that by comparing a wild-type to mutants lacking regulators that are specifically affecting processes in aerial hypha, it is

  11. Maternal supportive and interfering control as predictors of adaptive and social development in children with and without developmental delays

    PubMed Central

    Green, S.; Caplan, B.; Baker, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents of children with developmental delays (DD) have been found to use more controlling behaviour with their children than parents of children with typical development (TD). While controlling behaviour is related to poorer developmental outcomes in TD children, there is little research on how it predicts outcomes in DD children. Furthermore, existing research tends to use inconsistent or non-specific definitions of controlling behaviour, often combining parent control which follows the child’s goal (e.g. supportive direction) and that which interferes with the child’s goal (e.g. interference). Methods Participants were 200 mother–child dyads observed at child age 3, with follow-up assessments of adaptive behaviour and social skills administered at child ages 5 and 6, respectively. We coded the frequency of both types of controlling behaviour based on mothers’ interactions with their children with TD (n = 113) or DD (n = 87) at age 3. Results Mothers in the DD group used more interfering but not more supportive directive acts compared to mothers in the TD group. Adaptive behaviour was assessed at child age 5 and social skills were assessed at age 6. Higher frequency of supportive directive acts predicted better adaptive functioning for the TD group and better social skills for the DD group. Higher frequency of interfering acts predicted lower adaptive and social skills for children with DD but not with TD. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the differential developmental needs of children with and without DD as well as implications for early intervention. PMID:23865770

  12. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regulated by an interplay between blood-borne metabolites and regulatory centers within the brain. Gene expression in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver, is strongly suppressed during diapause, resulting in low levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates circulating within the blood, and at diapause termination, the fat body becomes activated, releasing an abundance of TCA intermediates that act on the brain to stimulate synthesis of regulatory peptides that prompt production of the insect growth hormone ecdysone. This model is supported by our success in breaking diapause by injecting a mixture of TCA intermediates and upstream metabolites. The results underscore the importance of cross-talk between the brain and fat body as a regulator of diapause and suggest that the TCA cycle may be a checkpoint for regulating different forms of animal dormancy. PMID:22912402

  13. ADAPTING THE MEDAKA EMBRYO ASSAY TO A HIGH-THROUGHPUT APPROACH FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY TESTING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro ...

  14. CDK8-Cyclin C Mediates Nutritional Regulation of Developmental Transitions through the Ecdysone Receptor in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiao-Jun; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Gao, Xinsheng; Xu, Wu; Ni, Jian-Quan; Xing, Yue; Huang, Liying; Hsiao, Hao-Ching; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Chenguang; Zheng, Yani; Xiaoli, Alus M.; Yang, Fajun; Bondos, Sarah E.; Ji, Jun-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormone ecdysone and its receptor (EcR) play critical roles in orchestrating developmental transitions in arthropods. However, the mechanism by which EcR integrates nutritional and developmental cues to correctly activate transcription remains poorly understood. Here, we show that EcR-dependent transcription, and thus, developmental timing in Drosophila, is regulated by CDK8 and its regulatory partner Cyclin C (CycC), and the level of CDK8 is affected by nutrient availability. We observed that cdk8 and cycC mutants resemble EcR mutants and EcR-target genes are systematically down-regulated in both mutants. Indeed, the ability of the EcR-Ultraspiracle (USP) heterodimer to bind to polytene chromosomes and the promoters of EcR target genes is also diminished. Mass spectrometry analysis of proteins that co-immunoprecipitate with EcR and USP identified multiple Mediator subunits, including CDK8 and CycC. Consistently, CDK8-CycC interacts with EcR-USP in vivo; in particular, CDK8 and Med14 can directly interact with the AF1 domain of EcR. These results suggest that CDK8-CycC may serve as transcriptional cofactors for EcR-dependent transcription. During the larval–pupal transition, the levels of CDK8 protein positively correlate with EcR and USP levels, but inversely correlate with the activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), the master regulator of intracellular lipid homeostasis. Likewise, starvation of early third instar larvae precociously increases the levels of CDK8, EcR and USP, yet down-regulates SREBP activity. Conversely, refeeding the starved larvae strongly reduces CDK8 levels but increases SREBP activity. Importantly, these changes correlate with the timing for the larval–pupal transition. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK8-CycC links nutrient intake to developmental transitions (EcR activity) and fat metabolism (SREBP activity) during the larval–pupal transition. PMID:26222308

  15. Nucleus downscaling in mouse embryos is regulated by cooperative developmental and geometric programs

    PubMed Central

    Tsichlaki, Elina; FitzHarris, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining appropriate nucleus size is important for cell health, but the mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. Controlling nucleus size is a particular challenge in early development, where the nucleus must downscale in size with progressive reductive cell divisions. Here we use live and fixed imaging, micromanipulation approaches, and small molecule analyses during preimplantation mouse development to probe the mechanisms by which nucleus size is determined. We find a close correlation between cell and nuclear size at any given developmental stage, and show that experimental cytoplasmic reduction can alter nuclear size, together indicating that cell size helps dictate nuclear proportions. Additionally, however, by creating embryos with over-sized blastomeres we present evidence of a developmental program that drives nuclear downscaling independently of cell size. We show that this developmental program does not correspond with nuclear import rates, but provide evidence that PKC activity may contribute to this mechanism. We propose a model in which nuclear size regulation during early development is a multi-mode process wherein nucleus size is set by cytoplasmic factors, and fine-tuned on a cell-by-cell basis according to cell size. PMID:27320842

  16. From Parent-Child Mutuality to Security to Socialization Outcomes: Developmental Cascade toward Positive Adaptation in Preadolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J.; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    A developmental cascade from positive early parent-child relationship to child security with the parent to adaptive socialization outcomes, proposed in attachment theory and often implicitly accepted but rarely formally tested, was examined in 100 mothers, fathers, and children followed from toddler age to preadolescence. Parent-child Mutually Responsive Orientation (MRO) was observed in lengthy interactions at 38, 52, 67, and 80 months; children reported their security with parents at age 8. Socialization outcomes (parent- and child-reported cooperation with parental monitoring and teacher-reported school competence) were assessed at age 10. Mediation was tested with PROCESS (Hayes, 2013). The parent-child history of MRO significantly predicted both mother-child and father-child security. For mother-child dyads, security mediated links between history of MRO and cooperation with maternal monitoring and school competence, controlling for developmental continuity of the studied constructs. For father-child dyads, the mediation effect was not evident. PMID:26258443

  17. From parent-child mutuality to security to socialization outcomes: developmental cascade toward positive adaptation in preadolescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    A developmental cascade from positive early parent-child relationship to child security with the parent to adaptive socialization outcomes, proposed in attachment theory and often implicitly accepted but rarely formally tested, was examined in 100 mothers, fathers, and children followed from toddler age to preadolescence. Parent-child Mutually Responsive Orientation (MRO) was observed in lengthy interactions at 38, 52, 67, and 80 months; children reported their security with parents at age eight. Socialization outcomes (parent- and child-reported cooperation with parental monitoring and teacher-reported school competence) were assessed at age 10. Mediation was tested with PROCESS. The parent-child history of MRO significantly predicted both mother-child and father-child security. For mother-child dyads, security mediated links between history of MRO and cooperation with maternal monitoring and school competence, controlling for developmental continuity of the studied constructs. For father-child dyads, the mediation effect was not evident.

  18. The Fate of Early Experience Following Developmental Change: Longitudinal Approaches to Individual Adaptation in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, L. Alan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined Bowlby's proposition that early experiences and the adaptations to which they give rise influence later development, even beyond the influence of current circumstances or very recent adaptation. Groups whose adaptation were similar during preschool years but consistently different earlier were defined and compared. Results supported…

  19. 77 FR 75523 - Adaptation of Regulations To Incorporate Swaps-Records of Transactions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ...\\ Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps, 76 FR 33066 (June 7, 2011) (``the Proposal''). \\6\\ See the... Securities and Exchange Commission. See Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps, 77 FR 66288, 66319...) concerning records of oral and written communications. See Final Adaptation Rule, 77 FR 66288. \\11\\ See...

  20. Developmentally regulated localization of endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in different tissue layers of coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.-J.; Wang, L.-H.; Chen, W.-N. U.; Fang, L.-S.; Chen, C.-S.

    2008-06-01

    In adult cnidarians, symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium are usually located in the gastrodermis. However, the onset of this endosymbiotic association and its regulation during larval development are unclear. This study examined the distribution of the Symbiodinium population in tissue layers of planula larvae released from the stony coral Euphyllia glabrescens. Symbiodinium were redistributed from the epidermis to the gastrodermis, at a rate that was fastest during early planulation and then decreased prior to metamorphosis. This process indicates that the endosymbiotic activity of coral tissues is developmentally regulated. During the early larval stage, both the epidermis and gastrodermis contained Symbiodinium; then, as the larvae developed toward metamorphosis, the numbers in the epidermis gradually diminished until they were only found in the gastrodermis. The mechanism of redistribution remains unknown, but may be due to a direct translocation and/or change in the proliferation of symbionts in different tissue layers.

  1. c-di-GMP signalling and the regulation of developmental transitions in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew J; Tschowri, Natalia; Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The complex life cycle of streptomycetes involves two distinct filamentous cell forms: the growing (or vegetative) hyphae and the reproductive (or aerial) hyphae, which differentiate into long chains of spores. Until recently, little was known about the signalling pathways that regulate the developmental transitions leading to sporulation. In this Review, we discuss important new insights into these pathways that have led to the emergence of a coherent regulatory network, focusing on the erection of aerial hyphae and the synchronous cell division event that produces dozens of unigenomic spores. In particular, we highlight the role of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) in controlling the initiation of development, and the role of the master regulator BldD in mediating c-di-GMP signalling.

  2. Ripening-associated ethylene biosynthesis in tomato fruit is autocatalytically and developmentally regulated

    PubMed Central

    Yokotani, Naoki; Nakano, Ryohei; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Nagata, Masayasu; Inaba, Akitsugu; Kubo, Yasutaka

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the regulatory mechanism(s) of ethylene biosynthesis in fruit, transgenic tomatoes with all known LeEIL genes suppressed were produced by RNA interference engineering. The transgenic tomato exhibited ethylene insensitivity phenotypes such as non-ripening and the lack of the triple response and petiole epinasty of seedlings even in the presence of exogenous ethylene. Transgenic fruit exhibited a low but consistent increase in ethylene production beyond 40 days after anthesis (DAA), with limited LeACS2 and LeACS4 expression. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a potent inhibitor of ethylene perception, failed to inhibit the limited increase in ethylene production and expression of the two 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS) genes in the transgenic fruit. These results suggest that ripening-associated ethylene (system 2) in wild-type tomato fruit consists of two parts: a small part regulated by a developmental factor through the ethylene-independent expression of LeACS2 and LeACS4 and a large part regulated by an autocatalytic system due to the ethylene-dependent expression of the same genes. The results further suggest that basal ethylene (system 1) is less likely to be involved in the transition to system 2. Even if the effect of system 1 ethylene is eliminated, fruit can show a small increase in ethylene production due to unknown developmental factors. This increase would be enough for the stimulation of autocatalytic ethylene production, leading to fruit ripening. PMID:19605457

  3. A co-expression gene network associated with developmental regulation of apple fruit acidity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Dougherty, Laura; Cheng, Lailiang; Xu, Kenong

    2015-08-01

    Apple fruit acidity, which affects the fruit's overall taste and flavor to a large extent, is primarily determined by the concentration of malic acid. Previous studies demonstrated that the major QTL malic acid (Ma) on chromosome 16 is largely responsible for fruit acidity variations in apple. Recent advances suggested that a natural mutation that gives rise to a premature stop codon in one of the two aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT)-like genes (called Ma1) is the genetic causal element underlying Ma. However, the natural mutation does not explain the developmental changes of fruit malate levels in a given genotype. Using RNA-seq data from the fruit of 'Golden Delicious' taken at 14 developmental stages from 1 week after full-bloom (WAF01) to harvest (WAF20), we characterized their transcriptomes in groups of high (12.2 ± 1.6 mg/g fw, WAF03-WAF08), mid (7.4 ± 0.5 mg/g fw, WAF01-WAF02 and WAF10-WAF14) and low (5.4 ± 0.4 mg/g fw, WAF16-WAF20) malate concentrations. Detailed analyses showed that a set of 3,066 genes (including Ma1) were expressed not only differentially (P FDR < 0.05) between the high and low malate groups (or between the early and late developmental stages) but also in significant (P < 0.05) correlation with malate concentrations. The 3,066 genes fell in 648 MapMan (sub-) bins or functional classes, and 19 of them were significantly (P FDR < 0.05) co-enriched or co-suppressed in a malate dependent manner. Network inferring using the 363 genes encompassed in the 19 (sub-) bins, identified a major co-expression network of 239 genes. Since the 239 genes were also differentially expressed between the early (WAF03-WAF08) and late (WAF16-WAF20) developmental stages, the major network was considered to be associated with developmental regulation of apple fruit acidity in 'Golden Delicious'.

  4. Parental adaptation to out-of-home placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jeffrey B; Roper, Susanne Olsen

    2014-05-01

    Utilizing grounded theory qualitative research methods, a model was developed for describing parental adaptation after voluntary placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities in out-of-home care. Interviews of parents from 20 families were analyzed. Parents' cognitive appraisals of placement outcomes were classified as either inducing emotional stress (i.e., guilt, sadness, fear and worry, anger and frustration, and uncertainty) or relief. Parental appraisals of responses to placement by children, extended family, and friends were identified as factors affecting the parents' adaptation to placement. The primary coping methods used by parents to decrease emotional stress and increase relief consisted of reappraisals regarding the necessity of placement, involvement in the child's life, psychotherapy, and the passage of time.

  5. Postural Adaptations to a Suprapostural Memory Task among Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fu-Chen; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chang, Chihu-Hui; Wade, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The present study investigated the effects of varying the cognitive demands of a memory task (a suprapostural task) while recording postural motion on two groups of children, one diagnosed with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and an age-matched group of typically developing children. Method: Two groups, each comprising 38 child…

  6. Subcellular Profiling Reveals Distinct and Developmentally Regulated Repertoire of Growth Cone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zivraj, Krishna H.; Tung, Yi Chun Loraine; Piper, Michael; Gumy, Laura; Fawcett, James W.; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-directed axon guidance depends partly on local translation in growth cones. Many mRNA transcripts are known to reside in developing axons, yet little is known about their subcellular distribution or, specifically, which transcripts are in growth cones. Here laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate the growth cones of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of two vertebrate species, mouse and Xenopus, coupled with unbiased genomewide microarray profiling. An unexpectedly large pool of mRNAs defined predominant pathways in protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, neurological disease, and signaling. Comparative profiling of “young” (pathfinding) versus “old” (target-arriving) Xenopus growth cones revealed that the number and complexity of transcripts increases dramatically with age. Many presynaptic protein mRNAs are present exclusively in old growth cones, suggesting that functionally related sets of mRNAs are targeted to growth cones in a developmentally regulated way. Remarkably, a subset of mRNAs was significantly enriched in the growth cone compared with the axon compartment, indicating that mechanisms exist to localize mRNAs selectively to the growth cone. Furthermore, some receptor transcripts (e.g., EphB4), present exclusively in old growth cones, were equally abundant in young and old cell bodies, indicating that RNA trafficking from the soma is developmentally regulated. Our findings show that the mRNA repertoire in growth cones is regulated dynamically with age and suggest that mRNA localization is tailored to match the functional demands of the growing axon tip as it transforms into the presynaptic terminal. PMID:21084603

  7. Hormonal and developmental regulation of DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Tamai, K T; Monaco, L; Alastalo, T P; Lalli, E; Parvinen, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1996-12-01

    Mutations in the human DAX-1 gene lead to X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. DAX-1 has been proposed to play a role in steroidogenesis because it is highly expressed in adrenocortical and testicular Leydig cells and because loss-of-function mutations lead to low serum levels of steroid hormones. Recent reports of DAX-1 expression in hypothalamus and pituitary, however, suggest additional functions for this protein. Here we demonstrate that DAX-1 is expressed in Sertoli cells of rat testis. This expression is regulated during spermatogenesis and peaks during the androgen-sensitive phase of the spermatogenic cycle. In addition, we show that DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells is regulated developmentally. Maximum levels are present in the rat between postnatal days 20 and 30, during the first spermatogenic wave. Moreover, we show that activation of the cAMP-signaling pathway by the pituitary hormone FSH leads to a potent down-regulation of DAX-1 expression in cultured Sertoli cells. This down-regulation requires transcription and de novo protein synthesis. Taken together, these data indicate that DAX-1 expression in Sertoli cells may influence the development of spermatogenic cells in response to steroid and pituitary hormones. PMID:8961266

  8. Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor α Regulates Developmental Timing via Gene Repression in Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinyoung; Suzuki, Ken-ichi T.; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Shewade, Leena; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) expression begins early in development in all vertebrates when circulating TH levels are absent or minimal, yet few developmental roles for unliganded TRs have been established. Unliganded TRs are expected to repress TH-response genes, increase tissue responsivity to TH, and regulate the timing of developmental events. Here we examined the role of unliganded TRα in gene repression and development in Xenopus tropicalis. We used transcription activator-like effector nuclease gene disruption technology to generate founder animals with mutations in the TRα gene and bred them to produce F1 offspring with a normal phenotype and a mutant phenotype, characterized by precocious hind limb development. Offspring with a normal phenotype had zero or one disrupted TRα alleles, and tadpoles with the mutant hind limb phenotype had two truncated TRα alleles with frame shift mutations between the two zinc fingers followed by 40–50 mutant amino acids and then an out-of-frame stop codon. We examined TH-response gene expression and early larval development with and without exogenous TH in F1 offspring. As hypothesized, mutant phenotype tadpoles had increased expression of TH-response genes in the absence of TH and impaired induction of these same genes after exogenous TH treatment, compared with normal phenotype animals. Also, mutant hind limb phenotype animals had reduced hind limb and gill responsivity to exogenous TH. Similar results in methimazole-treated tadpoles showed that increased TH-response gene expression and precocious development were not due to early production of TH. These results indicate that unliganded TRα delays developmental progression by repressing TH-response genes. PMID:25456067

  9. Different cytokinin histidine kinase receptors regulate nodule initiation as well as later nodule developmental stages in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Stéphane; Kazmierczak, Théophile; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Gamas, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Frugier, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Legume plants adapt to low nitrogen by developing an endosymbiosis with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria to form a new specific organ: the nitrogen-fixing nodule. In the Medicago truncatula model legume, the MtCRE1 cytokinin receptor is essential for this symbiotic interaction. As three other putative CHASE-domain containing histidine kinase (CHK) cytokinin receptors exist in M. truncatula, we determined their potential contribution to this symbiotic interaction. The four CHKs have extensive redundant expression patterns at early nodulation stages but diverge in differentiated nodules, even though MtCHK1/MtCRE1 has the strongest expression at all stages. Mutant and knock-down analyses revealed that other CHKs than MtCHK1/CRE1 are positively involved in nodule initiation, which explains the delayed nodulation phenotype of the chk1/cre1 mutant. In addition, cre1 nodules exhibit an increased growth, whereas other chk mutants have no detectable phenotype, and the maintained nitrogen fixation capacity in cre1 requires other CHK genes. Interestingly, an AHK4/CRE1 genomic locus from the aposymbiotic Arabidopsis plant rescues nodule initiation but not the nitrogen fixation capacity. This indicates that different CHK cytokinin signalling pathways regulate not only nodule initiation but also later developmental stages, and that legume-specific determinants encoded by the MtCRE1 gene are required for later nodulation stages than initiation. PMID:27341695

  10. Cold adaptation mechanisms in the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis: Metabolic regulation and thermal compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xuan; Meng, Qian; Shu, Ruihao; Wang, Menglong; Zhou, Guiling; Wang, Hongtuo; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Jihong; Qin, Qilian

    2016-02-01

    Ghost moths (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) are cold-adapted stenothermal species inhabiting alpine meadows on the Tibetan Plateau. They have an optimal developmental temperature of 12-16 °C but can maintain feeding and growth at 0 °C. Their survival strategies have received little attention, but these insects are a promising model for environmental adaptation. Here, biochemical adaptations and energy metabolism in response to cold were investigated in larvae of the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient decreased dramatically with decreasing temperature (15-4 °C), suggesting that the energy metabolism of ghost moths, especially glycometabolism, was sensitive to cold. However, the metabolic rate at 4 °C increased with the duration of cold exposure, indicating thermal compensation to sustain energy budgets under cold conditions. Underlying regulation strategies were studied by analyzing metabolic differences between cold-acclimated (4 °C for 48 h) and control larvae (15 °C). In cold-acclimated larvae, the energy generating pathways of carbohydrates, instead of the overall consumption of carbohydrates, was compensated in the fat body by improving the transcription of related enzymes. The mobilization of lipids was also promoted, with higher diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol and free fatty acid content in hemolymph. These results indicated that cold acclimation induced a reorganization on metabolic structure to prioritise energy metabolism. Within the aerobic process, flux throughout the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was encouraged in the fat body, and the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was the likely compensation target. Increased mitochondrial cristae density was observed in the midgut of cold-acclimated larvae. The thermal compensation strategies in this ghost moth span the entire process of energy metabolism, including degration of metabolic substrate, TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, and from an energy budget

  11. Assessing Adaptive Functioning in Preschoolers Referred for Diagnosis of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Susan; McDonald, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive function is an essential dimension in the diagnosis of neurodevelopmental conditions in young children, assisting in determining the pattern of intellectual function and the amount and type of support required. Yet, little information is available on the accuracy of currently used adaptive function assessments for preschool children. This…

  12. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. ); Olsen, N.J. ); Siminovitch, K.A. )

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  13. Developmental regulation of spatio-temporal patterns of cortical circuit activation

    PubMed Central

    Griffen, Trevor C.; Wang, Lang; Fontanini, Alfredo; Maffei, Arianna

    2013-01-01

    Neural circuits are refined in an experience-dependent manner during early postnatal development. How development modulates the spatio-temporal propagation of activity through cortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we use voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD) to show that there are significant changes in the spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical signals in primary visual cortex (V1) from postnatal day 13 (P13), eye opening, to P28, the peak of the critical period for rodent visual cortical plasticity. Upon direct stimulation of layer 4 (L4), activity spreads to L2/3 and to L5 at all ages. However, while from eye opening to the peak of the critical period, the amplitude and persistence of the voltage signal decrease, peak activation is reached more quickly and the interlaminar gain increases with age. The lateral spread of activation within layers remains unchanged throughout the time window under analysis. These developmental changes in spatio-temporal patterns of intracortical circuit activation are mediated by differences in the contributions of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components. Our results demonstrate that after eye opening the circuit in V1 is refined through a progression of changes that shape the spatio-temporal patterns of circuit activation. Signals become more efficiently propagated across layers through developmentally regulated changes in interlaminar gain. PMID:23316135

  14. Developmentally regulated loss of ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins during pollen maturation in maize.

    PubMed

    Callis, J; Bedinger, P

    1994-06-21

    Eukaryotic cells typically contain 0.2-1.0% of their total protein as the highly conserved protein ubiquitin, which exists both free and covalently attached to cellular proteins. The attachment of ubiquitin to cellular proteins occurs posttranslationally by a three-enzyme pathway and results in a peptide linkage of the C terminus of ubiquitin either to a lysyl epsilon-amino group of a substrate protein or to a lysyl epsilon-amino group of a previously linked ubiquitin molecule. The multiple conjugation of ubiquitin to substrate proteins via ubiquitin-ubiquitin linkages is thought to be necessary, but not sufficient, for recognition and degradation by a ubiquitin-dependent protease. In higher plant cells the steady-state level of ubiquitinated proteins is generally constant and can be readily detected in all somatic tissues. In contrast, we have found that a developmentally regulated loss of free ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins occurs during maize (Zea mays L.) pollen maturation. This dramatic loss of ubiquitin correlates temporally with commitment to the gametophytic developmental program. Northern blot analysis indicates that the loss of ubiquitin is not due to low levels of ubiquitin mRNA, suggesting that a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism is responsible. PMID:7517039

  15. New tools for the identification of developmentally regulated enhancer regions in embryonic and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Mitchell P; Krauss, Jana; Koehler, Carla; Boden, Cindy; Harris, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a screen to identify developmentally regulated enhancers that drive tissue-specific Gal4 expression in zebrafish. We obtained 63 stable transgenic lines with expression patterns in embryonic or adult zebrafish. The use of a newly identified minimal promoter from the medaka edar locus resulted in a relatively unbiased set of expression patterns representing many tissue types derived from all germ layers. Subsequent detailed characterization of selected lines showed strong and reproducible Gal4-driven GFP expression in diverse tissues, including neurons from the central and peripheral nervous systems, pigment cells, erythrocytes, and peridermal cells. By screening adults for GFP expression, we also isolated lines expressed in tissues of the adult zebrafish, including scales, fin rays, and joints. The new and efficient minimal promoter and large number of transactivating driver-lines we identified will provide the zebrafish community with a useful resource for further enhancer trap screening, as well as precise investigation of tissue-specific processes in vivo.

  16. Developmental and target-dependent regulation of vesicular glutamate transporter expression by dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Jose Alfredo; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Dal Bo, Gregory; Bourdeau, Mathieu L; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2008-06-18

    Mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons have been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. Here, we suggest a mechanism for this form of cotransmission by showing that a subset of DA neurons both in vitro and in vivo expresses vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). Expression of VGluT2 decreases with age. Moreover, when DA neurons are grown in isolation using a microculture system, there is a marked upregulation of VGluT2 expression. We provide evidence that expression of this transporter is normally repressed through a contact-dependent interaction with GABA and other DA neurons, thus providing a partial explanation for the highly restricted expression of VGluT2 in DA neurons in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the neurotransmitter phenotype of DA neurons is both developmentally and dynamically regulated. These findings may have implications for a better understanding of the fast synaptic action of DA neurons as well as basal ganglia circuitry. PMID:18562601

  17. Cells of a common developmental origin regulate REM/non-REM sleep and wakefulness in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yu; Kashiwagi, Mitsuaki; Yasuda, Kosuke; Ando, Reiko; Kanuka, Mika; Sakai, Kazuya; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2015-11-20

    Mammalian sleep comprises rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. To functionally isolate from the complex mixture of neurons populating the brainstem pons those involved in switching between REM and NREM sleep, we chemogenetically manipulated neurons of a specific embryonic cell lineage in mice. We identified excitatory glutamatergic neurons that inhibit REM sleep and promote NREM sleep. These neurons shared a common developmental origin with neurons promoting wakefulness; both derived from a pool of proneural hindbrain cells expressing Atoh1 at embryonic day 10.5. We also identified inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing neurons that act downstream to inhibit REM sleep. Artificial reduction or prolongation of REM sleep in turn affected slow-wave activity during subsequent NREM sleep, implicating REM sleep in the regulation of NREM sleep.

  18. Regulation of developmental and environmental signaling by interaction between microtubules and membranes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Wenhua

    2016-02-01

    Cell division and expansion require the ordered arrangement of microtubules, which are subject to spatial and temporal modifications by developmental and environmental factors. Understanding how signals translate to changes in cortical microtubule organization is of fundamental importance. A defining feature of the cortical microtubule array is its association with the plasma membrane; modules of the plasma membrane are thought to play important roles in the mediation of microtubule organization. In this review, we highlight advances in research on the regulation of cortical microtubule organization by membrane-associated and membrane-tethered proteins and lipids in response to phytohormones and stress. The transmembrane kinase receptor Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase, phospholipase D, phosphatidic acid, and phosphoinositides are discussed with a focus on their roles in microtubule organization. PMID:26687389

  19. The phosphorylation state of translation initiation factors is regulated developmentally and following heat shock in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gallie, D R; Le, H; Caldwell, C; Tanguay, R L; Hoang, N X; Browning, K S

    1997-01-10

    Several translation initiation factors in mammals and yeast are regulated by phosphorylation. The phosphorylation state of these factors is subject to alteration during development, environmental stress (heat shock, starvation, or heme deprivation), or viral infection. The phosphorylation state and the effect of changes in phosphorylation of the translation initiation factors of higher plants have not been previously investigated. We have determined the isoelectric states for the wheat translation initiation factors eIF-4A, eIF-4B, eIF-4F, eIF-iso4F, and eIF-2 and the poly(A)-binding protein in the seed, during germination, and following heat shock of wheat seedlings using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western analysis. We found that the developmentally induced changes in isoelectric state observed during germination or the stress-induced changes were consistent with changes in phosphorylation. Treatment of the phosphorylated forms of the factors with phosphatases confirmed that the nature of the modification was due to phosphorylation. The isoelectric states of eIF-4B, eIF-4F (eIF-4E, p26), eIF-iso4F (eIF-iso4E, p28), and eIF-2alpha (p42) were altered during germination, suggesting that phosphorylation of these factors is developmentally regulated and correlates with the resumption of protein synthesis that occurs during germination. The phosphorylation of eIF-2beta (p38) or poly(A)-binding protein did not change either during germination or following a thermal stress. Only the phosphorylation state of two factors, eIF-4A and eIF-4B, changed following a heat shock, suggesting that plants may differ significantly from animals in the way in which their translational machinery is modified in response to a thermal stress. PMID:8995401

  20. Aaknox1, a kn1-like homeobox gene in Acetabularia acetabulum, undergoes developmentally regulated subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, K A; Mandoli, D F

    1999-12-01

    Homeobox-containing genes play developmentally important roles in a wide variety of plants, animals and fungi. As a way of studying how development is controlled in the unicellular green macroalga Acetabularia acetabulum, we used degenerate PCR to clone a knotted1-like (kn1-like) homeobox gene, Aaknox1 (Acetabularia acetabulum kn1-like homeobox 1). Aaknorx1 is the first knotted1-like homeobox gene to be cloned from a non-vascular plant and shows strong conservation with kn1-like genes from the vascular plants (ca. 56% amino acid identity within the homeodomain). Sequencing of cDNA clones indicates that Aaknor1 possesses at least two distinct polyadenylation sites spaced ca. 600 bp apart. Southern analysis suggests that several other kn1-like homeobox genes exist in the Acetabularia genome. Northern analyses demonstrate that expression of Aaknox1 is developmentally regulated, with peak levels of expression during early reproductive phase. Northern analyses further demonstrate that Aaknox1 mRNA undergoes a change in its subcellular localization pattern during the progression from late vegetative to early reproductive phase. In late adult phase, Aaknox1 is distributed uniformly throughout the alga; in early reproductive phase, Aaknox1 is present in a gradient with the highest concentration of the mRNA at the base of the stalk, near the single nucleus. These data suggest that Aaknox1 may have a role during early reproductive development and that mRNA localization may be one mechanism by which A. acetabulum regulates gene expression posttranscriptionally.

  1. Down regulation by p60v-src of genes specifically expressed and developmentally regulated in postmitotic quail neuroretina cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guermah, M; Gillet, G; Michel, D; Laugier, D; Brun, G; Calothy, G

    1990-01-01

    The avian neuroretina (NR) is composed of photoreceptors and different neurons that are derived from proliferating precursor cells. Neuronal differentiation takes place after terminal mitosis. We have previously shown that differentiating NR cells can be induced to proliferate by infection with Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and that cell multiplication requires expression of a functional v-src gene. We speculated that the quiescence of NR cells could be determined by specific genes. Cell proliferation could then result from the negative regulation of these genes by the v-src protein. By differential hybridization of a cDNA library, we isolated eight clones corresponding to genes expressed in postmitotic NR cells from 13-day-old quail embryos, transcriptional levels of which are significantly reduced in NR cells induced to proliferate by tsNY68, an RSV mutant with temperature-sensitive mitogenic activity. Partial sequencing analysis indicated that one RNA encoded the calmodulin gene, whereas the other seven showed no similarity to known sequences. By using v-src mutants that induce NR cell proliferation in the absence of transformation, we showed that transcription of six genes was negatively regulated by the v-src protein and that of four genes was correlated with NR cell quiescence. We also report that a subset of genes are specifically transcribed in neural cells and developmentally regulated in the NR. These results indicate that the v-src protein regulates expression of genes likely to play a role in the control of neural cell growth or differentiation. Images PMID:2162475

  2. An Organizational Hub of Developmentally Regulated Chromatin Loops in the Drosophila Antennapedia Complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Ma, Zhibo; Liu, Jiayang K; Roy, Sharmila; Patel, Sapna K; Lane, Derrick C; Cai, Haini N

    2015-12-01

    Chromatin boundary elements (CBEs) are widely distributed in the genome and mediate formation of chromatin loops, but their roles in gene regulation remain poorly understood. The complex expression pattern of the Drosophila homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) is directed by an unusually long regulatory sequence harboring diverse cis elements and an intervening neighbor gene fushi tarazu (ftz). Here we report the presence of a multitude of CBEs in the Scr regulatory region. Selective and dynamic pairing among these CBEs mediates developmentally regulated chromatin loops. In particular, the SF1 boundary plays a central role in organizing two subsets of chromatin loops: one subset encloses ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and compartmentalizing distinct histone modifications, and the other subset subdivides the Scr regulatory sequences into independent enhancer access domains. We show that these CBEs exhibit diverse enhancer-blocking activities that vary in strength and tissue distribution. Tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2, two strong CBEs that flank the ftz domain, allows the distal enhancers to bypass their block in transgenic Drosophila, providing a mechanism for the endogenous Scr enhancer to circumvent the ftz domain. Our study demonstrates how an endogenous CBE network, centrally orchestrated by SF1, could remodel the genomic environment to facilitate gene regulation during development.

  3. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-10-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote.

  4. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches’ broom disease of cacao

    PubMed Central

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Witches’ broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant–fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation. PMID:25540440

  5. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches' broom disease of cacao.

    PubMed

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-03-01

    Witches' broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant-fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation.

  6. Toward a developmental model of child compliance: the role of emotion regulation in infancy.

    PubMed

    Stifter, C A; Spinrad, T L; Braungart-Rieker, J M

    1999-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between early emotion regulation and later compliance. When infants were 5, 10, and 18 months of age, they participated in a frustration task. The degree to which they reacted negatively to the stimuli and the behaviors they used to regulate that response were coded. Baseline heart rate also was recorded and a measure of cardiac vagal tone (VNA) was derived. Several tasks (electrode placement, toy clean-up, and test situation) were administered to elicit compliance/noncompliance when the participants were 30 months of age. Results revealed that infants who demonstrated low levels of regulatory behavior were more likely to be noncompliant as toddlers. Several interaction effects suggested that the prediction to later noncompliance was also dependent upon the infants' level of reactivity. Cardiac vagal tone also was related to compliance but in a contradictory fashion. High VNA was related to noncompliance to toy clean-up, whereas low VNA was related to noncompliance to electrode placement. The data provide support for a developmental model of compliance that includes the ability to regulate emotional arousal. PMID:10191513

  7. Developmentally regulated IL6-type cytokines signal to germ cells in the human fetal ovary.

    PubMed

    Eddie, Sharon L; Childs, Andrew J; Jabbour, Henry N; Anderson, Richard A

    2012-02-01

    Fetal ovarian development and primordial follicle formation are imperative for adult fertility in the female. Data suggest the interleukin (IL)6-type cytokines, leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), IL6, oncostatin M (OSM) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), are able to regulate the survival, proliferation and differentiation of fetal murine germ cells (GCs) in vivo and in vitro. We postulated that these factors may play a similar role during early human GC development and primordial follicle formation. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the expression and regulation of IL6-type cytokines, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Expression of transcripts encoding OSM increased significantly across the gestational range examined (8-20 weeks), while expression of IL6 increased specifically between the first (8-11 weeks) and early second (12-16 weeks) trimesters, co-incident with the initiation of meiosis. LIF and CNTF expression remained unchanged. Expression of the genes encoding the LIF and IL6 receptors, and their common signalling subunit gp130, was also found to be developmentally regulated, with expression increasing significantly with increasing gestation. LIF receptor and gp130 proteins localized exclusively to GCs, including oocytes in primordial follicles, indicating this cell type to be the sole target of IL6-type cytokine signalling in the human fetal ovary. These data establish that IL6-type cytokines and their receptors are expressed in the human fetal ovary and may directly influence GC development at multiple stages of maturation. PMID:21965347

  8. Developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 coordinates Rab5 activity and transferrin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Muralidharan; Lee, Unn Hwa; Yoon, Nal Ae; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Ko, Myoung Seok; Seol, Wongi; Joe, Yeonsoo; Chung, Hun Taeg; Lee, Byung Ju; Moon, Chang Hoon; Cho, Wha Ja; Park, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 regulates the early endocytic pathway of transferrin (Tfn), and Rab5 deactivation is required for Tfn recycling. Rab5 deactivation is achieved by RabGAP5, a GTPase-activating protein, on the endosomes. Here we report that recruitment of RabGAP5 is insufficient to deactivate Rab5 and that developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 2 (DRG2) is required for Rab5 deactivation and Tfn recycling. DRG2 was associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate–containing endosomes. It colocalized and interacted with EEA1 and Rab5 on endosomes in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–dependent manner. DRG2 depletion did not affect Tfn uptake and recruitment of RabGAP5 and Rac1 to Rab5 endosomes. However, it resulted in impairment of interaction between Rab5 and RabGAP5, Rab5 deactivation on endosomes, and Tfn recycling. Ectopic expression of shRNA-resistant DRG2 rescued Tfn recycling in DRG2-depleted cells. Our results demonstrate that DRG2 is an endosomal protein and a key regulator of Rab5 deactivation and Tfn recycling. PMID:26582392

  9. Size control: the developmental physiology of body and organ size regulation.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Rewatee H; Shingleton, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    The developmental regulation of final body and organ size is fundamental to generating a functional and correctly proportioned adult. Research over the last two decades has identified a long list of genes and signaling pathways that, when perturbed, influence final body size. However, body and organ size are ultimately a characteristic of the whole organism, and how these myriad genes and pathways function within a physiological context to control size remains largely unknown. In this review, we first describe the major size-regulatory signaling pathways: the Insulin/IGF-, RAS/RAF/MAPK-, TOR-, Hippo-, and JNK-signaling pathways. We then explore what is known of how these pathways regulate five major aspects of size regulation: growth rate, growth duration, target size, negative growth and growth coordination. While this review is by no means exhaustive, our goal is to provide a conceptual framework for integrating the mechanisms of size control at a molecular-genetic level with the mechanisms of size control at a physiological level.

  10. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  11. Adaptive regulation of digestive performance in the genus Python.

    PubMed

    Ott, Brian D; Secor, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    The adaptive interplay between feeding habits and digestive physiology is demonstrated by the Burmese python, which in response to feeding infrequently has evolved the capacity to widely regulate gastrointestinal performance with feeding and fasting. To explore the generality of this physiological trait among pythons, we compared the postprandial responses of metabolism and both intestinal morphology and function among five members of the genus Python: P. brongersmai, P. molurus, P. regius, P. reticulatus and P. sebae. These infrequently feeding pythons inhabit Africa, southeast Asia and Indonesia and vary in body shape from short and stout (P. brongersmai) to long and slender (P. reticulatus). Following the consumption of rodent meals equaling 25% of snake body mass, metabolic rates of pythons peaked at 1.5 days at levels 9.9- to 14.5-fold of standard metabolic rates before returning to prefeeding rates by day 6-8. Specific dynamic action of these meals (317-347 kJ) did not differ among species and equaled 23-27% of the ingested energy. For each species, feeding triggered significant upregulation of intestinal nutrient transport and aminopeptidase-N activity. Concurrently, intestinal mass doubled on average for the five species, in part due to an 85% increase in mucosal thickness, itself a product of 27-59% increases in enterocyte volume. The integrative response of intestinal functional upregulation and tissue hypertrophy enables each of these five python species, regardless of body shape, to modulate intestinal performance to meet the demands of their large infrequent meals.

  12. Fast Count-Regulated OSEM Reconstruction With Adaptive Resolution Recovery.

    PubMed

    Vaissier, Pieter E B; Goorden, Marlies C; Taylor, Aaron B; Beekman, Freek J

    2013-12-01

    Ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) is widely used to accelerate tomographic reconstruction. Speed-up of OSEM over maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) is close to the number of subsets (NS). Recently we significantly increased the speed-up achievable with OSEM by specific subset choice (pixel-based OSEM). However, a high NS can cause undesirable noise levels, quantitative inaccuracy or even disappearance of lesions in low-activity image regions, while a low NS leads to prohibitively long reconstructions or unrecovered details in highly active regions. Here, we introduce count-regulated OSEM (CROSEM) which locally adapts the effective NS based on the estimated amount of detected photons originating from individual voxels. CROSEM was tested using multi-pinhole SPECT simulations and in vivo imaging. With the maximum NS set to 128, CROSEM attained acceleration factors close to 128 in high-activity regions and kept quantitative accuracy in low-activity regions close to that of MLEM. At equal cold-lesion contrast in high-activity regions, CROSEM exhibited lower noise than MLEM in low-activity regions. CROSEM is a fast and stable alternative to OSEM, preventing excessive image noise and quantitative errors in low-activity regions while achieving high-resolution recovery in structures with high activity uptake.

  13. [Cyclic interactions in the processes of adaptation regulation].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, N N; Aleksandrova, Zh G; Suvorov, N B

    1989-01-01

    Human adaptation is characterised by essential changes of functional systems biorhythms which appears in the changes of their components' sequence and in the dynamics of biorhythmological cycles. These objective laws, having been described for human EEG, allow to discern clearly the individual-typological peculiarities in man with different stages of adaptation, the same as the adaptive shifts during long-term influence of external factors. The cyclic course of adaptative processes is regarded as a measure of adaptability. With the help of biorhythmic multitude the memory is constantly satiated from the brain by discrete portions of adaptogenic information, which prevents the natural processes of the memory disintegration. PMID:2816008

  14. Chinese Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Child Version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Chen, Liang; Blue, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to validate a Chinese's adaption of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for children (CERQ-Ck). This self-report instrument evaluates nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies that can be used by children after experiencing a negative life event. The CERQ-Ck was evaluated in a sample of 1403 elementary students between the ages of 9 and 11 by using cluster sampling. All the item-correlation coefficients for CERQ-Ck were above 0.30. The internal consistencies of the nine factors suggested moderate reliability (0.66 to 0.73). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that the current version had the same structure as the original instrument (Tucker-Lewis index = 0.912, comparative fit index = 0.922, root mean square error of approximation = 0.032, standardized root mean square residual = 0.044). A second-order factor and a third-order factor structure were also found. Test-retest correlations (0.53 to 0.70, ps < 0.01) over a period of 1 month, which ranged from acceptable to moderately strong were obtained from a random and stratified subsample of elementary students (N = 76). In addition, we analyzed convergent validity in relation to CERQ-Ck and the Chinese version of the Children's Depression Inventory model dimensions with a subsample of 1083 elementary students. Multiple-group CFA confirmed the measurement invariance for both the male and female groups (ΔCFI < 0.01, ΔRMSEA < 0.015). Overall, results indicate that CERQ-Ck has similar psychometric properties to the original instrument as well as with adequate reliability and validity to investigate the nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies during late childhood developmental periods. PMID:26925586

  15. Chinese Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Child Version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Chen, Liang; Blue, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to validate a Chinese’s adaption of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for children (CERQ-Ck). This self-report instrument evaluates nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies that can be used by children after experiencing a negative life event. The CERQ-Ck was evaluated in a sample of 1403 elementary students between the ages of 9 and 11 by using cluster sampling. All the item-correlation coefficients for CERQ-Ck were above 0.30. The internal consistencies of the nine factors suggested moderate reliability (0.66 to 0.73). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated that the current version had the same structure as the original instrument (Tucker–Lewis index = 0.912, comparative fit index = 0.922, root mean square error of approximation = 0.032, standardized root mean square residual = 0.044). A second-order factor and a third-order factor structure were also found. Test–retest correlations (0.53 to 0.70, ps < 0.01) over a period of 1 month, which ranged from acceptable to moderately strong were obtained from a random and stratified subsample of elementary students (N = 76). In addition, we analyzed convergent validity in relation to CERQ-Ck and the Chinese version of the Children’s Depression Inventory model dimensions with a subsample of 1083 elementary students. Multiple-group CFA confirmed the measurement invariance for both the male and female groups (ΔCFI < 0.01, ΔRMSEA < 0.015). Overall, results indicate that CERQ-Ck has similar psychometric properties to the original instrument as well as with adequate reliability and validity to investigate the nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies during late childhood developmental periods. PMID:26925586

  16. Adaptive Flow Management in Regulated Rivers: Successes and Challenges (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. T.; Melis, T. S.; Kennedy, T.; Korman, J.; Ortlepp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental high flows are becoming common management actions in rivers affected by large dams. When implemented under clear objectives and goals, experimental flows provide opportunities for long-term ecological successes but also impose various ecological challenges as systems shift under environmental change or from human-related actions. We present case studies from long-term adaptive flow management programs on the River Spöl, Switzerland and the Colorado River, USA, both of which are regulated by high dams and flow through National Parks. The management goals in each system differ thus reflecting the different high flow practices implemented over time. Regulated flows in the Spöl reflect a compromise between hydropower needs and ecology (native brown trout fishery), whereas Glen Canyon Dam flows have mainly been directed towards maintenance of river beaches in Grand Canyon National Park with co-management of both nonnative rainbow trout in the tailwater immediately below the dam and downstream endangered native fish of Grand Canyon also an objective. Some 24 experimental floods have occurred on the Spöl over the last 13 years, resulting in a positive effect on the trout fishery and a zoobenthic assemblage having a more typical alpine stream composition. The system has experienced various shifts in assemblage composition over time with the last shift occurring 7 years after the initial floods. A major challenge occurred in spring 2013 with an accidental release of fine sediments from the reservoir behind Punt dal Gall Dam, causing high fish mortality and smothering of the river bottom. Results showed that the effect was pronounced near the dam and gradually lessened downriver to the lower reservoir. Zoobenthic assemblages displayed relatively high resistance to the event and some fish found refugia in the lower reservoir and larger side tributaries, thus projecting a faster recovery than initially thought. Below Glen Canyon dam, benefits to sandbars have

  17. Adapting the medaka embryo assay to a high-throughput approach for developmental toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Oxendine, Sharon L; Cowden, John; Hinton, David E; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-09-01

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro methods are useful for screening, these methods do not replicate all the intricacies of embryonic development and should ideally be complemented by an in vivo screening strategy. In this study, we modify a medaka fish embryo assay to meet the requirements of high-throughput, developmental toxicant testing in vivo. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) offers several advantages over traditional mammalian model systems, including economic husbandry, high fecundity, and rapid ex utero development. In most studies where fish eggs are exposed to a chemical, the exposure takes place in a common vessel, with many embryos being exposed to the same solution. This type of design is not amenable to high-throughput methodology, does not allow the investigator to follow the same embryo throughout gestation, and may confound statistical analysis of the results. Therefore, we developed a 96-well microtiter plate method to facilitate exposure of individual medaka embryos in single wells and compared this approach to the common vessel method using the industrial solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the test compound. At lower DMSO concentrations (0% or 1%), the 96-well microtiter plate assay replicated results obtained using the common vessel exposure method. There was, however, increased lethality and decreased hatching rate in the bottle-reared embryos treated with the higher DMSO concentrations (5% or 10%). Because the embryos reared in the 96-well microtiter plates never showed increased adverse effects (as compared to the bottle-reared embryos) at any DMSO concentration, we conclude that the 96-well microtiter plate assay provides a rapid and efficient alternative for developmental toxicity screens that

  18. Postnatal reduction of BDNF regulates the developmental remodeling of taste bud innervation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-09-15

    The refinement of innervation is a common developmental mechanism that serves to increase the specificity of connections following initial innervation. In the peripheral gustatory system, the extent to which innervation is refined and how refinement might be regulated is unclear. The initial innervation of taste buds is controlled by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Following initial innervation, taste receptor cells are added and become newly innervated. The connections between the taste receptor cells and nerve fibers are likely to be specific in order to retain peripheral coding mechanisms. Here, we explored the possibility that the down-regulation of BDNF regulates the refinement of taste bud innervation during postnatal development. An analysis of BDNF expression in Bdnf(lacZ/+) mice and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that BDNF was down-regulated between postnatal day (P) 5 and P10. This reduction in BDNF expression was due to a loss of precursor/progenitor cells that express BDNF, while the expression of BDNF in the subpopulations of taste receptor cells did not change. Gustatory innervation, which was identified by P2X3 immunohistochemistry, was lost around the perimeter where most progenitor/precursor cells are located. In addition, the density of innervation in the taste bud was reduced between P5 and P10, because taste buds increase in size without increasing innervation. This reduction of innervation density was blocked by the overexpression of BDNF in the precursor/progenitor population of taste bud cells. Together these findings indicate that the process of BDNF restriction to a subpopulation of taste receptor cells between P5 and P10, results in a refinement of gustatory innervation. We speculate that this refinement results in an increased specificity of connections between neurons and taste receptor cells during development.

  19. Postnatal reduction of BDNF regulates the developmental remodeling of taste bud innervation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    The refinement of innervation is a common developmental mechanism that serves to increase the specificity of connections following initial innervation. In the peripheral gustatory system, the extent to which innervation is refined and how refinement might be regulated is unclear. The initial innervation of taste buds is controlled by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Following initial innervation, taste receptor cells are added and become newly innervated. The connections between the taste receptor cells and nerve fibers are likely to be specific in order to retain peripheral coding mechanisms. Here, we explored the possibility that the down-regulation of BDNF regulates the refinement of taste bud innervation during postnatal development. An analysis of BDNF expression in BdnflacZ/+ mice and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that BDNF was down-regulated between postnatal day (P) 5 and P10. This reduction in BDNF expression was due to a loss of precursor/progenitor cells that express BDNF, while the expression of BDNF in the subpopulations of taste receptor cells did not change. Gustatory innervation, which was identified by P2X3 immunohistochemistry, was lost around the perimeter where most progenitor/precursor cells are located. In addition, the density of innervation in the taste bud was reduced between P5 and P10, because taste buds increase in size without increasing innervation. This reduction of innervation density was blocked by the overexpression of BDNF in the precursor/progenitor population of taste bud cells. Together these findings indicate that the process of BDNF restriction to a subpopulation of taste receptor cells between P5 and P10, results in a refinement of gustatory innervation. We speculate that this refinement results in an increased specificity of connections between neurons and taste receptor cells during development. PMID:26164656

  20. Postnatal reduction of BDNF regulates the developmental remodeling of taste bud innervation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-09-15

    The refinement of innervation is a common developmental mechanism that serves to increase the specificity of connections following initial innervation. In the peripheral gustatory system, the extent to which innervation is refined and how refinement might be regulated is unclear. The initial innervation of taste buds is controlled by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Following initial innervation, taste receptor cells are added and become newly innervated. The connections between the taste receptor cells and nerve fibers are likely to be specific in order to retain peripheral coding mechanisms. Here, we explored the possibility that the down-regulation of BDNF regulates the refinement of taste bud innervation during postnatal development. An analysis of BDNF expression in Bdnf(lacZ/+) mice and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that BDNF was down-regulated between postnatal day (P) 5 and P10. This reduction in BDNF expression was due to a loss of precursor/progenitor cells that express BDNF, while the expression of BDNF in the subpopulations of taste receptor cells did not change. Gustatory innervation, which was identified by P2X3 immunohistochemistry, was lost around the perimeter where most progenitor/precursor cells are located. In addition, the density of innervation in the taste bud was reduced between P5 and P10, because taste buds increase in size without increasing innervation. This reduction of innervation density was blocked by the overexpression of BDNF in the precursor/progenitor population of taste bud cells. Together these findings indicate that the process of BDNF restriction to a subpopulation of taste receptor cells between P5 and P10, results in a refinement of gustatory innervation. We speculate that this refinement results in an increased specificity of connections between neurons and taste receptor cells during development. PMID:26164656

  1. Positive Effects of Methylphenidate on Social Communication and Self-Regulation in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Hyperactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahromi, Laudan B.; Kasari, Connie L.; McCracken, James T.; Lee, Lisa S-Y.; Aman, Michael G.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Tierney, Elaine; Arnold, L. Eugene; Vitiello, Benedetto; Ritz, Louise; Witwer, Andrea; Kustan, Erin; Ghuman, Jaswinder; Posey, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This report examined the effect of methylphenidate on social communication and self-regulation in children with pervasive developmental disorders and hyperactivity in a secondary analysis of RUPP Autism Network data. Participants were 33 children (29 boys) between the ages of 5 and 13 years who participated in a four-week crossover trial of…

  2. Using Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning to Help Developmental Mathematics Students Achieve: A Multi-Campus Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudesman, John; Crosby, Sara; Ziehmke, Niesha; Everson, Howard; Issac, Sharlene; Flugman, Bert; Zimmerman, Barry; Moylan, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe an Enhanced Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning (EFA-SRL) program designed to improve the achievement of community college students enrolled in developmental mathematics courses. Their model includes the use of specially formatted quizzes designed to assess both the students' mathematics and metacognitive…

  3. The Effects of Self-Regulated Learning Training on Community College Students' Metacognition and Achievement in Developmental Math Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bol, Linda; Campbell, Karen D. Y.; Perez, Tony; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2016-01-01

    The effects of training in self-regulation on metacognition and math achievement were investigated. The participants were 116 community college students enrolled in developmental math courses. Students enrolled in 16 classrooms were randomly assigned to the treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group completed four…

  4. The Role of Intentional Self Regulation, Lower Neighborhood Ecological Assets, and Activity Involvement in Youth Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Lewin-Bizan, Selva; Lerner, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Extracurricular activities provide a key context for youth development, and participation has been linked with positive developmental outcomes. Using data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD), this study explored how the intentional self regulation ability of youth interacted with participation in extracurricular activities to…

  5. Peer Relations and Emotion Regulation of Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties with and without a Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Sasha; Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Cobham, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) and those who also have developmental disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), can experience the same adverse consequences in their peer interactions and relationships. This present study compared the emotion regulation and peer…

  6. How Do Different Aspects of Self-Regulation Predict Successful Adaptation to School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuenschwander, Regula; Rothlisberger, Marianne; Cimeli, Patrizia; Roebers, Claudia M.

    2012-01-01

    Self-regulation plays an important role in successful adaptation to preschool and school contexts as well as in later academic achievement. The current study relates different aspects of self-regulation such as temperamental effortful control and executive functions (updating, inhibition, and shifting) to different aspects of adaptation to school…

  7. 78 FR 21045 - Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps-Records of Transactions; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... published in the Federal Register of December 21, 2012 (77 FR 75523), regarding Adaptation of Regulations to... December 21, 2012 (77 FR 75523). The final rulemaking made certain conforming amendments to recordkeeping... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 1 RIN 3038-AD53 Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps--Records...

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF A DEVELOPMENTALLY-REGULATED PATHWAY OF MEMBRANE RETRIEVAL IN NEURONAL GROWTH CONES

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Dario; Fornasiero, Eugenio F.; Valdez, Gregorio; Halegoua, Simon; Benfenati, Fabio; Menegon, Andrea; Valtorta, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    During axon navigation and upon target recognition the growth cone plasma membrane is constantly reconfigured as a result of changes in cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics. The identity and regulation of the membrane pathway(s) participating in remodeling of the growth cone surface remain elusive. Here, we identify a constitutive, high capacity plasma membrane recycling activity in the axonal growth cones which is mediated by a novel bulk endocytic pathway mechanistically related to macropinocytosis. This pathway, involving large compartments distributed at sites of intense actin-based membrane ruffling, requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, the small GTPase Rac1 and the pinocytic chaperone Pincher. At early developmental stages, the synaptic vesicle and classical endosomal recycling pathways do not participate in the rapid retrieval of the growth cone plasma membrane. At later stages, during the onset of synaptogenesis, an intrinsic program of maturation leads to downregulation of basal bulk endocytosis and the emergence of depolarization-induced synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis. We propose that the control of bulk membrane retrieval contributes to the homeostatic regulation of the axonal plasma membrane and growth cone remodeling during axonal outgrowth. In addition, we suggest that the downregulation of bulk endocytosis during synaptogenesis might contribute to the preservation of synaptic vesicle specificity. PMID:18940911

  9. On the Developmental and Environmental Regulation of Secondary Metabolism in Vaccinium spp. Berries.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, Katja; Zoratti, Laura; Nguyenquynh, Nga; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites have important defense and signaling roles, and they contribute to the overall quality of developing and ripening fruits. Blueberries, bilberries, cranberries, and other Vaccinium berries are fleshy berry fruits recognized for the high levels of bioactive compounds, especially anthocyanin pigments. Besides anthocyanins and other products of the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathways, these berries also contain other metabolites of interest, such as carotenoid derivatives, vitamins and flavor compounds. Recently, new information has been achieved on the mechanisms related with developmental, environmental, and genetic factors involved in the regulation of secondary metabolism in Vaccinium fruits. Especially light conditions and temperature are demonstrated to have a prominent role on the composition of phenolic compounds. The present review focuses on the studies on mechanisms associated with the regulation of key secondary metabolites, mainly phenolic compounds, in Vaccinium berries. The advances in the research concerning biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in Vaccinium species, including specific studies with mutant genotypes in addition to controlled and field experiments on the genotype × environment (G×E) interaction, are discussed. The recently published Vaccinium transcriptome and genome databases provide new tools for the studies on the metabolic routes. PMID:27242856

  10. Developmental Trajectories of Emotion Regulation Across Infancy: Do Age and the Social Partner Influence Temporal Patterns?

    PubMed

    Ekas, Naomi V; Lickenbrock, Diane M; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M

    2013-09-01

    The ability to effectively regulate emotions is a critical component of early socio-emotional development. This longitudinal study examined the developmental trajectories of emotion regulation in a sample of 3-, 5-, and 7-month-olds during an interaction with mothers and fathers. Infants' negative affect and use of behavioral strategies, including distraction, self-soothing, and high intensity motor behaviors were rated during the still-face episode of the Still-Face Paradigm. Longitudinal mixed-effects models were tested to determine whether strategies were followed by an increase or decrease in negative affect. Results from mother-infant and father-infant dyads indicated that focusing attention away from the unresponsive parent and engaging in self-soothing behaviors were associated with a subsequent decline in negative affect and the strength of these temporal associations were stable across infancy. In contrast, high-intensity motor behaviors were followed by an increase in negative affect and this effect declined over time. No significant effects were found for the behavioral strategy of looking at the parent. Results underscore the importance of considering infant age and the social partner when studying the effectiveness of emotion regulatory strategies in early infancy.

  11. Core Mechanisms Regulating Developmentally Timed and Environmentally Triggered Abscission[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drought-triggered abscission is a strategy used by plants to avoid the full consequences of drought; however, it is poorly understood at the molecular genetic level. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) can be used to elucidate the pathway controlling drought-triggered leaf shedding. We further show that much of the pathway regulating developmentally timed floral organ abscission is conserved in regulating drought-triggered leaf abscission. Gene expression of HAESA (HAE) and INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) is induced in cauline leaf abscission zones when the leaves become wilted in response to limited water and HAE continues to accumulate in the leaf abscission zones through the abscission process. The genes that encode HAE/HAESA-LIKE2, IDA, NEVERSHED, and MAPK KINASE4 and 5 are all necessary for drought-induced leaf abscission. Our findings offer a molecular mechanism explaining drought-triggered leaf abscission. Furthermore, the ability to study leaf abscission in Arabidopsis opens up a new avenue to tease apart mechanisms involved in abscission that have been difficult to separate from flower development as well as for understanding the mechanistic role of water and turgor pressure in abscission. PMID:27468996

  12. Mechanisms regulating nutrition-dependent developmental plasticity through organ-specific effects in insects

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Takashi; Mendes, Cláudia C.; Mirth, Christen K.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition, via the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS)/Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway, can provide a strong molding force for determining animal size and shape. For instance, nutrition induces a disproportionate increase in the size of male horns in dung and rhinoceros beetles, or mandibles in staghorn or horned flour beetles, relative to body size. In these species, well-fed male larvae produce adults with greatly enlarged horns or mandibles, whereas males that are starved or poorly fed as larvae bear much more modest appendages. Changes in IIS/TOR signaling plays a key role in appendage development by regulating growth in the horn and mandible primordia. In contrast, changes in the IIS/TOR pathway produce minimal effects on the size of other adult structures, such as the male genitalia in fruit flies and dung beetles. The horn, mandible and genitalia illustrate that although all tissues are exposed to the same hormonal environment within the larval body, the extent to which insulin can induce growth is organ specific. In addition, the IIS/TOR pathway affects body size and shape by controlling production of metamorphic hormones important for regulating developmental timing, like the steroid molting hormone ecdysone and sesquiterpenoid hormone juvenile hormone. In this review, we discuss recent results from Drosophila and other insects that highlight mechanisms allowing tissues to differ in their sensitivity to IIS/TOR and the potential consequences of these differences on body size and shape. PMID:24133450

  13. The SUMO pathway is developmentally regulated and required for programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Forney, James D

    2006-05-01

    Extensive genome-wide remodeling occurs during the formation of the somatic macronuclei from the germ line micronuclei in ciliated protozoa. This process is limited to sexual reproduction and includes DNA amplification, chromosome fragmentation, and the elimination of internal segments of DNA. Our efforts to define the pathways regulating these events revealed a gene encoding a homologue of ubiquitin activating enzyme 2 (UBA2) that is upregulated at the onset of macronuclear development in Paramecium tetraurelia. Uba2 enzymes are known to activate the protein called small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) that is covalently attached to target proteins. Consistent with this relationship, Northern analysis showed increased abundance of SUMO transcripts during sexual reproduction in Paramecium. RNA interference (RNAi) against UBA2 or SUMO during vegetative growth had little effect on cell survival or fission rates. In contrast, RNAi of mating cells resulted in failure to form a functional macronucleus. Despite normal amplification of the genome, excision of internal eliminated sequences was completely blocked. Additional experiments showed that the homologous UBA2 and SUMO genes in Tetrahymena thermophila are also upregulated during conjugation. These results provide evidence for the developmental regulation of the SUMO pathway in ciliates and suggest a key role for the pathway in controlling genome remodeling. PMID:16682458

  14. On the Developmental and Environmental Regulation of Secondary Metabolism in Vaccinium spp. Berries

    PubMed Central

    Karppinen, Katja; Zoratti, Laura; Nguyenquynh, Nga; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites have important defense and signaling roles, and they contribute to the overall quality of developing and ripening fruits. Blueberries, bilberries, cranberries, and other Vaccinium berries are fleshy berry fruits recognized for the high levels of bioactive compounds, especially anthocyanin pigments. Besides anthocyanins and other products of the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathways, these berries also contain other metabolites of interest, such as carotenoid derivatives, vitamins and flavor compounds. Recently, new information has been achieved on the mechanisms related with developmental, environmental, and genetic factors involved in the regulation of secondary metabolism in Vaccinium fruits. Especially light conditions and temperature are demonstrated to have a prominent role on the composition of phenolic compounds. The present review focuses on the studies on mechanisms associated with the regulation of key secondary metabolites, mainly phenolic compounds, in Vaccinium berries. The advances in the research concerning biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in Vaccinium species, including specific studies with mutant genotypes in addition to controlled and field experiments on the genotype × environment (G×E) interaction, are discussed. The recently published Vaccinium transcriptome and genome databases provide new tools for the studies on the metabolic routes. PMID:27242856

  15. Alternatives to restrictive feeding practices to promote self-regulation in childhood: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Rollins, B Y; Savage, J S; Fisher, J O; Birch, L L

    2016-10-01

    Intake of energy-dense snack foods is high among US children. Although the use of restrictive feeding practices has been shown to be counterproductive, there is very limited evidence for effective alternatives to restriction that help children moderate their intake of these foods and that facilitate the development of self-regulation in childhood. The developmental literature on parenting and child outcomes may provide insights into alternatives to restrictive feeding practices. This review paper uses a model of parental control from the child development and parenting literatures to (i) operationally define restrictive feeding practices; (ii) summarize current evidence for antecedents and effects of parental restriction use on children's eating behaviours and weight status, and (iii) highlight alternative feeding practices that may facilitate the development of children's self-regulation and moderate children's intake of palatable snack foods. We also discuss recent empirical evidence highlighting the role of child temperament and food motivation related behaviours as factors that prompt parents to use restrictive feeding practices and, yet, may increase children's dysregulated intake of forbidden foods.

  16. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control vacuole trafficking and developmental programs through the regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Sun, Ruobai; Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2015-01-01

    The vacuole is the most prominent compartment in plant cells and is important for ion and protein storage. In our effort to search for key regulators in the plant vacuole sorting pathway, ribosomal large subunit 4 (rpl4d) was identified as a translational mutant defective in both vacuole trafficking and normal development. Polysome profiling of the rpl4d mutant showed reduction in polysome-bound mRNA compared with wild-type, but no significant change in the general mRNA distribution pattern. Ribsomal profiling data indicated that genes in the lipid metabolism pathways were translationally down-regulated in the rpl4d mutant. Live imaging studies by Nile red staining suggested that both polar and nonpolar lipid accumulation was reduced in meristem tissues of rpl4d mutants. Pharmacological evidence showed that sterol and sphingolipid biosynthetic inhibitors can phenocopy the defects of the rpl4d mutant, including an altered vacuole trafficking pattern. Genetic evidence from lipid biosynthetic mutants indicates that alteration in the metabolism of either sterol or sphingolipid biosynthesis resulted in vacuole trafficking defects, similar to the rpl4d mutant. Tissue-specific complementation with key enzymes from lipid biosynthesis pathways can partially rescue both vacuole trafficking and auxin-related developmental defects in the rpl4d mutant. These results indicate that lipid metabolism modulates auxin-mediated tissue differentiation and endomembrane trafficking pathways downstream of ribosomal protein function.

  17. Abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellic acid act at different developmental stages to instruct the adaptation of young leaves to stress

    PubMed Central

    Verelst, Wim; Skirycz, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Drought stress represents a particularly great environmental challenge for plants. A decreased water availability can severely limit growth, and this jeopardizes the organism's primary goal—to survive and sustain growth long enough to ensure the plentiful production of viable seeds within the favorable growth season. It is therefore vital for a growing plant to sense oncoming drought as early as possible, and to respond to it rapidly and appropriately in all organs. A typical, fast energy-saving response is the arrest of growth in young organs, which is likely mediated by root-derived signals. A recent publication indicates that three plant hormones (abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellic acid) mediate the adaptation of leaf growth in response to drought, and that they act at different developmental stages. Abscisic acid mainly acts in mature cells, while ethylene and gibberellic acid function in expanding and dividing leaf cells. This provides the plant with a means to differentially control the developmental zones of a growing leaf, and to integrate environmental signals differently in sink and source tissues. Here we discuss the biological implications of this discovery in the context of long-distance xylem and phloem transport. PMID:20383070

  18. Developmental regulation of protein kinase A expression and activity in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewski, Brett E.; Davies, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    c-AMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs) are the main transducers of cAMP signaling in eukaryotic cells. Recently we reported the identification and characterization of a PKA catalytic subunit (SmPKA-C) in Schistosoma mansoni that is required for adult schistosome viability in vitro. To gain further insights into the role of SmPKA-C in biological processes during the schistosome life cycle, we undertook a quantitative analysis of SmPKA-C mRNA expression in different life cycle stages. Our data shows that SmPKA-C mRNA expression is developmentally regulated, with the highest levels of expression in cercariae and adult female worms. To evaluate the biological role of SmPKA-C in these developmental stages, cercariae and adult worms were treated with various concentrations of PKA inhibitors. Treatment of cercariae with H-89 or PKI 14-22 amide resulted in loss of viability suggesting that, as in adults, PKA is an essential enzyme activity in this infectious larval stage. In adult worms, in vitro exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of H-89 or PKI 14-22 amide resulted in inhibition of egg production in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, using a murine model of schistosome infection where S. mansoni fecundity is impaired, we show that reduced rates of egg production in vivo correlate with significant reductions in SmPKA-C mRNA expression and PKA activity. Finally, restoration of parasite egg production in vivo also resulted in normalization of SmPKA-C mRNA expression and PKA activity. Taken together, our data suggest that PKA signaling is required for cercarial viability and may play a specific role in the reproductive activity of adult worms. PMID:20097200

  19. Developmental expression of chicken antithrombin III is regulated by increased RNA abundance and intracellular processing.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Rosenberg, J; Samad, F; Bergtrom, G; Banfield, D K

    1993-01-23

    We isolated and sequenced a 432 bp cDNA to cAT-III, that encoded 115 nucleotides of 5' untranslated sequence, a 17 amino acid long signal peptide and residues 1-88 of the mature protein, and used it to prepare a probe for measuring and correlating the developmental changes of steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels with known changes in antigen levels. Densitometric analysis of nuclease protection (n = 2), Northern blot (n = 4), and slot blots (n = 3) of total RNA from chick livers of 16-day-old embryos to 6-day-old chicks showed a 2.6 +/- 0.5-fold increase in steady-state cAT-III mRNA levels. Assay of functional mRNA levels by in vitro translation of poly(A)+ RNA and specific immunoprecipitation of 35S-Met-labelled cAT-III was comparable to RNA analysis (16-day-old embryos vs. 10-day-old hatchlings). We evaluated whether there were developmental differences in post-translational secretion which may also contribute to the regulation of the circulating level of this protein. Pulse-chase studies of freshly-isolated hepatocytes from 16-day-old embryos and 10-day-old hatchlings maintained in suspension demonstrated a approx. 5.0-5.5-fold increase in cAT-III levels at steady-state secretion. The above findings indicate that changes in circulating cAT-III levels during late embryonic development are primarily due to increased abundance of cAT-III mRNA. In addition, we postulate that post-translational intracellular processing may account for further differences in circulating protein levels. PMID:8424948

  20. Developmental and environmental regulation of antifreeze proteins in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Graham, L A; Walker, V K; Davies, P L

    2000-11-01

    The yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, contains a family of small Cys-rich and Thr-rich thermal hysteresis proteins that depress the hemolymph freezing point below the melting point by as much as 5. 5 degrees C (DeltaT = thermal hysteresis). Thermal hysteresis protein expression was evaluated throughout development and after exposure to altered environmental conditions. Under favorable growth conditions, small larvae (11-13 mg) had only low levels of thermal hysteresis proteins or thermal hysteresis protein message, but these levels increased 10-fold and 18-fold, respectively, by the final larval instar (> 190 mg), resulting in thermal hysteresis > 3 degrees C. Exposure of small larvae (11-13 mg) to 4 weeks of cold (4 degrees C) caused an approximately 20-fold increase in thermal hysteresis protein concentration, well in excess of the less than threefold developmental increase seen after 4 weeks at 22 degrees C. Exposure of large larvae (100-120 mg) to cold caused 12-fold and sixfold increases in thermal hysteresis protein message and protein levels, respectively, approximately double the maximum levels they would have attained in the final larval instar at 22 degrees C. Thus, thermal hysteresis increased to similar levels (> 4 degrees C) in the cold, irrespective of the size of the larvae (the overwintering stage). At pupation, thermal hysteresis protein message levels decreased > 20-fold and remained low thereafter, but thermal hysteresis activity decreased much more slowly. Exposure to cold did not reverse this decline. Desiccation or starvation of larvae had comparable effects to cold exposure, but surprisingly, short daylength photoperiod or total darkness had no effect on either thermal hysteresis or message levels. As all environmental conditions that caused increased thermal hysteresis also inhibited growth, we postulate that developmental arrest is a primary factor in the regulation of T. molitor thermal hysteresis proteins.

  1. Abscisic Acid Induction of Vacuolar H+-ATPase Activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Is Developmentally Regulated1

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Maldonado-Gama, Minerva; Pantoja, Omar

    1999-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated as a key component in water-deficit-induced responses, including those triggered by drought, NaCl, and low- temperature stress. In this study a role for ABA in mediating the NaCl-stress-induced increases in tonoplast H+-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase) and Na+/H+ antiport activity in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, leading to vacuolar Na+ sequestration, were investigated. NaCl or ABA treatment of adult M. crystallinum plants induced V-ATPase H+ transport activity, and when applied in combination, an additive effect on V-ATPase stimulation was observed. In contrast, treatment of juvenile plants with ABA did not induce V-ATPase activity, whereas NaCl treatment resulted in a similar response to that observed in adult plants. Na+/H+ antiport activity was induced in both juvenile and adult plants by NaCl, but ABA had no effect at either developmental stage. Results indicate that ABA-induced changes in V-ATPase activity are dependent on the plant reaching its adult phase, whereas NaCl-induced increases in V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport activity are independent of plant age. This suggests that ABA-induced V-ATPase activity may be linked to the stress-induced, developmentally programmed switch from C3 metabolism to Crassulacean acid metabolism in adult plants, whereas, vacuolar Na+ sequestration, mediated by the V-ATPase and Na+/H+ antiport, is regulated through ABA-independent pathways. PMID:10398716

  2. Developmental strategies and regulation of cell-free enzyme system for ethanol production: a molecular prospective.

    PubMed

    Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Shaukat; Kim, Minah; Kim, Yeji; Park, Joong Kon

    2014-12-01

    Most biomanufacturing systems developed for the production of biocommodities are based on whole-cell systems. However, with the advent of innovative technologies, the focus has shifted from whole-cell towards cell-free enzyme system. Since more than a century, researchers are using the cell-free extract containing the required enzymes and their respective cofactors in order to study the fundamental aspects of biological systems, particularly fermentation. Although yeast cell-free enzyme system is known since long ago, it is rarely been studied and characterized in detail. In this review, we hope to describe the major pitfalls encountered by whole-cell system and introduce possible solutions to them using cell-free enzyme systems. We have discussed the glycolytic and fermentative pathways and their regulation at both transcription and translational levels. Moreover, several strategies employed for development of cell-free enzyme system have been described with their potential merits and shortcomings associated with these developmental approaches. We also described in detail the various developmental approaches of synthetic cell-free enzyme system such as compartmentalization, metabolic channeling, protein fusion, and co-immobilization strategies. Additionally, we portrayed the novel cell-free enzyme technologies based on encapsulation and immobilization techniques and their development and commercialization. Through this review, we have presented the basics of cell-free enzyme system, the strategies involved in development and operation, and the advantages over conventional processes. Finally, we have addressed some potential directions for the future development and industrialization of cell-free enzyme system.

  3. Children's Conscience during Toddler and Preschool Years, Moral Self, and a Competent, Adaptive Developmental Trajectory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Koenig, Jamie L.; Barry, Robin A.; Kim, Sanghag; Yoon, Jeung Eun

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether children's robust conscience, formed during early family socialization, promotes their future adaptive and competent functioning in expanded ecologies. We assessed two dimensions of conscience in young children (N = 100) at 25, 38, and 52 months in scripted laboratory contexts: internalization of their mothers' and fathers'…

  4. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  5. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N; Simmons, Shaneka S; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V; Udensi, Udensi K; Ayensu, Wellington K; Cohly, Hari H; Brown, Shyretha D; Dates, Centdrika R; Hentz, Sonya D; Hughes, Shawntae J; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R; Patterson, Carvey O; Sims, Jennifer N; Turner, Kelisha T; Williams, Baraka S; Johnson, Matilda O; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V; Anumudu, Chiaka I; Adeoye, Grace O; Thomas, Bolaji N; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  6. A generic mechanism for adaptive growth rate regulation.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-01-01

    How can a microorganism adapt to a variety of environmental conditions despite the existence of a limited number of signal transduction mechanisms? We show that for any growing cells whose gene expression fluctuate stochastically, the adaptive cellular state is inevitably selected by noise, even without a specific signal transduction network for it. In general, changes in protein concentration in a cell are given by its synthesis minus dilution and degradation, both of which are proportional to the rate of cell growth. In an adaptive state with a higher growth speed, both terms are large and balanced. Under the presence of noise in gene expression, the adaptive state is less affected by stochasticity since both the synthesis and dilution terms are large, while for a nonadaptive state both the terms are smaller so that cells are easily kicked out of the original state by noise. Hence, escape time from a cellular state and the cellular growth rate are negatively correlated. This leads to a selection of adaptive states with higher growth rates, and model simulations confirm this selection to take place in general. The results suggest a general form of adaptation that has never been brought to light--a process that requires no specific mechanisms for sensory adaptation. The present scheme may help explain a wide range of cellular adaptive responses including the metabolic flux optimization for maximal cell growth.

  7. Egocentric speech: an adaptive function applied to developmental disabilities in occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Burnell, D P

    1979-03-01

    This paper reviews egocentric speech as a theoretical postulate of change relevant to the practice of occupational therapy. Egocentric speech, an important adaptive behavior in normal development, designates the verbalizations that usually occur while a child between the ages of two and seven performs an adaptive task and thereby increases problem-solving abilities. The behavior is first discussed as it relates to the structures of assimilation and accommodation in Piaget's earlier sensorimotor stage, then as it appears in the preoperatory level of the concrete operations stage of intelligence. The importance of the behavior as a foundation for the inner language and thinking capacities of the adult is supported by the research of Soviet scientists Vygotsky and Luria. Finally, three case studies are presented in which egocentric speech is used in conjunction with problem-solving tasks in occupational therapy. PMID:474332

  8. Molecular identification of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors and their developmental dependence on ret signaling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenqin; Enomoto, Hideki; Rice, Frank L; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Ginty, David D

    2009-12-24

    In mammals, the first step in the perception of form and texture is the activation of trigeminal or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) mechanosensory neurons, which are classified as either rapidly (RA) or slowly adapting (SA) according to their rates of adaptation to sustained stimuli. The molecular identities and mechanisms of development of RA and SA mechanoreceptors are largely unknown. We found that the "early Ret(+)" DRG neurons are RA mechanoreceptors, which form Meissner corpuscles, Pacinian corpuscles, and longitudinal lanceolate endings. The central projections of these RA mechanoreceptors innervate layers III through V of the spinal cord and terminate within discrete subdomains of the dorsal column nuclei. Moreover, mice lacking Ret signaling components are devoid of Pacinian corpuscles and exhibit a dramatic disruption of RA mechanoreceptor projections to both the spinal cord and medulla. Thus, the early Ret(+) neurons are RA mechanoreceptors and Ret signaling is required for the assembly of neural circuits underlying touch perception.

  9. Adaptive regulation or governmentality: patient safety and the changing regulation of medicine.

    PubMed

    Waring, Justin

    2007-03-01

    This paper explores how current 'patient safety' reforms offer to change the regulation of medicine. Drawing on existing literature, it is argued that this policy agenda represents a new frontier in medical/managerial relations, introducing a disciplinary expertise within the health service that provides managers with the knowledge and legitimacy to survey and scrutinise medical performance, made real through procedures for incident reporting and root-cause analysis. The extent of regulatory change is investigated, drawing on an ethnographic case study of one hospital. It is shown that, as with other organisational and managerial reforms, doctors are resisting managerial prerogatives through seeking to subvert and 'capture' components of reform. I describe this as 'adaptive regulation' to account for how doctors seek to maintain their regulatory monopoly and limit managerial encroachment. It is speculated, however, that this process could signal the future 'modernisation' of medical professionalism where emerging managerial discourses, within the wider context of public sector reform, are increasingly internalised with medical practice and culture. This leads to new and rearticulated forms of self-surveillance, self-management or 'governmentality', ultimately negating the need for external groups to explicitly manage or regulate professional practice. PMID:17381811

  10. Aquaporin family genes exhibit developmentally-regulated and host-dependent transcription patterns in the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    PubMed

    Farlora, Rodolfo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins are small integral membrane proteins that function as pore channels for the transport of water and other small solutes across the cell membrane. Considering the important roles of these proteins in several biological processes, including host-parasite interactions, there has been increased research on aquaporin proteins recently. The present study expands on the knowledge of aquaporin family genes in parasitic copepods, examining diversity and expression during the ontogeny of the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi. Furthermore, aquaporin expression was evaluated during the early infestation of Atlantic (Salmo salar) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Deep transcriptome sequencing data revealed eight full length and two partial open reading frames belonging to the aquaporin protein family. Clustering analyses with identified Caligidae sequences revealed three major clades of aquaglyceroporins (Cr-Glp), classical aquaporin channels (Cr-Bib and Cr-PripL), and unorthodox aquaporins (Cr-Aqp12-like). In silico analysis revealed differential expression of aquaporin genes between developmental stages and between sexes. Male-biased expression of Cr-Glp1_v1 and female-biased expression of Cr-Bib were further confirmed in adults by RT-qPCR. Additionally, gene expressions were measured for seven aquaporins during the early infestation stage. The majority of aquaporin genes showed significant differential transcription expressions between sea lice parasitizing different hosts, with Atlantic salmon sea lice exhibiting overall reduced expression as compared to Coho salmon. The observed differences in the regulation of aquaporin genes may reveal osmoregulatory adaptations associated with nutrient ingestion and metabolite waste export, exposing complex host-parasite relationships in C. rogercresseyi. PMID:27016299

  11. The Adaptation of a School-Based Health Promotion Programme for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Community-Engaged Research Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Kristie L.; Bandini, Linda G.; Folta, Sara C.; Wansink, Brian; Must, Aviva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidenced-based health promotion programmes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are notably absent. Barriers include a lack of understanding of how to adapt existing evidence-based programmes to their needs, maximize inclusion and support mutual goals of health and autonomy. Methods: We undertook a…

  12. Functional and developmental identification of a molecular subtype of brain serotonergic neuron specialized to regulate breathing dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Rachael D.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT) dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. We find, by manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one-by-one chemogenetically, that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Further, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections – increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally, and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth. PMID:25497093

  13. Developmentally Regulated Production of meso-Zeaxanthin in Chicken Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Choroid and Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Shyam, Rajalekshmy; Li, Binxing; Vachali, Preejith; Subhani, Yumna K.; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose meso-Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that is rarely encountered in nature outside of the vertebrate eye. It is not a constituent of a normal human diet, yet this carotenoid comprises one-third of the primate macular pigment. In the current study, we undertook a systematic approach to biochemically characterize the production of meso-zeaxanthin in the vertebrate eye. Methods Fertilized White Leghorn chicken eggs were analyzed for the presence of carotenoids during development. Yolk, liver, brain, serum, retina, and RPE/choroid were isolated, and carotenoids were extracted. The samples were analyzed on C-30 or chiral HPLC columns to determine the carotenoid composition. Results Lutein and zeaxanthin were found in all studied nonocular tissues, but no meso-zeaxanthin was ever detected. Among the ocular tissues, the presence of meso-zeaxanthin was consistently observed starting at embryonic day 17 (E17) in the RPE/choroid, several days before its consistent detection in the retina. If RPE/choroid of an embryo was devoid of meso-zeaxanthin, the corresponding retina was always negative as well. Conclusions This is the first report of developmentally regulated synthesis of meso-zeaxanthin in a vertebrate system. Our observations suggest that the RPE/choroid is the primary site of meso-zeaxanthin synthesis. Identification of meso-zeaxanthin isomerase enzyme in the developing chicken embryo will facilitate our ability to determine the biochemical mechanisms responsible for production of this unique carotenoid in other higher vertebrates, such as humans. PMID:27082300

  14. Sequential evolution of bacterial morphology by co-option of a developmental regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Ducret, Adrien; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-02-01

    What mechanisms underlie the transitions responsible for the diverse shapes observed in the living world? Although bacteria exhibit a myriad of morphologies, the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of bacterial cell shape are not understood. We investigated morphological diversity in a group of bacteria that synthesize an appendage-like extension of the cell envelope called the stalk. The location and number of stalks varies among species, as exemplified by three distinct subcellular positions of stalks within a rod-shaped cell body: polar in the genus Caulobacter and subpolar or bilateral in the genus Asticcacaulis. Here we show that a developmental regulator of Caulobacter crescentus, SpmX, is co-opted in the genus Asticcacaulis to specify stalk synthesis either at the subpolar or bilateral positions. We also show that stepwise evolution of a specific region of SpmX led to the gain of a new function and localization of this protein, which drove the sequential transition in stalk positioning. Our results indicate that changes in protein function, co-option and modularity are key elements in the evolution of bacterial morphology. Therefore, similar evolutionary principles of morphological transitions apply to both single-celled prokaryotes and multicellular eukaryotes.

  15. Functional Analysis of Developmentally Regulated Genes chs7 and sec22 in the Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Traeger, Stefanie; Nowrousian, Minou

    2015-04-14

    During sexual development, filamentous ascomycetes form complex, three-dimensional fruiting bodies for the generation and dispersal of spores. In previous studies, we identified genes with evolutionary conserved expression patterns during fruiting body formation in several fungal species. Here, we present the functional analysis of two developmentally up-regulated genes, chs7 and sec22, in the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. The genes encode a class VII (division III) chitin synthase and a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein, respectively. Deletion mutants of chs7 had normal vegetative growth and were fully fertile but showed sensitivity toward cell wall stress. Deletion of sec22 resulted in a reduced number of ascospores and in defects in ascospore pigmentation and germination, whereas vegetative growth was normal in the mutant. A SEC22-EGFP fusion construct under control of the native sec22 promoter and terminator regions was expressed during different stages of sexual development. Expression of several development-related genes was deregulated in the sec22 mutant, including three genes involved in melanin biosynthesis. Our data indicate that chs7 is dispensable for fruiting body formation in S. macrospora, whereas sec22 is required for ascospore maturation and germination and thus involved in late stages of sexual development.

  16. Developmentally Regulated Sesquiterpene Production Confers Resistance to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in Ripe Pepper Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Im, Soonduk; Han, Yun-Jeong; Lee, Sungbeom; Back, Kyoungwhan; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kim, Young Soon

    2014-01-01

    Sesquiterpenoid capsidiol, exhibiting antifungal activity against pathogenic fungus, is accumulated in infected ripe pepper fruits. In this study, we found a negative relation between the capsidiol level and lesion size in fruits infected with Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, depending on the stage of ripening. To understand the developmental regulation of capsidiol biosynthesis, fungal-induced gene expressions in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways were examined in unripe and ripe pepper fruits. The sterol biosynthetic pathway was almost shut down in healthy ripe fruits, showing very low expression of hydroxymethyl glutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) and squalene synthase (SS) genes. In contrast, genes in the carotenoid pathway were highly expressed in ripe fruits. In the sesquiterpene pathway, 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (EAS), belonging to a sesquiterpene cyclase (STC) family, was significantly induced in the ripe fruits upon fungal infection. Immunoblot and enzyme activity analyses showed that the STCs were induced both in the infected unripe and ripe fruits, while capsidiol was synthesized discriminatively in the ripe fruits, implying diverse enzymatic specificity of multiple STCs. Thereby, to divert sterol biosynthesis into sesquiterpene production, infected fruits were pretreated with an SS inhibitor, zaragozic acid (ZA), resulting in increased levels of capsidiol by more than 2-fold in the ripe fruits, with concurrent reduction of phytosterols. Taken together, the present results suggest that the enhanced expression and activity of EAS in the ripe fruits play an important role in capsidiol production, contributing to the incompatibility between the anthracnose fungus and the ripe pepper fruits. PMID:25286411

  17. Developmental and hormonal regulation of β-1,3-glucanase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Felix, G; Meins, F

    1986-02-01

    A highly sensitive and specific "rocket" immunoassay was used to measure the content of an endo-type β-1,3-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.39) in tissues of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Havana 425. We show that the accumulation of β-1,3-glucanase in cultured pith-parenchyma tissue is blocked by combinations of the auxin, α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), and the cytokinin, kinetin. When tissues pre-incubated for 7 d on complete medium containing 2.0 mg·l(-1) NAA and 0.3 mg·l(-1) kinetin are transferred onto medium without hormones or with either hormone added separately, the β-1,3-glucanase content expressed per mg soluble protein increases approx. ten fold over a 7-d period. Under these inductive conditions, up to approx. 5% of the soluble protein is β-1,3-glucanase. The induction is inhibited by >90% when tissues are cultured over the same period on medium containing both hormones. This β-1,3-glucanase is developmentally regulated in the intact plant. It is a major component of the soluble protien in the lower leaves and roots but is not detectable in leaves near the top of the plant.

  18. Prospore membrane formation defines a developmentally regulated branch of the secretory pathway in yeast.

    PubMed

    Neiman, A M

    1998-01-12

    Spore formation in yeast is an unusual form of cell division in which the daughter cells are formed within the mother cell cytoplasm. This division requires the de novo synthesis of a membrane compartment, termed the prospore membrane, which engulfs the daughter nuclei. The effect of mutations in late-acting genes on sporulation was investigated. Mutation of SEC1, SEC4, or SEC8 blocked spore formation, and electron microscopic analysis of the sec4-8 mutant indicated that this inability to produce spores was caused by a failure to form the prospore membrane. The soluble NSF attachment protein 25 (SNAP-25) homologue SEC9, by contrast, was not required for sporulation. The absence of a requirement for SEC9 was shown to be due to the sporulation-specific induction of a second, previously undescribed, SNAP-25 homologue, termed SPO20. These results define a developmentally regulated branch of the secretory pathway and suggest that spore morphogenesis in yeast proceeds by the targeting and fusion of secretory vesicles to form new plasma membranes in the interior of the mother cell. Consistent with this model, the extracellular proteins Gas1p and Cts1p were localized to an internal compartment in sporulating cells. Spore formation in yeast may be a useful model for understanding secretion-driven cell division events in a variety of plant and animal systems.

  19. N6-methyladenosine modification destabilizes developmental regulators in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Yue; Toth, Julia I; Petroski, Matthew D; Zhang, Zhaolei; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2014-02-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) has been identified as the most abundant internal modification of messenger RNA in eukaryotes. m(6)A modification is involved in cell fate determination in yeast and embryo development in plants. Its mammalian function remains unknown but thousands of mammalian mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) show m(6)A modification and m(6)A demethylases are required for mammalian energy homeostasis and fertility. We identify two proteins, the putative m(6)A MTase, methyltransferase-like 3 (Mettl3; ref. ), and a related but uncharacterized protein Mettl14, that function synergistically to control m(6)A formation in mammalian cells. Knockdown of Mettl3 and Mettl14 in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) led to similar phenotypes, characterized by lack of m(6)A RNA methylation and lost self-renewal capability. A large number of transcripts, including many encoding developmental regulators, exhibit m(6)A methylation inversely correlated with mRNA stability and gene expression. The human antigen R (HuR) and microRNA pathways were linked to these effects. This gene regulatory mechanism operating in mESCs through m(6)A methylation is required to keep mESCs at their ground state and may be relevant to thousands of mRNAs and lncRNAs in various cell types. PMID:24394384

  20. Functional Analysis of Developmentally Regulated Genes chs7 and sec22 in the Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Traeger, Stefanie; Nowrousian, Minou

    2015-01-01

    During sexual development, filamentous ascomycetes form complex, three-dimensional fruiting bodies for the generation and dispersal of spores. In previous studies, we identified genes with evolutionary conserved expression patterns during fruiting body formation in several fungal species. Here, we present the functional analysis of two developmentally up-regulated genes, chs7 and sec22, in the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. The genes encode a class VII (division III) chitin synthase and a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein, respectively. Deletion mutants of chs7 had normal vegetative growth and were fully fertile but showed sensitivity toward cell wall stress. Deletion of sec22 resulted in a reduced number of ascospores and in defects in ascospore pigmentation and germination, whereas vegetative growth was normal in the mutant. A SEC22-EGFP fusion construct under control of the native sec22 promoter and terminator regions was expressed during different stages of sexual development. Expression of several development-related genes was deregulated in the sec22 mutant, including three genes involved in melanin biosynthesis. Our data indicate that chs7 is dispensable for fruiting body formation in S. macrospora, whereas sec22 is required for ascospore maturation and germination and thus involved in late stages of sexual development. PMID:25873638

  1. RNA editing of the Drosophila para Na(+) channel transcript. Evolutionary conservation and developmental regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanrahan, C J; Palladino, M J; Ganetzky, B; Reenan, R A

    2000-01-01

    Post-transcriptional editing of pre-mRNAs through the action of dsRNA adenosine deaminases results in the modification of particular adenosine (A) residues to inosine (I), which can alter the coding potential of the modified transcripts. We describe here three sites in the para transcript, which encodes the major voltage-activated Na(+) channel polypeptide in Drosophila, where RNA editing occurs. The occurrence of RNA editing at the three sites was found to be developmentally regulated. Editing at two of these sites was also conserved across species between the D. melanogaster and D. virilis. In each case, a highly conserved region was found in the intron downstream of the editing site and this region was shown to be complementary to the region of the exonic editing site. Thus, editing at these sites would appear to involve a mechanism whereby the edited exon forms a base-paired secondary structure with the distant conserved noncoding sequences located in adjacent downstream introns, similar to the mechanism shown for A-to-I RNA editing of mammalian glutamate receptor subunits (GluRs). For the third site, neither RNA editing nor the predicted RNA secondary structures were evolutionarily conserved. Transcripts from transgenic Drosophila expressing a minimal editing site construct for this site were shown to faithfully undergo RNA editing. These results demonstrate that Na(+) channel diversity in Drosophila is increased by RNA editing via a mechanism analogous to that described for transcripts encoding mammalian GluRs. PMID:10880477

  2. Clique of functional hubs orchestrates population bursts in developmentally regulated neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Luccioli, Stefano; Bonifazi, Paolo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari

    2015-03-01

    It has recently been discovered that single neuron stimulation can impact network dynamics in immature and adult neuronal circuits. Here we report a novel mechanism which can explain in developing neuronal circuits, typically composed of only excitatory cells, the peculiar role played by a few specific neurons in promoting/arresting the population activity. For this purpose, we consider a standard neuronal network model, with short-term synaptic plasticity, whose population activity is characterized by bursting behavior. The addition of developmentally regulated constraints on single neuron excitability and connectivity leads to the emergence of functional hub neurons, whose stimulation/deletion is critical for the network activity. Functional hubs form a clique, where a precise sequential activation of the neurons is essential to ignite collective events without any need for a specific topological architecture. Unsupervised time-lagged firings of supra-threshold cells, in connection with coordinated entrainments of near-threshold neurons, are the key ingredients to orchestrate population activity. This work is part of the activity of the Joint Italian-Israeli Laboratory on Integrative Network Neuroscience supported by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  3. SUMOylation is developmentally regulated and required for cell pairing during conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Amjad M; Yang, Qianyi; Chalker, Douglas L; Forney, James D

    2015-02-01

    The covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins regulates numerous nuclear events in eukaryotes, including transcription, mitosis and meiosis, and DNA repair. Despite extensive interest in nuclear pathways within the field of ciliate molecular biology, there have been no investigations of the SUMO pathway in Tetrahymena. The developmental program of sexual reproduction of this organism includes cell pairing, micronuclear meiosis, and the formation of a new somatic macronucleus. We identified the Tetrahymena thermophila SMT3 (SUMO) and UBA2 (SUMO-activating enzyme) genes and demonstrated that the corresponding green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged gene products are found predominantly in the somatic macronucleus during vegetative growth. Use of an anti-Smt3p antibody to perform immunoblot assays with whole-cell lysates during conjugation revealed a large increase in SUMOylation that peaked during formation of the new macronucleus. Immunofluorescence using the same antibody showed that the increase was localized primarily within the new macronucleus. To initiate functional analysis of the SUMO pathway, we created germ line knockout cell lines for both the SMT3 and UBA2 genes and found both are essential for cell viability. Conditional Smt3p and Uba2p cell lines were constructed by incorporation of the cadmium-inducible metallothionein promoter. Withdrawal of cadmium resulted in reduced cell growth and increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, Smt3p and Uba2p conditional cell lines were unable to pair during sexual reproduction in the absence of cadmium, consistent with a function early in conjugation. Our studies are consistent with multiple roles for SUMOylation in Tetrahymena, including a dynamic regulation associated with the sexual life cycle.

  4. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  5. Lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase mRNA tissue specific expression, developmental regulation, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, C F; Chen, S H; Wims, M; Luo, C C; Li, W H; Chan, L

    1989-03-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) enzyme activities were previously reported to be regulated during development, but the underlying molecular events are unknown. In addition, little is known about LPL evolution. We cloned and sequenced a complete mouse LPL cDNA. Comparison of sequences from mouse, human, bovine, and guinea pig cDNAs indicated that the rates of evolution of mouse, human, and bovine LPL are quite low, but guinea pig LPL has evolved several times faster than the others. 32P-Labeled mouse LPL and rat HL cDNAs were used to study lipase mRNA tissue distribution and developmental regulation in the rat. Northern gel analysis revealed the presence of a single 1.87 kb HL mRNA species in liver, but not in other tissues including adrenal and ovary. A single 4.0 kb LPL mRNA species was detected in epididymal fat, heart, psoas muscle, lactating mammary gland, adrenal, lung, and ovary, but not in adult kidney, liver, intestine, or brain. Quantitative slot-blot hybridization analysis demonstrated the following relative amounts of LPL mRNA in rat tissues: adipose, 100%; heart, 94%; adrenal, 6.6%; muscle, 3.8%; lung, 3.0%; kidney, 0%; adult liver, 0%. The same quantitative analysis was used to study lipase mRNA levels during development. There was little postnatal variation in LPL mRNA in adipose tissue; maximal levels were detected at the earliest time points studied for both inguinal and epididymal fat. In heart, however, LPL mRNA was detected at low levels 6 days before birth and increased 278-fold as the animals grew to adulthood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. SUMOylation Is Developmentally Regulated and Required for Cell Pairing during Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Amjad M.; Yang, Qianyi

    2014-01-01

    The covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to target proteins regulates numerous nuclear events in eukaryotes, including transcription, mitosis and meiosis, and DNA repair. Despite extensive interest in nuclear pathways within the field of ciliate molecular biology, there have been no investigations of the SUMO pathway in Tetrahymena. The developmental program of sexual reproduction of this organism includes cell pairing, micronuclear meiosis, and the formation of a new somatic macronucleus. We identified the Tetrahymena thermophila SMT3 (SUMO) and UBA2 (SUMO-activating enzyme) genes and demonstrated that the corresponding green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged gene products are found predominantly in the somatic macronucleus during vegetative growth. Use of an anti-Smt3p antibody to perform immunoblot assays with whole-cell lysates during conjugation revealed a large increase in SUMOylation that peaked during formation of the new macronucleus. Immunofluorescence using the same antibody showed that the increase was localized primarily within the new macronucleus. To initiate functional analysis of the SUMO pathway, we created germ line knockout cell lines for both the SMT3 and UBA2 genes and found both are essential for cell viability. Conditional Smt3p and Uba2p cell lines were constructed by incorporation of the cadmium-inducible metallothionein promoter. Withdrawal of cadmium resulted in reduced cell growth and increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, Smt3p and Uba2p conditional cell lines were unable to pair during sexual reproduction in the absence of cadmium, consistent with a function early in conjugation. Our studies are consistent with multiple roles for SUMOylation in Tetrahymena, including a dynamic regulation associated with the sexual life cycle. PMID:25527524

  7. Identification, functional characterization and developmental regulation of sesquiterpene synthases from sunflower capitate glandular trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, Jens C; MacNevin, Gillian; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Spring, Otmar

    2009-01-01

    Background Sesquiterpene lactones are characteristic metabolites of Asteraceae (or Compositae) which often display potent bioactivities and are sequestered in specialized organs such as laticifers, resin ducts, and trichomes. For characterization of sunflower sesquiterpene synthases we employed a simple method to isolate pure trichomes from anther appendages which facilitated the identification of these genes and investigation of their enzymatic functions and expression patterns during trichome development. Results Glandular trichomes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were isolated, and their RNA was extracted to investigate the initial steps of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments led to the identification of three sesquiterpene synthases. By combination of in vitro and in vivo characterization of sesquiterpene synthase gene products in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, two enzymes were identified as germacrene A synthases, the key enzymes of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Due to the very low in vitro activity, the third enzyme was expressed in vivo in yeast as a thioredoxin-fusion protein for functional characterization. In in vivo assays, it was identified as a multiproduct enzyme with the volatile sesquiterpene hydrocarbon δ-cadinene as one of the two main products with α-muuorlene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene and α-copaene as minor products. The second main compound remained unidentified. For expression studies, glandular trichomes from the anther appendages of sunflower florets were isolated in particular developmental stages from the pre- to the post-secretory phase. All three sesquiterpene synthases were solely upregulated during the biosynthetically active stages of the trichomes. Expression in different aerial plant parts coincided with occurrence and maturity of trichomes. Young roots with root hairs showed expression of the sesquiterpene synthase genes as well. Conclusion This

  8. The RNA-binding protein LIN28B regulates developmental timing in the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Erin J.; Benito-Gonzalez, Ana; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Proper tissue development requires strict coordination of proliferation, growth, and differentiation. Strict coordination is particularly important for the auditory sensory epithelium, where deviations from the normal spatial and temporal pattern of auditory progenitor cell (prosensory cell) proliferation and differentiation result in abnormal cellular organization and, thus, auditory dysfunction. The molecular mechanisms involved in the timing and coordination of auditory prosensory proliferation and differentiation are poorly understood. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein LIN28B as a critical regulator of developmental timing in the murine cochlea. We show that Lin28b and its opposing let-7 miRNAs are differentially expressed in the auditory sensory lineage, with Lin28b being highly expressed in undifferentiated prosensory cells and let-7 miRNAs being highly expressed in their progeny—hair cells (HCs) and supporting cells (SCs). Using recently developed transgenic mouse models for LIN28B and let-7g, we demonstrate that prolonged LIN28B expression delays prosensory cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation, resulting in HC and SC patterning and maturation defects. Surprisingly, let-7g overexpression, although capable of inducing premature prosensory cell cycle exit, failed to induce premature HC differentiation, suggesting that LIN28B’s functional role in the timing of differentiation uses let-7 independent mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of LIN28B or let-7g can significantly alter the postnatal production of HCs in response to Notch inhibition; LIN28B has a positive effect on HC production, whereas let-7 antagonizes this process. Together, these results implicate a key role for the LIN28B/let-7 axis in regulating postnatal SC plasticity. PMID:26139524

  9. Children with Williams syndrome: Developmental trajectories for intellectual abilities, vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Pitts, C Holley

    2015-06-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4-15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (>7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (<7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered.

  10. Developmental cascade effects of the New Beginnings Program on adolescent adaptation outcomes.

    PubMed

    McClain, Darya Bonds; Wolchik, Sharlene A; Winslow, Emily; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N; Millsap, Roger E

    2010-11-01

    Using data from a 6-year longitudinal follow-up sample of 240 youth who participated in a randomized experimental trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families with children ages 9-12, the current study tested alternative cascading pathways by which the intervention decreased symptoms of internalizing disorders, symptoms of externalizing disorders, substance use, and risky sexual behavior and increased self-esteem and academic performance in mid- to late adolescence (15-19 years old). It was hypothesized that the impact of the program on adolescent adaptation outcomes would be explained by progressive associations between program-induced changes in parenting and youth adaptation outcomes. The results supported a cascading model of program effects in which the program was related to increased mother-child relationship quality that was related to subsequent decreases in child internalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent increases in self-esteem and decreases in symptoms of internalizing disorders in adolescence. The results were also consistent with a model in which the program increased maternal effective discipline that was related to decreased child externalizing problems, which was related to subsequent decreases in symptoms of externalizing disorders, less substance use, and better academic performance in adolescence. There were no significant differences in the model based on level of baseline risk or adolescent gender. These results provide support for a cascading pathways model of child and adolescent development.

  11. Developmental Cascade Effects of the New Beginnings Program on Adolescent Adaptation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Darya D.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Winslow, Emily; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a 6-year longitudinal follow-up sample of 240 youth who participated in a randomized experimental trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families with children ages 9–12, the current study tested alternative cascading pathways by which the intervention decreased symptoms of internalizing disorders, symptoms of externalizing disorders, substance use, and risky sexual behavior, and increased self-esteem and academic performance in mid-to late-adolescence (15–19 years old). It was hypothesized that the impact of the program on adolescent adaptation outcomes would be explained by progressive associations between program-induced changes in parenting and youth adaptation outcomes. The results supported a cascading model of program effects in which the program was related to increased mother-child relationship quality, which was related to subsequent decreases in child internalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent increases in self-esteem and decreases in symptoms of internalizing disorders in adolescence. The results also were consistent with a model in which the program was related to increased maternal effective discipline, which was related to subsequent decreases in child externalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent decreases in symptoms of externalizing disorders, less substance use and better academic performance in adolescence. There were no significant differences in the model based on level of baseline risk or adolescent gender. These results provide support for a cascading pathways model of child and adolescent development. PMID:20883581

  12. Threat of resource loss: The role of self-regulation in adaptive task performance.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Cornelia; Jimmieson, Nerina L

    2016-03-01

    Changes at work are often accompanied with the threat of, or actual, resource loss. Through an experiment, we investigated the detrimental effect of the threat of resource loss on adaptive task performance. Self-regulation (i.e., task focus and emotion control) was hypothesized to buffer the negative relationship between the threat of resource loss and adaptive task performance. Adaptation was conceptualized as relearning after a change in task execution rules. Threat of resource loss was manipulated for 100 participants undertaking an air traffic control task. Using discontinuous growth curve modeling, 2 kinds of adaptation--transition adaptation and reacquisition adaptation--were differentiated. The results showed that individuals who experienced the threat of resource loss had a stronger drop in performance (less transition adaptation) and a subsequent slower recovery (less reacquisition adaptation) compared with the control group who experienced no threat. Emotion control (but not task focus) moderated the relationship between the threat of resource loss and transition adaptation. In this respect, individuals who felt threatened but regulated their emotions performed better immediately after the task change (but not later on) compared with those individuals who felt threatened and did not regulate their emotions as well. However, later on, relearning (reacquisition adaptation) under the threat of resource loss was facilitated when individuals concentrated on the task at hand.

  13. Children with Williams Syndrome: Developmental Trajectories for Intellectual Abilities, Vocabulary Abilities, and Adaptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Pitts, C. Holley

    2016-01-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4 – 15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (> 7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (< 7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. PMID:25989316

  14. Temperament, recalled parenting styles, and self-regulation: testing the developmental postulates of self-discrepancy theory.

    PubMed

    Manian, N; Strauman, T J; Denney, N

    1998-11-01

    Self-discrepancy theory (SDT) postulates that self-regulatory systems corresponding to the ideal and ought self-domains emerge from the influences of temperament (e.g., sensitivity to stimuli for positive vs. negative outcomes) and socialization (e.g., parenting behaviors and interpersonal outcome contingencies). This article reports 2 studies testing the developmental postulates of SDT concurrently and retrospectively. Study 1 showed that self-regulation with reference to the ideal vs. the ought domain was differentially associated with recollections of parenting styles of warmth and rejection, respectively. In Study 2, these findings were replicated, and self-regulation with reference to the ideal vs. ought domain was discriminantly associated with questionnaire measures of positive vs. negative temperament. Findings support the developmental postulates of SDT, despite the limitations of retrospective studies.

  15. Going beyond nutrition: regulation of potassium homoeostasis as a common denominator of plant adaptive responses to environment.

    PubMed

    Anschütz, Uta; Becker, Dirk; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-05-15

    Partially and fully completed plant genome sequencing projects in both lower and higher plants allow drawing a comprehensive picture of the molecular and structural diversities of plant potassium transporter genes and their encoded proteins. While the early focus of the research in this field was aimed on the structure-function studies and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying K(+) transport, availability of Arabidopsis thaliana mutant collections in combination with micro-array techniques have significantly advanced our understanding of K(+) channel physiology, providing novel insights into the transcriptional regulation of potassium homeostasis in plants. More recently, posttranslational regulation of potassium transport systems has moved into the center stage of potassium transport research. The current review is focused on the most exciting developments in this field. By summarizing recent work on potassium transporter regulation we show that potassium transport in general, and potassium channels in particular, represent important targets and are mediators of the cellular responses during different developmental stages in a plant's life cycle. We show that regulation of intracellular K(+) homeostasis is essential to mediate plant adaptive responses to a broad range of abiotic and biotic stresses including drought, salinity, and oxidative stress. We further link post-translational regulation of K(+) channels with programmed cell death and show that K(+) plays a critical role in controlling the latter process. Thus, is appears that K(+) is not just the essential nutrient required to support optimal plant growth and yield but is also an important signaling agent mediating a wide range of plant adaptive responses to environment.

  16. Going beyond nutrition: regulation of potassium homoeostasis as a common denominator of plant adaptive responses to environment.

    PubMed

    Anschütz, Uta; Becker, Dirk; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-05-15

    Partially and fully completed plant genome sequencing projects in both lower and higher plants allow drawing a comprehensive picture of the molecular and structural diversities of plant potassium transporter genes and their encoded proteins. While the early focus of the research in this field was aimed on the structure-function studies and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying K(+) transport, availability of Arabidopsis thaliana mutant collections in combination with micro-array techniques have significantly advanced our understanding of K(+) channel physiology, providing novel insights into the transcriptional regulation of potassium homeostasis in plants. More recently, posttranslational regulation of potassium transport systems has moved into the center stage of potassium transport research. The current review is focused on the most exciting developments in this field. By summarizing recent work on potassium transporter regulation we show that potassium transport in general, and potassium channels in particular, represent important targets and are mediators of the cellular responses during different developmental stages in a plant's life cycle. We show that regulation of intracellular K(+) homeostasis is essential to mediate plant adaptive responses to a broad range of abiotic and biotic stresses including drought, salinity, and oxidative stress. We further link post-translational regulation of K(+) channels with programmed cell death and show that K(+) plays a critical role in controlling the latter process. Thus, is appears that K(+) is not just the essential nutrient required to support optimal plant growth and yield but is also an important signaling agent mediating a wide range of plant adaptive responses to environment. PMID:24635902

  17. Arousal regulation and affective adaptation to human responsiveness by a robot that explores and learns a novel environment

    PubMed Central

    Hiolle, Antoine; Lewis, Matthew; Cañamero, Lola

    2014-01-01

    In the context of our work in developmental robotics regarding robot–human caregiver interactions, in this paper we investigate how a “baby” robot that explores and learns novel environments can adapt its affective regulatory behavior of soliciting help from a “caregiver” to the preferences shown by the caregiver in terms of varying responsiveness. We build on two strands of previous work that assessed independently (a) the differences between two “idealized” robot profiles—a “needy” and an “independent” robot—in terms of their use of a caregiver as a means to regulate the “stress” (arousal) produced by the exploration and learning of a novel environment, and (b) the effects on the robot behaviors of two caregiving profiles varying in their responsiveness—“responsive” and “non-responsive”—to the regulatory requests of the robot. Going beyond previous work, in this paper we (a) assess the effects that the varying regulatory behavior of the two robot profiles has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the robots; (b) bring together the two strands previously investigated in isolation and take a step further by endowing the robot with the capability to adapt its regulatory behavior along the “needy” and “independent” axis as a function of the varying responsiveness of the caregiver; and (c) analyze the effects that the varying regulatory behavior has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the adaptive robot. PMID:24860492

  18. Arousal regulation and affective adaptation to human responsiveness by a robot that explores and learns a novel environment.

    PubMed

    Hiolle, Antoine; Lewis, Matthew; Cañamero, Lola

    2014-01-01

    In the context of our work in developmental robotics regarding robot-human caregiver interactions, in this paper we investigate how a "baby" robot that explores and learns novel environments can adapt its affective regulatory behavior of soliciting help from a "caregiver" to the preferences shown by the caregiver in terms of varying responsiveness. We build on two strands of previous work that assessed independently (a) the differences between two "idealized" robot profiles-a "needy" and an "independent" robot-in terms of their use of a caregiver as a means to regulate the "stress" (arousal) produced by the exploration and learning of a novel environment, and (b) the effects on the robot behaviors of two caregiving profiles varying in their responsiveness-"responsive" and "non-responsive"-to the regulatory requests of the robot. Going beyond previous work, in this paper we (a) assess the effects that the varying regulatory behavior of the two robot profiles has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the robots; (b) bring together the two strands previously investigated in isolation and take a step further by endowing the robot with the capability to adapt its regulatory behavior along the "needy" and "independent" axis as a function of the varying responsiveness of the caregiver; and (c) analyze the effects that the varying regulatory behavior has on the exploratory and learning patterns of the adaptive robot.

  19. Paradoxical cardiovascular effects of implementing adaptive emotion regulation strategies in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Aldao, Amelia; Mennin, Douglas S

    2012-02-01

    Recent models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have expanded on Borkovec's avoidance theory by delineating emotion regulation deficits associated with the excessive worry characteristic of this disorder (see Behar, DiMarco, Hekler, Mohlman, & Staples, 2009). However, it has been difficult to determine whether emotion regulation is simply a useful heuristic for the avoidant properties of worry or an important extension to conceptualizations of GAD. Some of this difficulty may arise from a focus on purported maladaptive regulation strategies, which may be confounded with symptomatic distress components of the disorder (such as worry). We examined the implementation of adaptive regulation strategies by participants with and without a diagnosis of GAD while watching emotion-eliciting film clips. In a between-subjects design, participants were randomly assigned to accept, reappraise, or were not given specific regulation instructions. Implementation of adaptive regulation strategies produced differential effects in the physiological (but not subjective) domain across diagnostic groups. Whereas participants with GAD demonstrated lower cardiac flexibility when implementing adaptive regulation strategies than when not given specific instructions on how to regulate, healthy controls showed the opposite pattern, suggesting they benefited from the use of adaptive regulation strategies. We discuss the implications of these findings for the delineation of emotion regulation deficits in psychopathology. PMID:22218164

  20. Developmental-stage-specific expression and regulation of an amphotropic retroviral receptor in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C; Bank, A

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the transmembrane receptor protein Ram-1 may be critical to optimizing retroviral gene transfer. Ram-1 acts as both a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter and a receptor for amphotropic retroviruses. We previously reported detectable Ram-1 in murine hematopoietic fetal liver cells (FLC) despite resistance of these cells to amphotropic retroviral transduction (infection). We document here that Ram-1 expression is completely absent in murine yolk sac cells from days 9.5 through 13.5 of ontogeny and first appears at low levels in midgestational FLC between days 13.5 and 14.5. In addition, Ram-1 expression is detected only in more differentiated populations within FLC, day 14.5, and not in those highly enriched for stem cells, indicating developmental regulation of Ram-1 during murine hematopoiesis. Others have reported the in vitro use of phosphate-free medium as a stimulus to increase levels of Ram-1 mRNA in nonhematopoietic cells. We now demonstrate that Ram-1 poly(A)+ mRNA increases significantly following culture of FLC in phosphate-free medium. Further, transduction of FLC in phosphate-free medium with an amphotropic retrovirus containing the multiple drug resistance gene leads to gene transfer not observed previously. These data demonstrate that (i) the normal resistance of FLC to amphotropic transduction is most likely due to an insufficient number of Ram-1 molecules for efficient retroviral recognition and binding, and (ii) Ram-1 can be upregulated by increasing the need for phosphate transport across the cell membrane. PMID:8754824

  1. A WNT1-regulated developmental gene cascade prevents dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult En1(+/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhong; Götz, Sebastian; Vogt Weisenhorn, Daniela M; Simeone, Antonio; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2015-10-01

    The protracted and age-dependent degeneration of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of the Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the mammalian midbrain is a hallmark of human Parkinson's Disease (PD) and of certain genetic mouse models of PD, such as mice heterozygous for the homeodomain transcription factor Engrailed 1 (En1(+/-) mice). Neurotoxin-based animal models of PD, in contrast, are characterized by the fast and partly reversible degeneration of the SNc and VTA DA neurons. The secreted protein WNT1 was previously shown to be strongly induced in the neurotoxin-injured adult ventral midbrain (VM), and to protect the SNc and VTA DA neurons from cell death in this context. We demonstrate here that the sustained and ectopic expression of Wnt1 in the SNc and VTA DA neurons of En1(+/Wnt1) mice also protected these genetically affected En1 heterozygote (En1(+/-)) neurons from their premature degeneration in the adult mouse VM. We identified a developmental gene cascade that is up-regulated in the adult En1(+/Wnt1) VM, including the direct WNT1/β-catenin signaling targets Lef1, Lmx1a, Fgf20 and Dkk3, as well as the indirect targets Pitx3 (activated by LMX1A) and Bdnf (activated by PITX3). We also show that the secreted neurotrophin BDNF and the secreted WNT modulator DKK3, but not the secreted growth factor FGF20, increased the survival of En1 mutant dopaminergic neurons in vitro. The WNT1-mediated signaling pathway and its downstream targets BDNF and DKK3 might thus provide a useful means to treat certain genetic and environmental (neurotoxic) forms of human PD.

  2. S-(-)equol production is developmentally regulated and related to early diet composition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nadine M; Galandi, Stephanie L; Summer, Suzanne S; Zhao, Xueheng; Heubi, James E; King, Eileen C; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2014-05-01

    S-(-)7-hydroxy-3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-chroman, or S-(-)equol, a biologically active intestinally derived bacterial metabolite of the soy isoflavones daidzin/daidzein, is not produced in neonatal life. Because its synthesis is dependent on equol-producing bacteria, we hypothesized that early nutrition may influence equol production. This prospective 2.5-year study determined the frequency of S-(-)equol production in healthy infants (n = 90) fed breast milk, soy infant formula, or cow's milk formula in their first year. Urinary S-(-)equol and daidzein were quantified by mass spectrometry after a standardized 3.5-day soy isoflavone challenge. Infants were tested at 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months of age, and 3-day diet records were obtained at each visit to explore the effect of early and postweaning (>12 months) macronutrient and micronutrient dietary composition and S-(-)equol production. Use of antibiotics was also recorded. At age 6 months, none of the breast-fed infants produced S-(-)equol, whereas 3.8% and 6.0%, respectively, of soy and cow's milk formula-fed infants were equol producers. By age 3 years, 50% of the formula-fed infants were equol producers, compared with 25% of breast-fed infants. Use of antibiotics was prevalent among infants and may have impacted the stability of S-(-)equol production. No significant differences among the groups were observed in postweaning dietary intakes of total energy, carbohydrate, fiber, protein, fat, saturated fatty acids, or polyunsaturated fatty acids and the propensity to make S-(-)equol. In conclusion, S-(-)equol production is developmentally regulated and initially related to diet composition with the proportion of equol producers increasing over the first 3 years of life, with a trend for formula feeding favoring S-(-)equol production.

  3. S-(–)equol production is developmentally regulated and related to early diet composition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nadine M.; Galandi, Stephanie L.; Summer, Suzanne S.; Zhao, Xueheng; Heubi, James E.; King, Eileen C.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.

    2016-01-01

    S-(−)7-hydroxy-3-(4′-hydroxyphenyl)-chroman, or S-(−)equol, a biologically active intestinally derived bacterial metabolite of the soy isoflavones daidzin/daidzein, is not produced in neonatal life. Because its synthesis is dependent on equol-producing bacteria, we hypothesized that early nutrition may influence equol production. This prospective 2.5-year study determined the frequency of S-(−)equol production in healthy infants (n = 90) fed breast milk, soy infant formula, or cow’s milk formula in their first year. Urinary S-(−)equol and daidzein were quantified by mass spectrometry after a standardized 3.5-day soy isoflavone challenge. Infants were tested at 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months of age, and 3-day diet records were obtained at each visit to explore the effect of early and postweaning (>12 months) macronutrient and micronutrient dietary composition and S-(−)equol production. Use of antibiotics was also recorded. At age 6 months, none of the breast-fed infants produced S-(−)equol, whereas 3.8% and 6.0%, respectively, of soy and cow’s milk formula–fed infants were equol producers. By age 3 years, 50% of the formula-fed infants were equol producers, compared with 25% of breast-fed infants. Use of antibiotics was prevalent among infants and may have impacted the stability of S-(−)equol production. No significant differences among the groups were observed in postweaning dietary intakes of total energy, carbohydrate, fiber, protein, fat, saturated fatty acids, or polyunsaturated fatty acids and the propensity to make S-(−)equol. In conclusion, S-(−)equol production is developmentally regulated and initially related to diet composition with the proportion of equol producers increasing over the first 3 years of life, with a trend for formula feeding favoring S-(−)equol production. PMID:24916553

  4. Developmental Regulation of Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Family Gene Expression in Tung Tree Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Shockey, Jay M.; Klasson, K. Thomas; Chapital, Dorselyn C.; Mason, Catherine B.; Scheffler, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGAT) catalyze the final and rate-limiting step of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in eukaryotic organisms. DGAT genes have been identified in numerous organisms. Multiple isoforms of DGAT are present in eukaryotes. We previously cloned DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes of tung tree (Vernicia fordii), whose novel seed TAGs are useful in a wide range of industrial applications. The objective of this study was to understand the developmental regulation of DGAT family gene expression in tung tree. To this end, we first cloned a tung tree gene encoding DGAT3, a putatively soluble form of DGAT that possesses 11 completely conserved amino acid residues shared among 27 DGAT3s from 19 plant species. Unlike DGAT1 and DGAT2 subfamilies, DGAT3 is absent from animals. We then used TaqMan and SYBR Green quantitative real-time PCR, along with northern and western blotting, to study the expression patterns of the three DGAT genes in tung tree tissues. Expression results demonstrate that 1) all three isoforms of DGAT genes are expressed in developing seeds, leaves and flowers; 2) DGAT2 is the major DGAT mRNA in tung seeds, whose expression profile is well-coordinated with the oil profile in developing tung seeds; and 3) DGAT3 is the major form of DGAT mRNA in tung leaves, flowers and immature seeds prior to active tung oil biosynthesis. These results suggest that DGAT2 is probably the major TAG biosynthetic isoform in tung seeds and that DGAT3 gene likely plays a significant role in TAG metabolism in other tissues. Therefore, DGAT2 should be a primary target for tung oil engineering in transgenic organisms. PMID:24146944

  5. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  6. Identity of the NMDA receptor coagonist is synapse specific and developmentally regulated in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Le Bail, Matildé; Martineau, Magalie; Sacchi, Silvia; Yatsenko, Natalia; Radzishevsky, Inna; Conrod, Sandrine; Ait Ouares, Karima; Wolosker, Herman; Pollegioni, Loredano; Billard, Jean-Marie; Mothet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) require the coagonists d-serine or glycine for their activation, but whether the identity of the coagonist could be synapse specific and developmentally regulated remains elusive. We therefore investigated the contribution of d-serine and glycine by recording NMDAR-mediated responses at hippocampal Schaffer collaterals (SC)–CA1 and medial perforant path–dentate gyrus (mPP–DG) synapses in juvenile and adult rats. Selective depletion of endogenous coagonists with enzymatic scavengers as well as pharmacological inhibition of endogenous d-amino acid oxidase activity revealed that d-serine is the preferred coagonist at SC–CA1 mature synapses, whereas, unexpectedly, glycine is mainly involved at mPP–DG synapses. Nevertheless, both coagonist functions are driven by the levels of synaptic activity as inferred by recording long-term potentiation generated at both connections. This regional compartmentalization in the coagonist identity is associated to different GluN1/GluN2A to GluN1/GluN2B subunit composition of synaptic NMDARs. During postnatal development, the replacement of GluN2B- by GluN2A-containing NMDARs at SC–CA1 synapses parallels a change in the identity of the coagonist from glycine to d-serine. In contrast, NMDARs subunit composition at mPP–DG synapses is not altered and glycine remains the main coagonist throughout postnatal development. Altogether, our observations disclose an unprecedented relationship in the identity of the coagonist not only with the GluN2 subunit composition at synaptic NMDARs but also with astrocyte activity in the developing and mature hippocampus that reconciles the complementary functions of d-serine and glycine in modulating NMDARs during the maturation of tripartite glutamatergic synapses. PMID:25550512

  7. Developmental and Environmental Regulation of Aquaporin Gene Expression across Populus Species: Divergence or Redundancy?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvère; Merret, Rémy; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Moretti, Sébastien; Bizet, François; Guilliot, Agnès; Hummel, Irène

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane channels belonging to the major intrinsic proteins family and are known for their ability to facilitate water movement. While in Populus trichocarpa, AQP proteins form a large family encompassing fifty-five genes, most of the experimental work focused on a few genes or subfamilies. The current work was undertaken to develop a comprehensive picture of the whole AQP gene family in Populus species by delineating gene expression domain and distinguishing responsiveness to developmental and environmental cues. Since duplication events amplified the poplar AQP family, we addressed the question of expression redundancy between gene duplicates. On these purposes, we carried a meta-analysis of all publicly available Affymetrix experiments. Our in-silico strategy controlled for previously identified biases in cross-species transcriptomics, a necessary step for any comparative transcriptomics based on multispecies design chips. Three poplar AQPs were not supported by any expression data, even in a large collection of situations (abiotic and biotic constraints, temporal oscillations and mutants). The expression of 11 AQPs was never or poorly regulated whatever the wideness of their expression domain and their expression level. Our work highlighted that PtTIP1;4 was the most responsive gene of the AQP family. A high functional divergence between gene duplicates was detected across species and in response to tested cues, except for the root-expressed PtTIP2;3/PtTIP2;4 pair exhibiting 80% convergent responses. Our meta-analysis assessed key features of aquaporin expression which had remained hidden in single experiments, such as expression wideness, response specificity and genotype and environment interactions. By consolidating expression profiles using independent experimental series, we showed that the large expansion of AQP family in poplar was accompanied with a strong divergence of gene expression, even if some cases of functional redundancy

  8. Have studies of the developmental regulation of behavioral phenotypes revealed the mechanisms of gene-environment interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T. G.

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses the recent convergence of our long-standing knowledge of the regulation of behavioral phenotypes by developmental experience with recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating gene expression. This review supports a particular perspective on the developmental regulation of behavioral phenotypes: That the role of common developmental experiences (e.g. maternal interactions, peer interactions, exposure to a complex environment, etc.) is to fit individuals to the circumstances of their lives within bounds determined by long-standing (evolutionary) mechanisms that have shaped responses to critical and fundamental types of experience via those aspects of gene structure that regulate gene expression. The phenotype of a given species is not absolute for a given genotype but rather variable within bounds that are determined by mechanisms regulated by experience (e.g. epigenetic mechanisms). This phenotypic variation is not necessarily random, or evenly distributed along a continuum of description or measurement, but often highly disjointed, producing distinct, even opposing, phenotypes. The potentiality for these varying phenotypes is itself the product of evolution, the potential for alternative phenotypes itself conveying evolutionary advantage. Examples of such phenotypic variation, resulting from environmental or experiential influences, have a long history of study in neurobiology, and a number of these will be discussed in this review: neurodevelopmental experiences that produce phenotypic variation in visual perception, cognitive function, and emotional behavior. Although other examples will be discussed, particular emphasis will be made on the role of social behavior on neurodevelopment and phenotypic determination. It will be argued that an important purpose of some aspects of social behavior is regulation of neurobehavioral phenotypes by experience via genetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22643448

  9. Developmental adaptation of withdrawal reflexes to early alteration of peripheral innervation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, H; Schouenborg, J

    1996-01-01

    1. In adult decerebrate spinal rats whose plantar nerves (PLN) had been transected at either postnatal day 1 (P1) or P21 the nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) of musculi extensor digitorum longus (EDL), peroneus longus (PER) and semitendinosus (ST) were characterized with respect to receptive field (RF) organization, magnitude and time course, using electromyography. Thermal (short CO2 laser pulses) and mechanical (calibrated pinch) stimulation were used. The innervation patterns in normal and lesioned adult rats were assessed by acute nerve lesions. 2. The spatial organization of the mean mechano- and thermonociceptive RFs of all the muscles studied was similar to normal in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats, although in some P21-lesioned rats atypical EDL RFs were encountered. 3. In P1-lesioned rats thermo-NWR of PER and EDL had normal magnitudes, while mechano-NWR were reduced. In P21-lesioned rats both thermo- and mechano-NWR of these muscles had reduced magnitudes. Except for thermo-NWR of ST in P1-lesioned rats, which were increased, NWR of ST had normal magnitudes in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats. The time course of thermonociceptive NWR of the muscles studied were near normal in both P1- and P21-lesioned rats. 4. Acute nerve lesions in adult P1-lesioned rats revealed an essentially abolished contribution to NWR from the PLN. Instead, the contribution to NWR from other hindpaw nerves, such as the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, was dramatically increased. By contrast, in P21-lesioned rats, the regenerated PLN contributed significantly to the NWR. 5. It is concluded that despite profound alterations of plantar hindpaw innervation induced by early PLN transection the cutaneous nociceptive input to NWR attained an essentially normal spatial organization. An experience-dependent mechanism is suggested to be instrumental in adapting the reflex connectivity to the peripheral innervation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID

  10. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  11. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  12. Developmental consequences of early parenting experiences: self-recognition and self-regulation in three cultural communities.

    PubMed

    Keller, Heidi; Yovsi, Relindis; Borke, Joern; Kärtner, Joscha; Jensen, Henning; Papaligoura, Zaira

    2004-01-01

    This study relates parenting of 3-month-old children to children's self-recognition and self-regulation at 18 to 20 months. As hypothesized, observational data revealed differences in the sociocultural orientations of the 3 cultural samples' parenting styles and in toddlers' development of self-recognition and self-regulation. Children of Cameroonian Nso farmers who experience a proximal parenting style develop self-regulation earlier, children of Greek urban middle-class families who experience a distal parenting style develop self-recognition earlier, and children of Costa Rican middle-class families who experience aspects of both distal and proximal parenting styles fall between the other 2 groups on both self-regulation and self-recognition. Results are discussed with respect to their implications for culturally informed developmental pathways.

  13. Assessment of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Mixtures of Regulated Drinking Water Chlorination By-Products in a Multigenerational Rat Bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse reproductive and developmental effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. To address these concerns, we provided mixtures of the regulated trihalomethanes (THMs; chlorof...

  14. Developmental shifts in frequency distribution of polysomal mRNA and their posttranscriptional regulation in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, G W; Nemer, M

    1980-08-01

    The frequency distributions of polyadenylylated RNAs from the polysomes of sea urchin blastulae and gastrulae were estimated from their kinetics of hybridization with complementary DNA. Developmental decreases in complexity were observed among abundant, intermediate, and rare frequency classes. The class of highest abundance in the blastula polysomes had a complexity of 5.6 X 10(4) nucleotides and contained about 30 mRNA species, which divided into subsets according to developmental fate. Studies with purified DNA complementary to this abundant class revealed that five of these mRNA species remained abundant in the gastrula, wherein each comprised 2% of the polyadenylylated RNA in the polysomes. Approximately 5 species decreased to a nearly rare frequency and 20 were absent or at the limits of detection in polyadenylylated RNA of gastrula polysomes. These distinctly different developmental fates suggest distinct modes of regulation of mRNA concentration for different subsets. Focusing on the small number of abundant blastula mRNAs, we ascertained that those which were absent from gastrula polysomes were nevertheless represented in the gastrula nuclear RNA. Therefore, the appearance of abundant mRNA species in polysomes can be regulated by posttranscriptional processes. PMID:6933514

  15. Mutations in global regulators lead to metabolic selection during adaptation to complex environments

    DOE PAGES

    Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Valovska, Marie -Thérèse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Leiser, Owen P.; et al

    2014-12-11

    Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Unlike adaptation to a single limiting resource, adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes since many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased geneticmore » and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that a subtle modulation of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order “metabolic selection” that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a “one-step” mechanism of adaptation to a novel

  16. 76 FR 33065 - Adaptation of Regulations to Incorporate Swaps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... year in a separate release. See Position Limits for Derivatives, 76 FR 4752, Jan. 26, 2011. All NPRMs... for regulation 1.3(zz). See Agricultural Commodity Definition, 75 FR 65586, Oct. 26, 2010... Regarding the Mitigation of Conflicts of Interest, 75 FR 63732, Oct. 18, 2010. However, as each...

  17. [Adaptive and Maladaptive Strategies of Emotion Regulation in Adolescents with ADHD].

    PubMed

    Lange, Sarah; Tröster, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated differences between adolescents with ADHD and control subjects in their adaptive und maladaptive regulation of negative emotions. We assessed emotion regulation strategies using the German self-report questionnaire FEEL-KJ in a sample of adolescents (between 11 and 18 years) with ADHD (disturbance of activity, impulsivity and attention: n = 32, hyperkinetic conduct disorder: n = 26) and controls (n = 58). We found that adolescents with ADHD reported using less adaptive strategies for dealing with negative emotions than control subjects. No effects were found for maladaptive emotion regulation strategies for anger, fear and sadness. Our findings indicate that adolescents with ADHD should be encouraged in the development of adaptive emotion regulation. PMID:27184787

  18. Developmental change in the neurophysiological correlates of self-regulation in high- and low-emotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Connie; Lewis, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important tasks of childhood is learning to self-regulate in the presence of negative emotions. Until recently, almost no research has examined the neurophysiological correlates of emotional self-regulation as it develops over childhood and adolescence. We were interested in plotting a fine-grained developmental profile of the neural underpinnings of self-regulation, in the context of negative emotion, for 7- to 14-year-old children. We predicted that children would recruit less cortical activation with age in the service of self-regulation, reflecting increased neural efficiency with development. We also predicted that children would recruit more cortical activation with increased negative emotion, possibly reflecting greater demand on cortical resources. We administered a go/nogo task with an emotion induction block and we measured the amplitude of the N2, an event-related potential associated with inhibitory control, as it varied with block and with age. Furthermore, we estimated activation for a ventral prefrontal region of interest (ROI; suggestive of orbital frontal, ventromedial prefrontal, or rostral anterior cingulate activation) and a dorsomedial prefrontal ROI (suggestive of dorsal anterior cingulate activation) frequently modeled as cortical generators underlying the N2. Results revealed a marginal decrease in mediofrontal scalp activation, but a more pronounced decrease in activation of the ventromedial prefrontal ROI, with age. There were no age-related changes in dorsomedial prefrontal ROI activation. Lastly, as predicted, we found increased ventral prefrontal ROI activation during the negative emotion induction, possibly reflecting greater recruitment of frontocortical resources underlying emotion regulation, but developmental change in this activation was no different than for the other conditions. Thus, both self-regulation in general and emotion regulation in particular recruited less cortical activation with age, suggesting more

  19. Developmental change in the neurophysiological correlates of self-regulation in high- and low-emotion conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Connie; Lewis, Marc D

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important tasks of childhood is learning to self-regulate in the presence of negative emotions. Until recently, almost no research has examined the neurophysiological correlates of emotional self-regulation as it develops over childhood and adolescence. We were interested in plotting a fine-grained developmental profile of the neural underpinnings of self-regulation, in the context of negative emotion, for 7- to 14-year-old children. We predicted that children would recruit less cortical activation with age in the service of self-regulation, reflecting increased neural efficiency with development. We also predicted that children would recruit more cortical activation with increased negative emotion, possibly reflecting greater demand on cortical resources. We administered a Go No-Go task with an emotion induction block and we measured the amplitude of the N2, an event related potential associated with inhibitory control, as it varied with block and with age. Furthermore, we estimated activation for a ventral prefrontal region of interest (ROI; suggestive of orbital frontal, ventromedial prefrontal, or rostral anterior cingulate activation) and a dorsomedial prefrontal ROI (suggestive of dorsal anterior cingulate activation) frequently modeled as cortical generators underlying the N2. Results revealed a marginal decrease in mediofrontal scalp activation, but a more pronounced decrease in activation of the ventromedial prefrontal ROI, with age. There were no age-related changes in dorsomedial prefrontal ROI activation. Lastly, as predicted, we found increased ventral prefrontal ROI activation during the negative emotion induction, possibly reflecting greater recruitment of frontocortical resources underlying emotion regulation, but developmental change in this activation was no different than for the other conditions. Thus, both self-regulation in general and emotion regulation in particular recruited less cortical activation with age, suggesting more

  20. Mitochondria in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Samuel E; Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2015-03-17

    Mitochondria are well appreciated for their role as biosynthetic and bioenergetic organelles. In the past two decades, mitochondria have emerged as signaling organelles that contribute critical decisions about cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. Mitochondria not only sustain immune cell phenotypes but also are necessary for establishing immune cell phenotype and their function. Mitochondria can rapidly switch from primarily being catabolic organelles generating ATP to anabolic organelles that generate both ATP and building blocks for macromolecule synthesis. This enables them to fulfill appropriate metabolic demands of different immune cells. Mitochondria have multiple mechanisms that allow them to activate signaling pathways in the cytosol including altering in AMP/ATP ratio, the release of ROS and TCA cycle metabolites, as well as the localization of immune regulatory proteins on the outer mitochondrial membrane. In this Review, we discuss the evidence and mechanisms that mitochondrial dependent signaling controls innate and adaptive immune responses.

  1. Developmental regulation and partial-length cloning of tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen of murine metanephros.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Ota, K; Wada, J; Wallner, E I; Charonis, A S; Carone, F A; Kanwar, Y S

    1997-09-01

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen (TIN-ag) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein that has been recently isolated and cloned from the rabbit kidney. It is an integral component of the basal lamina, and unlike other basement membrane proteins it is exclusively expressed in the tubular basement membranes (TBMs). Since other ECM glycoproteins have been shown to regulate development of various organ systems, studies were initiated to ascertain its developmental regulation in renal tubulogenesis and glomerulogenesis. Embryonic (day-13 and -17 of gestation), newborn and one-week-old mice kidneys were harvested for expression of TIN-ag as well as cDNA cloning studies. Immunostaining with polyclonal anti-TIN-ag antibody revealed its localization to the basal lamina of ureteric bud branches and epithelial elements of developing nephrons in day-13 embryonic kidneys. Interestingly, it was heavily expressed at the tips of the ureteric bud branches, and was not expressed in the distal convolutions of the S-shaped body stage of the nephrons, the region which forms the future glomerulus. At day-17, TIN-ag expression was less, and the immuno-reactivity was mainly localized to the cortex. In the newborn and one-week-old mice kidneys, the cortical expression of TIN-ag increased progressively, but was absent in the glomeruli. The TIN-ag expression was confined to the cortical TBMs, while absent in the medullary tubules, the latter included segments of the collecting ducts and loop of Henle. Immunoprecipitation studies on [35S]methionine-labeled metanephroi revealed a single band of approximately 58 kDa at day-13, and the incorporated radioactivity decreased at day-17. No high molecular weight isoforms were observed. A partial-length mouse TIN-ag cDNA of approximately 530 bp PCR product was generated, and it had approximately 88% and approximately 93% nucleotide and amino acid sequence homolgy, respectively, with rabbit TIN-ag. Utilizing this cDNA, Northern blot analyses

  2. Mutations in Global Regulators Lead to Metabolic Selection during Adaptation to Complex Environments

    PubMed Central

    Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Valovska, Marie-Thérèse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Leiser, Owen P.; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes if many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that subtle modulations of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order metabolic selection that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism, and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a “one-step” mechanism of adaptation to a novel environment, which highlights the importance of global resource management

  3. Regulation of Emotions in Socially Challenging Learning Situations: An Instrument to Measure the Adaptive and Social Nature of the Regulation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvenoja, Hanna; Volet, Simone; Jarvela, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) research has conventionally relied on measures, which treat SRL as an aptitude. To study self-regulation and motivation in learning contexts as an ongoing adaptive process, situation-specific methods are needed in addition to static measures. This article presents an "Adaptive Instrument for Regulation of Emotions"…

  4. DEVELOPMENTAL REGULATION OF PROTEIN KINASE B ACTIVATION IS ISOFORM SPECIFIC IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial activation of the insulin signaling pathway that leads to translation initiation is enhanced in skeletal muscle of the neonate and decreases with development in parallel with the developmental decline in muscle protein synthesis. Our previous study showed that the activity of protei...

  5. Adaptation of ovarian cancer cells to the peritoneal environment: Multiple mechanisms of the developmental patterning gene HOXA9

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Song Yi; Naora, Honami

    2015-01-01

    The lethality of ovarian cancer stems from its propensity to involve the peritoneal cavity. However, the mechanisms that enable ovarian cancer cells to readily adapt to the peritoneal environment are not well understood. Here, we describe our recent studies in which we identified the mechanisms by which the transcription factor encoded by the patterning gene HOXA9 promotes the aggressive behavior of ovarian cancer. Firstly, we identified that HOXA9 promotes ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis by activating the gene encoding transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), which in turn stimulates peritoneal fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells to acquire features of cancer-associated fibroblasts. Secondly, by inducing TGF-β2 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, HOXA9 stimulates peritoneal macrophages to acquire an immunosuppressive phenotype. Thirdly, HOXA9 stimulates attachment of ovarian cancer cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells by inducing expression of P-cadherin. By inducing P-cadherin, HOXA9 also enables floating cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity to form aggregates and escape anoikis. Together, our studies demonstrate that HOXA9 enables ovarian cancer cells to adapt to the peritoneal environment and ‘educates’ different types of stromal cells to become permissive for tumor growth. Our studies provide new insights into the regulation of tumor-stroma interactions in ovarian cancer and implicate several key effector molecules as candidate therapeutic targets. PMID:26000332

  6. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  7. A role for pectin de-methylesterification in a developmentally regulated growth acceleration in dark-grown Arabidopsis hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Sandra; Van Orden, Jürgen; Wolf, Sebastian; Vissenberg, Kris; Delacourt, Julien; Ndong, Yves Assoumou; Pelloux, Jérôme; Bischoff, Volker; Urbain, Aurélie; Mouille, Grégory; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Höfte, Herman

    2010-11-01

    • We focused on a developmentally regulated growth acceleration in the dark-grown Arabidopsis hypocotyl to study the role of changes in cell wall metabolism in the control of cell elongation. • To this end, precise transcriptome analysis on dissected dark-grown hypocotyls, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy and kinematic analysis were used. • Using a cellulose synthesis inhibitor, we showed that the growth acceleration marks a developmental transition during which growth becomes uncoupled from cellulose synthesis. We next investigated the cellular changes that take place during this transition. FT-IR microspectroscopy revealed significant changes in cell wall composition during, but not after, the growth acceleration. Transcriptome analysis suggested a role for cell wall remodeling, in particular pectin modification, in this growth acceleration. This was confirmed by the overexpression of a pectin methylesterase inhibitor, which caused a delay in the growth acceleration. • This study shows that the acceleration of cell elongation marks a developmental transition in dark-grown hypocotyl cells and supports a role for pectin de-methylesterification in the timing of this event.

  8. Parental Influences on Children's Self-Regulation of Energy Intake: Insights from Developmental Literature on Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Leslie A.; Hughes, Sheryl O.; O'Connor, Teresia M.; Power, Thomas G.; Fisher, Jennifer O.; Hazen, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    The following article examines the role of parents in the development of children's self-regulation of energy intake. Various paths of parental influence are offered based on the literature on parental influences on children's emotion self-regulation. The parental paths include modeling, responses to children's behavior, assistance in helping children self-regulate, and motivating children through rewards and punishments. Additionally, sources of variation in parental influences on regulation are examined, including parenting style, child temperament, and child-parent attachment security. Parallels in the nature of parents' role in socializing children's regulation of emotions and energy intake are examined. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:22545206

  9. Epigenetic regulation of adaptive responses of forest tree species to the environment

    PubMed Central

    Bräutigam, Katharina; Vining, Kelly J; Lafon-Placette, Clément; Fossdal, Carl G; Mirouze, Marie; Marcos, José Gutiérrez; Fluch, Silvia; Fraga, Mario Fernández; Guevara, M Ángeles; Abarca, Dolores; Johnsen, Øystein; Maury, Stéphane; Strauss, Steven H; Campbell, Malcolm M; Rohde, Antje; Díaz-Sala, Carmen; Cervera, María-Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic variation is likely to contribute to the phenotypic plasticity and adaptative capacity of plant species, and may be especially important for long-lived organisms with complex life cycles, including forest trees. Diverse environmental stresses and hybridization/polyploidization events can create reversible heritable epigenetic marks that can be transmitted to subsequent generations as a form of molecular “memory”. Epigenetic changes might also contribute to the ability of plants to colonize or persist in variable environments. In this review, we provide an overview of recent data on epigenetic mechanisms involved in developmental processes and responses to environmental cues in plant, with a focus on forest tree species. We consider the possible role of forest tree epigenetics as a new source of adaptive traits in plant breeding, biotechnology, and ecosystem conservation under rapid climate change. PMID:23467802

  10. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26844865

  11. Adaptive regulation of glucose transport, glycolysis and respiration for cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yusuke; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2015-12-01

    The cell must utilise nutrients to generate energy as a means of sustaining its life. As the environment is not necessarily abundant in nutrients and oxygen, the cell must be able to regulate energy metabolism to adapt to changes in extracellular and intracellular conditions. Recently, several key regulators of energy metabolism have been reported. This review describes the recent advances in molecular regulation of energy metabolism, focusing mainly on glycolysis and its shunt pathways. Human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders, are also discussed in relation to failure of energy metabolism regulation.

  12. Butterfly wing pattern mutants: developmental heterochrony and co-ordinately regulated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Koch, P B; Lorenz, U; Brakefield, P M; ffrench-Constant, R H

    2000-11-01

    Butterfly wings are colored late in development, when pigments are synthesized in specialized wing scale cells in a fixed developmental succession. In this succession, colored pigments are deposited first and the remaining areas are later melanized black or brown. Here we studied the developmental changes underlying two wing pattern mutants, firstly melanic mutants of the swallowtail Papilio glaucus, in which the yellow background is turned black, and secondly a Spotty mutant of the satyrid Bicyclus anynana, which carries two additional eyespots. Despite the very different pattern changes in these two mutants, they are both associated with changes in rates of scale development and correspondingly, the final color pattern. In the melanic swallowtail, background scales originally destined to become yellow (normally developing early and synthesizing papiliochrome) show delayed development, fail to make papiliochrome, and subsequently melanize at the same time as scales in the wild-type black pattern. In the B. anynana eyespot, scale maturation begins with the central white focus, then progresses to the surrounding gold ring and later finishes with melanization of the black center. Mutants showing additional eyespots display accelerated rates of scale development (corresponding to new eyespots) in wing cells not normally occupied by eyespots. Thus by either delaying or accelerating rates of scale development, the final color, or position, of a wing pattern element can be changed. We propose that this heterochrony of scale development is a basic mechanism of color pattern formation on which developmental mutants act to change lepidopteran color patterns. PMID:11180804

  13. Butterfly wing pattern mutants: developmental heterochrony and co-ordinately regulated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Koch, P B; Lorenz, U; Brakefield, P M; ffrench-Constant, R H

    2000-11-01

    Butterfly wings are colored late in development, when pigments are synthesized in specialized wing scale cells in a fixed developmental succession. In this succession, colored pigments are deposited first and the remaining areas are later melanized black or brown. Here we studied the developmental changes underlying two wing pattern mutants, firstly melanic mutants of the swallowtail Papilio glaucus, in which the yellow background is turned black, and secondly a Spotty mutant of the satyrid Bicyclus anynana, which carries two additional eyespots. Despite the very different pattern changes in these two mutants, they are both associated with changes in rates of scale development and correspondingly, the final color pattern. In the melanic swallowtail, background scales originally destined to become yellow (normally developing early and synthesizing papiliochrome) show delayed development, fail to make papiliochrome, and subsequently melanize at the same time as scales in the wild-type black pattern. In the B. anynana eyespot, scale maturation begins with the central white focus, then progresses to the surrounding gold ring and later finishes with melanization of the black center. Mutants showing additional eyespots display accelerated rates of scale development (corresponding to new eyespots) in wing cells not normally occupied by eyespots. Thus by either delaying or accelerating rates of scale development, the final color, or position, of a wing pattern element can be changed. We propose that this heterochrony of scale development is a basic mechanism of color pattern formation on which developmental mutants act to change lepidopteran color patterns.

  14. Using Community-based Participatory Research to Adapt keepin’ it REAL: Creating a Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders

    PubMed Central

    Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade “keepin’ it REAL” prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step adaptation model, emphasized a collaborative approach, both transformative and empowering. Essential adaptation elements were the Risk-to-Resiliency Continuum; the teaching of a wide range of skills including risk assessment, decision making, and resistance strategies; and, maintaining the theoretical grounding of Narrative Theory, Communication Competence, and Focus Theory of Norms. This paper describes how CBPR methodology can be conducted successfully while focusing on sustained theoretical grounding and effective research practices in a school-based setting. PMID:21057596

  15. Implications of Childhood Experiences for the Health and Adaptation of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals: Sensitivity to Developmental Process in Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The empirical literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals has predominantly focused on sexual-orientation disparities between LGB and heterosexual individuals on health and adaptation, as well as on the role of gay-related or minority stress in the health and adaptation of LGB individuals. Aside from demographic control variables, the initial predictor is a marker of sexual orientation or LGB-related experience (e.g., minority stress). Missing are potential strengths and vulnerabilities that LGB individuals develop over time and bring to bear on their sexual identity development and other LGB-related experiences. Those strengths and vulnerabilities may have profound consequences for the sexual identity development, health, and adaptation of LGB individuals. Here, I focus on one such set of strengths and vulnerabilities derived from attachment. I conclude by emphasizing the importance of attachment in the lives of LGB individuals and the need to identify other developmental processes that may be equally consequential. PMID:26900586

  16. Merging of Research and Teaching in Developmental Biology: Adaptation of Current Scientific Research Papers for Use in Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, H. H.; and others

    1970-01-01

    Describes two laboratory exercises adopted from current research papers for use in an undergraduate developmental biology course. Gives methods, summary of student results, and student comments. Lists lecture topics, text and reprint assignments, and laboratory exercises for course. (EB)

  17. Regulation of early T-lineage gene expression and developmental progression by the progenitor cell transcription factor PU.1.

    PubMed

    Champhekar, Ameya; Damle, Sagar S; Freedman, George; Carotta, Sebastian; Nutt, Stephen L; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2015-04-15

    The ETS family transcription factor PU.1 is essential for the development of several blood lineages, including T cells, but its function in intrathymic T-cell precursors has been poorly defined. In the thymus, high PU.1 expression persists through multiple cell divisions in early stages but then falls sharply during T-cell lineage commitment. PU.1 silencing is critical for T-cell commitment, but it has remained unknown how PU.1 activities could contribute positively to T-cell development. Here we employed conditional knockout and modified antagonist PU.1 constructs to perturb PU.1 function stage-specifically in early T cells. We show that PU.1 is needed for full proliferation, restricting access to some non-T fates, and controlling the timing of T-cell developmental progression such that removal or antagonism of endogenous PU.1 allows precocious access to T-cell differentiation. Dominant-negative effects reveal that this repression by PU.1 is mediated indirectly. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identifies novel targets of PU.1 positive and negative regulation affecting progenitor cell signaling and cell biology and indicating distinct regulatory effects on different subsets of progenitor cell transcription factors. Thus, in addition to supporting early T-cell proliferation, PU.1 regulates the timing of activation of the core T-lineage developmental program.

  18. Regulation of early T-lineage gene expression and developmental progression by the progenitor cell transcription factor PU.1

    PubMed Central

    Champhekar, Ameya; Damle, Sagar S.; Freedman, George; Carotta, Sebastian; Nutt, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    The ETS family transcription factor PU.1 is essential for the development of several blood lineages, including T cells, but its function in intrathymic T-cell precursors has been poorly defined. In the thymus, high PU.1 expression persists through multiple cell divisions in early stages but then falls sharply during T-cell lineage commitment. PU.1 silencing is critical for T-cell commitment, but it has remained unknown how PU.1 activities could contribute positively to T-cell development. Here we employed conditional knockout and modified antagonist PU.1 constructs to perturb PU.1 function stage-specifically in early T cells. We show that PU.1 is needed for full proliferation, restricting access to some non-T fates, and controlling the timing of T-cell developmental progression such that removal or antagonism of endogenous PU.1 allows precocious access to T-cell differentiation. Dominant-negative effects reveal that this repression by PU.1 is mediated indirectly. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identifies novel targets of PU.1 positive and negative regulation affecting progenitor cell signaling and cell biology and indicating distinct regulatory effects on different subsets of progenitor cell transcription factors. Thus, in addition to supporting early T-cell proliferation, PU.1 regulates the timing of activation of the core T-lineage developmental program. PMID:25846797

  19. Challenges to Developmental Regulation across the Life Course: What Are They and Which Individual Differences Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the major processes involved in individuals' motivation and self-regulation of goal striving throughout the life course. While much is regulated based on the biological and societal scaffolding of lifespan development, certain challenges for motivation and self-regulation are more substantial and need to be managed by the individual,…

  20. Parental influences on children's self-regulation of energy intake: Insights from developmental literature on emotion regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article examines the role of parents in the development of children's self-regulation of energy intake. Various paths of parental influence are offered based on the literature on parental influences on children's emotion self-regulation. The parental paths include modeling, responses to childre...

  1. Direct Adaptive Control of Utility-Scale Wind Turbine for Speed Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S. A.; Balas, M. J.; Wright, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    The accurate modeling of wind turbines is an extremely challenging problem due to the tremendous complexity of the machines and the turbulent and unpredictable conditions in which they operate. Adaptive control techniques are well suited to nonlinear applications, such as wind turbines, which are difficult to accurately model and which have effects from poorly known operating environments. In this paper, we extended the direct model reference adaptive control (DMRAC) approach to track a reference point and to reject persistent disturbances. This approach was then used to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller was to regulate generator speed in Region 3 and to reject step disturbances. The control objective was accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The turbine simulation models the controls advanced research turbine (CART) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The CART is a utility-scale wind turbine that has a well-developed and extensively verified simulator. This novel application of adaptive control was compared in simulations with a classical proportional integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. In the simulations, the adaptive pitch controller showed improved speed regulation in Region 3 when compared with the PI pitch controller.

  2. Mutations in global regulators lead to metabolic selection during adaptation to complex environments

    SciTech Connect

    Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Valovska, Marie -Thérèse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Leiser, Owen P.; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Shamoo, Yousif; Matic, Ivan

    2014-12-11

    Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Unlike adaptation to a single limiting resource, adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes since many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that a subtle modulation of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order “metabolic selection” that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a

  3. Constructive, Self-Regulated, Situated, and Collaborative Learning: An Approach for the Acquisition of Adaptive Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Corte, Erik

    2012-01-01

    In today's learning society, education must focus on fostering adaptive competence (AC) defined as the ability to apply knowledge and skills flexibly in different contexts. In this article, four major types of learning are discussed--constructive, self-regulated, situated, and collaborative--in relation to what students must learn in order to…

  4. ADHD and Adaptability: The Roles of Cognitive, Behavioural, and Emotional Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Emma; Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptability has been recently proposed as cognitive, behavioural, and emotional regulation assisting individuals to effectively respond to change, uncertainty and novelty. Given students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have known impairments with regulatory functions, they may be at particular disadvantage as they seek to…

  5. Characteristics of Social-Psychological Adaptation and Self-Regulation in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsv?tkova, Nadezhda A.; Aleksandrova, Marina I.; Rybakova, Anna Igorevna; Starovoitova, Larisa I.; Kononova, Tatiana B.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of searching for answers to the following questions: Which are the characteristics of socio-psychological adaptation and self-regulation behavior in patients with diabetes mellitus type II? What is the nature of the relationship between these personal characteristics? In particular, it contains results of…

  6. Brain Networks Subserving Emotion Regulation and Adaptation after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    van der Horn, Harm J; Liemburg, Edith J; Aleman, André; Spikman, Jacoba M; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustain a mild injury (mTBI). One out of 4 patients experiences persistent complaints, despite their often normal neuropsychological test results and the absence of structural brain damage on conventional neuroimaging. Susceptibility to develop persistent complaints is thought to be affected by interindividual differences in adaptation, which can also be influenced by preinjury psychological factors. Coping is a key construct of adaptation and refers to strategies to deal with new situations and serious life events. An important element of coping is the ability to regulate emotions and stress. The prefrontal cortex is a crucial area in this regulation process, given that it exerts a top-down influence on the amygdala and other subcortical structures involved in emotion processing. However, little is known about the role of the prefrontal cortex and associated brain networks in emotion regulation and adaptation post-mTBI. Especially, the influence of prefrontal dysfunction on development of persistent postconcussive complaints is poorly understood. In this article, we aim to integrate findings from functional and structural MRI studies on this topic. Alterations within the default mode, executive and salience network have been found in relation to complaints post-mTBI. Dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex may impair network dynamics for emotion regulation and adaptation post-mTBI, resulting in persistent post-concussive complaints. PMID:25962860

  7. Does Adaptive Scaffolding Facilitate Students' Ability to Regulate their Learning with Hypermedia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Roger; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Seibert, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Is adaptive scaffolding effective in facilitating students' ability to regulate their learning of complex science topics with hypermedia? We examined the role of different scaffolding instructional interventions in facilitating students' shift to more sophisticated mental models as indicated by both performance and process data. Undergraduate…

  8. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Flight Control Using Engine Differentials: Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Liu; Xidong, Tang; Gang, Tao; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of using engine thrust differentials to compensate for rudder and aileron failures in aircraft flight control is addressed in this paper in a new framework. A nonlinear aircraft model that incorporates engine di erentials in the dynamic equations is employed and linearized to describe the aircraft s longitudinal and lateral motion. In this model two engine thrusts of an aircraft can be adjusted independently so as to provide the control flexibility for rudder or aileron failure compensation. A direct adaptive compensation scheme for asymptotic regulation is developed to handle uncertain actuator failures in the linearized system. A design condition is specified to characterize the system redundancy needed for failure compensation. The adaptive regulation control scheme is applied to the linearized model of a large transport aircraft in which the longitudinal and lateral motions are coupled as the result of using engine thrust differentials. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive compensation scheme.

  9. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio C. A.; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  10. Genome-Wide Ultrabithorax Binding Analysis Reveals Highly Targeted Genomic Loci at Developmental Regulators and a Potential Connection to Polycomb-Mediated Regulation.

    PubMed

    Shlyueva, Daria; Meireles-Filho, Antonio C A; Pagani, Michaela; Stark, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Hox homeodomain transcription factors are key regulators of animal development. They specify the identity of segments along the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans by controlling the expression of diverse downstream targets, including transcription factors and signaling pathway components. The Drosophila melanogaster Hox factor Ultrabithorax (Ubx) directs the development of thoracic and abdominal segments and appendages, and loss of Ubx function can lead for example to the transformation of third thoracic segment appendages (e.g. halters) into second thoracic segment appendages (e.g. wings), resulting in a characteristic four-wing phenotype. Here we present a Drosophila melanogaster strain with a V5-epitope tagged Ubx allele, which we employed to obtain a high quality genome-wide map of Ubx binding sites using ChIP-seq. We confirm the sensitivity of the V5 ChIP-seq by recovering 7/8 of well-studied Ubx-dependent cis-regulatory regions. Moreover, we show that Ubx binding is predictive of enhancer activity as suggested by comparison with a genome-scale resource of in vivo tested enhancer candidates. We observed densely clustered Ubx binding sites at 12 extended genomic loci that included ANTP-C, BX-C, Polycomb complex genes, and other regulators and the clustered binding sites were frequently active enhancers. Furthermore, Ubx binding was detected at known Polycomb response elements (PREs) and was associated with significant enrichments of Pc and Pho ChIP signals in contrast to binding sites of other developmental TFs. Together, our results show that Ubx targets developmental regulators via strongly clustered binding sites and allow us to hypothesize that regulation by Ubx might involve Polycomb group proteins to maintain specific regulatory states in cooperative or mutually exclusive fashion, an attractive model that combines two groups of proteins with prominent gene regulatory roles during animal development. PMID:27575958

  11. Developmentally Regulated RNA Transcripts Coding for Alcohol Dehydrogenase in DROSOPHILA AFFINIDISJUNCTA

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Robert G.; Brennan, Mark D.; Dickinson, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The organization of the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in Drosophila affinidisjuncta has been determined by physically mapping Adh RNA transcripts to cloned genomic DNA. Two distinct transcript types accumulate with developmental specificity. Because only a single genomic Adh locus is detected in D. affinidisjuncta , and since all Adh transcripts appear to be identical except at their termini, the two Adh RNA types are products of the same gene. One type of transcript, abundant in adults, contains a small 5' terminal exon that is completely lacking in the other type of transcript, which accumulates in larvae. This 5' end difference suggests that the D. affinidisjuncta Adh gene, like the homologous gene from the distantly related species D. melanogaster, is expressed from two promoters. According to the transcription map, these D. affinidisjuncta promoters are separated by approximately 560 base pairs of genomic DNA sequence. D. affinidisjuncta Adh transcripts also resemble D. melanogaster Adh transcripts in both their overall organization and their developmental distribution. Multiple 3' ends are responsible for the size heterogeneity of both types of D. affinidisjuncta Adh RNA, and some of these also appear with stage specificity. PMID:2429897

  12. Characterization of Plasmodium developmental transcriptomes in Anopheles gambiae midgut reveals novel regulators of malaria transmission.

    PubMed

    Akinosoglou, Karolina A; Bushell, Ellen S C; Ukegbu, Chiamaka Valerie; Schlegelmilch, Timm; Cho, Jee-Sun; Redmond, Seth; Sala, Katarzyna; Christophides, George K; Vlachou, Dina

    2015-02-01

    The passage through the mosquito is a major bottleneck for malaria parasite populations and a target of interventions aiming to block disease transmission. Here, we used DNA microarrays to profile the developmental transcriptomes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei in vivo, in the midgut of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, from parasite stages in the midgut blood bolus to sporulating oocysts on the basal gut wall. Data analysis identified several distinct transcriptional programmes encompassing genes putatively involved in developmental processes or in interactions with the mosquito. At least two of these programmes are associated with the ookinete development that is linked to mosquito midgut invasion and establishment of infection. Targeted disruption by homologous recombination of two of these genes resulted in mutant parasites exhibiting notable infection phenotypes. GAMER encodes a short polypeptide with granular localization in the gametocyte cytoplasm and shows a highly penetrant loss-of-function phenotype manifested as greatly reduced ookinete numbers, linked to impaired male gamete release. HADO encodes a putative magnesium phosphatase with distinctive cortical localization along the concave ookinete periphery. Disruption of HADO compromises ookinete development leading to significant reduction of oocyst numbers. Our data provide important insights into the molecular framework underpinning Plasmodium development in the mosquito and identifies two genes with important functions at initial stages of parasite development in the mosquito midgut.

  13. TORC1 Regulates Developmental Responses to Nitrogen Stress via Regulation of the GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1

    PubMed Central

    Laor, Dana; Cohen, Adiel; Kupiec, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The TOR (target of rapamycin [sirolimus]) is a universally conserved kinase that couples nutrient availability to cell growth. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe positively regulates growth in response to nitrogen availability while suppressing cellular responses to nitrogen stress. Here we report the identification of the GATA transcription factor Gaf1 as a positive regulator of the nitrogen stress-induced gene isp7+, via three canonical GATA motifs. We show that under nitrogen-rich conditions, TORC1 positively regulates the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of Gaf1 via the PP2A-like phosphatase Ppe1. Under nitrogen stress conditions when TORC1 is inactivated, Gaf1 becomes dephosphorylated and enters the nucleus. Gaf1 was recently shown to negatively regulate the transcription induction of ste11+, a major regulator of sexual development. Our findings support a model of a two-faceted role of Gaf1 during nitrogen stress. Gaf1 positively regulates genes that are induced early in the response to nitrogen stress, while inhibiting later responses, such as sexual development. Taking these results together, we identify Gaf1 as a novel target for TORC1 signaling and a step-like mechanism to modulate the nitrogen stress response. PMID:26152587

  14. Organizational Changes to Thyroid Regulation in Alligator mississippiensis: Evidence for Predictive Adaptive Responses

    PubMed Central

    Boggs, Ashley S. P.; Lowers, Russell H.; Cloy-McCoy, Jessica A.; Guillette, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, organisms are sensitive to changes in thyroid hormone signaling which can reset the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. It has been hypothesized that this developmental programming is a ‘predictive adaptive response’, a physiological adjustment in accordance with the embryonic environment that will best aid an individual's survival in a similar postnatal environment. When the embryonic environment is a poor predictor of the external environment, the developmental changes are no longer adaptive and can result in disease states. We predicted that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and environmentally-based iodide imbalance could lead to developmental changes to the thyroid axis. To explore whether iodide or EDCs could alter developmental programming, we collected American alligator eggs from an estuarine environment with high iodide availability and elevated thyroid-specific EDCs, a freshwater environment contaminated with elevated agriculturally derived EDCs, and a reference freshwater environment. We then incubated them under identical conditions. We examined plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations, thyroid gland histology, plasma inorganic iodide, and somatic growth at one week (before external nutrition) and ten months after hatching (on identical diets). Neonates from the estuarine environment were thyrotoxic, expressing follicular cell hyperplasia (p = 0.01) and elevated plasma triiodothyronine concentrations (p = 0.0006) closely tied to plasma iodide concentrations (p = 0.003). Neonates from the freshwater contaminated site were hypothyroid, expressing thyroid follicular cell hyperplasia (p = 0.01) and depressed plasma thyroxine concentrations (p = 0.008). Following a ten month growth period under identical conditions, thyroid histology (hyperplasia p = 0.04; colloid depletion p = 0.01) and somatic growth (body mass p<0.0001; length p = 0.02) remained altered among the

  15. The Role of Adaptation in Body Load-Regulating Mechanisms During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Holt, Christopher; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Body loading is a fundamental parameter that modulates motor output during locomotion, and is especially important for controlling the generation of stepping patterns, dynamic balance, and termination of locomotion. Load receptors that regulate and control posture and stance in locomotion include the Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles at the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the Ruffini endings and the Pacinian corpuscles in the soles of the feet. Increased body weight support (BWS) during locomotion results in an immediate reorganization of locomotor control, such as a reduction in stance and double support duration and decreased hip, ankle, and knee angles during the gait cycle. Previous studies on the effect during exposure to increased BWS while walking showed a reduction in lower limb joint angles and gait cycle timing that represents a reorganization of locomotor control. Until now, no studies have investigated how locomotor control responds after a period of exposure to adaptive modification in the body load sensing system. The goal of this research was to determine the adaptive properties of body load-regulating mechanisms in locomotor control during locomotion. We hypothesized that body load-regulating mechanisms contribute to locomotor control, and adaptive changes in these load-regulating mechanisms require reorganization to maintain forward locomotion. Head-torso coordination, lower limb movement patterns, and gait cycle timing were evaluated before and after a 30-minute adaptation session during which subjects walked on a treadmill at 5.4 km/hr with 40% body weight support (BWS). Before and after the adaptation period, head-torso and lower limb 3D kinematic data were obtained while performing a goal directed task during locomotion with 0% BWS using a video-based motion analysis system, and gait cycle timing parameters were collected by foot switches positioned under the heel and toe of the subjects shoes. Subjects showed adaptive modification in

  16. Regulation of the Adaptive Immune Response by the IκB Family Protein Bcl-3

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Felicity D.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-3 is a member of the IκB family of proteins and an important regulator of Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB activity. The ability of Bcl-3 to bind and regulate specific NF-κB dimers has been studied in great depth, but its physiological roles in vivo are still not fully understood. It is, however, becoming clear that Bcl-3 is essential for the proper development, survival and activity of adaptive immune cells. Bcl-3 dysregulation can be observed in a number of autoimmune pathologies, and Bcl3-deficient animals are more susceptible to bacterial and parasitic infection. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles played by Bcl-3 in the development and regulation of the adaptive immune response, including lymphoid organogenesis, immune tolerance, lymphocyte function and dendritic cell biology. PMID:27023613

  17. Developmental and environmental regulation of AaeIAP1 transcript in Aedes aegypti.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is a tightly regulated physiological process. The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are key regulators for apoptosis. An inhibitor of apoptosis protein gene IAP1 was recently cloned from Aedes aegypti (AaeIAP1, Genbank accession no. DQ993355), however, it is n...

  18. Chromatin states of developmentally-regulated genes revealed by DNA and histone methylation patterns in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Leif C; Winata, Cecilia L; Aanes, Hvard; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Alestrom, Peter; Collas, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Embryo development proceeds from a cascade of gene activation and repression events controlled by epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones. Little is known about epigenetic states in the developing zebrafish, despite its importance as a model organism. We report here DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of promoters of developmentally-regulated genes (pou5f1, sox2, sox3, klf4, nnr, otx1b, nes, vasa), as well as tert and bactin2, in zebrafish embryos at the mid-late blastula transition, shortly after embryonic genome activation. We identify four classes of promoters based on the following profiles: (i) those enriched in marks of active genes (H3K9ac, H4ac, H3K4me3) without transcriptionally repressing H3K9me3 or H3K27me3; (ii) those enriched in H3K9ac, H4ac and H3K27me3, without H3K9me3; one such gene was klf4, shown by in situ hybridization to be mosaically expressed, likely accounting for the detection of both activating and repressive marks on its promoter; (iii) those enriched in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 without acetylation; and (iv) those enriched in all histone modifications examined. Culture of embryo-derived cells under differentiation conditions leads to H3K9 and H4 deacetylation and H3K9 and H3K27 trimethylation on genes that are inactivated, yielding an epigenetic profile similar to those of fibroblasts or muscle. All promoters however retain H3K4me3, indicating an uncoupling of H3K4me3 occupancy and gene expression. All non-CpG island developmentally-regulated promoters are DNA unmethylated in embryos, but hypermethylated in fibroblasts. Our results suggest that differentially expressed embryonic genes are regulated by various patterns of histone modifications on unmethylated DNA, which create a developmentally permissive chromatin state. PMID:20336603

  19. White Adipose Tissue Development in Zebrafish Is Regulated by Both Developmental Time and Fish Size

    PubMed Central

    Imrie, Dru; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2010-01-01

    Adipocytes are heterogeneous. Whether their differences are attributed to anatomical location or to different developmental origins is unknown. We investigated whether development of different white adipose tissue (WAT) depots in zebrafish occurs simultaneously or whether adipogenesis is influenced by the metabolic demands of growing fish. Like mammals, zebrafish adipocyte morphology is distinctive and adipocytes express cell-specific markers. All adults contain WAT in pancreatic, subcutaneous, visceral, esophageal, mandibular, cranial, and tail-fin depots. Unlike most zebrafish organs that form during embryogenesis, WAT was not found in embryos or young larvae. Instead, WAT was first identified in the pancreas on 12 days postfertilization (dpf), and then in visceral, subcutaneous, and cranial stores in older fish. All 30 dpf fish exceeding 10.6 mm standard length contained the adult repertoire of WAT depots. Pancreatic, esophageal, and subcutaneous WAT appearance correlated with size, not age, as found for other features appearing during postembryonic zebrafish development. PMID:20925116

  20. Cutting Edge: Developmental Regulation of IFN-γ Production by Mouse Neutrophil Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sturge, Carolyn R; Burger, Elise; Raetz, Megan; Hooper, Lora V; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophils are an emerging cellular source of IFN-γ, a key cytokine that mediates host defense to intracellular pathogens. Production of IFN-γ by neutrophils, in contrast to lymphoid cells, is TLR- and IL-12-independent and the events associated with IFN-γ production by neutrophils are not understood. In this study, we show that mouse neutrophils express IFN-γ during their lineage development in the bone marrow niche at the promyelocyte stage independently of microbes. IFN-γ accumulates in primary neutrophilic granules and is released upon induction of degranulation. The developmental mechanism of IFN-γ production in neutrophils arms the innate immune cells prior to infection and assures the potential for rapid release of IFN-γ upon neutrophil activation, the first step during responses to many microbial infections. PMID:26026057

  1. Tracking developmentally regulated post-synthetic processing of homogalacturonan and chitin using reciprocal oligosaccharide probes.

    PubMed

    Mravec, Jozef; Kračun, Stjepan K; Rydahl, Maja G; Westereng, Bjørge; Miart, Fabien; Clausen, Mads H; Fangel, Jonatan U; Daugaard, Mathilde; Van Cutsem, Pierre; De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Höfte, Herman; Malinovsky, Frederikke G; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2014-12-01

    Polysaccharides are major components of extracellular matrices and are often extensively modified post-synthetically to suit local requirements and developmental programmes. However, our current understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics and functional significance of these modifications is limited by a lack of suitable molecular tools. Here, we report the development of a novel non-immunological approach for producing highly selective reciprocal oligosaccharide-based probes for chitosan (the product of chitin deacetylation) and for demethylesterified homogalacturonan. Specific reciprocal binding is mediated by the unique stereochemical arrangement of oppositely charged amino and carboxy groups. Conjugation of oligosaccharides to fluorophores or gold nanoparticles enables direct and rapid imaging of homogalacturonan and chitosan with unprecedented precision in diverse plant, fungal and animal systems. We demonstrated their potential for providing new biological insights by using them to study homogalacturonan processing during Arabidopsis thaliana root cap development and by analyzing sites of chitosan deposition in fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeletons. PMID:25395456

  2. Tracking developmentally regulated post-synthetic processing of homogalacturonan and chitin using reciprocal oligosaccharide probes.

    PubMed

    Mravec, Jozef; Kračun, Stjepan K; Rydahl, Maja G; Westereng, Bjørge; Miart, Fabien; Clausen, Mads H; Fangel, Jonatan U; Daugaard, Mathilde; Van Cutsem, Pierre; De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Höfte, Herman; Malinovsky, Frederikke G; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2014-12-01

    Polysaccharides are major components of extracellular matrices and are often extensively modified post-synthetically to suit local requirements and developmental programmes. However, our current understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics and functional significance of these modifications is limited by a lack of suitable molecular tools. Here, we report the development of a novel non-immunological approach for producing highly selective reciprocal oligosaccharide-based probes for chitosan (the product of chitin deacetylation) and for demethylesterified homogalacturonan. Specific reciprocal binding is mediated by the unique stereochemical arrangement of oppositely charged amino and carboxy groups. Conjugation of oligosaccharides to fluorophores or gold nanoparticles enables direct and rapid imaging of homogalacturonan and chitosan with unprecedented precision in diverse plant, fungal and animal systems. We demonstrated their potential for providing new biological insights by using them to study homogalacturonan processing during Arabidopsis thaliana root cap development and by analyzing sites of chitosan deposition in fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeletons.

  3. MicroRNAs in Breastmilk and the Lactating Breast: Potential Immunoprotectors and Developmental Regulators for the Infant and the Mother

    PubMed Central

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Human milk (HM) is the optimal source of nutrition, protection and developmental programming for infants. It is species-specific and consists of various bioactive components, including microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. microRNAs are both intra- and extra-cellular and are present in body fluids of humans and animals. Of these body fluids, HM appears to be one of the richest sources of microRNA, which are highly conserved in its different fractions, with milk cells containing more microRNAs than milk lipids, followed by skim milk. Potential effects of exogenous food-derived microRNAs on gene expression have been demonstrated, together with the stability of milk-derived microRNAs in the gastrointestinal tract. Taken together, these strongly support the notion that milk microRNAs enter the systemic circulation of the HM fed infant and exert tissue-specific immunoprotective and developmental functions. This has initiated intensive research on the origin, fate and functional significance of milk microRNAs. Importantly, recent studies have provided evidence of endogenous synthesis of HM microRNA within the human lactating mammary epithelium. These findings will now form the basis for investigations of the role of microRNA in the epigenetic control of normal and aberrant mammary development, and particularly lactation performance. PMID:26529003

  4. MicroRNAs in Breastmilk and the Lactating Breast: Potential Immunoprotectors and Developmental Regulators for the Infant and the Mother.

    PubMed

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-11-01

    Human milk (HM) is the optimal source of nutrition, protection and developmental programming for infants. It is species-specific and consists of various bioactive components, including microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. microRNAs are both intra- and extra-cellular and are present in body fluids of humans and animals. Of these body fluids, HM appears to be one of the richest sources of microRNA, which are highly conserved in its different fractions, with milk cells containing more microRNAs than milk lipids, followed by skim milk. Potential effects of exogenous food-derived microRNAs on gene expression have been demonstrated, together with the stability of milk-derived microRNAs in the gastrointestinal tract. Taken together, these strongly support the notion that milk microRNAs enter the systemic circulation of the HM fed infant and exert tissue-specific immunoprotective and developmental functions. This has initiated intensive research on the origin, fate and functional significance of milk microRNAs. Importantly, recent studies have provided evidence of endogenous synthesis of HM microRNA within the human lactating mammary epithelium. These findings will now form the basis for investigations of the role of microRNA in the epigenetic control of normal and aberrant mammary development, and particularly lactation performance. PMID:26529003

  5. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:26904693

  6. Adopting and Adapting Contextualization Strategies: A Practitioner Brief. Right from the Start: An Institutional Perspective on Developmental Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Leslie; Zandt, Alyson

    2014-01-01

    As described in this brief, Tacoma Community College and South Texas College each focused on contextualization as a cornerstone of developmental education reform, albeit with different approaches. With a comprehensive look at the experience at Tacoma Community College and a supplementary example from South Texas College, we begin to understand how…

  7. Adopting and Adapting Compression Strategies: A Practitioner Brief. Right from the Start: An Institutional Perspective on Developmental Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lass, Leslie; Powell, David S.

    2014-01-01

    This brief summarizes efforts to reform developmental education at Zane State College and the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC). Focused on accelerating student success and progress, the two schools pursued distinctive approaches to reform that aligned with their institutional missions and student populations. Recognizing that the…

  8. Developmental programming of energy balance regulation: Is physical activity more "programmable" than food intake?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive human and animal model data show that environmental influences during critical periods of prenatal and early postnatal development can cause persistent alterations in energy balance regulation. Although a potentially important factor in the worldwide obesity epidemic, the fundamental mecha...

  9. Caffeine biosynthesis and degradation in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is under developmental and seasonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Mohanpuria, Prashant; Kumar, Vinay; Joshi, Robin; Gulati, Ashu; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2009-10-01

    To study caffeine biosynthesis and degradation, here we monitored caffeine synthase gene expression and caffeine and allantoin content in various tissues of four Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze cultivars during non-dormant (ND) and dormant (D) growth phases. Caffeine synthase expression as well as caffeine content was found to be higher in commercially utilized tissues like apical bud, 1st leaf, 2nd leaf, young stem, and was lower in old leaf during ND compared to D growth phase. Among fruit parts, fruit coats have higher caffeine synthase expression, caffeine content, and allantoin content. On contrary, allantoin content was found lower in the commercially utilized tissues and higher in old leaf. Results suggested that caffeine synthesis and degradation in tea appears to be under developmental and seasonal regulation.

  10. The subcellular localization of Otx2 is cell-type specific and developmentally regulated in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Baas, D; Bumsted, K M; Martinez, J A; Vaccarino, F M; Wikler, K C; Barnstable, C J

    2000-05-31

    Recent evidence implicates homeodomain-containing proteins in the specification of cell fates in the central nervous system. Here we report that in the embryonic mouse eye Otx2, a paired homeodomain transcription factor, was found in retinal pigment epithelial cells and a restricted subset of retinal neurons, including ganglion cells. In the postnatal and adult eye, however, both the cellular and subcellular distribution of the Otx2 protein were cell type-specific. Otx2 was detected only in the nuclei of retinal pigment epithelial and bipolar cells, but was present in the cytoplasm of rod photoreceptors. Immunohistochemical studies of retinal explants and transfected cell lines both suggested that the retention of Otx2 in the cytoplasm of immature rods is a developmentally regulated process. The differential distribution of Otx2 in the cytoplasm of rods and the nucleus of other cell types, suggests that subcellular localization of this transcription factor may participate cell fate determination during specific phases of retinal development.

  11. How do different aspects of self-regulation predict successful adaptation to school?

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Regula; Röthlisberger, Marianne; Cimeli, Patrizia; Roebers, Claudia M

    2012-11-01

    Self-regulation plays an important role in successful adaptation to preschool and school contexts as well as in later academic achievement. The current study relates different aspects of self-regulation such as temperamental effortful control and executive functions (updating, inhibition, and shifting) to different aspects of adaptation to school such as learning-related behavior, school grades, and performance in standardized achievement tests. The relationship between executive functions/effortful control and academic achievement has been established in previous studies; however, little is known about their unique contributions to different aspects of adaptation to school and the interplay of these factors in young school children. Results of a 1-year longitudinal study (N=459) revealed that unique contributions of effortful control (parental report) to school grades were fully mediated by children's learning-related behavior. On the other hand, the unique contributions of executive functions (performance on tasks) to school grades were only partially mediated by children's learning-related behavior. Moreover, executive functions predicted performance in standardized achievement tests exclusively, with comparable predictive power for mathematical and reading/writing skills. Controlling for fluid intelligence did not change the pattern of prediction substantially, and fluid intelligence did not explain any variance above that of the two included aspects of self-regulation. Although effortful control and executive functions were not significantly related to each other, both aspects of self-regulation were shown to be important for fostering early learning and good classroom adjustment in children around transition to school. PMID:22920433

  12. Tissue-specific and developmentally regulated expression of a chimeric actin-globin gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shani, M

    1986-01-01

    A chimeric plasmid containing about 2/3 of the rat skeletal muscle actin gene plus 730 base pairs of its 5' flanking sequences fused to the 3' end of a human embryonic globin gene (D. Melloul, B. Aloni, J. Calvo, D. Yaffe, and U. Nudel, EMBO J. 3:983-990, 1984) was inserted into mice by microinjection into fertilized eggs. Eleven transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene with or without plasmid pBR322 DNA sequences were identified. The majority of these mice transmitted the injected DNA to about 50% of their progeny. However, in transgenic mouse CV1, transmission to progeny was associated with amplification or deletion of the injected DNA sequences, while in transgenic mouse CV4 transmission was distorted, probably as a result of insertional mutagenesis. Tissue-specific expression was dependent on the removal of the vector DNA sequences from the chimeric gene sequences prior to microinjection. None of the transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene together with plasmid pBR322 sequences expressed the introduced gene in striated muscles. In contrast, the six transgenic mice carrying the chimeric gene sequences alone expressed the inserted gene specifically in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, expression of the chimeric gene was not only tissue specific, but also developmentally regulated. Similar to the endogenous skeletal muscle actin gene, the chimeric gene was expressed at a relatively high level in cardiac muscle of neonatal mice and at a significantly lower level in adult cardiac muscle. These results indicate that the injected DNA included sufficient cis-acting control elements for its tissue-specific and developmentally regulated expression in transgenic mice. Images PMID:3023942

  13. Chronic up-regulation of the SHH pathway normalizes some developmental effects of trisomy in Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Tara; Hallberg, Dorothy; Reeves, Roger H

    2015-02-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is a highly complex developmental genetic disorder caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). All individuals with DS exhibit some degree of brain structural changes and cognitive impairment; mouse models such as Ts65Dn have been instrumental in understanding the underlying mechanisms. Several phenotypes of DS might arise from a reduced response of trisomic cells to the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) growth factor. If all trisomic cells show a similar reduced response to SHH, then up-regulation of the pathway in trisomic cells might ameliorate multiple DS phenotypes. We crossed Ptch1tm1Mps/+ mice, in which the canonical SHH pathway is expected to be up-regulated in every SHH-responsive cell due to the loss of function of one allele of the pathway suppressor, Ptch1, to the Ts65Dn DS model and assessed the progeny for possible rescue of multiple DS-related phenotypes. Down-regulation of Ptch produced several previously unreported effects on development by itself, complicating interpretation of some phenotypes, and a number of structural or behavioral effects of trisomy were not compensated by SHH signaling. However, a deficit in a nest-building task was partially restored in Ts;Ptch+/- mice, as were the structural anomalies of the cerebellum seen in Ts65Dn mice. These results extend the body of evidence indicating that reduced response to SHH in trisomic cells and tissues contributes to various aspects of the trisomic phenotype. PMID:25511459

  14. Developmental time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in the zebrafish neural rod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis requires developmental processes to occur both at the right time and in the right place. During neural tube formation in the zebrafish embryo, the generation of the apical specializations of the lumen must occur in the center of the neural rod after the neural cells have undergone convergence, invagination and interdigitation across the midline. How this coordination is achieved is uncertain. One possibility is that environmental signaling at the midline of the neural rod controls the schedule of apical polarization. Alternatively, polarization could be regulated by a timing mechanism and then independent morphogenetic processes ensure the cells are in the correct spatial location. Results Ectopic transplantation demonstrates the local environment of the neural midline is not required for neural cell polarization. Neural cells can self-organize into epithelial cysts in ectopic locations in the embryo and also in three-dimensional gel cultures. Heterochronic transplants demonstrate that the schedule of polarization and the specialized cell divisions characteristic of the neural rod are more strongly regulated by time than local environmental signals. The cells’ schedule for polarization is set prior to gastrulation, is stable through several rounds of cell division and appears independent of the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation and neurulation. Conclusions Time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in zebrafish neural rod. PMID:23521850

  15. Chronic up-regulation of the SHH pathway normalizes some developmental effects of trisomy in Ts65Dn mice

    PubMed Central

    Dutka, Tara; Hallberg, Dorothy; Reeves, Roger H.

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is a highly complex developmental genetic disorder caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). All individuals with DS exhibit some degree of brain structural changes and cognitive impairment; mouse models such as Ts65Dn have been instrumental in understanding the underlying mechanisms. Several phenotypes of DS might arise from a reduced response of trisomic cells to the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) growth factor. If all trisomic cells show a similar reduced response to SHH, then up-regulation of the pathway in trisomic cells might ameliorate multiple DS phenotypes. We crossed Ptch1tm1Mps/+ mice, in which the canonical SHH pathway is expected to be up-regulated in every SHH-responsive cell due to the loss of function of one allele of the pathway suppressor, Ptch1, to the Ts65Dn DS model and assessed the progeny for possible rescue of multiple DS-related phenotypes. Down-regulation of Ptch produced several previously unreported effects on development by itself, complicating interpretation of some phenotypes, and a number structural or behavioral effects of trisomy were not compensated by SHH signaling. However, a deficit in a nest-building task was partially restored in Ts;Ptch+/− mice, as were structural anomalies of the cerebellum in Ts65Dn mice. These results extend the body of evidence indicating that reduced response to SHH in trisomic cells and tissues contributes to various aspects of the trisomic phenotype. PMID:25511459

  16. Absence of canonical marks of active chromatin in developmentally regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lluch, Sílvia; Blanco, Enrique; Tilgner, Hagen; Curado, Joao; Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-10-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to have a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that the transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated with the stable production of RNA, whereas unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and deactivation during development. In the latter case, regulation by transcription factors would have a comparatively more important regulatory role than chromatin marks.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of string (cdc25): a link between developmental programming and the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Bruce A.; Lehman, Dara A.; O'Farrell, Patrick H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary During postblastoderm embryogenesis in Drosophila, cell cycles progress in an invariant spatiotemporal pattern. Most of these cycles are differentially timed by bursts of transcription of string (cdc25), a gene encoding a phosphatase that triggers mitosis by activating the Cdc2 kinase. An analysis of string expression in 36 pattern-formation mutants shows that known patterning genes act locally to influence string transcription. Embryonic expression of string gene fragments shows that the complete pattern of string transcription requires extensive cis-acting regulatory sequences (>15.3 kb), but that smaller segments of this regulatory region can drive proper temporal expression in defined spatial domains. We infer that string upstream sequences integrate many local signals to direct string's transcriptional program. Finally, we show that the spatiotemporal progression of string transcription is largely unaffected in mutant embryos specifically arrested in G2 of cycles 14, 15, or 16, or G1 of cycle 17. Thus, there is a regulatory hierarchy in which developmental inputs, not cell cycle inputs, control the timing of string transcription and hence cell cycle progression. PMID:7720557

  18. Epigenetic self-regulation of developmental excision of an internal eliminated sequence on Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Duharcourt, S; Butler, A; Meyer, E

    1995-08-15

    Differentiation of the somatic macronucleus of ciliates after sexual events involves the programmed excision of thousands of single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IESs) from the germ-line genome. We have studied two cell lines of Paramecium tetraurelia that have identical germ-line genomes but differ in their macronuclear genomes. In the IES- cell line, a 222-bp IES interrupting a coding sequence is reproducibly excised during macronuclear differentiation, whereas it is not in the IES+ cell line. In a cross between the two lines, the developmental alternative in maternally inherited, suggesting that it is epigenetically controlled by the old (prezygotic) macronucleus in each cell. Transformation of the macronucleus of both lines with plasmids carrying fragments of either version of the gene shows that the presence of the IES sequence in the old macronucleus results in retention of the IES in the new macronuclear genome of sexual progeny. This could be attributable to (1) inhibition of excision, or (2) repair of a double-strand gap left in the genomic sequence after constitutive excision of the IES, by a polymerization mechanism using a homologous IES+ template from the old macronucleus. The latter possibility is ruled out by experiments showing that modified IESs can inhibit excision without being copied in the new macronuclear genome. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of a quantitative analysis of excision inhibition by the maternal IES sequence. PMID:7649484

  19. Mutational analyses of fs(1)Ya, an essential, developmentally regulated, nuclear envelope protein in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Song, Kiwon; Wolfner, M.F.

    1995-12-01

    The fs(1)Ya protein (YA) is an essential, maternally encoded, nuclear lamina protein that is under both developmental and cell cycle control. A strong Ya mutation results in early arrest of embryos. To define the function of YA in the nuclear envelope during early embryonic development, we characterized the phenotypes of four Ya mutant alleles and determined their molecular lesions. Ya mutant embryos arrest with abnormal nuclear envelopes prior to the first mitotic division; a proportion of embryos from two leaky Ya mutants proceed beyond this but arrest after several abnormal divisions. Ya unfertilized eggs contain nuclei of different sizes and condensation states, apparently due to abnormal fusion of the meiotic products immediately after meiosis. Lamin is localized at the periphery of the uncondensed nuclei in these eggs. These results suggest that Ya function is required during and after egg maturation to facilitate proper chromatin condensation, rather than to allow a lamin-containing nuclear envelope to form. Two leaky Ya alleles that partially complement have lesions at opposite ends of the YA protein, suggesting that the N- and C-termini are important for YA function might interact with itself either directly or indirectly. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Developmental exposure to a complex PAH mixture causes persistent behavioral effects in naive Fundulus heteroclitus (killifish) but not in a population of PAH-adapted killifish.

    PubMed

    Brown, D R; Bailey, J M; Oliveri, A N; Levin, E D; Di Giulio, R T

    2016-01-01

    Acute exposures to some individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and complex PAH mixtures are known to cause cardiac malformations and edema in the developing fish embryo. However, the heart is not the only organ impacted by developmental PAH exposure. The developing brain is also affected, resulting in lasting behavioral dysfunction. While acute exposures to some PAHs are teratogenically lethal in fish, little is known about the later life consequences of early life, lower dose subteratogenic PAH exposures. We sought to determine and characterize the long-term behavioral consequences of subteratogenic developmental PAH mixture exposure in both naive killifish and PAH-adapted killifish using sediment pore water derived from the Atlantic Wood Industries Superfund Site. Killifish offspring were embryonically treated with two low-level PAH mixture dilutions of Elizabeth River sediment extract (ERSE) (TPAH 5.04 μg/L and 50.4 μg/L) at 24h post fertilization. Following exposure, killifish were raised to larval, juvenile, and adult life stages and subjected to a series of behavioral tests including: a locomotor activity test (4 days post-hatch), a sensorimotor response tap/habituation test (3 months post hatch), and a novel tank diving and exploration test (3months post hatch). Killifish were also monitored for survival at 1, 2, and 5 months over 5-month rearing period. Developmental PAH exposure caused short-term as well as persistent behavioral impairments in naive killifish. In contrast, the PAH-adapted killifish did not show behavioral alterations following PAH exposure. PAH mixture exposure caused increased mortality in reference killifish over time; yet, the PAH-adapted killifish, while demonstrating long-term rearing mortality, had no significant changes in mortality associated with ERSE exposure. This study demonstrated that early embryonic exposure to PAH-contaminated sediment pore water caused long-term locomotor and behavioral alterations in

  1. The History of Legislation and Regulations Related to Children with Developmental Disabilities: Implications for School Nursing Practice Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dang, Michelle T.

    2010-01-01

    A significant number of children in the United States have developmental disabilities. Historically, many children with developmental disabilities were institutionalized and rarely seen in public. Currently, children with developmental disabilities are entitled to education and health-related support services that permit them access to public…

  2. Emotion Regulation in the Brain: Conceptual Issues and Directions for Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marc D.; Stieben, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Emotion regulation cannot be temporally distinguished from emotion in the brain, but activation patterns in prefrontal cortex appear to mediate cognitive control during emotion episodes. Frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) can tap cognitive control hypothetically mediated by the anterior cingulate cortex, and developmentalists have used these…

  3. PPARy and GLUT-4 expression as developmental regulators/markers for preadipocyte differentiation into an adipocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this document, we have integrated knowledge about two major cellular markers found in cells of the adipocyte lineage. The first factor is PPARy, which has been identified as an important adipogenic regulator. PPARy plays an important role in converting adipofibroblasts, fibroblasts or preadipocyt...

  4. Developmental Trends in Self-Regulation among Low-Income Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raikes, H. Abigail; Robinson, JoAnn L.; Bradley, Robert H.; Raikes, Helen H.; Ayoub, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    The attainment of self-regulatory skills during the toddler years is an understudied issue, especially among low-income children. The present study used growth modeling to examine the change over time and the final status in children's abilities to self-regulate, in a sample of 2,441 low-income children aged 14 to 36 months. Positive growth in…

  5. Toward a Developmental Model of Child Compliance: The Role of Emotion Regulation in Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifter, Cynthia A.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.

    1999-01-01

    Examined relationship between emotion regulation at ages 5, 10, and 18 months, and compliance at 30 months. Found that infants with low levels of regulatory behavior were more likely to be noncompliant as toddlers. High cardiac vagal tone was related to noncompliance to toy clean-up, whereas low cardiac vagal tone was related to noncompliance to…

  6. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  7. Structure, organization and evolution of developmentally regulated chorion genes in a silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Jones, C W; Kafatos, F C

    1980-12-01

    We describe in detail two cloned chromosomal DNA segments from Antheraea polyphemus, each bearing multiple chorion genes. Two types of genes are found per segment, each in two or three copies: they belong to both major chorion multigene families (A and B), but are expressed during the same developmental period (middle choriongenesis in one segment, late in the other). A and B genes alternate and are paired, lie in divergent transcriptional orientation and are in very close proximity to each other (mRNA cap sites are separated by a 5' flanking sequence 264 or 325 bp long). Each AB pair is embedded within a large, tandemly repeating unit. Within that unit, the homologous 3' flanking sequences that separate gene pairs evolve rapidly and are frequently interrupted by long segments representing inserts (or deletions). These segments would decrease unequal crossing-over, facilitating rapid evolution of the chorion multigene families. A total of 10.4 kb of DNA has been sequenced, permitting detailed comparisons of genes, their introns, 5' flanking and immediately 3' flanking regions. Genes range over two orders of sequence similarity, from highly releated to very disparate (gene copies; members of the same multigene family; members of different families). Among their universal features are a common cap-site sequence, a single intron invariably located at the same position within the signal peptide-encoding region, and a Hogness box 21 to 23 nucleotides upstream from the cap site. Features of possible paired promoters occupying the short 5' flanking region are discussed. Genes evolve both by base substitutions and by segmental mutations, which are almost invariably deletions/insertions related to small, direct repeats.

  8. Structural and Functional Features of a Developmentally Regulated Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Krasity, Benjamin C.; Troll, Joshua V.; Lehnert, Erik M.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding proteins (LBPs) occur mainly in extracellular fluids and promote LPS delivery to specific host cell receptors. The function of LBPs has been studied principally in the context of host defense; the possible role of LBPs in nonpathogenic host-microbe interactions has not been well characterized. Using the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri model, we analyzed the structure and function of an LBP family protein, E. scolopes LBP1 (EsLBP1), and provide evidence for its role in triggering a symbiont-induced host developmental program. Previous studies showed that, during initial host colonization, the LPS of V. fischeri synergizes with peptidoglycan (PGN) monomer to induce morphogenesis of epithelial tissues of the host animal. Computationally modeled EsLBP1 shares some but not all structural features of mammalian LBPs that are thought important for LPS binding. Similar to human LBP, recombinant EsLBP1 expressed in insect cells bound V. fischeri LPS and Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with nanomolar or greater affinity but bound Francisella tularensis LPS only weakly and did not bind PGN monomer. Unlike human LBP, EsLBP1 did not bind N. meningitidis LOS:CD14 complexes. The eslbp1 transcript was upregulated ~22-fold by V. fischeri at 24 h postinoculation. Surprisingly, this upregulation was not induced by exposure to LPS but, rather, to the PGN monomer alone. Hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) localized eslbp1 transcript and protein in crypt epithelia, where V. fischeri induces morphogenesis. The data presented here provide a window into the evolution of LBPs and the scope of their roles in animal symbioses. PMID:26463160

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Green Peach Aphid (Myzus persicae): Insight into Developmental Regulation and Inter-Species Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui; Wang, Yujun; Cheng, Yanbin; Zhang, Meiping; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Zhu, Li; Fang, Jichao; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    Green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) are two phylogenetically closely related agricultural pests. While pea aphid is restricted to Fabaceae, green peach aphid feeds on hundreds of plant species from more than 40 families. Transcriptome comparison could shed light on the genetic factors underlying the difference in host range between the two species. Furthermore, a large scale study contrasting gene expression between immature nymphs and fully developed adult aphids would fill a previous knowledge gap. Here, we obtained transcriptomic sequences of green peach aphid nymphs and adults, respectively, using Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 2244 genes were found to be differentially expressed between the two developmental stages, many of which were associated with detoxification, hormone production, cuticle formation, metabolism, food digestion, and absorption. When searched against publically available pea aphid mRNA sequences, 13,752 unigenes were found to have no homologous counterparts. Interestingly, many of these unigenes that could be annotated in other databases were involved in the “xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism” pathway, suggesting the two aphids differ in their adaptation to secondary metabolites of host plants. Conversely, 3989 orthologous gene pairs between the two species were subjected to calculations of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions, and 148 of the genes potentially evolved in response to positive selection. Some of these genes were predicted to be associated with insect-plant interactions. Our study has revealed certain molecular events related to aphid development, and provided some insight into biological variations in two aphid species, possibly as a result of host plant adaptation. PMID:27812361

  10. Abundance of amino acid transporters involved in mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulinand amino acid-induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated that members of the System A transporter (SNAT2), the System N transporter (SNAT3), the Sy...

  11. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and "delivering" remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  12. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development.

  13. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  14. Acute Multiple Organ Failure in Adult Mice Deleted for the Developmental Regulator Wt1

    PubMed Central

    Chau, You-Ying; Brownstein, David; Mjoseng, Heidi; Lee, Wen-Chin; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Perry, Paul; Berry, Rachel; Thornburn, Anna; Sexton, David; Morton, Nik; Hohenstein, Peter; Freyer, Elisabeth; Samuel, Kay; van't Hof, Rob; Hastie, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    There is much interest in the mechanisms that regulate adult tissue homeostasis and their relationship to processes governing foetal development. Mice deleted for the Wilms' tumour gene, Wt1, lack kidneys, gonads, and spleen and die at mid-gestation due to defective coronary vasculature. Wt1 is vital for maintaining the mesenchymal–epithelial balance in these tissues and is required for the epithelial-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) that generates coronary vascular progenitors. Although Wt1 is only expressed in rare cell populations in adults including glomerular podocytes, 1% of bone marrow cells, and mesothelium, we hypothesised that this might be important for homeostasis of adult tissues; hence, we deleted the gene ubiquitously in young and adult mice. Within just a few days, the mice suffered glomerulosclerosis, atrophy of the exocrine pancreas and spleen, severe reduction in bone and fat, and failure of erythropoiesis. FACS and culture experiments showed that Wt1 has an intrinsic role in both haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell lineages and suggest that defects within these contribute to the phenotypes we observe. We propose that glomerulosclerosis arises in part through down regulation of nephrin, a known Wt1 target gene. Protein profiling in mutant serum showed that there was no systemic inflammatory or nutritional response in the mutant mice. However, there was a dramatic reduction in circulating IGF-1 levels, which is likely to contribute to the bone and fat phenotypes. The reduction of IGF-1 did not result from a decrease in circulating GH, and there is no apparent pathology of the pituitary and adrenal glands. These findings 1) suggest that Wt1 is a major regulator of the homeostasis of some adult tissues, through both local and systemic actions; 2) highlight the differences between foetal and adult tissue regulation; 3) point to the importance of adult mesenchyme in tissue turnover. PMID:22216009

  15. The developmental basis of epigenetic regulation of HTR2A and psychiatric outcomes.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Alison G; Marsit, Carmen J

    2014-12-01

    The serotonin receptor 5-HT2A (encoded by HTR2A) is an important regulator of fetal brain development and adult cognitive function. Environmental signals that induce epigenetic changes of serotonin response genes, including HTR2A, have been implicated in adverse mental health outcomes. The objective of this perspective article is to address the medical implications of HTR2A epigenetic regulation, which has been associated with both infant neurobehavioral outcomes and adult mental health. Ongoing research has identified a region of the HTR2A promoter that has been associated with a number of medical outcomes in adults and infants, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic fatigue syndrome, borderline personality disorder, suicidality, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Epigenetic regulation of HTR2A has been studied in several different types of tissues, including the placenta. The placenta is an important source of serotonin during fetal neurodevelopment, and placental epigenetic variation of HTR2A has been associated with infant neurobehavioral outcomes, which may represent the basis of adult mental health disorders. Further analysis is needed to identify intrinsic and extrinsic factors that modulate HTR2A methylation, and the mechanism by which this epigenetic variation influences fetal growth and leads to altered brain development, manifesting in psychiatric disorders.

  16. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  17. Developmental Toxicity of Diclofenac and Elucidation of Gene Regulation in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-Bin; Gao, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Li, Chun-Qi; Gao, Hai-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Environmental pollution by emerging contaminants, e.g. pharmaceuticals, has become a matter of widespread concern in recent years. We investigated the membrane transport of diclofenac and its toxic effects on gene expression and the development of zebrafish embryos. The association of diclofenac with the embryos conformed to the general partition model at low concentration, the partition coefficient being 0.0033 ml per embryo. At high concentration, the interaction fitted the Freundlich model. Most of the diclofenac remained in the extracellular aqueous solution with less than 5% interacting with the embryo, about half of which was adsorbed on the membranes while the rest entered the cytoplasm. Concentrations of diclofenac over 10.13 μM were lethal to all the embryos, while 3.78 μM diclofenac was teratogenic. The development abnormalities at 4 day post treatment (dpt) include shorter body length, smaller eye, pericardial and body edema, lack of liver, intestine and circulation, muscle degeneration, and abnormal pigmentation. The portion of the diclofenac transferred into the embryo altered the expression of certain genes, e.g. down-regulation of Wnt3a and Gata4 and up-regulation of Wnt8a. The alteration of expression of such genes or the regulation of downstream genes could cause defects in the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

  18. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-08-19

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth.

  19. Developmental toxicity of diclofenac and elucidation of gene regulation in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Bin; Gao, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xue-Fei; Li, Chun-Qi; Gao, Hai-Ping

    2014-05-02

    Environmental pollution by emerging contaminants, e.g. pharmaceuticals, has become a matter of widespread concern in recent years. We investigated the membrane transport of diclofenac and its toxic effects on gene expression and the development of zebrafish embryos. The association of diclofenac with the embryos conformed to the general partition model at low concentration, the partition coefficient being 0.0033 ml per embryo. At high concentration, the interaction fitted the Freundlich model. Most of the diclofenac remained in the extracellular aqueous solution with less than 5% interacting with the embryo, about half of which was adsorbed on the membranes while the rest entered the cytoplasm. Concentrations of diclofenac over 10.13 μM were lethal to all the embryos, while 3.78 μM diclofenac was teratogenic. The development abnormalities at 4 day post treatment (dpt) include shorter body length, smaller eye, pericardial and body edema, lack of liver, intestine and circulation, muscle degeneration, and abnormal pigmentation. The portion of the diclofenac transferred into the embryo altered the expression of certain genes, e.g. down-regulation of Wnt3a and Gata4 and up-regulation of Wnt8a. The alteration of expression of such genes or the regulation of downstream genes could cause defects in the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

  20. The Developmental Basis of Epigenetic Regulation of HTR2A and Psychiatric Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Alison G.; Marsit, Carmen J.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin receptor 5-HT2A (encoded by HTR2A) is an important regulator of fetal brain development and adult cognitive function. Environmental signals that induce epigenetic changes of serotonin response genes, including HTR2A, have been implicated in adverse mental health outcomes. The objective of this perspective article is to address the medical implications of HTR2A epigenetic regulation, which has been associated with both infant neurobehavioral outcomes and adult mental health. Ongoing research has identified a region of the HTR2A promoter that has been associated with a number of medical outcomes in adults and infants, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, chronic fatigue syndrome, borderline personality disorder, suicidality, and neurobehavioral outcomes. Epigenetic regulation of HTR2A has been studied in several different types of tissues, including the placenta. The placenta is an important source of serotonin during fetal neurodevelopment, and placental epigenetic variation of HTR2A has been associated with infant neurobehavioral outcomes, which may represent the basis of adult mental health disorders. Further analysis is needed to identify intrinsic and extrinsic factors modulate HTR2A methylation, and the mechanism by which this epigenetic variation influences fetal growth and leads to altered brain development, manifesting in psychiatric disorders. PMID:25043477

  1. Developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor expression in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegenga, S. L.; Kalb, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons undergo experience-dependent development during a critical period in early postnatal life. It has been suggested that the repertoire of glutamate receptor subunits differs between young and mature motor neurons and contributes to this activity-dependent development. In the present study we examined the expression patterns of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor subunits during the postnatal maturation of the spinal cord. Young motor neurons express much higher levels of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 than do adult motor neurons. Although there are eight potential splice variants of NR1, only a subgroup is expressed by motor neurons. With respect to NR2 receptor subunits, young motor neurons express NR2A and C, while adult motor neurons express only NR2A. Young motor neurons express kainate receptor subunits GluR5, 6 and KA2 but we are unable to detect these or any other kainate receptor subunits in the adult spinal cord. Other spinal cord regions display a distinct pattern of developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptor subunit expression in comparison to motor neurons. Our findings indicate a precise spatio-temporal regulation of individual subunit expression in the developing spinal cord. Specific combinations of subunits in developing neurons influence their excitable properties and could participate in the emergence of adult neuronal form and function.

  2. The Conserved Splicing Factor SUA Controls Alternative Splicing of the Developmental Regulator ABI3 in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sugliani, Matteo; Brambilla, Vittoria; Clerkx, Emile J.M.; Koornneef, Maarten; Soppe, Wim J.J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) is a major regulator of seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We detected two ABI3 transcripts, ABI3-α and ABI3-β, which encode full-length and truncated proteins, respectively. Alternative splicing of ABI3 is developmentally regulated, and the ABI3-β transcript accumulates at the end of seed maturation. The two ABI3 transcripts differ by the presence of a cryptic intron in ABI3-α, which is spliced out in ABI3-β. The suppressor of abi3-5 (sua) mutant consistently restores wild-type seed features in the frameshift mutant abi3-5 but does not suppress other abi3 mutant alleles. SUA is a conserved splicing factor, homologous to the human protein RBM5, and reduces splicing of the cryptic ABI3 intron, leading to a decrease in ABI3-β transcript. In the abi3-5 mutant, ABI3-β codes for a functional ABI3 protein due to frameshift restoration. PMID:20525852

  3. Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Marcelo L; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Falcon, Carles; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Torres-Prioris, María J; De-Torres, Irene; Alfaro, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Cardo, Antonio L; Baquero, Miquel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain

  4. Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Marcelo L; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Falcon, Carles; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Torres-Prioris, María J; De-Torres, Irene; Alfaro, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Cardo, Antonio L; Baquero, Miquel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain

  5. Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Falcon, Carles; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Torres-Prioris, María J.; De-Torres, Irene; Alfaro, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Cardo, Antonio L.; Baquero, Miquel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain

  6. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 is a RNA chaperone that is regulated by cold and developmental signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-12-21

    Bacterial cold shock proteins (CSPs) are RNA chaperones that unwind RNA secondary structures. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (AtCSP2) contains a domain that is shared with bacterial CSPs. Here we showed that AtCSP2 binds to RNA and unwinds nucleic acid duplex. Heterologous expression of AtCSP2 complemented cold sensitivity of an Escherichia coli csp quadruple mutant, indicating that AtCSP2 function as a RNA chaperone in E. coli. AtCSP2 mRNA and protein levels increased during cold acclimation, but the protein accumulation was most prominent after 10 days of cold treatment. AtCSP2 promoter::GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtCSP2 is expressed only in root and shoot apical regions during vegetative growth but is expressed in reproductive organs such as pollens, ovules and embryos. These data indicated that AtCSP2 is involved in developmental processes as well as cold adaptation. Localization of AtCSP2::GFP in nucleolus and cytoplasm suggested different nuclear and cytosolic RNA targets.

  7. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingli; Hu, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jianfei; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li; Poethig, R Scott

    2016-08-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development-the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition-are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  8. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tieqiang; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W.; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development—the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition—are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  9. Developmental Regulation of Drug-Processing Genes in Livers of Germ-Free Mice

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K.; Prasad, Bhagwat; Vrana, Marc; Klaassen, Curtis; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the effect of gut microbiota on the ontogeny of drug-processing genes (DPGs) in liver. In this study, livers were harvested from conventional (CV) and germ-free (GF) male and female mice from 1 to 90 days of age. RNA-Seq in livers of 90-day-old male mice showed that xenobiotic metabolism was the most downregulated pathway within the mRNA transcriptome in absence of intestinal bacteria. In male livers, the mRNAs of 67 critical DPGs partitioned into 4 developmental patterns (real-time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction): Pattern-1 gradually increased to adult levels in livers of CV mice and were downregulated in livers of GF mice, as exemplified by the major drug-metabolizing enzymes cytochrome 3a (Cyp3a) family, which are prototypical pregnane X receptor (PXR)-target genes. Genes in Pattern-2 include Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon receptor-target gene), Cyp2c family, and Cyp2e1, which were all upregulated mainly at 90 days of age; as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-target genes Cyp4a family and Aldh3a2, which were upregulated not only in 90-days adult age, but also between neonatal and adolescent ages (from 1 to 30 days of age). Genes in Pattern-3 were enriched predominantly in livers of 15-day-old mice, among which the sterol-efflux transporter dimers Abcg5/Abcg8 were downregulated in GF mice. Genes in Pattern-4 were neonatal-enriched, among which the transporter Octn1 mRNA tended to be lower in GF mice at younger ages but higher in adult GF mice as compared with age-matched CV mice. Protein assays confirmed the downregulation of the PXR-target gene Cyp3a protein (Western-blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy), and decreased Cyp3a enzyme activities in male GF livers. Increased microsomal-Cyp4a proteins and nuclear-PPARα were also observed in male GF livers. Interestingly, in contrast to male livers, the mRNAs of Cyp2c or Cyp4a were not readily upregulated in female GF livers approaching

  10. The emerging role of PDZ adapter proteins for regulation of intestinal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, G; Seidler, U

    2006-11-01

    In the gastrointestinal tract, CFTR, in conjunction with one or several members of the SLC26 anion exchanger family, mediates electrogenic Cl- and HCO3- secretion. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform NHE3, on the other hand, coupled to one or several of the SLC26 isoforms, mediates electroneutral NaCl absorption. The agonist-induced activation of anion secretion and inhibition of salt absorption causes secretory diarrhea. Current dogma sees the formation of a multiprotein complex of transport proteins, postsynaptic density-95/discs large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) adapter proteins, anchoring proteins, the cytoskeleton, and the involved protein kinases as one crucial step in the regulation of these transport processes. Data obtained in heterologous expression studies suggest an important role of these PDZ adapter proteins in trafficking, endocytic recycling, and membrane retention of the respective transmembrane proteins. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the role of the PDZ adapter proteins NHERF, E3KARP, PDZK1, IKEPP (NHERF-1 to NHERF-4), CAL, and Shank-2 that bind to CFTR, NHE3, and the intestinal SLC26 members in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport. Current concepts are mostly derived from heterologous expression studies and studies on their role in organ physiology are still in infancy. Recently, however, PDZ adapter protein-deficient mice and organ-specific cell lines have become available, and the first results suggest a more cell-type and possibly signal-specific role of these adapter proteins. This opens the potential for drug development targeted to PDZ domain interactions, which is, in theory, one of the most efficient antidiarrheal strategies. PMID:16798722

  11. Regulating adaptive immune responses using small molecule modulators of aminopeptidases that process antigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Stratikos, Efstratios

    2014-12-01

    Antigenic peptide processing by intracellular aminopeptidases has emerged recently as an important pathway that regulates adaptive immune responses. Pathogens and cancer can manipulate the activity of key enzymes of this pathway to promote immune evasion. Furthermore, the activity of these enzymes is naturally variable due to polymorphic variation, contributing to predisposition to disease, most notably autoimmunity. Here, we review recent findings that suggest that the pharmacological regulation of the activity of these aminopeptidases constitutes a valid approach for regulating human immune responses. We furthermore review the state of the art in chemical tools for inhibiting these enzymes and how these tools can be useful for the development of innovative therapeutic approaches for a variety of diseases including cancer, viral infections and autoimmunity.

  12. Developmentally regulated switch in alternatively spliced SNAP-25 isoforms alters facilitation of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Bark, Christina; Bellinger, Frederick P; Kaushal, Ashutosh; Mathews, James R; Partridge, L Donald; Wilson, Michael C

    2004-10-01

    Although the basic molecular components that promote regulated neurotransmitter release are well established, the contribution of these proteins as regulators of the plasticity of neurotransmission and refinement of synaptic connectivity during development is elaborated less fully. For example, during the period of synaptic growth and maturation in brain, the expression of synaptosomal protein 25 kDa (SNAP-25), a neuronal t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) essential for action potential-dependent neuroexocytosis, is altered through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA transcripts. We addressed the role of the two splice-variant isoforms of SNAP-25 with a targeted mouse mutation that impairs the shift from SNAP-25a to SNAP-25b. Most of these mutant mice die between 3 and 5 weeks of age, which coincides with the time when SNAP-25b expression normally reaches mature levels in brain and synapse formation is essentially completed. The altered expression of these SNAP-25 isoforms influences short-term synaptic function by affecting facilitation but not the initial probability of release. This suggests that mechanisms controlling alternative splicing between SNAP-25 isoforms contribute to a molecular switch important for survival that helps to guide the transition from immature to mature synaptic connections, as well as synapse regrowth and remodeling after neural injury.

  13. Role of primary afferents in the developmental regulation of motor axon synapse numbers on Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Siembab, Valerie C; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Rotterman, Travis M; Shneider, Neil A; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2016-06-15

    Motor function in mammalian species depends on the maturation of spinal circuits formed by a large variety of interneurons that regulate motoneuron firing and motor output. Interneuron activity is in turn modulated by the organization of their synaptic inputs, but the principles governing the development of specific synaptic architectures unique to each premotor interneuron are unknown. For example, Renshaw cells receive, at least in the neonate, convergent inputs from sensory afferents (likely Ia) and motor axons, raising the question of whether they interact during Renshaw cell development. In other well-studied neurons, such as Purkinje cells, heterosynaptic competition between inputs from different sources shapes synaptic organization. To examine the possibility that sensory afferents modulate synaptic maturation on developing Renshaw cells, we used three animal models in which afferent inputs in the ventral horn are dramatically reduced (ER81(-/-) knockout), weakened (Egr3(-/-) knockout), or strengthened (mlcNT3(+/-) transgenic). We demonstrate that increasing the strength of sensory inputs on Renshaw cells prevents their deselection and reduces motor axon synaptic density, and, in contrast, absent or diminished sensory afferent inputs correlate with increased densities of motor axons synapses. No effects were observed on other glutamatergic inputs. We conclude that the early strength of Ia synapses influences their maintenance or weakening during later development and that heterosynaptic influences from sensory synapses during early development regulates the density and organization of motor inputs on mature Renshaw cells. PMID:26660356

  14. Developmentally regulated cleavage of tRNAs in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Haiser, Henry J.; Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Elliot, Marie A.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental and physiological signals is critical for the survival of the soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. Nutrient deprivation triggers the onset of a complex morphological differentiation process that involves the raising of aerial hyphae and formation of spore chains, and coincides with the production of a diverse array of clinically relevant antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. These processes are tightly regulated; however, the genes and signals involved have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a novel tRNA cleavage event that follows the same temporal regulation as morphological and physiological differentiation, and is growth medium dependent. All tRNAs appear to be susceptible to cleavage; however, there appears to be a bias towards increased cleavage of those tRNAs that specify highly utilized codons. In contrast to what has been observed in eukaryotes, accumulation of tRNA halves in S. coelicolor is not significantly affected by amino acid starvation, and is also not affected by induction of the stringent response or inhibition of ribosome function. Mutants defective in aerial development and antibiotic production exhibit altered tRNA cleavage profiles relative to wild-type strains. PMID:18084030

  15. MicroRNA Biogenesis and Hedgehog-Patched Signaling Cooperate to Regulate an Important Developmental Transition in Granule Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lena; Constantin, Myrna; Wainwright, Brandon J

    2016-03-01

    The Dicer1, Dcr-1 homolog (Drosophila) gene encodes a type III ribonuclease required for the canonical maturation and functioning of microRNAs (miRNAs). Subsets of miRNAs are known to regulate normal cerebellar granule cell development, in addition to the growth and progression of medulloblastoma, a neoplasm that often originates from granule cell precursors. Multiple independent studies have also demonstrated that deregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-Patched (Ptch) signaling, through miRNAs, is causative of granule cell pathologies. In the present study, we investigated the genetic interplay between miRNA biogenesis and Shh-Ptch signaling in granule cells of the cerebellum by way of the Cre/lox recombination system in genetically engineered models of Mus musculus (mouse). We demonstrate that, although the miRNA biogenesis and Shh-Ptch-signaling pathways, respectively, regulate the opposing growth processes of cerebellar hypoplasia and hyperplasia leading to medulloblastoma, their concurrent deregulation was nonadditive and did not bring the growth phenotypes toward an expected equilibrium. Instead, mice developed either hypoplasia or medulloblastoma, but of a greater severity. Furthermore, some genotypes were bistable, whereby subsets of mice developed hypoplasia or medulloblastoma. This implies that miRNAs and Shh-Ptch signaling regulate an important developmental transition in granule cells of the cerebellum. We also conclusively show that the Dicer1 gene encodes a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene for Ptch1-induced medulloblastoma, with the monoallielic loss of Dicer1 more severe than biallelic loss. These findings exemplify how genetic interplay between pathways may produce nonadditive effects with a substantial and unpredictable impact on biology. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the functional dosage of Dicer1 may nonadditively influence a wide range of Shh-Ptch-dependent pathologies. PMID:26773048

  16. Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and developmentally regulated expression of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Mensa-Wilmot, K; Hereld, D; Englund, P T

    1990-02-01

    The surface of the bloodstream form of the African trypanosome, Trypansoma brucei, is covered with about 10(7) molecules of the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), a protein tethered to the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor. This anchor is cleavable by an endogenous GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC). GPI-PLC activity is down regulated when trypanosomes differentiate from the bloodstream form to the procyclic form found in the tsetse fly vector. We have mapped the GPI-PLC locus in the trypanosome genome and have examined the mechanism for this developmental regulation in T. brucei. Southern blot analysis indicates a single-copy gene for GPI-PLC, with two allelic variants distinguishable by two NcoI restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The gene was localized solely to a chromosome in the two-megabase compression region by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel electrophoresis. No rearrangement of the GPI-PLC gene occurs during differentiation to procyclic forms, which could potentially silence GPI-PLC gene expression. Enzymological studies give no indication of a diffusible inhibitor of GPI-PLC activity in procyclic forms, and Western immunoblot analysis reveals no detectable GPI-PLC polypeptide in these forms. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that the absence of GPI-PLC activity in procyclic forms is due to posttranslational control. Northern (RNA) blot analysis reveals barely detectable levels of GPI-PLC mRNA in procyclic forms; therefore, regulation of GPI-PLC activity in these forms correlates with the steady-state mRNA level.

  17. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  18. Transcription Factor ADS-4 Regulates Adaptive Responses and Resistance to Antifungal Azole Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. PMID:26100701

  19. Developmental and hormonal regulation of gibberellin biosynthesis and catabolism in pea fruit.

    PubMed

    Ozga, Jocelyn A; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ayele, Belay T; Ngo, Phuong; Nadeau, Courtney; Wickramarathna, Aruna D

    2009-05-01

    In pea (Pisum sativum), normal fruit growth requires the presence of the seeds. The coordination of growth between the seed and ovary tissues involves phytohormones; however, the specific mechanisms remain speculative. This study further explores the roles of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and catabolism genes during pollination and fruit development and in seed and auxin regulation of pericarp growth. Pollination and fertilization events not only increase pericarp PsGA3ox1 message levels (codes for GA 3-oxidase that converts GA(20) to bioactive GA(1)) but also reduce pericarp PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(20) to GA(29)), suggesting a concerted regulation to increase levels of bioactive GA(1) following these events. 4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) was found to mimic the seeds in the stimulation of PsGA3ox1 and the repression of PsGA2ox1 mRNA levels as well as the stimulation of PsGA2ox2 mRNA levels (codes for GA 2-oxidase that mainly catabolizes GA(1) to GA(8)) in pericarp at 2 to 3 d after anthesis, while the other endogenous pea auxin, IAA, did not. This GA gene expression profile suggests that both seeds and 4-Cl-IAA can stimulate the production, as well as modulate the half-life, of bioactive GA(1), leading to initial fruit set and subsequent growth and development of the ovary. Consistent with these gene expression profiles, deseeded pericarps converted [(14)C]GA(12) to [(14)C]GA(1) only if treated with 4-Cl-IAA. These data further support the hypothesis that 4-Cl-IAA produced in the seeds is transported to the pericarp, where it differentially regulates the expression of pericarp GA biosynthesis and catabolism genes to modulate the level of bioactive GA(1) required for initial fruit set and growth. PMID:19297588

  20. Soybean seed lectin gene and flanking nonseed protein genes are developmentally regulated in transformed tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Okamuro, J K; Jofuku, K D; Goldberg, R B

    1986-01-01

    We introduced a 17.1-kilobase soybean DNA fragment containing the lectin gene and at least four nonseed protein genes into the tobacco genome. As in soybean plants, lectin mRNA is present in tobacco seeds, accumulates and decays during tobacco seed development, and is translated into a protein that accumulates prior to dormancy. Each soybean nonseed protein mRNA is present in tobacco leaves, roots, stems, and seeds at levels similar to that found in soybean plants. We conclude that a differentially expressed soybean gene cluster is correctly regulated in transformed tobacco plants and that sequences controlling their expression are recognized by regulatory factors present in tobacco cells. Images PMID:3464951

  1. The piRNA pathway is developmentally regulated during spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Quénerch'du, Emilie; Anand, Amit; Kai, Toshie

    2016-07-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are predominantly produced in animal gonads to suppress transposons during germline development. Our understanding about the piRNA biogenesis and function is predominantly from studies of the Drosophila female germline. piRNA pathway function in the male germline, however, remains poorly understood. To study overall and stage-specific features of piRNAs during spermatogenesis, we analyzed small RNAs extracted from entire wild-type testes and stage-specific arrest mutant testes enriched with spermatogonia or primary spermatocytes. We show that most active piRNA clusters in the female germline do not majorly contribute to piRNAs in testes, and abundance patterns of piRNAs mapping to different transposon families also differ between male and female germlines. piRNA production is regulated in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenesis. The piRNAs in spermatogonia-enriched testes are predominantly transposon-mapping piRNAs, and almost half of those exhibit a ping-pong signature. In contrast, the primary spermatocyte-enriched testes have a dramatically high amount of piRNAs targeting repeats like suppressor of stellate and AT-chX The transposon-mapping piRNAs in the primary spermatocyte stages lacking Argonaute3 expression also show a ping-pong signature, albeit to a lesser extent. Consistently, argonaute3 mutant testes also retain ping-pong signature-bearing piRNAs, suggesting that a noncanonical ping-pong cycle might act during spermatogenesis. Our study shows stage-specific regulation of piRNA biogenesis during spermatogenesis: An active ping-pong cycle produces abundant transposon-mapping piRNAs in spermatogonia, while in primary spermatocytes, piRNAs act to suppress the repeats and transposons. PMID:27208314

  2. Regulation of Adaptive Immunity in Health and Disease by Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Four decades ago, it was observed that stimulation of T cells induces rapid changes in cellular cholesterol that are required before proliferation can commence. Investigators returning to this phenomenon have finally revealed its molecular underpinnings. Cholesterol trafficking and its dysregulation are now also recognized to strongly influence dendritic cell function, T cell polarization, and antibody responses. In this review, the state of the literature is reviewed on how cholesterol and its trafficking regulate the cells of the adaptive immune response and in vivo disease phenotypes of dysregulated adaptive immunity, including allergy, asthma, and autoimmune disease. Emerging evidence supporting a potential role for statins and other lipid-targeted therapies in the treatment of these diseases is presented. Just as vascular biologists have embraced immunity in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis, so should basic and clinical immunologists in allergy, pulmonology, and other disciplines seek to encompass a basic understanding of lipid science. PMID:26149587

  3. Evolutionary Adaptations of Plant AGC Kinases: From Light Signaling to Cell Polarity Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Eike H.; Offringa, Remko

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and trafficking over membranes involves a plethora of transmembrane proteins that control the flow of compounds or relay specific signaling events. Next to external cues, internal stimuli can modify the activity or abundance of these proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). One such regulatory mechanism is protein phosphorylation by membrane-associated kinases, several of which are AGC kinases. The AGC kinase family is one of seven kinase families that are conserved in all eukaryotic genomes. In plants evolutionary adaptations introduced specific structural changes within the AGC kinases that most likely allow modulation of kinase activity by external stimuli (e.g., light). Starting from the well-defined structural basis common to all AGC kinases we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship in plant AGC kinases. Nine of the 39 Arabidopsis AGC kinases have now been shown to be involved in the regulation of auxin transport. In particular, AGC kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the auxin transporters ABCB1 and ABCB19 has been shown to regulate their activity, while auxin transporters of the PIN family are located to different positions at the PM depending on their phosphorylation status, which is a result of counteracting AGC kinase and PP6 phosphatase activities. We therefore focus on regulation of AGC kinase activity in this context. Identified structural adaptations of the involved AGC kinases may provide new insight into AGC kinase functionality and demonstrate their position as central hubs in the cellular network controlling plant development and growth. PMID:23162562

  4. FoxP2 directly regulates the reelin receptor VLDLR developmentally and by singing.

    PubMed

    Adam, Iris; Mendoza, Ezequiel; Kobalz, Ursula; Wohlgemuth, Sandra; Scharff, Constance

    2016-07-01

    Mutations of the transcription factor FOXP2 cause a severe speech and language disorder. In songbirds, FoxP2 is expressed in the medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the avian basal ganglia song nucleus, Area X, which is crucial for song learning and adult song performance. Experimental downregulation of FoxP2 in Area X affects spine formation, prevents neuronal plasticity induced by social context and impairs song learning. Direct target genes of FoxP2 relevant for song learning and song production are unknown. Here we show that a lentivirally mediated FoxP2 knockdown in Area X of zebra finches downregulates the expression of VLDLR, one of the two reelin receptors. Zebra finch FoxP2 binds to the promoter of VLDLR and activates it, establishing VLDLR as a direct FoxP2 target. Consistent with these findings, VLDLR expression is co-regulated with FoxP2 as a consequence of adult singing and during song learning. We also demonstrate that knockdown of FoxP2 affects glutamatergic transmission at the corticostriatal MSN synapse. These data raise the possibility that the regulatory relationship between FoxP2 and VLDLR guides structural plasticity towards the subset of FoxP2-positive MSNs in an activity dependent manner via the reelin pathway.

  5. The AOC promoter of tomato is regulated by developmental and environmental stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Irene; Hause, Bettina; Proels, Reinhard; Miersch, Otto; Oka, Mariko; Roitsch, Thomas; Wasternack, Claus

    2008-06-01

    The allene oxide cyclase (AOC) catalyzes the formation of cis-(+)-12-oxophytodienoic acid, an intermediate in jasmonate biosynthesis and is encoded by a single copy gene in tomato. The full length AOC promoter isolated by genome walk contains 3600 bp. Transgenic tomato lines carrying a 1000 bp promoter fragment and the full length promoter, respectively, in front of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS)-encoding uidA gene and several tobacco lines carrying the full length tomato AOC promoter before GUS were used to record organ- and tissue-specific promoter activities during development and in response to various stimuli. High promoter activities corresponding to immunocytochemically detected occurrence of the AOC protein were found in seeds and young seedlings and were confined to the root tip, hypocotyl and cotyledons of 3-d-old seedlings. In 10-d-old seedlings promoter activity appeared preferentially in the elongation zone. Fully developed tomato leaves were free of AOC promoter activity, but showed high activity upon wounding locally and systemically or upon treatment with JA, systemin or glucose. Tomato flowers showed high AOC promoter activities in ovules, sepals, anthers and pollen. Most of the promoter activity patterns found in tomato with the 1000 bp promoter fragment were also detected with the full length tomato AOC promoter in tobacco during development or in response to various stimuli. The data support a spatial and temporal regulation of JA biosynthesis during development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:18445500

  6. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of the human fgr proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, T.J. . Dept. of Medicine); Connolly, N.L.; Senior, R.M. ); Katamine, S.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Robbins

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the authors show that c-fgr proto-oncogene expression is limited to normal peripheral blood granulocytes, monocytes, and alveolar macrophages, all of which contain 50 to 100 copies of c-fgr mRNA per cell. The c-fgr RNA molecules in these cells consisted of partially spliced transcripts containing intron 7 and completely spliced molecules capable of encoding the predicted p55 c-fgr protein. The splicing of intron 7 appeared to occur after the splicing of most of the other introns; partially spliced molecules containing intron 7 did not appear to be transported into the cytoplasm. Very low levels of fgr transcripts were also present in U937 promonocytic cells and increased in abundance with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation. The level of fgr transcripts began to increase 2 to 4 after TPA addition peaked at 8 h, and subsequently declined. Since the authors found that the half-life of fgr mRNA was longer than 8 h, these changes are best explained by transient transcriptional activation of fgr during TPA-induced differentiation, although nuclear runoff experiments were not sensitive enough to detect this event. Their results demonstrate that the c-fgr gene is expressed in a tissue- and development-specific fashion and suggest that constitutive expression of c-fgr in U937 cells is regulated by a labile transcriptional repressor.

  7. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon.

  8. Expression of Pit2 sodium-phosphate cotransporter during murine odontogenesis is developmentally regulated.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dawei; Vaziri Sani, Forugh; Nilsson, Jeanette; Rodenburg, Michaela; Stocking, Carol; Linde, Anders; Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2006-12-01

    Different sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate (P(i)) uptake mechanisms play a major role in cellular P(i) homeostasis. The function and detailed distribution patterns of the type III Na(+)-phosphate cotransporter, PiT-2, in different organs during development are still largely unknown. We therefore examined the temporospatial expression patterns of Pit2 during murine odontogenesis. Odontoblasts were always devoid of Pit2 expression, whereas a transient, but strong, expression was detected in young secretory ameloblasts. However, the stratum intermedium and, later on, the papillary layer and cells of the subodontoblastic layer, exhibited high levels of Pit2 mRNA, which increased gradually as the tooth matured. Hormonal treatment or P(i) starvation of tooth germs in vitro did not alter Pit2 levels or patterns of expression, indicating mechanisms of regulation different from those of PiT-1 or other cell types. PiT-2 also functions as a retroviral receptor, and functional membrane-localized protein was confirmed throughout the dental papilla/pulp by demonstrating cellular permissiveness to infection by a gammaretrovirus that uses PiT-2 as a receptor. The distinct pattern of Pit2 expression during odontogenesis suggests that its P(i)-transporter function may be important for homeostasis of dental cells and not specifically for mineralization of the dental extracellular matrices. The expression of viral receptors in enamel-forming cells and the dental pulp may be of pathological significance.

  9. Glucocorticoid and developmental regulation of amylase mRNAs in mouse liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, L C; Keller, P R; Darlington, G J; Meisler, M H

    1988-01-01

    We characterized alpha-amylase expression in the hepatoma cell line Hepa 1-6 and in normal mouse liver. Both Amy-1 and Amy-2 were expressed in Hepa 1-6 and were regulated by glucocorticoids. Transcription in the hepatoma cells was initiated at the same start sites as in mouse tissues. Glucocorticoid treatment increased the abundance of Amy-1 and Amy-2 transcripts by 10 to 20-fold. This increase was detected within 4 h and was maximal by 24 h. The pattern of amylase expression in this hepatoma cell line accurately reflects amylase expression in the liver in vivo. During liver development, we observed a large increase in the abundance of Amy-1 transcripts just before birth, at a time when circulating glucocorticoids are also elevated. Adult mouse liver expressed Amy-1 and Amy-2 at levels comparable to those of fully induced hepatoma cells. Liver is thus a likely source of both amylase isozymes in mouse serum. These studies demonstrate that Amy-2 expression is not limited to the pancreas but also occurs at a low level in liver cells. Images PMID:2464743

  10. Developmental and heat stress-regulated expression of HsfA2 and small heat shock proteins in tomato anthers.

    PubMed

    Giorno, Filomena; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grillo, Stefania; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Vriezen, Wim H; Mariani, Celestina

    2010-01-01

    The high sensitivity of male reproductive cells to high temperatures may be due to an inadequate heat stress response. The results of a comprehensive expression analysis of HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII, two important members of the heat stress system, in the developing anthers of a heat-tolerant tomato genotype are reported here. A transcriptional analysis at different developmental anther/pollen stages was performed using semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. The messengers were localized using in situ RNA hybridization, and protein accumulation was monitored using immunoblot analysis. Based on the analysis of the gene and protein expression profiles, HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII are finely regulated during anther development and are further induced under both short and prolonged heat stress conditions. These data suggest that HsfA2 may be directly involved in the activation of protection mechanisms in the tomato anther during heat stress and, thereby, may contribute to tomato fruit set under adverse temperatures. PMID:19854799

  11. Regulation of transplacental virus infection by developmental and immunological factors: studies with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus.

    PubMed

    Haven, T R; Rowland, R R; Plagemann, P G; Wong, G H; Bradley, S E; Cafruny, W A

    1996-04-01

    Placental and fetal infections with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) were determined by virus titration, indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA), and in situ hybridization with cDNA probes. Experiments were designed to determine the effects of gestational age, timing of maternal LDV infection, and immunological (antibody and cytokine) factors on mouse placental and fetal LDV infection. Virus infection of the placenta was detected at high levels (almost all placentas infected) within 24 h post-maternal infection (p.m.i.), whereas fetal LDV infection was detected only at a low level by 24 h p.m.i. The percentage of fetuses becoming LDV infected progressively increased between 24 and 72 h p.m.i. When fetal infection was studied at 72 h p.m.i., earlier gestational ages (9-11 days) were associated with fetal resistance to infection, whereas between 12.5 and 15 days of gestation, virus infection was detected in 50-71% of fetuses. Maternal treatment with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or anti-LDV monoclonal antibodies was associated with reduced rates of fetal, but not placental, LDV infection. These results demonstrate that both developmental and immunological factors are important in the regulation of transplacental LDV infection.

  12. QTL identification and microphenotype characterisation of the developmentally regulated yellow rust resistance in the UK wheat cultivar Guardian.

    PubMed

    Melichar, J P E; Berry, S; Newell, C; MacCormack, R; Boyd, L A

    2008-08-01

    Yellow rust (causal agent: Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici) resistance in the UK wheat cultivar Guardian is developmentally regulated, resistance increasing as the plant matures. Yellow rust resistance was assessed under field conditions on plants after ear emergence to ensure maximum expression of resistance. Three quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yellow rust resistance were identified, being located on chromosomes 1B (QPst.jic-1B), 2D (QPst.jic-2D) and 4B (QPst.jic-4B). The largest resistance effect, QPst.jic-1B located to the same position on the long arm of chromosome 1B as the known durable source of yellow rust resistance, Yr29. Microscopic studies were carried out to determine what effect the resistance in Guardian had on the development of P. striiformis f.sp. tritici. While the adult plant resistance in Guardian did not prevent germinated urediniospores from establishing an effective infection site, the growth of hyphae within flag leaf tissue was significantly inhibited, slowing the development of microcolonies. 3,3-diaminabenzadine (DAB) and trypan blue staining indicated that this inhibition of hyphal growth was not associated with hydrogen peroxide accumulation or extensive plant cell death.

  13. Developmentally and environmentally regulated expression of gamone 1: the trigger molecule for sexual reproduction in Blepharisma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Mayumi; Kawahara, Seiko; Iio, Hideo; Harumoto, Terue

    2005-06-15

    Sexual reproduction (conjugation) in protozoan ciliates is induced by specific cell-cell interactions between cells of complementary mating types. The ancestral ciliate Blepharisma japonicum has two mating types, I and II. The substances that act as signaling molecules in this extracellular interaction for conjugation are called gamones. The glycoprotein gamone 1, produced by mating type I cells, is a key factor that triggers this interaction. We have previously isolated gamone 1 and determined its complete amino acid sequence. To elucidate the mechanism of initiation of conjugation in ciliates, we investigated the transcription of the gamone 1 gene and found that it is controlled by various internal and external factors. The gamone 1 gene transcript appeared specifically when sexually mature mating type I cells were starved. It was not detected in immature cells, mating type II cells or proliferating cells. The level of transcription was markedly increased in type I cells when they were stimulated with gamone 2, which is secreted by type II cells. This is the first report that the transcription of gamone genes in ciliates is strictly regulated by developmental and environmental factors. This study suggests that the onset of transcription of gamone 1 is linked to the switching mechanism that converts mitotically proliferating cells to differentiated preconjugants, the mechanism of differentiation from immature to mature cells in clonal development, and the mechanism that ensures mating type-specific gene silencing.

  14. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing and Developmental Regulation of Gene Expression in Anopheles aquasalis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria C. P.; Lopes, Adriana R.; Barros, Michele S.; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Kojin, Bianca B.; Carvalho, Eneas; Suesdek, Lincoln; Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto C.; James, Anthony A.; Capurro, Margareth L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anopheles aquasalis is a major malaria vector in coastal areas of South and Central America where it breeds preferentially in brackish water. This species is very susceptible to Plasmodium vivax and it has been already incriminated as responsible vector in malaria outbreaks. There has been no high-throughput investigation into the sequencing of An. aquasalis genes, transcripts and proteins despite its epidemiological relevance. Here we describe the sequencing, assembly and annotation of the An. aquasalis transcriptome. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 419 thousand cDNA sequence reads, encompassing 164 million nucleotides, were assembled in 7544 contigs of ≥2 sequences, and 1999 singletons. The majority of the An. aquasalis transcripts encode proteins with their closest counterparts in another neotropical malaria vector, An. darlingi. Several analyses in different protein databases were used to annotate and predict the putative functions of the deduced An. aquasalis proteins. Larval and adult-specific transcripts were represented by 121 and 424 contig sequences, respectively. Fifty-one transcripts were only detected in blood-fed females. The data also reveal a list of transcripts up- or down-regulated in adult females after a blood meal. Transcripts associated with immunity, signaling networks and blood feeding and digestion are discussed. Conclusions/Significance This study represents the first large-scale effort to sequence the transcriptome of An. aquasalis. It provides valuable information that will facilitate studies on the biology of this species and may lead to novel strategies to reduce malaria transmission on the South American continent. The An. aquasalis transcriptome is accessible at http://exon.niaid.nih.gov/transcriptome/An_aquasalis/Anaquexcel.xlsx. PMID:25033462

  16. Aberration in epigenetic gene regulation in hippocampal neurogenesis by developmental exposure to manganese chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyun; Shiraki, Ayako; Itahashi, Megu; Akane, Hirotoshi; Abe, Hajime; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    We have shown that maternal manganese (Mn) exposure caused sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis of mouse offspring. To clarify the effects of maternal Mn exposure on epigenetic gene regulation contributing to the sustained disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis, we treated pregnant ICR mice with MnCl₂ in diet from gestational day 10 through day 21 after delivery on weaning and searched epigenetically downregulated genes by global promoter methylation analysis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male offspring on postnatal day (PND) 21 and PND 77. By CpG promoter microarray analysis on PND 21 following 800-ppm Mn exposure, sustained promoter hypermethylation and transcript downregulation through PND 77 were confirmed with Mid1, Atp1a3, and Nr2f1, whereas Pvalb showed a transient hypermethylation only on weaning. The numbers of Pvalb⁺ and ATP1a3⁺ neurons suggestive of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons, Mid1⁺ cells suggestive of late-stage granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons, and COUP-TF1⁺ cells suggestive of early-stage granule cell lineage were all reduced on PND 21, and reductions were sustained on PND 77 except for no change in Pvalb⁺ cells. Mid1⁺ cells showed asymmetric distribution with right-side predominance, and Mn exposure abolished it by promoter hypermethylation of the right side. These findings indicate epigenetic mechanisms as mediators, through which Mn exposure modulates neurogenesis involving both granule cell lineage and GABAergic interneurons with long-lasting and stable repercussions. Disruption of asymmetric cellular distribution of Mid1 suggests that higher brain functions specialized in the left or right side of the brain were affected.

  17. Developmental regulation of DUOX1 expression and function in human fetal lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Gonzales, Linda K; Kolla, Venkatadri; Schwarzer, Christian; Miot, Françoise; Illek, Beate; Ballard, Philip L

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the expression and cellular functions of the epithelial NADPH oxidase DUOX1 during alveolar type II cell development. When human fetal lung cells (gestational age 11-22 wk) were cultured to confluency on permeable filters, exposure of cells to a hormone mixture (dexamethasone, 8-Br-cAMP, and IBMX, together referred to as DCI) resulted in differentiation of cells into a mature type II phenotype as assessed by expression of lamellar bodies, surfactant proteins, and transepithelial electrical parameters. After 6 days in culture in presence of DCI, transepithelial resistance (2,616 +/- 529 Omega.cm(2)) and potential (-8.5 +/- 0.6 mV) indicated epithelial polarization. At the same time, treatment with DCI significantly increased the mRNA expression of DUOX1 ( approximately 21-fold), its maturation factor DUOXA1 ( approximately 12-fold), as well as DUOX protein ( approximately 12-fold), which was localized near the apical cell pole in confluent cultures. For comparison, in fetal lung specimens, DUOX protein was not detectable at up to 27 wk of gestational age but was strongly upregulated after 32 wk. Function of DUOX1 was assessed by measuring H(2)O(2) and acid production. Rates of H(2)O(2) production were increased by DCI treatment and blocked by small interfering RNA directed against DUOX1 or by diphenylene iodonium. DCI-treated cultures also showed increased intracellular acid production and acid release into the mucosal medium, and acid production was largely blocked by knockdown of DUOX1 mRNA. These data establish the regulated expression of DUOX1 during alveolar maturation, and indicate DUOX1 in alveolar H(2)O(2) and acid secretion by differentiated type II cells.

  18. Mechanisms of Regulation of Olfactory Transduction and Adaptation in the Olfactory Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca2+)-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca2+, and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca2+ response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control GPCR

  19. Developmental expression, differential hormonal regulation and evolution of thyroid and glucocorticoid receptor variants in a marine acanthomorph teleost (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Scott L; Finn, Roderick Nigel; Faulk, Cynthia K; Joan Holt, G; Scott Nunez, B

    2012-03-01

    Interactions between the thyroid hormone (TH) and corticosteroid (CS) hormone axes are suggested to regulate developmental processes in vertebrates with a larval phase. To investigate this hypothesis, we isolated three nuclear receptors from a larval acanthomorph teleost, the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), and established their orthologies as thraa, thrb-L and gra-L using phylogenomic and functional analyses. Functional characterization of the TH receptors in COS-1 cells revealed that Thraa and Thrb-L exhibit dose-dependent transactivation of a luciferase reporter in response to T3, while SoThraa is constitutively active at a low level in the absence of ligand. To test whether interactions between the TH and CS systems occur during development, we initially quantified the in vivo receptor transcript expression levels, and then examined their response to treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) or cortisol. We find that sothraa and sothrb-L are autoregulated in response to exogenous T3 only during early larval development. T3 did not affect sogra-L expression levels, nor did cortisol alter levels of sothraa or sothrb-L at any stage. While differential expression of the receptors in response to non-canonical ligand hormone was not observed under the conditions in this study, the correlation between sothraa and sogra-L transcript abundance during development suggests a coordinated function of the TH and CS systems. By comparing the findings in the present study to earlier investigations, we suggest that the up-regulation of thraa may be a specific feature of metamorphosis in acanthomorph teleosts. PMID:22226731

  20. Identification of developmentally-regulated proteins in Leishmania panamensis by proteome profiling of promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Vasquez, Juan-José; Gomez, Maria Adelaida; Drummelsmith, Jolyne; Burchmore, Richard; Girard, Isabelle; Ouellette, Marc

    2006-05-01

    We have employed proteomics to identify proteins upregulated in the amastigote life-stage of Leishmaniapanamensis, using axenically-differentiated forms as models of authentic intracellular parasites. Resolution of the soluble proteomes of axenic amastigotes and promastigotes by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) in the neutral pI range (5-7) revealed equivalent numbers of protein spots in both life-stages (644-682 using Coomassie Blue and 851-863 by silver staining). Although representing a relatively low proportion (8.1-10.8%) of the predicted 8000 gene products of Leishmania, these proteome maps enabled the reproducible detection of 75 differentially-regulated protein spots in amastigotes, comprising 24 spots "uniquely" expressed in this life-stage and 51 over-expressed by 1.2-5.7-fold compared to promastigotes. Of the 11 amastigote-specific spots analysed by mass spectrometry (MS), 5 yielded peptide sequences with no orthologues in Leishmania major, and the remaining 6 were identified as 7 distinct proteins (some of which were truncated isoforms) representing several functional classes: carbohydrate/energy metabolism (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase), stress response (heat shock protein [HSP] 83), cell membrane/cytoskeleton (beta-tubulin), amino acid metabolism (cysteine synthase) and cell-cycle (ran-binding protein). Four additional over-expressed spots were tentatively identified as HSPs 60 and 70 and HSP 70-related proteins -1 and -4 by positional analogy with these landmark proteins in the Leishmania guyanensis proteome. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify novel developmentally-regulated proteins linked to Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival, while simultaneously pinpointing therapeutic targets. In particular, the amastigote-specific expression of cysteine synthase underlines the importance of de novo cysteine synthesis both as a

  1. Adaptive thermogenesis in human body weight regulation: more of a concept than a measurable entity?

    PubMed

    Dulloo, A G; Jacquet, J; Montani, J-P; Schutz, Y

    2012-12-01

    According to Lavoisier, 'Life is combustion'. But to what extent humans adapt to changes in food intake through adaptive thermogenesis--by turning down the rate of heat production during energy deficit (so as to conserve energy) or turning it up during overnutrition (so as to dissipate excess calories)--has been one of the most controversial issues in nutritional sciences over the past 100 years. The debate nowadays is not whether adaptive thermogenesis exists or not, but rather about its quantitative importance in weight homoeostasis and its clinical relevance to the pathogenesis and management of obesity. Such uncertainties are likely to persist in the foreseeable future primarily because of limitations to unobtrusively measure changes in energy expenditure and body composition with high enough accuracy and precision, particularly when even small inter-individual variations in thermogenesis can, in dynamic systems and over the long term, be important in the determining weight maintenance in some and obesity and weight regain in others. This paper reviews the considerable body of evidence, albeit fragmentary, suggesting the existence of quantitatively important adaptive thermogenesis in several compartments of energy expenditure in response to altered food intake. It then discusses the various limitations that lead to over- or underestimations in its assessment, including definitional and semantics, technical and methodological, analytical and statistical. While the role of adaptive thermogenesis in human weight regulation is likely to remain more a concept than a strictly 'quantifiable' entity in the foreseeable future, the evolution of this concept continues to fuel exciting hypothesis-driven mechanistic research which contributes to advance knowledge in human metabolism and which is bound to result in improved strategies for the management of a healthy body weight.

  2. Nucleotide synthesis is regulated by cytoophidium formation during neurodevelopment and adaptive metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Grice, Stuart J.; Shen, Qing-Ji; Xu, Yichi; Chang, Chia-Chun; Azzam, Ghows; Wang, Pei-Yu; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Pai, Li-Mei; Sung, Li-Ying; Yan, Jun; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The essential metabolic enzyme CTP synthase (CTPsyn) can be compartmentalised to form an evolutionarily-conserved intracellular structure termed the cytoophidium. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the enzymatic activity of CTPsyn is attenuated by incorporation into cytoophidia in bacteria and yeast cells. Here we demonstrate that CTPsyn is regulated in a similar manner in Drosophila tissues in vivo. We show that cytoophidium formation occurs during nutrient deprivation in cultured cells, as well as in quiescent and starved neuroblasts of the Drosophila larval central nervous system. We also show that cytoophidia formation is reversible during neurogenesis, indicating that filament formation regulates pyrimidine synthesis in a normal developmental context. Furthermore, our global metabolic profiling demonstrates that CTPsyn overexpression does not significantly alter CTPsyn-related enzymatic activity, suggesting that cytoophidium formation facilitates metabolic stabilisation. In addition, we show that overexpression of CTPsyn only results in moderate increase of CTP pool in human stable cell lines. Together, our study provides experimental evidence, and a mathematical model, for the hypothesis that inactive CTPsyn is incorporated into cytoophidia. PMID:25326513

  3. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  4. Sex differences, developmental changes, response to injury and cAMP regulation of the mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cytochrome p450scc, and aromatase in the olivocerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Lavaque, Esteban; Mayen, Aurora; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2006-02-15

    Compelling evidence has now demonstrated direct biological actions of sex steroids at the cerebellum. Likewise, the expression of key steroidogenic factors, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc), and aromatase, at this neural site has been reported. Little is known, however, about the regulation of their genes in the cerebellum. Assessment of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNAs in the cerebellum of male and female rats revealed that the expression of these genes is developmentally regulated, with the highest levels at early postnatal ages in both sexes and with significantly higher mRNA levels in postnatal males. Expression of these genes in the female remained unaltered after perinatal androgenization and along the estrous cycle. In contrast, damage of cerebellar afferent neurons of the inferior olivary nucleus evoked a significant increase in StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNA levels at this site, as well as a transient elevation in StAR mRNA at the cerebellum. Finally, enhancement of cAMP levels in cultured cerebellar neurons induced a significant increase in StAR and aromatase mRNA levels. In summary, we present herein novel evidence for the developmentally regulated and partially sexually dimorphic pattern of expression of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase genes in the rat cerebellum. These observations, together with the finding that the mRNA levels of these steroidogenic molecules are sensitive to injury and are regulated by intracellular cAMP, strongly suggest that local steroidogenesis is likely to play an important role during development and adaptation to neurodegenerative processes in the olivocerebellar system. PMID:16329132

  5. Vagal Regulation of Heart Rate in the Prediction of Developmental Outcome for Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doussard-Roosevelt, Jane A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Used heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) assessed at 33 to 35 weeks gestational age to predict developmental outcome at 3 years for very low birth weight infants. Found that RSA measures predicted developmental outcome beyond effects of birth weight, medical risk, and socioeconomic status. For infants < 1,000 grams, RSA maturation…

  6. Developmental regulation of {beta}-hexosaminidase {alpha}- and {beta}-subunit gene expression in the rat reproductive system

    SciTech Connect

    Trasler, J.M.; Wakamatsu, N.; Gravel, R.A.; Benoit, G.

    1994-09-01

    {beta}-Hexosaminidase is an essential lysosomal enzyme whose absence in man results in a group of disorders, the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses. Enzyme activity for {beta}-hexosaminidase is many fold higher in the epididymis than in other tissues, is present in sperm and is postulated to be required for mammalian fertilization. To better understand how {beta}-hexosaminidase is regulated in the reproductive system, we quantitated the mRNA expression of the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits (Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta}) of the enzyme in the developing rat testis and epididymis. Hex {alpha} mRNA was differentially expressed and abundant in adult rat testis and epididymis, 13- and 2-fold brain levels, respectively. In contrast, Hex {beta} mRNA levels in the testis and epididymis were .3- and 5-fold brain levels. Within the epididymis both Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNA concentrations were highest in the corpus, 1.5-fold and 9-fold initial segment values, respectively. During testis development from 7-91 days of age, testis levels of Hex {alpha} mRNA increased 10-fold and coincided with the appearance of spermatocytes and spermatids in the epithelium. In isolated male germ cells, Hex {alpha} expression was most abundant in haploid round spermatids. Hex {alpha} mRNA was undetectable after hypophysectomy and returned to normal after testosterone administration and the return of advanced germ cells to the testis. Hex {beta} mRNA was expressed at constant low levels throughout testis development. In the caput-corpus and cauda regions of the epididymis Hex {alpha} mRNA levels increased 2-fold between 14 and 91 days; during the same developmental period epididymal Hex {beta} mRNA levels increased dramatically, by 10-20 fold. In summary, Hex {alpha} and Hex {beta} mRNAs are differentially and developmentally expressed at high levels in the rat testis and epididymis and augur for an important role for {beta}-hexosaminidase in normal male reproductive function.

  7. Developmental profile and hormonal regulation of the transcription factors broad and Krüppel homolog 1 in hemimetabolous thrips.

    PubMed

    Minakuchi, Chieka; Tanaka, Miho; Miura, Ken; Tanaka, Toshiharu

    2011-02-01

    In holometabolous insects, Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and broad (br) are key players in the juvenile hormone (JH) regulation of metamorphosis: Kr-h1 is an early JH-response gene, while br is a transcription factor that directs pupal development. Thrips (Thysanoptera) are classified as hemimetabolous insects that develop directly from nymph to adult, but they have quiescent and non-feeding stages called propupa and pupa. We analyzed the developmental profiles of br and Kr-h1 in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thripidae) that has one propupal instar and one pupal instar, and Haplothrips brevitubus (Phlaeothripidae) that has one propupal instar and two pupal instars, i.e. pupa I and pupa II. In F. occidentalis, the br mRNA levels were moderate in the embryonic stage, high at the larva-propupa transition, and low in the pre-final larval instar and the pupal stage, while Kr-h1 mRNA levels were high in the embryonic stage, remained at a moderate level in the larval and propupal stages, and low in the pupal stage. The expression profiles in H. brevitubus were very similar to those in F. occidentalis, except that the increase of br expression in the final larval stage occurs more slowly in H. brevitubus, and that the mRNA levels of br and Kr-h1 remained high in pupa I of H. brevitubus and then decreased. These profiles of br and Kr-h1 were comparable to those in holometabolous insects, although br expression found in thrips' embryogenesis is reminiscent of several hemimetabolous species. Treatment with an exogenous JH mimic (JHM) in distinct developmental stages consistently resulted in lethality as pupa of F. occidentalis or pupa II of H. brevitubus. Treatment with JHM to newly molted propupae caused prolonged expression of Kr-h1 and br in both species, suggesting that Kr-h1 and br could be involved in mediating anti-metamorphic signals of JHM.

  8. The Aspergillus fumigatus StuA Protein Governs the Up-Regulation of a Discrete Transcriptional Program during the Acquisition of Developmental CompetenceD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Donald C.; Doedt, Thomas; Chiang, Lisa Y.; Kim, H. Stanley; Chen, Dan; Nierman, William C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2005-01-01

    Members of the Asm1p, Phd1p, Sok2p, Efg1p, and StuAp (APSES) family of fungal proteins regulate morphogenesis and virulence in ascomycetes. We cloned the Aspergillus fumigatus APSES gene encoding StuAp and demonstrated that stuA transcription is markedly up-regulated after the acquisition of developmental competence. A. fumigatus ΔstuA mutants were impaired in their ability to undergo asexual reproduction. Conidiophore morphology was markedly abnormal, and only small numbers of dysmorphic conidia were produced, which exhibited precocious germination. Whole genome transcriptional analysis during the onset of developmental competence was performed and identified a subset of developmentally regulated genes that were stuA dependent, including a cluster of putative secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes, genes encoding proteins implicated in the regulation of morphogenesis, and genes encoding allergens and other antigenic proteins. Additionally, hyphae of the ΔstuA mutant displayed reduced expression of the catalase gene CAT1 and were hypersusceptible to hydrogen peroxide. PMID:16207816

  9. Ca2+-dependent regulations and signaling in skeletal muscle: from electro-mechanical coupling to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-05

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca(2+) is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca(2+) regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca(2+)-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca(2+) ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca(2+) ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance.

  10. Ca2+-Dependent Regulations and Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: From Electro-Mechanical Coupling to Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca2+ is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca2+ regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca2+-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca2+ ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca2+ ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca2+-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  11. Ca2+-dependent regulations and signaling in skeletal muscle: from electro-mechanical coupling to adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca(2+) is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca(2+) regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca(2+)-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca(2+) ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca(2+) ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  12. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation revives a form of developmentally regulated synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of post-critical period rats.

    PubMed

    Shaffery, James P; Lopez, Jorge; Bissette, Garth; Roffwarg, Howard P

    2006-01-01

    The critical period for observing a developmentally regulated form of synaptic plasticity in the visual cortex of young rats normally ends at about postnatal day 30. This developmentally regulated form of in vitro long-term potentiation (LTP) can be reliably induced in layers II-III by aiming high frequency, theta burst stimulation (TBS) at the white matter situated directly below visual cortex (LTPWM-III). Previous work has demonstrated that suppression of sensory activation of visual cortex, achieved by rearing young rats in total darkness from birth, delays termination of the critical period for inducing LTPWM-III. Subsequent data also demonstrated that when rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is suppressed, thereby reducing REMS cortical activation, just prior to the end of the critical period, termination of this developmental phase is delayed, and LTPWM-III can still be reliably produced in the usual post-critical period. Here, we report that for approximately 3 weeks immediately following the usual end of the critical period, suppression of REMS disrupts the maturational processes that close the critical period, and LTPWM-III is readily induced in brain slices taken from these somewhat older animals. Insofar as in vitro LTP is a model for the cellular and molecular changes that underlie developmental synaptic plasticity, these results suggest that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, which participate in brain development and perhaps also in learning and memory processes, remain susceptible to the effects of REMS deprivation during the general period of adolescence in the rat.

  13. A Decentralized Multivariable Robust Adaptive Voltage and Speed Regulator for Large-Scale Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okou, Francis A.; Akhrif, Ouassima; Dessaint, Louis A.; Bouchard, Derrick

    2013-05-01

    This papter introduces a decentralized multivariable robust adaptive voltage and frequency regulator to ensure the stability of large-scale interconnnected generators. Interconnection parameters (i.e. load, line and transormer parameters) are assumed to be unknown. The proposed design approach requires the reformulation of conventiaonal power system models into a multivariable model with generator terminal voltages as state variables, and excitation and turbine valve inputs as control signals. This model, while suitable for the application of modern control methods, introduces problems with regards to current design techniques for large-scale systems. Interconnection terms, which are treated as perturbations, do not meet the common matching condition assumption. A new adaptive method for a certain class of large-scale systems is therefore introduces that does not require the matching condition. The proposed controller consists of nonlinear inputs that cancel some nonlinearities of the model. Auxiliary controls with linear and nonlinear components are used to stabilize the system. They compensate unknown parametes of the model by updating both the nonlinear component gains and excitation parameters. The adaptation algorithms involve the sigma-modification approach for auxiliary control gains, and the projection approach for excitation parameters to prevent estimation drift. The computation of the matrix-gain of the controller linear component requires the resolution of an algebraic Riccati equation and helps to solve the perturbation-mismatching problem. A realistic power system is used to assess the proposed controller performance. The results show that both stability and transient performance are considerably improved following a severe contingency.

  14. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  15. GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis links growth regulation with stress adaptation response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Youn-Sung; Staswick, Paul E; Jeon, Jin; Yun, Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Jungmook; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Chung-Mo

    2007-03-30

    Plants constantly monitor environmental fluctuations to optimize their growth and metabolism. One example is adaptive growth occurring in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis is an essential constituent of the complex network of auxin actions that regulates stress adaptation responses in Arabidopsis. Endogenous auxin pool is regulated, at least in part, through negative feedback by a group of auxin-inducible GH3 genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzymes. An Arabidopsis mutant, wes1-D, in which a GH3 gene WES1 is activated by nearby insertion of the (35)S enhancer, exhibited auxin-deficient traits, including reduced growth and altered leaf shape. Interestingly, WES1 is also induced by various stress conditions as well as by salicylic acid and abscisic acid. Accordingly, wes1-D was resistant to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and stress-responsive genes, such as pathogenesis-related genes and CBF genes, were upregulated in this mutant. In contrast, a T-DNA insertional mutant showed reduced stress resistance. We therefore propose that GH3-mediated growth suppression directs reallocation of metabolic resources to resistance establishment and represents the fitness costs of induced resistance.

  16. Alternative developmental pathways associated with diapause regulated by temperature and maternal influences in embryos of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus

    PubMed Central

    Podrabsky, Jason E.; Garrett, Ian D. F.; Kohl, Zachary F.

    2010-01-01

    Embryos of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus enter a state of developmental arrest termed diapause as part of their normal developmental program. Diapause can occur at two distinct developmental stages in this species, termed diapause II and III. When incubated at 25°C, most embryos enter diapause II, whereas a small percentage of ‘escape’ embryos develop continuously past diapause II and enter diapause III. Control of entry into diapause II can be altered by maternal influences and the incubation environment experienced by the embryos. Young females produce a higher proportion of escape embryos than do older females. In addition, increasing the incubation temperature from 25 to 30°C induces all embryos to escape from diapause. Surprisingly, escape embryos follow a different morphological and physiological developmental trajectory than do embryos that enter diapause II. Development of anterior structures is advanced compared with that of posterior structures in escape embryos when compared with embryos that will enter diapause II. The difference in timing of development for these two trajectories is consistent with changes observed between two species but is very atypical of variation observed within a species. Importantly, the two developmental pathways diverge early in development, during the segmentation period, when, according to evolutionary theory, constraint on developmental pathways should be relatively high. The possession of alternative developmental pathways in a vertebrate embryo is a novel finding, the ecological and evolutionary importance of which is still unknown, but potentially significant in terms of life-history evolution. PMID:20833920

  17. The Contribution of Children's Self-Regulation and Classroom Quality to Children's Adaptive Behaviors in the Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Curby, Tim W.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Brock, Laura L.; Nathanson, Lori

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the extent to which children's self-regulation upon kindergarten entrance and classroom quality in kindergarten contributed to children's adaptive classroom behavior. Children's self-regulation was assessed using a direct assessment upon entrance into kindergarten. Classroom quality was measured on the basis of…

  18. DNA methyltransferase expressions in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis is developmentally regulated and modulated by ethanol and 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Dasmahapatra, Asok K; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of the epigenome in inducting fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) phenotypes in Japanese rice fish embryogenesis. One of the significant events in epigenome is DNA methylation which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) enzymes. We analyzed DNMT enzyme mRNA expressions in Japanese rice fish development starting from fertilized eggs to hatching and also in embryos exposed for first 48h of development either to ethanol (300mM) or to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC; 2mM), an inhibitor of DNMT enzyme activity. As observed in FASD phenotypes, 5-azaC exposure was able to induce microcephaly and craniofacial cartilage deformities in Japanese rice fish. Moreover, we have observed that expression of DNMTs (dnmt1, dnmt3aa, and dnmt3bb.1) are developmentally regulated; high mRNA copies were found in early stages (1-2day-post-fertilization, dpf), followed by gradual reduction until hatched. In ethanol-treated embryos, compared to controls, dnmt1 mRNA is in reduced level in 2dpf and in enhanced level in 6dpf embryos. While dnmt3aa and 3bb.1 remained unaltered. In contrast, embryos exposed to 5-azaC have an enhanced level of dnmt1 and dnmt3bb.1 mRNAs both in 2 and 6dpf embryos while dnmt3aa is enhanced only in 6dpf embryos. Moreover, endocannabinoid receptor 1a (cnr1a) mRNA which was found to be reduced by ethanol remained unaltered and cnr1b and cnr2 mRNAs, which were remained unaltered by ethanol, were increased significantly by 5-azaC in 6dpf embryos. This study indicates that the craniofacial defects observed in FASD phenotypes are the results of dysregulations in DNMT expressions.

  19. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Louis, Justin V; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice. PMID:18715506

  20. Synaptic commitment: developmentally regulated reciprocal changes in hippocampal granule cell NMDA and AMPA receptors over the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Krause, Michael; Rao, Geeta; McNaughton, Bruce L; Barnes, C A

    2008-06-01

    Synaptic transmission in hippocampal field CA1 is largely N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA(R)) dependent during the early postnatal period. It becomes increasingly mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors until an adult ratio of AMPA to NMDA receptors is achieved. It is shown here that increases in the AMPA receptor (AMPA(R))-mediated field potential response continue over the life span of the F-344 rat at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, the NMDA(R)-dependent component of the response decreases with age between 1 and 27 mo, leading to an increase of AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio with age. One possible explanation of this age difference is that the AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio can be modified by experience. To test the idea that the changed ratio is caused by the old rats' longer lives, an intensive 10-mo period of enrichment treatment was given to a group of animals, beginning at 3 mo of age. Compared with animals housed in standard cages, the enrichment treatment did not alter the glutamatergic response ratio measured with field potential recording methods. These data provide support for the conclusion that the observed change with age is developmentally regulated rather than experience dependent. Given the role of the NMDA(R) in synaptic plasticity, these changes suggest a progressive commitment of perforant path synapses to particular weights over the life span. One possible implication of this effect includes preservation of selected memories, ultimately at the expense of a reduced capacity to store new information.

  1. Multilevel risk factors and developmental assets for internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in disadvantaged adolescents: modeling longitudinal trajectories from the Rural Adaptation Project.

    PubMed

    Smokowski, Paul R; Guo, Shenyang; Rose, Roderick; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L; Bacallao, Martica

    2014-11-01

    The current study filled significant gaps in our knowledge of developmental psychopathology by examining the influence of multilevel risk factors and developmental assets on longitudinal trajectories of internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in an exceptionally culturally diverse sample of rural adolescents. Integrating ecological and social capital theories, we explored if positive microsystem transactions are associated with self-esteem while negative microsystem transactions increase the chances of internalizing problems. Data came from the Rural Adaptation Project, a 5-year longitudinal panel study of more than 4,000 middle school students from 28 public schools in two rural, disadvantaged counties in North Carolina. Three-level hierarchical linear modeling models were estimated to predict internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety) and self-esteem. Relative to other students, risk for internalizing problems and low self-esteem was elevated for aggressive adolescents, students who were hassled or bullied at school, and those who were rejected by peers or in conflict with their parents. Internalizing problems were also more common among adolescents from socioeconomically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods, among those in schools with more suspensions, in students who reported being pressured by peers, and in youth who required more teacher support. It is likely that these experiences left adolescents disengaged from developing social capital from ecological microsystems (e.g., family, school, peers). On the positive side, support from parents and friends and optimism about the future were key assets associated with lower internalizing symptoms and higher self-esteem. Self-esteem was also positively related to religious orientation, school satisfaction, and future optimism. These variables show active engagement with ecological microsystems. The implications and limitations were discussed. PMID:25422975

  2. Multilevel risk factors and developmental assets for internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in disadvantaged adolescents: modeling longitudinal trajectories from the Rural Adaptation Project.

    PubMed

    Smokowski, Paul R; Guo, Shenyang; Rose, Roderick; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L; Bacallao, Martica

    2014-11-01

    The current study filled significant gaps in our knowledge of developmental psychopathology by examining the influence of multilevel risk factors and developmental assets on longitudinal trajectories of internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in an exceptionally culturally diverse sample of rural adolescents. Integrating ecological and social capital theories, we explored if positive microsystem transactions are associated with self-esteem while negative microsystem transactions increase the chances of internalizing problems. Data came from the Rural Adaptation Project, a 5-year longitudinal panel study of more than 4,000 middle school students from 28 public schools in two rural, disadvantaged counties in North Carolina. Three-level hierarchical linear modeling models were estimated to predict internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety) and self-esteem. Relative to other students, risk for internalizing problems and low self-esteem was elevated for aggressive adolescents, students who were hassled or bullied at school, and those who were rejected by peers or in conflict with their parents. Internalizing problems were also more common among adolescents from socioeconomically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods, among those in schools with more suspensions, in students who reported being pressured by peers, and in youth who required more teacher support. It is likely that these experiences left adolescents disengaged from developing social capital from ecological microsystems (e.g., family, school, peers). On the positive side, support from parents and friends and optimism about the future were key assets associated with lower internalizing symptoms and higher self-esteem. Self-esteem was also positively related to religious orientation, school satisfaction, and future optimism. These variables show active engagement with ecological microsystems. The implications and limitations were discussed.

  3. The GATA Factor elt-1 Regulates C. elegans Developmental Timing by Promoting Expression of the let-7 Family MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Max L.; Kim, Sunhong; Morita, Kiyokazu; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Min

    2015-01-01

    Postembryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model for the study of the temporal regulation of development and for the roles of microRNAs in controlling gene expression. Stable switch-like changes in gene expression occur during development as stage-specific microRNAs are expressed and subsequently down-regulate other stage-specific factors, driving developmental progression. Key genes in this regulatory network are phylogenetically conserved and include the post-transcriptional microRNA repressor LIN-28; the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12; and the microRNAs LIN-4, LET-7, and the three LET-7 family miRNAs (miR-48, miR-84, and miR-241). DAF-12 is known to regulate transcription of miR-48, miR-84 and miR-241, but its contribution is insufficient to account for all of the transcriptional regulation implied by the mutant phenotypes. In this work, the GATA-family transcription factor ELT-1 is identified from a genetic enhancer screen as a regulator of developmental timing in parallel to DAF-12, and is shown to do so by promoting the expression of the LET-7, miR-48, miR-84, and miR-241 microRNAs. The role of ELT-1 in developmental timing is shown to be separate from its role in cell-fate maintenance during post-embryonic development. In addition, analysis of Chromatin Immnoprecipitation (ChIP) data from the modENCODE project and this work suggest that the contribution of ELT-1 to the control of let-7 family microRNA expression is likely through direct transcription regulation. PMID:25816370

  4. Variable memory strategy use in children's adaptive intratask learning behavior: developmental changes and working memory influences in free recall.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Martin; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    Variability in strategy use within single trials in free recall was analyzed longitudinally from second to fourth grades (ages 8-10 years). To control for practice effects another sample of fourth graders was included (age 10 years). Video analyses revealed that children employed different strategies when preparing for free recall. A gradual shift from labeling to cumulative rehearsal was present both with increasing age and across different list positions. Whereas cumulative rehearsal was frequent at early list positions, labeling was dominant at later list portions. Working memory capacity predicted the extent of cumulative rehearsal usage, which became more efficient with increasing age. Results are discussed in the context of the adaptive strategy choice model. PMID:17650126

  5. Developmental screening in a Canadian First Nation (Mohawk): psychometric properties and adaptations of ages & stages questionnaires (2nd edition)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The need for early intervention tools adapted to the First Nation culture is well documented. However, standards derived from First Nation communities are absent from the literature. This study examines the psychometric properties of an adaptation of a caregiver-completed screening tool, the Ages & Stages Questionnaires (ASQ), for the Mohawk population. Methods Participants who completed the questionnaires include 17 teachers, along with the parents of 282 children (130 girls and 152 boys) between the ages of 9 and 66 months who attend the Child and Family Center Mohawk Territory, Quebec. Results For the internal consistency of the four questionnaires (36-, 42-, 48- and 54-month intervals), Cronbach’s alphas varied between .61 and .84. Five results were below 0.60: “gross motor” (Q36 and Q42), “problem solving” (Q36) and “personal-social” (Q36 and Q42). A comparison of the results shows that parents and teachers agreed in 85% of the cases concerning the referral of the child for further evaluation. Moreover, the group discussion with the parents revealed that the use of the questionnaire was appreciated and was deemed appropriate for use within the community. Conclusion The results show that the ASQ is a screening test that may be appropriate for use with children from communities that are seemingly very different in terms of geographic, climatic and cultural backgrounds. This preliminary study with the Child and Family Center appears to support further study and the use of the ASQ with the Mohawk population. PMID:24467769

  6. Synergistic induction of AHR regulated genes in developmental toxicity from co-exposure to two model PAHs in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia. R.; Cockman, Crystal. J.; Matson, Cole. W.; Di Giulio, Richard. T.

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants created by the incomplete combustion of carbon, and are increasing in the environment largely due to the burning of fossil fuels. PAHs occur as complex mixtures, and some combinations have been shown to cause synergistic developmental toxicity in fish embryos, characterized by pericardial edema and craniofacial malformations. Previous studies have indicated that in the zebrafish model, this toxicity is mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR2), and enhanced by inhibition of CYP1A activity. In this study, we further examined this interaction of the model PAH and AHR agonist β-naphthoflavone (BNF) with and without the AHR partial agonist/antagonist and CYP1A inhibitor α-naphthoflavone (ANF) to determine 1) whether ANF was acting as an AHR antagonist, 2) what alterations BNF and ANF both alone and in combination had on mRNA expression of the AHR regulated genes cytochrome P450 (cyp) 1a, 1b1, and 1c1, and the AHR repressor (ahrr2) prior to vs. during deformity onset, and 3) compare CYP1A enzyme activity with mRNA induction. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from 24–48 or 24–96 hpf to BNF, 1–100 μg/L, ANF, 1–150 μg/L, a BNF+ANF co-exposure (1 μg/L + 100 μg/L), or a DMSO solvent control. RNA was extracted and examined by quantitative real time PCR. Both BNF and ANF each individually resulted in a dose dependent increase CYP1A, CYP1B1, CYP1C1, and AHRR2 mRNA, confirming their activities as AHR agonists. In the BNF+ANF co-exposures prior to deformity onset, expression of these genes was synergistic, and expression levels of the AHR regulated genes resembled the higher doses of BNF alone. Gene induction during deformities was also significantly increased in the co-exposure, but to a lesser magnitude than prior to deformity onset. EROD measurements of CYP1A activity showed ANF inhibited activity induction by BNF in the co-exposure group; this finding is not predicted by mRNA expression, which is

  7. The neurofilament antibody RT97 recognises a developmentally regulated phosphorylation epitope on microtubule-associated protein 1B

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSTONE, MANDY; GOOLD, ROBERT G.; FISCHER, ITZHAK; GORDON-WEEKS, PHILLIP R.

    1997-01-01

    Microtubules are important for the growth and maintenance of stable neuronal processes and their organisation is controlled partly by microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). MAP 1B is the first MAP to be expressed in neurons and plays an important role in neurite outgrowth. MAP 1B is phosphorylated at multiple sites and it is believed that the function of the protein is regulated by its phosphorylation state. We have shown that the monoclonal antibody (mAb) RT97, which recognises phosphorylated epitopes on neurofilament proteins, fetal tau, and on Alzheimer's paired helical filament-tau, also recognises a developmentally regulated phosphorylation epitope on MAP 1B. In the rat cerebellum, Western blot analysis shows that mAb RT97 recognises the upper band of the MAP 1B doublet and that the amount of this epitope peaks very early postnatally and decreases with increasing age so that it is absent in the adult, despite the continued expression of MAP 1B in the adult. We confirmed that mAb RT97 binds to MAP 1B by showing that it recognises MAP 1B immunoprecipitated from postnatal rat cerebellum using polyclonal antibodies to recombinant MAP 1B proteins. We established that the RT97 epitope on MAP 1B is phosphorylated by showing that antibody binding was abolished by alkaline phosphatase treatment of immunoblots. Epitope mapping experiments suggest that the mAb RT97 site on MAP 1B is near the N-terminus of the molecule. Despite our immunoblotting data, immunostaining of sections of postnatal rat cerebellum with mAb RT97 shows a staining pattern typical of neurofilaments with no apparent staining of MAP 1B. For instance, basket cell axons and axons in the granule cell layer and white matter stained, whereas parallel fibres did not. These results suggest that the MAP 1B epitope is masked or lost under the immunocytochemical conditions in which the cerebellar sections are prepared. The upper band of the MAP 1B doublet is believed to be predominantly phosphorylated by

  8. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  9. Allele-specific down-regulation of RPTOR expression induced by retinoids contributes to climate adaptations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Southard, Catherine; Witonsky, David B; Kittler, Ralf; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2010-10-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway regulates cell growth, energy homeostasis, apoptosis, and immune response. The regulatory associated protein of MTOR encoded by the RPTOR gene is a key component of this pathway. A previous survey of candidate genes found that RPTOR contains multiple SNPs with strong correlations between allele frequencies and climate variables, consistent with the action of selective pressures that vary across environments. Using data from a recent genome scan for selection signals, we honed in on a SNP (rs11868112) 26 kb upstream to the transcription start site of RPTOR that exhibits the strongest association with temperature variables. Transcription factor motif scanning and mining of recently mapped transcription factor binding sites identified a binding site for POU class 2 homeobox 1 (POU2F1) spanning the SNP and an adjacent retinoid acid receptor (RAR) binding site. Using expression quantification, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and reporter gene assays, we demonstrate that POU2F1 and RARA do bind upstream of the RPTOR gene to regulate its expression in response to retinoids; this regulation is affected by the allele status at rs11868112 with the derived allele resulting in lower expression levels. We propose a model in which the derived allele influences thermogenesis or immune response by altering MTOR pathway activity and thereby increasing fitness in colder climates. Our results show that signatures of genetic adaptations can identify variants with functional effects, consistent with the idea that selection signals may be used for SNP annotation.

  10. An Argonaute 2 Switch Regulates Circulating miR-210 to Coordinate Hypoxic Adaptation across Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Andrew; Lee, Changjin; Annis, Sofia; Min, Pil-Ki; Pande, Reena; Creager, Mark A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Moore, Lorna G.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Hwang, Sarah J.; Kourembanas, Stella; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Complex organisms may coordinate molecular responses to hypoxia by specialized avenues of communication across multiple tissues, but these mechanisms are poorly understood. Plasma-based, extracellular microRNAs have been described, yet, their regulation and biological functions in hypoxia remain enigmatic. We found a unique pattern of release of the hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 (miR-210) from hypoxic and reoxygenated cells. This microRNA is also elevated in human plasma in physiologic and pathologic conditions of altered oxygen demand and delivery. Released miR-210 can be delivered to recipient cells, and its direct suppression of its direct target ISCU and mitochondrial metabolism is primarily evident in hypoxia. To regulate these hypoxia-specific actions, prolyl-hydroxylation of Argonaute 2 acts as a molecular switch that reciprocally modulates miR-210 release and intracellular activity in source cells as well as regulates intracellular activity in recipient cells after miR-210 delivery. Therefore, Argonaute 2-dependent control of released miR-210 represents a unique communication system that integrates the hypoxic response across anatomically distinct cells, preventing unnecessary activity of delivered miR-210 in normoxia while still preparing recipient tissues for incipient hypoxic stress and accelerating adaptation. PMID:24983771

  11. Transcriptomic Profiling and H3K27me3 Distribution Reveal Both Demethylase-Dependent and Independent Regulation of Developmental Gene Transcription in Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jin Choul; Kim, Sun Hwa; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The removal of histone H3 trimethylation at lysine residue 27 (H3K27me3) plays a critical role in the transcriptional initiation of developmental genes. The H3K27me3-specific KDM6 demethylases JMJD3 and UTX are responsible for the transcriptional initiation of various developmental genes, but some genes are expressed in a KDM6 demethylase-independent manner. To address the role of H3K27me3 in the retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of the human carcinoma NCCIT cell line, we inhibited JMJD3 and UTX using the H3K27me3 demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4. The commitment of JMJD3/UTX-inhibited cells to a specific fate was delayed, and transcriptome profiling also revealed the differential expression of genes related to cell fate specification in demethylase-inactivated cells; the expression levels of RA metabolism and HOX family genes significantly decreased. We observed a weak correlation between H3K27me3 enrichment and transcriptional repression in the control and JMJD/UTX-inhibited cells, except for a few sets of developmental genes that are indispensable for cell fate specification. Taken together, these results provide the H3K27me3 landscape of a differentiating cell line and suggest that both demethylase-dependent and demethylase-independent transcriptional regulation play a role in early differentiation and developmental gene expression activated by H3K27me3 demethylation. PMID:26263556

  12. Developmental regulation of neuroligin genes in Japanese ricefish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis maintains the rhythm during ethanol-induced fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Haron, Mona H; Khan, Ikhlas A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2014-01-01

    Although prenatal alcohol exposure is the potential cause of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) in humans, the molecular mechanism(s) of FASD is yet unknown. We have used Japanese ricefish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis as an animal model of FASD and reported that this model has effectively generated several phenotypic features in the cardiovasculature and neurocranial cartilages by developmental ethanol exposure which is analogous to human FASD phenotypes. As FASD is a neurobehavioral disorder, we are searching for a molecular target of ethanol that alters neurological functions. In this communication, we have focused on neuroligin genes (nlgn) which are known to be active at the postsynaptic side of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses of the central nervous system. There are six human NLGN homologs of Japanese ricefish reported in public data bases. We have partially cloned these genes and analyzed their expression pattern during normal development and also after exposing the embryos to ethanol. Our data indicate that the expression of all six nlgn genes in Japanese ricefish embryos is developmentally regulated. Although ethanol is able to induce developmental abnormalities in Japanese ricefish embryogenesis comparable to the FASD phenotypes, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of nlgn mRNAs indicate unresponsiveness of these genes to ethanol. We conclude that the disruption of the developmental rhythm of Japanese ricefish embryogenesis by ethanol that leads to FASD may not affect the nlgn gene expression at the message level.

  13. Systems theory and cascades in developmental psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Cox, Martha J; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Propper, Cathi; Gariépy, Jean-Louis

    2010-08-01

    In the wake of prominent theoreticians in developmental science, whose contributions we review in this article, many developmental psychologists came to endorse a systems approach to understanding how the individual, as it develops, establishes functional relationships to social ecological contexts that from birth to school entry rapidly increase in complexity. The concept of developmental cascade has been introduced in this context to describe lawful processes by which antecedent conditions may be related with varying probabilities to specified outcomes. These are understood as processes by which function at one level or in one domain of behavior affect the organization of competency in later developing domains of general adaptation. Here we propose a developmental sequence by which the developing child acquires regulative capacities that are key to adjustment to a society that demands considerable control of emotional and cognitive functions early in life. We report empirical evidence showing that the acquisition of regulative capacities may be understood as a cascade of shifts in control parameters induced by the progressive integration of biological, transactional, and socioaffective systems over development. We conclude by suggesting how the developmental process may be accessed for effective intervention in populations deemed "at risk" for later problems of psychosocial adjustment.

  14. Developmental Toxicology##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicology encompasses the study of developmental exposures, pharmacokinetics, mechanisms, pathogenesis, and outcomes potentially leading to adverse health effects. Manifestations of developmental toxicity include structural malformations, growth retardation, functi...

  15. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Veith, Nadine; Feldman-Salit, Anna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Henrich, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Wade, Rebecca C

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PYK) is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric activation may

  16. Local Adaptation of Sun-Exposure-Dependent Gene Expression Regulation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Ryosuke; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2016-01-01

    Sun-exposure is a key environmental variable in the study of human evolution. Several skin-pigmentation genes serve as classical examples of positive selection, suggesting that sun-exposure has significantly shaped worldwide genomic variation. Here we investigate the interaction between genetic variation and sun-exposure, and how this impacts gene expression regulation. Using RNA-Seq data from 607 human skin samples, we identified thousands of transcripts that are differentially expressed between sun-exposed skin and non-sun-exposed skin. We then tested whether genetic variants may influence each individual’s gene expression response to sun-exposure. Our analysis revealed 10 sun-exposure-dependent gene expression quantitative trait loci (se-eQTLs), including genes involved in skin pigmentation (SLC45A2) and epidermal differentiation (RASSF9). The allele frequencies of the RASSF9 se-eQTL across diverse populations correlate with the magnitude of solar radiation experienced by these populations, suggesting local adaptation to varying levels of sunlight. These results provide the first examples of sun-exposure-dependent regulatory variation and suggest that this variation has contributed to recent human adaptation. PMID:27760139

  17. The stringent response regulates adaptation to darkness in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Hood, Rachel D; Higgins, Sean A; Flamholz, Avi; Nichols, Robert J; Savage, David F

    2016-08-16

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus relies upon photosynthesis to drive metabolism and growth. During darkness, Synechococcus stops growing, derives energy from its glycogen stores, and greatly decreases rates of macromolecular synthesis via unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that the stringent response, a stress response pathway whose genes are conserved across bacteria and plant plastids, contributes to this dark adaptation. Levels of the stringent response alarmone guanosine 3'-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate (ppGpp) rise after a shift from light to dark, indicating that darkness triggers the same response in cyanobacteria as starvation in heterotrophic bacteria. High levels of ppGpp are sufficient to stop growth and dramatically alter many aspects of cellular physiology, including levels of photosynthetic pigments and polyphosphate, DNA content, and the rate of translation. Cells unable to synthesize ppGpp display pronounced growth defects after exposure to darkness. The stringent response regulates expression of a number of genes in Synechococcus, including ribosomal hibernation promoting factor (hpf), which causes ribosomes to dimerize in the dark and may contribute to decreased translation. Although the metabolism of Synechococcus differentiates it from other model bacterial systems, the logic of the stringent response remains remarkably conserved, while at the same time having adapted to the unique stresses of the photosynthetic lifestyle. PMID:27486247

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Adaptive Regulation of Intestinal Riboflavin Uptake Process.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Ghosal, Abhisek; Kapadia, Rubina; Nabokina, Svetlana M; Said, Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal absorption process of vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) is carrier-mediated, and all three known human RF transporters, i.e., hRFVT-1, -2, and -3 (products of the SLC52A1, 2 & 3 genes, respectively) are expressed in the gut. We have previously shown that the intestinal RF uptake process is adaptively regulated by substrate level, but little is known about the molecular mechanism(s) involved. Using human intestinal epithelial NCM460 cells maintained under RF deficient and over-supplemented (OS) conditions, we now show that the induction in RF uptake in RF deficiency is associated with an increase in expression of the hRFVT-2 & -3 (but not hRFVT-1) at the protein and mRNA levels. Focusing on hRFVT-3, the predominant transporter in the intestine, we also observed an increase in the level of expression of its hnRNA and activity of its promoter in the RF deficiency state. An increase in the level of expression of the nuclear factor Sp1 (which is important for activity of the SLC52A3 promoter) was observed in RF deficiency, while mutating the Sp1/GC site in the SLC52A3 promoter drastically decreased the level of induction in SLC52A3 promoter activity in RF deficiency. We also observed specific epigenetic changes in the SLC52A3 promoter in RF deficiency. Finally, an increase in hRFVT-3 protein expression at the cell surface was observed in RF deficiency. Results of these investigations show, for the first time, that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are involved in the adaptive regulation of intestinal RF uptake by the prevailing substrate level.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Adaptive Regulation of Intestinal Riboflavin Uptake Process

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Ghosal, Abhisek; Kapadia, Rubina; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal absorption process of vitamin B2 (riboflavin, RF) is carrier-mediated, and all three known human RF transporters, i.e., hRFVT-1, -2, and -3 (products of the SLC52A1, 2 & 3 genes, respectively) are expressed in the gut. We have previously shown that the intestinal RF uptake process is adaptively regulated by substrate level, but little is known about the molecular mechanism(s) involved. Using human intestinal epithelial NCM460 cells maintained under RF deficient and over-supplemented (OS) conditions, we now show that the induction in RF uptake in RF deficiency is associated with an increase in expression of the hRFVT-2 & -3 (but not hRFVT-1) at the protein and mRNA levels. Focusing on hRFVT-3, the predominant transporter in the intestine, we also observed an increase in the level of expression of its hnRNA and activity of its promoter in the RF deficiency state. An increase in the level of expression of the nuclear factor Sp1 (which is important for activity of the SLC52A3 promoter) was observed in RF deficiency, while mutating the Sp1/GC site in the SLC52A3 promoter drastically decreased the level of induction in SLC52A3 promoter activity in RF deficiency. We also observed specific epigenetic changes in the SLC52A3 promoter in RF deficiency. Finally, an increase in hRFVT-3 protein expression at the cell surface was observed in RF deficiency. Results of these investigations show, for the first time, that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are involved in the adaptive regulation of intestinal RF uptake by the prevailing substrate level. PMID:26121134

  20. Adaptive Regulation of the Northern California Reservoir System for Water, Energy, and Environmental Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, A. P.; Kistenmacher, M.; Yao, H.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 National Climate Assessment of the US Global Change Research Program emphasizes that water resources managers and planners in most US regions will have to cope with new risks, vulnerabilities, and opportunities, and recommends the development of adaptive capacity to effectively respond to the new water resources planning and management challenges. In the face of these challenges, adaptive reservoir regulation is becoming all the more ncessary. Water resources management in Northern California relies on the coordinated operation of several multi-objective reservoirs on the Trinity, Sacramento, American, Feather, and San Joaquin Rivers. To be effective, reservoir regulation must be able to (a) account for forecast uncertainty; (b) assess changing tradeoffs among water uses and regions; and (c) adjust management policies as conditions change; and (d) evaluate the socio-economic and environmental benefits and risks of forecasts and policies for each region and for the system as a whole. The Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management (INFORM) prototype demonstration project operated in Northern California through the collaboration of several forecast and management agencies has shown that decision support systems (DSS) with these attributes add value to stakeholder decision processes compared to current, less flexible management practices. Key features of the INFORM DSS include: (a) dynamically downscaled operational forecasts and climate projections that maintain the spatio-temporal coherence of the downscaled land surface forcing fields within synoptic scales; (b) use of ensemble forecast methodologies for reservoir inflows; (c) assessment of relevant tradeoffs among water uses on regional and local scales; (d) development and evaluation of dynamic reservoir policies with explicit consideration of hydro-climatic forecast uncertainties; and (e) focus on stakeholder information needs.This article discusses the INFORM integrated design concept, underlying

  1. A Prolactin Family Paralog Regulates Placental Adaptations to a Physiological Stressor.

    PubMed

    Bu, Pengli; Alam, Sheikh M Khorshed; Dhakal, Pramod; Vivian, Jay L; Soares, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The prolactin (PRL) family of hormones and cytokines participates in the regulation of optimal reproductive performance in the mouse and rat. Members of the PRL family are expressed in the anterior pituitary, uterus, and/or placenta. In the present study, we investigated the ontogeny of PRL family 7, subfamily b, member 1 (PRL7B1; also called PRL-like protein-N, PLP-N) expression in the developing mouse placenta and established a mouse model for investigating the biological function of PRL7B1. Transcripts for Prl7b1 were first detected on Gestation Day (d) 8.5. From gestation d8.5 through d14.5, Prl7b1 was expressed in trophoblast cells residing at the interface between maternal mesometrial decidua and the developing placenta. On gestation d17.5, the predominant cellular source of Prl7b1 mRNA was migratory trophoblast cells invading into the uterine mesometrial decidua. The Prl7b1 null mutant allele was generated via replacement of the endogenous Prl7b1 coding sequence with beta-galactosidase (LacZ) reporter and neomycin cassettes. The mutant Prl7b1 allele was successfully passed through the germline. Homozygous Prl7b1 mutant mice were viable and fertile. Under standard animal housing conditions, Prl7b1 had undetectable effects on placentation and pregnancy. Hypoxia exposure during pregnancy evoked adaptations in the organization of the wild-type placenta that were not observed in Prl7b1 null placentation sites. In summary, PRL7B1 is viewed as a part of a pathway regulating placental adaptations to physiological stressors.

  2. The Arabidopsis Mediator CDK8 module genes CCT (MED12) and GCT (MED13) are global regulators of developmental phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Gillmor, C. Stewart; Silva-Ortega, Claudia O.; Willmann, Matthew R.; Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Poethig, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Temporal coordination of developmental programs is necessary for normal ontogeny, but the mechanism by which this is accomplished is still poorly understood. We have previously shown that two components of the Mediator CDK8 module encoded by CENTER CITY (CCT; Arabidopsis MED12) and GRAND CENTRAL (GCT; Arabidopsis MED13) are required for timing of pattern formation during embryogenesis. A morphological, molecular and genomic analysis of the post-embryonic phenotype of gct and cct mutants demonstrated that these genes also promote at least three subsequent developmental transitions: germination, vegetative phase change, and flowering. Genetic and molecular analyses indicate that GCT and CCT operate in parallel to gibberellic acid, a phytohormone known to regulate these same three transitions. We demonstrate that the delay in vegetative phase change in gct and cct is largely due to overexpression of miR156, and that the delay in flowering is due in part to upregulation of FLC. Thus, GCT and CCT coordinate vegetative and floral transitions by repressing the repressors miR156 and FLC. Our results suggest that MED12 and MED13 act as global regulators of developmental timing by fine-tuning the expression of temporal regulatory genes. PMID:25377553

  3. Erythroid pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase: cloning, developmental expression, and regulation by cAMP and in vivo hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mass, Markus; Simo, Erika; Dragon, Stefanie

    2003-12-01

    A characteristic process of terminal erythroid differentiation is the degradation of ribosomal RNA into mononucleotides. The pyrimidine mononucleotides can be dephosphorylated by pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N-I). In humans, a lack of this enzyme causes hemolytic anemia with ribosomal structures and trinucleotides retained in the red blood cells (RBCs). Although the protein/nucleotide sequence of P5N-I is known in mammals, the onset and regulation of P5N-I during erythroid maturation is unknown. However, in circulating chicken embryonic RBCs, the enzyme is induced together with carbonic anhydrase (CAII) and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) by norepinephrine (NE) and adenosine, which are released by the embryo under hypoxic conditions. Here, we present the chicken P5N-I sequence and the gene expression of P5N-I during RBC maturation; the profile of gene expression follows the enzyme activity with a rise between days 13 and 16 of embryonic development. The p5n-I expression is induced (1) in definitive but not primitive RBCs by stimulation of beta-adrenergic/adenosine receptors, and (2) in definitive RBCs by hypoxic incubation of the chicken embryo. Since embryonic RBCs increase their hemoglobin-oxygen affinity by degradation of nucleotides such as uridine triphosphate (UTP) and cytidine triphosphate (CTP), the induction of p5n-I expression can be seen as an adaptive response to hypoxia.

  4. Adaptive evolution of genes involved in the regulation of germline stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    PubMed

    Flores, Heather A; DuMont, Vanessa L Bauer; Fatoo, Aalya; Hubbard, Diana; Hijji, Mohammed; Barbash, Daniel A; Aquadro, Charles F

    2015-04-01

    Population genetic and comparative analyses in diverse taxa have shown that numerous genes involved in reproduction are adaptively evolving. Two genes involved in germline stem cell regulation, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), have been shown previously to experience recurrent, adaptive evolution in both Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Here we report a population genetic survey on eight additional genes involved in germline stem cell regulation in D. melanogaster and D. simulans that reveals all eight of these genes reject a neutral model of evolution in at least one test and one species after correction for multiple testing using a false-discovery rate of 0.05. These genes play diverse roles in the regulation of germline stem cells, suggesting that positive selection in response to several evolutionary pressures may be acting to drive the adaptive evolution of these genes.

  5. Female-specific gene expression in dioecious liverwort Pellia endiviifolia is developmentally regulated and connected to archegonia production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    developmentally regulated. The contribution of the identified genes may be crucial for successful liverwort sexual reproduction. PMID:24939387

  6. Developmentally regulated effects of severe hemorrhage on cardiovascular homeostasis and the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Samhan, Mohamed; Qi, Wei; Smith, Francine G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in developing animals, the cardiovascular responses to severe hemorrhage at which compensatory mechanisms fail and when blood pressure remains decreased after blood loss. Two groups of conscious lambs (Group I: one to two weeks, N = 7; group II: six to seven weeks, N = 7) were studied. Mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic pressures, and heart rate were measured for 20 min before (Control, C) and for 60 min after a fixed hemorrhage of 30% of blood volume. The arterial baroreflex control of heart rate was assessed before (C), and at 30 and 60 min intervals after hemorrhage. Mean arterial pressure decreased for up to 60 min after hemorrhage in both groups of lambs. In group I, heart rate decreased from 200 ± 29 (C) to 164 ± 24 beat min−1 at 30 min then increased to 232 ± 45 beat min−1 at 60 min, whereas heart rate remained unaltered in group II. With respect to the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate, by 30 min after hemorrhage in group I, there was a decrease in the heart rate range over which the baroreflex operates (P1) from 192 ± 13 (C) to 102 ± 9 beats min−1; by 60 min after hemorrhage, there was a decrease in minimum heart rate (P4) from 72 ± 10 (C) to 32 ± 25 beats min−1. In group II, P1 decreased to a lesser extent than group I from 134 ± 21 (C) to 82 ± 10 beats min−1 at 30 min; minimum heart rate (P4) decreased from 40 ± 15 (C) to 24 ± 9 and 20 ± 13 beats min−1 at 30 and 60 min, respectively. These results provide the first assessment of the arterial baroreflex control of heart rate following blood loss and new evidence that the cardiovascular responses to severe hemorrhage are developmentally regulated. PMID:26197929

  7. Metabolic and developmental adaptations of growing potato tubers in response to specific manipulations of the adenylate energy status.

    PubMed

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Zauber, Henrik; Wucke, Cornelia; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-04-01

    in fermentation products nor in the cellular redox state, indicating that fermentation was not yet induced in the transgenic lines. When taken together the combined results of these studies allow the identification of both short- and long-term adaptation of plant metabolism and development to direct changes in the adenylate status.

  8. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    PubMed

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation. PMID:20930516

  9. Identification of signaling pathways regulating primary cilium length and flow-mediated adaptation.

    PubMed

    Besschetnova, Tatiana Y; Kolpakova-Hart, Elona; Guan, Yinghua; Zhou, Jing; Olsen, Bjorn R; Shah, Jagesh V

    2010-01-26

    The primary cilium acts as a transducer of extracellular stimuli into intracellular signaling [1, 2]. Its regulation, particularly with respect to length, has been defined primarily by genetic experiments and human disease states in which molecular components that are necessary for its proper construction have been mutated or deleted [1]. However, dynamic modulation of cilium length, a phenomenon observed in ciliated protists [3, 4], has not been well-characterized in vertebrates. Here we demonstrate that decreased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) or increased cyclic AMP (cAMP), and subsequent protein kinase A activation, increases primary cilium length in mammalian epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Anterograde intraflagellar transport is sped up in lengthened cilia, potentially increasing delivery flux of cilium components. The cilium length response creates a negative feedback loop whereby fluid shear-mediated deflection of the primary cilium, which decreases intracellular cAMP, leads to cilium shortening and thus decreases mechanotransductive signaling. This adaptive response is blocked when the autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) gene products, polycystin-1 or -2, are reduced. Dynamic regulation of cilium length is thus intertwined with cilium-mediated signaling and provides a natural braking mechanism in response to external stimuli that may be compromised in PKD.

  10. Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes and the elongation factor 1B gene show coordinate developmental regulation which is under post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Blumberg, D D

    1999-06-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental program in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum [19, 20]. One of the earliest developmental events is the decline in ribosomal protein synthesis [2, 17, 29, 30]. The ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes with 20 min to 1 h following the removal of nutrients, and their mRNA levels decline sharply at about 9 h into the 24-h developmental cycle [28, 31, 35, 36]. It has been generally assumed that the decline in r-protein mRNA levels during late development reflected a decline in the transcription rate [12, 32, 43]. Here we demonstrate that this is not the case. The transcription rates of three ribosomal protein genes, rpL11, rpL23 and rpS9 as well as an elongation factor 1B gene have been determined during growth and development in Dictyostelium. Throughout growth and development the transcription rate of the ribosomal protein genes remains relatively constant at 0.2%-0.5% of the rate of rRNA transcription while the elongation factor 1B gene is transcribed at 0.4%-0.6% of the rRNA rate. This low but constant transcription rate is in contrast to a spore coat protein gene Psp D, which is transcribed at 6% of the rRNA rate in late developing cells. The elongation factor 1B gene appears to be co-regulated with the ribosomal protein genes both in terms of its transcription rate and mRNA accumulation. Dictyostelium has been a popular model for understanding signal transduction and the growth to differentiation transition, thus it is of significance that the regulation of ribosome biosynthesis in Dictyostelium resembles that of higher eukaryotes in being regulated largely at the post-transcriptional level in response to starvation as opposed to yeasts where the regulation is largely transcriptional [27]. PMID:10374261

  11. DEVELOPMENTAL DIVERSITY OF AMPHIBIANS

    PubMed Central

    Elinson, Richard P.; del Pino, Eugenia M.

    2011-01-01

    The current model amphibian, Xenopus laevis, develops rapidly in water to a tadpole which metamorphoses into a frog. Many amphibians deviate from the X. laevis developmental pattern. Among other adaptations, their embryos develop in foam nests on land or in pouches on their mother’s back or on a leaf guarded by a parent. The diversity of developmental patterns includes multinucleated oogenesis, lack of RNA localization, huge non-pigmented eggs, and asynchronous, irregular early cleavages. Variations in patterns of gastrulation highlight the modularity of this critical developmental period. Many species have eliminated the larva or tadpole and directly develop to the adult. The wealth of developmental diversity among amphibians coupled with the wealth of mechanistic information from X. laevis permit comparisons that provide deeper insights into developmental processes. PMID:22662314

  12. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression. PMID:26646288

  13. Adaptation of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator to activate transcription in plants.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, Eva; Salem, Tarek A; Gurley, William B

    2016-02-01

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirG response regulator of the VirA/VirG two-component system was adapted to function in tobacco protoplasts. The subcellular localization of VirG and VirA proteins transiently expressed in onion cells was determined using GFP fusions. Preliminary studies using Gal4DBD-VP16 fusions with VirG and Escherichia coli UhpA, and NarL response regulators indicated compatibility of these bacterial proteins with the eukaryotic transcriptional apparatus. A strong transcriptional activator based on tandem activation domains from the Drosophila fushi tarazu and Herpes simplex VP16 was created. Selected configurations of the two-site Gal4-vir box GUS reporters were activated by chimeric effectors dependent on either the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain or that of VirG. Transcriptional induction of the GUS reporter was highest for the VirE19-element promoter with both constitutive and wild-type VirG-tandem activation domain effectors. Multiple VirE19 elements increased the reporter activity proportionately, indicating that the VirG DNA binding domain was functional in plants. The VirG constitutive-Q-VP16 effector was more active than the VirG wild-type. In both the constitutive and wild-type forms of VirG, Q-VP16 activated transcription of the GUS reporter best when located at the C-terminus, i.e. juxtaposed to the VirG DNA binding domain. These results demonstrate the possibility of using DNA binding domains from bacterial response regulators and their cognate binding elements in the engineering of plant gene expression.

  14. The Cryptococcus neoformans Rim101 Transcription Factor Directly Regulates Genes Required for Adaptation to the Host

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Teresa R.; Xu, Wenjie; Selvig, Kyla M.; O'Meara, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    The Rim101 protein is a conserved pH-responsive transcription factor that mediates important interactions between several fungal pathogens and the infected host. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the Rim101 protein retains conserved functions to allow the microorganism to respond to changes in pH and other host stresses. This coordinated cellular response enables this fungus to effectively evade the host immune response. Preliminary studies suggest that this conserved transcription factor is uniquely regulated in C. neoformans both by the canonical pH-sensing pathway and by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here we present comparative transcriptional data that demonstrate a strong concordance between the downstream effectors of PKA and Rim101. To define Rim101-dependent gene expression during a murine lung infection, we used nanoString profiling of lung tissue infected with a wild-type or rim101Δ mutant strain. In this setting, we demonstrated that Rim101 controls the expression of multiple cell wall-biosynthetic genes, likely explaining the enhanced immunogenicity of the rim101Δ mutant. Despite its divergent upstream regulation, the C. neoformans Rim101 protein recognizes a conserved DNA binding motif. Using these data, we identified direct targets of this transcription factor, including genes involved in cell wall regulation. Therefore, the Rim101 protein directly controls cell wall changes required for the adaptation of C. neoformans to its host environment. Moreover, we propose that integration of the cAMP/PKA and pH-sensing pathways allows C. neoformans to respond to a broad range of host-specific signals. PMID:24324006

  15. Pressure regulation for earth pressure balance control on shield tunneling machine by using adaptive robust control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haibo; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Huayong

    2016-05-01

    Most current studies about shield tunneling machine focus on the construction safety and tunnel structure stability during the excavation. Behaviors of the machine itself are also studied, like some tracking control of the machine. Yet, few works concern about the hydraulic components, especially the pressure and flow rate regulation components. This research focuses on pressure control strategies by using proportional pressure relief valve, which is widely applied on typical shield tunneling machines. Modeling of a commercial pressure relief valve is done. The modeling centers on the main valve, because the dynamic performance is determined by the main valve. To validate such modeling, a frequency-experiment result of the pressure relief valve, whose bandwidth is about 3 Hz, is presented as comparison. The modeling and the frequency experimental result show that it is reasonable to regard the pressure relief valve as a second-order system with two low corner frequencies. PID control, dead band compensation control and adaptive robust control (ARC) are proposed and simulation results are presented. For the ARC, implements by using first order approximation and second order approximation are presented. The simulation results show that the second order approximation implement with ARC can track 4 Hz sine signal very well, and the two ARC simulation errors are within 0.2 MPa. Finally, experiment results of dead band compensation control and adaptive robust control are given. The results show that dead band compensation had about 30° phase lag and about 20% off of the amplitude attenuation. ARC is tracking with little phase lag and almost no amplitude attenuation. In this research, ARC has been tested on a pressure relief valve. It is able to improve the valve's dynamic performances greatly, and it is capable of the pressure control of shield machine excavation.

  16. Insertion of an imprinted insulator into the IgH locus reveals developmentally regulated, transcription-dependent control of V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Puget, Nadine; Hirasawa, Ryutaro; Hu, Ngoc-Sa Nguyen; Laviolette-Malirat, Nathalie; Feil, Robert; Khamlichi, Ahmed Amine

    2015-02-01

    The assembly of antigen receptor loci requires a developmentally regulated and lineage-specific recombination between variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments through V(D)J recombination. The process is regulated by accessibility control elements, including promoters, insulators, and enhancers. The IgH locus undergoes two recombination steps, D-J(H) and then V(H)-DJ(H), but it is unclear how the availability of the DJ(H) substrate could influence the subsequent V(H)-DJ(H) recombination step. The Eμ enhancer plays a critical role in V(D)J recombination and controls a set of sense and antisense transcripts. We epigenetically perturbed the early events at the IgH locus by inserting the imprinting control region (ICR) of the Igf2/H19 locus or a transcriptional insulator devoid of the imprinting function upstream of the Eμ enhancer. The insertions recapitulated the main epigenetic features of their endogenous counterparts, including differential DNA methylation and binding of CTCF/cohesins. Whereas the D-J(H) recombination step was unaffected, both the insulator insertions led to a severe impairment of V(H)-DJ(H) recombination. Strikingly, the inhibition of V(H)-DJ(H) recombination correlated consistently with a strong reduction of DJ(H) transcription and incomplete demethylation. Thus, developmentally regulated transcription following D-J(H) recombination emerges as an important mechanism through which the Eμ enhancer controls V(H)-DJ(H) recombination.

  17. Functional analysis of developmentally regulated chromatin-hypersensitive domains carrying the alpha 1-fetoprotein gene promoter and the albumin/alpha 1-fetoprotein intergenic enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, D; Thomassin, H; Allard, D; Guertin, M; Hamel, D; Blaquière, M; Beauchemin, M; LaRue, H; Estable-Puig, M; Bélanger, L

    1993-01-01

    During liver development, the tandem alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP)/albumin locus is triggered at the AFP end and then asymmetrically enhanced; this is followed by autonomous repression of the AFP-encoding gene. To understand this regulation better, we characterized the two early developmental stage-specific DNase I-hypersensitive (DH) sites so far identified in rat liver AFP/albumin chromatin: an intergenic DH-enhancer site and the AFP DH-promoter site. Mutation-transfection analyses circumscribed the DH-enhancer domain to a 200-bp DNA segment stringently conserved among species. Targeted mutations, DNA-protein-binding assays, and coexpression experiments pinpointed C/EBP as the major activatory component of the intergenic enhancer. Structure-function relationships at the AFP DH-promoter site defined a discrete glucocorticoid-regulated domain activated cooperatively by HNF1 and a highly specific AFP transcription factor, FTF, which binds to a steroid receptor recognition motif. The HNF1/FTF/DNA complex is deactivated by glucocorticoid receptors or by the ubiquitous factor NF1, which eliminates HNF1 by competition at an overlapping, high-affinity binding site. We propose that the HNF1-NF1 site might serve as a developmental switch to direct autonomous AFP gene repression in late liver development. We also conclude that the intergenic enhancer is driven by C/EBP alpha primarily to fulfill albumin gene activation functions at early developmental stages. Factor FTF seems to be the key regulator of AFP gene-specific functions in carcinoembryonic states. Images PMID:7680097

  18. 17ß-Estradiol Regulates mTORC2 Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Adaptive Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Angelika; Schmidt, Maria; Gürgen, Dennis; Postpieszala, Daniel; Catar, Rusan; Hegner, Björn; Davidson, Merci M.; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Dragun, Duska

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive cardiac remodeling is characterized by enhanced signaling of mTORC2 downstream kinase Akt. In females, 17ß-estradiol (E2), as well as Akt contribute essentially to sex-related premenopausal cardioprotection. Pharmacologic mTOR targeting with rapamycin is increasingly used for various clinical indications, yet burdened with clinical heterogeneity in therapy responses. The drug inhibits mTORC1 and less-so mTORC2. In male rodents, rapamycin decreases maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy whereas it leads to detrimental dilative cardiomyopathy in females. We hypothesized that mTOR inhibition could interfere with 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated sexual dimorphism and adaptive cell growth and tested responses in murine female hearts and cultured female cardiomyocytes. Under physiological in vivo conditions, rapamycin compromised mTORC2 function only in female, but not in male murine hearts. In cultured female cardiomyocytes, rapamycin impaired simultaneously IGF-1 induced activation of both mTOR signaling branches, mTORC1 and mTORC2 only in presence of E2. Use of specific estrogen receptor (ER)α- and ERβ-agonists indicated involvement of both estrogen receptors (ER) in rapamycin effects on mTORC1 and mTORC2. Classical feedback mechanisms common in tumour cells with upregulation of PI3K signaling were not involved. E2 effect on Akt-pS473 downregulation by rapamycin was independent of ERK as shown by sequential mTOR and MEK-inhibition. Furthermore, regulatory mTORC2 complex defining component rictor phosphorylation at Ser1235, known to interfere with Akt-substrate binding to mTORC2, was not altered. Functionally, rapamycin significantly reduced trophic effect of E2 on cell size. In addition, cardiomyocytes with reduced Akt-pS473 under rapamycin treatment displayed decreased SERCA2A mRNA and protein expression suggesting negative functional consequences on cardiomyocyte contractility. Rictor silencing confirmed regulation of SERCA2A expression by mTORC2 in E2-cultured

  19. Coordinate developmental expression of genes regulating sterol economy and cholesterol side-chain cleavage in the porcine ovary.

    PubMed

    LaVoie, H A; Benoit, A M; Garmey, J C; Dailey, R A; Wright, D J; Veldhuis, J D

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the coordinate developmental expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme messages throughout the pig estrous cycle, RNase protection analysis was performed using homologous (partially cloned) porcine sequences. Total RNA was isolated from ovarian tissues from unstimulated prepubertal gilts and gilts stimulated with eCG (Day -3) and hCG (Day 0) to induce follicular growth and ovulation. Specific transcripts (relative to 18S rRNA) were quantified in immature ovaries, preovulatory follicles (> or = 5 mm), corpora lutea (CL), and corpora albicantia. As an index of steroidogenesis, tissue progesterone content (per microgram protein) was low in the unstimulated ovary and preovulatory follicles, and it began to increase 4 days post-hCG, peaked at 12 days, and returned to preovulatory concentrations by 20 days post-hCG. HMG-CoA reductase mRNA was expressed at low levels and did not change significantly throughout the estrous cycle. The amount of LDL receptor mRNA increased approximately 6-fold after eCG stimulation and was expressed at similar concentrations in both preovulatory follicles and functional CL. Expression of SCP2 mRNA did not differ among the four tissue types but tended to be highest in midcycle (Day 12) CL compared other stages of CL (p = 0.007). StAR mRNA expression was minimal in unstimulated ovaries, was higher in preovulatory follicles (p = 0.014), and then rose again in CL (p = 0.009 compared with unstimulated ovary). P450scc mRNA concentrations were low in unstimulated ovaries, increased in preovulatory follicles (p = 0.044), and increased further in CL (p = 0.001 compared with preovulatory follicles). P450scc and StAR mRNA levels correlated with progesterone levels (r = +0.37, p = 0.025, and r = +0.71, p < 0.001, respectively). The

  20. Analysis of regulation of pentose utilisation in Aspergillus niger reveals evolutionary adaptations in Eurotiales

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, E.; Visser, L.; Nijssen, A.; van Veluw, G.J.; Wösten, H.A.B.; de Vries, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    Aspergilli are commonly found in soil and on decaying plant material. D-xylose and L-arabinose are highly abundant components of plant biomass. They are released from polysaccharides by fungi using a set of extracellular enzymes and subsequently converted intracellularly through the pentose catabolic pathway (PCP). In this study, the L-arabinose responsive transcriptional activator (AraR) is identified in Aspergillus niger and was shown to control the L-arabinose catabolic pathway as well as expression of genes encoding extracellular L-arabinose releasing enzymes. AraR interacts with the D-xylose-responsive transcriptional activator XlnR in the regulation of the pentose catabolic pathway, but not with respect to release of L-arabinose and D-xylose. AraR was only identified in the Eurotiales, more specifically in the family Trichocomaceae and appears to have originated from a gene duplication event (from XlnR) after this order or family split from the other filamentous ascomycetes. XlnR is present in all filamentous ascomycetes with the exception of members of the Onygenales. Since the Onygenales and Eurotiales are both part of the subclass Eurotiomycetidae, this indicates that strong adaptation of the regulation of pentose utilisation has occurred at this evolutionary node. In Eurotiales a unique two-component regulatory system for pentose release and metabolism has evolved, while the regulatory system was lost in the Onygenales. The observed evolutionary changes (in Eurotiomycetidae) mainly affect the regulatory system as in contrast, homologues for most genes of the L-arabinose/D-xylose catabolic pathway are present in all the filamentous fungi, irrespective of the presence of XlnR and/or AraR. PMID:21892241

  1. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Little, Richard H.; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M.; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome. PMID:26845436

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Innate But Not Adaptive Inflammation in ZAP70-Mutated SKG Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Simon; Holmdahl, Rikard; Wing, Kajsa

    2016-09-01

    Polysaccharides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can induce arthritis, ileitis, and interstitial pneumonitis in BALB/c ZAP70 (W163C)-mutant (SKG) mice via T helper 17-cell-dependent pathways. However, little is known regarding the factors influencing disease severity. We investigated mannan-induced arthritis in SKG mice and how NADPH oxidase 2-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate disease. SKG mice were highly susceptible to both IL-17-mediated T-cell-driven arthritis and T-cell-independent acute psoriasis-like dermatitis. In vivo imaging revealed more ROS in joints of arthritic SKG mice compared to wild-type mice, which links ROS and joint inflammation. Still, ROS deficiency in SKG.Ncf1(m1j/m1j) mice greatly increased severity of arthritis and dermatitis, a difference that could not be attributed to increased T-cell activation, thymic selection, or antibody production. However, when ROS production was restored in CD68(+) macrophages, inflammation reverted to baseline, demonstrating a regulatory role of macrophage-derived ROS in autoimmunity. Thus, arthritis in SKG mice is a useful model to study the role of ROS in innate-driven chronic inflammation independently of adaptive immunity. PMID:27427418

  3. Regulation of Yeast Chronological Life Span by TORC1 via Adaptive Mitochondrial ROS Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Schroeder, Elizabeth A.; Ocampo, Alejandro; Barrientos, Antoni; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Here we show that yeast strains with reduced target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling have greater overall mitochondrial electron transport chain activity during growth that is efficiently coupled to ATP production. This metabolic alteration increases mitochondrial membrane potential and superoxide production that we propose supplies an adaptive signal during growth that extends chronological life span (CLS). In strong support of this concept, uncoupling respiration during growth or over-expressing mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase significantly curtails CLS extension in tor1Δ strains, and treatment of wild-type strains with either rapamycin (to inhibit TORC1) or menadione (to generate mitochondrial ROS) during growth is sufficient to extend CLS. Finally, extension of CLS by reduced TORC1/Sch9p-mitochondrial signaling occurs independently of Rim15p and is not a function of changes in media acidification/composition. Considering the conservation of TOR-pathway effects on life span, mitochondrial ROS signaling may be an important mechanism of longevity regulation in higher organisms. PMID:21641548

  4. A postmarket surveillance study on electro-neuro-adaptive-regulator therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonello, Rod P; Cohen, Marc; Reece, John; Aggarwal, Arun; Rigney, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    The Electro-Neuro-Adaptive-Regulator (ENAR) device is a hand-held electrotherapy which is applied using energetic medicine principles and aspects of acupuncture theory. The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a postmarket survey of persons who have used the ENAR device. The conditions for which the therapy was used and its perceived effectiveness are discussed. A web-based survey of Australian recipients of ENAR therapy was completed by 481 respondents. Most (76%) used ENAR exclusively for pain relief for musculoskeletal disorders, especially back, shoulder, and neck pain; 8% used ENAR exclusively for nonmusculoskeletal disorders; while 16% used ENAR for both. Respondents reported a mean reduction in pain of 70% (t(423) = 38.73, P < .001) and functional improvement of 62% (t(423) = 10.45, P < .001) using 11-point numerical rating scales. Following ENAR treatment, medication reduction was reported by 91% of respondents. Most respondents reported high satisfaction following ENAR therapy, with between 15 and 20% achieving complete pain relief. The self-delivery of ENAR may, in part, account for the high level of satisfaction.

  5. miR156 and miR390 regulate tasiRNA accumulation and developmental timing in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hyun; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    microRNA156 (miR156) affects developmental timing in flowering plants. miR156 and its target relationships with members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) gene family appear universally conserved in land plants, but the specific functions of miR156 outside of flowering plants are unknown. We find that miR156 promotes a developmental change from young filamentous protonemata to leafy gametophores in the moss Physcomitrella patens, opposite to its role as an inhibitor of development in flowering plants. P. patens miR156 also influences accumulation of trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) dependent upon a second ancient microRNA, miR390. Both miR156 and miR390 directly target a single major tasiRNA primary transcript. Inhibition of miR156 function causes increased miR390-triggered tasiRNA accumulation and decreased accumulation of tasiRNA targets. Overexpression of miR390 also caused a slower formation of gametophores, elevated miR390-triggered tasiRNA accumulation, and reduced level of tasiRNA targets. We conclude that a gene regulatory network controlled by miR156, miR390, and their targets controls developmental change in P. patens. The broad outlines and regulatory logic of this network are conserved in flowering plants, albeit with some modifications. Partially conserved small RNA networks thus influence developmental timing in plants with radically different body plans.

  6. 20-Hydroxyecdysone (20E) Primary Response Gene E75 Isoforms Mediate Steroidogenesis Autoregulation and Regulate Developmental Timing in Bombyx.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Tian, Ling; Guo, Zhongjian; Guo, Sanyou; Zhang, Jianzhen; Gu, Shi-Hong; Palli, Subba R; Cao, Yang; Li, Sheng

    2016-08-26

    The temporal control mechanisms that precisely control animal development remain largely elusive. The timing of major developmental transitions in insects, including molting and metamorphosis, is coordinated by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E involves feedback loops to maintain pulses of ecdysteroid biosynthesis leading to its upsurge, whereas the underpinning molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Using the silkworm Bombyx mori as a model, we demonstrated that E75, the 20E primary response gene, mediates a regulatory loop between ecdysteroid biosynthesis and 20E signaling. E75 isoforms A and C directly bind to retinoic acid receptor-related response elements in Halloween gene promoter regions to induce gene expression thus promoting ecdysteroid biosynthesis and developmental transition, whereas isoform B antagonizes the transcriptional activity of isoform A/C through physical interaction. As the expression of E75 isoforms is differentially induced by 20E, the E75-mediated regulatory loop represents a fine autoregulation of steroidogenesis, which contributes to the precise control of developmental timing. PMID:27365399

  7. 20-Hydroxyecdysone (20E) Primary Response Gene E75 Isoforms Mediate Steroidogenesis Autoregulation and Regulate Developmental Timing in Bombyx.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Tian, Ling; Guo, Zhongjian; Guo, Sanyou; Zhang, Jianzhen; Gu, Shi-Hong; Palli, Subba R; Cao, Yang; Li, Sheng

    2016-08-26

    The temporal control mechanisms that precisely control animal development remain largely elusive. The timing of major developmental transitions in insects, including molting and metamorphosis, is coordinated by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). 20E involves feedback loops to maintain pulses of ecdysteroid biosynthesis leading to its upsurge, whereas the underpinning molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Using the silkworm Bombyx mori as a model, we demonstrated that E75, the 20E primary response gene, mediates a regulatory loop between ecdysteroid biosynthesis and 20E signaling. E75 isoforms A and C directly bind to retinoic acid receptor-related response elements in Halloween gene promoter regions to induce gene expression thus promoting ecdysteroid biosynthesis and developmental transition, whereas isoform B antagonizes the transcriptional activity of isoform A/C through physical interaction. As the expression of E75 isoforms is differentially induced by 20E, the E75-mediated regulatory loop represents a fine autoregulation of steroidogenesis, which contributes to the precise control of developmental timing.

  8. Design of an Adaptive Power Regulation Mechanism and a Nozzle for a Hydroelectric Power Plant Turbine Test Rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Burak; Aytac, Zeynep; Tascioglu, Yigit; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the design of a power regulation mechanism for a Hydroelectric Power Plant (HEPP) model turbine test system which is designed to test Francis type hydroturbines up to 2 MW power with varying head and flow(discharge) values. Unlike the tailor made regulation mechanisms of full-sized, functional HEPPs; the design for the test system must be easily adapted to various turbines that are to be tested. In order to achieve this adaptability, a dynamic simulation model is constructed in MATLAB/Simulink SimMechanics. This model acquires geometric data and hydraulic loading data of the regulation system from Autodesk Inventor CAD models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis respectively. The dynamic model is explained and case studies of two different HEPPs are performed for validation. CFD aided design of the turbine guide vanes, which is used as input for the dynamic model, is also presented. This research is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  9. The Subcellular Localization of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-5 (Telencephalin) in the Visual Cortex is not Developmentally Regulated in the Absence of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily A.; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Tian, Li; Majewska, Ania K.

    2013-01-01

    The telencephalon-associated intercellular adhesion molecule 5 (Telencephalin; ICAM-5) regulates dendritic morphology in the developing brain. In vitro studies have shown that ICAM-5 is predominantly found within dendrites and immature dendritic protrusions, with reduced expression in mushroom spines, suggesting that ICAM-5 downregulation is critical for the maturation of synaptic structures. However, developmental expression of ICAM-5 has not been explored in depth at the ultrastructural level in intact brain tissue. To investigate the ultrastructural localization of ICAM-5 with transmission electron microscopy, we performed immunoperoxidase histochemistry for ICAM-5 in mouse visual cortex at postnatal day (P)14, a period of intense synaptogenesis, and at P28, when synapses mature. We observed the expected ICAM-5 expression in dendritic protrusions and shafts at both P14 and P28. ICAM-5 expression in these dendritic protrusions decreased in prevalence with developmental age to become predominantly localized to dendritic shafts by P28. To further understand the relationship between ICAM-5 and the endopeptidase metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which mediates ICAM-5 cleavage following glutamate activation during postnatal development, we also explored ICAM-5 expression in MMP-9 null animals. This analysis revealed a similar expression of ICAM-5 in dendritic elements at P14 and P28; however an increased prevalence of ICAM-5 was noted in dendritic protrusions at P28 in the MMP-9 null animals, indicating that in the absence of MMP-9, there is no developmental shift in ICAM-5 subcellular localization. Our ultrastructural observations shed light on possible functions mediated by ICAM-5 and their regulation by extracellular proteases. PMID:23897576

  10. Negative-ion Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Microarray Analyses of Developmentally-regulated Antigens Based on Type 1 and Type 2 Backbone Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yibing; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) and type 2 (Galβ1-4GlcNAc) sequences are constituents of the backbones of a large family of glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids whose branching and peripheral substitutions are developmentally-regulated. It is highly desirable to have micro-sequencing methods that can be used to precisely identify and monitor these oligosaccharide sequences with high sensitivity. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation has been used for characterization of branching points, peripheral substitutions and partial assignment of linkages in reducing oligosaccharides. We now extend this method to characterizing entire sequences of linear type 1 and type 2 chain-based glycans, focusing on the type 1 and -2 units in the internal regions including the linkages connecting type 1 and type 2 disaccharide units. We apply the principles to sequence analysis of closely related isomeric oligosaccharides and demonstrate by microarray analyses distinct binding activities of antibodies and a lectin toward various combinations of type 1 and 2 units joined by 1,3- and 1,6-linkages. These sequence-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins are in turn valuable tools for detecting and distinguishing the type 1 and type 2-based developmentally-regulated glycan sequences. PMID:26530895

  11. The expression of the Alzheimer’s Amyloid Precursor Protein-like gene is regulated by developmental timing microRNAs and their targets in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Ryusuke; Zhou, Feng; Li, Chris; Slack, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of dense plaques in the brain, resulting in progressive dementia. A major plaque component is the β-amyloid peptide, which is a cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Studies of dominant inheritable familial AD support the hypothesis that APP is critical for AD development. On the other hand, the pathogenesis of amyloid plaque deposition in AD is thought to be the result of age-related changes with unknown mechanisms. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of APP, APP-like-1 (apl-1), functions with and is under the control of molecules regulating developmental progression. In C. elegans, the timing of cell fate determination is controlled by the heterochronic genes, including let-7 microRNAs. C. elegans apl-1 shows significant genetic interactions with let-7 family microRNAs and let-7-targeted heterochronic genes, hbl-1, lin-41 and lin-42. apl-1 expression is upregulated during the last larval stage in hypodermal seam cells which is transcriptionally regulated by hbl-1, lin-41 and lin-42. Moreover, the levels of the apl-1 transcription are modulated by the activity of let-7 family microRNAs. Our works places apl-1 in a developmental timing pathway and may provide new insights into the time-dependent progression of AD. PMID:18262516

  12. Contrasting Evolutionary Dynamics of the Developmental Regulator PAX9, among Bats, with Evidence for a Novel Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Caleb D.; Butler, Boyd; Fondon, John W.; Mantilla-Meluk, Hugo; Baker, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological evolution can be the result of natural selection favoring modification of developmental signaling pathways. However, little is known about the genetic basis of such phenotypic diversity. Understanding these mechanisms is difficult for numerous reasons, yet studies in model organisms often provide clues about the major developmental pathways involved. The paired-domain gene, PAX9, is known to be a key regulator of development, particularly of the face and teeth. In this study, using a comparative genetics approach, we investigate PAX9 molecular evolution among mammals, focusing on craniofacially diversified (Phyllostomidae) and conserved (Vespertilionidae) bat families, and extend our comparison to other orders of mammal. Open-reading frame analysis disclosed signatures of selection, in which a small percentage of residues vary, and lineages acquire different combinations of variation through recurrent substitution and lineage specific changes. A few instances of convergence for specific residues were observed between morphologically convergent bat lineages. Bioinformatic analysis for unknown PAX9 regulatory motifs indicated a novel post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism involving a Musashi protein. This regulation was assessed through fluorescent reporter assays and gene knockdowns. Results are compatible with the hypothesis that the number of Musashi binding-elements in PAX9 mRNA proportionally regulates protein translation rate. Although a connection between morphology and binding element frequency was not apparent, results indicate this regulation would vary among craniofacially divergent bat species, but be static among conserved species. Under this model, Musashi’s regulatory control of alternative human PAX9 isoforms would also vary. The presence of Musashi-binding elements within PAX9 of all mammals examined, chicken, zebrafish, and the fly homolog of PAX9, indicates this regulatory mechanism is ancient, originating basal to much of the

  13. Citrus fruit flavor and aroma biosynthesis: isolation, functional characterization, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a key gene in the production of the sesquiterpene aroma compound valencene.

    PubMed

    Sharon-Asa, Liat; Shalit, Moshe; Frydman, Ahuva; Bar, Einat; Holland, Doron; Or, Etti; Lavi, Uri; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Eyal, Yoram

    2003-12-01

    Citrus fruits possess unique aromas rarely found in other fruit species. While fruit flavor is composed of complex combinations of soluble and volatile compounds, several low-abundance sesquiterpenes, such as valencene, nootkatone, alpha-sinensal, and beta-sinensal, stand out in citrus as important flavor and aroma compounds. The profile of terpenoid volatiles in various citrus species and their importance as aroma compounds have been studied in detail, but much is still lacking in our understanding of the physiological, biochemical, and genetic regulation of their production. Here, we report on the isolation, functional expression, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a sesquiterpene synthase-encoding gene, involved in citrus aroma formation. The recombinant enzyme encoded by Cstps1 was shown to convert farnesyl diphosphate to a single sesquiterpene product identified as valencene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Phylogenetic analysis of plant terpene synthase genes localized Cstps1 to the group of angiosperm sesquiterpene synthases. Within this group, Cstps1 belongs to a subgroup of citrus sesquiterpene synthases. Cstps1 was found to be developmentally regulated: transcript was found to accumulate only towards fruit maturation, corresponding well with the timing of valencene accumulation in fruit. Although citrus fruits are non-climacteric, valencene accumulation and Cstps1 expression were found to be responsive to ethylene, providing further evidence for the role of ethylene in the final stages of citrus fruit ripening. Isolation of the gene encoding valencene synthase provides a tool for an in-depth study of the regulation of aroma compound biosynthesis in citrus and for metabolic engineering for fruit flavor characteristics. PMID:14617067

  14. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  15. Developmental Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Learn More about Your Child’s Development: Developmental Monitoring and Screening Taking a first step, waving “bye-bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, ...

  16. Developmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibb, T. Clifford

    1998-01-01

    Outlines steps developmental educators need to take to win the cooperation of more students. Argues also that developmental educators must include computer literacy in their understanding of literacy. (SR)

  17. Developmental and hormonal regulation of direct shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. interspecific hybrids) leaf culture.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Prakash; Geijskes, R Jason; Wang, Lifang; Elliott, Adrian; Grof, Christopher P L; Berding, Nils; Smith, Grant R

    2006-10-01

    Rapid and efficient in vitro regeneration methods that minimise somaclonal variation are critical for the genetic transformation and mass propagation of commercial varieties. Using a transverse thin cell layer culture system, we have identified some of the developmental and physiological constraints that limit high-frequency regeneration in sugarcane leaf tissue. Tissue polarity and consequently the orientation of the explant in culture, size and developmental phase of explant, and auxin concentration play a significant role in determining the organogenic potential of leaf tissue in culture. Both adventitious shoot production and somatic embryogenesis occurred on the proximal cut surface of the explant, and a regeneration gradient, decreasing gradually from the basal to the distal end, exists in the leaf roll. Importantly, auxin, when added to the culture medium, reduced this spatial developmental constraint, as well as the effect of genotype on plant regeneration. Transverse sections (1-2 mm thick) obtained from young leaf spindle rolls and orienting explants with its distal end facing the medium (directly in contact with medium) are critical for maximum regeneration. Shoot regeneration was observed as early as 3 weeks on MS medium supplemented with alpha-naphthalenencetic acid (NAA) and 6-benzyladenine, while somatic embryogenesis or both adventitious shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis occurred on medium with NAA and chlorophenoxyacetic acid. Twenty shoots or more could be generated from a single transverse section explant. These shoots regenerated roots and successfully established after transplanted to pots. Large numbers of plantlets can be regenerated directly and rapidly using this system. SmartSett, the registered name for this process and the plants produced, will have significant practical applications for the mass propagation of new cultivars and in genetic modification programs. The SmartSett system has already been used commercially to

  18. Evolutionary Developmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geary, David C.; Bjorklund, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Describes evolutionary developmental psychology as the study of the genetic and ecological mechanisms that govern the development of social and cognitive competencies common to all human beings and the epigenetic (gene-environment interactions) processes that adapt these competencies to local conditions. Outlines basic assumptions and domains of…

  19. Adaptive Force Regulation of Muscle Strengthening Rehabilitation Device With Magnetorheological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  20. Adaptive force regulation of muscle strengthening rehabilitation device with magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-03-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  1. Regulation of the seed to seedling developmental phase transition by the LAFL and VAL transcription factor networks

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haiyan; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    In the seed, a fundamental transition between embryo and vegetative phases of plant development is coordinated by the interaction between the AFL and VAL sub-clades of the plant specific B3 domain transcription factor family. The AFL B3 factors together with LEC1-type HAP3 transcription factors promote embryo maturation; whereas the VAL B3 factors repress the LEC1/AFL (LAFL) network during seed germination. Recent advances reveal that genes in key developmental programs and hormone signaling pathways are downstream targets of the LAFL network highlighting the central role of the LAFL network in integration of intrinsic developmental and hormonal signals during plant development. The VAL B3 proteins are proposed to mediate repression by recruiting a histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) to LAFL genes that contain the Sph/RY cis-element recognized by AFL and VAL B3-DNA-binding domains. In addition to VAL B3 factors, epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in maintaining repression of LAFL network during vegetative development. WIREs Dev Biol 2014, 3:135–145. doi: 10.1002/wdev.126 PMID:24902838

  2. Distinct and developmentally regulated activity-dependent plasticity at descending glutamatergic synapses on flexor and extensor motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lenschow, Constanze; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity (ADSP) is paramount to synaptic processing and maturation. However, identifying the ADSP capabilities of the numerous synapses converging onto spinal motoneurons (MNs) remain elusive. Using spinal cord slices from mice at two developmental stages, 1–4 and 8–12 postnatal days (P1–P4; P8–P12), we found that high-frequency stimulation of presumed reticulospinal neuron axons in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) induced either an NMDA receptor-dependent-long-term depression (LTD), a short-term depression (STD) or no synaptic modulation in limb MNs. Our study shows that P1–P4 cervical MNs expressed the same plasticity profiles as P8–P12 lumbar MNs rather than P1–P4 lumbar MNs indicating that ADSP expression at VLF-MN synapses is linked to the rostrocaudal development of spinal motor circuitry. Interestingly, we observed that the ADSP expressed at VLF-MN was related to the functional flexor or extensor MN subtype. Moreover, heterosynaptic plasticity was triggered in MNs by VLF axon tetanisation at neighbouring synapses not directly involved in the plasticity induction. ADSP at VLF-MN synapses specify differential integrative synaptic processing by flexor and extensor MNs and could contribute to the maturation of spinal motor circuits and developmental acquisition of weight-bearing locomotion. PMID:27329279

  3. Developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy for adolescents and young adults with PTSD symptoms after physical and sexual abuse: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although childhood sexual and/or physical abuse (CSA/CPA) is known to have severe psychopathological consequences, there is little evidence on psychotherapeutic interventions for adolescents and young adults suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Equally sparse are data on moderators of treatment response on PTSD-related epigenetic changes, health care costs and loss of productivity, alterations in cognitive processing, and on how successful interventions affect all of these factors. Early treatment may prevent later (co)morbidity. In this paper, we present a study protocol for the evaluation of a newly developed psychotherapeutic manual for PTSD after CSA/CPA in adolescents and young adults – the Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy (D-CPT). Methods/design In a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) D-CPT is compared to treatment as usual (TAU). A sample of 90 adolescent outpatients aged 14 to 21 years will be randomized to one of these conditions. Four assessments will be carried out at baseline, at end of treatment, and 3 and 6 months after end of therapy. Each time, patients will be assessed via clinical interviews and a wide range of questionnaires. In addition to PTSD symptoms and comorbidities, we will evaluate moderators of treatment response, epigenetic profiles, direct and indirect costs of this disorder, and neurophysiological processing of threat cues in PTSD and their respective changes in the course of these two treatments (D-CPT and TAU). Discussion The study will provide new insights in the understudied field of PTSD in adolescents and young adults. A newly developed intervention will be evaluated in this therapeutically underserved population. Results will provide data on treatment efficacy, direct and indirect treatment costs, as well as on associations of treatment outcome and PTSD intensity both to epigenetic profiles and to the neurobiological processing of threat cues. Besides, they will

  4. The Developmental Trajectory of Perceived Self-Regulation, Personal Interest, and General Achievement throughout High School: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helle, Laura; Laakkonen, Eero; Tuijula, Tiina; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Our interest in perceived self-regulation of learning arose in the context of educational reform. After decades of stability, the Finnish high school system underwent reform in the 1990s, with a significant emphasis being placed on promoting student self-regulation of learning. Aims: The purposes of the study were (1) to evaluate…

  5. MULTIPASS, a rice R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, regulates adaptive growth by integrating multiple hormonal pathways.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Growth regulation is an important aspect of plant adaptation during environmental perturbations. Here, the role of MULTIPASS (OsMPS), an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor of rice, was explored. OsMPS is induced by salt stress and expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues. Over-expression of OsMPS reduces growth under non-stress conditions, while knockdown plants display increased biomass. OsMPS expression is induced by abscisic acid and cytokinin, but is repressed by auxin, gibberellin and brassinolide. Growth retardation caused by OsMPS over-expression is partially restored by auxin application. Expression profiling revealed that OsMPS negatively regulates the expression of EXPANSIN (EXP) and cell-wall biosynthesis as well as phytohormone signaling genes. Furthermore, the expression of OsMPS-dependent genes is regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Moreover, we show that OsMPS is a direct upstream regulator of OsEXPA4, OsEXPA8, OsEXPB2, OsEXPB3, OsEXPB6 and the endoglucanase genes OsGLU5 and OsGLU14. The multiple responses of OsMPS and its target genes to various hormones suggest an integrative function of OsMPS in the cross-talk between phytohormones and the environment to regulate adaptive growth.

  6. Pregnancy Adaptive Programming of Capacitative Entry Responses Alters NO Output in Vascular Endothelium: New Insights Into eNOS Regulation through Adaptive Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boeldt, DS; Yi, FX; Bird, IM

    2014-01-01

    In pregnancy, vascular nitric oxide (NO) production is increased in the systemic and more so in the uterine vasculature, so supporting maximal perfusion of the uterus. This high level of functionality is matched in the umbilical vein, and in corresponding disease states such as preeclampsia, reduced vascular responses are seen in both uterine artery and umbilical vein. In any endothelial cell, NO actually produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is determined by the maximum capacity of the cell (eNOS expression levels), eNOS phosphorylation state, and the intracellular [Ca2+]i concentration in response to circulating hormones or physical forces. Herein we discuss how pregnancy specific reprogramming of NO output is determined as much by pregnancy adaptation of [Ca2+]i signaling responses as it is by eNOS expression and phosphorylation. By examining changes in [Ca2+]i signaling responses from HHVE, UAEC, and HUVEC in (where appropriate) nonpregnant, normal pregnant, and pathological pregnant (preeclamptic) state, it is clear that pregnancy adaptation of NO output occurs at the level of sustained phase ‘capacitative entry’ [Ca2+]i response, and the adapted response is lacking in preeclamptic pregnancies. Further, gap junction function is an essential permissive regulator of the capacitative response and impairment of NO output results from any inhibitor of gap junction function, or capacitative entry using TRPC channels. Identifying these [Ca2+]i signaling mechanisms underlying normal pregnancy adaptation of NO output not only provides novel targets for future treatment of diseases of pregnancy, but may also apply to other common forms of hypertension. PMID:21555345

  7. The Adapter Molecule Sin Regulates T-Cell-Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction by Modulating Signaling Substrate Availability

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Luzhou; Donlin, Laura T.; Miller, Rebecca H.; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina

    2004-01-01

    Engagement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) results in the activation of a multitude of signaling events that regulate the function of T lymphocytes. These signaling events are in turn modulated by adapter molecules, which control the final functional output through the formation of multiprotein complexes. In this report, we identified the adapter molecule Sin as a new regulator of T-cell activation. We found that the expression of Sin in transgenic T lymphocytes and Jurkat T cells inhibited interleukin-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. This inhibitory effect was specific and was due to defective phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) phosphorylation and activation. In contrast to other adapters that become phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation, Sin was constitutively phosphorylated in resting cells by the Src kinase Fyn and bound to signaling intermediates, including PLC-γ. In stimulated cells, Sin was transiently dephosphorylated, which coincided with transient dissociation of Fyn and PLC-γ. Downregulation of Sin expression using Sin-specific short interfering RNA oligonucleotides inhibited transcriptional activation in response to TCR stimulation. Our results suggest that endogenous Sin influences T-lymphocyte signaling by sequestering signaling substrates and regulating their availability and/or activity in resting cells, while Sin is required for targeting these intermediates to the TCR for fast signal transmission during stimulation. PMID:15121874

  8. Application of Physiological Self-Regulation and Adaptive Task Allocation Techniques for Controlling Operator Hazardous States of Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Pope, Alan T.; Freeman, Frederick G.

    2001-01-01

    Prinzel, Hadley, Freeman, and Mikulka found that adaptive task allocation significantly enhanced performance only when used at the endpoints of the task workload continuum (i.e., very low or high workload), but that the technique degraded performance if invoked during other levels of task demand. These researchers suggested that other techniques should be used in conjunction with adaptive automation to help minimize the onset of hazardous states of awareness (HSA) and keep the operator 'in-the-loop.' The paper reports on such a technique that uses psychophysiological self-regulation to modulate the level of task engagement. Eighteen participants were assigned to three groups (self-regulation, false feedback, and control) and performed a compensatory tracking task that was cycled between three levels of task difficulty on the basis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) record. Those participants who had received self-regulation training performed significantly better and reported lower NASA-TLX scores than participants in the false feedback and control groups. Furthermore, the false feedback and control groups had significantly more task allocations resulting in return-to-manual performance decrements and higher EEG difference scores. Theoretical and practical implications of these results for adaptive automation are discussed.