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Sample records for adaptive differential pulse

  1. Unsupervised learning approach to adaptive differential pulse code modulation.

    PubMed

    Griswold, N C; Sayood, K

    1982-04-01

    This research is concerned with investigating the problem of data compression utilizing an unsupervised estimation algorithm. This extends previous work utilizing a hybrid source coder which combines an orthogonal transformation with differential pulse code modulation (DPCM). The data compression is achieved in the DPCM loop, and it is the quantizer of this scheme which is approached from an unsupervised learning procedure. The distribution defining the quantizer is represented as a set of separable Laplacian mixture densities for two-dimensional images. The condition of identifiability is shown for the Laplacian case and a decision directed estimate of both the active distribution parameters and the mixing parameters are discussed in view of a Bayesian structure. The decision directed estimators, although not optimum, provide a realizable structure for estimating the parameters which define a distribution which has become active. These parameters are then used to scale the optimum (in the mean square error sense) Laplacian quantizer. The decision criteria is modified to prevent convergence to a single distribution which in effect is the default condition for a variance estimator. This investigation was applied to a test image and the resulting data demonstrate improvement over other techniques using fixed bit assignments and ideal channel conditions.

  2. Paired-Pulse Parietal-Motor Stimulation Differentially Modulates Corticospinal Excitability across Hemispheres When Combined with Prism Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Arévalo, Elisa; Salemme, Romeo; Pisella, Laure; Farnè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Rightward prism adaptation ameliorates neglect symptoms while leftward prism adaptation (LPA) induces neglect-like biases in healthy individuals. Similarly, inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) induces neglect-like behavior, whereas on the left PPC it ameliorates neglect symptoms and normalizes hyperexcitability of left hemisphere parietal-motor (PPC-M1) connectivity. Based on this analogy we hypothesized that LPA increases PPC-M1 excitability in the left hemisphere and decreases it in the right one. In an attempt to shed some light on the mechanisms underlying LPA's effects on cognition, we investigated this hypothesis in healthy individuals measuring PPC-M1 excitability with dual-site paired-pulse TMS (ppTMS). We found a left hemisphere increase and a right hemisphere decrease in the amplitude of motor evoked potentials elicited by paired as well as single pulses on M1. While this could indicate that LPA biases interhemispheric connectivity, it contradicts previous evidence that M1-only MEPs are unchanged after LPA. A control experiment showed that input-output curves were not affected by LPA per se. We conclude that LPA combined with ppTMS on PPC-M1 differentially alters the excitability of the left and right M1. PMID:27418979

  3. Pulse front control with adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B.; Salter, P. S.; Booth, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    The focusing of ultrashort laser pulses is extremely important for processes including microscopy, laser fabrication and fundamental science. Adaptive optic elements, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators or membrane deformable mirrors, are routinely used for the correction of aberrations in these systems, leading to improved resolution and efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that adaptive elements used with ultrashort pulses should not be considered simply in terms of wavefront modification, but that changes to the incident pulse front can also occur. We experimentally show how adaptive elements may be used to engineer pulse fronts with spatial resolution.

  4. Seebeck Coefficient Measured With Differential Heat Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, L.; Wood, C.; Stapfer, G.

    1986-01-01

    Common experimental errors reduced because pulse technique suppresses drifts in thermoelectric measurements. Differential-heat-pulse apparatus measures Seebeck coefficient in semiconductors at temperatures up to 1,900 K. Sample heated to measuring temperature in furnace. Ends of sample then differentially heated a few degrees more by lamps. Differential temperature rise and consequent Seebeck voltage measured via thermocouple leads. Because pulse technique used, errors that often arise from long-term drifts in thermoelectric measurements suppressed. Apparatus works with temperature differences of only few degrees, further increasing accuracy of coefficients obtained.

  5. Paired Pulse Voltammetry for differentiating complex analytes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, Inyong; Chang, Su-Youne; Min, Hoon Ki; Arora, Kanika; Marsh, Michale P.; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.

    2012-01-01

    Although fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has contributed to important advances in neuroscience research, the technique is encumbered by significant analytical challenges. Confounding factors such as pH change and transient effects at the microelectrode surface make it difficult to discern the analytes represented by complex voltammograms. Here we introduce paired-pulse voltammetry (PPV), that mitigates the confounding factors and simplifies the analytical task. PPV consists of a selected binary waveform with a specific time gap between each of its two comprising pulses, such that each binary wave is repeated, while holding the electrode at a negative potential between the waves. This allows two simultaneous yet very different voltammograms (primary and secondary) to be obtained, each corresponding to the two pulses in the binary waveform. PPV was evaluated in the flow cell to characterize three different analytes, (dopamine, adenosine, and pH changes). The peak oxidation current decreased by approximately 50%, 80%, and 4% for dopamine, adenosine, and pH, in the secondary voltammogram compared with primary voltammogram, respectively. Thus, the influence of pH changes could be virtually eliminated using the difference between the primary and secondary voltammograms in the PPV technique, which discriminates analytes on the basis of their adsorption characteristics to the carbon fiber electrode. These results demonstrate that PPV can be effectively used for differentiating complex analytes. PMID:22299131

  6. Differential effect of visual motion adaption upon visual cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Lubeck, Astrid J A; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Ahmad, Hena; Bos, Jelte E; Wuyts, Floris L; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Arshad, Qadeer

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to probe the effects of visual motion adaptation on early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability and 2) to investigate whether changes in cortical excitability following visual motion adaptation are related to the degree of visual dependency, i.e., an overreliance on visual cues compared with vestibular or proprioceptive cues. Participants were exposed to a roll motion visual stimulus before, during, and after visual motion adaptation. At these stages, 20 transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses at phosphene threshold values were applied over early visual and V5/MT cortical areas from which the probability of eliciting a phosphene was calculated. Before and after adaptation, participants aligned the subjective visual vertical in front of the roll motion stimulus as a marker of visual dependency. During adaptation, early visual cortex excitability decreased whereas V5/MT excitability increased. After adaptation, both early visual and V5/MT excitability were increased. The roll motion-induced tilt of the subjective visual vertical (visual dependence) was not influenced by visual motion adaptation and did not correlate with phosphene threshold or visual cortex excitability. We conclude that early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability is differentially affected by visual motion adaptation. Furthermore, excitability in the early or late visual cortex is not associated with an increase in visual reliance during spatial orientation. Our findings complement earlier studies that have probed visual cortical excitability following motion adaptation and highlight the differential role of the early visual cortex and V5/MT in visual motion processing.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We examined the influence of visual motion adaptation on visual cortex excitability and found a differential effect in V1/V2 compared with V5/MT. Changes in visual excitability following motion adaptation were not related to the degree of an individual's visual dependency.

  7. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  8. Pulse front adaptive optics in two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive optics has been extensively studied for the correction of phase front aberrations in optical systems. In systems using ultrafast lasers, distortions can also exist in the pulse front (contour of constant intensity in space and time), but until now their correction has been mostly unexplored due to technological limitations. In this Letter, we apply newly developed pulse front adaptive optics, for the first time to our knowledge, to practical compensation of a two-photon fluorescence microscope. With adaptive correction of the system-induced pulse front distortion, improvements beyond conventional phase correction are demonstrated.

  9. Pulse front adaptive optics: a new method for control of ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bangshan; Salter, Patrick S; Booth, Martin J

    2015-07-27

    Ultrafast lasers enable a wide range of physics research and the manipulation of short pulses is a critical part of the ultrafast tool kit. Current methods of laser pulse shaping are usually considered separately in either the spatial or the temporal domain, but laser pulses are complex entities existing in four dimensions, so full freedom of manipulation requires advanced forms of spatiotemporal control. We demonstrate through a combination of adaptable diffractive and reflective optical elements - a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) and a deformable mirror (DM) - decoupled spatial control over the pulse front (temporal group delay) and phase front of an ultra-short pulse was enabled. Pulse front modulation was confirmed through autocorrelation measurements. This new adaptive optics technique, for the first time enabling in principle arbitrary shaping of the pulse front, promises to offer a further level of control for ultrafast lasers.

  10. Differential processing for frequency chirp measurement using optical pulse synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Seki, Satoshi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we introduced an optical pulse synthesizer (OPS) to measure frequency chirps of optical pulses by differential processing. The OPS has a single-chip integrated structure of all elements for the differential filtering and enables stable measurement. Because the exact filter causes a large loss, we employed a phase-only filter, whose frequency response was only in phase. We measured chirp rates of pulses which were induced by propagating standard single mode fibers with different lengths. The retrieved chirp rates were comparable to calculated results. We simulated accuracy of the method and concluded that our experiment had phase control accuracy within 0.07π.

  11. Pulse transit time differential measurement by fiber Bragg grating pulse recorder.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Ambastha, Shikha; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports a noninvasive technique for the measurement of the pulse transit time differential (PTTD) from the pulse pressure waveforms obtained at the carotid artery and radial artery using fiber Bragg grating pulse recorders (FBGPR). PTTD is defined as the time difference between the arrivals of a pulse pressure waveform at the carotid and radial arterial sites. The PTTD is investigated as an indicator of variation in the systolic blood pressure. The results are validated against blood pressure variation obtained from a Mindray Patient Monitor. Furthermore, the pulse wave velocity computed from the obtained PTTD is compared with the pulse wave velocity obtained from the color Doppler ultrasound system and is found to be in good agreement. The major advantage of the PTTD measurement via FBGPRs is that the data acquisition system employed can simultaneously acquire pulse pressure waveforms from both FBGPRs placed at carotid and radial arterial sites with a single time scale, which eliminates time synchronization complexity.

  12. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  13. Further considerations of adaptive canceller and pulse compression interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Karl

    1995-01-01

    The number of independent samples per channel needed so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level are derived. This analysis is used to predict the canceller weight calculation of a contaminating desired signal. It is shown that if the code length L of the desired waveform is less than or equal to the processing batch width K of the canceller, it is necessary to place the pulse compression after the adaptive canceller. Moreover, if L greater than K, the issue is not so clear-cut, thus tradeoff study is necessary.

  14. High fidelity femtosecond pulses from an ultrafast fiber laser system via adaptive amplitude and phase pre-shaping.

    PubMed

    Prawiharjo, Jerry; Daga, Nikita K; Geng, Rui; Price, Jonathan H; Hanna, David C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2008-09-15

    The generation of high-fidelity femtosecond pulses is experimentally demonstrated in a fiber based chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system through an adaptive amplitude and phase pre-shaping technique. A pulse shaper, based on a dual-layer liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM), was implemented in the fiber CPA system for amplitude and phase shaping prior to amplification. The LC-SLM was controlled using a differential evolution algorithm, to maximize a two-photon absorption detector signal from the compressed fiber CPA output pulses. It is shown that this approach compensates for both accumulated phase from material dispersion and nonlinear phase modulation. A train of pulses was produced with an average power of 12.6W at a 50MHz repetition rate from our fiber CPA system, which were compressible to high fidelity pulses with a duration of 170 fs.

  15. Adaptive pulse width control and sampling for low power pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Sagar Venkatesh; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing of physiological parameters could be a cost effective approach to improving health care, and low-power sensors are essential for remote sensing because these sensors are often energy constrained. This paper presents a power optimized photoplethysmographic sensor interface to sense arterial oxygen saturation, a technique to dynamically trade off SNR for power during sensor operation, and a simple algorithm to choose when to acquire samples in photoplethysmography. A prototype of the proposed pulse oximeter built using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components is tested on 10 adults. The dynamic adaptation techniques described reduce power consumption considerably compared to our reference implementation, and our approach is competitive to state-of-the-art implementations. The techniques presented in this paper may be applied to low-power sensor interface designs where acquiring samples is expensive in terms of power as epitomized by pulse oximetry.

  16. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  17. Adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cololla, P.

    1995-07-01

    This review describes a structured approach to adaptivity. The Automated Mesh Refinement (ARM) algorithms developed by M Berger are described, touching on hyperbolic and parabolic applications. Adaptivity is achieved by overlaying finer grids only in areas flagged by a generalized error criterion. The author discusses some of the issues involved in abutting disparate-resolution grids, and demonstrates that suitable algorithms exist for dissipative as well as hyperbolic systems.

  18. Proposal and simulation of differential double-pulse pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguan; Luo, Wenping; Chen, Beiqing; Guo, Huiyong; Zhang, Cui

    2013-09-01

    A differential double-pulse pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DDP-BOTDA) combined with the double-pulsed technique and the differential pulse-width pair technique is proposed and simulated to detect small temperature and strain changes. Using a symmetrical double-pulse pair, the system can detect small Brillouin shift with high spatial resolution and large dynamic range. Sub-meter spatial resolution is decided by the difference between the pulse-width and the peak and valley of the spectrum which is derived from differential pump depletion signals, and detectable Brillouin shift is less than 1 MHz.

  19. Numerical analysis of single pulse and differential pulse-width pair BOTDA systems in the high spatial resolution regime.

    PubMed

    Minardo, Aldo; Bernini, Romeo; Zeni, Luigi

    2011-09-26

    A numerical analysis of conventional and differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time domain analysis systems is reported. The tests are focused on determining the performance of these systems especially in terms of spatial resolution, as a function of the pulse characteristics. A new definition of spatial resolution is given, based on analysis of the shape of the Brillouin gain spectrum. The influence of the rise/fall time of the pulse light to the spatial resolution is also studied.

  20. An Adaptive Unified Differential Evolution Algorithm for Global Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad

    2014-11-03

    In this paper, we propose a new adaptive unified differential evolution algorithm for single-objective global optimization. Instead of the multiple mutation strate- gies proposed in conventional differential evolution algorithms, this algorithm employs a single equation unifying multiple strategies into one expression. It has the virtue of mathematical simplicity and also provides users the flexibility for broader exploration of the space of mutation operators. By making all control parameters in the proposed algorithm self-adaptively evolve during the process of optimization, it frees the application users from the burden of choosing appro- priate control parameters and also improves the performance of the algorithm. In numerical tests using thirteen basic unimodal and multimodal functions, the proposed adaptive unified algorithm shows promising performance in compari- son to several conventional differential evolution algorithms.

  1. Differential evolution for many-particle adaptive quantum metrology.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Neil B; Crosnier, Cécile; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-05-31

    We devise powerful algorithms based on differential evolution for adaptive many-particle quantum metrology. Our new approach delivers adaptive quantum metrology policies for feedback control that are orders-of-magnitude more efficient and surpass the few-dozen-particle limitation arising in methods based on particle-swarm optimization. We apply our method to the binary-decision-tree model for quantum-enhanced phase estimation as well as to a new problem: a decision tree for adaptive estimation of the unknown bias of a quantum coin in a quantum walk and show how this latter case can be realized experimentally.

  2. Remotely detected differential pulse transit time as a stress indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Tarbox, Elizabeth; Cissel, Marty; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Vaidya, Misha; Tran, Nhien; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2015-05-01

    The human cardiovascular system, controlled by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), is one of the first sites where one can see the "fight-or-flight" response due to the presence of external stressors. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of detecting mental stress using a novel measure that can be measured in a contactless manner: Pulse transit time (dPTT), which refers to the time that is required for the blood wave (BW) to cover the distance from the heart to a defined remote location in the body. Loosely related to blood pressure, PTT is a measure of blood velocity, and is also implicated in the "fight-or-flight" response. We define the differential PTT (dPTT) as the difference in PTT between two remote areas of the body, such as the forehead and the palm. Expanding our previous work on remote BW detection from visible spectrum videos, we built a system that remotely measures dPTT. Human subject data were collected under an IRB approved protocol from 15 subjects both under normal and stress states and are used to initially establish the potential use of remote dPPT detection as a stress indicator.

  3. An Adaptive Cauchy Differential Evolution Algorithm for Global Numerical Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Jong; Ahn, Chang Wook; An, Jinung

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation of control parameters, such as scaling factor (F), crossover rate (CR), and population size (NP), appropriately is one of the major problems of Differential Evolution (DE) literature. Well-designed adaptive or self-adaptive parameter control method can highly improve the performance of DE. Although there are many suggestions for adapting the control parameters, it is still a challenging task to properly adapt the control parameters for problem. In this paper, we present an adaptive parameter control DE algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, each individual has its own control parameters. The control parameters of each individual are adapted based on the average parameter value of successfully evolved individuals' parameter values by using the Cauchy distribution. Through this, the control parameters of each individual are assigned either near the average parameter value or far from that of the average parameter value which might be better parameter value for next generation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more robust than the standard DE algorithm and several state-of-the-art adaptive DE algorithms in solving various unimodal and multimodal problems. PMID:23935445

  4. An adaptive Cauchy differential evolution algorithm for global numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae Jong; Ahn, Chang Wook; An, Jinung

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation of control parameters, such as scaling factor (F), crossover rate (CR), and population size (NP), appropriately is one of the major problems of Differential Evolution (DE) literature. Well-designed adaptive or self-adaptive parameter control method can highly improve the performance of DE. Although there are many suggestions for adapting the control parameters, it is still a challenging task to properly adapt the control parameters for problem. In this paper, we present an adaptive parameter control DE algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, each individual has its own control parameters. The control parameters of each individual are adapted based on the average parameter value of successfully evolved individuals' parameter values by using the Cauchy distribution. Through this, the control parameters of each individual are assigned either near the average parameter value or far from that of the average parameter value which might be better parameter value for next generation. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more robust than the standard DE algorithm and several state-of-the-art adaptive DE algorithms in solving various unimodal and multimodal problems.

  5. Differential pulse-width pair BOTDA for high spatial resolution sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhai; Bao, Xiaoyi; Li, Yun; Chen, Liang

    2008-12-22

    A differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA) for centimeter spatial resolution sensing using meter equivalent pulses is proposed. This scheme uses the time domain waveform subtraction at the same scanned Brillouin frequency obtained from pulse lights with different pulse-widths (e.g. 50ns and 49ns) to form the differential Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) at each fiber location. The spatial resolution is defined by the average of the rise and fall time equivalent fiber length for a small stress section rather than the pulse-width difference equivalent length. The spatial resolution of 0.18m for the 50/49ns pulse pair and 0.15m for 20/19ns pulse pair over 1km sensing length with Brillouin frequency shift accuracy of 2.6MHz are demonstrated.

  6. GPU-based parallel clustered differential pulse code modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaji; Li, Wenze; Kong, Wanqiu

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing technology is widely used in marine remote sensing, geological exploration, atmospheric and environmental remote sensing. Owing to the rapid development of hyperspectral remote sensing technology, resolution of hyperspectral image has got a huge boost. Thus data size of hyperspectral image is becoming larger. In order to reduce their saving and transmission cost, lossless compression for hyperspectral image has become an important research topic. In recent years, large numbers of algorithms have been proposed to reduce the redundancy between different spectra. Among of them, the most classical and expansible algorithm is the Clustered Differential Pulse Code Modulation (CDPCM) algorithm. This algorithm contains three parts: first clusters all spectral lines, then trains linear predictors for each band. Secondly, use these predictors to predict pixels, and get the residual image by subtraction between original image and predicted image. Finally, encode the residual image. However, the process of calculating predictors is timecosting. In order to improve the processing speed, we propose a parallel C-DPCM based on CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) with GPU. Recently, general-purpose computing based on GPUs has been greatly developed. The capacity of GPU improves rapidly by increasing the number of processing units and storage control units. CUDA is a parallel computing platform and programming model created by NVIDIA. It gives developers direct access to the virtual instruction set and memory of the parallel computational elements in GPUs. Our core idea is to achieve the calculation of predictors in parallel. By respectively adopting global memory, shared memory and register memory, we finally get a decent speedup.

  7. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Hou, Tianyong; Zhang, Zehua; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Xuehui; Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Third-generation human mesenchymal stem cells were irradiated with different frequencies of pulsed electromagnetic fields, including 5, 25, 50, 75, 100, and 150 Hz, with a field intensity of 1.1 mT, for 30 minutes per day for 21 days. Changes in human mesenchymal stem cell morphology were observed using phase contrast microscopy. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin expression were also determined to evaluate human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.Different effects were observed on human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast induction following exposure to different pulsed electromagnetic field frequencies. Levels of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation increased when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 5 hz to 50 hz, but the effect was weaker when the pulsed electromagnetic field frequency was increased from 50 Hz to 150 hz. The most significant effect on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation was observed at of 50 hz.The results of the current study show that pulsed electromagnetic field frequency is an important factor with regard to the induction of human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, a pulsed electromagnetic field frequency of 50 Hz was the most effective at inducing human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

  8. Voltammetric Studies of Zomepirac Sodium and Its Determination in Tablets by Differential-Pulse Polarography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-06

    D-A136 982 VOLTAMMETRIC STUDIES OF ZOMEPIRAC SODIUM AND ITS i/i DETERMINATION IN TABLETS.. U) UTAH UNIV SALT LAKE CITY DEPT OF CHEMISTRY L G CHATTEN... Sodium determinations; differential-pulse polarography; controlled potential coulometry; cyclic voltammetry "INV * 3 Zomepirac sodium ( sodium salt of 5...TYPE OF REPORT &PEMOCVE Voltaninetric Studies of Zomepirac Sodium and its Dete~rmrination in Tablets by Differential-Pulse ,Technical Reportf 24 Pol

  9. Simulation of the electrically stimulated cochlear neuron: modeling adaptation to trains of electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jihwan; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model does not simulate the significant changes in auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to sustained stimulation that are associated with neural adaptation. Given that the electric stimuli used by cochlear prostheses can result in adapted responses, a computational model incorporating an adaptation process is warranted if such models are to remain relevant and contribute to related research efforts. In this paper, we describe the development of a modified HH single-node model that includes potassium ion ( K(+)) concentration changes in response to each action potential. This activity-related change results in an altered resting potential, and hence, excitability. Our implementation of K(+)-related changes uses a phenomenological approach based upon K(+) accumulation and dissipation time constants. Modeled spike times were computed using repeated presentations of modeled pulse-train stimuli. Spike-rate adaptation was characterized by rate decrements and time constants and compared against ANF data from animal experiments. Responses to relatively low (250 pulse/s) and high rate (5000 pulse/s) trains were evaluated and the novel adaptation model results were compared against model results obtained without the adaptation mechanism. In addition to spike-rate changes, jitter and spike intervals were evaluated and found to change with the addition of modeled adaptation. These results provide one means of incorporating a heretofore neglected (although important) aspect of ANF responses to electric stimuli. Future studies could include evaluation of alternative versions of the adaptation model elements and broadening the model to simulate a complete axon, and eventually, a spatially realistic model of the electrically stimulated nerve within extracochlear tissues.

  10. Pulsed DC Electric Field–Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K.; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  11. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  12. Parameter adaptation in a simplified pulse-coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Geza; Lindblad, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    In a general purpose pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) algorithm the following parameters are used: 2 weight matrices, 3 time constants, 3 normalization factors and 2 further parameters. In a given application, one has to determine the near optimal parameter set to achieve the desired goal. Here a simplified PCNN is described which contains a parameter fitting part, in the least squares sense. Given input and a desired output image, the program is able to determine the optimal value of a selected PCNN parameter. This method can be extended to more general PCNN algorithms, because partial derivatives are not required for the fitting. Only the sum of squares of the differences is used.

  13. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, M.; Johnson, C.R.; Smith, P.J.; Fogelson, A.

    1998-12-10

    OAK-B135 Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations. Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  14. Adaptive Control of a Transport Aircraft Using Differential Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an adaptive control technique for a damaged large transport aircraft subject to unknown atmospheric disturbances such as wind gust or turbulence. It is assumed that the damage results in vertical tail loss with no rudder authority, which is replaced with a differential thrust input. The proposed technique uses the adaptive prediction based control design in conjunction with the time scale separation principle, based on the singular perturbation theory. The application of later is necessitated by the fact that the engine response to a throttle command is substantially slow that the angular rate dynamics of the aircraft. It is shown that this control technique guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system and the tracking of a given reference model. The simulation example shows the benefits of the approach.

  15. Pulse Compression Degradation Due to Open Loop Adaptive Cancellation. Part 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-23

    An exact expression for the perturbed range sidelobe level of a compressed pulse that has been preprocessed through an adaptive canceller is derived...good approximate expression is also obtained for evaluating the perturbed range sidelobe level. This report derives the number of independent samples per...channel (main and auxiliaries) necessary so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level

  16. Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution Algorithm With Zoning Evolution of Control Parameters and Adaptive Mutation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qinqin; Yan, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the differential evolution (DE) algorithm is significantly affected by the choice of mutation strategies and control parameters. Maintaining the search capability of various control parameter combinations throughout the entire evolution process is also a key issue. A self-adaptive DE algorithm with zoning evolution of control parameters and adaptive mutation strategies is proposed in this paper. In the proposed algorithm, the mutation strategies are automatically adjusted with population evolution, and the control parameters evolve in their own zoning to self-adapt and discover near optimal values autonomously. The proposed algorithm is compared with five state-of-the-art DE algorithm variants according to a set of benchmark test functions. Furthermore, seven nonparametric statistical tests are implemented to analyze the experimental results. The results indicate that the overall performance of the proposed algorithm is better than those of the five existing improved algorithms.

  17. Cellular pulse-coupled neural network with adaptive weights for image segmentation and its VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiter, Juerg; Ramacher, Ulrich; Heittmann, Arne; Matolin, Daniel; Schuffny, Rene

    2004-05-01

    We present a cellular pulse coupled neural network with adaptive weights and its analog VLSI implementation. The neural network operates on a scalar image feature, such as grey scale or the output of a spatial filter. It detects segments and marks them with synchronous pulses of the corresponding neurons. The network consists of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are coupled to their nearest neighbors via adaptive synaptic weights. Adaptation follows either one of two empirical rules. Both rules lead to spike grouping in wave like patterns. This synchronous activity binds groups of neurons and labels the corresponding image segments. Applications of the network also include feature preserving noise removal, image smoothing, and detection of bright and dark spots. The adaptation rules are insensitive for parameter deviations, mismatch and non-ideal approximation of the implied functions. That makes an analog VLSI implementation feasible. Simulations showed no significant differences in the synchronization properties between networks using the ideal adaptation rules and networks resembling implementation properties such as randomly distributed parameters and roughly implemented adaptation functions. A prototype is currently being designed and fabricated using an Infineon 130nm technology. It comprises a 128 × 128 neuron array, analog image memory, and an address event representation pulse output.

  18. Image segmentation by EM-based adaptive pulse coupled neural networks in brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, J C; Chen, C C; Chai, J W; Wong, S T C; Li, I C

    2010-06-01

    We propose an automatic hybrid image segmentation model that integrates the statistical expectation maximization (EM) model and the spatial pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) for brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation. In addition, an adaptive mechanism is developed to fine tune the PCNN parameters. The EM model serves two functions: evaluation of the PCNN image segmentation and adaptive adjustment of the PCNN parameters for optimal segmentation. To evaluate the performance of the adaptive EM-PCNN, we use it to segment MR brain image into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The performance of the adaptive EM-PCNN is compared with that of the non-adaptive EM-PCNN, EM, and Bias Corrected Fuzzy C-Means (BCFCM) algorithms. The result is four sets of boundaries for the GM and the brain parenchyma (GM+WM), the two regions of most interest in medical research and clinical applications. Each set of boundaries is compared with the golden standard to evaluate the segmentation performance. The adaptive EM-PCNN significantly outperforms the non-adaptive EM-PCNN, EM, and BCFCM algorithms in gray mater segmentation. In brain parenchyma segmentation, the adaptive EM-PCNN significantly outperforms the BCFCM only. However, the adaptive EM-PCNN is better than the non-adaptive EM-PCNN and EM on average. We conclude that of the three approaches, the adaptive EM-PCNN yields the best results for gray matter and brain parenchyma segmentation.

  19. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  20. Differential linear scan voltammetry: analytical performance in comparison with pulsed voltammetry techniques.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Disha B; Gratzl, Miklós

    2013-06-01

    We report here on differential linear scan voltammetry, DLSV, that combines the working principles of linear scan voltammetry, LSV, and the numerous existing pulsed voltammetry techniques. DLSV preserves the information from continuous interrogation in voltage and high accuracy that LSV provides about electrochemical processes, and the much better sensitivity of differential pulsed techniques. DLSV also minimizes the background current compared to both LSV and pulsed voltammetry. An early version of DLSV, derivative stationary electrode polarography, DSEP, had been proposed in the 1960s but soon abandoned in favor of the emerging differential pulsed techniques. Relative to DSEP, DLSV takes advantage of the flexibility of discrete smoothing differentiation that was not available to early investigators. Also, DSEP had been explored in pure solutions and with reversible electrochemical reactions. DLSV is tested in this work in more challenging experimental contexts: the measurement of oxygen with a carbon fiber microelectrode in buffer, and with a gold microdisc electrode exposed to a live biological preparation. This work compares the analytical performance of DLSV and square wave voltammetry, the most popular pulsed voltammetry technique.

  1. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  2. An Adaptive Multipopulation Differential Evolution With Dynamic Population Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa Z; Awad, Noor H; Suganthan, Ponnuthurai Nagaratnam; Reynolds, Robert G

    2016-10-25

    Developing efficient evolutionary algorithms attracts many researchers due to the existence of optimization problems in numerous real-world applications. A new differential evolution algorithm, sTDE-dR, is proposed to improve the search quality, avoid premature convergence, and stagnation. The population is clustered in multiple tribes and utilizes an ensemble of different mutation and crossover strategies. In this algorithm, a competitive success-based scheme is introduced to determine the life cycle of each tribe and its participation ratio for the next generation. In each tribe, a different adaptive scheme is used to control the scaling factor and crossover rate. The mean success of each subgroup is used to calculate the ratio of its participation for the next generation. This guarantees that successful tribes with the best adaptive schemes are only the ones that guide the search toward the optimal solution. The population size is dynamically reduced using a dynamic reduction method. Comprehensive comparison of the proposed heuristic over a challenging set of benchmarks from the CEC2014 real parameter single objective competition against several state-of-the-art algorithms is performed. The results affirm robustness of the proposed approach compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms.

  3. Phase-sensitive optical coherence reflectometer with differential phase-shift keying of probe pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A E; Vdovenko, V S; Sergachev, I A; Simikin, D E; Gorshkov, B G; Potapov, V T

    2014-10-31

    We report a new method for reconstructing the signal shape of the external dynamic perturbations along the entire length of the fibre of an optical coherence reflectometer. The method proposed is based on differential phase-shift keying of a probe pulse and demodulation of scattered light by the phase diversity technique. Possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally. (fibre-optic sensors)

  4. On the ability of resonant diffraction gratings to differentiate a pulsed optical signal

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, D. A. Doskolovich, L. L.; Soifer, V. A.

    2012-05-15

    The passage of an optical pulse through a resonant grating is considered. The conditions under which the resonant grating differentiates the envelope of the incident pulse are determined. It is shown that the necessary condition for computing the k-order derivative is the presence of k resonances in the transmission spectrum of the grating in the vicinity of the central frequency of the incident pulse. A method is described for constructing the stacked structure for computing the kth derivative on the basis of repetition of the structure for computing the first derivative. The results of numerical simulation of diffraction of the pulse from the analyzed structure for computing the first, second, and third derivative are presented.

  5. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  6. Pulse compression degradation due to open loop adaptive cancellation, part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Karl

    1991-08-01

    An exact expression for the perturbed range sidelobe level of a compressed pulse that has been preprocessed through an adaptive canceller is derived. This result is a generalization of past research (parts 1 and 2, NRL Reports 9107 and 9309) where the signal was assumed to be completely contained within the canceller's processing batch. In this report, we allow the signal to extend over an arbitrary number of canceller processing batches. A good approximate expression is also obtained for evaluating the perturbed range sidelobe level. This report derives the number of independent samples per channel (main and auxiliaries) necessary so that the average adaptive range sidelobe level is within 3 dB of the quiescent range sidelobe level. Furthermore, the same analysis is used to predict the canceller noise power level that is induced by the desired signal's presence in the canceller weight calculation. Placement of the pulse compressor before or after the canceller is also considered. It Is shown that if the desired waveform's code length L is less than or equal to the canceller's processing batch width K, it is desirable to place the pulse compression after the adaptive canceller. If L greater than K, then the issue is not so clear-cut, and a trade-off study is necessary.

  7. Differential pulse amplitude modulation for multiple-input single-output OWVLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Kim, S. J.; Son, Y. H.; Han, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are widely used for lighting due to their energy efficiency, eco-friendly, and small size than previously light sources such as incandescent, fluorescent bulbs and so on. Optical wireless visible light communication (OWVLC) based on LED merges lighting and communications in applications such as indoor lighting, traffic signals, vehicles, and underwater communications because LED can be easily modulated. However, physical bandwidth of LED is limited about several MHz by slow time constant of the phosphor and characteristics of device. Therefore, using the simplest modulation format which is non-return-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK), the data rate reaches only to dozens Mbit/s. Thus, to improve the transmission capacity, optical filtering and pre-, post-equalizer are adapted. Also, high-speed wireless connectivity is implemented using spectrally efficient modulation methods: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) or discrete multi-tone (DMT). However, these modulation methods need additional digital signal processing such as FFT and IFFT, thus complexity of transmitter and receiver is increasing. To reduce the complexity of transmitter and receiver, we proposed a novel modulation scheme which is named differential pulse amplitude modulation. The proposed modulation scheme transmits different NRZ-OOK signals with same amplitude and unit time delay using each LED chip, respectively. The `N' parallel signals from LEDs are overlapped and directly detected at optical receiver. Received signal is demodulated by power difference between unit time slots. The proposed scheme can overcome the bandwidth limitation of LEDs and data rate can be improved according to number of LEDs without complex digital signal processing.

  8. Laser pulse design using optimal control theory-based adaptive simulated annealing technique: vibrational transitions and photo-dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Bikram; Mondal, Chandan Kumar

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and optimised a combined laser pulse using optimal control theory-based adaptive simulated annealing technique for selective vibrational excitations and photo-dissociation. Since proper choice of pulses for specific excitation and dissociation phenomena is very difficult, we have designed a linearly combined pulse for such processes and optimised the different parameters involved in those pulses so that we can get an efficient combined pulse. The technique makes us free from choosing any arbitrary type of pulses and makes a ground to check their suitability. We have also emphasised on how we can improve the performance of simulated annealing technique by introducing an adaptive step length of the different variables during the optimisation processes. We have also pointed out on how we can choose the initial temperature for the optimisation process by introducing heating/cooling step to reduce the annealing steps so that the method becomes cost effective.

  9. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kupenko, I. Strohm, C.; McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Glazyrin, K.; Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  10. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  11. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, G.G.; Vogilin, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Disclosed is a pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form. 5 figs.

  12. Differentially-charged and sequentially-switched square-wave pulse forming network

    DOEpatents

    North, George G. [Stockton, CA; Vogilin, George E. [Livermore, CA

    1980-04-01

    A pulse forming network for delivering a high-energy square-wave pulse to a load, including a series of inductive-capacitive sections wherein the capacitors are differentially charged higher further from the load. Each charged capacitor is isolated from adjacent sections and the load by means of a normally open switch at the output of each section. The switch between the load and the closest section to the load is closed to begin discharge of the capacitor in that section into the load. During discharge of each capacitor, the voltage thereacross falls to a predetermined potential with respect to the potential across the capacitor in the next adjacent section further from the load. When this potential is reached, it is used to close the switch in the adjacent section further from the load and thereby apply the charge in that section to the load through the adjacent section toward the load. Each successive section further from the load is sequentially switched in this manner to continuously and evenly supply energy to the load over the period of the pulse, with the differentially charged capacitors providing higher potentials away from the load to compensate for the voltage drop across the resistance of each inductor. This arrangement is low in cost and yet provides a high-energy pulse in an acceptable square-wave form.

  13. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor

    PubMed Central

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A.; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A.; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2014-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm. PMID:24478619

  14. Adaptive pulsed laser line extraction for terrain reconstruction using a dynamic vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Christian; Mantel, Thomas A; Hutter, Marco; Höpflinger, Markus A; Berner, Raphael; Siegwart, Roland; Delbruck, Tobi

    2013-01-01

    Mobile robots need to know the terrain in which they are moving for path planning and obstacle avoidance. This paper proposes the combination of a bio-inspired, redundancy-suppressing dynamic vision sensor (DVS) with a pulsed line laser to allow fast terrain reconstruction. A stable laser stripe extraction is achieved by exploiting the sensor's ability to capture the temporal dynamics in a scene. An adaptive temporal filter for the sensor output allows a reliable reconstruction of 3D terrain surfaces. Laser stripe extractions up to pulsing frequencies of 500 Hz were achieved using a line laser of 3 mW at a distance of 45 cm using an event-based algorithm that exploits the sparseness of the sensor output. As a proof of concept, unstructured rapid prototype terrain samples have been successfully reconstructed with an accuracy of 2 mm.

  15. Adaptive Control of Two-Photon Excitation of Green Fluorescent Protein with Shaped Femtosecond Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Nabekawa, Yasuo; Suda, Akira; Oishi, Yu; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    For many years, it has been believed that a Fourier-transform-limited (FTL) laser pulse is the most effective light source for the generation of nonlinear phenomena, since the FTL pulse has the shortest pulse duration, that is, the highest intensity, that can be limited by the spectral width due to the principle of uncertainty. Recently, many reports have been published on the adaptive control of nonlinear phenomena with shaped femtosecond excitation laser pulses [1, 2]. Their reports have shown that the modification of the spectral and temporal phases of excitation pulses can increase or decrease the probabilities and efficiencies of such nonlinear phenomena. This method has been widely applied to studies on the active control of molecular motions or chemical reactions [3,4]. Considering further novel biological applications, we focus on the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. GFP is spontaneously fluorescent and is relatively nontoxic compared with other organic dyes used as optical markers. Therefore, it has been widely used as a "tag" material for the fluorescence observation of living cells [5]. Two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) is a powerful tool for biological real-time observation due to its various advantages, such as a clear contrast, good S/N ratio, and high spatial resolution [7]. From a practical point of view, however, there is a serious problem with TPEM, which is the photobleaching of a dye. The intensity of a fluorescence signal decreases significantly during observation. One of the reasons for this is that the chromophore structure is degraded by intense excitation laser pulses that are required for efficient two-photon excitation. In this study, therefore, we attempted to determine the optimal phase for maximizing the fluorescence efficiency of a GFP variant with excitation laser pulses of minimal intensity. We considered that GFP can be an ideal dye for the

  16. Light pulse duration differentially regulates mouse locomotor suppression and phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-10-01

    Brief exposure of mice to nocturnal light causes circadian rhythm phase shifts, simultaneously inducing locomotor suppression, a drop in body temperature, and associated sleep. The exact nature of the relationship between these light-induced responses is uncertain, although locomotor suppression and phase shift magnitudes are related to stimulus irradiance. Whether stimulus duration has similar effects is less clear. Here, the relationship between stimulus duration and response magnitude was evaluated further using 100 µW/cm(2) white light-emitting diode pulses administered for 30, 300, 1200, or 3000 sec. The results show that, in general, shorter pulses yielded smaller responses and larger pulses yielded larger responses. However, the 300-sec pulse failed to augment locomotor suppression compared with the effect of a 30-sec pulse (44.7 ± 4.8 vs 40.6 ± 2.0 min) but simultaneously induced much larger phase shifts (1.28 ± 0.20 vs 0.52 ± 0.11 h). The larger phase shifts induced by the 300-sec stimulus did not differ from those induced by either the 1200- or 3000-sec pulses (1.43 ± 0.10 and 1.30 ± 0.17 h, respectively). The results demonstrate differential photic regulation of the two response types. Pulses ranging from 300 to 3000 sec produce equal phase shifts (present data); pulses ranging from 30 to 600 sec produce equal locomotor suppression levels. Greater suppression can occur additively in response to pulses of 1200 sec or more (present data), but this is not true for phase shifts. Nocturnal light appears to trigger a fixed duration event, locomotor suppression, or phase shift, with the latter followed by a light-refractory interval during which locomotor suppression can additively increase. The results also provide further support for the view that temporal integration of photic energy applies, at best, across a limited set of stimulus durations for both light-induced locomotor suppression/sleep and phase shift regulation.

  17. Arbitrary waveform generator and differentiator employing an integrated optical pulse shaper.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji; Yang, Ting; Chen, Xiaolin; Gao, Dingshan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-05-04

    We propose and demonstrate an optical arbitrary waveform generator and high-order photonic differentiator based on a four-tap finite impulse response (FIR) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on-chip circuit. Based on amplitude and phase modulation of each tap controlled by thermal heaters, we obtain several typical waveforms such as triangular waveform, sawtooth waveform, square waveform and Gaussian waveform, etc., assisted by an optical frequency comb injection. Unlike other proposed schemes, our scheme does not require a spectral disperser which is difficult to fabricate on chip with high resolution. In addition, we demonstrate first-, second- and third-order differentiators based on the optical pulse shaper. Our scheme can switch the differentiator patterns from first- to third-order freely. In addition, our scheme has distinct advantages of compactness, capability for integration with electronics.

  18. Adaptive engineering of coherent soft-x-rays by temporal and spatial laser-pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate qualitative amplitude shaping of the coherent soft x-ray spectrum produced in the process of high-harmonic generation. This is accomplished by applying adaptive femtosecond pulse shaping methods. We performed the basic operations of complete spectral control by 1) selective generation of extended parts of the high-harmonic spectra, 2) tunable single harmonic generation and 3) creation of spectral holes (suppression of harmonics) in the plateau region of the spectrum. Our ability to qualitatively ``engineer'' the coherent spectral properties by application of temporal and spatial laser-pulse-shaping methods has immediate consequences for the developing field of attosecond x-ray science. Control over the spectrum is directly related to the control over the attosecond pulse shape as we will show by comparing experiment with simulation. In addition, even more important is the prospect to extend the field of coherent control into the soft x-ray range. In the future, the proposed technique will allow us to directly manipulate electronic motion on its natural attosecond time scale.

  19. Adaptive Bessel-autocorrelation of ultrashort pulses with phase-only spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huferath-von Luepke, Silke; Bock, Martin; Grunwald, Ruediger

    2009-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a new approach of a noncollinear correlation technique for ultrashort-pulsed coherent optical signals which was referred to as Bessel-autocorrelator (BAC). The BAC-principle combines the advantages of Bessellike nondiffracting beams like stable propagation, angular robustness and self-reconstruction with the principle of temporal autocorrelation. In comparison to other phase-sensitive measuring techniques, autocorrelation is most straightforward and time-effective because of non-iterative data processing. The analysis of nonlinearly converted fringe patterns of pulsed Bessel-like beams reveals their temporal signature from details of fringe envelopes. By splitting the beams with axicon arrays into multiple sub-beams, transversal resolution is approximated. Here we report on adaptive implementations of BACs with improved phase resolution realized by phase-only liquid-crystal-on-silicon spatial light modulators (LCoS-SLMs). Programming microaxicon phase functions in gray value maps enables for a flexible variation of phase and geometry. Experiments on the diagnostics of few-cycle pulses emitted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser oscillator at wavelengths around 800 nm with 2D-BAC and angular tuned BAC were performed. All-optical phase shift BAC and fringe free BAC approaches are discussed.

  20. Ipsilateral medial olivocochlear reflex adaptation of the primary-source DPOAE component measured with pulsed tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalhoff, Ernst; Zelle, Dennis; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of contralateral suppression or ipsilateral adaptation of DPOAE due to the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) in humans has so far been complicated by interference between the two major contributors to a DPOAE signal, namely, the nonlinear and the reflection-source components. For instance, while the MOCR has been shown to act inhibitory to the cochlear amplifier, a considerable share of the measured responses has been reported to be of the excitatory type (e.g. 22% for contralateral adaptation in [11]), and it has been shown that the magnitudes of ipsilateral adaptation as well as contralateral suppression depend on the precise frequency choice relative to the position of dips in the DPOAE fine structure [3, 8]. To separate MOCR effects on both source components, we developed a paradigm consisting of five short f2 pulses presented during a 0.35 s on-period of the f1 primary within blocks of 1.35 s length. The responses at f1 and f2 were cancelled using the primary-tone phase variation technique [13]. In 16 normal-hearing subjects, we measured MOCR-induced ipsilateral adaptation at three near-by frequencies in the DPOAE fine structure, corresponding roughly to characteristic interference states between the two major source components of a DPOAE, i.e. constructive, destructive and quadrature interference. Measurements were performed in the frequency range 1.7 ≤ f2 ≤ 2 kHz, f2/f1 = 1.2, and with moderate primary-tone levels (L2 = 45 dB SPL, L1 = 57 dB SPL). Analysis of the DPOAE time traces showed that the nonlinear component typically presents inhibitory adaptation between the 1st and the 5th pulses (median: 0.92 dB). Fitting a single exponential function to the pooled data yielded adaptation of 1.49 dB. From 26 statistically significant MOCR effects (P < 0.1) ranging between 0.29 and 2.81 dB, no excitatory response was detected. The separation of the DPOAE sources when analysing MOCR effects on ipsilateral DPOAE offers the potential of investigating

  1. Measurement of optical path length change following pulsed laser irradiation using differential phase optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Oh, Junghwan; Milner, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Differential phase optical coherence tomography (DPOCT) is introduced to measure optical path length changes in response to pulsed laser irradiation (585 nm). An analytical equation that includes thermoelastic surface displacement and thermorefractive index change is derived to predict optical path length change in response to pulsed laser irradiation for both "confined surface" and "free surface" model systems. The derived equation is tested by comparing predicted values with data recorded from experiments using two model systems. Thermorefractive index change and the thermal expansion coefficient are deduced from differential phase change (dDeltaphi) and temperature increase (DeltaT0) measurements. The measured n(T0)beta(T0)+dndT[=1.7410(-4)+/-1.710(-6) (1K)] in the free surface experiment matches with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) data value [=1.7710(-4) (1K)]. Exclusion of lateral thermal expansion in the analytical model for the confined surface experiment causes difference between the measured dndT[=-2.310(-4)+/-7.310(-6)(1K)] and the NIST value [=-9.4510(-5) (1K)]. In spite of the difference in the confined surface experiment, results of our studies indicate DPOCT can detect dynamic optical path length change in response to pulsed laser irradiation with high sensitivity, and applications to tissue diagnostics may be possible.

  2. Pulsed eddy current differential probe to detect the defects in a stainless steel pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angani, C. S.; Park, D. G.; Kim, C. G.; Leela, P.; Kishore, M.; Cheong, Y. M.

    2011-04-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) is an electromagnetic nondestructive technique widely used to detect and quantify the flaws in conducting materials. In the present study a differential Hall-sensor probe which is used in the PEC system has been fabricated for the detection of defects in stainless steel pipelines. The differential probe has an exciting coil with two Hall-sensors. A stainless steel test sample with electrical discharge machining (EDM) notches under different depths of 1-5 mm was made and the sample was laminated by plastic insulation having uniform thickness to simulate the pipelines in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The driving coil in the probe is excited by a rectangular current pulse and the resultant response, which is the difference of the two Hall-sensors, has been detected as the PEC probe signal. The discriminating time domain features of the detected pulse such as peak value and time to zero are used to interpret the experimental results with the defects in the test sample. A feature extraction technique such as spectral power density has been devised to infer the PEC response.

  3. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  4. Characterization of an electrochemical mercury sensor using alternating current, cyclic, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Gabriela V; Zaitouna, Anita J; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-01-31

    Here we report the characterization of an electrochemical mercury (Hg(2+)) sensor constructed with a methylene blue (MB)-modified and thymine-containing linear DNA probe. Similar to the linear probe electrochemical DNA sensor, the resultant sensor behaved as a "signal-off" sensor in alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. However, depending on the applied frequency or pulse width, the sensor can behave as either a "signal-off" or "signal-on" sensor in square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In SWV, the sensor showed "signal-on" behavior at low frequencies and "signal-off" behavior at high frequencies. In DPV, the sensor showed "signal-off" behavior at short pulse widths and "signal-on" behavior at long pulse widths. Independent of the sensor interrogation technique, the limit of detection was found to be 10nM, with a linear dynamic range between 10nM and 500nM. In addition, the sensor responded to Hg(2+) rather rapidly; majority of the signal change occurred in <20min. Overall, the sensor retains all the characteristics of this class of sensors; it is reagentless, reusable, sensitive, specific and selective. This study also highlights the feasibility of using a MB-modified probe for real-time sensing of Hg(2+), which has not been previously reported. More importantly, the observed "switching" behavior in SWV and DPV is potentially generalizable and should be applicable to most sensors in this class of dynamics-based electrochemical biosensors.

  5. Airborne 2-micron double-pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar for column CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 mJ and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 µs and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-µm direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-μm IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  6. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  7. The simulation of adaptive optical image even and pulse noise and research of image quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Changli; Xu, Yuannan; Xu, Rong; Liu, Changhai; Men, Tao; Niu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    As optical image becomes more and more important in adaptive optics area, and adaptive optical telescopes play a more and more important role in the detection system on the ground, and the images we get are so many that we need find a suitable method to choose good quality images automatically in order to save human power, people pay more and more attention in image's evaluation methods and their characteristics. According to different image degradation model, the applicability of different image's quality evaluation method will be different. Researchers have paid most attention in how to improve or build new method to evaluate degraded images. Now we should change our way to take some research in the models of degradation of images, the reasons of image degradation, and the relations among different degraded images and different image quality evaluation methods. In this paper, we build models of even noise and pulse noise based on their definition and get degraded images using these models, and we take research in six kinds of usual image quality evaluation methods such as square error method, sum of multi-power of grey scale method, entropy method, Fisher function method, Sobel method, and sum of grads method, and we make computer software for these methods to use easily to evaluate all kinds of images input. Then we evaluate the images' qualities with different evaluation methods and analyze the results of six kinds of methods, and finally we get many important results. Such as the characteristics of every method for evaluating qualities of degraded images of even noise, the characteristics of every method for evaluating qualities of degraded images of pulse noise, and the best method to evaluate images which affected by tow kinds of noise both and the characteristics of this method. These results are important to image's choosing automatically, and this will help we to manage the images we get through adaptive optical telescopes base on the ground.

  8. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  9. Differential time domain method improves performance of pulsed laser ranging and three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jie; Hao, Qun; Cheng, Yang; Peng, Yuxin; Zhang, Kaiyu; Mu, Jiaxing; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-10

    A ranging method based on the differential time domain method (DTDM) is proposed in order to improve ranging accuracy and the range of active measurement based on peak discriminator (PD). We develop mathematical models and deduce that zero-crossing sensitivity is an important factor, which affects the ranging error of DTDM. Additionally, zero-crossing sensitivity is determined by delayed time. We carried out relative experiments and obtained the smallest ranging error when delayed time is receiving pulse width. We also compare ranging, three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and depth images based on two methods under same testing conditions. The results show that DTDM is beneficial in improving performance of pulse laser ranging and 3D imaging.

  10. Differentiation of human and animal strains of Streptococcus dysgalactiae by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bert, F; Branger, C; Poutrel, B; Lambert-Zechovsky, N

    1997-05-01

    The genetic diversity among 54 human isolates and 33 animal isolates belonging to the species Streptococcus dysgalactiae (20 alpha-haemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae, 23 Streptococcus equisimilis, 43 group G streptococci and one group L streptococcus) was evaluated by macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA with SmaI and resolution by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This technique revealed a high degree of intraspecies polymorphism, leading to the differentiation of 80 distinct banding patterns, and identified the presence of two major clusters, one containing isolates of human origin and the other isolates of animal origin. These results suggest than human and animal isolates of S.dysgalactiae are genetically distinct, and support the recent proposal of the subspecies S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis for human isolates. The heterogeneity revealed within isolates from the same host type indicates that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a powerful epidemiological tool for studying S. dysgalactiae infections.

  11. Development of a pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center.

  12. In vivo brain glucose measurements: differential normal pulse voltammetry with enzyme-modified carbon fiber microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Netchiporouk, L I; Shram, N F; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Martelet, C; Cespuglio, R

    1996-12-15

    The enzyme glucose oxidase was immobilized on the surface of carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) either by cross-linking in glutaraldehyde vapor or by enzyme entrapment in electropolymerized films of m-phenylenediamine or resorcinol. The cross-linked enzymatic layer was, in the given conditions, covered with an additional membrane of Nafion or cellulose acetate. The prepared glucose sensors were tested using differential normal pulse voltammetry (DNPV, in which the scan comprises successive double pulses ("prepulse and pulse"), the prepulses are of increasing amplitude, and the current measured is the differential of the current existing between each prepulse and pulse). With properly chosen DNPV parameters, the response to glucose presented a peak at a potential of about 1 V versus an Ag/AgC1-reference, owing to the oxidation of enzymatically produced hydrogen peroxide. The calibration curves obtained (peak height/glucose concentration) were linear from 0.3-0.5 up to 1.5-6.5 mM and showed a sensitivity ranging from 1.4 up to 34.5 mA M-1 cm-2, depending on the sensor type. The DNPV response to glucose exhibited an essential insensitivity toward easily oxidizable interfering substances such as ascorbic acid and acetaminophen present at physiological concentrations. Peptides, the interfering species typical of the cerebral medium, were effectively retained by the above additional membranes. Concentration values of glucose in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, determined in vitro from the DNPV peak height, agreed well with those measured by standard procedures. In the anesthetized rat, extracellular brain concentration of glucose was also monitored during administration of either insulin or glucagon. Under such pharmacological conditions, the changes observed in the peak height were in perfect agreement with the known effects induced by both substances.

  13. Investigations on the binding of mercury ions to albumins employing differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Clarissa Silva Pires de; SouzaDe, Jurandir Rodrigues; Bloch, Carlos

    2003-04-01

    Binding of mercury to BSA and Ovalbumin was investigated by Differential Pulse Voltammetry. The method relies on the direct monitoring of peak current variation due to mercury oxidation in the presence of these two albumins. Linear calibration graphs were obtained for both BSA and Ovalbumin in concentrations ranging from 2.49 x 10(-9) to 19.6 x 10(-9) mol L(-1). The acquired data was used to quantify these two proteins independently and to calculate the dissociation constants of Hg-BSA and Hg-Ovalbumin complexes.

  14. Differential pulse polarographic determination of molybdenum after separation by 8-hydroxyquinoline extraction into dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Nagaosa, Y; Kobayashi, K

    1984-08-01

    A polarographic investigation of several metal 8-hydroxyquinolinates in dichloromethane medium following solvent extraction has been made. From the data obtained, a selective, specific and sensitive method for the determination of molybdenum at ng ml levels has been developed involving direct differential pulse polarographic measurement on the dichloromethane extract. In this work, EDTA is used as an effective masking agent to separate molybdenum from other metals. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in a variety of steels and NBS-SRM 1577 bovine liver with good accuracy and precision.

  15. Generation of 0.5 mJ, few-cycle laser pulses by an adaptive phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wu, Yi; Li, Chengquan; Mashiko, Hiroki; Gilbertson, Steve; Chang, Zenghu

    2008-09-15

    Previously, pulses shorter than 4 fs were generated by compressing white light from gas-filled hollow-core fibers with adaptive phase modulators; however, the energy of the few-cycle pulses was limited to 15 microJ. Here, we report the generation of 550 microJ, 5 fs pulses by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator in a grating-based 4f system. The high pulse energy was obtained by improving the throughput of the phase modulator and by increasing the input laser energy. When the pulses were used in high harmonic generation, it was found that the harmonic spectra depend strongly on the high order spectral phases of the driving laser fields.

  16. Human adaptation and population differentiation in the light of ancient genomes

    PubMed Central

    Key, Felix M.; Fu, Qiaomei; Romagné, Frédéric; Lachmann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of positive selection sweeps in human evolution is increasingly debated, although our ability to detect them is hampered by inherent uncertainties in the timing of past events. Ancient genomes provide snapshots of allele frequencies in the past and can help address this question. We combine modern and ancient genomic data in a simple statistic (DAnc) to time allele frequency changes, and investigate the role of drift and adaptation in population differentiation. Only 30% of the most strongly differentiated alleles between Africans and Eurasians changed in frequency during the colonization of Eurasia, but in Europe these alleles are enriched in genic and putatively functional alleles to an extent only compatible with local adaptation. Adaptive alleles—especially those associated with pigmentation—are mostly of hunter-gatherer origin, although lactose persistence arose in a haplotype present in farmers. These results provide evidence for a role of local adaptation in human population differentiation. PMID:26988143

  17. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  18. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  19. Final Report: Symposium on Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pernice, Michael; Johnson, Christopher R.; Smith, Philip J.; Fogelson, Aaron

    1998-12-08

    Complex physical phenomena often include features that span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate simulation of such phenomena can be difficult to obtain, and computations that are under-resolved can even exhibit spurious features. While it is possible to resolve small scale features by increasing the number of grid points, global grid refinement can quickly lead to problems that are intractable, even on the largest available computing facilities. These constraints are particularly severe for three dimensional problems that involve complex physics. One way to achieve the needed resolution is to refine the computational mesh locally, in only those regions where enhanced resolution is required. Adaptive solution methods concentrate computational effort in regions where it is most needed. These methods have been successfully applied to a wide variety of problems in computational science and engineering. Adaptive methods can be difficult to implement, prompting the development of tools and environments to facilitate their use. To ensure that the results of their efforts are useful, algorithm and tool developers must maintain close communication with application specialists. Conversely it remains difficult for application specialists who are unfamiliar with the methods to evaluate the trade-offs between the benefits of enhanced local resolution and the effort needed to implement an adaptive solution method.

  20. Differential viability response of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to high strength pulsed magnetic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boda, Sunil Kumar; Ravikumar, K; Saini, Deepak K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the efficacy of a high strength pulsed magnetic field (PMF) towards bacterial inactivation in vitro, without compromising eukaryotic cell viability. The differential response of prokaryotes [Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli], and eukaryotes [C2C12 mouse myoblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells, hMSCs] upon exposure to varying PMF stimuli (1-4 T, 30 pulses, 40 ms pulse duration) is investigated. Among the prokaryotes, ~60% and ~70% reduction was recorded in the survival of staphylococcal species and E. coli, respectively at 4 T PMF as evaluated by colony forming unit (CFU) analysis and flow cytometry. A 2-5 fold increase in intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels suggests oxidative stress as the key mediator in PMF induced bacterial death/injury. The 4 T PMF treated staphylococci also exhibited longer doubling times. Both TEM and fluorescence microscopy revealed compromised membranes of PMF exposed bacteria. Under similar PMF exposure conditions, no immediate cytotoxicity was recorded in C2C12 mouse myoblasts and hMSCs, which can be attributed to the robust resistance towards oxidative stress. The ion interference of iron containing bacterial proteins is invoked to analytically explain the PMF induced ROS accumulation in prokaryotes. Overall, this study establishes the potential of PMF as a bactericidal method without affecting eukaryotic viability. This non-invasive stimulation protocol coupled with antimicrobial agents can be integrated as a potential methodology for the localized treatment of prosthetic infections.

  1. Pulsed neutron differential die away analysis for detection of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kelly A.; Gozani, Tsahi

    2007-08-01

    Differential die away analysis (DDAA) is a very sensitive technique for detecting the presence of fissile materials such as 235U and 239Pu. DDAA is based on conventional pulsed neutron source interrogation, employing typically low cost 14 MeV (d, T) generators. In DDAA, a neutron generator produces repetitive pulses of neutrons that are directed into an inspected cargo. As each pulse passes through the cargo, the neutrons are thermalized and absorbed. The population of thermal neutrons decays with the diffusion decay time of the inspected medium (the so called thermal neutron "die-away" time) on the order of hundreds of microseconds. If SNM is present, the thermalized neutrons from the source cause fissions that produce a new source of fast neutrons. These fast fission neutrons decay with a time very similar to that of the thermal neutron die away of the surrounding cargo. The sensitivity of DDAA for a given source of neutrons is greatly affected by the size, geometry, density and composition of the inspected cargo. The sensitivity is also affected by the reflection of neutrons from surfaces such as the ground, nearby walls or nearby cargo; these effects were studied. The ability of DDAA to detect enriched uranium sample in dense hydrogenous cargo, such as paper and wood is shown.

  2. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  3. Nutrient presses and pulses differentially impact plants, herbivores, detritivores and their natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shannon M; Wimp, Gina M; Lewis, Danny; Denno, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient inputs into native ecosystems cause fluctuations in resources that normally limit plant growth, which has important consequences for associated food webs. Such inputs from agricultural and urban habitats into nearby natural systems are increasing globally and can be highly variable, spanning the range from sporadic to continuous. Despite the global increase in anthropogenically-derived nutrient inputs into native ecosystems, the consequences of variation in subsidy duration on native plants and their associated food webs are poorly known. Specifically, while some studies have examined the effects of nutrient subsidies on native ecosystems for a single year (a nutrient pulse), repeated introductions of nutrients across multiple years (a nutrient press) better reflect the persistent nature of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. We therefore contrasted the effects of a one-year nutrient pulse with a four-year nutrient press on arthropod consumers in two salt marshes. Salt marshes represent an ideal system to address the differential impacts of nutrient pulses and presses on ecosystem and community dynamics because human development and other anthropogenic activities lead to recurrent introductions of nutrients into these natural systems. We found that plant biomass and %N as well as arthropod density fell after the nutrient pulse ended but remained elevated throughout the nutrient press. Notably, higher trophic levels responded more strongly than lower trophic levels to fertilization, and the predator/prey ratio increased each year of the nutrient press, demonstrating that food web responses to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment can take years to fully manifest themselves. Vegetation at the two marshes also exhibited an apparent tradeoff between increasing %N and biomass in response to fertilization. Our research emphasizes the need for long-term, spatially diverse studies of nutrient enrichment in order to understand how variation in the duration

  4. Nutrient Presses and Pulses Differentially Impact Plants, Herbivores, Detritivores and Their Natural Enemies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon M.; Wimp, Gina M.; Lewis, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient inputs into native ecosystems cause fluctuations in resources that normally limit plant growth, which has important consequences for associated food webs. Such inputs from agricultural and urban habitats into nearby natural systems are increasing globally and can be highly variable, spanning the range from sporadic to continuous. Despite the global increase in anthropogenically-derived nutrient inputs into native ecosystems, the consequences of variation in subsidy duration on native plants and their associated food webs are poorly known. Specifically, while some studies have examined the effects of nutrient subsidies on native ecosystems for a single year (a nutrient pulse), repeated introductions of nutrients across multiple years (a nutrient press) better reflect the persistent nature of anthropogenic nutrient enrichment. We therefore contrasted the effects of a one-year nutrient pulse with a four-year nutrient press on arthropod consumers in two salt marshes. Salt marshes represent an ideal system to address the differential impacts of nutrient pulses and presses on ecosystem and community dynamics because human development and other anthropogenic activities lead to recurrent introductions of nutrients into these natural systems. We found that plant biomass and %N as well as arthropod density fell after the nutrient pulse ended but remained elevated throughout the nutrient press. Notably, higher trophic levels responded more strongly than lower trophic levels to fertilization, and the predator/prey ratio increased each year of the nutrient press, demonstrating that food web responses to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment can take years to fully manifest themselves. Vegetation at the two marshes also exhibited an apparent tradeoff between increasing %N and biomass in response to fertilization. Our research emphasizes the need for long-term, spatially diverse studies of nutrient enrichment in order to understand how variation in the duration

  5. Enhanced responsiveness to parathyroid hormone and induction of functional differentiation of cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes by a pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Y; Endo, N; Takigawa, M; Asada, A; Takahashi, H; Suzuki, F

    1987-10-22

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote healing of delayed united and ununited fractures by triggering a series of events in fibrocartilage. We examined the effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (recurrent bursts, 15.4 Hz, of shorter pulses of an average of 2 gauss) on rabbit costal chondrocytes in culture. A pulsed electromagnetic field slightly reduced the intracellular cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) level in the culture. However, it significantly enhanced cAMP accumulation in response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) to 140% of that induced by PTH in its absence, while it did not affect cAMP accumulation in response to prostaglandin E1 or prostaglandin I2. The effect on cAMP accumulation in response to PTH became evident after exposure of the cultures to the pulsed electromagnetic field for 48 h, and was dependent upon the field strength. cAMP accumulation in response to PTH is followed by induction of ornithine decarboxylase, a good marker of differentiated chondrocytes, after PTH treatment for 4 h. Consistent with the enhanced cAMP accumulation, ornithine decarboxylase activity induced by PTH was also increased by the pulsed electromagnetic field to 170% of that in cells not exposed to a pulsed electromagnetic field. Furthermore, stimulation of glycosaminoglycan synthesis, a differentiated phenotype, in response to PTH was significantly enhanced by a pulsed electromagnetic field. Thus, a pulsed electromagnetic field enhanced a series of events in rabbit costal chondrocytes in response to PTH. These findings show that exposure of chondrocytes to a pulsed electromagnetic field resulted in functional differentiation of the cells.

  6. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  7. Neuropsychological differentiation of adaptive creativity and schizotypal cognition

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Joscelyn E.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Both creativity and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been associated with activation of remote semantic concepts, but this activation results in innovative output in one case and communication disturbances in the other. The present study examined the relationship between monitoring semantic information (which relies on executive brain function), creativity, and characteristics of schizotypy in an undergraduate population. Results indicate that executive function differentiates the use of semantic information in creativity and schizotypy. Specification of the balance between executive monitoring and activation of semantic information is important for determining how communication disturbances manifest, and for the measurement of creativity and schizotypy in the general population. PMID:23109749

  8. Neuropsychological differentiation of adaptive creativity and schizotypal cognition.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joscelyn E; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Both creativity and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have been associated with activation of remote semantic concepts, but this activation results in innovative output in one case and communication disturbances in the other. The present study examined the relationship between monitoring semantic information (which relies on executive brain function), creativity, and characteristics of schizotypy in an undergraduate population. Results indicate that executive function differentiates the use of semantic information in creativity and schizotypy. Specification of the balance between executive monitoring and activation of semantic information is important for determining how communication disturbances manifest, and for the measurement of creativity and schizotypy in the general population.

  9. Data Analysis of a Pulsed 2-micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar For Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Yu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The study of climate change requires precise measurement of the production, migration, and sinking of greenhouse gases. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is one of the principal greenhouse gases. NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) has developed a pulsed 2-micron coherent differential absorption lidar (DiAL) for CO2 measurement, operating on the R30 absorption line. On April 5, 2010, the lidar instrument transmitted alternating On-line and Off-line pulses from LARC into a residential area in Poquoson, Virginia; while a passive in-situ sensor measured the local CO2 concentration. This paper outlines a procedure to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return signal using the DiAL method; our calculation produced results in line with the in-situ measurement and matched the current state of DiAL instrument accuracy. Data from April 5 is part of a series of experiments validating the measurement accuracy and precision of this lidar. After a summative verification, a packaged lidar may be installed on research aircraft to perform CO2 studies at a great range of latitudes throughout the year, and to discover sources, sinks, and migration trends for this key greenhouse gas. The following procedure is used to estimate CO2 concentration from atmospheric lidar return using the DiAL method. First, MATLAB software developed at LARC sorts the lidar return into On-only and Off-only files containing pulses of only that type. The sorted pulses are reexamined for quality based on the center frequency, energy, and power - unsatisfactory pulses are removed. A 512-point Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with 256-point shift is performed on each pulse to discretize the atmospheric return signal according to 63 distance 'bins'. Next, comparing decay rates of the On-line and Off-line atmospheric return intensity with distance yields the Differential Absorption Optical Slope (DAOD), which is proportional to the concentration of the desired gas. Then, in-situ meteorological data - pressure

  10. Gendered knowledge and adaptive practices: Differentiation and change in Mwanga District, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Smucker, Thomas A; Wangui, Elizabeth Edna

    2016-12-01

    We examine the wider social knowledge domain that complements technical and environmental knowledge in enabling adaptive practices through two case studies in Tanzania. We are concerned with knowledge production that is shaped by gendered exclusion from the main thrusts of planned adaptation, in the practice of irrigation in a dryland village and the adoption of fast-maturing seed varieties in a highland village. The findings draw on data from a household survey, community workshops, and key informant interviews. The largest challenge to effective adaptation is a lack of access to the social networks and institutions that allocate resources needed for adaptation. Results demonstrate the social differentiation of local knowledge, and how it is entwined with adaptive practices that emerge in relation to gendered mechanisms of access. We conclude that community-based adaptation can learn from engaging the broader social knowledge base in evaluating priorities for coping with greater climate variability.

  11. Adapted RF Pulse Design for SAR Reduction in Parallel Excitation with Experimental Verification at 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Akgün, Can; Vaughan, J. Thomas; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    Parallel excitation holds strong promises to mitigate the impact of large transmit B1 (B1+) distortion at very high magnetic field. Accelerated RF pulses, however, inherently tend to require larger values in RF peak power which may result in substantial increase in Specific Absorption Rate in tissues, which is a constant concern for patient safety at very high field. In this study, we demonstrate adapted rate RF pulse design allowing for SAR reduction while preserving excitation target accuracy. Compared with other proposed implementations of adapted rate RF pulses, our approach is compatible with any k-space trajectories, does not require an analytical expression of the gradient waveform and can be used for large flip angle excitation. We demonstrate our method with numerical simulations based on electromagnetic modeling and we include an experimental verification of transmit pattern accuracy on an 8 transmit channel 9.4 T system. PMID:20556882

  12. 2 cm spatial-resolution and 2 km range Brillouin optical fiber sensor using a transient differential pulse pair.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongkang; Zhang, Hongying; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-03-20

    We report a high-spatial-resolution and long-range distributed temperature sensor through optimizing differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA). In DPP-BOTDA, the differential signal suffers from a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction with respect to the original signals, and for a fixed pulse-width difference the SNR reduction increases with the pulse width. Through reducing the pulse width to a transient regime (near to or less than the phonon lifetime) to decrease the SNR reduction after the differential process, the optimized 8/8.2 ns pulse pair is applied to realize a 2 cm spatial resolution, where a pulse generator with a 150 ps fall-time is used to ensure the effective resolution of DPP-BOTDA. In the experiment, a 2 cm spatial-resolution hot-spot detection with a 2 °C temperature accuracy is demonstrated over a 2 km sensing fiber.

  13. Sensitivity to differential piston and to adaptive optics errors with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, Fabien; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Hill, John; Hinz, Philip

    2016-08-01

    On-sky adaptive optics wavefront screens have been used and random optical path fluctuations - differential pistons - have been included in numerical simulations for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. We characterize the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) by computing respectively the interferometric Strehl and the visibility criteria. We study the contribution of the wavefront disturbance induced by each adaptive optics system and by the optical path difference between the arms of the LBTI. To provide an image of quality (Strehl above 70%) suitable with standard science cases , the requirements for a LBTI mode in the visible wavelengths (750nm) must be at least an adaptive optics wavefront RMS fluctuations below λ/18≍40nm (Strehl above 90%) provided by each adaptive optics system, and a differential piston RMS fluctuations below λ/8≍100nm in the overall LBTI system. The adaptive optics wavefront errors - mainly the differential tip-tilt - appear to be more critical than the differential piston.

  14. Differential adaptation of descending motor tracts in musicians.

    PubMed

    Rüber, Theodor; Lindenberg, Robert; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-06-01

    Between-group comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians have revealed structural brain differences and also functional differences in motor performance. In this study, we aimed to examine the relation between white matter microstructure and high-level motor skills by contrasting 2 groups of musicians with different instrument-specific motor requirements. We used diffusion tensor imaging to compare diffusivity measures of different corticospinal motor tracts of 10 keyboard players, 10 string players, and 10 nonmusicians. Additionally, the maximal tapping rates of their left and right index fingers were determined. When compared with nonmusicians, fractional anisotropy (FA) values of right-hemispheric motor tracts were significantly higher in both musician groups, whereas left-hemispheric motor tracts showed significantly higher FA values only in the keyboard players. Voxel-wise FA analysis found a group effect in white matter underlying the right motor cortex. Diffusivity measures of fibers originating in the primary motor cortex correlated with the maximal tapping rate of the contralateral index finger across all groups. The observed between-group diffusivity differences might represent an adaptation to the specific motor demands of the respective musical instrument. This is supported further by finding correlations between diffusivity measures and maximal tapping rates.

  15. Thermally tuneable optical modulator adapted for differential signaling

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.

    2016-01-12

    An apparatus for optical modulation is provided. The apparatus includes a modulator structure and a heater structure. The modulator structure comprises a ring or disk optical resonator having a closed curvilinear periphery and a pair of oppositely doped semiconductor regions within and/or adjacent to the optical resonator and conformed to modify the optical length of the optical resonator upon application of a bias voltage. The heater structure comprises a relatively resistive annulus of semiconductor material enclosed between an inner disk and an outer annulus of relatively conductive semiconductor material. The inner disk and the outer annulus are adapted as contact regions for a heater activation current. The heater structure is situated within the periphery of the optical resonator such that in operation, at least a portion of the resonator is heated by radial conductive heat flow from the heater structure. The apparatus further includes a substantially annular isolation region of dielectric or relatively resistive semiconductor material interposed between the heater structure and the modulator structure. The isolation region is effective to electrically isolate the bias voltage from the heater activation current.

  16. Limitations and strategies to improve measurement accuracy in differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis sensing.

    PubMed

    Minardo, Aldo; Bernini, Romeo; Zeni, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we analyze the effects of Brillouin gain and Brillouin frequency drifts on the accuracy of the differential pulse-width pair Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (DPP-BOTDA). In particular, we demonstrate numerically that the differential gain is highly sensitive to variations in the Brillouin gain and/or Brillouin shift occurring during the acquisition process, especially when operating with a small pulse pair duration difference. We also propose and demonstrate experimentally a method to compensate for these drifts and consequently improve measurement accuracy.

  17. Determination of antioxidant activity of spices and their active principles by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alberto; Ruiz Montoya, Mercedes; Arteaga, Jesús F; Rodríguez Mellado, Jose M

    2014-01-22

    The anodic oxidation of mercury in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine the antioxidant (AO) character of radical scavengers. Hydroperoxide radical is formed at the potentials of the oxidation peak on mercury electrodes, such radical reacting with the antioxidants in different extension. The parameter C10 (antioxidant concentration at which the peak area decreases by 10%) is used to measure the scavenging activity of the individual antioxidants. To establish the scavenging activity of antioxidant mixtures as a whole, the parameter, μ10 as the reverse of V10, V10 being the volume necessary to decrease the peak area in DPV by 10%, was selected. Higher μ10 values correspond to higher scavenging activity. The studies have been extended to aqueous extracts of some species. The results may be useful in explaining the effect of spices in vitro and in vivo studies.

  18. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  19. Indirect differential pulse voltammetric determination of aluminum by a pyrocatechol violet-modified electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Bi, S.; Dai, L.; Cao, M.; Chen, Y. Wang, X.

    1999-03-01

    Aluminum is one of the abundant elements in the earth`s crust. It has been considered to be a causative agent for various neurological disorders such as Alzheimer Senile, presenile dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. It is also very harmful to plants and aquatic organisms. Therefore, the determination of Al is very important. A Pyrocatechol Violet (PCV) modified electrode for the voltammetric determination of aluminum is reported. The modified electrode is simply prepared by dip-coating a pyrolytic graphite electrode in a NaAc-HAc buffer solution of PCV. Optimum experimental conditions for aluminum determination include a 0.2 mol/L NaAc-HAc buffer solution of pH 4.8, a PCV concentration of 0.02 mol/L used to modify the electrode and the use of differential-pulse mode for measurement. The peak currents of differential pulse voltammograms (DPV) decrease with the addition of Al into the buffer solution while the peak potentials remain the same. The decreasing value of peak current {Delta}i{sub p} is linear with Al concentration in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}8} to 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} mol/L and 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} mol/L. The detection limit is 5{times}10{sup {minus}9} mol/L and the relative standard deviation for 4{times}10{sup {minus}8} mol/L Al is 2.9% (n=8). The stability of this electrode is satisfactory. No serious interference is found. This method has been applied to determine Al in drinking water samples.

  20. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-06-01

    A differential pulse-height discriminator circuit is described which is readily adaptable for operation in a single-channel pulse-height analyzer. The novel aspect of the circuit lies in the specific arrangement of differential pulse-height discriminator which includes two pulse-height discriminators having a comnnon input and an anticoincidence circuit having two interconnected vacuum tubes with a common cathode resistor. Pulses from the output of one discriminator circuit are delayed and coupled to the grid of one of the anticoincidence tubes by a resistor. The output pulses from the other discriminator circuit are coupled through a cathode follower circuit, which has a cathode resistor of such value as to provide a long time constant with the interelectrode capacitance of the tube, to lenthen the output pulses. The pulses are then fed to the grid of the other anticoincidence tube. With such connections of the circuits, only when the incoming pulse has a pesk value between the operating levels of the two discriminators does an output pulse occur from the anticoincidence circuit.

  1. Role of phenotypic plasticity and population differentiation in adaptation to novel environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Volis, Sergei; Ormanbekova, Danara; Yermekbayev, Kanat

    2015-09-01

    Species can adapt to new environmental conditions either through individual phenotypic plasticity, intraspecific genetic differentiation in adaptive traits, or both. Wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, an annual grass with major distribution in Eastern Mediterranean region, is predicted to experience in the near future, as a result of global climate change, conditions more arid than in any part of the current species distribution. To understand the role of the above two means of adaptation, and the effect of population range position, we analyzed reaction norms, extent of plasticity, and phenotypic selection across two experimental environments of high and low water availability in two core and two peripheral populations of this species. We studied 12 quantitative traits, but focused primarily on the onset of reproduction and maternal investment, which are traits that are closely related to fitness and presumably involved in local adaptation in the studied species. We hypothesized that the population showing superior performance under novel environmental conditions will either be genetically differentiated in quantitative traits or exhibit higher phenotypic plasticity than the less successful populations. We found the core population K to be the most plastic in all three trait categories (phenology, reproductive traits, and fitness) and most successful among populations studied, in both experimental environments; at the same time, the core K population was clearly genetically differentiated from the two edge populations. Our results suggest that (1) two means of successful adaptation to new environmental conditions, phenotypic plasticity and adaptive genetic differentiation, are not mutually exclusive ways of achieving high adaptive ability; and (2) colonists from some core populations can be more successful in establishing beyond the current species range than colonists from the range extreme periphery with conditions seemingly closest to those in the new

  2. A Simulation Study of Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Simulated data were used to investigate the performance of modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel method of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis in computerized adaptive tests (CAT). Results indicate that CAT-based DIF procedures perform well and support the use of item response theory-based matching variables in DIF analysis. (SLD)

  3. A Simulation Study of Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Computer-Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Simulated data were used to investigate the performance of modified versions of the Mantel-Haenszel and standardization methods of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis in computer-adaptive tests (CATs). Each "examinee" received 25 items out of a 75-item pool. A three-parameter logistic item response model was assumed, and…

  4. Genomewide scan for adaptive differentiation along altitudinal gradient in the Andrew's toad Bufo andrewsi.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baocheng; Lu, Di; Liao, Wen Bo; Merilä, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of humans, dogs and rodents have started to discover the genetic underpinnings of high altitude adaptations, yet amphibians have received little attention in this respect. To identify possible signatures of adaptation to altitude, we performed a genome scan of 15 557 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained with restriction site-associated DNA sequencing of pooled samples from 11 populations of Andrew's toad (Bufo andrewsi) from the edge of the Tibetan Plateau, spanning an altitudinal gradient from 1690 to 2768 m.a.s.l. We discovered significant geographic differentiation among all sites, with an average FST   = 0.023 across all SNPs. Apart from clear patterns of isolation by distance, we discovered numerous outlier SNPs showing strong associations with variation in altitude (1394 SNPs), average annual temperature (1859 SNPs) or both (1051 SNPs). Levels and patterns of genetic differentiation in these SNPs were consistent with the hypothesis that they have been subject to directional selection and reflect adaptation to altitudinal variation among the study sites. Genes with footprints of selection were significantly enriched in binding and metabolic processes. Several genes potentially related to high altitude adaptation were identified, although the identity and functional significance of most genomic targets of selection remain unknown. In general, the results provide genomic support for results of earlier common garden and low coverage genetic studies that have uncovered substantial adaptive differentiation along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients in amphibians.

  5. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Flight Control Using Engine Differentials: Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Liu; Xidong, Tang; Gang, Tao; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of using engine thrust differentials to compensate for rudder and aileron failures in aircraft flight control is addressed in this paper in a new framework. A nonlinear aircraft model that incorporates engine di erentials in the dynamic equations is employed and linearized to describe the aircraft s longitudinal and lateral motion. In this model two engine thrusts of an aircraft can be adjusted independently so as to provide the control flexibility for rudder or aileron failure compensation. A direct adaptive compensation scheme for asymptotic regulation is developed to handle uncertain actuator failures in the linearized system. A design condition is specified to characterize the system redundancy needed for failure compensation. The adaptive regulation control scheme is applied to the linearized model of a large transport aircraft in which the longitudinal and lateral motions are coupled as the result of using engine thrust differentials. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive compensation scheme.

  6. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lei; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Wenchuan; Chen, Mengshi; Zhu, Zhimin

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes inhibits proliferation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes enhances differentiation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPUS stimulates MLO-Y4 cells to secrete PGE{sub 2} and NO. -- Abstract: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as a safe and effective modality to enhance fracture healing. As the most abundant cells in bone, osteocytes orchestrate biological activities of effector cells via direct cell-to-cell contacts and by soluble factors. In this study, we have used the osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells to study the effects of conditioned medium from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Conditioned media from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells (LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM) were collected and added on MC3T3-E1 cell cultures. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM demonstrated a significant inhibition of proliferation and an increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The results of PGE{sub 2} and NO assay showed that LIPUS could enhance PGE{sub 2} and NO secretion from MLO-Y4 cells at all time points within 24 h after LIPUS stimulation. We conclude that LIPUS regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes in vitro. Increased secretion of PGE{sub 2} from osteocytes may play a role in this effect.

  7. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light.

  9. Differential Polarization Nonlinear Optical Microscopy with Adaptive Optics Controlled Multiplexed Beams

    PubMed Central

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-01-01

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures. PMID:24022688

  10. Self-adaptive differential evolution algorithm incorporating local search for protein-ligand docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hwan Won; Cho, Seung Joo; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Lee, Kyu-Hwan

    2013-02-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm is powerful in optimization problems over several real parameters. DE depends on strategies to generate new trial solutions and the associated parameter values for searching performance. In self-adaptive DE, the automatic learning about previous evolution was used to determine the best mutation strategy and its parameter settings. By combining the self-adaptive DE and Hooke Jeeves local search, we developed a new docking method named SADock (Strategy Adaptation Dock) with the help of AutoDock4 scoring function. As the accuracy and performance of SADock was evaluated in self-docking using the Astex diverse set, the introduced SADock showed better success ratio (89%) than the success ratio (60%) of the Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA) of AutoDock4. The self-adapting scheme enabled our new docking method to converge fast and to be robust through the various docking problems.

  11. Determination of the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor from near-infrared pulse signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Matthias; Nolte, Christian; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Horst, Susanne; Scholz, Udo; Obrig, Hellmuth; Villringer, Arno

    1998-06-01

    For the calculation of changes in oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and the redox state of cytochrome-c-oxidase from attenuation data via a modified Beer-Lambert equation the wavelength dependence of the differential pathlength factor (DPF) has to be taken into account. The DPF, i.e. the ratio of the mean optical pathlength and the physical light source-detector separation at each wavelength, determines the crosstalk between the different concentrations and is therefore essential for a sensitive detection of chromophore changes. Here a simple method is suggested to estimate the wavelength dependence of the DPF from pulse-induced attenuation changes measured on the head of adult humans. The essence is that the DPF is the ratio of the attenuation changes over absorption coefficient changes, and that the spectral form of the pulse correlated absorption coefficient change can be assumed to be proportional to the extinction coefficient of blood. Indicators for the validity of the DPF derived for wavelengths between 700 and 970 nm are the stability of the calculated haemoglobin and cytochrome signals with variations of the wavelength range included for their calculation and its overall agreement with the data available from the literature.

  12. Adaptation of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential following pulsed pneumatic stimulation of the lower face in adults.

    PubMed

    Custead, Rebecca; Oh, Hyuntaek; Rosner, Austin Oder; Barlow, Steven

    2015-10-05

    Cortical adaptation to sustained sensory input is a pervasive form of short-term plasticity in neurological systems. Its role in sensory perception in health and disease, or predicting long-term plastic changes resulting from sensory training offers insight into the mechanisms of somatosensory and sensorimotor processing. A 4-channel electroencephalography (EEG) recording montage was placed bilaterally (C3-P3, C4-P4, F7-P3, F8-P4) to characterize the short-term effects of pulsed pneumatic orofacial stimulation on the cortical somatosensory evoked potential (cSEP) in twenty neurotypical adults (mean age=21±2.88 years). A servo-controlled pneumatic amplifier was used to deliver a repetitive series of pneumatic pulse trains (six 50-ms pulses, 5-second intertrain interval) through a linked pair of custom acetal homopolymer probes (aka TAC-Cells) adhered to the nonglabrous skin of the lower face proximal to the right oral angle to synchronously activate mechanoreceptive afferents in the trigeminal nerve. Blocks of pulse trains were counterbalanced among participants and delivered at two rates, 2 and 4Hz. TAC-Cell stimulation of the lower face consistently evoked a series of cSEPs at P7, N20, P28, N38, P75, N85, and P115. The spatial organization and adaptation of the evoked cSEP was dependent on stimulus pulse index (1-6 within the pulse train, p=.012), frequency of stimulus presentation (2 vs 4Hz, p<.001), component (P7-P115, p<.001), and recording montage (channels 1-4, p<.001). Early component latencies (P7-N20) were highly stable in polarity (sign) and latency, and consistent with putative far-field generators (e.g., trigeminal brainstem, ventroposteromedial thalamus).

  13. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation Facilitates Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jing; Deng, Feng; Wang, Zhibiao; Song, Jinlin

    2014-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) possess stem cell properties, which play a key role in periodontal regeneration. Physical stimulation at appropriate intensities such as low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesechymal stem cells. However, the impacts of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs in vitro and its molecular mechanism are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. HPDLCs were isolated from premolars of adolescents for orthodontic reasons, and exposed to LIPUS at different intensities to determine an optimal LIPUS treatment dosage. Dynamic changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in the cultured cells and supernatants, and osteocalcin production in the supernatants after treatment were analyzed. Runx2 and integrin β1 mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after LIPUS stimulation. Blocking antibody against integrinβ1 was used to assess the effects of integrinβ1 inhibitor on LIPUS-induced ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium deposition. Our data showed that LIPUS at the intensity of 90 mW/cm2 with 20 min/day was more effective. The ALP activities in lysates and supernatants of LIPUS-treated cells started to increase at days 3 and 7, respectively, and peaked at day 11. LIPUS treatment significantly augmented the production of osteocalcin after day 5. LIPUS caused a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Runx2 and integrin β1, while a significant decline when the integrinβ1 inhibitor was used. Moreover, ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium nodules of cells treated with both daily LIPUS stimulation and integrinβ1 antibody were less than those in the LIPUS-treated group. In conclusion, LIPUS promotes osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs, which is associated with upregulation of Runx2 and integrin β1, which

  14. Distinct subcomponents of mouse retinal ganglion cell receptive fields are differentially altered by light adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Sabharwal, Jasdeep; Seilheimer, Robert L; Wu, Samuel M

    2017-02-01

    The remarkable dynamic range of vision is facilitated by adaptation of retinal sensitivity to ambient lighting conditions. An important mechanism of sensitivity adaptation is control of the spatial and temporal window over which light is integrated. The retina accomplishes this by switching between parallel synaptic pathways with differing kinetics and degrees of synaptic convergence. However, the relative shifts in spatial and temporal integration are not well understood - particularly in the context of the antagonistic spatial surround. Here, we resolve these issues by characterizing the adaptation-induced changes to spatiotemporal integration in the linear receptive field center and surround of mouse retinal ganglion cells. While most ganglion cells lose their antagonistic spatial surround under scotopic conditions, a strong surround is maintained in a subset. We then applied a novel technique that allowed us to analyze the receptive field as a triphasic temporal filter in the center and a biphasic filter in the surround. The temporal tuning of the surround was relatively maintained across adaptation conditions compared to the center, which greatly increased its temporal integration. Though all phases of the center's triphasic temporal response slowed, some shifted significantly less. Additionally, adaptation differentially shifted ON and OFF pathway temporal tuning, reducing their asymmetry under scotopic conditions. Finally, spatial integration was significantly increased by dark adaptation in some cells while it decreased it in others. These findings provide novel insight into how adaptation adjusts visual information processing by altering fundamental properties of ganglion cell receptive fields, such as center-surround antagonism and space-time integration.

  15. Continental-level population differentiation and environmental adaptation in the mushroom Suillus brevipes.

    PubMed

    Branco, Sara; Bi, Ke; Liao, Hui-Ling; Gladieux, Pierre; Badouin, Hélène; Ellison, Christopher E; Nguyen, Nhu H; Vilgalys, Rytas; Peay, Kabir G; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2017-04-01

    Recent advancements in sequencing technology allowed researchers to better address the patterns and mechanisms involved in microbial environmental adaptation at large spatial scales. Here we investigated the genomic basis of adaptation to climate at the continental scale in Suillus brevipes, an ectomycorrhizal fungus symbiotically associated with the roots of pine trees. We used genomic data from 55 individuals in seven locations across North America to perform genome scans to detect signatures of positive selection and assess whether temperature and precipitation were associated with genetic differentiation. We found that S. brevipes exhibited overall strong population differentiation, with potential admixture in Canadian populations. This species also displayed genomic signatures of positive selection as well as genomic sites significantly associated with distinct climatic regimes and abiotic environmental parameters. These genomic regions included genes involved in transmembrane transport of substances and helicase activity potentially involved in cold stress response. Our study sheds light on large-scale environmental adaptation in fungi by identifying putative adaptive genes and providing a framework to further investigate the genetic basis of fungal adaptation.

  16. Differential Neural Responses Underlying the Inhibition of the Startle Response by Pre-Pulses or Gaps in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Paublete, Rocio; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    Gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) is a behavioral paradigm used for inferring the presence of tinnitus in animal models as well as humans. In contrast to pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), the neural circuitry controlling GPIAS is poorly understood. To increase our knowledge on GPIAS, a comparative study with PPI was performed in mice combining these behavioral tests and c-Fos activity mapping in brain areas involved in the inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Both pre-pulses and gaps efficiently inhibited the ASR and abolished the induction of c-Fos in the pontine reticular nucleus. Differential c-Fos activation was found between PPI and GPIAS in the forebrain whereby PPI activated the lateral globus pallidus and GPIAS activated the primary auditory cortex. Thus, different neural maps are regulating the inhibition of the startle response by pre-pulses or gaps. To further investigate this differential response to PPI and GPIAS, we pharmacologically disrupted PPI and GPIAS with D-amphetamine or Dizocilpine (MK-801) to target dopamine efflux and to block NMDA receptors, respectively. Both D-amp and MK-801 efficiently decreased PPI and GPIAS. We administered Baclofen, an agonist GABAB receptor, but failed to detect any robust rescue of the effects of D-amp and MK-801 suggesting that PPI and GPIAS are GABAB-independent. These novel findings demonstrate that the inhibition of the ASR by pre-pulses or gaps is orchestrated by different neural pathways. PMID:28239338

  17. Differential Neural Responses Underlying the Inhibition of the Startle Response by Pre-Pulses or Gaps in Mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Paublete, Rocio; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    Gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) is a behavioral paradigm used for inferring the presence of tinnitus in animal models as well as humans. In contrast to pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), the neural circuitry controlling GPIAS is poorly understood. To increase our knowledge on GPIAS, a comparative study with PPI was performed in mice combining these behavioral tests and c-Fos activity mapping in brain areas involved in the inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Both pre-pulses and gaps efficiently inhibited the ASR and abolished the induction of c-Fos in the pontine reticular nucleus. Differential c-Fos activation was found between PPI and GPIAS in the forebrain whereby PPI activated the lateral globus pallidus and GPIAS activated the primary auditory cortex. Thus, different neural maps are regulating the inhibition of the startle response by pre-pulses or gaps. To further investigate this differential response to PPI and GPIAS, we pharmacologically disrupted PPI and GPIAS with D-amphetamine or Dizocilpine (MK-801) to target dopamine efflux and to block NMDA receptors, respectively. Both D-amp and MK-801 efficiently decreased PPI and GPIAS. We administered Baclofen, an agonist GABAB receptor, but failed to detect any robust rescue of the effects of D-amp and MK-801 suggesting that PPI and GPIAS are GABAB-independent. These novel findings demonstrate that the inhibition of the ASR by pre-pulses or gaps is orchestrated by different neural pathways.

  18. Boundedness of the solutions for certain classes of fractional differential equations with application to adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Aguila-Camacho, Norelys; Duarte-Mermoud, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of three classes of fractional differential equations appearing in the field of fractional adaptive systems, for the case when the fractional order is in the interval α ∈(0,1] and the Caputo definition for fractional derivatives is used. The boundedness of the solutions is proved for all three cases, and the convergence to zero of the mean value of one of the variables is also proved. Applications of the obtained results to fractional adaptive schemes in the context of identification and control problems are presented at the end of the paper, including numerical simulations which support the analytical results.

  19. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2015-10-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on "one-time" release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Differential flatness properties and multivariable adaptive control of ovarian system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos

    2016-12-01

    The ovarian system exhibits nonlinear dynamics which is modeled by a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. The paper proposes adaptive fuzzy control based on differential flatness theory for the complex dynamics of the ovarian system. It is proven that the dynamic model of the ovarian system, having as state variables the LH and the FSH hormones and their derivatives, is a differentially flat one. This means that all its state variables and its control inputs can be described as differential functions of the flat output. By exploiting differential flatness properties the system's dynamic model is written in the multivariable linear canonical (Brunovsky) form, for which the design of a state feedback controller becomes possible. After this transformation, the new control inputs of the system contain unknown nonlinear parts, which are identified with the use of neurofuzzy approximators. The learning procedure for these estimators is determined by the requirement the first derivative of the closed-loop's Lyapunov function to be a negative one. Moreover, Lyapunov stability analysis shows that H-infinity tracking performance is succeeded for the feedback control loop and this assures improved robustness to the aforementioned model uncertainty as well as to external perturbations. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive fuzzy control scheme is confirmed through simulation experiments.

  1. Partitioning adaptive differentiation across a patchy landscape: shade avoidance traits in impatiens capensis.

    PubMed

    von Wettberg, Eric J; Remington, David L; Schmitt, Johanna

    2008-03-01

    Adaptation to different habitat types across a patchy landscape may either arise independently in each patch or occur due to repeated colonization of each patch by the same specialized genotype. We tested whether open- and closed-canopy forms of Impatiens capensis, an herbaceous annual plant of eastern North America, have evolved repeatedly by comparing hierarchical measures of F(ST) estimated from AFLPs to morphological differentiation measured by Q(ST) for five pairs of populations found in open and closed habitats in five New England regions. Morphological differentiation between habitats (Q(HT)) in elongation traits was greater than marker divergence (F(HT)), suggesting adaptive differentiation. Genotypes from open- and closed-canopy habitats differed in shade avoidance traits in several population pairs, whereas patterns of AFLP differentiation suggest this differentiation does not have a single origin. These results suggest that open- and closed-canopy habitats present different selective pressures, but that the outcome of diversifying selection may differ depending on specific closed- and open-canopy habitats and on starting genetic variation. Hierarchical partitioning of F(ST) and Q(ST) makes it possible to distinguish global stabilizing selection on traits across a landscape from diversifying selection between habitat types within regions.

  2. Differentially Private Histogram Publication For Dynamic Datasets: An Adaptive Sampling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Xiong, Li; Liu, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently become a de facto standard for private statistical data release. Many algorithms have been proposed to generate differentially private histograms or synthetic data. However, most of them focus on “one-time” release of a static dataset and do not adequately address the increasing need of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time. A straightforward application of existing histogram methods on each snapshot of such dynamic datasets will incur high accumulated error due to the composibility of differential privacy and correlations or overlapping users between the snapshots. In this paper, we address the problem of releasing series of dynamic datasets in real time with differential privacy, using a novel adaptive distance-based sampling approach. Our first method, DSFT, uses a fixed distance threshold and releases a differentially private histogram only when the current snapshot is sufficiently different from the previous one, i.e., with a distance greater than a predefined threshold. Our second method, DSAT, further improves DSFT and uses a dynamic threshold adaptively adjusted by a feedback control mechanism to capture the data dynamics. Extensive experiments on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our approach achieves better utility than baseline methods and existing state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26973795

  3. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of acyclovir in pharmaceutical preparations using a pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Dilgin, Didem Giray; Karakaya, Serkan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new selective and sensitive voltammetric procedure for determination of acyclovir (ACV) was proposed using a disposable electrode, pencil graphite electrode (PGE). Cyclic and differential pulse voltammograms of ACV were recorded in Britton-Robinson buffer solution containing 0.10 M KCl with pH of 4.0 at PGE. The PGE displayed a very good electrochemical behavior with significant enhancement of the peak current compared to a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Under experimental conditions, the PGE had a linear response range from 1.0 μM to 100.0 μM ACV with a detection limit of 0.3 μM (based on 3 Sb). Relative standard deviations of 4.8 and 3.6% were obtained for five successive determinations of 10.0 and 50.0 μM ACV, respectively, which indicate acceptable repeatability. This voltammetric method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ACV in real pharmaceutical samples. The effect of various interfering compounds on the ACV peak current was studied.

  4. Gold nanoparticles modified carbon paste electrode for differential pulse voltammetric determination of eugenol.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Zarei, Somaye; Fathirad, Fariba; Mostafavi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, a carbon paste electrode chemically modified with gold nanoparticles was used as a sensitive electrochemical sensor for determination of eugenol. The differential pulse voltammetric method was employed to study the behavior of eugenol on this modified electrode. The effect of variables such as percent of gold nanoparticles, pH of solution, accumulation potential and time on voltammogram peak current were optimized. The proposed electrode showed good oxidation response for eugenol in 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH8) and the peak potential was about +285 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). The peak current increased linearly with the eugenol concentration in the range of 5-250 μmol L(-1). The detection limit was found to be 2.0 μmol L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 1.2% (n=7). The effect of interferences on the eugenol peak current was studied. The method has been applied to the determination of eugenol in different real samples, spiked recoveries were in the range of 96%-99%.

  5. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of eugenol at a pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Sağlam, Özlem; Dilgin, Didem Giray; Ertek, Bensu; Dilgin, Yusuf

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of eugenol, a widely used herbal drug, was investigated at a pencil graphite electrode (PGE). A low-cost, disposable, sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor is proposed for the determination of eugenol by recording its differential pulse voltammograms in Britton-Robinson buffer solution containing 0.1 M KCl with pH of 2.0 at the PGE. The PGE displayed a very good electrochemical behavior with significant enhancement of the peak current compared to a glassy carbon electrode. Under experimental conditions, the PGE had a linear response range from 0.3 μM to 50.0 μM eugenol with a detection limit of 0.085 μM (based on 3S(b)). Relative standard deviations of 2.4 and 4.8% were obtained for five successive determinations of 30.0 and 5.0 μM eugenol, respectively, which indicate acceptable repeatability. This voltammetric method was successfully applied for the direct determination of eugenol in real samples. The effect of various interfering compounds on the eugenol peak current was also studied.

  6. A Dual Mode Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Cell Stimulator Produces Acceleration of Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Rizk, Hatem; Mo, Chenglin; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Leticia; Abreu, Eduardo; Brotto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test of a dual-mode electric and magnetic biological stimulator (EM-Stim). The stimulator generates pulsing electric and magnetic fields at programmable rates and intensities. While electric and magnetic stimulators have been reported before, this is the first device that combines both modalities. The ability of the dual stimulation to target bone and muscle tissue simultaneously has the potential to improve the therapeutic treatment of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. The device is fully programmable, portable and easy to use, and can run from a battery or a power supply. The device can generate magnetic fields of up to 1.6 mT and output voltages of +/−40 V. The EM-Stim accelerated myogenic differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes as evidenced by morphometric, gene expression, and protein content analyses. Currently, there are many patents concerned with the application of single electrical or magnetic stimulation, but none that combine both simultaneously. However, we applied for and obtained a provisional patent for new device to fully explore its therapeutic potential in pre-clinical models. PMID:23445453

  7. Determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations by linear sweep, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry methods.

    PubMed

    Atila, Alptug; Yilmaz, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, simple, fast and reliable cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods were developed and validated for determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods were based on electrochemical oxidation of bosentan at platinum electrode in acetonitrile solution containing 0.1 M TBACIO4. The well-defined oxidation peak was observed at 1.21 V. The calibration curves were linear for bosentan at the concentration range of 5-40 µg/mL for LSV and 5-35 µg/mL for SWV and DPV methods, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision values for bosentan were less than 4.92, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 6.29%. The mean recovery of bosentan was 100.7% for pharmaceutical preparations. No interference was found from two tablet excipients at the selected assay conditions. Developed methods in this study are accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Tracleer and Diamond tablets as pharmaceutical preparation.

  8. Differential pulse polarographic investigation of lansoprazole and rabeprazole using dropping mercury electrode.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, P; Zschimmer, K; Knoth, H

    2009-06-01

    The electrochemical reduction of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) lansoprazole and rabeprazole has been investigated by differential pulse polarography (DPP) using a dropping mercury electrode (DME). The results were compared not only among both substances but also among other proton pump inhibitors depending on the varying chemical structures of the agents. All investigations were carried out in Britton-Robinson buffer solutions with pH values from 3.0 to 11.0. It was shown that both PPI undergo an extensive decomposition decreasing with increasing pH values forming two main compounds, a cyclic sulfenamide and a dimer. In this case lansoprazole was found to be stable at pH 8.0 and rabeprazole at pH 9.0. The decomposition of rabeprazole ran considerably quicker and also up to higher pH values than those of lansoprazole. The peak currents varied linearly with the concentration of both PPI in the range from 1 x 10(-6) M to 7 x 10(-5) M at pH 9.0. Both substances showed similarities in reaction as well as individual differences based on their varying chemical structures and characteristics.

  9. Determination of soluble chromium in simulated PWR coolant by differential-pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Torrance, K; Gatford, C

    1987-11-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of dissolved chromium at concentrations less than 2 mug/l. in PWR coolant by differential-pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode. Concentrations above 2 mug/l. can be determined by appropriate dilution of the sample. The method is based on measurement of the current associated with reduction of a chromium(III)-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid) complex adsorbed at the surface of the mercury drop. The effects of boric acid, pH, DTPA concentration, accumulation potential and time were investigated together with the oxidation state of the chromium. No interference was observed from other transition metal ions expected to be present in PWR coolant. No alternative chemical technique of similar sensitivity was available for comparison with the results obtained in solutions containing <1 mug/l. chromium. Recoveries from simulated coolant solutions were greater than 95% and the relative standard deviations for single determinations were in the range 12-25%. The statistical limit of detection at the 95% confidence level was 0.023 mug/l. This method of analysis should prove valuable in corrosion studies and is uniquely capable of following the changes in soluble chromium concentration in PWR coolant that follow operational changes in the reactor.

  10. Differential pulse stripping voltammetry for the determination of nickel and cobalt in simulated PWR coolant.

    PubMed

    Torrance, K; Gatford, C

    1985-04-01

    The determination of ionic nickel and cobalt in simulated PWR coolant at concentrations below 1 microg/l. by differential pulse stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury-drop electrode has been investigated. The high sensitivity for these ions results from the adsorptive accumulation of their dimethylglyoximate complexes on the mercury drop. Boric acid does not interfere and if the samples are adjusted to pH 9 with an ammonia-ammonium chloride buffer, both nickel and cobalt can be determined in the same run. The relative standard deviations at concentrations below 2 microg/l. are of the order of 5-7% and the limits of detection for nickel and cobalt are about 8 and 2 ng/l. respectively. These performance statistics show that this method is the most sensitive method currently available for determination of soluble nickel and cobalt in PWR coolant and it should prove to be most valuable in any corrosion studies of the materials of construction of the primary circuit of a PWR.

  11. Analysis of LAPAN-IPB image lossless compression using differential pulse code modulation and huffman coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, P. R.; Permala, R.

    2017-01-01

    LAPAN-A3/IPB satellite is the latest Indonesian experimental microsatellite with remote sensing and earth surveillance missions. The satellite has three optical payloads, which are multispectral push-broom imager, digital matrix camera and video camera. To increase data transmission efficiency, the multispectral imager data can be compressed using either lossy or lossless compression method. This paper aims to analyze Differential Pulse Code Modulation (DPCM) method and Huffman coding that are used in LAPAN-IPB satellite image lossless compression. Based on several simulation and analysis that have been done, current LAPAN-IPB lossless compression algorithm has moderate performance. There are several aspects that can be improved from current configuration, which are the type of DPCM code used, the type of Huffman entropy-coding scheme, and the use of sub-image compression method. The key result of this research shows that at least two neighboring pixels should be used for DPCM calculation to increase compression performance. Meanwhile, varying Huffman tables with sub-image approach could also increase the performance if on-board computer can support for more complicated algorithm. These results can be used as references in designing Payload Data Handling System (PDHS) for an upcoming LAPAN-A4 satellite.

  12. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields have differential effects on cells in the S-phase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2007-03-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are a type of nonthermal, nonionizing radiation that exhibit intense electric fields with high power, but low energy. NsPEFs extend conventional electroporation (EP) to affect intracellular structures and functions and depending on the intensity, can induce lethal and nonlethal cell signaling. In this study, HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells were synchronized to the S-phase or remained unsynchronized, exposed to electric fields of 60 kV/cm with either 60-ns or 300-ns durations, and analyzed for apoptosis and proliferative markers. Several nsPEF structural and functional targets were identified. Unlike unsynchronized cells, S-phase cells under limiting conditions exhibited greater membrane integrity and caspase activation and maintained cytoskeletal structure. Regardless of synchronization, cells exposed to nsPEFs under these conditions primarily survived, but exhibited some turnover and delayed proliferation in cell populations, as well as reversible increases in phosphatidylserine externalization, membrane integrity, and nuclei size. These results show that nsPEFs can act as a nonligand agonist to modulate plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular structures and functions, as well as differentially affect cells in the S-phase, but without effect on cell survival. Furthermore, nsPEF effects on the nucleus and cytoskeleton may provide synergistic therapeutic actions with other agents, such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutics that affect these same structures.

  13. Adaptive non-collinear autocorrelation of few-cycle pulses with an angular tunable bi-mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Treffer, A. Bock, M.; König, S.; Grunwald, R.; Brunne, J.; Wallrabe, U.

    2016-02-01

    Adaptive autocorrelation with an angular tunable micro-electro-mechanical system is reported. A piezo-actuated Fresnel bi-mirror structure was applied to measure the second order autocorrelation of near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses in a non-collinear setup at tunable superposition angles. Because of enabling measurements with variable scaling and minimizing the influence of distortions by adaptive self-reconstruction, the approach extends the capability of autocorrelators. Flexible scaling and robustness against localized amplitude obscurations are demonstrated. The adaptive reconstruction of temporal frequency information by the Fourier analysis of autocorrelation data is shown. Experimental results and numerical simulations of the beam propagation and interference are compared for variable angles.

  14. Analysis of differential immune responses induced by innate and adaptive immunity following transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhen; Stone, James R; Perkins, David L

    2003-01-01

    The roles of innate and adaptive immunity in allograft rejection remain incompletely understood. Previous studies analysing lymphocyte deficient or syngeneic graft recipients have identified subsets of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines induced by antigen independent mechanisms. In the current study, we analysed a panel of 60 inflammatory parameters including serum cytokines, intragraft chemokines and cytokines, receptors, and cellular markers. Our results confirmed the up-regulation of a subset of markers by innate mechanisms and also identified a subset of parameters up-regulated only in the context of an adaptive response. Thus, we successfully differentiated markers of the innate and adaptive phases of rejection. Current paradigms emphasize that innate signals can promote a subsequent adaptive response. Interestingly, in our studies, expression of the markers induced by innate mechanisms was markedly amplified in the allogeneic, but not syngeneic or lymphocyte deficient, recipients. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators can have functional overlap between the innate and adaptive responses, and that the adaptive component of the rejection process amplifies the innate response by positive feedback regulation. PMID:12757613

  15. Contemporary evolution during invasion: evidence for differentiation, natural selection, and local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Colautti, Robert I; Lau, Jennifer A

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are 'natural' experiments that can improve our understanding of contemporary evolution. We evaluate evidence for population differentiation, natural selection and adaptive evolution of invading plants and animals at two nested spatial scales: (i) among introduced populations (ii) between native and introduced genotypes. Evolution during invasion is frequently inferred, but rarely confirmed as adaptive. In common garden studies, quantitative trait differentiation is only marginally lower (~3.5%) among introduced relative to native populations, despite genetic bottlenecks and shorter timescales (i.e. millennia vs. decades). However, differentiation between genotypes from the native vs. introduced range is less clear and confounded by nonrandom geographic sampling; simulations suggest this causes a high false-positive discovery rate (>50%) in geographically structured populations. Selection differentials (¦s¦) are stronger in introduced than in native species, although selection gradients (¦β¦) are not, consistent with introduced species experiencing weaker genetic constraints. This could facilitate rapid adaptation, but evidence is limited. For example, rapid phenotypic evolution often manifests as geographical clines, but simulations demonstrate that nonadaptive trait clines can evolve frequently during colonization (~two-thirds of simulations). Additionally, QST-FST studies may often misrepresent the strength and form of natural selection acting during invasion. Instead, classic approaches in evolutionary ecology (e.g. selection analysis, reciprocal transplant, artificial selection) are necessary to determine the frequency of adaptive evolution during invasion and its influence on establishment, spread and impact of invasive species. These studies are rare but crucial for managing biological invasions in the context of global change.

  16. Wavelet multiresolution analyses adapted for the fast solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jawerth, Bjoern; Sweldens, Wim

    1993-01-01

    We present ideas on how to use wavelets in the solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations. Rather than using classical wavelets, we adapt their construction so that they become (bi)orthogonal with respect to the inner product defined by the operator. The stiffness matrix in a Galerkin method then becomes diagonal and can thus be trivially inverted. We show how one can construct an O(N) algorithm for various constant and variable coefficient operators.

  17. Adaptive properties of differential learning rates for positive and negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cazé, Romain D; van der Meer, Matthijs A A

    2013-12-01

    The concept of the reward prediction error-the difference between reward obtained and reward predicted-continues to be a focal point for much theoretical and experimental work in psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. Models that rely on reward prediction errors typically assume a single learning rate for positive and negative prediction errors. However, behavioral data indicate that better-than-expected and worse-than-expected outcomes often do not have symmetric impacts on learning and decision-making. Furthermore, distinct circuits within cortico-striatal loops appear to support learning from positive and negative prediction errors, respectively. Such differential learning rates would be expected to lead to biased reward predictions and therefore suboptimal choice performance. Contrary to this intuition, we show that on static "bandit" choice tasks, differential learning rates can be adaptive. This occurs because asymmetric learning enables a better separation of learned reward probabilities. We show analytically how the optimal learning rate asymmetry depends on the reward distribution and implement a biologically plausible algorithm that adapts the balance of positive and negative learning rates from experience. These results suggest specific adaptive advantages for separate, differential learning rates in simple reinforcement learning settings and provide a novel, normative perspective on the interpretation of associated neural data.

  18. Differentially expressed genes associated with adaptation to different thermal environments in three sympatric Cuban Anolis lizards.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Hiroshi D; Cádiz Díaz, Antonio; Shigenobu, Shuji; Makino, Takashi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-05-01

    How animals achieve evolutionary adaptation to different thermal environments is an important issue for evolutionary biology as well as for biodiversity conservation in the context of recent global warming. In Cuba, three sympatric species of Anolis lizards (Anolis allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei) inhabit different thermal microhabitats, thereby providing an excellent opportunity to examine how they have adapted to different environmental temperatures. Here, we performed RNA-seq on the brain, liver and skin tissues from these three species to analyse their transcriptional responses at two different temperatures. In total, we identified 400, 816 and 781 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two temperatures in A. allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei, respectively. Only 62 of these DEGs were shared across the three species, indicating that global transcriptional responses have diverged among these species. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that large numbers of ribosomal protein genes were DEGs in the warm-adapted A. homolechis, suggesting that the upregulation of protein synthesis is an important physiological mechanism in the adaptation of this species to hotter environments. GO analysis also showed that GO terms associated with circadian regulation were enriched in all three species. A gene associated with circadian regulation, Nr1d1, was detected as a DEG with opposite expression patterns between the cool-adapted A. allogus and the hot-adapted A. sagrei. Because the environmental temperature fluctuates more widely in open habitats than in forests throughout the day, the circadian thermoregulation could also be important for adaptation to distinct thermal habitats.

  19. Solar Radiation-Associated Adaptive SNP Genetic Differentiation in Wild Emmer Wheat, Triticum dicoccoides

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jing; Chen, Liang; Jin, Xiaoli; Zhang, Miaomiao; You, Frank M.; Wang, Jirui; Frenkel, Vladimir; Yin, Xuegui; Nevo, Eviatar; Sun, Dongfa; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Peng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome scans with large number of genetic markers provide the opportunity to investigate local adaptation in natural populations and identify candidate genes under positive selection. In the present study, adaptation genetic differentiation associated with solar radiation was investigated using 695 polymorphic SNP markers in wild emmer wheat originated in a micro-site at Yehudiyya, Israel. The test involved two solar radiation niches: (1) sun, in-between trees; and (2) shade, under tree canopy, separated apart by a distance of 2–4 m. Analysis of molecular variance showed a small (0.53%) but significant portion of overall variation between the sun and shade micro-niches, indicating a non-ignorable genetic differentiation between sun and shade habitats. Fifty SNP markers showed a medium (0.05 ≤ FST ≤ 0.15) or high genetic differentiation (FST > 0.15). A total of 21 outlier loci under positive selection were identified by using four different FST-outlier testing algorithms. The markers and genome locations under positive selection are consistent with the known patterns of selection. These results suggested that genetic differentiation between sun and shade habitats is substantial, radiation-associated, and therefore ecologically determined. Hence, the results of this study reflected effects of natural selection through solar radiation on EST-related SNP genetic diversity, resulting presumably in different adaptive complexes at a micro-scale divergence. The present work highlights the evolutionary theory and application significance of solar radiation-driven natural selection in wheat improvement. PMID:28352272

  20. Differential effects of magnetic pulses on the orientation of naturally migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Holland, Richard A

    2010-11-06

    In migratory passerine birds, strong magnetic pulses are thought to be diagnostic of the remagnetization of iron minerals in a putative sensory system contained in the beak. Previous evidence suggests that while such a magnetic pulse affects the orientation of migratory birds in orientation cages, no effect was present when pulse-treated birds were tested in natural migration. Here we show that two migrating passerine birds treated with a strong magnetic pulse, designed to alter the magnetic sense, migrated in a direction that differed significantly from that of controls when tested in natural conditions. The orientation of treated birds was different depending on the alignment of the pulse with respect to the magnetic field. These results can aid in advancing understanding of how the putative iron-mineral-based receptors found in birds' beaks may be used to detect and signal the intensity and/or direction of the Earth's magnetic field.

  1. Differential adaptation drives ecological speciation in campions (Silene): evidence from a multi-site transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Favre, Adrien; Widmer, Alex; Karrenberg, Sophie

    2017-02-01

    In order to investigate the role of differential adaptation for the evolution of reproductive barriers, we conducted a multi-site transplant experiment with the dioecious sister species Silene dioica and S. latifolia and their hybrids. Crosses within species as well as reciprocal first-generation (F1 ) and second-generation (F2 ) interspecific hybrids were transplanted into six sites, three within each species' habitat. Survival and flowering were recorded over 4 yr. At all transplant sites, the local species outperformed the foreign species, reciprocal F1 hybrids performed intermediately and F2 hybrids underperformed in comparison to F1 hybrids (hybrid breakdown). Females generally had slightly higher cumulative fitness than males in both within- and between-species crosses and we thus found little evidence for Haldane's rule acting on field performance. The strength of selection against F1 and F2 hybrids as well as hybrid breakdown increased with increasing strength of habitat adaptation (i.e. the relative fitness difference between the local and the foreign species) across sites. Our results suggest that differential habitat adaptation led to ecologically dependent post-zygotic reproductive barriers and drives divergence and speciation in this Silene system.

  2. Pooled ecotype sequencing reveals candidate genetic mechanisms for adaptive differentiation and reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Gould, Billie A; Chen, Yani; Lowry, David B

    2017-01-01

    The early stages of speciation are often characterized by the formation of partially reproductively isolated ecotypes, which evolve as a by-product of divergent selective forces that are endemic to different habitats. Identifying the genomic regions, genes and ultimately functional polymorphisms that are involved in the processes of ecotype formation is inherently challenging, as there are likely to be many different loci involved in the process. To localize candidate regions of the genome contributing to ecotype formation, we conducted whole-genome pooled sequencing (pool-seq) with 47 coastal perennial and 50 inland annual populations of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. Coastal perennial and inland annual ecotypes of M. guttatus have previously been shown to be ecologically reproductively isolated and highly locally adapted to their respective habitats. Our pool-seq results found allelic differentiation between the ecotypes for two chromosomal inversions, suggesting that frequencies of inversion heterokaryotypes are strongly differentiated between the ecotypes. Further, there were elevated levels of nonsynonymous change across chromosomal inversions. Across the genome, we identified multiple strong candidate genes potentially driving the morphological, life history and salt tolerance differences between the ecotypes. Several candidate genes coincide with previously identified quantitative trait locus regions and also show a signature of recent natural selection. Overall, the results of our study add to growing support for a major role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation and provide new insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying classic plant ecotype adaptations to wet and dry habitats.

  3. Accelerating Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation by differential evolution with self-adaptive randomized subspace sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Hyman, James M; Robinson, Bruce A; Higdon, Dave; Ter Braak, Cajo J F; Diks, Cees G H

    2008-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have found widespread use in many fields of study to estimate the average properties of complex systems, and for posterior inference in a Bayesian framework. Existing theory and experiments prove convergence of well constructed MCMC schemes to the appropriate limiting distribution under a variety of different conditions. In practice, however this convergence is often observed to be disturbingly slow. This is frequently caused by an inappropriate selection of the proposal distribution used to generate trial moves in the Markov Chain. Here we show that significant improvements to the efficiency of MCMC simulation can be made by using a self-adaptive Differential Evolution learning strategy within a population-based evolutionary framework. This scheme, entitled DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis or DREAM, runs multiple different chains simultaneously for global exploration, and automatically tunes the scale and orientation of the proposal distribution in randomized subspaces during the search. Ergodicity of the algorithm is proved, and various examples involving nonlinearity, high-dimensionality, and multimodality show that DREAM is generally superior to other adaptive MCMC sampling approaches. The DREAM scheme significantly enhances the applicability of MCMC simulation to complex, multi-modal search problems.

  4. Size differentiation in Finnish house sparrows follows Bergmann's rule with evidence of local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brommer, J E; Hanski, I K; Kekkonen, J; Väisänen, R A

    2014-04-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts that individuals are larger in more poleward populations and that this size gradient has an adaptive basis. Hence, phenotypic divergence in size traits between populations (PST ) is expected to exceed the level of divergence by drift alone (FST ). We measured 16 skeletal traits, body mass and wing length in 409 male and 296 female house sparrows Passer domesticus sampled in 12 populations throughout Finland, where the species has its northernmost European distributional margin. Morphometric differentiation across populations (PST ) was compared with differentiation in 13 microsatellites (FST ). We find that twelve traits phenotypically diverged more than FST in both sexes, and an additional two traits diverged in males. The phenotypic divergence exceeded FST in several traits to such a degree that findings were robust also to strong between-population environmental effects. Divergence was particularly strong in dimensions of the bill, making it a strong candidate for the study of adaptive molecular genetic divergence. Divergent traits increased in size in more northern populations. We conclude that house sparrows show evidence of an adaptive latitudinal size gradient consistent with Bergmann's rule on the modest spatial scale of ca. 600 km.

  5. Optimization of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) for the simultaneous determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in seawater and comparison with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV).

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Gambini, Gloria; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2002-03-01

    Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was optimized for the simultaneous determination of Cd, Pb and Cu in coastal seawater samples. Background subtraction was adapted to improve peak detection and quantification. Optimum background voltammograms were obtained by applying a 7.5 s equilibration potential at -975 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3M KCl) before starting the background scan. Voltammetric scan parameters were optimized to obtain maximum sensitivity while retaining good peak resolution and discrimination from background. Optimal parameters were: frequency 100 Hz, pulse amplitude 25 mV, current sampling delay time 2 ms, step height 8 mV. The sensitivity of optimized SWASV proved to be more than double that of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV), and analysis time was halved. Samples containing around 13 (Cd), 30 (Pb), 200 (Cu) ng/l (typical averages of the coastal area of the Marche region) can be analyzed using a 5 min deposition time and the total analysis time using three standard additions is about 1 h and half, excluding the mercury film preparation and the outgassing of the sample, which can be made in parallel using a second cell cup.

  6. Differential thermal adaptation of clonal strains of a protist morphospecies originating from different climatic zones.

    PubMed

    Boenigk, Jens; Jost, Steffen; Stoeck, Thorsten; Garstecki, Tobias

    2007-03-01

    Eco-physiological variation and local adaptation are key issues in microbial ecology. Here, we investigated the thermal adaptation of 19 strains of the same Spumella morphospecies (Chrysophyceae, Heterokonta). In order to test for local adaptation and the existence of specific ecotypes we analysed growth rates of these strains, which originated from different climate regions. We applied temperature-adaptation as an eco-physiological marker and analysed growth rates of the different Spumella strains at temperatures between 0 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The temperatures allowing for maximal growth of strains from temperate and warm climatic zones ranged between 19.9 degrees C and 33.4 degrees C. Phylogenetically, most of these 'warm'-adapted strains fall into two different previously defined 18S rDNA Spumella clusters, one of them consisting of mostly soil organisms and the other one being a freshwater cluster. As a rule, the 'warm'-adapted strains of the soil cluster grew slower than the 'warm'-adapted isolates within the freshwater cluster. This difference most probably reflect different strategies, i.e. the formation of cysts at the expense of lower growth rates in soil organisms. In contrast, as expected, all isolates from Antarctica were cold-adapted and grew already around melting point of freshwater. Surprisingly, optimum temperature for these strains was between 11.8 degrees C and 17.7 degrees C and maximum temperature tolerated was between 14.6 degrees C and 23.5 degrees C. Our data indicate that despite the relatively high optimal temperature of most Antarctic strains, they may have a relative advantage below 5-10 degrees C only. Based on the thermal adaptation of the flagellate strains the Antarctic strains were clearly separated from the other investigated strains. This may indicate a limited dispersal of flagellates to and from Antarctica. Even if the latter assumption needs support from more data, we argue that the high levels of eco-physiological and

  7. Complementary effect of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintains differentiation between locally adapted fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, Martin; Riesch, Rüdiger; Oranth, Alexandra; Dzienko, Justina; Karau, Nora; Schießl, Angela; Stadler, Stefan; Wigh, Adriana; Zimmer, Claudia; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Adaptation to ecologically heterogeneous environments can drive speciation. But what mechanisms maintain reproductive isolation among locally adapted populations? Using poeciliid fishes in a system with naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide, we show that (a) fish from non-sulfidic sites ( Poecilia mexicana) show high mortality (95 %) after 24 h when exposed to the toxicant, while locally adapted fish from sulfidic sites ( Poecilia sulphuraria) experience low mortality (13 %) when transferred to non-sulfidic water. (b) Mate choice tests revealed that P. mexicana females exhibit a preference for conspecific males in non-sulfidic water, but not in sulfidic water, whereas P. sulphuraria females never showed a preference. Increased costs of mate choice in sulfidic, hypoxic water, and the lack of selection for reinforcement due to the low survival of P. mexicana may explain the absence of a preference in P. sulphuraria females. Taken together, our study may be the first to demonstrate independent—but complementary—effects of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintaining differentiation between locally adapted fish populations.

  8. Differential adaptations during growth spurt and in young adult rat muscles.

    PubMed

    Barros, K M F T; Manhaes-de-Castro, R; Goubel, F; Canon, F

    2009-01-01

    During the post-weaning growth and maturation period (25/90 days after birth), rat limb muscles are submitted to specific adaptations. Our aim was to characterize the mechanical properties of two muscles that are opposite in terms of fibre-type distribution, the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of male Wistar rats. Results showed a fast-to-slow fibre-type transition in soleus while no modification in fibre-type distribution was observed in EDL. A growth-induced increase in muscle force was observed. Soleus underwent an increase in twitch kinetics, but EDL showed no modification. Resistance to fatigue was higher in 90-day-old soleus but not modified in the EDL. Surprisingly, analysis of maximal shortening velocity showed a decrease in both soleus and EDL. Finally, tension/extension curves indicated a growth-induced increase in series elastic stiffness in the two muscles. These results suggest that during this growth period, skeletal muscles are submitted to differential adaptations. Moreover, whereas adaptation of biomechanical properties observed can be explained partly by an adaptation of fibre profile in soleus, this is not the case for EDL. It is suggested that changes in muscle architecture, which are often disregarded, could explain some variations in mechanical properties, especially when muscles undergo an increase in both mass and length.

  9. Multiple wall-reflection effect in adaptive-array differential-phase reflectometry on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hamasaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Onchi, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; QUEST Team

    2016-01-01

    A phased array antenna and Software-Defined Radio (SDR) heterodyne-detection systems have been developed for adaptive array approaches in reflectometry on the QUEST. In the QUEST device considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave (multiple wall-reflection) effect was significantly observed with distorted amplitude and phase evolution even if the adaptive array analyses were applied. The distorted fields were analyzed by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in wavenumber domain to treat separately the components with and without wall reflections. The differential phase evolution was properly obtained from the distorted field evolution by the FFT procedures. A frequency derivative method has been proposed to overcome the multiple-wall reflection effect, and SDR super-heterodyned components with small frequency difference for the derivative method were correctly obtained using the FFT analysis.

  10. Curriculum Adaptations for Students with Learning and Behavior Problems: Differentiating Instruction to Meet Diverse Needs. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, John J.; Patton, James R.

    2005-01-01

    This popular book in its third edition shows inclusive and special educators in elementary and special education how to adapt curricula for students with diverse needs. The contents of this updated and expanded edition reflect the most current and practical adaptation issues necessary to successfully differentiate curriculum and instruction for…

  11. The Effect of Adaptive Administration on the Variability of the Mantel-Haenszel Measure of Differential Item Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Recent simulations have shown that, for a given sample size, the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) variances tend to be larger when items are administered to randomly selected examinees than when they are administered adaptively. Results suggest that adaptive testing may lead to more efficient application of MH differential item functioning analyses. (SLD)

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia differential gene expression during host-pathogen interactions and adaptation to the host environment.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Eoin P; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are important in medical, biotechnological, and agricultural disciplines. These bacteria naturally occur in soil and water environments and have adapted to survive in association with plants and animals including humans. All Bcc species are opportunistic pathogens including Burkholderia cenocepacia that causes infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease patients. The adaptation of B. cenocepacia to the host environment was assessed in a rat chronic respiratory infection model and compared to that of high cell-density in vitro grown cultures using transcriptomics. The distribution of genes differentially expressed on chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was relatively proportional to the size of each genomic element, whereas the proportion of plasmid-encoded genes differentially expressed was much higher relative to its size and most genes were induced in vivo. The majority of genes encoding known virulence factors, components of types II and III secretion systems and chromosome 2-encoded type IV secretion system were similarly expressed between in vitro and in vivo environments. Lower expression in vivo was detected for genes encoding N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase CepI, orphan LuxR homolog CepR2, zinc metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB, LysR-type transcriptional regulator ShvR, nematocidal protein AidA, and genes associated with flagellar motility, Flp type pilus formation, and type VI secretion. Plasmid-encoded type IV secretion genes were markedly induced in vivo. Additional genes induced in vivo included genes predicted to be involved in osmotic stress adaptation or intracellular survival, metal ion, and nutrient transport, as well as those encoding outer membrane proteins. Genes identified in this study are potentially important for virulence during host-pathogen interactions and may be associated with survival and adaptation to the host environment during chronic lung infections.

  13. A constrained backpropagation approach for the adaptive solution of partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Keith; Di Muro, Gianluca; Ferrari, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a constrained backpropagation (CPROP) methodology for solving nonlinear elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) adaptively, subject to changes in the PDE parameters or external forcing. Unlike existing methods based on penalty functions or Lagrange multipliers, CPROP solves the constrained optimization problem associated with training a neural network to approximate the PDE solution by means of direct elimination. As a result, CPROP reduces the dimensionality of the optimization problem, while satisfying the equality constraints associated with the boundary and initial conditions exactly, at every iteration of the algorithm. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through several examples, including nonlinear elliptic and parabolic PDEs with changing parameters and nonhomogeneous terms.

  14. Multiobjective Image Color Quantization Algorithm Based on Self-Adaptive Hybrid Differential Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuewen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, some researchers considered image color quantization as a single-objective problem and applied heuristic algorithms to solve it. This paper establishes a multiobjective image color quantization model with intracluster distance and intercluster separation as its objectives. Inspired by a multipopulation idea, a multiobjective image color quantization algorithm based on self-adaptive hybrid differential evolution (MoDE-CIQ) is then proposed to solve this model. Two numerical experiments on four common test images are conducted to analyze the effectiveness and competitiveness of the multiobjective model and the proposed algorithm. PMID:27738423

  15. Adaptation of NS cells growth and differentiation to high-throughput screening-compatible plates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need of neuronal cell models to be applied to high-throughput screening settings while recapitulating physiological and/or pathological events occurring in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Stem cells offer a great opportunity in this direction since their self renewal capacity allows for large scale expansion. Protocols for directed differentiation also promise to generate populations of biochemically homogenous neuronal progenies. NS (Neural Stem) cells are a novel population of stem cells that undergo symmetric cell division in monolayer and chemically defined media, while remaining highly neurogenic. Results We report the full adaptation of the NS cell systems for their growth and neuronal differentiation to 96- and 384-well microplates. This optimized system has also been exploited in homogeneous and high-content assays. Conclusions Our results show that these mouse NS cells may be suitable for a series of applications in high-throughput format. PMID:20085655

  16. Simultaneous voltammetric determination of morphine and noscapine by adsorptive differential pulse stripping method and least-squares support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Ali; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh; Zendehdel, Mojgan

    2007-11-30

    An adsorptive differential pulse stripping method for the simultaneous determination of morphine and noscapine is proposed. The procedure involves an adsorptive accumulation of morphine and noscapine on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), followed by oxidation of adsorbed morphine and noscapine by voltammetric scan using differential pulse modulation. The optimum experimental conditions are: pH 10.0, accumulation potential of -100 mV versus Ag/AgCl, accumulation time of 150 s, scan rate of 40 mV s(-1) and pulse height of 100 mV. Morphine and noscapine peak currents were observed in same potential region at about +0.25 V. The simultaneous determination of morphine and noscapine by using voltammetry is a difficult problem in analytical chemistry, due to voltammogram interferences. The resolution of mixture of morphine and noscapine by the application of least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) was performed. The linear dynamic ranges were 0.01-3.10 and 0.015-2.75 microg mL(-1) and detection limits were 3 and 7 ng mL(-1) for morphine and noscapine, respectively. The capability of the method for the analysis of real samples was evaluated by the determination of morphine and noscapine in addict's human plasma with satisfactory results.

  17. Novel image fusion method based on adaptive pulse coupled neural network and discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jun; Hao, Zhengchao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we first propose the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform (DMPFRNT), which can make the spectrum distributed randomly and uniformly. Then we introduce this new spectrum transform into the image fusion field and present a new approach for the remote sensing image fusion, which utilizes both adaptive pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) and the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform in order to meet the requirements of both high spatial resolution and low spectral distortion. In the proposed scheme, the multi-spectral (MS) and panchromatic (Pan) images are converted into the discrete multi-parameter fractional random transform domains, respectively. In DMPFRNT spectrum domain, high amplitude spectrum (HAS) and low amplitude spectrum (LAS) components carry different informations of original images. We take full advantage of the synchronization pulse issuance characteristics of PCNN to extract the HAS and LAS components properly, and give us the PCNN ignition mapping images which can be used to determine the fusion parameters. In the fusion process, local standard deviation of the amplitude spectrum is chosen as the link strength of pulse coupled neural network. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate that the proposed method is more reliable and superior than several existing methods based on Hue Saturation Intensity representation, Principal Component Analysis, the discrete fractional random transform etc.

  18. Evaluating tactile sensitivity adaptation by measuring the differential threshold of archers.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kentaro; Ito, Seiji; Miura, Toshihiro; Horii, Ken

    2007-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the force applied to a finger and the differential threshold of the force. Further, it presented an improvement function for tactile perception in archers by adapting to circumstances in which enhanced tactile perception and finger dexterity are required to practice archery on a daily basis. For this purpose, a tactile display using an air jet was developed. The air was aimed at the center of the fingertip of the index finger. The inner diameter of the nozzle was set to 3 mm. In this study, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to obtain the differential threshold from two subject groups-an archery athlete group and a control group. A total of six levels of standard stimuli ranging from 2.0 gf to 7.0 gf was obtained. As a result, the differential threshold of the archery group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The Weber ratio of the archery group remained around 0.13 and that of control group was 0.10. The experiment also revealed that the differential threshold for archers exhibited less fluctuation between the trials and between the days, which implied that the tactile perception of archery athletes may be more stable than that of non-experienced subjects. This may be a plasticity property of tactile perception.

  19. Single laser pulse generates dual photoacoustic signals for differential contrast photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zhang, Ruochong; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-04-04

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent signal amplitude. An analytical model is derived to describe the generation of the dual photoacoustic pulses, incorporating Gruneisen saturation and thermal diffusion effect, which is experimentally proved. Lastly, an alternate of LDPA technique using quasi-CW laser excitation is also introduced and demonstrated for both super-contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. Compared with existing nonlinear PA techniques, the proposed LDPA nonlinear effect could enable a much broader range of potential applications.

  20. Simultaneous polarographic determination of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol by differential pulse polarography method and support vector regression.

    PubMed

    Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim; Soheili-Azad, Payam

    2012-01-01

    A differential pulse polarography (DPP) for the simultaneous determination of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol was proposed. It was found that under optimum experimental conditions (pH = 5, scan rate = 5 mV/s, pulse amplitude = -50 mV), 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol had well-defined polarographic reduction waves with peak potentials at -317 and -406 mV, respectively. In the mixture of two compounds overlapping polarographic peaks were observed. In this study, support vector regression (SVR) was applied to resolve the overlapped polarograms. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the performance of SVR and partial least square (PLS) on data set. The results demonstrated that SVR is a better well-performing alternative for the analysis and modeling of DPP data than the commonly applied PLS technique. The proposed method was used for the determination of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol in industrial waste water.

  1. Identification of genes involved in the drought adaptation and recovery in Portulaca oleracea by differential display.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Rodrigo Matías; Triassi, Agustina; Casas, María Isabel; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Lara, María Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Portulaca oleracea is one of the richest plant sources of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and other compounds potentially valuable for nutrition. It is broadly established in arid, semiarid and well-watered fields, thus making it a promising candidate for research on abiotic stress resistance mechanisms. It is capable of withstanding severe drought and then of recovering upon rehydration. Here, the adaptation to drought and the posterior recovery was evaluated at transcriptomic level by differential display validated by qRT-PCR. Of the 2279 transcript-derived fragments amplified, 202 presented differential expression. Ninety of them were successfully isolated and sequenced. Selected genes were tested against different abiotic stresses in P. oleracea and the behavior of their orthologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana was also explored to seek for conserved response mechanisms. In drought adapted and in recovered plants changes in expression of many protein metabolism-, lipid metabolism- and stress-related genes were observed. Many genes with unknown function were detected, which also respond to other abiotic stresses. Some of them are also involved in the seed desiccation/imbibition process and thus would be of great interest for further research. The potential use of candidate genes to engineer drought tolerance improvement and recovery is discussed.

  2. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  3. Pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulate osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow and adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ongaro, Alessia; Pellati, Agnese; Bagheri, Leila; Fortini, Cinzia; Setti, Stefania; De Mattei, Monica

    2014-09-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) play a regulatory role on osteoblast activity and are clinically beneficial during fracture healing. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from different sources have been extensively used in bone tissue engineering. Compared with MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BMSCs), those derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) are easier to obtain and available in larger amounts, although they show a less osteogenic differentiation potential than BMSCs. The hypothesis tested in this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs favor osteogenic differentiation both in BMSCs and in ASCs and to compare the role of PEMFs alone and in combination with the biochemical osteogenic stimulus bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. Early and later osteogenic markers, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin levels, and matrix mineralization, were analyzed at different times during osteogenic differentiation. Results showed that PEMFs induced osteogenic differentiation by increasing ALP activity, osteocalcin, and matrix mineralization in both BMSCs and ASCs, suggesting that PEMF activity is maintained during the whole differentiation period. The addition of BMP-2 in PEMF exposed cultures further increased all the osteogenic markers in BMSCs, while in ASCs, the stimulatory role of PEMFs was independent of BMP-2. Our results indicate that PEMFs may stimulate an early osteogenic induction in both BMSCs and ASCs and they suggest PEMFs as a bioactive factor to enhance the osteogenesis of ASCs, which are an attractive cell source for clinical applications. In conclusion, PEMFs may be considered a possible tool to improve autologous cell-based regeneration of bone defects in orthopedics.

  4. Intestinal transcriptome analysis revealed differential salinity adaptation between two tilapiine species.

    PubMed

    Ronkin, Dana; Seroussi, Eyal; Nitzan, Tali; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Cnaani, Avner

    2015-03-01

    Tilapias are a group of freshwater species, which vary in their ability to adapt to high salinity water. Osmotic regulation in fish is conducted mainly in the gills, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The mechanisms involved in ion and water transport through the GIT is not well-characterized, with only a few described complexes. Comparing the transcriptome of the anterior and posterior intestinal sections of a freshwater and saltwater adapted fish by deep-sequencing, we examined the salinity adaptation of two tilapia species: the high salinity-tolerant Oreochromis mossambicus (Mozambique tilapia), and the less salinity-tolerant Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia). This comparative analysis revealed high similarity in gene expression response to salinity change between species in the posterior intestine and large differences in the anterior intestine. Furthermore, in the anterior intestine 68 genes were saltwater up-regulated in one species and down-regulated in the other species (47 genes up-regulated in O. niloticus and down-regulated in O. mossambicus, with 21 genes showing the reverse pattern). Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed a high proportion of transporter and ion channel function among these genes. The results of this study point to a group of genes that differed in their salinity-dependent regulation pattern in the anterior intestine as potentially having a role in the differential salinity tolerance of these two closely related species.

  5. Independent AMP and NAD signaling regulates C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia George; Burkholder, Thomas J

    2016-12-01

    The balance of ATP production and consumption is reflected in adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) content and has been associated with phenotypic plasticity in striated muscle. Some studies have suggested that AMPK-dependent plasticity may be an indirect consequence of increased NAD synthesis and SIRT1 activity. The primary goal of this study was to assess the interaction of AMP- and NAD-dependent signaling in adaptation of C2C12 myotubes. Changes in myotube developmental and metabolic gene expression were compared following incubation with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) to activate AMPK- and NAD-related signaling. AICAR showed no effect on NAD pool or nampt expression but significantly reduced histone H3 acetylation and GLUT1, cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2 (COX2), and MYH3 expression. In contrast, NMN supplementation for 24 h increased NAD pool by 45 % but did not reduce histone H3 acetylation nor promote mitochondrial gene expression. The combination of AMP and NAD signaling did not induce further metabolic adaptation, but NMN ameliorated AICAR-induced myotube reduction. We interpret these results as indication that AMP and NAD contribute to C2C12 differentiation and metabolic adaptation independently.

  6. Differential flatness properties and adaptive control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos

    2016-12-01

    It is shown that the model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gland axis is a differentially flat one and this permits to transform it to the so-called linear canonical form. For the new description of the system's dynamics the transformed control inputs contain unknown terms which depend on the system's parameters. To identify these terms an adaptive fuzzy approximator is used in the control loop. Thus an adaptive fuzzy control scheme is implemented in which the unknown or unmodeled system dynamics is approximated by neurofuzzy networks and next this information is used by a feedback controller that makes the state variables (CRH - corticotropin releasing hormone, adenocortocotropic hormone - ACTH, cortisol) of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gland axis model converge to the desirable levels (setpoints). This adaptive control scheme is exclusively implemented with the use of output feedback, while the state vector elements which are not directly measured are estimated with the use of a state observer that operates in the control loop. The learning rate of the adaptive fuzzy system is suitably computed from Lyapunov analysis, so as to assure that both the learning procedure for the unknown system's parameters, the dynamics of the observer and the dynamics of the control loop will remain stable. The performed Lyapunov stability analysis depends on two Riccati equations, one associated with the feedback controller and one associated with the state observer. Finally, it is proven that for the control scheme that comprises the feedback controller, the state observer and the neurofuzzy approximator, an H-infinity tracking performance can be succeeded.

  7. Electrochemical Removal of Metal Cations from Wastewater Monitored by Differential Pulse Polarography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Delphine; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2004-01-01

    Electrodeposition eliminates wastewater pollutants such as electrochemically active metal cations, with different pulse polarography (DPP) scrutinizing the kinetics of the treatment process. These mechanisms produce qualitative and quantitative data about the removal process, while students appreciate the use of electrochemistry in resolving…

  8. On-Sky Tests of a High-Power Pulsed Laser for Sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otarola, Angel; Hickson, Paul; Gagné, Ronald; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Junwei; Xie, Shiyong; Feng, Lu; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Shen, Shixia; Xue, Suijian; Min, Li; Wei, Kai; Boyer, Corinne; Ellerbroek, Brent; Hu, Jingyao; Peng, Qinjun; Xu, Zuyan

    2016-03-01

    We present results of on-sky tests performed in the summer of 2013 to characterize the performance of a prototype high-power pulsed laser for adaptive optics. The laser operates at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 600-800Hz, with a 6% duty cycle. Its coupling efficiency was found to be, in the best test case (using 18W of transmitted power), 231±14 photons s-1 sr-1 atom-1 W-1 m2 when circular polarization was employed and 167±17 photons s-1 sr-1 atom-1 W-1 m2 with linear polarization. No improvement was seen when D2b repumping was used, but this is likely due to the relatively large laser guide star (LGS) diameter, typically 10 arcsec or more, which resulted in low irradiance levels. Strong relaxation oscillations were present in the laser output, which have the effect of reducing the coupling efficiency. To better understand the results, a physical modeling was performed using the measured pulse profiles and parameters specific to these tests. The model results, for a 10 arcsec angular size LGS spot, agree well with the observations. When extrapolating the physical model for a sub-arcsecond angular size LGS (typical of what is needed for a successful astronomical guide star), the model predicts that this laser would have a coupling efficiency of 130 photons s-1 sr-1 atom-1 W-1 m2, using circular polarization and D2b repumping, for a LGS diameter of 0.6 arcsec Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), and free of relaxation oscillations in the 589 nm laser light.

  9. Anodic Oxidation of Etodolac and its Linear Sweep, Square Wave and Differential Pulse Voltammetric Determination in Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, B.; Kaban, S.; Akcay, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, simple, fast and reliable cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, square wave voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods were developed and validated for determination of etodolac in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods were based on electrochemical oxidation of etodolac at platinum electrode in acetonitrile solution containing 0.1 M lithium perchlorate. The well-defined oxidation peak was observed at 1.03 V. The calibration curves were linear for etodolac at the concentration range of 2.5-50 μg/ml for linear sweep, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry methods, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision values for etodolac were less than 4.69, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 2.00%. The mean recovery of etodolac was 100.6% for pharmaceutical preparations. No interference was found from three tablet excipients at the selected assay conditions. Developed methods in this study are accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Etol, Tadolak and Etodin tablets as pharmaceutical preparation. PMID:26664057

  10. Energy and angular differential probabilities for photoionization of He using chirped attosecond soft-x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.

    2009-05-15

    Based on the time-dependent close-coupling method, energy and angular differential probabilities for various ionization processes of He atoms subjected to intense attosecond soft-x-ray pulses with a photon energy of 91.6 eV and a peak intensity of 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} are calculated to explore their dependence on the duration and the chirp of the pulse. It is found that the single and the double electron energy distributions for two-photon double ionization are rather sensitive to chirps. That is, both the magnitudes and locations of the sequential peaks in the single electron energy distributions vary strongly with chirps and the two-electron energy distributions being broadened and stretched along the equal energy sharing direction as opposed to the usual total excess energy direction for the case of zero chirp. In addition, our calculation also reveals an unexpected structure formed between the two sequential peaks. In order to better understand the chirp effects on both independent-electron and correlated electron emissions and their relations to the origin of the structure, we analyzed the corresponding probability differential in energy and angle.

  11. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  12. Strong genetic differentiation but not local adaptation toward the range limit of a coastal dune plant.

    PubMed

    Samis, Karen E; López-Villalobos, Adriana; Eckert, Christopher G

    2016-11-01

    All species have limited geographic distributions; but the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms causing range limits are largely unknown. That many species' geographic range limits are coincident with niche limits suggests limited evolutionary potential of marginal populations to adapt to conditions experienced beyond the range. We provide a test of range limit theory by combining population genetic analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms with a transplant experiment within, at the edge of, and 60 km beyond the northern range of a coastal dune plant. Contrary to expectations, lifetime fitness increased toward the range limit with highest fitness achieved by most populations at and beyond the range edge. Genetic differentiation among populations was strong, with very low, nondirectional gene flow suggesting range limitation via constraints to dispersal. In contrast, however, local adaptation was negligible, and a distance-dependent decline in fitness only occurred for those populations furthest from home when planted beyond the range limit. These results challenge a commonly held assumption that stable range limits match niche limits, but also raise questions about the unique value of peripheral populations in expanding species' geographical ranges.

  13. Pulse Compression Degradation Due to Open Loop Adaptive Cancellation. Part 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-23

    compreosed sidelobe level after adaptive cancellation -of the Ith range sidelobe (sidelobes are numbered :h1, I = 1, 2, ... , these can be related...sidelobe level at a specific range sidelobe 1 is at most 3 1,1#0 dB above the maximum quiescent sidelobe level). It is straightforward to-show that K...SL, (K,N) T Ilsc(1)lI2 (43) ’Jmin, and 6 = max ((). 44) One normally desires 6 :5 1, otherwise the desired signal generates more range sidelobe power

  14. Optimization of reactor network design problem using Jumping Gene Adaptation of Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujarathi, Ashish M.; Purohit, S.; Srikanth, B.

    2015-06-01

    Detailed working principle of jumping gene adaptation of differential evolution (DE-JGa) is presented. The performance of the DE-JGa algorithm is compared with the performance of differential evolution (DE) and modified DE (MDE) by applying these algorithms on industrial problems. In this study Reactor network design (RND) problem is solved using DE, MDE, and DE-JGa algorithms: These industrial processes are highly nonlinear and complex with reference to optimal operating conditions with many equality and inequality constraints. Extensive computational comparisons have been made for all the chemical engineering problems considered. The results obtained in the present study show that DE-JGa algorithm outperforms the other algorithms (DE and MDE). Several comparisons are made among the algorithms with regard to the number of function evaluations (NFE)/CPU- time required to find the global optimum. The standard deviation and the variance values obtained using DE-JGa, DE and MDE algorithms also show that the DE-JGa algorithm gives consistent set of results for the majority of the test problems and the industrial real world problems.

  15. An adaptive view of caste differentiation in the neotropical wasp Polybia (Trichothorax) sericea Olivier (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    PubMed

    Desuó, I C; Souza-Galheico, C B; Shima, S N; Santos, G M M; Cruz, J D; Bichara Filho, C C; Dias, C T S

    2011-01-01

    The tribe Epiponini comprehends the swarm-founding Neotropical wasps, with several species endemic to Brazil, which are extremely important in studies of social evolution of wasps. The Epiponini diverge in several ways from the definitions of high eusociality, since caste syndromes range from species without morphological caste differentiation to those with complete caste dimorphism, and all species are polygynous. Frequently, indirect studies based on morphometry and physiology are the only solutions to collect data regarding the natural history and caste system in this tribe, since most species are extremely aggressive and build enveloped nests, usually in places of difficult access. We analyzed morphological parameters in seven colonies of the Epiponini species Polybia (Trichothorax) sericea Olivier in different phases of colonial development. Nine body variables were taken and females were classified according to their ovary development and spermathecal contents. The results showed that caste differences in this species are based on a contrast among variables: queens have larger mesosoma and abdomen, but are smaller in head width and wing length. These results suggest that morphological caste differentiation in this species is based mainly on body shape. We considered this combination of characters as being adaptive. We also showed that caste differences varied according to the colony cycle, with more conspicuous differences when queen number is reduced.

  16. Biotypic diversity in greenbug (Hemiptera: Aphididae): microsatellite-based regional divergence and host-adapted differentiation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yiqun; Perumal, Azhaguvel; Burd, John D; Rudd, Jackie C

    2010-08-01

    Nineteen isolates of the cereal aphid pest greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), were collected from wheat, Triticum aestivum L.; barley, Hordeum vulgare L.; or noncultivated grass hosts in five locations from Colorado and Wyoming. Parthenogenetic colonies were established. Biotypic profiles of the 19 isolates were determined based on their abilities to damage a set of host plant differentials, and 13 new biotypes were identified. Genetic diversity among the 19 isolates and five previously designated greenbug biotypes (E, G, H, I, and K) was examined with 31 cross-species transferable microsatellite (simple sequence repeat) markers. Neighbor-joining clustering analysis of marker data revealed host-adapted genetic divergence as well as regional differentiation of greenbug populations. Host associated biotypic variation seems to be more obvious in "agricultural biotypes," whereas isolates collected from noncultivated grasses tend to show more geographic divergence. It seems that the biotype sharing the most similar biotypic profiles and the same geographic region with current prevailing one may have the greatest potential to become the new prevailing biotype. Close monitoring of greenbug population dynamics especially biotypic variation on both crop plants and noncultivated grasses in small grain production areas may be a useful strategy for detecting potentially new prevailing virulent biotypes of the greenbug.

  17. A feasibility study of rain radar for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. IV - A discussion of pulse compression and adaptive scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    1988-07-01

    The possible use of a pulse compression system on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to meet the requirement on the number of independent samples for the rain radar under the constraint on allowable power consumption. The applicability of a pulse compression system to the mission depends on the technological feasibility of reducing the range sidelobe levels of the strong surface echo down to at least -60 dB. It is found that applying the pulse compression technique to the mission is risky. The concept of adaptive scanning is examined, and its power saving efficiency is numerically evaluated for four kinds of rain searching schemes. It is shown that the power saving efficiency of adaptive scanning is considerably high for all the rain searching schemes evaluated.

  18. Synergistic effect of defined artificial extracellular matrices and pulsed electric fields on osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs.

    PubMed

    Hess, Ricarda; Jaeschke, Anna; Neubert, Holger; Hintze, Vera; Moeller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Wiesmann, Hans-Peter; Hart, David A; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2012-12-01

    In vivo, bone formation is a complex, tightly regulated process, influenced by multiple biochemical and physical factors. To develop a vital bone tissue engineering construct, all of these individual components have to be considered and integrated to gain an in vivo-like stimulation of target cells. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the synergistic role of defined biochemical and physical microenvironments with respect to osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Biochemical microenvironments have been designed using artificial extracellular matrices (aECMs), containing collagen I (coll) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) like chondroitin sulfate (CS), or a high-sulfated hyaluronan derivative (sHya), formulated as coatings on three-dimensional poly(caprolactone-co-lactide) (PCL) scaffolds. As part of the physical microenvironment, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields via transformer-like coupling (TC). Results showed that aECM containing sHya enhanced osteogenic differentiation represented by increases in ALP activity and gene-expression (RT-qPCR) of several bone-related proteins (RUNX-2, ALP, OPN). Electric field stimulation alone did not influence cell proliferation, but osteogenic differentiation was enhanced if osteogenic supplements were provided, showing synergistic effects by the combination of sHya and electric fields. These results will improve the understanding of bone regeneration processes and support the development of effective tissue engineered bone constructs.

  19. Adaptive filtering for reduction of speckle in ultrasonic pulse-echo images.

    PubMed

    Bamber, J C; Daft, C

    1986-01-01

    Current medical ultrasonic scanning instrumentation permits the display of fine image detail (speckle) which does not transfer useful information but degrades the apparent low contrast resolution in the image. An adaptive two-dimensional filter has been developed which uses local features of image texture to recognize and maximally low-pass filter those parts of the image which correspond to fully developed speckle, while substantially preserving information associated with resolved-object structure. A first implementation of the filter is described which uses the ratio of the local variance and the local mean as the speckle recognition feature. Preliminary results of applying this form of display processing to medical ultrasound images are very encouraging; it appears that the visual perception of features such as small discrete structures, subtle fluctuations in mean echo level and changes in image texture may be enhanced relative to that for unprocessed images.

  20. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  1. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  2. Controlled pulse delivery of electrical stimulation differentially reduces epileptiform activity in Mg2+-free-treated hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Albensi, Benedict C; Toupin, Justin D; Oikawa, Kensuke; Oliver, Derek R

    2008-08-21

    Electrical stimulation for applications in epilepsy has been attempted in multiple brain regions [corrected] using high- or low-frequency stimulation protocols. Data suggest that specific frequencies may have more benefit at controlling seizure activity. To this end, investigators have tested low-frequency stimulation (LFS) protocols (0.1 to 25 Hz) in both animal models and in human epileptic patients and reported reduced epileptiform synchronization, afterdischarge thresholds, and seizure activity in general. Collectively, these studies imply that LFS may have benefit in reducing epileptiform activity, however, the effectiveness of various electrical parameters still needs to be determined in specific targets. This study aimed to systematically control the total number of stimulation pulses when using primarily LFS protocols (0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 25 Hz) delivered for the suppression of seizure-like activity in the hippocampal brain slice using a Mg2+-free model of epilepsy. Fifty Hz was also tested as a reference higher frequency protocol. Regulating the total number of pulses also controlled the amount of electrical work delivered. Of the LFS protocols tested, 0.5 Hz, and 1 Hz were optimal and significantly (p<0.05) reduced several measures of epileptiform activity. However, the higher frequency protocol, 50 Hz was similarly effective at significantly (p < 0.05) suppressing several aspects of epileptiform activity (but not for reduction of population-spike amplitude). The data show that these protocols, which had a controlled number of pulses differentially reduced epileptiform activity in our model where increasing the frequency of stimulation did not result in increased attenuation.

  3. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of nanomolar concentrations of antiviral drug acyclovir at polymer film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Dorraji, Parisa S; Jalali, Fahimeh

    2016-04-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the sensitive detection of acyclovir was developed by the electropolymerization of Eriochrome black T at a pretreated glassy carbon electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Under the optimized conditions, a significant electrochemical improvement was observed toward the electrooxidation of acyclovir on the modified electrode surface relative to the unmodified electrode. The detection limit of 12 nM and two linear calibration ranges of 0.03-0.3 μM and 0.3-1.5 μM were obtained for acyclovir determination using a differential pulse voltammetric method in acetate buffer (0.1 M, pH 4.0). Real sample studies were carried out in human blood serum and pharmaceutical formulations, which offered good recovery (98-102%). The electrode showed excellent reproducibility, selectivity and antifouling effects.

  4. Study of antioxidant properties of a water-soluble Vitamin E derivative-tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG) by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, E I; Avramchik, O A; Kagiya, T V; Karbainov, Y A; Tcherdyntseva, N V

    2004-06-17

    Study of antioxidant properties of tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water-soluble Vitamin E derivative, by differential pulse voltammetry has been carried out in this work. The pH influence on the antioxidant properties of TMG has been also investigated. It was observed that the antioxidant activity of TMG is greater at 6.90

  5. Phasorial differential pulse-width pair technique for long-range Brillouin optical time-domain analysis sensors.

    PubMed

    Urricelqui, Javier; Sagues, Mikel; Loayssa, Alayn

    2014-07-14

    We introduce a novel phasorial differential pulse-width pair (PDPP) method for Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors that combines spatial resolution enhancement with increased tolerance to non-local effects. It is based on the subtraction of the complex time-domain traces supplied by a sensor configuration that uses a phase-modulated probe wave and RF demodulation. The fundamentals of the technique are first described theoretically and using numerical simulation of the propagating waves. Then, proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate the measurement of the Brillouin frequency shift distribution over 50-km. The system is shown to withstand large variations of the pump power generated by its interaction with a powerful probe wave along the fiber; hence, highlighting the potential of the PDPP technique to increase the detected signal-to-noise ratio in long-range BOTDA. Moreover, the PDPP is also shown to increase the measurement contrast by allowing the use of relatively long duration pulses while retaining 1-m spatial resolution.

  6. Application of an Empirical Bayes Enhancement of Mantel-Haenszel Differential Item Functioning Analysis to a Computerized Adaptive Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    2002-01-01

    Used a simulation to investigate the applicability to computerized adaptive test data of a differential item functioning (DIF) analysis method. Results show the performance of this empirical Bayes enhancement of the Mantel Haenszel DIF analysis method to be quite promising. (SLD)

  7. Age differential response of Hyalella curvispina to a cadmium pulse: influence of sediment particle size.

    PubMed

    García, M E; Rodrígues Capítulo, A; Ferrari, L

    2012-06-01

    In Argentina periurban streams frequently receive agricultural, livestock and industrial discharges. Heavy metals have been found in the water column and sediments of numerous water bodies of the pampean region, at levels above the limits established for aquatic life protection. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a contaminant pulse of cadmium discharged into a water-sediment system of different particle sizes, by means of laboratory tests using juveniles and adults of Hyalella curvispina, a native amphipod. We found that the substrate particle size was a determining factor in the toxicity of cadmium and that the adults of H. curvispina were more sensitive than juveniles. We also observed a temporal difference between the two ages for the same type of sediment. Given the nature of the sediments of regional water bodies, it is expected that a discharge of cadmium, even at concentrations as low as those tested here, will affect the survival of native amphipods.

  8. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    PubMed

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium.

  9. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  10. Different types of exercise induce differential effects on neuronal adaptations and memory performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen; Huang, Tung-Yi; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chuang, Jih-Ing; Wu, Fong-Sen; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jen, Chauying J

    2012-01-01

    Different exercise paradigms show differential effects on various forms of memory. We hypothesize that the differential effects of exercises on memory performance are caused by different neuroplasticity changes in relevant brain regions in response to different exercise trainings. We examined the effects of treadmill running (TR) and wheel running (WR) on the Pavlovian fear conditioning task that assesses learning and memory performance associated with the amygdala (cued conditioning) and both the amygdala and hippocampus (contextual conditioning). The skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity, an indicator of aerobic capacity, was elevated in rats received 4 w of TR, but not WR. While both TR and WR elevated the contextual conditional response, only TR facilitated the cued conditional response. Using a single-neuron labeling technique, we found that while both TR and MR enlarged the dendritic field and increased the spine density in hippocampal CA3 neurons, only TR showed these effects in basolateral amygdalar neurons. Moreover, both types of exercise upregulated synaptic proteins (i.e., TrkB and SNAP-25) in the hippocampus; however only TR showed similar effects in the amygdala. Injection of K252a, a TrkB kinase inhibitor, in the dorsal hippocampus or basolateral amygdala abolished the exercise-facilitated contextual or cued fear learning and memory performance, respectively, regardless of the types of exercise. In summary, our results supported that different types of exercise affect the performance of learning and memory via BDNF-TrkB signaling and neuroplasticity in specific brain regions. The brain region-specific neuronal adaptations are possibly induced by various levels of intensity/stress elicited by different types of exercise.

  11. The Differentiation of Adaptive Behaviours: Evidence from High and Low Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Harrison; Oakland, Thomas David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professionals who use measures of adaptive behaviour when working with special populations may assume that adaptive behaviour is a consistent and linear construct at various ability levels and thus believe the construct of adaptive behaviour is the same for high and low performers. That is, highly adaptive people simply are assumed to…

  12. Local adaptation along a continuous coastline: prey recruitment drives differentiation in a predatory snail.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Eric; Worth, David J

    2010-03-01

    these snails to succeed in an oceanographic region where the recruitment of alternative, preferred prey is low. More broadly, our results suggest that persistent spatial variation in recruitment and other oceanographically mediated processes may lead to adaptive differentiation among populations of consumers in adjacent coastal regions.

  13. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed Laser Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    years or younger, either sex, with no mitigating ocular or retinal pathology such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa , etc. Donor: The...USAFA TR 2004-01 Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed...TR 2004-01 This article, "Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps

  14. Adaptive optics self-calibration using differential OTF (dOTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodack, Alexander T.; Knight, Justin M.; Codona, Johanan L.; Miller, Kelsey L.; Guyon, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate self-calibration of an adaptive optical system using differential OTF [Codona, JL; Opt. Eng. 0001; 52(9):097105-097105. doi:10.1117/1.OE.52.9.097105]. We use a deformable mirror (DM) along with science camera focal plane images to implement a closed-loop servo that both flattens the DM and corrects for non-common-path aberrations within the telescope. The pupil field modification required for dOTF measurement is introduced by displacing actuators near the edge of the illuminated pupil. Simulations were used to develop methods to retrieve the phase from the complex amplitude dOTF measurements for both segmented and continuous sheet MEMS DMs and tests were performed using a Boston Micromachines continuous sheet DM for verification. We compute the actuator correction updates directly from the phase of the dOTF measurements, reading out displacements and/or slopes at segment and actuator positions. Through simulation, we also explore the effectiveness of these techniques for a variety of photons collected in each dOTF exposure pair.

  15. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts accumulate differentially on titanium surfaces treated with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Radmanesh, Mitra; Ektesabi, Amin M; Wyatt, Rachael A; Crawford, Bryan D; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-10-01

    Biomaterial engineering, specifically in bone implant and osseointegration, is currently facing a critical challenge regarding the response of cells to foreign objects and general biocompatibility of the materials used in the production of these implants. Using the developing technology of the laser surface treatment, this study investigates the effects of the laser repetition rate (frequency) on cell distribution across the surface of the titanium substrates. The main objective of this research is building a fundamental understanding of how cells interact with treated titanium and how different treatments affect cell accumulation. Cells respond differently to surfaces treated with different frequency lasers. The results of this research identify the influence of frequency on surface topography properties and oxidation of titanium, and their subsequent effects on the pattern of cell accumulation on its surface. Despite increased oxidation in laser-treated regions, the authors observe that fibroblast cells prefer untreated titanium to laser-treated regions, except the regions treated with 25 kHz pulses, which become preferentially colonized after 72 h.

  16. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  17. Determination of para-arsanilic acid with improved diazotization reaction using differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry in aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Misni, Marpongahtun; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ahamad, Rahmalan; MohdYusoff, Abdull Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Para-arsanilic acid (p-ASA) has been widely used in the poultry industry to promote growth and prevent dysentery. It is excreted unchanged in the manure and released into non-target sites causing organoarsenic pollution risk to the environment and living system. Therefore, simple and effective analytical strategies are demanded for determining the samples that contain p-ASA. However, direct determination of both p-ASA and ortho-arsanilic acid (o-ASA) using differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPCSV) gives the similar voltammograms that directly hamper the analysis used by the DPCSV technique. In this study, a method to determine and differentiate p-ASA from o-ASA via diazotization and coupling reaction of the amine groups followed by the direct DPCSV determination of diazo compounds is presented. The diazotization reaction carried out at pH 1.5 and 0 ± 1°C for 10 min showed two reduction peaks in DPCSV at-70 mV and -440 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (KCl 3 M). However, when the diazotization reaction was performed at pH 12.5 and 0 ± 1°C for 40 min, a coloured azo compound was produced and the DPCSV showed only one reduction peak that appeared at -600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (3 M of KCl). The results of this study show that only p-ASA compound gave a reduction peak, whereas o-ASA compound did not give any peak. The detection limit of p-ASA was found to be 4 × 10(-8 )M. As a result, the proposed electro-analytical technique might be a good candidate to determine and differentiate the p-ASA present in the poultry and environmental samples.

  18. Self-calibration and laser energy monitor validations for a double-pulsed 2-μm CO2 integrated path differential absorption lidar application.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-08-20

    Double-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-μm double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photoelectromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-μm IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  19. Catalases play differentiated roles in the adaptation of a fungal entomopathogen to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Liang; Zhang, Long-Bin; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-02-01

    The catalase family of Beauveria bassiana (fungal entomopathogen) consists of catA (spore-specific), catB (secreted), catP (peroxisomal), catC (cytoplasmic) and catD (secreted peroxidase/catalase), which were distinguished in phylogeny and structure and functionally characterized by constructing single-gene disrupted and rescued mutants for enzymatic and multi-phenotypic analyses. Total catalase activity decreased 89% and 56% in ΔcatB and ΔcatP, corresponding to the losses of upper and lower active bands gel-profiled for all catalases respectively, but only 9-12% in other knockout mutants. Compared with wild type and complement mutants sharing similar enzymatic and phenotypic parameters, all knockout mutants showed significant (9-56%) decreases in the antioxidant capability of their conidia (active ingredients of mycoinsecticides), followed by remarkable phenotypic defects associated with the fungal biocontrol potential. These defects included mainly the losses of 40% thermotolerance (45°C) in ΔcatA, 46-48% UV-B resistance in ΔcatA and ΔcatD, and 33-47% virulence to Spodoptera litura larvae in ΔcatA, ΔcatP and ΔcatD respectively. Moreover, the drastic transcript upregulation of some other catalase genes observed in the normal culture of each knockout mutant revealed functionally complimentary effects among some of the catalase genes, particularly between catB and catC whose knockout mutants displayed little or minor phenotypic changes. However, the five catalase genes functioned redundantly in mediating the fungal tolerance to either hyperosmotic or fungicidal stress. The differentiated roles of five catalases in regulating the B. bassiana virulence and tolerances to oxidative stress, high temperature and UV-B irradiation provide new insights into fungal adaptation to stressful environment and host invasion.

  20. Differential Molecular Responses of Rapeseed Cotyledons to Light and Dark Reveal Metabolic Adaptations toward Autotrophy Establishment

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongli; Damaris, Rebecca N.; Fu, Jinlei; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Xi, Chen; Yi, Bin; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis competent autotrophy is established during the postgerminative stage of plant growth. Among the multiple factors, light plays a decisive role in the switch from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth. Under dark conditions, the rapeseed hypocotyl extends quickly with an apical hook, and the cotyledon is yellow and folded, and maintains high levels of the isocitrate lyase (ICL). By contrast, in the light, the hypocotyl extends slowly, the cotyledon unfolds and turns green, the ICL content changes in parallel with cotyledon greening. To reveal metabolic adaptations during the establishment of postgerminative autotrophy in rapeseed, we conducted comparative proteomic and metabolomic analyses of the cotyledons of seedlings grown under light versus dark conditions. Under both conditions, the increase in proteases, fatty acid β-oxidation and glyoxylate-cycle related proteins was accompanied by rapid degradation of the stored proteins and lipids with an accumulation of the amino acids. While light condition partially retarded these conversions. Light significantly induced the expression of chlorophyll-binding and photorespiration related proteins, resulting in an increase in reducing-sugars. However, the levels of some chlorophyllide conversion, Calvin-cycle and photorespiration related proteins also accumulated in dark grown cotyledons, implying that the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy is programmed in the seed rather than induced by light. Various anti-stress systems, e.g., redox related proteins, salicylic acid, proline and chaperones, were employed to decrease oxidative stress, which was mainly derived from lipid oxidation or photorespiration, under both conditions. This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the differential molecular responses of rapeseed cotyledons to light and dark conditions, which will facilitate further study on the complex mechanism underlying the transition from heterotrophy to autotrophy. PMID:27471506

  1. Calibration of liquid crystal ultrafast pulse shaper with common-path spectral interferometry and application to coherent control with a covariance matrix adaptation evolutionary strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Schlup, Philip; Lunacek, Monte; Whitley, Darrell; Bartels, Randy A.

    2008-03-01

    An ultrafast pulse shaper for coherent control applications is described, complete with a simple, reliable calibration technique and an advanced learning control algorithm. The calibration technique makes use of a common-path interferometer, producing less noisy measurements than a conventional Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A covariance matrix adaptation evolutionary strategy (ES) is demonstrated to perform better than a traditional ES for high-dimensional search landscapes.

  2. Monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy using two different light paths.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Yasuaki; Yoshii, Yotsumi; Takahashi, Kenshi; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of the local distribution of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-PDOAS) in Tokyo during August 2008 are presented. Two LP-PDOAS systems simultaneously measured average NO(2) temporal mixing ratios along two different paths from a single observation point. Two flashing aviation obstruction lights, located 7.0 km north and 6.3 km east from the observation point, were used as light sources, allowing spatiotemporal variations of NO(2) in Tokyo to be inferred. The LP-PDOAS data were compared with ground-based data measured using chemiluminescence. Surface wind data indicated that large inhomogeneities were present in the spatial NO(2) distributions under southerly wind conditions, while northerly wind conditions displayed greater homogeneity between the two systems. The higher correlation in the NO(2) mixing ratio between the two LP-PDOAS systems was observed under northerly wind conditions with a correlation factor R(2) = 0.88. We demonstrated that the combined deployment of two LP-PDOAS systems oriented in different directions provides detailed information on the spatial distribution of NO(2).

  3. Simultaneous assessment of zinc, cadmium, lead and copper in poultry feeds by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Mahesar, S A; Sherazi, S T H; Niaz, Abdul; Bhanger, M I; Uddin, Siraj; Rauf, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    In the present work four metals (Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu) were determined simultaneously in 28 commercial broiler poultry feeds by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) using hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The digestion of poultry feeds was carried out with concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (2:1) with the help of microwave heating. Acetate buffer of pH 5 was used as a supporting electrolyte. The limit of detection for Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu was 0.69, 0.35, 0.68 and 0.24 microg/kg, respectively. The amount of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in the analyzed poultry feeds was ranged between 54.3-482.2, 3.8-33.6, 23.2-32.6 and 12.3-65.8 mg/kg, respectively. In most of analyzed poultry feed samples, the amount of Cd and Pb was found to be greater than the maximum tolerable level (MTL) which could be harmful for the poultry.

  4. Determination of buprenorphine by differential pulse voltammetry on carbon paste electrode using SDS as an enhancement factor.

    PubMed

    Behpour, Mohsen; Valipour, Akram; Keshavarz, Mahin

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a facile electrochemical approach is proposed for the determination of buprenorphine (BPR) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS was applied for amplification of oxidation signal. Carbon paste electrode (CPE) used as working electrode and cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out in phosphate buffer solution (pH3.0). Under optimal experimental conditions, the oxidation current increased with the addition of BPR in the sample and two dynamic ranges obtained from 4.00 nM to 0.126 μM and from 0.126 to 0.317 μM by DPV and exhibited a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.33 nM (S/N=3). This offered method has been used for the determination of BPR in the real samples and has validated with the recovery test for BPR spiked urine samples. The result demonstrated that this method is a simple, sensitive, rapid, low-cost, and stable method for BPR detection.

  5. Unveiling One-Dimensional Supramolecular Structures Formed Through π-π Stacking of Phenothiazines by Differential Pulse Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando R; Zampieri, Eduardo H; Caetano, Wilker; Silva, Rafael

    2017-03-09

    Organic based nanomaterials can be self-assembled by strong and directional intermolecular forces as π-π interactions are. Experimental information about the stability, size and geometry of those formed structures are very limited for species which easily aggregates even at very low concentration. Differential pulse voltammetry can unveil the formation, growth and also the stability window of ordered one-dimensional, lamellar, self-aggregates formed by supramolecular π stacking of phenothiazines at micromolar (10-6 mol·L-1) concentration. The self-diffusion features of the species at different concentration were determined by DPV and used to probe the π staking process through the concept of the frictional resistance. It is observed that toluidine blue and methylene blue start to self-aggregate around 9 µmol·L-1 and the self-aggregation process occurs by one-dimensional growth as the concentration of the phenothiazines is increased up to around 170 µmol·L-1 for toluidine blue O and 200 µmol·L-1 for methylene blue. At higher concentration the aggregation process leads to structures with lower anisometry.

  6. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  7. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of methyl parathion based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-poly(acrylamide) nanocomposite film modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yanbo; Yu, Dajun; Yu, Yanyan; Zhou, Tianshu; Shi, Guoyue

    2012-05-30

    A sensitive electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry method was developed for detecting methyl parathion based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-poly(acrylamide) (MWCNTs-PAAM) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode. The novel MWCNTs-PAAM nanocomposite, containing high content of amide groups, was synthesized by PAAM polymerizing at the vinyl group functionalized MWCNTs surface using free radical polymerization. The MWCNTs-PAAM nanocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical behavior and interference studies of MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE for methyl parathion were investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that the MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE exhibited a high adsorption and strong affinity toward methyl parathion compared with some metal ions and nitroaromatic compounds, which exist in environmental samples. The adsorbed amount of methyl parathion on the MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE approached the equilibrium value upon 5 min adsorption time. A linear calibration curve for methyl parathion was obtained in the concentration range from 5.0×10(-9) to 1.0×10(-5) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 2.0×10(-9) mol L(-1). The MWCNTs-PAAM/GCE was proved to be a suitable sensing tool for the fast, sensitive and selective determination of methyl parathion in environmental water samples.

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymer grafted graphene for simultaneous electrochemical sensing of 4, 4-methylene diphenylamine and aniline by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ningning; Chen, Li; Cheng, Yuxiao; Zhao, Kai; Wu, Xiaohong; Xian, Yuezhong

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor based on molecular imprinting polymers grafted graphene (MIPs-G) was developed for simultaneous measurement of 4, 4-methylene diphenylamine (MDA) and aniline by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). MIPs-G was synthesized via free radical polymerization reaction using MDA and 4-vinyl pyridine as template molecule and functional monomer respectively. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. After removal template molecules, MIPs-G was used as electrode material for aromatic amines measurements. Due to the high binding affinity towards MDA and the π-π interaction with aniline, the MIPs-G based electrochemical sensor can be used for simultaneous detection of MDA and aniline by DPV. Under the optimized condition, the oxidation potentials for MDA and aniline were observed at 0.62 and 0.72 V, respectively. Moreover, MIPs-G modified glassy carbon electrode shows linear response towards MDA and aniline simultaneously over the range of 1.0 to 15 μM. The MIPs-G based electrochemical sensor has been applied for simultaneous measurement of MDA and aniline in plastic tableware.

  9. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  10. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  11. Landscape genomics and a common garden trial reveal adaptive differentiation to temperature across Europe in the tree species Alnus glutinosa.

    PubMed

    De Kort, Hanne; Vandepitte, Katrien; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Closset-Kopp, Déborah; Honnay, Olivier; Mergeay, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The adaptive potential of tree species to cope with climate change has important ecological and economic implications. Many temperate tree species experience a wide range of environmental conditions, suggesting high adaptability to new environmental conditions. We investigated adaptation to regional climate in the drought-sensitive tree species Alnus glutinosa (Black alder), using a complementary approach that integrates genomic, phenotypic and landscape data. A total of 24 European populations were studied in a common garden and through landscape genomic approaches. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to identify SNPs across the genome, resulting in 1990 SNPs. Although a relatively low percentage of putative adaptive SNPs was detected (2.86% outlier SNPs), we observed clear associations among outlier allele frequencies, temperature and plant traits. In line with the typical drought avoiding nature of A. glutinosa, leaf size varied according to a temperature gradient and significant associations with multiple outlier loci were observed, corroborating the ecological relevance of the observed outlier SNPs. Moreover, the lack of isolation by distance, the very low genetic differentiation among populations and the high intrapopulation genetic variation all support the notion that high gene exchange combined with strong environmental selection promotes adaptation to environmental cues.

  12. Adapted physical exercise enhances activation and differentiation potential of satellite cells in the skeletal muscle of old mice.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Barbara; Giagnacovo, Marzia; Costanzo, Manuela; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Zancanaro, Carlo; Pellicciari, Carlo; Malatesta, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    During ageing, a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and a decrease in muscle strength and endurance take place, in the condition termed sarcopenia. The mechanisms of sarcopenia are complex and still unclear; however, it is known that muscle atrophy is associated with a decline in the number and/or efficiency of satellite cells, the main contributors to muscle regeneration. Physical exercise proved beneficial in sarcopenia; however, knowledge of the effect of adapted physical exercise on the myogenic properties of satellite cells in aged muscles is limited. In this study the amount and activation state of satellite cells as well as their proliferation and differentiation potential were assessed in situ by morphology, morphometry and immunocytochemistry at light and transmission electron microscopy on 28-month-old mice submitted to adapted aerobic physical exercise on a treadmill. Sedentary age-matched mice served as controls, and sedentary adult mice were used as a reference for an unperturbed control at an age when the capability of muscle regeneration is still high. The effect of physical exercise in aged muscles was further analysed by comparing the myogenic potential of satellite cells isolated from old running and old sedentary mice using an in vitro system that allows observation of the differentiation process under controlled experimental conditions. The results of this ex vivo and in vitro study demonstrated that adapted physical exercise increases the number and activation of satellite cells as well as their capability to differentiate into structurally and functionally correct myotubes (even though the age-related impairment in myotube formation is not fully reversed): this evidence further supports adapted physical exercise as a powerful, non-pharmacological approach to counteract sarcopenia and the age-related deterioration of satellite cell capabilities even at very advanced age.

  13. 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar development for simultaneous airborne column measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-05-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  14. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation at carbon paste electrode of tacrine and 1-hydroxytacrine and differential pulse voltammetric determination of tacrine in pharmaceuticals and human urine.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, I; Callejón, M; Jiménez, J C; Bello, M A; Guiraúm, A

    2000-11-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of tacrine and its 1-OH-metabolite, has been studied by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry by using carbon paste electrodes. The peak current-concentration relationship was found to be linear up to 20 micrograms ml-1 with detection limits of 0.06 microgram ml-1 for tacrine and 0.18 microgram ml-1 for 1-OH-tacrine and quantitation limits of 0.20 microgram ml-1 for tacrine and 0.37 microgram ml-1 for 1-OH-tacrine. A method for determining tacrine by differential pulse voltammetry in pharmaceuticals and human urine, in the presence of 1-OH-tacrine, has been developed.

  16. A new sensitive sensor for simultaneous differential pulse voltammetric determination of codeine and acetaminophen using a hydroquinone derivative and multiwall carbon nanotubes carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Garazhian, Elahe; Shishehbore, M Reza

    2015-01-01

    A new sensitive sensor was fabricated for simultaneous determination of codeine and acetaminophen based on 4-hydroxy-2-(triphenylphosphonio)phenolate (HTP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode at trace levels. The sensitivity of codeine determination was deeply affected by spiking multiwall carbon nanotubes and a modifier in carbon paste. Electron transfer coefficient, α, catalytic electron rate constant, k, and the exchange current density, j 0, for oxidation of codeine at the HTP-MWCNT-CPE were calculated using cyclic voltammetry. The calibration curve was linear over the range 0.2-844.7 μM with two linear segments, and the detection limit of 0.063 μM of codeine was obtained using differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode was separated codeine and acetaminophen signals by differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode was applied for the determination of codeine and acetaminophen in biological and pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results.

  17. A New Sensitive Sensor for Simultaneous Differential Pulse Voltammetric Determination of Codeine and Acetaminophen Using a Hydroquinone Derivative and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Carbon Paste Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Garazhian, Elahe; Shishehbore, M. Reza

    2015-01-01

    A new sensitive sensor was fabricated for simultaneous determination of codeine and acetaminophen based on 4-hydroxy-2-(triphenylphosphonio)phenolate (HTP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode at trace levels. The sensitivity of codeine determination was deeply affected by spiking multiwall carbon nanotubes and a modifier in carbon paste. Electron transfer coefficient, α, catalytic electron rate constant, k, and the exchange current density, j 0, for oxidation of codeine at the HTP-MWCNT-CPE were calculated using cyclic voltammetry. The calibration curve was linear over the range 0.2–844.7 μM with two linear segments, and the detection limit of 0.063 μM of codeine was obtained using differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode was separated codeine and acetaminophen signals by differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode was applied for the determination of codeine and acetaminophen in biological and pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25945094

  18. Laser fusion pulse shape controller

    DOEpatents

    Siebert, Larry D.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for controlling the pulse shape, i.e., the pulse duration and intensity pattern, of a pulsed laser system, and which is particularly well adapted for controlling the pellet ignition pulse in a laser-driven fusion reaction system. The apparatus comprises a laser generator for providing an optical control pulse of the shape desired, a pulsed laser triggered by the control pulse, and a plurality of optical Kerr-effect gates serially disposed at the output of the pulsed laser and selectively triggered by the control pulse to pass only a portion of the pulsed laser output generally corresponding in shape to the control pulse.

  19. Electrochemical Investigation of Coenzyme Q10 on Silver Electrode in Ethanol Aqueous Solution and Its Determination Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Deng, Wei; Xu, Hu; Sun, Yinxing; Wang, Yuhong; Chen, Shouhui; Ding, Xianting

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemistry reduction of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on silver electrodes has been investigated in mixed solvent containing 95 vol. % ethanol and 5 vol. % water. A combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is employed to explore the mechanism of redox processes of CoQ10 in the presence and absence of oxygen, respectively. It has been proved that the redox reaction of CoQ10 is highly dependent on the oxygen in the solution compared with that of CoQ0, which may be attributed to the isoprenoid side chain effect of CoQ10 Moreover, the effects of experimental variables such as electrolyte component, pH, temperature, and sonication time on the amperometric and potentiometric responses of CoQ10 are presented. The differential pulse voltammetry method has been developed for the quantification of the CoQ10 in the complex samples. Under the optimum conditions, the method is linear over the concentration range of 1.00 × 10(-7) to 1.00 × 10(-3) mol/L (8.63 × 10(-2) to 8.63 × 10(2) mg/kg). The limit of detection (3σ/k) is 3.33 × 10(-8) mol/L (2.88 × 10(-2) mg/kg). The recoveries of the spiked samples are between 91% and 108%. The presented method can be applied to the analysis of CoQ10 in real samples without any pretreatment.

  20. Differential adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clendaniel, Richard A.; Lasker, David M.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Previous work in squirrel monkeys has demonstrated the presence of linear and nonlinear components to the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-acceleration rotations. The nonlinear component is seen as a rise in gain with increasing velocity of rotation at frequencies more than 2 Hz (a velocity-dependent gain enhancement). We have shown that there are greater changes in the nonlinear than linear component of the response after spectacle-induced adaptation. The present study was conducted to determine if the two components of the response share a common adaptive process. The gain of the VOR, in the dark, to sinusoidal stimuli at 4 Hz (peak velocities: 20-150 degrees /s) and 10 Hz (peak velocities: 20 and 100 degrees /s) was measured pre- and postadaptation. Adaptation was induced over 4 h with x0.45 minimizing spectacles. Sum-of-sines stimuli were used to induce adaptation, and the parameters of the stimuli were adjusted to invoke only the linear or both linear and nonlinear components of the response. Preadaptation, there was a velocity-dependent gain enhancement at 4 and 10 Hz. In postadaptation with the paradigms that only recruited the linear component, there was a decrease in gain and a persistent velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of only the linear component). After adaptation with the paradigm designed to recruit both the linear and nonlinear components, there was a decrease in gain and no velocity-dependent gain enhancement (indicating adaptation of both components). There were comparable changes in the response to steps of acceleration. We interpret these results to indicate that separate processes drive the adaptation of the linear and nonlinear components of the response.

  1. Service Differentiated and Adaptive CSMA/CA over IEEE 802.15.4 for Cyber-Physical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ruixia

    2013-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) that collect, exchange, manage information, and coordinate actions are an integral part of the Smart Grid. In addition, Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning in CPS, especially in the wireless sensor/actuator networks, plays an essential role in Smart Grid applications. IEEE 802.15.4, which is one of the most widely used communication protocols in this area, still needs to be improved to meet multiple QoS requirements. This is because IEEE 802.15.4 slotted Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA) employs static parameter configuration without supporting differentiated services and network self-adaptivity. To address this issue, this paper proposes a priority-based Service Differentiated and Adaptive CSMA/CA (SDA-CSMA/CA) algorithm to provide differentiated QoS for various Smart Grid applications as well as dynamically initialize backoff exponent according to traffic conditions. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed SDA-CSMA/CA scheme significantly outperforms the IEEE 802.15.4 slotted CSMA/CA in terms of effective data rate, packet loss rate, and average delay. PMID:24260021

  2. Service differentiated and adaptive CSMA/CA over IEEE 802.15.4 for Cyber-Physical Systems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Feng; Li, Jie; Hao, Ruonan; Kong, Xiangjie; Gao, Ruixia

    2013-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) that collect, exchange, manage information, and coordinate actions are an integral part of the Smart Grid. In addition, Quality of Service (QoS) provisioning in CPS, especially in the wireless sensor/actuator networks, plays an essential role in Smart Grid applications. IEEE 802.15.4, which is one of the most widely used communication protocols in this area, still needs to be improved to meet multiple QoS requirements. This is because IEEE 802.15.4 slotted Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA) employs static parameter configuration without supporting differentiated services and network self-adaptivity. To address this issue, this paper proposes a priority-based Service Differentiated and Adaptive CSMA/CA (SDA-CSMA/CA) algorithm to provide differentiated QoS for various Smart Grid applications as well as dynamically initialize backoff exponent according to traffic conditions. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed SDA-CSMA/CA scheme significantly outperforms the IEEE 802.15.4 slotted CSMA/CA in terms of effective data rate, packet loss rate, and average delay.

  3. Adaptive Resistance and Differential Protein Expression of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Biofilms Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Korber, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 μg ml−1) or intermittently (10 μg ml−1 for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 μg ml−1 for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC. PMID:16940079

  4. Adaptive resistance and differential protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms exposed to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Korber, Darren R

    2006-11-01

    The development of adaptive resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931 biofilms following exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BC) either continuously (1 microg ml(-1)) or intermittently (10 microg ml(-1) for 10 min daily) was examined. Biofilms adapted to BC over a 144-h period could survive a normally lethal BC challenge (500 microg ml(-1) for 10 min) and then regrow, as determined by increases in biofilm thickness, total biomass, and the ratio of the viable biomass to the nonviable biomass. Exposure of untreated control biofilms to the lethal BC challenge resulted in biofilm erosion and cell death. Proteins found to be up-regulated following BC adaptation were those involved in energy metabolism (TpiA and Eno), amino acid and protein biosynthesis (WrbA, TrxA, RplL, Tsf, Tuf, DsbA, and RpoZ), nutrient binding (FruB), adaptation (CspA), detoxification (Tpx, SodB, and a probable peroxidase), and degradation of 1,2-propanediol (PduJ and PduA). A putative universal stress protein (YnaF) was also found to be up-regulated. Proteins involved in proteolysis (DegQ), cell envelope formation (RfbH), adaptation (UspA), heat shock response (DnaK), and broad regulatory functions (Hns) were found to be down-regulated following adaptation. An overall increase in cellular protein biosynthesis was deduced from the significant up-regulation of ribosomal subunit proteins, translation elongation factors, and amino acid biosynthesis protein and down-regulation of serine endoprotease. The cold shock response, stress response, and detoxification are suggested to play roles in the adaptive resistance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis biofilms to BC.

  5. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Narum, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  6. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Thorgaard, Gary H; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-05-04

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis.

  7. Adapting collagen/CNT matrix in directing hESC differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Indumathi; Kim, Taeyoung; Wang, Rong

    2009-04-17

    The lineage selection in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation relies on both the growth factors and small molecules in the media and the physical characteristics of the micro-environment. In this work, we utilized various materials, including the collagen-carbon nanotube (collagen/CNT) composite material, as cell culture matrices to examine the impact of matrix properties on hESC differentiation. Our AFM analysis indicated that the collagen/CNT formed rigid fibril bundles, which polarized the growth and differentiation of hESCs, resulting in more than 90% of the cells to the ectodermal lineage in Day 3 in the media commonly used for spontaneous differentiation. We also observed the differentiated cells followed the coarse alignment of the collagen/CNT matrix. The research not only revealed the responsiveness of hESCs to matrix properties, but also provided a simple yet efficient way to direct the hESC differentiation, and imposed the potential of forming neural-cell based bio-devices for further applications.

  8. Simplified flexible-PON upstream transmission using pulse position modulation at ONU and DSP-enabled soft-combining at OLT for adaptive link budgets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Effenberger, Frank; Chand, Naresh

    2015-03-09

    We demonstrate a flexible modulation and detection scheme for upstream transmission in passive optical networks using pulse position modulation at optical network unit, facilitating burst-mode detection with automatic decision threshold tracking, and DSP-enabled soft-combining at optical line terminal. Adaptive receiver sensitivities of -33.1 dBm, -36.6 dBm and -38.3 dBm at a bit error ratio of 10(-4) are respectively achieved for 2.5 Gb/s, 1.25 Gb/s and 625 Mb/s after transmission over a 20-km standard single-mode fiber without any optical amplification.

  9. Differential freshwater adaptation in juvenile sea-bass Dicentrarchus labrax: involvement of gills and urinary system.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Catherine; Romestand, Bernard; Nègre-Sadargues, Geneviève; Grousset, Evelyse; Aujoulat, Fabien; Bacal, Julien; Bonhomme, François; Charmantier, Guy

    2005-10-01

    The effects of long-term freshwater acclimatization were investigated in juvenile sea-bass Dicentrarchus labrax to determine whether all sea-bass juveniles are able to live in freshwater and to investigate the physiological basis of a successful adaptation to freshwater. This study particularly focused on the ability of sea-bass to maintain their hydromineral balance in freshwater and on their ion (re)absorbing abilities through the gills and kidneys. Two different responses were recorded after a long-term freshwater acclimatization. (1) Successfully adapted sea-bass displayed standard behavior; their blood osmolality was maintained almost constant after the freshwater challenge, attesting to their efficient hyperosmoregulation. Their branchial and renal Na+/K+-ATPase abundance and activity were high compared to seawater fish due to a high number of branchial ionocytes and to the involvement of the urinary system in active ion reabsorption, producing hypotonic urine. (2) Sea-bass that had not successfully adapted to freshwater were recognized by abnormal schooling behavior. Their blood osmolality was low (30% lower than in the successfully adapted sea-bass), which is a sign of acute osmoregulatory failure. High branchial Na+/K+-ATPase abundance and activity compared to successfully adapted fish were coupled to a proliferation of gill chloride cells, whose ultrastructure did not display pathological signs. The large surface used by the gill chloride cells might negatively interfere with respiratory gas exchanges. In their urinary system, enzyme abundance and activity were low, in accordance with the observed lower density of the kidney tubules. Urine was isotonic to blood in unsuccessfully adapted fish, ruling out any participation of the kidney in hyperosmoregulation. The kidney failure seems to generate a compensatory ion absorption through increased gill activity, but net ion loss through urine seems higher than ion absorption by the gills, leading to lower hyper

  10. An adaptive wavelet stochastic collocation method for irregular solutions of stochastic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Clayton G; Zhang, Guannan; Gunzburger, Max D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate predictive simulations of complex real world applications require numerical approximations to first, oppose the curse of dimensionality and second, converge quickly in the presence of steep gradients, sharp transitions, bifurcations or finite discontinuities in high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this paper we present a novel multi-dimensional multi-resolution adaptive (MdMrA) sparse grid stochastic collocation method, that utilizes hierarchical multiscale piecewise Riesz basis functions constructed from interpolating wavelets. The basis for our non-intrusive method forms a stable multiscale splitting and thus, optimal adaptation is achieved. Error estimates and numerical examples will used to compare the efficiency of the method with several other techniques.

  11. PULSE COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Trumbo, D.E.

    1959-02-10

    A transistorized pulse-counting circuit adapted for use with nuclear radiation detecting detecting devices to provide a small, light weight portable counter is reported. The small size and low power requirements of the transistor are of particular value in this instance. The circuit provides an adjustable count scale with a single transistor which is triggered by the accumulated charge on a storage capacitor.

  12. Comparison of differential pulse and alternating current polarography in the soft-modelling study of the complexation of Cd(II) by the fragment Cys-Gly and by the phytochelatin (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly.

    PubMed

    Garrigosa, Anna Maria; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2008-07-01

    A comparison of a differential pulse polarographic with a phase sensitive alternating current polarographic study of the Cd-Cys-Gly and Cd-PC(2) systems [PC(2) being a phytochelatin of general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)(n)-Gly, with n = 2] has been performed. The chemometric multivariate curve resolution method with alternating least squares was applied in the experimental data analysis. The results obtained by both polarographic techniques have made it possible to find out the formation sequences of the complexes and their final stoichiometries. The alternating current polarograms compared with the differential pulse ones show some differences (a new signal and an important shift of peak potentials), which anyway are consistent with some of the conclusions obtained by differential pulse polarography. This fact implies that although the alternating current polarography results need some corrections before data treatment, they provide extra information that complements the conclusions achieved by differential pulse polarography.

  13. Using community archetypes to better understand differential community adaptation to wildfire risk.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Matthew; Paveglio, Travis

    2016-06-05

    One of the immediate challenges of wildfire management concerns threats to human safety and property in residential areas adjacent to non-cultivated vegetation. One approach for relieving this problem is to increase human community 'adaptiveness' to deal with the risk and reality of fire in a variety of landscapes. The challenge in creating 'fire-adapted communities' (FACs) is the great diversity in character and make-up of populations at risk from wildfire. This paper outlines a recently developed categorization scheme for Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI) communities based on a larger conceptual approach for understanding how social diversity is likely to influence the creation of FACs. The WUI categorization scheme situates four community archetypes on a continuum that recognizes dynamic change in human community functioning. We use results from the WUI classification scheme to outline key characteristics associated with each archetype and results from recent case studies to demonstrate the diversity across WUI communities. Differences among key characteristics of local social context will likely result in the need for different adaptation strategies to wildfire. While the WUI archetypes described here may not be broadly applicable to other parts of the world, we argue that the conceptual approach and strategies for systematically documenting local influences on wildfire adaptation have potential for broad application.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'.

  14. Social Support Provisions as Differential Predictors of Adaptive Outcomes in Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jared S.; Jackson, Yo; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2009-01-01

    Social support provisions were examined in relation to negative life events, adaptive skills, hope, and grade point average in a sample of 103 inner-city youth (ages 11-14). Analyses focused on seven support provisions: social integration, attachment, guidance and information, reliable alliance, reassurance of worth, nurturance, and instrumental…

  15. Habituation and adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex: a model of differential control by the vestibulocerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H.; Cohen, B.; Raphan, T.; Waespe, W.

    1992-01-01

    We habituated the dominant time constant of the horizontal vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys by repeated testing with steps of velocity about a vertical axis and adapted the gain of the VOR by altering visual input with magnifying and reducing lenses. After baseline values were established, the nodulus and ventral uvula of the vestibulocerebellum were ablated in two monkeys, and the effects of nodulouvulectomy and flocculectomy on VOR gain adaptation and habituation were compared. The VOR time constant decreased with repeated testing, rapidly at first and more slowly thereafter. The gain of the VOR was unaffected. Massed trials were more effective than distributed trials in producing habituation. Regardless of the schedule of testing, the VOR time constant never fell below the time constant of the semicircular canals (approximately 5 s). This finding indicates that only the slow component of the vestibular response, the component produced by velocity storage, was habituated. In agreement with this, the time constant of optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) was habituated concurrently with the VOR. Average values for VOR habituation were obtained on a per session basis for six animals. The VOR gain was adapted by natural head movements in partially habituated monkeys while they wore x 2.2 magnifying or x 0.5 reducing lenses. Adaptation occurred rapidly and reached about +/- 30%, similar to values obtained using forced rotation. VOR gain adaptation did not cause additional habituation of the time constant. When the VOR gain was reduced in animals with a long VOR time constant, there were overshoots in eye velocity that peaked at about 6-8 s after the onset or end of constant-velocity rotation. These overshoots occurred at times when the velocity storage integrator would have been maximally activated by semicircular canal input. Since the activity generated in the canals is not altered by visual adaptation, this finding indicates that the gain

  16. Habitat Choice and Temporal Variation Alter the Balance between Adaptation by Genetic Differentiation, a Jack-of-All-Trades Strategy, and Phenotypic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, Samuel M

    2016-05-01

    Confronted with variable environments, species adapt in several ways, including genetic differentiation, a jack-of-all-trades strategy, or phenotypic plasticity. Adaptive habitat choice favors genetic differentiation and local adaptation over a generalist, jack-of-all-trades strategy. Models predict that, absent plasticity costs, variable environments generally favor phenotypic plasticity over genetic differentiation and being a jack-of-all-trades generalist. It is unknown how habitat choice might affect the evolution of plasticity. Using an individual-based simulation model, I explored the interaction of choice and plasticity. With only spatial variation, habitat choice promotes genetic differentiation over a jack-of-all-trades strategy or phenotypic plasticity. In the absence of plasticity, temporal variation favors a jack-of-all-trades strategy over choice-mediated genetic differentiation; when plasticity is an option, it is favored. This occurs because habitat choice creates a feedback between genetic differentiation and dispersal rates. As demes become better adapted to their local environments, the effective dispersal rate decreases, because more individuals have very high fitness and so choose not to disperse, reinforcing local stabilizing selection and negating selection for plasticity. Temporal variation breaks that feedback. These results point to a potential data paradox: systems with habitat choice may have the lowest actual movement rates. The potential for adaptive habitat choice may be very common, but its existence may reduce observed dispersal rates enough that we do not recognize systems where it may be present, warranting further exploration of likely systems.

  17. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  18. Plant responses to climate in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa: evidence for adaptive differentiation in the Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jane E; Holsinger, Kent E; Prunier, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Local adaptation along environmental gradients may drive plant species radiation within the Cape Floristic Region (CFR), yet few studies examine the role of ecologically based divergent selection within CFR clades. In this study, we ask whether populations within the monophyletic white protea clade (Protea section Exsertae, Proteaceae) differ in key functional traits along environmental gradients and whether differences are consistent with local adaptation. Using seven taxa, we measured trait-environment associations and selection gradients across 35 populations of wild adults and their offspring grown in two common gardens. Focal traits were leaf size and shape, specific leaf area (SLA), stomatal density, growth, and photosynthetic rate. Analyses on wild and common garden plants revealed heritable trait differences that were associated with gradients in rainfall seasonality, drought stress, cold stress, and less frequently, soil fertility. Divergent selection between gardens generally matched trait-environment correlations and literature-based predictions, yet variation in selection regimes among wild populations generally did not. Thus, selection via seedling survival may promote gradient-wide differences in SLA and leaf area more than does selection via adult fecundity. By focusing on the traits, life stages, and environmental clines that drive divergent selection, our study uniquely demonstrates adaptive differentiation among plant populations in the CFR.

  19. Adaptive fuzzy control of underactuated robotic systems with the use of differential flatness theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G.

    2013-10-01

    An adaptive fuzzy controller is designed for a class of underactuated nonlinear robotic manipulators, under the constraint that the system's model is unknown. The control algorithm aims at satisfying the H∞ tracking performance criterion, which means that the influence of the modeling errors and the external disturbances on the tracking error is attenuated to an arbitrary desirable level. After transforming the robotic system into the canonical form, the resulting control inputs are shown to contain nonlinear elements which depend on the system's parameters. The nonlinear terms which appear in the control inputs are approximated with the use of neuro-fuzzy networks. It is shown that a suitable learning law can be defined for the aforementioned neuro-fuzzy approximators so as to preserve the closed-loop system stability. With the use of Lyapunov stability analysis it is proven that the proposed adaptive fuzzy control scheme results in H∞ tracking performance. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive fuzzy control scheme is checked in the case of a 2-DOF planar robotic manipulator that has the structure of a closed-chain mechanism.

  20. Differential effects of deep cerebellar nuclei inactivation on reaching and adaptive control.

    PubMed

    Martin, J H; Cooper, S E; Hacking, A; Ghez, C

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the effects of selective inactivation of the cerebellar nuclei in the cat on the control of multijoint trajectories and trajectory adaptation to avoid obstacles. Animals were restrained in a hammock and trained to perform a prehension task in which they reached to grasp a small cube of meat from a narrow food well. To examine trajectory adaptation, reaching was obstructed by placing a horizontal bar in the limb's path. Inactivation was produced by microinjection of the GABA agonist muscimol (0.25-1.0 microg in 1 microL saline). Fastigial nucleus inactivation produced a severe impairment in balance and in head and trunk control but no effect on reaching and grasping. Dentate inactivation slowed movements significantly and produced a significant increase in tip path curvature but did not impair reaching and grasping. Selective inactivation of the anterior and posterior interpositus nuclei did not impair grasping but severely decreased the accuracy of reaching movements and produced different biases in wrist and paw paths. Anterior interpositus inactivation produced movement slowing (wrist speed) and under-reaching to the food well. Wrist and tip paths showed anterior biases and became more curved. Also animals could no longer make anticipatory adjustments in limb kinematics to avoid obstructions but sensory-evoked corrective responses were preserved. Posterior interpositus inactivation produced a significant increase in wrist speed and overreaching. Wrist and tip paths showed a posterior bias and became more curved, although in a different way than during anterior interpositus inactivation. Posterior interpositus inactivation did not impair trajectory adaptation to reach over the obstacle. During inactivation of either interpositus nucleus, all measures of kinematic temporal and spatial variability increased with somewhat greater effects being produced by anterior interpositus inactivation. We discuss our results in relation to the hypothesis that

  1. QoS Differential Scheduling in Cognitive-Radio-Based Smart Grid Networks: An Adaptive Dynamic Programming Approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Shengli; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yun

    2016-02-01

    As the next-generation power grid, smart grid will be integrated with a variety of novel communication technologies to support the explosive data traffic and the diverse requirements of quality of service (QoS). Cognitive radio (CR), which has the favorable ability to improve the spectrum utilization, provides an efficient and reliable solution for smart grid communications networks. In this paper, we study the QoS differential scheduling problem in the CR-based smart grid communications networks. The scheduler is responsible for managing the spectrum resources and arranging the data transmissions of smart grid users (SGUs). To guarantee the differential QoS, the SGUs are assigned to have different priorities according to their roles and their current situations in the smart grid. Based on the QoS-aware priority policy, the scheduler adjusts the channels allocation to minimize the transmission delay of SGUs. The entire transmission scheduling problem is formulated as a semi-Markov decision process and solved by the methodology of adaptive dynamic programming. A heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) architecture is established for the scheduling problem. By the online network training, the HDP can learn from the activities of primary users and SGUs, and adjust the scheduling decision to achieve the purpose of transmission delay minimization. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed priority policy ensures the low transmission delay of high priority SGUs. In addition, the emergency data transmission delay is also reduced to a significantly low level, guaranteeing the differential QoS in smart grid.

  2. Differential cortical neurotrophin and cytogenetic adaptation after voluntary exercise in normal and amnestic rats.

    PubMed

    Hall, J M; Vetreno, R P; Savage, L M

    2014-01-31

    Voluntary exercise (VEx) has profound effects on neural and behavioral plasticity, including recovery of CNS trauma and disease. However, the unique regional cortical adaption to VEx has not been elucidated. In a series of experiments, we first examined whether VEx would restore and retain neurotrophin levels in several cortical regions (frontal cortex [FC], retrosplenial cortex [RSC], occipital cortex [OC]) in an animal model (pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency [PTD]) of the amnestic disorder Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In addition, we assessed the time-dependent effect of VEx to rescue performance on a spontaneous alternation task. Following 2-weeks of VEx or stationary housing conditions (Stat), rats were behaviorally tested and brains were harvested either the day after VEx (24-h) or after an additional 2-week period (2-wk). In both control pair-fed (PF) rats and PTD rats, all neurotrophin levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], nerve growth factor [NGF], and vascular endothelial growth factor) increased at the 24-h period after VEx in the FC and RSC, but not OC. Two-weeks following VEx, BDNF remained elevated in both FC and RSC, whereas NGF remained elevated in only the FC. Interestingly, VEx only recovered cognitive performance in amnestic rats when there was an additional 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. Given this unique temporal profile, Experiment 2 examined the cortical cytogenetic responses in all three cortical regions following a 2-wk adaptation period after VEx. In healthy (PF) rats, VEx increased the survival of progenitor cells in both the FC and RSC, but only increased oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OLPs) in the FC. Furthermore, VEx had a selective effect of only recovering OLPs in the FC in PTD rats. These data reveal the therapeutic potential of exercise to restore cortical plasticity in the amnestic brain, and that the FC is one of the most responsive cortical regions to VEx.

  3. Differentiating adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism on the MMPI-2 and MIPS revised.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kenneth G; Stuart, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Although conceptualizations of perfectionism have emphasized adaptive as well as maladaptive expressions of the construct, how these different dimensions or types of perfectionists might be reflected in comprehensive personality assessment instruments is unknown. An initial sample of 267 university students completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2; Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 2001), Millon Index of Personality Styles Revised (MIPS-R; Millon, 2004), and Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (Slaney, Mobley, Trippi, Ashby, & Johnson, 1996). Analyses indicated that dimensions and types of perfectionism were associated, in expected directions, with select scores on the MMPI-2 and MIPS-R.

  4. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  5. Differential effects of endurance training and creatine depletion on regional mitochondrial adaptations in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, D; Lhenry, F; Ecochard, L; Sempore, B; Rouanet, J L; Favier, R

    2000-01-01

    To examine the combined effects of 2-week endurance training and 3-week feeding with beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) on regional adaptability of skeletal muscle mitochondria, intermyofibrillar mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated from quadriceps muscles of sedentary control, trained control, sedentary GPA-fed and trained GPA-fed rats. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation was assessed polarographically by using pyruvate plus malate, succinate (plus rotenone), and ascorbate plus N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) (plus antimycin) as respiratory substrates. Assays of cytochrome c oxidase and F(1)-ATPase activities were also performed. In sedentary control rats, IFM exhibited a higher oxidative capacity than SSM, whereas F(1)-ATPase activities were similar. Training increased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria with both pyruvate plus malate and ascorbate plus TMPD as substrates, with no differences between IFM and SSM. In contrast, the GPA diet mainly improved the overall SSM oxidative phosphorylation capacity, irrespective of the substrate used. Finally, the superimposition of training to feeding with GPA strongly increased both oxidase and enzymic activities in SSM, whereas no cumulative effects were found in IFM mitochondria. It therefore seems that endurance training and feeding with GPA, which are both known to alter the energetic status of the muscle cell, might mediate distinct biochemical adaptations in regional skeletal muscle mitochondria. PMID:10947970

  6. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-06-25

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi-yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts' genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

  7. Patched based methods for adaptive mesh refinement solutions of partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Saltzman, J.

    1997-09-02

    This manuscript contains the lecture notes for a course taught from July 7th through July 11th at the 1997 Numerical Analysis Summer School sponsored by C.E.A., I.N.R.I.A., and E.D.F. The subject area was chosen to support the general theme of that year`s school which is ``Multiscale Methods and Wavelets in Numerical Simulation.`` The first topic covered in these notes is a description of the problem domain. This coverage is limited to classical PDEs with a heavier emphasis on hyperbolic systems and constrained hyperbolic systems. The next topic is difference schemes. These schemes are the foundation for the adaptive methods. After the background material is covered, attention is focused on a simple patched based adaptive algorithm and its associated data structures for square grids and hyperbolic conservation laws. Embellishments include curvilinear meshes, embedded boundary and overset meshes. Next, several strategies for parallel implementations are examined. The remainder of the notes contains descriptions of elliptic solutions on the mesh hierarchy, elliptically constrained flow solution methods and elliptically constrained flow solution methods with diffusion.

  8. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R.; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi–yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts’ genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts. PMID:26108467

  9. Morphological adaptation with no mitochondrial DNA differentiation in the coastal plain swamp sparrow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenberg, R.; Cordero, P.J.; Droege, S.; Fleischer, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    We estimated genetic differentiation between morphologically distinct tidal marsh populations of Swamp Sparrows (Melospiza georgiana nigrescens) and the more wide-spread inland populations (M. g. georgiana and M. g. ericrypta). The tidal marsh populations are consistently grayer with more extensive black markings (particularly in the crown), and their bills are larger. These differences are variously shared with other species of salt marsh birds and small mammals. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA sequences (5' end of control region, COII/tlys/ATPase8, and ND2) of Swamp Sparrows and found low levels of genetic variation and no evidence of geographic structure. These results suggest a rapid and recent geographic expansion of Swamp Sparrows from restricted Pleistocene populations. Morphological differentiation has occurred without long-term genetic isolation, suggesting that selection on the divergent traits is intense. The grayer and more melanistic plumage is probably cryptic coloration for foraging on tidal mud, which tends to be grayish as a result of the formation of iron sulfides, rather than iron oxides, under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Population genomics of an endemic Mediterranean fish: differentiation by fine scale dispersal and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, Carlos; Ordóñez, Víctor; Zane, Lorenzo; Kruschel, Claudia; Nasto, Ina; Macpherson, Enrique; Pascual, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of the genetic structuring of biodiversity is crucial for management and conservation. For species with large effective population sizes a low number of markers may fail to identify population structure. A solution of this shortcoming can be high-throughput sequencing that allows genotyping thousands of markers on a genome-wide approach while facilitating the detection of genetic structuring shaped by selection. We used Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) on 176 individuals of the endemic East Atlantic peacock wrasse (Symphodus tinca), from 6 locations in the Adriatic and Ionian seas. We obtained a total of 4,155 polymorphic SNPs and we observed two strong barriers to gene flow. The first one differentiated Tremiti Islands, in the northwest, from all the other locations while the second one separated east and south-west localities. Outlier SNPs potentially under positive selection and neutral SNPs both showed similar patterns of structuring, although finer scale differentiation was unveiled with outlier loci. Our results reflect the complexity of population genetic structure and demonstrate that both habitat fragmentation and positive selection are on play. This complexity should be considered in biodiversity assessments of different taxa, including non-model yet ecologically relevant organisms. PMID:28262802

  11. Differential survival of Ichthyophonus isolates indicates parasite adaptation to its host environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Pacheco, C.A.; Gregg, J.L.; Purcell, M.K.; LaPatra, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro viability of Ichthyophonus spp. spores in seawater and freshwater corresponded with the water type of the host from which the spores were isolated. Among Ichthyophonus spp. spores from both marine and freshwater fish hosts (Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, respectively), viability was significantly greater (P < 0.05) after incubation in seawater than in freshwater at all time points from 1 to 60 min after immersion; however, magnitude of the spore tolerances to water type differed with host origin. Ichthyophonus sp. adaptation to its host environment was indicated by greater seawater tolerance of spores from the marine host and greater freshwater tolerance of spores from the freshwater host. Prolonged aqueous survival of Ichthyophonus spp. spores in the absence of a host provides insight into routes of transmission, particularly among planktivorous fishes, and should be considered when designing strategies to dispose of infected fish carcasses and tissues.

  12. Innate and adaptive immune traits are differentially affected by genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Roederer, Mario; Beddall, Margaret H.; Nestle, Frank O.; Spector, Tim D.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and activity of leukocytes is controlled by genetic and environmental influences to maintain balanced immune responses. However, the relative contribution of environmental compared with genetic factors that affect variations in immune traits is unknown. Here we analyse 23,394 immune phenotypes in 497 adult female twins. 76% of these traits show a predominantly heritable influence, whereas 24% are mostly influenced by environment. These data highlight the importance of shared childhood environmental influences such as diet, infections or microbes in shaping immune homeostasis for monocytes, B1 cells, γδ T cells and NKT cells, whereas dendritic cells, B2 cells, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells are more influenced by genetics. Although leukocyte subsets are influenced by genetics and environment, adaptive immune traits are more affected by genetics, whereas innate immune traits are more affected by environment. PMID:28054551

  13. Adaptive plasticity of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos: dehydration-stimulated development and differential aquaporin-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Zapater, Cinta; Chauvigné, François; Otero, David; Cerdà, Joan

    2009-04-01

    Embryos of the marine killifish Fundulus heteroclitus are adapted to survive aerially. However, it is unknown if they are able to control development under dehydration conditions. Here, we show that air-exposed blastula embryos under saturated relative humidity were able to stimulate development, and hence the time of hatching was advanced with respect to embryos continuously immersed in seawater. Embryos exposed to air at later developmental stages did not hatch until water was added, while development was not arrested. Air-exposed embryos avoided dehydration probably because of their thickened egg envelope, although it suffered significant evaporative water loss. The potential role of aquaporins as part of the embryo response to dehydration was investigated by cloning the aquaporin-0 (FhAqp0), -1a (FhAqp1a), and -3 (FhAqp3) cDNAs. Functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that FhaAqp1a was a water-selective channel, whereas FhAqp3 was permeable to water, glycerol, and urea. Expression of fhaqp0 and fhaqp1a was prominent during organogenesis, and their mRNA levels were similar between water- and air-incubated embryos. However, fhaqp3 transcripts were highly and transiently accumulated during gastrulation, and the protein product was localized in the basolateral membrane of the enveloping epithelial cell layer and in the membrane of ingressing and migrating blastomers. Interestingly, both fhaqp3 transcripts and FhAqp3 polypeptides were downregulated in air-exposed embryos. These data demonstrate that killifish embryos respond adaptively to environmental desiccation by accelerating development and that embryos are able to transduce dehydration conditions into molecular responses. The reduced synthesis of FhAqp3 may be one of these mechanisms to regulate water and/or solute transport in the embryo.

  14. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  15. Population differentiation in a Mediterranean relict shrub: the potential role of local adaptation for coping with climate change.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Nogal, Ana; Matesanz, Silvia; Hallik, Lea; Krasnova, Alisa; Traveset, Anna; Valladares, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Plants can respond to climate change by either migrating, adapting to the new conditions or going extinct. Relict plant species of limited distribution can be especially vulnerable as they are usually composed of small and isolated populations, which may reduce their ability to cope with rapidly changing environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the vulnerability of Cneorum tricoccon L. (Cneoraceae), a Mediterranean relict shrub of limited distribution, to a future drier climate. We evaluated population differentiation in functional traits related to drought tolerance across seven representative populations of the species' range. We measured morphological and physiological traits in both the field and the greenhouse under three water availability levels. Large phenotypic differences among populations were found under field conditions. All populations responded plastically to simulated drought, but they differed in mean trait values as well as in the slope of the phenotypic response. Particularly, dry-edge populations exhibited multiple functional traits that favored drought tolerance, such as more sclerophyllous leaves, strong stomatal control but high photosynthetic rates, which increases water use efficiency (iWUE), and an enhanced ability to accumulate sugars as osmolytes. Although drought decreased RGR in all populations, this reduction was smaller for populations from the dry edge. Our results suggest that dry-edge populations of this relict species are well adapted to drought, which could potentially mitigate the species' extinction risk under drier scenarios. Dry-edge populations not only have a great conservation value but can also change expectations from current species' distribution models.

  16. Structure and function of quinones in biological solar energy transduction: a differential pulse voltammetry, EPR, and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy study of model benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Weyers, Amanda M; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Lakshmi, K V

    2009-11-19

    Quinones are widely used electron transport cofactors in photosynthetic reaction centers. Previous studies have suggested that the structure of the quinone cofactors and the protein interactions or "smart" matrix effects from the surrounding environment govern the redox potential and hence the function of quinones in photosynthesis. In the present study, a series of 1,4-benzoquinone models are examined via differential pulse voltammetry to provide relative redox potentials. In parallel, CW and pulsed EPR methods are used to directly determine the electronic properties of each benzoquinone in aprotic and protic environments. The shifts in the redox potential of the quinones are found to be dependent on the nature of the substituent group and the number of substituent groups on the quinone molecule. Further, we establish a direct correlation between the nature of the substituent group and the change in electronic properties of the benzosemiquinone by analysis of the isotropic and anisotropic components of the electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions observed by CW and pulsed EPR studies, respectively. Examination of an extensive library of model quinones in both aprotic and protic solvents indicates that hydrogen-bonding interactions consistently accentuate the effects of the substituent groups of the benzoquinones. This study provides direct support for the tuning and control of quinone cofactors in biological solar energy transduction through interactions with the surrounding protein matrix.

  17. Differential single nucleotide polymorphism-based analysis of an outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan reveals epidemiological details missed by standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scaltriti, Erika; Sassera, Davide; Comandatore, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; Mandalari, Carmen; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele; Pongolini, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively analyzed a rare Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan outbreak that occurred in Italy in 2009 to evaluate the potential of new genomic tools based on differential single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in comparison with the gold standard genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 39 isolates were analyzed from patients (n=15) and food, feed, animal, and environmental sources (n=24), resulting in five different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Isolates epidemiologically related to the outbreak clustered within the same pulsotype, SXB_BS.0003, without any further differentiation. Thirty-three isolates were considered for genomic analysis based on different sets of SNPs, core, synonymous, nonsynonymous, as well as SNPs in different codon positions, by Bayesian and maximum likelihood algorithms. Trees generated from core and nonsynonymous SNPs, as well as SNPs at the second and first plus second codon positions detailed four distinct groups of isolates within the outbreak pulsotype, discriminating outbreak-related isolates of human and food origins. Conversely, the trees derived from synonymous and third-codon-position SNPs clustered food and human isolates together, indicating that all outbreak-related isolates constituted a single clone, which was in line with the epidemiological evidence. Further experiments are in place to extend this approach within our regional enteropathogen surveillance system.

  18. Polytetrafluorethylene film-based liquid-three phase micro extraction coupled with differential pulse voltammetry for the determination of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Khoddami, Elaheh; Rezaei, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new combination method based on polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) film-based liquid three-phase micro extraction coupled with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for the micro extraction and quantification of atorvastatin calcium (ATC) at the ultra-trace level. Different factors affecting the liquid-three phases micro extraction of atorvastatin calcium, including organic solvent, pH of the donor and acceptor phases, concentration of salt, extraction time, stirring rate and electrochemical factors, were investigated, and the optimal extraction conditions were established. The final stable signal was achieved after a 50 min extraction time, which was used for analytical applications. An enrichment factor of 21 was achieved, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method was 4.5% (n = 4). Differential pulse voltammetry exhibited two wide linear dynamic ranges of 20.0-1000.0 pmol L(-1) and 0.001-11.0 µmol L(-1) of ATC. The detection limit was found to be 8.1 pmol L(-1) ATC. Finally, the proposed method was used as a new combination method for the determination of atorvastatin calcium in real samples, such as human urine and plasma.

  19. Determination of Silver(I) by Differential Pulse Voltammetry Using a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Synthesized N-(2-Aminoethyl)-4,4′-Bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Chira, Ana; Radulescu, Medeea; Bucur, Bogdan; Bucur, Madalina Petruta; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2010-01-01

    A new modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) based on a synthesized N-(2-aminoethyl)-4,4′-bipyridine (ABP) was developed for the determination of Ag(I) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). ABP was covalently immobilized on GC electrodes surface using 4-nitrobenzendiazonium (4-NBD) and glutaraldehyde (GA). The Ag(I) ions were preconcentrated by chemical interaction with bipyridine under a negative potential (−0.6 V); then the reduced ions were oxidized by differential pulse voltammetry and a peak was observed at 0.34 V. The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range from 0.05 μM to 1 μM Ag(I) with a detection limit of 0.025 μM and RSD = 3.6%, for 0.4 μM Ag(I). The presence of several common ions in more than 125-fold excess had no effect on the determination of Ag(I). The developed sensor was applied to the determination of Ag(I) in water samples using a standard addition method. PMID:22163530

  20. Combined effect of pulsed electromagnetic field and sound wave on In vitro and In vivo neural differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Cho, Hyunjin; Jeong, Jong-Seob; Kim, Soo-Chan; Park, Jung-Keug

    2017-01-01

    Biophysical wave stimulus has been used as an effective tool to promote cellular maturation and differentiation in the construction of engineered tissue. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and sound waves have been selected as effective stimuli that can promote neural differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effect of PEMFs and sound waves on the neural differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). In vitro, neural-related genes in hBM-MSCs were accelerated by the combined exposure to both waves more than by individual exposure to PEMFs or sound waves. The combined wave also up-regulated the expression of neural and synaptic-related proteins in a three-dimensional (3-D) culture system through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase. In a mouse model of photochemically induced ischemia, exposure to the combined wave reduced the infarction volume and improved post-injury behavioral activity. These results indicate that a combined stimulus of biophysical waves, PEMFs and sound can enhance and possibly affect the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. Our study is meaningful for highlighting the potential of combined wave for neurogenic effects and providing new therapeutic approaches for neural cell therapy. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:201-211, 2017.

  1. The influence of innate and adaptative immune responses on the differential clinical outcomes of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Adriana Barbosa de Lima; Simon, Marise do Vale; Cazzaniga, Rodrigo Anselmo; de Moura, Tatiana Rodrigues; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; Duthie, Malcolm S; Reed, Steven G; de Jesus, Amelia Ribeiro

    2017-02-06

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to official reports from 121 countries across five WHO regions, there were 213 899 newly diagnosed cases in 2014. Although leprosy affects the skin and peripheral nerves, it can present across a spectrum of clinical and histopathological forms that are strongly influenced by the immune response of the infected individuals. These forms comprise the extremes of tuberculoid leprosy (TT), with a M. leprae-specific Th1, but also a Th17, response that limits M. leprae multiplication, through to lepromatous leprosy (LL), with M. leprae-specific Th2 and T regulatory responses that do not control M. leprae replication but rather allow bacterial dissemination. The interpolar borderline clinical forms present with similar, but less extreme, immune biases. Acute inflammatory episodes, known as leprosy reactions, are complications that may occur before, during or after treatment, and cause further neurological damages that can cause irreversible chronic disabilities. This review discusses the innate and adaptive immune responses, and their interactions, that are known to affect pathogenesis and influence the clinical outcome of leprosy.

  2. Specific Metabolomics Adaptations Define a Differential Regional Vulnerability in the Adult Human Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Cabré, Rosanna; Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Gil-Villar, Maria P; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Mayelin; Obis, Èlia; Berdun, Rebeca; Mota-Martorell, Natalia; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2016-01-01

    Brain neurons offer diverse responses to stresses and detrimental factors during development and aging, and as a result of both neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. This multiplicity of responses can be ascribed to the great diversity among neuronal populations. Here we have determined the metabolomic profile of three healthy adult human brain regions-entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex-using mass spectrometry-based technologies. Our results show the existence of a lessened energy demand, mitochondrial stress, and lower one-carbon metabolism (particularly restricted to the methionine cycle) specifically in frontal cortex. These findings, along with the better antioxidant capacity and lower mTOR signaling also seen in frontal cortex, suggest that this brain region is especially resistant to stress compared to the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, which are more vulnerable regions. Globally, our results show the presence of specific metabolomics adaptations in three mature, healthy human brain regions, confirming the existence of cross-regional differences in cell vulnerability in the human cerebral cortex.

  3. Robust and adaptive techniques for numerical simulation of nonlinear partial differential equations of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owolabi, Kolade M.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, some nonlinear space-fractional order reaction-diffusion equations (SFORDE) on a finite but large spatial domain x ∈ [0, L], x = x(x , y , z) and t ∈ [0, T] are considered. Also in this work, the standard reaction-diffusion system with boundary conditions is generalized by replacing the second-order spatial derivatives with Riemann-Liouville space-fractional derivatives of order α, for 0 < α < 2. Fourier spectral method is introduced as a better alternative to existing low order schemes for the integration of fractional in space reaction-diffusion problems in conjunction with an adaptive exponential time differencing method, and solve a range of one-, two- and three-components SFORDE numerically to obtain patterns in one- and two-dimensions with a straight forward extension to three spatial dimensions in a sub-diffusive (0 < α < 1) and super-diffusive (1 < α < 2) scenarios. It is observed that computer simulations of SFORDE give enough evidence that pattern formation in fractional medium at certain parameter value is practically the same as in the standard reaction-diffusion case. With application to models in biology and physics, different spatiotemporal dynamics are observed and displayed.

  4. Specific Metabolomics Adaptations Define a Differential Regional Vulnerability in the Adult Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cabré, Rosanna; Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Gil-Villar, Maria P.; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Mayelin; Obis, Èlia; Berdun, Rebeca; Mota-Martorell, Natalia; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2016-01-01

    Brain neurons offer diverse responses to stresses and detrimental factors during development and aging, and as a result of both neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. This multiplicity of responses can be ascribed to the great diversity among neuronal populations. Here we have determined the metabolomic profile of three healthy adult human brain regions—entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex—using mass spectrometry-based technologies. Our results show the existence of a lessened energy demand, mitochondrial stress, and lower one-carbon metabolism (particularly restricted to the methionine cycle) specifically in frontal cortex. These findings, along with the better antioxidant capacity and lower mTOR signaling also seen in frontal cortex, suggest that this brain region is especially resistant to stress compared to the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, which are more vulnerable regions. Globally, our results show the presence of specific metabolomics adaptations in three mature, healthy human brain regions, confirming the existence of cross-regional differences in cell vulnerability in the human cerebral cortex. PMID:28008307

  5. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Amy C.; Knaub, Leslie A.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Connon, Chelsea A.; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W.; Geary, Kate E.; Walker, Lori A.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  6. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Inspecting for Corrosion of Shipboard Conduits and Shield-to-Ground Adapters with Low-Bandwidth Pulsed-Current Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    defects. Low values of shield path resistance have been measured where shield -to- ground adapters have been “floating” or ungrounded. This type of fault can...tests aboard USNS Mohawk ........................................................ 2 Figures 1. Measurement of cable shield resistance , disconnection not...5 3. Measurement of total cable shield path resistance in a system, disconnection not required ... 5 4. Method 1 (L/R method

  8. The adaptive significance of population differentiation in offspring size of the least killifish, Heterandria formosa

    PubMed Central

    Leips, Jeff; Helen Rodd, F; Travis, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that density-dependent competition influences the evolution of offspring size. We studied two populations of the least killifish (Heterandria formosa) that differ dramatically in population density; these populations are genetically differentiated for offspring size, and females from both populations produce larger offspring when they experience higher social densities. To look at the influences of population of origin and relative body size on competitive ability, we held females from the high-density population at two different densities to create large and small offspring with the same genetic background. We measured the competitive ability of those offspring in mesocosms that contained either pure or mixed population treatments at either high or low density. High density increased competition, which was most evident in greatly reduced individual growth rates. Larger offspring from the high-density population significantly delayed the onset of maturity of fish from the low-density population. From our results, we infer that competitive conditions in nature have contributed to the evolution of genetically based interpopulation differences in offspring size as well as plasticity in offspring size in response to conspecific density. PMID:23610636

  9. Adapting in vitro embryonic stem cell differentiation to the study of locus control regions.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Armin; Kučerová-Levisohn, Martina; Holmes, Roxanne; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Ortiz, Benjamin D

    2014-05-01

    Numerous locus control region (LCR) activities have been discovered in gene loci important to immune cell development and function. LCRs are a distinct class of cis-acting gene regulatory elements that appear to contain all the DNA sequence information required to establish an independently and predictably regulated gene expression program at any genomic site in native chromatin of a whole animal. As such, LCR-regulated transgenic reporter systems provide invaluable opportunities to investigate the mechanisms of gene regulatory DNA action during development. Furthermore the qualities of LCR-driven gene expression, including spatiotemporal specificity and "integration site-independence" would be highly desirable to incorporate into vectors used in therapeutic genetic engineering. Thus, advancement in the methods used to investigate LCRs is of considerable basic and translational significance. We study the LCR present in the mouse T cell receptor (TCR)-α gene locus. Until recently, transgenic mice provided the only experimental model capable of supporting the entire spectrum of LCR activities. We have recently reported complete manifestation of TCRα LCR function in T cells derived in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC), thus validating a complete cell culture model for the full range of LCR activities seen in transgenic mice. Here we discuss the critical parameters involved in studying LCR-regulated gene expression during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation from ESCs. This advance provides an approach to speed progress in the LCR field, and facilitate the clinical application of its findings, particularly to the genetic engineering of T cells.

  10. Differential Regulation of Antagonistic Pleiotropy in Synthetic and Natural Populations Suggests Its Role in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Bhanot, Gyan; Sinha, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Antagonistic pleiotropy (AP), the ability of a gene to show opposing effects in different phenotypes, has been identified in various life history traits and complex disorders, indicating its fundamental role in balancing fitness over the course of evolution. It is intuitive that natural selection might maintain AP to allow organisms phenotypic flexibility in different environments. However, despite several attempts, little evidence exists for its role in adaptation. We performed a meta-analysis in yeast to identify the genetic basis of AP in bi-parental segregants, natural isolates, and a laboratory strain genome-wide deletion collection, by comparing growth in favorable and stress conditions. We found that whereas AP was abundant in the synthetic populations, it was absent in the natural isolates. This finding indicated resolution of trade-offs, i.e., mitigation of trade-offs over evolutionary history, probably through accumulation of compensatory mutations. In the deletion collection, organizational genes showed AP, suggesting ancient resolutions of trade-offs in the basic cellular pathways. We find abundant AP in the segregants, greater than estimated in the deletion collection or observed in previous studies, with IRA2, a negative regulator of the Ras/PKA signaling pathway, showing trade-offs across diverse environments. Additionally, IRA2 and several other Ras/PKA pathway genes showed balancing selection in isolates of S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus, indicating that multiple alleles maintain AP in this pathway in natural populations. We propose that during AP resolution, retaining the ability to vary signaling pathways such as Ras/PKA, may provide organisms with phenotypic flexibility. However, with increasing organismal complexity AP resolution may become difficult. A partial resolution of AP could manifest as complex human diseases, and the inability to resolve AP may play a role in speciation. Our findings suggest that testing a universal phenomenon like AP

  11. Differential Haemoparasite Intensity between Black Sparrowhawk (Accipiter melanoleucus) Morphs Suggests an Adaptive Function for Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Bonnie; Amar, Arjun; Koeslag, Ann; Gous, Tertius A.; Tate, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that genes coding for melanin based colouration may have pleiotropic properties, in particular conveying raised immune function. Thus adaptive function of polymorphism may be associated with parasite resistance. The black sparrowhawk Accipiter melanoleucus is a polymorphic raptor with two morphs. Over most of its range the light morph is commonest, however within the recently colonised Western Cape of South Africa the dark morph predominates. The species breeds in winter throughout South Africa, however unlike in the rest of the species' South African range, the Western Cape experiences a winter rainfall regime, where arthropod vectors which transmit haematozoan parasites may be more abundant. We hypothesise that the higher frequency of dark morph birds in this region may be due to their improved parasite resistance, which enables them to cope with higher parasite pressure. If so, we predict that dark morph black sparrowhawks would have lower parasite burdens than light morph birds. Within our population the prevalence of the two most common haematozoan parasites was high, with 72% of adults infected with Haemoproteus nisi and 59% of adults infected with Leucocytozoon toddi. We found no difference in prevalence for either parasite between adult morphs, or between chicks of different parental morphs. However, within adults infected with H. nisi, infection intensity was significantly higher in light morphs than dark morphs. This suggests that dark morphs have lower parasite loads than light morphs due to resistance rather than morph-specific habitat exploitation. Greater resistance to Haemoproteus parasites may therefore be one of the mechanisms through which dark morph black sparrowhawks have a selective advantage in this region and may explain why they are most common in our study area. In other regions, the cost to benefit ratio may be in favour of the light morph, where parasites are less abundant or virulent. PMID:24391707

  12. Adaptations to endosymbiosis in a cnidarian-dinoflagellate association: differential gene expression and specific gene duplications.

    PubMed

    Ganot, Philippe; Moya, Aurélie; Magnone, Virginie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola; Sabourault, Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Trophic endosymbiosis between anthozoans and photosynthetic dinoflagellates forms the key foundation of reef ecosystems. Dysfunction and collapse of symbiosis lead to bleaching (symbiont expulsion), which is responsible for the severe worldwide decline of coral reefs. Molecular signals are central to the stability of this partnership and are therefore closely related to coral health. To decipher inter-partner signaling, we developed genomic resources (cDNA library and microarrays) from the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Here we describe differential expression between symbiotic (also called zooxanthellate anemones) or aposymbiotic (also called bleached) A. viridis specimens, using microarray hybridizations and qPCR experiments. We mapped, for the first time, transcript abundance separately in the epidermal cell layer and the gastrodermal cells that host photosynthetic symbionts. Transcriptomic profiles showed large inter-individual variability, indicating that aposymbiosis could be induced by different pathways. We defined a restricted subset of 39 common genes that are characteristic of the symbiotic or aposymbiotic states. We demonstrated that transcription of many genes belonging to this set is specifically enhanced in the symbiotic cells (gastroderm). A model is proposed where the aposymbiotic and therefore heterotrophic state triggers vesicular trafficking, whereas the symbiotic and therefore autotrophic state favors metabolic exchanges between host and symbiont. Several genetic pathways were investigated in more detail: i) a key vitamin K-dependant process involved in the dinoflagellate-cnidarian recognition; ii) two cnidarian tissue-specific carbonic anhydrases involved in the carbon transfer from the environment to the intracellular symbionts; iii) host collagen synthesis, mostly supported by the symbiotic tissue. Further, we identified specific gene duplications and showed that the cnidarian-specific isoform was also up-regulated both in the

  13. Using Response-Time Constraints in Item Selection To Control for Differential Speededness in Computerized Adaptive Testing. Research Report 98-06.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Scrams, David J.; Schnipke, Deborah L.

    An item-selection algorithm to neutralize the differential effects of time limits on scores on computerized adaptive tests is proposed. The method is based on a statistical model for the response-time distributions of the examinees on items in the pool that is updated each time a new item has been administered. Predictions from the model are used…

  14. Novel Adaptive Optics concepts : wavefront sensing with sodium laser guide stars at Extemely Large Telescopes and simultaneous differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Stephan Albert

    2005-12-01

    Since more than 15 years, Adaptive Optics (AO) is a proven concept to reach diffraction limited imaging at modern astronomical telescopes. In the case of next generation telescopes (Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs)) with aperture diameters of up to 100m, sodium laser guide star based multi-conjugated-AO systems will be a basic requirement to exploit their full capability in terms of resolution and light concentration. A drawback of such an approach emerges in the finite distance and vertical extent of the sodium beacon in the mesosphere with respect to the telescope. This induces effects such as perspective elongation, where conventional wavefront sensing mechanisms will fail. Although several engineering concepts are under development to counteract these constraints at the cost of overall light efficiency and increased system complexity, this thesis proposes a novel kind of wavefront sensing technique to overcome the imposed limitations in a more natural way. The sensing technique is composed of two independently working sensors, a reflective rod and a mask with circular slits, each a representative of a novel wavefront sensor class, the so called z-invariant and Inverse Bessel Beam technique. Both are discussed in this thesis with a focus on the Inverse Bessel Beam technique. The latter is compared to alternative concepts such as temporal gating, with respect to the photon efficiency. Furthermore, the reflective rod was tested for its feasibility in laboratory conditions and in a more realistic environment at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at La Palma. With this test run its sensing principle has been verified. A novel technique already intensively used at 8m class telescopes is Simultaneous Differential Imaging. The direct detection of giant extra-solar planets is and will be a major science driver for galactic astronomy in the coming years. Modern telescope facilities such as the VLT reach, by means of adaptive optics, potentially the capability in terms

  15. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components. PMID:23573167

  16. Circuit motifs for contrast-adaptive differentiation in early sensory systems: the role of presynaptic inhibition and short-term plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems.

  17. Circuit Motifs for Contrast-Adaptive Differentiation in Early Sensory Systems: The Role of Presynaptic Inhibition and Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2015-01-01

    In natural signals, such as the luminance value across of a visual scene, abrupt changes in intensity value are often more relevant to an organism than intensity values at other positions and times. Thus to reduce redundancy, sensory systems are specialized to detect the times and amplitudes of informative abrupt changes in the input stream rather than coding the intensity values at all times. In theory, a system that responds transiently to fast changes is called a differentiator. In principle, several different neural circuit mechanisms exist that are capable of responding transiently to abrupt input changes. However, it is unclear which circuit would be best suited for early sensory systems, where the dynamic range of the natural input signals can be very wide. We here compare the properties of different simple neural circuit motifs for implementing signal differentiation. We found that a circuit motif based on presynaptic inhibition (PI) is unique in a sense that the vesicle resources in the presynaptic site can be stably maintained over a wide range of stimulus intensities, making PI a biophysically plausible mechanism to implement a differentiator with a very wide dynamical range. Moreover, by additionally considering short-term plasticity (STP), differentiation becomes contrast adaptive in the PI-circuit but not in other potential neural circuit motifs. Numerical simulations show that the behavior of the adaptive PI-circuit is consistent with experimental observations suggesting that adaptive presynaptic inhibition might be a good candidate neural mechanism to achieve differentiation in early sensory systems. PMID:25723493

  18. Accessible bioprinting: adaptation of a low-cost 3D-printer for precise cell placement and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Reid, John A; Mollica, Peter A; Johnson, Garett D; Ogle, Roy C; Bruno, Robert D; Sachs, Patrick C

    2016-06-07

    The precision and repeatability offered by computer-aided design and computer-numerically controlled techniques in biofabrication processes is quickly becoming an industry standard. However, many hurdles still exist before these techniques can be used in research laboratories for cellular and molecular biology applications. Extrusion-based bioprinting systems have been characterized by high development costs, injector clogging, difficulty achieving small cell number deposits, decreased cell viability, and altered cell function post-printing. To circumvent the high-price barrier to entry of conventional bioprinters, we designed and 3D printed components for the adaptation of an inexpensive 'off-the-shelf' commercially available 3D printer. We also demonstrate via goal based computer simulations that the needle geometries of conventional commercially standardized, 'luer-lock' syringe-needle systems cause many of the issues plaguing conventional bioprinters. To address these performance limitations we optimized flow within several microneedle geometries, which revealed a short tapered injector design with minimal cylindrical needle length was ideal to minimize cell strain and accretion. We then experimentally quantified these geometries using pulled glass microcapillary pipettes and our modified, low-cost 3D printer. This systems performance validated our models exhibiting: reduced clogging, single cell print resolution, and maintenance of cell viability without the use of a sacrificial vehicle. Using this system we show the successful printing of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into Geltrex and note their retention of a pluripotent state 7 d post printing. We also show embryoid body differentiation of hiPSC by injection into differentiation conducive environments, wherein we observed continuous growth, emergence of various evaginations, and post-printing gene expression indicative of the presence of all three germ layers. These data demonstrate an

  19. Differential pulse adsorption voltammetry for determination of procaine hydrochloride at a pumice modified carbon paste electrode in pharmaceutical preparations and urine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng Yin; Hu, Xiao Ya; Jin, Gen Di; Leng, Zong Zhou

    2002-08-22

    Procaine hydrochloride was determined by the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using a 6% (m/m) pumice modified carbon paste electrode in 1.25 x 10(-3) mol x l(-1) KH(2)PO(4) and Na(2)HPO(4) buffer solution (pH 6.88, 25 degrees C). The anodic peak potential used was +0.980 V (vs. SCE). A good linear relationship was realized between the anodic peak current and procaine concentration in the range of 9.0 x 10(-7)-2.6 x 10(-5) mol x l(-1) with the detection limit of 5.0 x 10(-8) mol x l(-1). The recovery was 95.2-104.8% with the relative standard deviation of 3.2% (n=10). The pharmaceutical preparations, procaine hydrochloride injection and the urine samples were determined with the desirable results.

  20. On-line coupling of sequential injection lab-on-valve to differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry for determination of Pb in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Zaiqing; Hu, Xiaoya; Cao, Jinglian; Wang, Fei; Xu, Qin; Yang, Chun

    2009-01-15

    Sequential injection lab-on-valve (LOV) was first proposed for analyzing ultra-trace amounts of Pb using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with a miniaturized electrochemical flow cell fabricated in the LOV unit. Deposition and stripping processes took place between the renewable mercury film carbon paste electrode and sample solution, the peak current was employed as the basis of quantification. The mercury film displayed a long-term stability and reproducibility for at least 50 cycles before next renewal, the properties of integrated miniature LOV unit not only enhanced the automation of the analysis procedure but also declined sample/reagent consumption. Potential factors that affect the present procedure were investigated in detail, i.e., deposition potential, deposition time, electrode renewable procedure and the volume of sample solution. The practical applicability of the present procedure was demonstrated by determination of Pb in environmental water samples.

  1. Study of Interactions between Metallothionein and Cisplatin by using Differential Pulse Voltammetry Brdickás reaction and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    PubMed Central

    Huska, Dalibor; Fabrik, Ivo; Baloun, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Masarik, Michal; Hubalek, Jaromir; Vasku, Anna; Trnkova, Libuse; Horna, Ales; Zeman, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Treatment strategies for tumour diseases are progressively focusing on personalization of medicine. However, this focus requires methods revealing the early general biological mechanisms, including the formation anti-cancer drugs’ resistance. The low molecular mass protein metallothionein is thought to be the crucial for the formation of resistance in tumour treatment based on the platinum-cytostatics. The interactions between metallothionein (MT) and cisplatin were determined by the adsorptive transfer stripping technique coupled with the differential pulse votlammetry Brdickás reaction. The signals related to the MT-cisplatin complex appeared at −0.9 V. The formation of this complex depended on the time of interaction between cisplatin and MT. The complex formation was consequently confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance analyses. The formation of this complex was detectable even after a 20 s long interaction. Moreover, we detected presence of MT-cisplatin complex in the blood of male rats treated with this drug. PMID:22573958

  2. Differential adaptive responses to 1- or 2-day fasting in various mouse tissues revealed by quantitative PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junya; Kamata, Shotaro; Miura, Asumi; Nagata, Tomoko; Kainuma, Ryo; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Dietary or caloric restriction confers various clinical benefits. Short-term fasting of mice is a common experimental procedure that may involve systemic metabolic remodeling, which may significantly affect experimental outputs. This study evaluated adaptive cellular responses after 1- or 2-day fasting in 13 mouse tissues by quantitative PCR using 15 marker primer sets for the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome (Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), autophagy–lysosome (LC3b, p62 and Lamp2), amino acid response (Asns, Trib3, Herpud1, xCT, and Chop), Nrf2-mediated antioxidant (HO-1 and Gsta1), and amino acid transport (Slc38a2, Slc7a5, and Slc7a1) systems. Differential activation profiles obtained in seven highly (thymus, liver, spleen, and small intestine) or mildly (stomach, kidney, and colon) atrophied tissues as well as in six non-atrophied tissues (brain, eye, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, and testis) suggested tissue-specific active metabolic remodeling. PMID:25973363

  3. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  4. Amino-termini isoforms of the Slack K+ channel, regulated by alternative promoters, differentially modulate rhythmic firing and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Maile R; Kronengold, Jack; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Spilianakis, Charalampos G; Flavell, Richard A; von Hehn, Christian A A; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2008-01-01

    The rates of activation and unitary properties of Na+-activated K+ (KNa) currents have been found to vary substantially in different types of neurones. One class of KNa channels is encoded by the Slack gene. We have now determined that alternative RNA splicing gives rise to at least five different transcripts for Slack, which produce Slack channels that differ in their predicted cytoplasmic amino-termini and in their kinetic properties. Two of these, termed Slack-A channels, contain an amino-terminus domain closely resembling that of another class of KNa channels encoded by the Slick gene. Neuronal expression of Slack-A channels and of the previously described Slack isoform, now called Slack-B, are driven by independent promoters. Slack-A mRNAs were enriched in the brainstem and olfactory bulb and detected at significant levels in four different brain regions. When expressed in CHO cells, Slack-A channels activate rapidly upon depolarization and, in single channel recordings in Xenopus oocytes, are characterized by multiple subconductance states with only brief transient openings to the fully open state. In contrast, Slack-B channels activate slowly over hundreds of milliseconds, with openings to the fully open state that are ∼6-fold longer than those for Slack-A channels. In numerical simulations, neurones in which outward currents are dominated by a Slack-A-like conductance adapt very rapidly to repeated or maintained stimulation over a wide range of stimulus strengths. In contrast, Slack-B currents promote rhythmic firing during maintained stimulation, and allow adaptation rate to vary with stimulus strength. Using an antibody that recognizes all amino-termini isoforms of Slack, Slack immunoreactivity is present at locations that have no Slack-B-specific staining, including olfactory bulb glomeruli and the dendrites of hippocampal neurones, suggesting that Slack channels with alternate amino-termini such as Slack-A channels are present at these locations. Our

  5. LGS adaptive optics system with long-pulsed sodium laser on Lijiang 1.8 meter telescope 2014-2016 observation campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Min; Jiang, Changchun; Wei, Ling; Zheng, Wenjia; Li, Wenru; Ma, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Luchun; Jin, Kai; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Junwei; Wang, Pengyuan; Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Donghong; Deng, Jijiang; Gao, Yang; Shen, Yu; Bian, Qi; Yao, Ji; Huang, Jiang; Dong, Ruoxi; Deng, Keran; Peng, Qinjun; Rao, Changhui; Xu, Zuyan; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    During 2014-2016, the Laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) system observation campaign has been carried out on Lijiang 1.8 meter telescope. During the campaign, two generation LGS AO systems have been developed and installed. In 2014, a long-pulsed solid Sodium prototype laser with 20W@400Hz, a beam transfer optical (BTO) system, and a laser launch telescope (LLT) with 300mm diameter were mounted onto the telescope and moved with telescope azimuth journal. At the same time, a 37-elements compact LGS AO system had been mounted on the Bent-Cassegrain focus and got its first light on observing HIP43963 (mV= 8.18mv) and reached Sr=0.27 in J Band after LGS AO compensation. In 2016, the solid Sodium laser has been upgrade to stable 32W@800Hz while D2a plus D2b repumping is used to increase the photon return, and a totally new LGS AO system with 164-elements Deformable Mirror, Linux Real Time Controller, inner closed loop Tip/tilt mirror, Multiple-PMT tracking detector is established and installed on the telescope. And the throughput for the BTO/LLT is improved nearly 20%. The campaign process, the performance of the two LGS AO systems especially the latter one, the characteristics of the BTO/LLT system and the result are present in this paper.

  6. An adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system controlled space cector pulse width modulation based HVDC light transmission system under AC fault conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay Kumar, M.; Srikanth, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    In HVDC Light transmission systems, converter control is one of the major fields of present day research works. In this paper, fuzzy logic controller is utilized for controlling both the converters of the space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) based HVDC Light transmission systems. Due to its complexity in the rule base formation, an intelligent controller known as adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) controller is also introduced in this paper. The proposed ANFIS controller changes the PI gains automatically for different operating conditions. A hybrid learning method which combines and exploits the best features of both the back propagation algorithm and least square estimation method is used to train the 5-layer ANFIS controller. The performance of the proposed ANFIS controller is compared and validated with the fuzzy logic controller and also with the fixed gain conventional PI controller. The simulations are carried out in the MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. The results reveal that the proposed ANFIS controller is reducing power fluctuations at both the converters. It also improves the dynamic performance of the test power system effectively when tested for various ac fault conditions.

  7. Differential-output B-dot and D-dot monitors for current and voltage measurements on a 20-MA, 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, T. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Ives, H. C.; Gilliland, T. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Johnson, M. F.; Reynolds, P. G.; Moore, J. K.; Mourning, R. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Androlewicz, K. E.; Bailey, J. E.; Broyles, R. S.; Dinwoodie, T. A.; Donovan, G. L.; Dudley, M. E.; Hahn, K. D.; Kim, A. A.; Lee, J. R.; Leeper, R. J.; Leifeste, G. T.; Melville, J. A.; Mills, J. A.; Mix, L. P.; Moore, W. B. S.; Peyton, B. P.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Savage, M. E.; Seamen, J. F.; Serrano, J. D.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shoup, R. W.; Slopek, J. S.; Speas, C. S.; Struve, K. W.; van de Valde, D. M.; Woodring, R. M.

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a system of differential-output monitors that diagnose current and voltage in the vacuum section of a 20-MA 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator. The system includes 62 gauges: 3 current and 6 voltage monitors that are fielded on each of the accelerator’s 4 vacuum-insulator stacks, 6 current monitors on each of the accelerator’s 4 outer magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs), and 2 current monitors on the accelerator’s inner MITL. The inner-MITL monitors are located 6 cm from the axis of the load. Each of the stack and outer-MITL current monitors comprises two separate B-dot sensors, each of which consists of four 3-mm-diameter wire loops wound in series. The two sensors are separately located within adjacent cavities machined out of a single piece of copper. The high electrical conductivity of copper minimizes penetration of magnetic flux into the cavity walls, which minimizes changes in the sensitivity of the sensors on the 100-ns time scale of the accelerator’s power pulse. A model of flux penetration has been developed and is used to correct (to first order) the B-dot signals for the penetration that does occur. The two sensors are designed to produce signals with opposite polarities; hence, each current monitor may be regarded as a single detector with differential outputs. Common-mode-noise rejection is achieved by combining these signals in a 50-Ω balun. The signal cables that connect the B-dot monitors to the balun are chosen to provide reasonable bandwidth and acceptable levels of Compton drive in the bremsstrahlung field of the accelerator. A single 50-Ω cable transmits the output signal of each balun to a double-wall screen room, where the signals are attenuated, digitized (0.5-ns/sample), numerically compensated for cable losses, and numerically integrated. By contrast, each inner-MITL current monitor contains only a single B-dot sensor. These monitors are fielded in opposite-polarity pairs. The two signals from a pair

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the In Vitro Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Treatment on Osteogenic Differentiation of Two Different Mesenchymal Cell Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Bloise, Nora; Mantelli, Melissa; Gastaldi, Giulia; Fassina, Lorenzo; De Angelis, Maria Gabriella Cusella; Ferrari, Davide; Imbriani, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate cell type for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. Exposure of MSCs to physical stimuli favors early and rapid activation of the tissue repair process. In this study we investigated the in vitro effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and adipose-tissue MSCs (ASCs), to assess if both types of MSCs could be indifferently used in combination with PEMF exposure for bone tissue healing. We compared the cell viability, cell matrix distribution, and calcified matrix production in unstimulated and PEMF-stimulated (magnetic field: 2 mT, amplitude: 5 mV) mesenchymal cell lineages. After PEMF exposure, in comparison with ASCs, BM-MSCs showed an increase in cell proliferation (p<0.05) and an enhanced deposition of extracellular matrix components such as decorin, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and type-I and -III collagens (p<0.05). Calcium deposition was 1.5-fold greater in BM-MSC–derived osteoblasts (p<0.05). The immunofluorescence related to the deposition of bone matrix proteins and calcium showed their colocalization to the cell-rich areas for both types of MSC-derived osteoblast. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased nearly 2-fold (p<0.001) and its protein content was 1.2-fold higher in osteoblasts derived from BM-MSCs. The quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed up-regulated transcription specific for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, osteonectin, and Runx2, but at a higher level for cells differentiated from BM-MSCs. All together these results suggest that PEMF promotion of bone extracellular matrix deposition is more efficient in osteoblasts differentiated from BM-MSCs. PMID:23914335

  9. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium John W. Obringer Martin D. Johnson Laser and Optics...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Lightl2-hours...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial USAFA F05611-02-P-0471 Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser-Light and 1064nm, 170 ps Pulsed

  10. Differential Adaptive Response and Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Exposed to Benzalkonium Chloride▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K.; Vidović, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive response and survival of planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis adapted to benzalkonium chloride (BC). Planktonic cells and biofilms were continuously exposed to 1 μg ml−1 of BC for 144 h. The proportion of BC-adapted biofilm cells able to survive a lethal BC treatment (30 μg ml−1) was significantly higher (4.6-fold) than that of BC-adapted planktonic cells. Similarly, there were 18.3-fold more survivors among the BC-adapted biofilm cells than among their nonadapted (i.e., without prior BC exposure) cell counterparts at the lethal BC concentration, and this value was significantly higher than the value for BC-adapted planktonic cells versus nonadapted cells (3.2-fold). A significantly higher (P < 0.05) proportion of surviving cells was noticed among BC-adapted biofilm cells relative to BC-adapted planktonic cells following a 10-min heat shock at 55°C. Fatty acid composition was significantly influenced by phenotype (planktonic cells or biofilm) and BC adaptation. Cell surface roughness of biofilm cells was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) than that of planktonic cells. Key proteins upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells included CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, STY0440. Nine and 17 unique proteins were upregulated in BC-adapted planktonic and biofilm cells, respectively. These results suggest that enhanced biofilm-specific upregulation of 17 unique proteins, along with the increased expression of CspA, TrxA, Tsf, YjgF, and a probable peroxidase, phenotype-specific alterations in cell surface roughness, and a shift in fatty acid composition conferred enhanced survival to the BC-adapted biofilm cell population relative to their BC-adapted planktonic cell counterparts. PMID:18663028

  11. Comparing geographical genetic differentiation between candidate and noncandidate loci for adaptation strengthens support for parallel ecological divergence in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Morán, P; Rolán-Alvarez, E

    2009-03-01

    The Galician sympatric ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis have been proposed as a model system for studying parallel ecological speciation. Such a model system makes a clear prediction: candidate loci (for divergent adaptation) should present a higher level of geographical differentiation than noncandidate (neutral) loci. We used 2356 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and four microsatellite loci to identify candidate loci for ecological adaptation using the F(ST) outlier method. Three per cent of the studied AFLP loci were identified as candidate loci associated with adaptation, after multitest adjustments, thus contributing to ecotype differentiation (candidate loci were not detected within ecotypes). Candidate and noncandidate loci were analysed separately at four different F(ST) partitions: differences between ecotypes (overall and local), differences between localities and micro-geographical differences within ecotypes. The magnitude of F(ST) differed between candidate and noncandidate loci for all partitions except in the case of micro-geographical differentiation within ecotypes, and the microsatellites (putatively neutral) showed an identical pattern to noncandidate loci. Thus, variation in candidate loci is determined partially independent by divergent natural selection (in addition to stochastic forces) at each locality, while noncandidate loci are exclusively driven by stochastic forces. These results support the evolutionary history described for these particular populations, considered to be a clear example of incomplete sympatric ecological speciation.

  12. The differential stress response of adapted chromite mine isolates Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and its impact on bioremediation potential.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Jastin; Paul, Madona Lien; Ravishankar, Harish; Mathur, Ankita; Saha, Dipti Priya; Natarajan, Chandrasekaran; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2013-11-01

    In the current study, indigenous bacterial isolates Bacillus subtilis VITSUKMW1 and Escherichia coli VITSUKMW3 from a chromite mine were adapted to 100 mg L(-1) of Cr(VI). The phase contrast and scanning electron microscopic images showed increase in the length of adapted E. coli cells and chain formation in case of adapted B. subtilis. The presence of chromium on the surface of the bacteria was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which was also supported by the conspicuous Cr-O peaks in FTIR spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of adapted E. coli and B. subtilis showed the presence of intact cells with Cr accumulated inside the bacteria. The TEM-EDX confirmed the internalization of Cr(VI) in the adapted cells. The specific growth rate and Cr(VI) reduction capacity was significantly higher in adapted B. subtilis compared to that of adapted E. coli. To study the possible role of Cr(VI) toxicity affecting the Cr(VI) reduction capacity, the definite assays for the released reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenging enzymes (SOD and GSH) were carried out. The decreased ROS production as well as SOD and GSH release observed in adapted B. subtilis compared to the adapted E. coli corroborated well with its higher specific growth rate and increased Cr(VI) reduction capacity.

  13. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of silver in water by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a new modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    El-Mai, Hafida; Espada-Bellido, Estrella; Stitou, Mostafa; García-Vargas, Manuel; Galindo-Riaño, Maria Dolores

    2016-05-01

    A highly sensitive and selective new procedure for the determination of silver in aqueous media was developed using a modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The modified electrode was based on the incorporation of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde benzoylhydrazone (2-HBBH) in the carbon paste electrode. Silver ions were preconcentrated on the modified electrode at open-circuit by complexation with the ligand and reduced to zero valent at a potential of 0V, and followed by the reoxidation of adsorbed ions onto the electrode by scanning the potential in a positive direction. The oxidation peak of Ag(I) was observed at 0.2V (versus Ag/AgCl). The analysis of Ag(I) was carried out in a cell containing the sample solution (20mL) buffered by 0.1molL(-1) K2HPO4/NaOH at pH 5.5 in aqueous solution and nitric acid (pH 1) in real water samples. The optimum conditions for the analysis of silver include a reduction potential of 0V and a pulse amplitude of 100mV, among others. The optimum carbon paste composition was found to be 14.1% (w/w) 2-HBBH, 56.2% (w/w) graphite powder and 29.7% (w/w) paraffin oil. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric response was used as the analytical signal. Under the selected conditions, the voltammetric signal was proportional to the Ag(I) concentration in the range of 0.001-100μgL(-1) with favorable limits of detection and quantification of 1.1ngL(-1) and 3.7ngL(-1) after 3min of accumulation time, respectively. By increasing the accumulation time to 10min, detection and quantification limits can be further improved up to 0.1ngL(-1) and 0.34ngL(-1), respectively. In addition, the results showed a highly reproducible procedure showing a relative standard deviation of 1.5% for 12 replicate measurements. Many coexisting metal ions were investigated and very few interferences were found on the determination of Ag(I). The proposed method was validated using certified reference estuarine waters

  14. Trace analysis of Ponceau 4R in soft drinks using differential pulse stripping voltammetry at SWCNTs composite electrodes based on PEDOT:PSS derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifei; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jie; Duan, Xuemin; Xu, Jingkun; Wen, Yangping

    2015-08-01

    Ponceau 4R, an edible synthetic colorant used in drinks, syrups, and sweets, has been successfully detected using differential pulse voltammetry at a single-walled carbon nanotubes-modified composite electrode based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) and two derivatives thereof. The electrochemical parameters of three Ponceau 4R sensors, such as pH value, pre-concentration time, and scan rate, have been optimized, and their electrochemical performances have been compared. A poly(acrylate-modified 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-co-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate)-single-walled carbon nanotubes-poly(vinyl alcohol)-modified electrode showed the best electrocatalytic activity, with the highest response current, lowest detection limit (1.8 nm), widest linear range (0.0055-110.6 μm), and best sensing stability. Additionally, the modified electrode has also been successfully employed for real sample analysis with soft drinks. Satisfactory results were obtained, demonstrating this to be an easy and effective approach for trace analysis of Ponceau 4R in food samples.

  15. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of atorvastatin calcium in pharmaceutical and biological samples using a vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago Almeida; Zanin, Hudson; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Corat, Evaldo José; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-06-07

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide (VACNT-GO) electrode is proposed, and its ability to determine atorvastatin calcium (ATOR) in pharmaceutical and biological samples by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) is evaluated. VACNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method and then treated with oxygen plasma to produce the VACNT-GO electrode. The oxygen plasma treatment exfoliates the carbon nanotube tips exposing graphene foils and inserting oxygen functional groups, these effects improved the VACNT wettability (super-hydrophobic) which is crucial for its electrochemical application. The electrochemical behaviour of ATOR on the VACNT-GO electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed that it underwent an irreversible oxidation process at a potential of +1.08 V in pHcond 2.0 (0.2 mol L(-1) buffer phosphate solution). By applying DPAdSV under optimized experimental conditions the analytical curve was found to be linear in the ATOR concentration range of 90 to 3.81 × 10(3) nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 9.4 nmol L(-1). The proposed DPAdSV method was successfully applied in the determination of ATOR in pharmaceutical and biological samples, and the results were in close agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method at a confidence level of 95%.

  16. Electrochemical study of the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel and its determination using differential pulse voltammetry in bulk form and pharmaceutical preparations with a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Dermiş, S; Aydoğan, E

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, the electroanalytical behaviour of clopidogrel (CLP) bisulfate, an antithrombotic drug, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) techniques using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The anodic oxidation of clopidogrel bisulfate was investigated with a GCE to determine the oxidation conditions. The voltammograms of solutions having various concentrations of clopidogrel were recorded in order to obtain the optimum oxidation conditions of this drug on a GCE. To determine the effects of the nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH and scan rate on the anodic oxidation reactions, the experiments were performed in 0.2 M sulphuric acid, and in Britton-Robinson (BR) (pH 2-5) and acetate (pH 3.5-5.63) buffers with a 10-400 mVs(-1) scan rate interval. The oxidation of clopidogrel bisulfate was found to be diffusion-controlled over a concentration range of 0.08 mM-1.0 mM in pH 3.7 acetate buffer by an optimized DPV technique. The voltammetric method developed was applied to the tablet form of pharmaceutical preparation of this compound and the accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity, repeatibility within and between days and reproducibility of the proposed method was investigated statistically. The results were compared with the spectrophotometric and HPLC methods developed in our laboratory and found to be in good agreement. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants.

  17. Highly sensitive and selective determination of pyrazinamide at poly-L-methionine/reduced graphene oxide modified electrode by differential pulse voltammetry in human blood plasma and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Cheemalapati, Srikanth; Devadas, Balamurugan; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2014-03-15

    In this current study we used electrochemically active film which contains poly-L-methionine (PMET) and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for pyrazinamide (PZM) detection. The electrocatalytic response of analyte at PMET/ERGO/GCE film was measured using both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In addition, electrochemical impedance studies revealed that the smaller R(ct) value observed at PMET/ERGO film modified GCE which authenticates its good conductivity and faster electron transfer rate. The prepared PMET/ERGO/GCE film exhibits excellent DPV response towards PZM and the reduction peak current increased linearly with respect to PZM concentration in the linear range between 0.4 μM to 1129 μM with a sensitivity of 0.266 μA μM(-1) cm(-2). Real sample studies were carried out in human blood plasma and urine samples, which offered good recovery and revealed the promising practicality of the sensor for PZM detection. The proposed sensor displayed a good selectivity, repeatability, sensitivity with appreciable consistency and good reproducibility. In addition, the proposed electrochemical sensor showed good results towards the commercial pharmaceutical PZM samples.

  18. Speciation analysis of aluminium(III) in natural waters and biological fluids by complexing with various catechols followed by differential pulse voltammetry detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Bi, Shuping; Yang, Li; Gu, Xiaodong; Ma, Pengju; Gan, Ning; Wang, Xianlong; Long, Xiufeng; Zhang, Fuping

    2002-12-01

    The biological effects of aluminium have received much attention in recent years. Speciation of Al is of basic relevance as it concerns its reactivity and bioavailability. A differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) procedure is proposed for speciation analysis of Al(III) in natural waters and biological fluids using six catechols (L-dopa, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, caffeic acid and o-benzenediol) as electroactive ligands. The decrease of the DPV anodic peak current for each catechol ligand is linear with the increase of Al concentration. This speciation analysis idea is based on the measurement of the complexation capacity, namely, different affinities of Al(III) for catechols and organic ligands under two pH conditions. The labile monomeric Al fraction (mainly inorganic aluminium) is determined at pH 4.6, while the total monomeric Al fraction is determined at pH 8.5. The principle for Al(III) speciation analysis by an electrochemical method is discussed. This sensitive and simple fractionation method is successfully applied to the speciation analysis of Al in natural waters and the results agree well with those of Driscoll's method. The speciation analysis of Al in biological fluids is also explored and the results are compared with those obtained by ultrafiltration and dialysis. Compared with other speciation protocols the electrochemical method possesses some remarkable advantages: rapidity, high sensitivity, cheap instrumentation and a simple operation procedure.

  19. Adaptive Pulse Compression Repair Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    algorithm such that an MMSE filter could be estimated for each individual range cell to suppress range sidelobes. Range sidelobe suppression can also be...noticeable effect yet the increased sensitivity of PCR results in a general increase in range sidelobe levels. Also, the sidelobe shoulders are again...to its significantly increased sensitivity the PCR algorithm (a single stage) has some degradation that manifests in the form of increased range

  20. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  1. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, David A.

    1983-01-01

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits.

  2. Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea-Baltic Sea salinity gradient.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist, C; Godhe, A; Jonsson, P R; Sundqvist, L; Kremp, A

    2015-06-01

    Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating from three different salinity regimes of the gradient. Modelled oceanographic connectivity was compared to directional relative migration by correlation analyses to examine oceanographic drivers. Population genetic analyses showed distinct genetic divergence of a low-salinity Baltic Sea population and a high-salinity North Sea population, coinciding with the most evident physical dispersal barrier in the area, the Danish Straits. Baltic Sea populations displayed reduced genetic diversity compared to North Sea populations. Growth optima of low salinity isolates were significantly lower than those of strains from higher native salinities, indicating local salinity adaptation. Although the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition was identified as a barrier to gene flow, migration between Baltic Sea and North Sea populations occurred. However, the presence of differentiated neutral markers on each side of the transition zone suggests that migrants are maladapted. It is concluded that local salinity adaptation, supported by oceanographic connectivity patterns creating an asymmetric migration pattern between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, determines genetic differentiation patterns in the transition zone.

  3. Population differentiation and species cohesion in two closely related plants adapted to neotropical high-altitude 'inselbergs', Alcantarea imperialis and Alcantarea geniculata (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Barbará, T; Martinelli, G; Fay, M F; Mayo, S J; Lexer, C

    2007-05-01

    Isolated granitic rock outcrops or 'inselbergs' may provide a window into the molecular ecology and genetics of continental radiations under simplified conditions, in analogy to the use of oceanic islands in studies of species radiations. Patterns of variability and gene flow in inselberg species have never been thoroughly evaluated in comparison to related taxa with more continuous distribution ranges, or to other species in the same kingdom in general. We use nuclear microsatellites to study population differentiation and gene flow in two diploid, perennial plants adapted to high-altitude neotropical inselbergs, Alcantarea imperialis and Alcantarea geniculata (Bromeliaceae). Population differentiation is pronounced in both taxa, especially in A. imperialis. Gene flow in this species is considerably lower than expected from the literature on plants in general and Bromeliaceae in particular, and too low to prevent differentiation due to drift (N(e)m < 1), unless selection coefficients/effect sizes of favourable alleles are great enough to maintain species cohesion. Low gene flow in A. imperialis indicates that the ability of pollinating bats to promote gene exchange between inselbergs is smaller than previously assumed. Population subdivision in one inselberg population of A. imperialis appears to be associated with the presence of two colour morphs that differ in the coloration of rosettes and bracts. Our results indicate a high potential for inselbergs as venues for studies of the molecular ecology and genetics of continental radiations, such as the one that gave rise to the extraordinary diversity of adaptive strategies and phenotypes seen in Bromeliaceae.

  4. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  5. Studies of pretreatments in the determination of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu, Sb and Bi in suspended particulate matter and plankton by differential-pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry with a hanging mercury drop electrode.

    PubMed

    Gillain, G

    1982-08-01

    The determination of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu, Sb and Bi by differential-pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry has been applied to samples of plankton and suspended particulate matter after decomposition of organic matter by two methods: low-temperature ashing with microwave-activated oxygen and wet-ashing in pressurized Teflon crucibles. The loss of these elements, and contamination, were studied with a standard reference material. The relative merits of these oxidation techniques are discussed.

  6. Detection of 17 β-Estradiol in Environmental Samples and for Health Care Using a Single-Use, Cost-Effective Biosensor Based on Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifan; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-03-29

    Environmental estrogen pollution and estrogen effects on the female reproductive system are well recognized scientifically. Among the estrogens, 17 β-estradiol is a priority in environmental estrogen pollution, and it is also a major contributor to estrogen which regulates the female reproductive system. 17 β-estradiol is carcinogenic and has a tumor promotion effect relating to breast cancer, lung cancer and others. It also affects psychological well-being such as depression, fatigue and others. Thus, a simple method of detecting 17 β-estradiol will be important for both environmental estrogen pollution and health care. This study demonstrates a single-use, cost-effective 17 β-estradiol biosensor system which can be used for both environmental and health care applications. The bio-recognition mechanism is based on the influence of the redox couple, K₃Fe(CN)₆/K₄Fe(CN)₆ by the interaction between 17 β-estradiol antigen and its α-receptor (ER-α; α-estrogen antibody). The transduction mechanism is an electrochemical analytical technique, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The levels of 17 β-estradiol antigen studied were between 2.25 pg/mL and 2250 pg/mL; Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), tap water from the Cleveland regional water district, and simulated urine were used as the test media covering the potential application areas for 17 β-estradiol detection. An interference study by testosterone, which has a similar chemical structure and molecular weight as those of 17 β-estradiol, was carried out, and this 17 β-estradiol biosensor showed excellent specificity without any interference by similar chemicals.

  7. A solid paraffin-based carbon paste electrode modified with 2-aminothiazole organofunctionalized silica for differential pulse adsorptive stripping analysis of nickel in ethanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Regina M; Santos, André L; Padilha, Pedro M; Stradiotto, Nelson R

    2007-02-19

    A solid paraffin-based carbon paste electrode modified with 2-aminothiazole organofunctionalized silica (SiAt-SPCPE) was applied to Ni(2+) determination in commercial ethanol fuel samples. The proposed method comprised four steps: (1) Ni(2+) preconcentration at open circuit potential directly in the ethanol fuel sample, (2) transference of the electrode to an electrochemical cell containing DMG, (3) differential pulse voltammogram registering and (4) surface regeneration by polishing the electrode. The proposed method combines the high Ni(2+) adsorption capacity presented by 2-aminothiazole organofunctionalized silica with the electrochemical properties of the Ni(DMG)(2) complex, whose electrochemical reduction provides the analytical signal. All experimental parameters involved in the proposed method were optimized. Using a preconcentration time of 20 min, it was obtained a linear range from 7.5 x 10(-9) to 1.0 x 10(-6) mol L(-1) with detection limit of 2.0 x 10(-9) mol L(-1). Recovery values between 96.5 and 102.4% were obtained for commercial samples spiked with 1.0 micromol L(-1) Ni(2+) and the developed electrode was totally stable in ethanolic solutions. The contents of Ni(2+) found in the commercial samples using the proposed method were compared to those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the F- and t-test. Neither the F- nor t-values exceeded the critical values at 95% confidence level, confirming that there are not statistical differences between the results obtained by both methods. These results indicate that the developed electrode can be successfully employed to reliable Ni(2+) determination in commercial ethanol fuel samples without any sample pretreatment or dilution step.

  8. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil and its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, by differential pulse voltammetry using multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Soleimani, Mohammad; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was fabricated by multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). The electrochemical behavior of these two drugs was studied at the modified electrode using cyclic voltammetry and adsorptive differential pulse voltammetry. MPM and MPA were oxidized at the GCE during an irreversible process. DPV analysis showed two oxidation peaks at 0.87V and 1.1V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPM and an oxidation peak at 0.87V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPA in phosphate buffer solution of pH5.0. The MWCNTs/GCE displayed excellent electrochemical activities toward oxidation of MPM and MPA relative to the bare GCE. The experimental design algorithm was used for optimization of DPV parameters. The electrode represents linear responses in the range 5.0×10(-6) to 1.6×10(-4)molL(-1) and 2.5×10(-6)molL(-1) to 6.0×10(-5)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 9.0×10(-7)molL(-1) and 4.0×10(-7)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The modified electrode showed a good sensitivity and stability. It was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MPM and MPA in plasma and urine samples.

  9. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Magagnin, Luca; Vena, Pasquale; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2016-07-01

    A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5-20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R² = 0.999) in the range of 0.1-0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated.

  10. Enhancement of cell ingrowth, proliferation, and early differentiation in a three-dimensional silicon carbide scaffold using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the use of autografts or allografts have necessitated the development of biomaterials for bone regeneration. Various studies have been performed to optimize the cultivation of osteogenic cells using osteoconductive porous scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic efficiency of bone cell ingrowth, proliferation, and early differentiation in a silicon carbide (SiC) porous ceramic scaffold promoted with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts were seeded onto scaffolds and cultured for 4 and 7 days with daily of 20-min ultrasound treatment. The cells were evaluated for cell attachment, morphology, viability, ingrowth depth, volumetric proliferation, and early differentiation. After 4 and 7 days of culture and ultrasound exposure, the cell density was higher in the ultrasound-treated group compared with the sham-treated group on SiC scaffolds. The cell ingrowth depths inside the SiC scaffolds were 149.2±27.3 μm at 1 day, 310.1±12.6 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 248.0±19.7 μm for the sham control at 4 days, and 359.6±18.5 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 280.0±17.7 μm for the sham control at 7 days. They were significantly increased, that is, 25% (p=0.0029) and 28% (p=0.0008) increase, respectively, with ultrasound radiation force as compared with those in sham control at 4 and 7 days postseeding. The dsDNA contents were 583.5±19.1 ng/scaffold at 1 day, 2749.9±99.9 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2514.9±114.7 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 4 days, and 3582.3±325.3 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2825.7±134.3 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 7 days. There was a significant difference in the dsDNA content between the ultrasound- and sham-treated groups at 4 and 7 days. The ultrasound-treated group with the SiC construct showed a 9% (p=0.00029) and 27% (p=0.00017) increase in the average dsDNA content at 4 and 7 days over

  11. Enhancement of Cell Ingrowth, Proliferation, and Early Differentiation in a Three-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Scaffold Using Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the use of autografts or allografts have necessitated the development of biomaterials for bone regeneration. Various studies have been performed to optimize the cultivation of osteogenic cells using osteoconductive porous scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic efficiency of bone cell ingrowth, proliferation, and early differentiation in a silicon carbide (SiC) porous ceramic scaffold promoted with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts were seeded onto scaffolds and cultured for 4 and 7 days with daily of 20-min ultrasound treatment. The cells were evaluated for cell attachment, morphology, viability, ingrowth depth, volumetric proliferation, and early differentiation. After 4 and 7 days of culture and ultrasound exposure, the cell density was higher in the ultrasound-treated group compared with the sham-treated group on SiC scaffolds. The cell ingrowth depths inside the SiC scaffolds were 149.2±27.3 μm at 1 day, 310.1±12.6 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 248.0±19.7 μm for the sham control at 4 days, and 359.6±18.5 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 280.0±17.7 μm for the sham control at 7 days. They were significantly increased, that is, 25% (p=0.0029) and 28% (p=0.0008) increase, respectively, with ultrasound radiation force as compared with those in sham control at 4 and 7 days postseeding. The dsDNA contents were 583.5±19.1 ng/scaffold at 1 day, 2749.9±99.9 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2514.9±114.7 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 4 days, and 3582.3±325.3 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2825.7±134.3 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 7 days. There was a significant difference in the dsDNA content between the ultrasound- and sham-treated groups at 4 and 7 days. The ultrasound-treated group with the SiC construct showed a 9% (p=0.00029) and 27% (p=0.00017) increase in the average dsDNA content at 4 and 7 days over

  12. Adaptive Differentiation in Seedling Traits in a Hybrid Pine Species Complex, Pinus densata and Its Parental Species, on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages. PMID:25757072

  13. Adaptive differentiation in seedling traits in a hybrid pine species complex, Pinus densata and its parental species, on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingxiang; Mao, Jian-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Fangqian; Chen, Xinyu; Liu, Hao; Xing, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from molecular genetics demonstrates that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from the parent species Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis, and ecological selection may have played a role in the speciation of P. densata. However, data on differentiation in adaptive traits in the species complex are scarce. In this study, we performed a common garden test on 16 seedling traits to examine the differences between P. densata and its parental species in a high altitude environment. We found that among the 16 analyzed traits, 15 were significantly different among the species. Pinus tabuliformis had much earlier bud set and a relatively higher bud set ratio but poorer seedling growth, and P. yunnanensis had opposite responses for the same traits. P. densata had the greatest fitness with higher viability and growth rates than the parents. The relatively high genetic contribution of seedling traits among populations suggested that within each species the evolutionary background is complex. The correlations between the seedling traits of a population within a species and the environmental factors indicated different impacts of the environment on species evolution. The winter temperature is among the most important climate factors that affected the fitness of the three pine species. Our investigation provides empirical evidence on adaptive differentiation among this pine species complex at seedling stages.

  14. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  15. MHC class II transactivator is an in vivo regulator of osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis co-opted from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Benasciutti, Elisa; Mariani, Elisabetta; Oliva, Laura; Scolari, Maria; Perilli, Egon; Barras, Emmanuele; Milan, Enrico; Orfanelli, Ugo; Fazzalari, Nicola L; Campana, Lara; Capobianco, Annalisa; Otten, Luc; Particelli, Francesca; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Faccio, Roberta; Sitia, Roberto; Reith, Walter; Cenci, Simone

    2014-02-01

    The molecular networks controlling bone homeostasis are not fully understood. The common evolution of bone and adaptive immunity encourages the investigation of shared regulatory circuits. MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional co-activator believed to be exclusively dedicated for antigen presentation. CIITA is expressed in osteoclast precursors, and its expression is accentuated in osteoporotic mice. We thus asked whether CIITA plays a role in bone biology. To this aim, we fully characterized the bone phenotype of two mouse models of CIITA overexpression, respectively systemic and restricted to the monocyte-osteoclast lineage. Both CIITA-overexpressing mouse models revealed severe spontaneous osteoporosis, as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry, associated with increased osteoclast numbers and enhanced in vivo bone resorption, whereas osteoblast numbers and in vivo bone-forming activity were unaffected. To understand the underlying cellular and molecular bases, we investigated ex vivo the differentiation of mutant bone marrow monocytes into osteoclasts and immune effectors, as well as osteoclastogenic signaling pathways. CIITA-overexpressing monocytes differentiated normally into effector macrophages or dendritic cells but showed enhanced osteoclastogenesis, whereas CIITA ablation suppressed osteoclast differentiation. Increased c-fms and receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling underlay enhanced osteoclast differentiation from CIITA-overexpressing precursors. Moreover, by extending selected phenotypic and cellular analyses to additional genetic mouse models, namely MHC Class II deficient mice and a transgenic mouse line lacking a specific CIITA promoter and re-expressing CIITA in the thymus, we excluded MHC Class II expression and T cells from contributing to the observed skeletal phenotype. Altogether, our study provides compelling genetic evidence that CIITA, the molecular switch of antigen presentation

  16. Differential effects of charybdotoxin on the activity of retinal ganglion cells in the dark- and light-adapted mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Nemargut, Joseph P.; Zhu, Junling; Savoie, Brian T.; Wang, Guo-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Patch-clamp recordings were made from retinal ganglion cells in the mouse retina. Under dark adaptation, blockage of BKCa channels increases the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and light-evoked On-EPSCs, while it decreases the light-evoked Off inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). However, under light adaptation it decreases the light-evoked On-EPSCs, the spontaneous IPSCs and the light-evoked On- and Off-IPSCs. Blockage of BKCa channels significantly altered the outputs of RGCs by changing their light-evoked responses into a bursting pattern and increasing the light-evoked depolarization of the membrane potentials, while it did not significantly change the peak firing rates of light-evoked responses. PMID:19084033

  17. Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis).

    PubMed

    Funk, W Chris; Lovich, Robert E; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Hofman, Courtney A; Morrison, Scott A; Sillett, T Scott; Ghalambor, Cameron K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Rick, Torben C; Day, Mitch D; Polato, Nicholas R; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W; Coonan, Timothy J; Crooks, Kevin R; Dillon, Adam; Garcelon, David K; King, Julie L; Boser, Christina L; Gould, Nicholas; Andelt, William F

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each of which occupies a different California Channel Island. Analysis of 5293 SNP loci generated using Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing found support for genetic drift as the dominant evolutionary mechanism driving population divergence among island fox populations. In particular, populations had exceptionally low genetic variation, small Ne (range = 2.1-89.7; median = 19.4), and significant genetic signatures of bottlenecks. Moreover, islands with the lowest genetic variation (and, by inference, the strongest historical genetic drift) were most genetically differentiated from mainland grey foxes, and vice versa, indicating genetic drift drives genome-wide divergence. Nonetheless, outlier tests identified 3.6-6.6% of loci as high FST outliers, suggesting that despite strong genetic drift, divergent selection contributes to population divergence. Patterns of similarity among populations based on high FST outliers mirrored patterns based on morphology, providing additional evidence that outliers reflect adaptive divergence. Extremely low genetic variation and small Ne in some island fox populations, particularly on San Nicolas Island, suggest that they may be vulnerable to fixation of deleterious alleles, decreased fitness and reduced adaptive potential.

  18. Thermal adaptation of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases of eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp): the role of differential isoenzyme expression

    PubMed

    Lin; Somero

    1995-01-01

    Kinetic properties, electrophoretic patterns and thermal stabilities of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenases (cMDHs) were compared in Eastern Pacific barracuda (Sphyraena spp) from different latitudes. All tissues of the tropical species S. ensis contained only a single, thermostable form of cMDH. Subtropical (S. lucasana) as well as north (S. argentea) and south (S. idiastes) temperate barracuda contained both thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs, the pattern characteristic of most teleosts. Kinetic studies using unfractioned cMDHs showed that the apparent Michaelis­Menten constant (Km) of cofactor (NADH) increased with temperature, but at the physiological temperatures of the four species, Km of NADH was conserved within a narrow range (20­23 µmol l-1). Thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs were chromatographically separated and compared. Thermolabile cMDHs had higher Km values for NADH at all measurement temperatures than did thermostable cMDHs. Thermolabile cMDHs isolated from congeneric barracuda exhibited similar kinetic properties (Km versus temperature, optimal pH, optimal substrate and cofactor concentrations). Thermostable cMDHs, likewise, were similar among the barracuda. Conservation of Km in the differently thermally adapted barracudas is, therefore, apparently due to adjustments in the ratio of expression of the thermostable and thermolabile isoforms, rather than to temperature-adaptive differences among orthologous homologues, as is commonly found for enzymes encoded by a single gene locus. The effects of temperature on the Km of NADH for isolated thermostable and thermolabile cMDHs of a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis, however, were consistent with adaptive change in orthologous homologues of cMDH. The selective basis for the absence of thermolabile cMDH in warm-adapted ectotherms, mammals and birds is discussed.

  19. Progress on the Development of B-spline Collocation for the Solution of Differential Model Equations: A Novel Algorithm for Adaptive Knot Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Richard Wayne

    2003-05-01

    The application of collocation methods using spline basis functions to solve differential model equations has been in use for a few decades. However, the application of spline collocation to the solution of the nonlinear, coupled, partial differential equations (in primitive variables) that define the motion of fluids has only recently received much attention. The issues that affect the effectiveness and accuracy of B-spline collocation for solving differential equations include which points to use for collocation, what degree B-spline to use and what level of continuity to maintain. Success using higher degree B-spline curves having higher continuity at the knots, as opposed to more traditional approaches using orthogonal collocation, have recently been investigated along with collocation at the Greville points for linear (1D) and rectangular (2D) geometries. The development of automatic knot insertion techniques to provide sufficient accuracy for B-spline collocation has been underway. The present article reviews recent progress for the application of B-spline collocation to fluid motion equations as well as new work in developing a novel adaptive knot insertion algorithm for a 1D convection-diffusion model equation.

  20. Noise tolerance in wavelength-selective switching of optical differential quadrature-phase-shift-keying pulse train by collinear acousto-optic devices.

    PubMed

    Goto, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu

    2014-06-01

    Optical switching of high-bit-rate quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) pulse trains using collinear acousto-optic (AO) devices is theoretically discussed. Since the collinear AO devices have wavelength selectivity, the switched optical pulse trains suffer from distortion when the bandwidth of the pulse train is comparable to the pass bandwidth of the AO device. As the AO device, a sidelobe-suppressed device with a tapered surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) waveguide and a Butterworth-type filter device with a lossy SAW directional coupler are considered. Phase distortion of optical pulse trains at 40 to 100  Gsymbols/s in QPSK format is numerically analyzed. Bit-error-rate performance with additive Gaussian noise is also evaluated by the Monte Carlo method.

  1. [The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the induction of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cardiomyocytes-like cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Feng, Xian; He, Xueling; Li, Kai; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing; Li, Liang

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on the induction of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) to differentiate into cardiomyocytes-like cells in vitro. rBMSCs were randomly divided into PEMFs groups, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) groups and control groups. PEMFs groups were exposed to 50 Hz, 1 mT PEMFs for 30 min every day, lasting for 10 d, 15 d and 20 d, respectively. 5-Aza groups were induced by 10 micromol/L 5-Aza for 1 day, then the medium was changed to complete medium without 5-Aza. And control groups were only cultured with complete medium, rBMSCs growth status and morphological features were observed by inverted phase microscope every day. The mRNA expressions of cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) and alpha-actinin (ACTN2) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The results showed that rBMSCs were spindle, polygon or fusiform in control groups. The cells gradually got longer and grew close together after being stimulated by PEMFs and 5-Aza, and with the extension of induction time, the tendency became obvious. At 20th day after PEMFs or 5-Aza treatment, rBMSCs gathered like a long chain, got much longer obviously at the high magnification, and some of them even fused with their neighbors. Compared with control groups, the levels of TNNT2 mRNA expression in 5-Aza groups were 19.40 fold (P < 0.01), 21.02 fold (P < 0.01) and 2.38 fold at 10 d, 15 d, 20 d and the levels of ACTN2 mRNA expression in 5-Aza groups were 6.64 fold (P < 0.01), 6.67 fold (P < 0.01) and 0.76 fold at 10 d, 15 d, 20 d. However, the levels of TNNT2 mRNA expression in PEMFs groups were 15.78 fold (P < 0.01), 6.73 fold (P < 0.05) and 2.73 fold (P < 0.01) of control groups at 10 d, 15 d, 20 d and the levels of ACTN2 mRNA expression in PEMFs groups were 4.93 fold (P < 0.01), 1.89 fold and 0.64 fold, respectively. Compared with 5-Aza groups, the levels of TNNT2 mRNA expression in PEMFs groups were 0.81 fold, 0.32 fold (P < 0.01) and 1.15 fold at 10

  2. A differential role for neuropeptides in acute and chronic adaptive responses to alcohol: behavioural and genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philippa; Mould, Richard; Dillon, James; Glautier, Steven; Andrianakis, Ioannis; James, Christopher; Pugh, Amanda; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2010-05-03

    Prolonged alcohol consumption in humans followed by abstinence precipitates a withdrawal syndrome consisting of anxiety, agitation and in severe cases, seizures. Withdrawal is relieved by a low dose of alcohol, a negative reinforcement that contributes to alcohol dependency. This phenomenon of 'withdrawal relief' provides evidence of an ethanol-induced adaptation which resets the balance of signalling in neural circuits. We have used this as a criterion to distinguish between direct and indirect ethanol-induced adaptive behavioural responses in C. elegans with the goal of investigating the genetic basis of ethanol-induced neural plasticity. The paradigm employs a 'food race assay' which tests sensorimotor performance of animals acutely and chronically treated with ethanol. We describe a multifaceted C. elegans 'withdrawal syndrome'. One feature, decrease reversal frequency is not relieved by a low dose of ethanol and most likely results from an indirect adaptation to ethanol caused by inhibition of feeding and a food-deprived behavioural state. However another aspect, an aberrant behaviour consisting of spontaneous deep body bends, did show withdrawal relief and therefore we suggest this is the expression of ethanol-induced plasticity. The potassium channel, slo-1, which is a candidate ethanol effector in C. elegans, is not required for the responses described here. However a mutant deficient in neuropeptides, egl-3, is resistant to withdrawal (although it still exhibits acute responses to ethanol). This dependence on neuropeptides does not involve the NPY-like receptor npr-1, previously implicated in C. elegans ethanol withdrawal. Therefore other neuropeptide pathways mediate this effect. These data resonate with mammalian studies which report involvement of a number of neuropeptides in chronic responses to alcohol including corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF), opioids, tachykinins as well as NPY. This suggests an evolutionarily conserved role for neuropeptides

  3. Differential light effects on the dark motility rhythm in Euglena gracilis by series of short light pulses: Induction of long-term fluctuations and holding of the circadian oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, Ivonne; Hardeland, Rüdiger

    1991-12-01

    Dark motility was measured by means of an infrared beam in stationary, 8- to 10-months-old autotrophic cultures of Euglena gracilis, strain Z. Controls in constant darkness exhibited circadian rhythms for several weeks. Cells were subjected to series of short light pulses of 800 lx covering, in most of the experiments, not more than 1/240 of the intermittent dark periods. When the overall amount of light per day was kept constant, the results of the light treatment strongly depended on the frequency of the light pulses. In light/dard cycles of more than 1 h, the circadian rhythmicity persited, whereas the oscillator was affected by cycles of 40 min or less. Such treatment by a high-frequency series of light pulses led to long-term fluctuations lasting for several days and a subsequent holding of the oscillator. The temporal position of extreme values of the fluctuations correlated with the frequency of the light pulses. The potency of light to suppress rhythmicity, as known from fading-out phenomena in constant illumination, is not restricted to the continuous presence of light, but is also immanent in the Zeitgeber signals of dark/light transitions. Hence, the results reflect differential effects in the action of light.

  4. An adaptive high-dimensional stochastic model representation technique for the solution of stochastic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2010-05-20

    A computational methodology is developed to address the solution of high-dimensional stochastic problems. It utilizes high-dimensional model representation (HDMR) technique in the stochastic space to represent the model output as a finite hierarchical correlated function expansion in terms of the stochastic inputs starting from lower-order to higher-order component functions. HDMR is efficient at capturing the high-dimensional input-output relationship such that the behavior for many physical systems can be modeled to good accuracy only by the first few lower-order terms. An adaptive version of HDMR is also developed to automatically detect the important dimensions and construct higher-order terms using only the important dimensions. The newly developed adaptive sparse grid collocation (ASGC) method is incorporated into HDMR to solve the resulting sub-problems. By integrating HDMR and ASGC, it is computationally possible to construct a low-dimensional stochastic reduced-order model of the high-dimensional stochastic problem and easily perform various statistic analysis on the output. Several numerical examples involving elementary mathematical functions and fluid mechanics problems are considered to illustrate the proposed method. The cases examined show that the method provides accurate results for stochastic dimensionality as high as 500 even with large-input variability. The efficiency of the proposed method is examined by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation.

  5. Differential photosynthetic and morphological adaptations to low light affect depth distribution of two submersed macrophytes in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfeng; Cao, Te; Zhang, Xiaolin; Xi, Yilong; Ni, Leyi; Jeppesen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of photosynthetic versus morphological adaptations of submersed macrophytes to low light intensity in lakes, rapid light curves (RLCs), morphological parameters, relative growth rate (RGR), clonal reproduction and abundance of two submersed macrophytes (Potamogeton maackianus and Vallisneria natans) were examined under 2.8%, 7.1%, 17.1% and 39.5% ambient light in a field and outdoor experimental study. The plants increased their initial slope of RLCs (α) and decreased their minimum saturating irradiance (Ek) and maximum relative electron transport rate (ETRm) of RLCs under low light stress, but V. natans was more sensitive in RLCs than P. maackianus. Accordingly, the RGR, plant height and abundance of P. maackianus were higher in the high light regimes (shallow water) but lower in the low light regimes than those of V. natans. At the 2.8% ambient light, V. natans produced ramets and thus fulfilled its population expansion, in contrast to P. maackianus. The results revealed that P. maackianus as a canopy-former mainly elongated its shoot length towards the water surface to compensate for the low light conditions, however, it became limited in severe low light stress conditions. V. natans as a rosette adapted to low light stress mainly through photosynthetic adjustments and superior to severely low light than shoot elongation. PMID:27694880

  6. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits.

  7. Intrinsic and Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Metabolism Adaptations of T Cells and Impact on Their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Kieda, Claudine; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. In this context, multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. This review will discuss different potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. We will also provide a general framework for understanding how tumor microenvironmental metabolism, associated with hypoxic stress, interferes with T-cell priming and expansion. How T-cell metabolism drives T-cell-mediated immunity and how the manipulation of metabolic programing for therapeutic purposes will be also discussed. PMID:27066006

  8. Maintenance of adaptive differentiation by Wolbachia induced bidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility: the importance of sib-mating and genetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Antoine; Vavre, Fabrice; Silvain, Jean-François; Dupas, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are reproductive parasites widespread among arthropods. The most common effect arising from the presence of Wolbachia in a population is Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI), whereby postmating reproductive isolation occurs in crosses between an infected male and an uninfected female, or when a male is infected with a different strain of Wolbachia to that of the female (bidirectional CI). Previous theoretical models have demonstrated that bidirectional CI can contribute to the genetic divergence of populations in haploid and diploid organisms. However, haplodiploid organisms were not considered in these models even though they include Nasonia parasitoid wasps – the best example of the implication of Wolbachia in ongoing speciation. Moreover, previous work did not investigate inbreeding mating systems, which are frequently observed in arthropod species. Results We developed a stochastic two-island model which simulated three genetic scenarios, diploidy, haploidy, and haplodiploidy, with two CI phenotypes being considered for the latter: (1) male development of female progeny; and (2) mortality of fertilized eggs. We also investigated the effect of varying the proportion of sib mating. In the model each allopatric population was initially fixed for a single allele at a nuclear locus under positive selection and infected with one strain of Wolbachia. Each simulation presupposed that the two populations were fixed for a different allele and a different strain of Wolbachia. The degree of genetic differentiation observed in the locus under selection due to bidirectional CI was much lower for the two haplodiploid phenotypes than for either diploids or haploids. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sib-mating may compensate for the lower efficiency of bidirectional CI in haplodiploids by maintaining genetic divergence. Conclusion Our model suggests that maintenance of genetic differentiation facilitated by Wolbachia is more likely to

  9. Differential metabolic and endocrine adaptations in llamas, sheep, and goats fed high- and low-protein grass-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kiani, A; Alstrup, L; Nielsen, M O

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to elucidate whether distinct endocrine and metabolic adaptations provide llamas superior ability to adapt to low protein content grass-based diets as compared with the true ruminants. Eighteen adult, nonpregnant females (6 llamas, 6 goats, and 6 sheep) were fed either green grass hay with (HP) or grass seed straw (LP) in a cross-over design experiment over 2 periods of 21 d. Blood samples were taken on day 21 in each period at -30, 60, 150, and 240 min after feeding the morning meal and analyzed for plasma contents of glucose, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acids, β-hydroxy butyrate (BOHB), urea, creatinine, insulin, and leptin. Results showed that llamas vs sheep and goats had higher plasma concentrations of glucose (7.1 vs 3.5 and 3.6 ± 0.18 mmol/L), creatinine (209 vs 110 and 103 ± 10 μmol/L), and urea (6.7 vs 5.6 and 4.9 ± 0.5 mmol/L) but lower leptin (0.33 vs 1.49 and 1.05 ± 0.1 ng/mL) and BOHB (0.05 vs 0.26 and 0.12 ± 0.02 mmol/L), respectively. BOHB in llamas was extremely low for a ruminating animal. Llamas showed that hyperglycemia coexisted with hyperinsulinemia (in general on the HP diet; postprandially on the LP diet). Llamas were clearly hypercreatinemic compared with the true ruminants, which became further exacerbated on the LP diet, where they also sustained plasma urea at markedly higher concentrations. However, llamas had markedly lower leptin concentrations than the true ruminants. In conclusion, llamas appear to have an intrinsic insulin resistant phenotype. Augmentation of creatinine and sustenance of elevated plasma urea concentrations in llamas when fed the LP diet must reflect distinct metabolic adaptations of intermediary protein and/or nitrogen metabolism, not observed in the true ruminants. These features can contribute to explain lower metabolic rates in llamas compared with the true ruminants, which must improve the chances of survival on low protein content diets.

  10. Differential cold-adaptation among protein components of the thioredoxin system in the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125.

    PubMed

    Cotugno, Roberta; Rosaria Ruocco, Maria; Marco, Salvatore; Falasca, Patrizia; Evangelista, Giovanna; Raimo, Gennaro; Chambery, Angela; Di Maro, Antimo; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele

    2009-05-01

    Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase from the psychrophilic eubacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were obtained as recombinant His-tagged proteins (rPhTrx and rPhTrxR, respectively). rPhTrxR is organised as a homodimeric flavoenzyme, whereas rPhTrx is a small monomeric protein, both containing a functional disulfide bridge. However, three additional cysteines are present as free thiols in purified rPhTrxR. When individually tested in specific assays, rPhTrxR and rPhTrx display a full activity at low temperatures, an indispensable requirement for cold-adapted proteins. In particular, rPhTrxR catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of DTNB and rPhTrx provokes the insulin precipitation in the presence of DTT. The analysis of the effect of temperature on these reactions indicates that rPhTrxR is more cold-adapted than rPhTrx, having a higher psychrophilicity. The combined activity of rPhTrxR and rPhTrx, tested in a reconstituted assay containing NADPH as electrons donor and human insulin as the thioredoxin substrate, demonstrates a direct functional interaction between the purified recombinant components of the thioredoxin system of P. haloplanktis. Furthermore, the NADPH-dependent reduction of rPhTrx catalysed by rPhTrxR is fully reversible and allows the determination of its redox potential, whose value is in the range of other bacterial and archaeal thioredoxins. The analysis of the thermostability of rPhTrxR points to its discrete heat resistance. However, rPhTrx is much more heat resistant, with a half inactivation time of about 4 h at 95 degrees C. This exceptional heat resistance for a psychrophilic protein is significantly decreased by the reduction of the disulfide bridge of rPhTrx. Functionality, thermodependence and thermostability of the P. haloplanktis thioredoxin system point to the relevance of this key mechanism for the preservation of the reduced state of cytoplasmic proteins even in a cold-adapted source.

  11. Simultaneous determination of Cd, Pb, Cu, Sb, Bi, Se, Zn, Mn, Ni, Co and Fe in water samples by differential pulse stripping voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, M M; Hassanein, A M; Hammam, E; Beltagi, A M

    2000-06-01

    A highly sensitive and selective voltammetric procedure is described for the simultaneous determination of eleven elements (Cd, Pb, Cu, Sb, Bi, Se, Zn, Mn, Ni, Co and Fe) in water samples. Firstly, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is used for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd, Pb, Cu, Sb and Bi in 0.1 M HCI solution (pH = 1) containing 2 M NaCl. Then, differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPCSV) is used for the determination of Se in the same solution. Zn is subsequently determined by DPASV after raising the pH of the same solution to pH 4. Next, the pH of the medium is raised to pH 8.5 by adding NH3/NH4Cl buffer solution for the determination of Mn by DPASV. Ni and Co are determined in the same solution by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) after adding DMG (1 x 10(-4) M). Finally, 1 x 10(-5) M 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP) is added to the solution for the determination of Fe by DPAdSV. The optimal conditions are described. Relative standard deviations and relative errors are calculated for the eleven elements at three different concentration levels. The lower detection limits for the investigated elements range from 1.11 x 10(-10) to 1.05 x 10(-9)M, depending on the element determined. The proposed analysis scheme was applied for the determination of these eleven elements in some ground water samples.

  12. mTORC2 signalling regulates M2 macrophage differentiation in response to helminth infection and adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, R. W.; Collins, S. L.; Craig, J. M.; Zhang, Y.; Oh, M.; Illei, P. B.; Chan-Li, Y.; Vigeland, C. L.; Mitzner, W.; Scott, A. L.; Powell, J. D.; Horton, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) have an important function in innate immune responses to parasitic helminths, and emerging evidence also indicates these cells are regulators of systemic metabolism. Here we show a critical role for mTORC2 signalling in the generation of M2 macrophages. Abrogation of mTORC2 signalling in macrophages by selective conditional deletion of the adaptor molecule Rictor inhibits the generation of M2 macrophages while leaving the generation of classically activated macrophages (M1) intact. Selective deletion of Rictor in macrophages prevents M2 differentiation and clearance of a parasitic helminth infection in mice, and also abrogates the ability of mice to regulate brown fat and maintain core body temperature. Our findings define a role for mTORC2 in macrophages in integrating signals from the immune microenvironment to promote innate type 2 immunity, and also to integrate systemic metabolic and thermogenic responses. PMID:28128208

  13. Morphometric and genetic differentiation of two sibling gossamer-wing damselflies, Euphaea formosa and E. yayeyamana, and adaptive trait divergence in subtropical East Asian islands.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yat-Hung; Lin, Chung-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Insular species frequently demonstrate different tendencies to become smaller or larger than their continental relatives. Two sibling gossamer-wing damselflies, Euphaea formosa (Odonata: Euphaeidae) from Taiwan and E. yayeyamana from the Yaeyama Islands of Japan, have no clear structural differentiation, and can only be recognized by their geographical distribution, sizes, and subtle differences in wing shape and coloration. This study combined morphometric and genetic techniques to investigate the adaptive significance of trait divergence and species status in these two Euphaea damselflies. Phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial cox2 sequences demonstrated that the two damselflies are monophyletic lineages and constitute valid phylogenetic species. The landmark-based geometric morphometrics indicated that the two damselflies are different morphological species characterized by distinctive wing shapes. The larger E. formosa exhibited broader hind wings, whereas E. yayeyamana had narrower and elongated forewings. The body size and wing shape variations among populations of the two species do not follow the expected pattern of neutral evolution, suggesting that the evolutionary divergence of these two traits is likely to be subjected to natural or sexual selection. The decreased body size, elongated forewings, and narrower hind wings of E. yayeyamana may represent insular adaptation to limited resources and reduced territorial competition on smaller islands.

  14. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? ...

  15. Differential Proteomic Profiles of Pleurotus ostreatus in Response to Lignocellulosic Components Provide Insights into Divergent Adaptive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiuyun; Ma, Fuying; Li, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Li, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a white rot fungus that grows on lignocellulosic biomass by metabolizing the main constituents. Extracellular enzymes play a key role in this process. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulose, potentially toxic molecules are released from lignin, and the molecules are derived from hemicellulose or cellulose that trigger various responses in fungus, thereby influencing mycelial growth. In order to characterize the mechanism underlying the response of P. ostreatus to lignin, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulose substrates. In this work, the mycelium proteome of P. ostreatus grown in liquid minimal medium with lignin, xylan, and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was analyzed using the complementary two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) approach; 115 proteins were identified, most of which were classified into five types according to their function. Proteins with an antioxidant function that play a role in the stress response were upregulated in response to lignin. Most proteins involving in carbohydrate and energy metabolism were less abundant in lignin. Xylan and CMC may enhanced the process of carbohydrate metabolism by regulating the level of expression of various carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins. The change of protein expression level was related to the adaptability of P. ostreatus to lignocellulose. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the response of white-rot fungus to lignocellulose. PMID:28386251

  16. Stage-Specific Changes in Plasmodium Metabolism Required for Differentiation and Adaptation to Different Host and Vector Environments

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anubhav; Philip, Nisha; Hughes, Katie R.; Georgiou, Konstantina; MacRae, James I.; Barrett, Michael P.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) encounter markedly different (nutritional) environments during their complex life cycles in the mosquito and human hosts. Adaptation to these different host niches is associated with a dramatic rewiring of metabolism, from a highly glycolytic metabolism in the asexual blood stages to increased dependence on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in mosquito stages. Here we have used stable isotope labelling, targeted metabolomics and reverse genetics to map stage-specific changes in Plasmodium berghei carbon metabolism and determine the functional significance of these changes on parasite survival in the blood and mosquito stages. We show that glutamine serves as the predominant input into TCA metabolism in both asexual and sexual blood stages and is important for complete male gametogenesis. Glutamine catabolism, as well as key reactions in intermediary metabolism and CoA synthesis are also essential for ookinete to oocyst transition in the mosquito. These data extend our knowledge of Plasmodium metabolism and point towards possible targets for transmission-blocking intervention strategies. Furthermore, they highlight significant metabolic differences between Plasmodium species which are not easily anticipated based on genomics or transcriptomics studies and underline the importance of integration of metabolomics data with other platforms in order to better inform drug discovery and design. PMID:28027318

  17. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission.

  18. Differential compartmentalization of Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors and host protein binding properties as a mechanism for host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kilsgård, Ola; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Erik; Malmström, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although S. pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen with no other known animal reservoir, several murine infection models exist to explore different aspects of the bacterial pathogenesis. Inoculating mice with wild-type S. pyogenes strains can result in the generation of new bacterial phenotypes that are hypervirulent compared to the original inoculum. In this study, we used a serial mass spectrometry based proteomics strategy to investigate if these hypervirulent strains have an altered distribution of virulence proteins across the intracellular, surface associated and secreted bacterial compartments and if any change in compartmentalization can alter the protein-protein interaction network between bacteria and host proteins. Quantitative analysis of the S. pyogenes surface and secreted proteomes revealed that animal passaged strains are associated with significantly higher amount of virulence factors on the bacterial surface and in the media. This altered virulence factor compartmentalization results in increased binding of several mouse plasma proteins to the bacterial surface, a trend that was consistent for mouse plasma from several different mouse strains. In general, both the wild-type strain and animal passaged strain were capable of binding high amounts of human plasma proteins. However, compared to the non-passaged strains, the animal passaged strains displayed an increased ability to bind mouse plasma proteins, in particular for M protein binders, indicating that the increased affinity for mouse blood plasma proteins is a consequence of host adaptation of this pathogen to a new host. In conclusion, plotting the total amount of virulence factors against the total amount of plasma proteins associated to the bacterial surface could clearly separate out animal passaged strains from wild type strains indicating a virulence model that could

  19. Differential adaptation of REM sleep latency, intermediate stage and theta power effects of escitalopram after chronic treatment.

    PubMed

    Vas, Szilvia; Kátai, Zita; Kostyalik, Diána; Pap, Dorottya; Molnár, Eszter; Petschner, Péter; Kalmár, Lajos; Bagdy, György

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the widely used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants on sleep have been intensively investigated. However, only a few animal studies examined the effect of escitalopram, the more potent S-enantiomer of citalopram, and conclusions of these studies on sleep architecture are limited due to the experimental design. Here, we investigate the acute (2 and 10 mg/kg, i.p. injected at the beginning of the passive phase) or chronic (10 mg/kg/day for 21 days, by osmotic minipumps) effects of escitalopram on the sleep and quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) of Wistar rats. The first 3 h of EEG recording was analyzed at the beginning of passive phase, immediately after injections. The acutely injected 2 and 10 mg/kg and the chronically administered 10 mg/kg/day escitalopram caused an approximately three, six and twofold increases in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) latency, respectively. Acute 2-mg/kg escitalopram reduced REMS, but increased intermediate stage of sleep (IS) while the 10 mg/kg reduced both. We also observed some increase in light slow wave sleep and passive wake parallel with a decrease in deep slow wave sleep and theta power in both active wake and REMS after acute dosing. Following chronic treatment, only the increase in REMS latency remained significant compared to control animals. In conclusion, adaptive changes in the effects of escitalopram, which occur after 3 weeks of treatment, suggest desensitization in the function of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors.

  20. FAAH-/- mice display differential tolerance, dependence, and cannabinoid receptor adaptation after delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and anandamide administration.

    PubMed

    Falenski, Katherine W; Thorpe, Andrew J; Schlosburg, Joel E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Abdullah, Rehab A; Smith, Tricia H; Selley, Dana E; Lichtman, Aron H; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2010-07-01

    Repeated administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, induces profound tolerance that correlates with desensitization and downregulation of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. However, the consequences of repeated administration of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) on cannabinoid receptor regulation are unclear because of its rapid metabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH(-/-) mice dosed subchronically with equi-active maximally effective doses of AEA or THC displayed greater rightward shifts in THC dose-effect curves for antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia than in AEA dose-effect curves. Subchronic THC significantly attenuated agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in brain and spinal cord, and reduced [(3)H]WIN55,212-2 binding in brain. Interestingly, AEA-treated FAAH(-/-) mice showed less CB(1) receptor downregulation and desensitization than THC-treated mice. Experiments examining tolerance and cross-tolerance indicated that the behavioral effects of THC, a low efficacy CB(1) receptor agonist, were more sensitive to receptor loss than those of AEA, a higher efficacy agonist, suggesting that the expression of tolerance was more affected by the intrinsic activity of the ligand at testing than during subchronic treatment. In addition, the CB(1) receptor antagonist, rimonabant, precipitated a markedly reduced magnitude of withdrawal in FAAH(-/-) mice treated subchronically with AEA compared with mice treated repeatedly with THC. The findings that repeated AEA administration produces lesser adaptive changes at the CB(1) receptor and has reduced dependence liability compared with THC suggest that pharmacotherapies targeting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes are less likely to promote tolerance and dependence than direct acting CB(1) receptor agonists.

  1. Differential gear

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, K.; Hamada, T.; Masuda, K.; Shimada, K.

    1989-05-02

    A differential gear for permitting a difference in rotational speed between two output shafts is described, the differential gear including an input shaft and two output shafts. The improvement consists of means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the rotational speed of the input shaft, the rotational speed limiting means comprising a differential casing coupled to the input shaft and adapted to be rotated by the input shaft, a differential pinion shaft radially extending within the differential casing and rotatably mounted at its opposite ends in the differential casing. A plurality of differential pinion gears rotatably mounted on the differential pinion shaft is also included, and also a pair of side gears having a rotational axis common to that of the differential casing, wherein the side gears mesh with the differential pinion gears and the two output shafts are fixed to the side gears, the means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts comprising a weight means radially movable in the differential casing, the weight means limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the centrifugal force applied to the weight means, the weight means being slidably mounted on the differential pinion shaft and being biased radially inwardly.

  2. Physiological and morphological adaptations of herbaceous perennial legumes allow differential access to sources of varyingly soluble phosphate.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jiayin; Yang, Jiyun; Lambers, Hans; Tibbett, Mark; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Ryan, Megan H

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of three perennial legume species to access sources of varyingly soluble phosphorus (P) and their associated morphological and physiological adaptations. Two Australian native legumes with pasture potential (Cullen australasicum and Kennedia prostrata) and Medicago sativa cv. SARDI 10 were grown in sand under two P levels (6 and 40 µg P g(-1) ) supplied as Ca(H2 PO4 )2 ·H2 O (Ca-P, highly soluble, used in many fertilizers) or as one of three sparingly soluble forms: Ca10 (OH)2 (PO4 )6 (apatite-P, found in relatively young soils; major constituent of rock phosphate), C6 H6 O24 P6 Na12 (inositol-P, the most common form of organic P in soil) and FePO4 (Fe-P, a poorly-available inorganic source of P). All species grew well with soluble P. When 6 µg P g(-1) was supplied as sparingly soluble P, plant dry weight (DW) and P uptake were very low for C. australasicum and M. sativa (0.1-0.4 g DW) with the exception of M. sativa supplied with apatite-P (1.5 g). In contrast, K. prostrata grew well with inositol-P (1.0 g) and Fe-P (0.7 g), and even better with apatite-P (1.7 g), similar to that with Ca-P (1.9 g). Phosphorus uptake at 6 µg P g(-1) was highly correlated with total root length, total rhizosphere carboxylate content and total rhizosphere acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) activity. These findings provide strong indications that there are opportunities to utilize local Australian legumes in low P pasture systems to access sparingly soluble soil P and increase perennial legume productivity, diversity and sustainability.

  3. Determination of arsenic in various environmental and oil samples by differential pulse polarography after adsorption of its morpholine-4-carbodithioate on to microcrystalline naphthalene or morpholine-4-dithio-carbamate-CTMAB-naphthalene adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R.K.; Puri, B.K.; Hussain, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    A highly selective, sensitive, rapid and economical differential pulse-polarographic (DPP) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of arsenic in various environmental and crude oil samples. The morpholine-4-carbodithioate of arsenic was quantitatively adsorbed on microcystalline naphthalene in the pH range of 6.0- 9.5. The metal complex along with naphthalene was shaken with 10 ml of 1 M HCl and arsenic determined with a differential pulse polarograph using HCl-pyridine-NaCl as the supporting electrolyte. Arsenic may also be adsorbed quantitatively under similar conditions on morpholine-4-dithiocarbamate-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-naphthalene adsorbent packed in a column at a flow rate of 0.5-5.0 ml/min and determined similarly. The detection limit is 0.016 ppm at the minimum instrumental setting (signal to noise ratio=2). Arsenic is being determined in the concentration range of 0.08- 9.0 ppm with a correlation factor of 0.9996 and a relative standard deviation of {plus_minus} 0.81%(n=8). Various parameters such as the effect of pH, volume of aqueous phase, and interference of a number of metal ions and anions on the estimation of arsenic have been evaluated to optimize the conditions for the estimation of arsenic in various environmental and crude oil samples.

  4. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  5. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, D.A.

    1981-06-16

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits. This circuit may be used for conditioning the sensor signal from the Fidler coil in a gas centrifuge for separation of isotopic gaseous mixtures.

  6. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOEpatents

    Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  7. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  8. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  9. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  10. An effective hybrid self-adapting differential evolution algorithm for the joint replenishment and location-inventory problem in a three-level supply chain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Qu, Hui; Chen, Tao; Yan, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The integration with different decisions in the supply chain is a trend, since it can avoid the suboptimal decisions. In this paper, we provide an effective intelligent algorithm for a modified joint replenishment and location-inventory problem (JR-LIP). The problem of the JR-LIP is to determine the reasonable number and location of distribution centers (DCs), the assignment policy of customers, and the replenishment policy of DCs such that the overall cost is minimized. However, due to the JR-LIP's difficult mathematical properties, simple and effective solutions for this NP-hard problem have eluded researchers. To find an effective approach for the JR-LIP, a hybrid self-adapting differential evolution algorithm (HSDE) is designed. To verify the effectiveness of the HSDE, two intelligent algorithms that have been proven to be effective algorithms for the similar problems named genetic algorithm (GA) and hybrid DE (HDE) are chosen to compare with it. Comparative results of benchmark functions and randomly generated JR-LIPs show that HSDE outperforms GA and HDE. Moreover, a sensitive analysis of cost parameters reveals the useful managerial insight. All comparative results show that HSDE is more stable and robust in handling this complex problem especially for the large-scale problem.

  11. Differential two-signal picosecond-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging microscopy by using a dual-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yong Shim; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Cho, Hyuck

    2007-11-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel differential two-signal technique of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging microscopy using a picosecond (ps) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By adjusting a Lyot filter inside the cavity, we operated the OPO oscillating in two stable modes separated by a few nanometers. The CARS images generated by the two modes are separated by a spectrograph behind the microscope setup, and their differential image is directly obtained by balanced lock-in detection. The feasibility of the technique is experimentally verified by imaging micrometer-sized polystyrene beads immersed in water.

  12. Pulse oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Jubran, Amal

    1999-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is one of the most commonly employed monitoringmodalities in the critical care setting. This review describes the latesttechnological advances in the field of pulse oximetry. Accuracy of pulseoximeters and their limitations are critically examined. Finally, the existingdata regarding the clinical applications and cost-effectiveness of pulseoximeters are discussed. PMID:11094477

  13. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  14. Rapid differentiation of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis by use of frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatograph: analysis of acids.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S; Shepherd, M E; Alley, C C

    1980-01-01

    The major causative agents of bacterial meningitis, Haemophilus influenzae serogroup B, Neisseria meningitidis serogroups B and C, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and two types of Escherichia coli, were cultured in a modified chemically defined Catlin medium and in a commercial version of the unmodified Catlin medium. The spent media were extracted under acidic conditions, and electron-capturing derivatives were prepared by derivatization with trichloroethanol or haptafluorobutyric anhydride. The derivatives were analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with a frequency-pulsed electron capture detector and a PEP-2 computer. The data obtained from the study show that these organisms can be easily distinguished from each other on the basis of metabolic products detected in either type of medium. Three different metabolic groups were detected within two serogroups of N. meningitidis. The methods are practical, and the new technique should offer clinical laboratories and hospitals a better method for rapid identification of this important group of pathogens.

  15. Integrating Evolutionary and Functional Tests of Adaptive Hypotheses: A Case Study of Altitudinal Differentiation in Hemoglobin Function in an Andean Sparrow, Zonotrichia capensis

    PubMed Central

    Cheviron, Zachary A.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Projecto-Garcia, Joana; Eddy, Douglas K.; Jones, Jennifer; Carling, Matthew D.; Witt, Christopher C.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E.; Fago, Angela; Storz, Jay F.

    2014-01-01

    In air-breathing vertebrates, the physiologically optimal blood-O2 affinity is jointly determined by the prevailing partial pressure of atmospheric O2, the efficacy of pulmonary O2 transfer, and internal metabolic demands. Consequently, genetic variation in the oxygenation properties of hemoglobin (Hb) may be subject to spatially varying selection in species with broad elevational distributions. Here we report the results of a combined functional and evolutionary analysis of Hb polymorphism in the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis), a species that is continuously distributed across a steep elevational gradient on the Pacific slope of the Peruvian Andes. We integrated a population genomic analysis that included all postnatally expressed Hb genes with functional studies of naturally occurring Hb variants, as well as recombinant Hb (rHb) mutants that were engineered through site-directed mutagenesis. We identified three clinally varying amino acid polymorphisms: Two in the αA-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunits of the major HbA isoform, and one in the αD-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunits of the minor HbD isoform. We then constructed and experimentally tested single- and double-mutant rHbs representing each of the alternative αA-globin genotypes that predominate at different elevations. Although the locus-specific patterns of altitudinal differentiation suggested a history of spatially varying selection acting on Hb polymorphism, the experimental tests demonstrated that the observed amino acid mutations have no discernible effect on respiratory properties of the HbA or HbD isoforms. These results highlight the importance of experimentally validating the hypothesized effects of genetic changes in protein function to avoid the pitfalls of adaptive storytelling. PMID:25135942

  16. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  17. Field 13CO2 pulse labeling reveals differential partitioning patterns of photoassimilated carbon in response to livestock exclosure in a Kobresia meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, J.; Zhao, L.; Xu, S.; Xu, X.; Chen, D.; Li, Q.; Zhao, N.; Luo, C.; Zhao, X.

    2014-08-01

    Livestock exclosure has been widely used as an approach for grassland restoration. However, the effects of exclosures on grasslands are controversial and can depend on many factors, such as the grassland ecosystem types, evolutionary history and so on. In this study, we conduct field experiments to investigate the variations of the ecosystem function in response to livestock exclosure in a Kobresia humilis meadow with 6 years of grazing exclosure on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. We focused on two ecosystem functions: plant community structure and ecosystem carbon cycling. The plant aboveground productivity, plant diversity and the composition of plant functional groups of the meadow were addressed as the indicators of the plant community structure. The 13C isotope pulse labeling technique was applied to evaluate the alterations of ecosystem carbon cycling during a short term. The results showed that the plant community structure was changed after being fenced in for 6 years, with significantly decreased aboveground productivity, species loss and varied composition of the four plant functional groups (grasses, sedges, legumes and forbs). Using the pulse labeling technique, we found a lower cycling rate of 13C in the plant-soil system of the fenced plots compared with the grazed sites during the first 24 h after labeling. A higher proportion of recovered 13C in the plant-soil system migrated into the soil as root exudates immediately after labeling at both fenced and control grazed sites, with a significantly lower proportion in the fenced site, coinciding with the lower proportion of 13C lost from soil respiration. Thirty-two days after labeling, 37% of the recovered 13C remained in the soil of the fenced plots, with significant differences compared to in the grazed plots (47%). In addition, less 13C (5 vs. 7%) was lost by soil respiration in the fenced plots during the chase period of 32 days. Overall, our study suggests that livestock exclosures have negative

  18. Pulse Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteryoung, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of pulse voltammetry, indicating that its widespread use arises from good sensitivity and detection limits and from ease of application and low cost. Provides analytical and mechanistic applications of the procedure. (JN)

  19. Rapid differentiation of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis by use of frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography: analysis of amines.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S; Shepherd, M E; Alley, C C

    1980-01-01

    The major causative agents of bacterial meningitis (Haemophilus influenzae serogroup B, Neisseria meningitidis serogroups B and C, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Steptococcus pneumoniae, and two types of Escherichia coli) were cultured in a chemically defined medium, and selected strains were further studied in Todd-Hewitt medium. After acidic extraction of the spent media with chloroform, a basic extraction was made with chloroform to obtain amines. A third extraction was performed on re-acidified Todd-Hewitt medium with ethyl ether to obtain hydroxyacids. The extracts were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride-ethanol to form electron-capturing derivatives, and the derivatives were analyzed on a frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatograph (FPEC-GLC) equipped with a PEP-2 computer. The data obtained from the study showed that amines were produced by these organisms that formed characteristic patterns. Different serotypes of K. pneumoniae and the two serogroups of N. meningitidis produced different types of FPEC-GLC profiles within serotypes. E. coli produced several hydroxy acids on Todd-Hewitt medium that made it unique among the organisms studied. The methods used are practical and the techniques have potential for use in clinical laboratories and hospitals as a valuable aid for the rapid identification of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis.

  20. Enhanced Cardiac Differentiation of Human Cardiovascular Disease Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Applying Unidirectional Electrical Pulses Using Aligned Electroactive Nanofibrous Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi Amirabad, Leila; Massumi, Mohammad; Shamsara, Mehdi; Shabani, Iman; Amari, Afshin; Mossahebi Mohammadi, Majid; Hosseinzadeh, Simzar; Vakilian, Saeid; Steinbach, Sarah K; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Soleimani, Masoud; Barzin, Jalal

    2017-03-01

    In the embryonic heart, electrical impulses propagate in a unidirectional manner from the sinus venosus and appear to be involved in cardiogenesis. In this work, aligned and random polyaniline/polyetersulfone (PANI/PES) nanofibrous scaffolds doped by Camphor-10-sulfonic acid (β) (CPSA) were fabricated via electrospinning and used to conduct electrical impulses in a unidirectional and multidirectional fashion, respectively. A bioreactor was subsequently engineered to apply electrical impulses to cells cultured on PANI/PES scaffolds. We established cardiovascular disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (CVD-iPSCs) from the fibroblasts of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgeries. The CVD-iPSCs were seeded onto the scaffolds, cultured in cardiomyocyte-inducing factors, and exposed to electrical impulses for 1 h/day, over a 15-day time period in the bioreactor. The application of the unidirectional electrical stimulation to the cells significantly increased the number of cardiac Troponin T (cTnT+) cells in comparison to multidirectional electrical stimulation using random fibrous scaffolds. This was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for cardiac-related transcription factors (NKX2.5, GATA4, and NPPA) and a cardiac-specific structural gene (TNNT2). Here we report for the first time that applying electrical pulses in a unidirectional manner mimicking the unidirectional wave of electrical stimulation in the heart, could increase the derivation of cardiomyocytes from CVD-iPSCs.

  1. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus (20) for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse. The apparatus (20) uses a White cell (10) having a plurality of optical delay paths (18a-18d) of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror (13) and the objective mirrors (11 and 12). A pulse (26) from a laser (27) travels through a multi-leg reflective path (28) between a beam splitter (21) and a totally reflective mirror (24) to the laser output (37). The laser pulse (26) is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter (21) to the input mirrors (14a-14d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d). The pulses from the output mirrors (16a-16d) of the optical delay paths (18a-18d) go simultaneously to the laser output (37) and to the input mirrors ( 14b-14d) of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter (21) is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output (37).

  2. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  3. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, B.T.; Reiner, D.

    1990-05-29

    A pulse combustor apparatus is described which is adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation. 4 figs.

  4. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, Ben T.; Reiner, David

    1990-01-01

    A pulse combustor apparatus adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation.

  5. Simultaneous mid-infrared pulse generation and shaping in engineered quasi-phase-matched nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations demonstrate that mid-infrared pulses are arbitrarily shaped during the differential frequency mixing of two femtosecond near-infrared pulses propagating in an engineered quasi-periodic poled medium with optical nonlinearity and group velocity dispersion. Shaped pulses, including linearly chirped pulses and pulse trains, are generated with high conversion efficiencies.

  6. Portable stimulator design aimed at differentiating facial nerves from normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kara, S; Kemaloğlu, S; Sener, F; Okandan, M; Erkan, M A

    2004-04-01

    Facial nerves are very prone to risk of being cut away in the facial surgeries. In order to differentiate the normal tissues from the nerves during the surgeries, facial stimulator is very essential. These stimulators are particularly useful in triggering action potentials in the facial muscle tissue. In the case of any damage to these nerves, paralysis is unavoidable. Second use of the stimulator would be to diagnose how severe the facial problems are. Third use, which is a noninvasive application, is the employment of facial stimulator to treat and diagnose facial problems that arose from temperature differences, cuts or strain. The stimulation is achieved through DC voltage pulses that conform to user-specified amplitude, pulse duration and pulse intervals. These variables are set according to the age, sex, and physiological conditions of the patient. Peripheral Interface Controller is used to derive different pulse patterns. The current specifications of our stimulator are a range of 0.1-20 V pulse amplitude, 0.1-2 msec pulse duration, and 0.05-1 sec pulse interval. The main benefits of our stimulator are its graphic display that shows the form of pulse, its compact size, and operation on a battery power supply and adaptability to convert to other stimulation applications.

  7. Differential changes in hippocampal CaMKII and GluA1 activity after memory training involving different levels of adaptive forgetting.

    PubMed

    Fraize, Nicolas; Hamieh, Al Mahdy; Joseph, Mickaël Antoine; Touret, Monique; Parmentier, Régis; Salin, Paul Antoine; Malleret, Gaël

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorylation of CaMKII and AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit has been shown to play a major role in hippocampal-dependent long-term/reference memory (RM) and in the expression of long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP). In contrast, it has been proposed that dephosphorylation of these proteins could be involved in the opposite phenomenon of hippocampal long-term synaptic depression (LTD) and in adaptive forgetting. Adaptive forgetting allows interfering old memories to be forgotten to give new ones the opportunity to be stored in memory, and in particular in short-term/working memory (WM) that was shown to be very sensitive to proactive interference. To determine the role of CaMKII and GluA1 in adaptive forgetting, we adopted a comparative approach to assess the relative quantity and phosphorylation state of these proteins in the brain of rats trained in one of three radial maze paradigms: a RM task, a WM task involving a high level of adaptive forgetting, or a WM involving a low level of adaptive forgetting. Surprisingly, Western blot analyses revealed that training in a WM task involving a high level of adaptive forgetting specifically increased the expression of AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit and the activity of CaMKII in the dentate gyrus. These results highlight that WM with proactive interference involves mechanisms of synaptic plasticity selectively in the dentate gyrus.

  8. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  9. A study of new pulse auscultation system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Yun; Chang, Rong-Seng

    2015-04-14

    This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine's pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called "cun", "guan" and "chi" of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g), searching (125 g) and pressing (150 g) actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners' objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  10. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  11. Modelling Multi-Pulse Population Dynamics from Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Lincoln, Craig N.; van Thor, Jasper J.

    2011-01-01

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  12. In vivo imaging rhodopsin distribution in the photoreceptors with nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin is a biomarker for the function of rod photoreceptors, the dysfunction of which is related to many blinding diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Imaging rhodopsin quantitatively may provide a powerful clinical tool for diagnosis of these diseases. To map rhodopsin distribution accurately in the retina, absorption by rhodopsin intermediates need to be minimized. Methods and materials We developed nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) to image rhodopsin distribution in the retina. The system takes advantage of the light-induced shift of rhodopsin absorption spectra, which in turn affects the fundus spectral reflection before and after photo-bleaching. By imaging the retina twice, one in the dark-adapted state and the other one in the light-adapted state, the rhodopsin absorption change can be calculated from the differential image, which is a function of the rhodopsin concentration in the rod photoreceptors. Results The system was successfully applied to in vivo imaging of rat retina in different bleaching conditions to verify its feasibility. Our studies showed that the differential image between the dark- and light-adapted states represents rhodopsin distribution in the retina. We also conducted a dynamic bleaching experiment to prove the importance of reducing light absorption of rhodopsin intermediates. Conclusions The preliminary results showed that our nano-second pulsed-light SLO is promising in imaging the functional biomarker of the rod photoreceptors. By using nanosecond pulsed laser, in which one laser pulse generates one pixel of the image, the absorption of rhodopsin intermediates can be reduced. PMID:25694955

  13. Using Response-Time Constraints in Item Selection To Control for Differential Speededness in Computerized Adaptive Testing. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Scrams, David J.; Schnipke, Deborah L.

    This paper proposes an item selection algorithm that can be used to neutralize the effect of time limits in computer adaptive testing. The method is based on a statistical model for the response-time distributions of the test takers on the items in the pool that is updated each time a new item has been administered. Predictions from the model are…

  14. Differential Roles of Hydrogen Peroxide in Adaptive and Inflammatory Gene Expression Induced by Exposure of Human Airway Epithelial Cells to Zn2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidant stress is believed to play an important role in particulate matter (PM)–mediated toxicity in the respiratory tract. Zinc (Zn2+) is a ubiquitous component of PM that has been shown to induce adverse responses such as inflammatory and adaptive gene expression in airway epit...

  15. A Single-Use, In Vitro Biosensor for the Detection of T-Tau Protein, A Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-02-19

    A single-use, in vitro biosensor for the detection of T-Tau protein in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was designed, manufactured, and tested. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism. This biosensor consisted of three electrodes: working, counter, and reference electrodes fabricated on a PET sheet. Both working and counter electrodes were thin gold film, 10 nm in thickness. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. The biosensor was produced using cost-effective roll-to-roll process. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize the anti-T-Tau (T-Tau antibody) on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked anti-T-Tau to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. A T-Tau protein ladder with six isoforms was used in this study. The anti-T-Tau concentration used was 500,000 pg/mL. The T-Tau protein concentration ranged from 1000 pg/mL to 100,000 pg/mL. DPV measurements showed excellent responses, with a good calibration curve. Thus, a practical tool for simple detection of T-Tau protein, a biomarker of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been successfully developed. This tool could also be extended to detect other biomarkers for neuro-degenerative disorders, such as P-Tau protein and β-amyloid 42.

  16. Simultaneous determination of trace Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a reduced graphene oxide-chitosan/poly-l-lysine nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhuo; Li, Dong-di; Luo, Xian-Ke; Li, Ya-Hui; Zhao, Qi-Nai; Li, Meng-Meng; Zhao, Yang-Ting; Sun, Tian-Shuai; Ma, Chi

    2017-03-15

    The reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Chitosan (CS) hybrid matrix RGO-CS were coated onto the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface, then, poly-l-lysine films (PLL) were prepared by electropolymerization with cyclic voltammetry (CV) method to prepare RGO-CS/PLL modified glassy carbon electrode (RGO-CS/PLL/GCE) for the simultaneous electrochemical determination of heavy metal ions Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II). Combining the advantageous features of RGO and CS, RGO and CS are used together because the positively charged CS can interact with the negatively changed RGO to prevent their aggregation. Furthermore, CS has many amino groups along its macromolecular chains and possessed strongly reactive with metal ions. Moreover, PLL modified electrodes have good stability, excellent permselectivity, more active sites and strong adherence to electrode surface, which enhanced electrocatalytic activity. The RGO-CS/PLL/GCE was characterized voltammetrically using redox couples (Fe(CN)6(3-/4-)), complemented with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) has been used for the detection of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II). The detection limit of RGO-CS/PLL/GCE toward Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) is 0.01μgL(-1), 0.02μgL(-1) and 0.02μgL(-1), respectively. The electrochemical parameters that exert influence on deposition and stripping of metal ions, such as supporting electrolytes, pH value, deposition potential, and deposition time, were carefully studied.

  17. A Single-Use, In Vitro Biosensor for the Detection of T-Tau Protein, A Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV)

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-01-01

    A single-use, in vitro biosensor for the detection of T-Tau protein in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was designed, manufactured, and tested. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism. This biosensor consisted of three electrodes: working, counter, and reference electrodes fabricated on a PET sheet. Both working and counter electrodes were thin gold film, 10 nm in thickness. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. The biosensor was produced using cost-effective roll-to-roll process. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize the anti-T-Tau (T-Tau antibody) on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N’-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N–hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked anti-T-Tau to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. A T-Tau protein ladder with six isoforms was used in this study. The anti-T-Tau concentration used was 500,000 pg/mL. The T-Tau protein concentration ranged from 1000 pg/mL to 100,000 pg/mL. DPV measurements showed excellent responses, with a good calibration curve. Thus, a practical tool for simple detection of T-Tau protein, a biomarker of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been successfully developed. This tool could also be extended to detect other biomarkers for neuro-degenerative disorders, such as P-Tau protein and β-amyloid 42. PMID:28218731

  18. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  19. Differential enrichment of TTF-I and Tip5 in the T-like promoter structures of the rDNA contribute to the epigenetic response of Cyprinus carpio during environmental adaptation.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Simonet, Nicolas G; Navarro, Cristina; Längst, Gernot; Alvarez, Marco

    2016-08-01

    To ensure homeostasis, ectothermic organisms adapt to environmental variations through molecular mechanisms. We previously reported that during the seasonal acclimatization of the common carp Cyprinus carpio, molecular and cellular functions are reprogrammed, resulting in distinctive traits. Importantly, the carp undergoes a drastic rearrangement of nucleolar components during adaptation. This ultrastructural feature reflects a fine modulation of rRNA gene transcription. Specifically, we identified the involvement of the transcription termination factor I (TTF-I) and Tip-5 (member of nucleolar remodeling complex, NoRC) in the control of rRNA transcription. Our results suggest that differential Tip5 enrichment is essential for silencing carp ribosomal genes and that the T0 element is key for regulating the ribosomal gene during the acclimatization process. Interestingly, the expression and content of Tip5 were significantly higher in winter than in summer. Since carp ribosomal gene expression is lower in the winter than in summer, and considering that expression concomitantly occurs with nucleolar ultrastructural changes of the acclimatization process, these results indicate that Tip5 importantly contributes to silencing the ribosomal genes. In conclusion, the current study provides novel evidence on the contributions of TTF-I and NoRC in the environmental reprogramming of ribosomal genes during the seasonal adaptation process in carp.

  20. SU-E-T-558: An Exploratory RF Pulse Sequence Technique Used to Induce Differential Heating in Tissues Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for a Possible Hyperthermic Adjuvant Effect to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Ionascu, D; Wilson, G; Thapa, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In pre-clinical trials of cancer thermotherapy, hyperthermia can be induced by exposing localized super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) to external alternating magnetic fields generated by a solenoid electrical circuit (Zhao et al., Theranostics 2012). Alternatively, an RF pulse technique implemented in a regular MRI system is explored as a possible hyperthermia induction technique . Methods: A new thermal RF pulse sequence was developed using the Philips pulse programming tool for the 3T Ingenia MRI system to provide a sinusoidal magnetic field alternating at the frequency of 1.43 kHz (multiples of sine waves of 0.7 ms period) before each excitation RF pulse for imaging. The duration of each thermal RF pulse routine was approximately 3 min, and the thermal pulse was applied multiple times to a phantom that contains different concentrations (high, medium and low) of SPION samples. After applying the thermal pulse each time, the temperature change was estimated by measuring the phase changes in the T1-weighted inversion-prepared multi-shot turbo field echo (TFE) sequence (TR=5.5 ms, TE=2.7 ms, inversion time=200 ms). Results: The phase values and relative differences among them changed as the number of applied thermal RF pulses increased. After the 5th application of the thermal RF pulse, the relative phase differences increased significantly, suggesting the thermal activation of the SPION. The increase of the phase difference was approximately linear with the SPION concentration. Conclusion: A sinusoidal RF pulse from the MRI system may be utilized to selectively thermally activate tissues containing super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  1. Parsing parallel evolution: ecological divergence and differential gene expression in the adaptive radiations of thick-lipped Midas cichlid fishes from Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Manousaki, Tereza; Hull, Pincelli M; Kusche, Henrik; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Franchini, Paolo; Harrod, Chris; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2013-02-01

    The study of parallel evolution facilitates the discovery of common rules of diversification. Here, we examine the repeated evolution of thick lips in Midas cichlid fishes (the Amphilophus citrinellus species complex)-from two Great Lakes and two crater lakes in Nicaragua-to assess whether similar changes in ecology, phenotypic trophic traits and gene expression accompany parallel trait evolution. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we characterize transcriptome-wide differential gene expression in the lips of wild-caught sympatric thick- and thin-lipped cichlids from all four instances of repeated thick-lip evolution. Six genes (apolipoprotein D, myelin-associated glycoprotein precursor, four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 2, calpain-9, GTPase IMAP family member 8-like and one hypothetical protein) are significantly underexpressed in the thick-lipped morph across all four lakes. However, other aspects of lips' gene expression in sympatric morphs differ in a lake-specific pattern, including the magnitude of differentially expressed genes (97-510). Generally, fewer genes are differentially expressed among morphs in the younger crater lakes than in those from the older Great Lakes. Body shape, lower pharyngeal jaw size and shape, and stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) differ between all sympatric morphs, with the greatest differentiation in the Great Lake Nicaragua. Some ecological traits evolve in parallel (those related to foraging ecology; e.g. lip size, body and head shape) but others, somewhat surprisingly, do not (those related to diet and food processing; e.g. jaw size and shape, stable isotopes). Taken together, this case of parallelism among thick- and thin-lipped cichlids shows a mosaic pattern of parallel and nonparallel evolution.

  2. Performance analysis of low-complexity adaptive frequency-domain equalization and MIMO signal processing for compensation of differential mode group delay in mode-division multiplexing communication systems using few-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission systems utilizing few-mode fibers (FMF) have been intensively explored to sustain continuous traffic growth. The key challenges of MDM systems are inter-modal crosstalk due to random mode coupling (RMC), and largely-accumulated differential mode group delay (DMGD), whilst hinders mode-demultiplexer implementation. The adaptive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can dynamically compensate DMGD using digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. The frequency-domain least-mean squares (FD-LMS) algorithm has been universally adopted for high-speed MDM communications, mainly for its relatively low computational complexity. However, longer training sequence is appended for FD-LMS to achieve faster convergence, which incurs prohibitively higher system overhead and reduces overall throughput. In this paper, we propose a fast-convergent single-stage adaptive frequency-domain recursive least-squares (FD-RLS) algorithm with reduced complexity for DMGD compensation at MDM coherent receivers. The performance and complexity comparison of FD-RLS, with signal-PSD-dependent FD-LMS method and conventional FD-LMS approach, are performed in a 3000 km six-mode transmission system with 65 ps/km DMGD. We explore the convergence speed of three adaptive algorithms, including the normalized mean-square-error (NMSE) per fast Fourier transform (FFT) block at 14-30 dB OSNR. The fast convergence of FD-RLS is exploited at the expense of slightly-increased necessary tap numbers for MIMO equalizers, and it can partially save the overhead of training sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate adaptive FD-RLS can also be used for chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation without increasing the filter tap length, thus prominently reducing the DSP implementation complexity for MDM systems.

  3. Compensated pulsed alternator

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.; Driga, Mircea D.; Woodson, Herbert H.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an electromechanical energy converter with inertial energy storage. The device, a single phase, two or multi-pole alternator with stationary field coils, and a rotating armature is provided. The rotor itself may be of laminated steel for slower pulses or for faster pulses should be nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive in order to allow rapid penetration of the field as the armature coil rotates. The armature coil comprises a plurality of power generating conductors mounted on the rotor. The alternator may also include a stationary or counterrotating compensating coil to increase the output voltage thereof and to reduce the internal impedance of the alternator at the moment of peak outout. As the machine voltage rises sinusoidally, an external trigger switch is adapted to be closed at the appropriate time to create the desired output current from said alternator to an external load circuit, and as the output current passes through zero a self-commutating effect is provided to allow the switch to disconnect the generator from the external circuit.

  4. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex.

  5. Pulse speed on a plucked wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekirk, Tristan; Slaton, William V.

    2012-04-01

    This paper serves to update an elegant experiment published in The Physics Teacher to measure the speed of a pulse on a taut metal wire. Unfortunately, commercially available units2 that serve the same purpose are priced outside the range of most high school or college physics teaching laboratories. Wakeland et al. show how an affordable adaptation of the traditional standing wave apparatus using taut metal wire and horseshoe magnets can be used to measure the speed of a pulse by using an oscilloscope to measure an induced voltage in the wire as the pulse transverses the middle of the magnets, which are a known distance apart.

  6. From reactors to long pulse sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mezei, F. |

    1995-12-31

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are.

  7. Pulsed Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlimann, C.

    Optics is the field of physics which comprises knowledge on the interaction between light and matter. When the superposition principle can be applied to electromagnetic waves or when the properties of matter do not depend on the intensity of light, one speaks of linear optics. This situation occurs with regular light sources such as light bulbs, low-intensity light-emitting diodes and the sun. With such low-intensity sources the reaction of matter to light can be characterized by a set of parameters such as the index of refraction, the absorption and reflection coefficients and the orientation of the medium with respect to the polarization of the light. These parameters depend only on the nature of the medium. The situation changed dramatically after the development of lasers in the early sixties, which allowed the generation of light intensities larger than a kilowatt per square centimeter. Actual large-scale short-pulse lasers can generate peak powers in the petawatt regime. In that large-intensity regime the optical parameters of a material become functions of the intensity of the impinging light. In 1818 Fresnel wrote a letter to the French Academy of Sciences in which he noted that the proportionality between the vibration of the light and the subsequent vibration of matter was only true because no high intensities were available. The intensity dependence of the material response is what usually defines nonlinear optics.

  8. Modeling, mesh generation and adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations: IMA summer program. Final report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Miller, W. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    The program was divided into segments: (Week 1) geometric modeling and mesh generation (Weeks 2 and 3) error estimation and adaptive strategies. Participants in the program came from a wide variety of disciplines dealing with remarkably analogous problems in this area. Ideas were exchanged and interdisciplinary collaboration was initiated in informal contexts as well as in the talks and question periods. In the talks, a number of algorithms were described along with specific applications to problems of great current interest in various scientific and engineering disciplines. In this emerging field, participants developed criteria for evaluation of algorithms and established guidelines for selection of algorithms appropriate to any specific problem. Special features of a problem may include curved surfaces, complicated boundaries, evolving interfaces (such as occur in coating flows), and/or criticality of error estimation.

  9. Cytokine and cytokine receptor genes of the adaptive immune response are differentially associated with breast cancer risk in American women of African and European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Quan, Lei; Gong, Zhihong; Yao, Song; Bandera, Elisa V; Zirpoli, Gary; Hwang, Helena; Roberts, Michelle; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Sucheston, Lara; Pawlish, Karen; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Cabasag, Citadel; Coignet, Jean-Gabriel; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2014-03-15

    Disparities in breast cancer biology are evident between American women of African ancestry (AA) and European ancestry (EA) and may be due, in part, to differences in immune function. To assess the potential role of constitutional host immunity on breast carcinogenesis, we tested associations between breast cancer risk and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 cytokine-related genes of the adaptive immune system using 650 EA (n = 335 cases) and 864 AA (n = 458 cases) women from the Women's Circle of Health Study (WCHS). With additional participant accrual to the WCHS, promising SNPs from the initial analysis were evaluated in a larger sample size (1,307 EAs and 1,365 AAs). Multivariate logistic regression found SNPs in genes important for T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity (IFNGR2 rs1059293, IL15RA rs2296135, LTA rs1041981), Th2 immunity (IL4R rs1801275), and T regulatory cell-mediated immunosuppression (TGFB1 rs1800469) associated with breast cancer risk, mainly among AAs. The combined effect of these five SNPs was highly significant among AAs (P-trend = 0.0005). When stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) status, LTA rs1041981 was associated with ER-positive breast cancers among EAs and marginally among AAs. Only among AA women, IL15 rs10833 and IL15RA rs2296135 were associated with ER-positive tumors, and IL12RB1 rs375947, IL15 rs10833 and TGFB1 rs1800469 were associated with ER-negative tumors. Our study systematically identified genetic variants in the adaptive immune response pathway associated with breast cancer risk, which appears to differ by ancestry groups, menopausal status and ER status.

  10. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  11. Monocytes/Macrophages Upregulate the Hyaluronidase HYAL1 and Adapt Its Subcellular Trafficking to Promote Extracellular Residency upon Differentiation into Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Emeline; Boonen, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are giant bone-resorbing cells originating from monocytes/macrophages. During their differentiation, they overexpress two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin K and TRAP, which are secreted into the resorption lacuna, an acidified sealed area in contact with bone matrix where bone degradation takes place. Here we report that the acid hydrolase HYAL1, a hyaluronidase able to degrade the glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate, is also upregulated upon osteoclastogenesis. The mRNA expression and protein level of HYAL1 are markedly increased in osteoclasts differentiated from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages or primary mouse bone marrow monocytes compared to these precursor cells. As a result, the HYAL1-mediated HA hydrolysis ability of osteoclasts is strongly enhanced. Using subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that HYAL1 proteins are sorted to the osteoclast lysosomes even though, in contrast to cathepsin K and TRAP, HYAL1 is poorly mannose 6-phosphorylated. We reported previously that macrophages secrete HYAL1 proforms by constitutive secretion, and that these are recaptured by the cell surface mannose receptor, processed in endosomes and sorted to lysosomes. Present work highlights that osteoclasts secrete HYAL1 in two ways, through lysosomal exocytosis and constitutive secretion, and that these cells promote the extracellular residency of HYAL1 through downregulation of the mannose receptor. Interestingly, the expression of the other main hyaluronidase, HYAL2, and of lysosomal exoglycosidases involved in HA degradation, does not increase similarly to HYAL1 upon osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, these findings point out the predominant involvement of HYAL1 in bone HA metabolism and perhaps bone remodeling via the resorption lacuna. PMID:27755597

  12. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  13. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  14. Airborne Double Pulsed 2-Micron IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Singh, Upendra

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an airborne 2-micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar for atmospheric CO2 measurements. The double pulsed, high pulse energy lidar instrument can provide high-precision CO2 column density measurements.

  15. Differentiated dynamics of bud dormancy and growth in temperate fruit trees relating to bud phenology adaptation, the case of apple and almond trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Yaacoubi, Adnane; Malagi, Gustavo; Oukabli, Ahmed; Citadin, Idemir; Hafidi, Majida; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean-Michel

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the characterization of bud dormancy and growth dynamics for temperate fruit species in temperate and mild cropping areas, although this is an appropriate framework to anticipate phenology adaptation facing future warming contexts which would potentially combine chill declines and heat increases. To examine this issue, two experimental approaches and field observations were used for high- and low-chill apple cultivars in temperate climate of southern France and in mild climates of northern Morocco and southern Brazil. Low-chill almond cultivars offered an additional relevant plant material for comparison with apple in northern Morocco. Divergent patterns of dormancy and growth dynamics were clearly found in apple tree between southern France and southern Brazil. Divergences were less pronounced between France and Morocco. A global view outlined main differences in the dormancy chronology and intensity, the transition between endordormancy and ecodormancy and the duration of ecodormancy. A key role of bud rehydration in the transition period was shown. High-chill cultivars would be submitted in mild conditions to heterogeneous rehydration capacities linked to insufficient chill fulfillment and excessive forcing linked to high temperatures. This would favor bud competitions and consequently excessive flowering durations and weak flowering. Low chilling requirements in apple and almond would conversely confer biological capacities to tolerate superficial dormancy and abrupt transition from endordormancy to ecodormancy without important heterogeneous rehydration states within buds. It may also assume that low-chill cultivars can also tolerate high temperatures during ecodormancy as well as extended flowering durations.

  16. Differential adaptations between cold-stenothermal environments in the bivalve Lissarca cf. miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea islands and Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Adam J.; Linse, Katrin; Thatje, Sven

    2014-04-01

    The cold stenothermal nature of the Southern Ocean, and highly adapted fauna living within, raises the question of how much intra-specific variation there is among invertebrate populations, and how variation may have a role in speciation processes through ecological divergence, natural selection, and reproductive isolation. Despite decades of collecting biological material, this question remains largely unanswered, and many studies compare ‘populations' of pooled material from wide geographic ranges to compensate for sampling constraints. In this study, variations in ecophysiological traits are explored by measuring growth, reproduction, and shell morphology among six populations of the small bivalve Lissarca cf. miliaris (Philippi, 1845) from the Southern Ocean, which experience subtle differences in temperature, disturbance, and food availability. There are significant differences in shell morphology and growth among different populations and slower growth rates at higher latitude populations. Prodissoconch sizes show an inverse ‘U' shaped relationship with latitude, and are correlated with egg size at South Georgia and King George Island's Potter Cove. Higher brood sizes at the South Georgia population represent a trade-off with lower egg size, and correlate with shell morphology by offering lower internal capacity to brood young. Lower investment into offspring and morphological variations in L. cf. miliaris highlight the importance of local scale environmental variations on species' ecology. These variations in physical traits appear to be underestimated in the Southern Ocean, but may be important drivers of ecological divergence and speciation, which should be considered in future genetic investigations on different invertebrate populations.

  17. A partial differential equation-based general framework adapted to Rayleigh's, Rician's and Gaussian's distributed noise for restoration and enhancement of magnetic resonance image.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ram Bharos; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The proposed framework is obtained by casting the noise removal problem into a variational framework. This framework automatically identifies the various types of noise present in the magnetic resonance image and filters them by choosing an appropriate filter. This filter includes two terms: the first term is a data likelihood term and the second term is a prior function. The first term is obtained by minimizing the negative log likelihood of the corresponding probability density functions: Gaussian or Rayleigh or Rician. Further, due to the ill-posedness of the likelihood term, a prior function is needed. This paper examines three partial differential equation based priors which include total variation based prior, anisotropic diffusion based prior, and a complex diffusion (CD) based prior. A regularization parameter is used to balance the trade-off between data fidelity term and prior. The finite difference scheme is used for discretization of the proposed method. The performance analysis and comparative study of the proposed method with other standard methods is presented for brain web dataset at varying noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, structure similarity index map, and correlation parameter. From the simulation results, it is observed that the proposed framework with CD based prior is performing better in comparison to other priors in consideration.

  18. A partial differential equation-based general framework adapted to Rayleigh's, Rician's and Gaussian's distributed noise for restoration and enhancement of magnetic resonance image

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ram Bharos; Srivastava, Subodh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    The proposed framework is obtained by casting the noise removal problem into a variational framework. This framework automatically identifies the various types of noise present in the magnetic resonance image and filters them by choosing an appropriate filter. This filter includes two terms: the first term is a data likelihood term and the second term is a prior function. The first term is obtained by minimizing the negative log likelihood of the corresponding probability density functions: Gaussian or Rayleigh or Rician. Further, due to the ill-posedness of the likelihood term, a prior function is needed. This paper examines three partial differential equation based priors which include total variation based prior, anisotropic diffusion based prior, and a complex diffusion (CD) based prior. A regularization parameter is used to balance the trade-off between data fidelity term and prior. The finite difference scheme is used for discretization of the proposed method. The performance analysis and comparative study of the proposed method with other standard methods is presented for brain web dataset at varying noise levels in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, structure similarity index map, and correlation parameter. From the simulation results, it is observed that the proposed framework with CD based prior is performing better in comparison to other priors in consideration. PMID:28144118

  19. Differential requirement for CCR4 and CCR7 during the development of innate and adaptive αβT cells in the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer E; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Parnell, Sonia M; White, Andrea J; Bacon, Andrea; Serge, Arnauld; Irla, Magali; Lane, Peter J L; Jenkinson, Eric J; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2014-08-01

    αβT cell development depends upon serial migration of thymocyte precursors through cortical and medullary microenvironments, enabling specialized stromal cells to provide important signals at specific stages of their development. Although conventional αβT cells are subject to clonal deletion in the medulla, entry into the thymus medulla also fosters αβT cell differentiation. For example, during postnatal periods, the medulla is involved in the intrathymic generation of multiple αβT cell lineages, notably the induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development and the completion of invariant NKT cell development. Although migration of conventional αβT cells to the medulla is mediated by the chemokine receptor CCR7, how other T cell subsets gain access to medullary areas during their normal development is not clear. In this study, we show that combining a panel of thymocyte maturation markers with cell surface analysis of CCR7 and CCR4 identifies distinct stages in the development of multiple αβT cell lineages in the thymus. Although Aire regulates expression of the CCR4 ligands CCL17 and CCL22, we show that CCR4 is dispensable for thymocyte migration and development in the adult thymus, demonstrating defective T cell development in Aire(-/-) mice is not because of a loss of CCR4-mediated migration. Moreover, we reveal that CCR7 controls the development of invariant NKT cells by enabling their access to IL-15 trans-presentation in the thymic medulla and influences the balance of early and late intrathymic stages of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development. Collectively, our data identify novel roles for CCR7 during intrathymic T cell development, highlighting its importance in enabling multiple αβT cell lineages to access the thymic medulla.

  20. Differential effects of sugar-mimic alkaloids in mulberry latex on sugar metabolism and disaccharidases of Eri and domesticated silkworms: enzymatic adaptation of Bombyx mori to mulberry defense.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Chikara; Konno, Kotaro; Wasano, Naoya; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    2007-12-01

    Mulberry leaves (Morus spp.) exude latex rich in sugar-mimic alkaloids, 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol (d-AB1) and 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), as a defense against herbivorous insects. Sugar-mimic alkaloids are inhibitors of sugar-metabolizing enzymes, and are toxic to the Eri silkworm, Samia ricini, a generalist herbivore, but not at all to the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, a mulberry specialist. To address the phenomena, we fed both larvae diets containing different sugar sources (sucrose, glucose or none) with or without sugar-mimic alkaloids from mulberry latex. In S. ricini, addition of sugar-mimic alkaloids to the sucrose (the major sugar in mulberry leaves) diet reduced both growth and the absorption ratio of sugar, but it reduced neither in B. mori. The midgut soluble sucrase activity of S. ricini was low and inhibited by very low concentrations of sugar-mimic alkaloids (IC(50)=0.9-8.2microM), but that of B. mori was high and not inhibited even by very high concentrations (IC(50)>1000microM) of sugar-mimic alkaloids. In S. ricini, the addition of sugar-mimic alkaloids to the glucose diet still had considerable negative effects on growth, although it did not reduce the absorption ratio of glucose. The hemolymph of S. ricini fed sugar-mimic alkaloids contained sugar-mimic alkaloids. The trehalose concentration in the hemolymph increased significantly in S. ricini fed sugar-mimic alkaloids, but not in B. mori. The trehalase activities of S. ricini were lower and inhibited by lower concentrations of sugar-mimic alkaloids than those of B. mori. These results suggest that sugar-mimic alkaloids in mulberry latex exert toxicity to S. ricini larvae first by inhibiting midgut sucrase and digestion of sucrose, and secondly, after being absorbed into hemolymph, by inhibiting trehalase and utilization of trehalose, the major blood sugar. Further, our results reveal that B. mori larvae evolved enzymatic adaptation to mulberry defense by developing sucrase and

  1. Double-Pulse Two-micron LPDA Lidar Simulation for Airborne Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2016-06-01

    An advanced double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide. The instrument utilizes a state-of-the-art 2-μm laser transmitter with tunable on-line wavelength and advanced receiver. Instrument modeling and airborne simulations are presented in this paper. Focusing on random errors, results demonstrate instrument capabilities of performing precise carbon dioxide differential optical depth measurement with less than 3% random error for single-shot operation up to 11 km altitude. This study is useful for defining CO2 measurement weighting function for adaptive targeting, instrument setting, validation and sensitivity trade-offs.

  2. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  3. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.

  4. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  5. Plasma Membrane Permeabilization by Trains of Ultrashort Electric Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    ultrashort electrical pulses. Bioelectromagnetics , 2001. 22(6): p. 440-8. 4. Stacey, M., et al., Differential effects in cells exposed to ultra-short...nanosecond pulsed electric field Bioelectromagnetics , 2007. 28: p. 655-663. 13. Gowrishankar, T.R. and J.C. Weaver, Electrical behavior and pore...electric field (nsPEF). Bioelectromagnetics , 2007. 28: p. 655- 663. 19. Nuccitelli, R., et al., A new pulsed electric field therapy for melanoma disrupts

  6. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  7. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOEpatents

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1992-07-07

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  8. A General Purpose Q-Measuring Circuit Using Pulse Ring-Down.

    PubMed

    Quine, Richard W; Mitchell, Deborah G; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-02-01

    A general purpose pulsed microwave circuit was developed for the purpose of measuring resonator Q by the pulse ring-down method in EPR spectrometers without pulse capability. The circuit was installed and tested in a Bruker X-band EPR bridge. This method and circuit could be adapted for use in a variety of spectrometers operating at various microwave frequencies.

  9. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  10. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  11. GnRH pulse frequency differentially regulates steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1), dosage-sensitive sex reversal-AHC critical region on the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX1), and serum response factor (SRF): potential mechanism for GnRH pulse frequency regulation of LH beta transcription in the rat.

    PubMed

    Burger, Laura L; Haisenleder, Daniel J; Marshall, John C

    2011-06-01

    The issue of how rapid frequency GnRH pulses selectively stimulate LH transcription is not fully understood. The rat LHβ promoter contains two GnRH-responsive regions: the proximal region has binding elements for SF1, and the distal site contains a CArG box, which binds SRF. This study determined whether GnRH stimulates pituitary SF1, DAX1 (an endogenous SF1 inhibitor), and SRF transcription in vivo, and whether regulation is frequency dependent. Male rats were pulsed with 25 ng GnRH i.v. every 30 min or every 240 min for 1-24 h, and primary transcripts (PTs) and mRNAs were measured by real time PCR. Fast frequency GnRH pulses (every 30 min) increased SF1 PT (threefold) within 1 h, and then declined after 6 h. SF1 mRNA also increased within 1 h and remained elevated through 24 h. Fast frequency GnRH also stimulated a transient increase in DAX1 PT (twofold after 1 h) and mRNA (1.7-fold after 6 h), while SRF mRNA rose briefly at 1 h. Slow frequency pulses did not affect gene expression of SF1, DAX1, or SRF. These findings support a mechanistic link between SF1 in the frequency regulation of LHβ transcription by pulsatile GnRH.

  12. Pulse compression in plasma: Generation of femtosecond pulses without CPA

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N. J. Fisch; A. Pukhov; J. Meyer-ter-Vehn

    2000-07-20

    Laser pulses can be efficiently compressed to femtosecond duration when a smaller-frequency short pulse collides with high frequency long pulse in rare plasma, absorbing most of its energy. The mechanism of short pulse amplification is nonlinear superradiance.

  13. Theory of psychological adaptive modes.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Juha

    2016-05-01

    When an individual is facing a stressor and normal stress-response mechanism cannot guarantee sufficient adaptation, special emotional states, adaptive modes, are activated (for example a depressive reaction). Adaptive modes are involuntary states of mind, they are of comprehensive nature, they interfere with normal functioning, and they cannot be repressed or controlled the same way as many emotions. Their transformational nature differentiates them from other emotional states. The object of the adaptive mode is to optimize the problem-solving abilities according to the situation that has provoked the mode. Cognitions and emotions during the adaptive mode are different than in a normal mental state. These altered cognitions and emotional reactions guide the individual to use the correct coping skills in order to deal with the stressor. Successful adaptation will cause the adaptive mode to fade off since the adaptive mode is no longer necessary, and the process as a whole will lead to raised well-being. However, if the adaptation process is inadequate, then the transformation period is prolonged, and the adaptive mode will turn into a dysfunctional state. Many psychiatric disorders are such maladaptive processes. The maladaptive processes can be turned into functional ones by using adaptive skills that are used in functional adaptive processes.

  14. Analysis of Vacuous Pulse and Replete Pulse Using a Clip-type Pulsimeter Equipped with a Hall Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Kyu; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2015-04-01

    A logistic regression equation for the vacuous pulse and the replete pulse was determined based on data obtained using a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a Hall device that sensed the change in the magnetic field due to the minute movement of a radial artery. To evaluate the efficacy of the two different pulses from the deficiency and the excess syndrome groups, we performed a clinical trial, and we used a statistical regression analysis to process the clinical data from the 180 participants who were enrolled in this study. The ratio of the systolic peak's amplitude to its time in the pulse's waveform was found to be a major efficacy parameter for differentiating between the vacuous pulse and the replete pulse using an empirical equation that was deduced from the data using a statistical logistic regression method. This logistic regression equation can be applied to develop a novel algorithm for pulse measurements based on Oriental medical diagnoses.

  15. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  16. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron neural networks for dark-spot detection from SAR imagery.

    PubMed

    Taravat, Alireza; Oppelt, Natascha

    2014-12-02

    Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM) and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) model generates poor accuracies.

  17. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  18. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  19. GPU simulation of nonlinear propagation of dual band ultrasound pulse complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, Johannes Angelsen, Bjørn A. J.; Elster, Anne C.

    2015-10-28

    In a new method of ultrasound imaging, called SURF imaging, dual band pulse complexes composed of overlapping low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) pulses are transmitted, where the frequency ratio LF:HF ∼ 1 : 20, and the relative bandwidth of both pulses are ∼ 50 − 70%. The LF pulse length is hence ∼ 20 times the HF pulse length. The LF pulse is used to nonlinearly manipulate the material elasticity observed by the co-propagating HF pulse. This produces nonlinear interaction effects that give more information on the propagation of the pulse complex. Due to the large difference in frequency and pulse length between the LF and the HF pulses, we have developed a dual level simulation where the LF pulse propagation is first simulated independent of the HF pulse, using a temporal sampling frequency matched to the LF pulse. A separate equation for the HF pulse is developed, where the the presimulated LF pulse modifies the propagation velocity. The equations are adapted to parallel processing in a GPU, where nonlinear simulations of a typical HF beam of 10 MHz down to 40 mm is done in ∼ 2 secs in a standard GPU. This simulation is hence very useful for studying the manipulation effect of the LF pulse on the HF pulse.

  20. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  1. Pulse shaper assisted short laser pulse characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, A.; Feurer, T.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that a pulse shaper is able to simultaneously act as an optical waveform generator and a short pulse characterization device when combined with an appropriate nonlinear element. We present autocorrelation measurements and their frequency resolved counterparts. We show that control over the carrier envelope phase allows continuous tuning between an intensity-like and an interferometric autocorrelation. By changing the transfer function other measurement techniques, for example STRUT, are easily realized without any modification of the optical setup.

  2. Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus: characterization and differential reassortment with closest relatives reveal adaptive virulence in the squash leaf curl virus clade and host shifting by the host-restricted bean calico mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Idris, A M; Mills-Lujan, K; Martin, K; Brown, J K

    2008-02-01

    The genome components of the Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus (MCLCuV) were cloned from symptomatic cantaloupe leaves collected in Guatemala during 2002. The MCLCuV DNA-A and DNA-B components shared their closest nucleotide identities among begomoviruses, at approximately 90 and 81%, respectively, with a papaya isolate of MCLCuV from Costa Rica. The closest relatives at the species level were other members of the Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) clade, which is endemic in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Biolistic inoculation of cantaloupe seedlings with the MCLCuV DNA-A and -B components resulted in the development of characteristic disease symptoms, providing definitive evidence of causality. MCLCuV experimentally infected species within the Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and Solanaceae. The potential for interspecific reassortment was examined for MCLCuV and its closest relatives, including the bean-restricted Bean calico mosaic virus (BCaMV), and three other cucurbit-infecting species, Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), SLCV, and SMLCV. The cucurbit viruses have distinct but overlapping host ranges. All possible reassortants were established using heterologous combinations of the DNA-A or DNA-B components. Surprisingly, only certain reassortants arising from MCLCuV and BCaMV, or MCLCuV and CuLCrV, were viable in bean, even though it is a host of all of the "wild-type" (parent) viruses. The bean-restricted BCaMV was differentially assisted in systemically infecting the cucurbit test species by the components of the four cucurbit-adapted begomoviruses. In certain heterologous combinations, the BCaMV DNA-A or -B component was able to infect one or more cucurbit species. Generally, the reassortants were less virulent in the test hosts than the respective wild-type (parent) viruses, strongly implicating adaptive modulation of virulence. This is the first illustration of reassortment resulting in the host range expansion of a host-restricted begomovirus.

  3. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  4. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-28

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  5. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  6. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  7. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  8. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Gray, G.W.; Jensen, A.S.

    1957-10-22

    A pulse-height analyzer system of improved design for sorting and counting a series of pulses, such as provided by a scintillation detector in nuclear radiation measurements, is described. The analyzer comprises a main transmission line, a cathode-ray tube for each section of the line with its deflection plates acting as the line capacitance; means to bias the respective cathode ray tubes so that the beam strikes a target only when a prearranged pulse amplitude is applied, with each tube progressively biased to respond to smaller amplitudes; pulse generating and counting means associated with each tube to respond when the beam is deflected; a control transmission line having the same time constant as the first line per section with pulse generating means for each tube for initiating a pulse on the second transmission line when a pulse triggers the tube of corresponding amplitude response, the former pulse acting to prevent successive tubes from responding to the pulse under test. This arrangement permits greater deflection sensitivity in the cathode ray tube and overcomes many of the disadvantages of prior art pulse-height analyzer circuits.

  9. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  10. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  11. Changes across time in the temporal responses of auditory nerve fibers stimulated by electric pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles A; Hu, Ning; Zhang, Fawen; Robinson, Barbara K; Abbas, Paul J

    2008-03-01

    Most auditory prostheses use modulated electric pulse trains to excite the auditory nerve. There are, however, scant data regarding the effects of pulse trains on auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses across the duration of such stimuli. We examined how temporal ANF properties changed with level and pulse rate across 300-ms pulse trains. Four measures were examined: (1) first-spike latency, (2) interspike interval (ISI), (3) vector strength (VS), and (4) Fano factor (FF, an index of the temporal variability of responsiveness). Data were obtained using 250-, 1,000-, and 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. First-spike latency decreased with increasing spike rate, with relatively small decrements observed for 5,000-pulse/s trains, presumably reflecting integration. ISIs to low-rate (250 pulse/s) trains were strongly locked to the stimuli, whereas ISIs evoked with 5,000-pulse/s trains were dominated by refractory and adaptation effects. Across time, VS decreased for low-rate trains but not for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. At relatively high spike rates (>200 spike/s), VS values for 5,000-pulse/s trains were lower than those obtained with 250-pulse/s stimuli (even after accounting for the smaller periods of the 5,000-pulse/s stimuli), indicating a desynchronizing effect of high-rate stimuli. FF measures also indicated a desynchronizing effect of high-rate trains. Across a wide range of response rates, FF underwent relatively fast increases (i.e., within 100 ms) for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. With a few exceptions, ISI, VS, and FF measures approached asymptotic values within the 300-ms duration of the low- and high-rate trains. These findings may have implications for designs of cochlear implant stimulus protocols, understanding electrically evoked compound action potentials, and interpretation of neural measures obtained at central nuclei, which depend on understanding the output of the auditory nerve.

  12. Pulse dynamics in an unstable medium

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, N.J.; Ierley, G.R.; Worthing, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is presented of a one-dimensional, nonlinear partial differential equation that describes evolution of dispersive, long-wave instability. The solutions, under certain specific conditions, take the form of trains of well-separated pulses. The dynamics of such patterns of pulses is investigated using singular perturbation theory and with numerical simulation. These tools permit the formulation of a theory of pulse interaction, and enable the mapping out of the range of behavior in parameter space. There are regimes in which steady trains form; such states can be studied with the asymptotic, pulse-interaction theory. In other regimes, pulse trains are unstable to global, wave-like modes or its radiation. This can precipitate more violent phenomena involving pulse creation, or generate periodic states which may follow Shil`nikov`s route to temporal chaos. The asymptotic theory is generalized lo take some account of radiative dynamics. In the limit of small dispersion, steady trains largely cease to exist; the system follows various pathways to temporal complexity and typical-bifurcation sequences are sketched out. The investigation guides us to a critical appraisal of the asymptotic theory and uncovers the wealth of different types of behavior present in the system.

  13. PULSED INDICATOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Linlor, W.I.; Kerns, Q.A.

    1960-11-15

    A system is given for detecting incremental changes in a transducer impedance terminating a transmission line. Principal novelty resides in the transducer impedance terminating the line in a mismatch and a pulse generator being provided to apply discrete pulses to the input end of the line. The amplitudes of the pulses reflected to the input end of the line from the mismatched transducer impedance are then observed as a very accurate measure of the instantaneous value of the latter.

  14. PulseSoar

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, P.; Peglow, S.

    1992-07-21

    This paper is an introduction to the PulseSoar concept. PulseSoar is a hypervelocity airplane that uses existing airport facilities and current technologies to fly at the very edge of space. It will be shown that PulseSoar can fly between any two points on the globe in less than two hours with fuel efficiency exceeding current state of the art commercial airliners. In addition, it will be shown that PulseSoar avoids environmental issues concerning the ozone layer and sonic booms because of its unique flight profile. All of this can be achieved with current technology. PulseSoar does not require the development of enabling technology. It is a concept which can be demonstrated today. The importance of this idea goes beyond the technical significance`s of PulseSoar in terms of feasibility and performance. PulseSoar could provide a crucial economic advantage to America`s largest export market: commercial aircraft. PulseSoar is a breakthrough concept for addressing the emerging markets of long range and high speed aircraft. Application of PulseSoar to commercial transport could provide the US Aerospace industry a substantial lead in offering high speed/long range aircraft to the world`s airlines. The rapid emergence of a US developed high speed aircraft could also be important to our competitiveness in the Pacific Rim and South American economies. A quick and inexpensive demonstration vehicle is proposed to bang the concept to reality within two years. This discussion will address all the major technical subjects encompassed by PulseSoar and identifies several near-term, and low risk, applications which may be further explored with the initial demonstration vehicle. What is PulseSoar? PulseSoar could enable high speed, high altitude and long range flight without many of the difficulties encountered by traditional hypersonic vehicles.

  15. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M.; Wheat, Jr., Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  16. Stability of a modified Peaceman-Rachford method for the paraxial Helmholtz equation on adaptive grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qin; Sun, Hai-wei

    2016-11-01

    This study concerns the asymptotic stability of an eikonal, or ray, transformation based Peaceman-Rachford splitting method for solving the paraxial Helmholtz equation with high wave numbers. Arbitrary nonuniform grids are considered in transverse and beam propagation directions. The differential equation targeted has been used for modeling propagations of high intensity laser pulses over a long distance without diffractions. Self-focusing of high intensity beams may be balanced with the de-focusing effect of created ionized plasma channel in the situation, and applications of grid adaptations are frequently essential. It is shown rigorously that the fully discretized oscillation-free decomposition method on arbitrary adaptive grids is asymptotically stable with a stability index one. Simulation experiments are carried out to illustrate our concern and conclusions.

  17. A robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse waveform with a wandering baseline.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Farooq, Umar; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse (DVP) waveform with a wandering baseline. A proposed new method uses a modified morphological filter (MMF) to eliminate a wandering baseline signal of the DVP signal with minimum distortion and a slope sum function (SSF) with an adaptive thresholding scheme to detect pulse peaks from the baseline-removed DVP signal. Further in order to cope with over-detected and missed pulse peaks, knowledge based rules are applied as a postprocessor. The algorithm automatically adjusts detection parameters periodically to adapt to varying beat morphologies and fluctuations. Compared with conventional methods (highpass filtering, linear interpolation, cubic spline interpolation, and wavelet adaptive filtering), our method performs better in terms of the signal-to-error ratio, the computational burden (0.125 seconds for one minute of DVP signal analysis with the Intel Core 2 Quad processor @ 2.40 GHz PC), the true detection rate (97.32% with an acceptance level of 4 ms ) as well as the normalized error rate (0.18%). In addition, the proposed method can detect true positions of pulse peaks more accurately and becomes very useful for pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse rate variability (PRV) analyses.

  18. PULSE SCALING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Kandiah, K.

    1954-06-01

    Pulse scaling systems embodying multi-electrode gaseous-discharge tubes of the type having a plurality of stable discharge paths are described. The novelty of this particular system lies in the simplification of the stepping arrangement between successive tubes. In one form the invention provides a multistage scaler comprising a pulse generator, a first multi-electrode scaling tube of the type set forth coupled to said generator to receive transfer pulses therefrom and one or more succeeding multi-electrode scaling tubes each deriving its transfer pulses from preceding scaling tubes.

  19. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  20. Driver sensitivity to brake pulse duration and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Lee, J D; McGehee, D V; Brown, T L; Nakamoto, J

    2007-06-01

    Adaptive cruise control (ACC) requires that the driver intervene in situations that exceed the capability of ACC. A brake pulse might provide a particularly compatible means of alerting the driver to situations in which the acceleration authority of the ACC has been exceeded. This study examined the sensitivity of the driver to brake pulses of five different amplitudes (0.01-0.025 g) and five different durations (50-800 ms). Drivers were sensitive to accelerations as low as 0.015 g. Pulse duration interacted with pulse amplitude, such that moderate duration pulses were more detectable than long and short duration pulses at intermediate levels of pulse amplitude. A power function with an exponent of 1.0 accounted for 99% of the variance in drivers' sensitivity to pulse amplitude; however, a power function with an exponent of 0.23 accounted for only 70% of the variance in drivers' sensitivity to pulse duration. These results can help designers create ACC algorithms and develop brake pulse warnings.

  1. Self-compression of intense short laser pulses in relativistic magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Olumi, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2014-11-15

    The compression of a relativistic Gaussian laser pulse in a magnetized plasma is investigated. By considering relativistic nonlinearity and using non-linear Schrödinger equation with paraxial approximation, a second-order differential equation is obtained for the pulse width parameter (in time) to demonstrate the longitudinal pulse compression. The compression of laser pulse in a magnetized plasma can be observed by the numerical solution of the equation for the pulse width parameter. The effects of magnetic field and chirping are investigated. It is shown that in the presence of magnetic field and negative initial chirp, compression of pulse is significantly enhanced.

  2. Results of adaptive feedforward on GTA

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.D.; Denney, P.M.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Jachim, S.P.; Eaton, L.E.; Natter, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the adaptive feedforward system in use on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The adaptive feedforward system was shown to correct repetitive, high-frequency errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of the pulsed accelerator. The adaptive feedforward system was designed as an augmentation to the RF field feedback control system and was able to extend the closed-loop bandwidth and disturbance rejection by a factor of ten. Within a second implementation, the adaptive feedforward hardware was implemented in place of the feedback control system and was shown to negate both beam transients and phase droop in the klystron amplifier.

  3. Results of adaptive feedforward on GTA

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.D.; Denney, P.M.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Jachim, S.P.; Eaton, L.E.; Natter, E.F.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the adaptive feedforward system in use on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The adaptive feedforward system was shown to correct repetitive, high-frequency errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of the pulsed accelerator. The adaptive feedforward system was designed as an augmentation to the RF field feedback control system and was able to extend the closed-loop bandwidth and disturbance rejection by a factor of ten. Within a second implementation, the adaptive feedforward hardware was implemented in place of the feedback control system and was shown to negate both beam transients and phase droop in the klystron amplifier.

  4. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  5. Adaptive behaviour of silicon oxide memristive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Sergeev, V. A.; Antonov, I. N.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.

    2016-08-01

    The response to electrical pulses of various parameters has been studied for the CMOS-compatible memristive nanostructures on the basis of silicon oxide demonstrating reproducible resistive switching. It is established that an increase in the amplitude or width of a single programming pulse is followed by the gradual decrease in the device resistivity. By applying periodic pulse sequences of different polarity it is possible to obtain both lower and higher resistance states. This adaptive behavior is analogous to synaptic plasticity and considered as one of the main conditions for the application of memristive devices in neuromorphic systems and synaptic electronics.

  6. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  7. Extrusion cooking: Legume pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  8. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  9. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  10. ELECTRIC PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Buntenbach, R.W.

    1959-06-01

    S>An electro-optical apparatus is described which produces electric pulses in programmed sequences at times and durations controlled with great accuracy. An oscilloscope CRT is supplied with signals to produce a luminous spot moving in a circle. An opaque mask with slots of variable width transmits light from the spot to a photoelectric transducer. For shorter pulse decay times a CRT screen which emits UV can be used with a UVtransmitting filter and a UV- sensitive photoelectric cell. Pulses are varied by changing masks or by using masks with variable slots. This device may be used in multiple arrangements to produce other pulse aT rangements, or it can be used to trigger an electronic pulse generator. (T.R.H.)

  11. Pulsed hall thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, Vladimir J. (Inventor); Pote, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gamero-Castano, Manuel (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pulsed Hall thruster system includes a Hall thruster having an electron source, a magnetic circuit, and a discharge chamber; a power processing unit for firing the Hall thruster to generate a discharge; a propellant storage and delivery system for providing propellant to the discharge chamber and a control unit for defining a pulse duration .tau.<0.1d.sup.3.rho./m, where d is the characteristic size of the thruster, .rho. is the propellant density at standard conditions, and m is the propellant mass flow rate for operating either the power processing unit to provide to the Hall thruster a power pulse of a pre-selected duration, .tau., or operating the propellant storage and delivery system to provide a propellant flow pulse of duration, .tau., or providing both as pulses, synchronized to arrive coincidentally at the discharge chamber to enable the Hall thruster to produce a discreet output impulse.

  12. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  13. Short pulse test set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-11-01

    This report discusses the construction and operation of the Short Pulse Test Set that has been built for the U.S. Army Missile Command for the purpose of applying short (25 to 100 nanosecond), high voltage pulses to electronic explosive devices (EEDs) in both the pin-to-pin and pins-to-case mode. The test set employs the short pulse generating techniques first described in the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories (now Franklin Research Center) Report I-C3410, 'Pins-to-Case Short Pulse Sensitivity Studies for the Atlas DC Switch', December 1974. This report, authored by Ramie H. Thompson, was prepared for Picatinny Arsenal under contract DAAA21-72C-0766. The test set described herein utilizes a computer controlled high speed digitizer to monitor the pulse voltage and current and provides software to process and display these data.

  14. Localized wave pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D L; Henderson, T L; Krueger, K L; Lewis, D K; Zilkowski, R N

    1999-06-01

    The Localized Wave project of the Strategic System Support Program has recently finished an experiment in cooperation with the Advanced SONAR group of the Applied Research Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin. The purpose of the experiment was three-fold. They wanted to see if (1) the LW pulse could propagate over significant distances, to see if (2) a new type of array and drive system specifically designed for the pulse would increase efficiency over single frequency tone bursts, and to see if (3) the complexity of our 24 channel drivers resulted in better efficiency than a single equivalent pulse driving a piston. In the experiment, several LW pulses were launched from the Lake Travis facility and propagated over distances of either 100 feet or 600 feet, through a thermocline for the 600 foot measurements. The results show conclusively that the Localized Wave will propagate past the near field distance. The LW pulses resulted in extremely broad frequency band width pulses with narrow spatial beam patterns and unmeasurable side lobes. Their array gain was better than most tone bursts and further, were better than their equivalent piston pulses. This marks the first test of several Low Diffraction beams against their equivalent piston pulses, as well as the first propagation of LW pulses over appreciable distances. The LW pulse is now proven a useful tool in open water, rather than a laboratory curiosity. The experimental system and array were built by ARL, and the experiments were conducted by ARL staff on their standard test range. The 600 feet measurements were made at the farthest extent of that range.

  15. Characterization of partially coherent ultrashort XUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, Charles; Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle

    2015-05-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, i.e. that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. As an example, the lack of longitudinal coherence, that is shot-to-shot fluctuations, of Free-Electron Lasers (FEL) has prevented so far their full amplitude and phase temporal characterization. To sort out this issue, we have adapted Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, to enable the measurement of partially coherent XUV pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. Especially, this technique allows one to overcome the sources of decoherence that normally prevent a pulse measurement, such as the spectrometer resolution or the presence of XUV/laser arrival time jitter.

  16. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  17. Gradient ascent pulse engineering for rapid exchange saturation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancan, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Glaser, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Efforts in the clinical translation of the paraCEST contrast agent Yb-HPDO3A have prompted an investigation into saturation pulse optimality under energy constraints. The GRAPE algorithm has been adapted and implemented for saturation pulse optimization with chemical exchange. The flexibility of the methodology, both in extracting the microscopical parameter ensemble for the algorithm as well as in determining the characteristics of this new class of rising amplitude waveforms allows rapid testing and implementation. Optimal pulses achieve higher saturation efficiencies than the continuous wave gold standard for rapid and especially for variable exchange rates, as brought about by pH-catalysis. Gains of at least 5-15% without any tradeoff have been confirmed both on a spectrometer and on a clinical imager. Pool specific solutions, with pulses optimized for a specific exchange rate value, additionally increase the flexibility of the CEST ratiometric analysis. A simple experimental approach to determine close to optimal triangular pulses is presented.

  18. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  19. Imaging Electronic Motion with Attosecond Electron Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Chieh; Starace, Anthony F.

    2010-03-01

    Ultrashort electron pulses have been proposed to observe time-dependent phenomena in atoms and molecules [1]. Owing to the temporal and spatial resolutions of short keV electron pulses, studying electronic motion in attosecond and sub-Angstrom regimes is feasible. We report benchmark calculations for oscillating electronic charge distributions in the H atom and in the H2^+ molecule to determine the effect of such charge oscillations on the elastic scattering cross section for a sub-fs electron pulse. In the pump/probe calculations, a femtosecond laser pulse is used to excite a coherent superposition of states, whose charge distribution oscillates with the beat frequency. The electron pulse scattering cross sections are calculated in the Born approximation. For the H atom, the cross section exhibits an oscillating effective radius. For the H2^+ molecules, the superposed state is chosen such that the electronic charge distribution oscillates from one nucleus to the other; hence, the differential cross section shows the localization of the electron.[4pt] [1] P. Baum and A.H. Zewail, PNAS 104, 18409 (2007).

  20. SHORT PULSE STRETCHER

    DOEpatents

    Branum, D.R.; Cummins, W.F.

    1962-12-01

    >A short pulse stretching circuit capable of stretching a short puise to enable it to be displayed on a relatively slow sweeping oscilloscope is described. Moreover, the duration of the pulse is increased by charging a capacitor through a diode and thereafter discharging the capacitor at such time as is desired. In the circuit the trigger pulse alone passes through a delay line, whereas the main signal passes through the diode only, and results in over-all circuit losses which are proportional to the low losses of the diode only. (AEC)

  1. Pulse joining cartridges

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis

    2016-08-23

    A pulsed joining tool includes a tool body that defines a cavity that receives an inner tubular member and an outer tubular member and a pulse joining cartridge. The tubular members are nested together with the cartridge being disposed around the outer tubular member. The cartridge includes a conductor, such as a wire or foil, that extends around the outer tubular member and is insulated to separate a supply segment from a return segment. A source of stored electrical energy is discharged through the conductor to join the tubular members with an electromagnetic force pulse.

  2. Dynamic pulse difference circuit

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Gerald L.

    1978-01-01

    A digital electronic circuit of especial use for subtracting background activity pulses in gamma spectrometry comprises an up-down counter connected to count up with signal-channel pulses and to count down with background-channel pulses. A detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal when the up-down counter has completed one scaling sequence cycle of counts in the up direction. In an alternate embodiment, a detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal upon overflow of the counter.

  3. [Differential diagnosis of aortitis].

    PubMed

    Rousselin, C; Pontana, F; Puech, P; Lambert, M

    2016-04-01

    Aortitis are mainly described in inflammatory disorders such as Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis or Behçet's disease. Aortitis is sometimes qualified as idiopathic. However, differential diagnoses must be searched since they need specific interventions. Infectious aortitis should be ruled out first as its rapid evolution and short-term poor prognosis makes it a therapeutic emergency. Furthermore, rarer differential diagnoses should be known as they require specific care that might sometimes differ from the treatment of inflammatory aortitis, such as retroperitoneal fibrosis mostly idiopathic but also secondary to neoplasia or malignant hemopathies. IgG4 related disease, Erdheim-Chester disease and inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm due to atherosclerosis are other differential diagnoses to mention in the presence of aortitis in order to adapt patients' care consequently.

  4. Control of grating-coupled ultrafast surface plasmon pulse and its nonlinear emission by shaping femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kazunori; Masaki, Yuta; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Spatiotemporal nanofocusing of ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled on a metal Au tapered tip with a curvature radius of a few tens of nanometers is deterministically controlled based on the measured plasmon response function. We control the SPP pulse shape and the second harmonic generation at the apex of the Au tapered tip by shaping the excitation femtosecond laser pulses based on the response function. We also adapted a similar control scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and achieved selective CARS excitation of a single Raman mode of carbon nanotubes with only a single excitation laser pulse at the apex of the tip.

  5. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  6. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  7. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  8. Pulse Coil Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Set of relays tested easily and repeatedly. Pulse coil tester causes coil under test to generate transient voltage; waveform indicates condition of coil. Tester accommodates assembly of up to four coils at a time.

  9. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 - F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) - H2 - F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% - 6%.

  10. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  11. Pulse measurement apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Marciante, John R.; Donaldson, William R.; Roides, Richard G.

    2011-10-25

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a pulse measuring system that measures a characteristic of an input pulse under test, particularly the pulse shape of a single-shot, nano-second duration, high shape-contrast optical or electrical pulse. An exemplary system includes a multi-stage, passive pulse replicator, wherein each successive stage introduces a fixed time delay to the input pulse under test, a repetitively-gated electronic sampling apparatus that acquires the pulse train including an entire waveform of each replica pulse, a processor that temporally aligns the replicated pulses, and an averager that temporally averages the replicated pulses to generate the pulse shape of the pulse under test. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for measuring an optical or an electrical pulse shape. The method includes the steps of passively replicating the pulse under test with a known time delay, temporally stacking the pulses, and temporally averaging the stacked pulses. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for increasing the dynamic range of a pulse measurement by a repetitively-gated electronic sampling device having a rated dynamic range capability, beyond the rated dynamic range of the sampling device; e.g., enhancing the dynamic range of an oscilloscope. The embodied technique can improve the SNR from about 300:1 to 1000:1. A dynamic range enhancement of four to seven bits may be achieved.

  12. Four pulse recoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes a family of novel recoupling pulse sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, called four pulse recoupling. These pulse sequences can be employed for both homonuclear and heteronuclear recoupling experiments and are robust to dispersion in chemical shifts and rf-inhomogeneity. The homonuclear pulse sequence consists of a building block (π/2) 0 °(3π/2) ϕ°(π/2) 180 ° + ϕ°(3π/2) 180 ° where ϕ = π/n (ϕ° = 180°/n) , and n is number of blocks in a two rotor period. The heteronuclear recoupling pulse sequence consists of a building block (π/2) 0 °(3π/2) ϕ1 °(π/2) 180 ° +ϕ1 °(3π/2) 180 ° and (π/2) 0 °(3π/2) ϕ2 °(π/2) 180 ° +ϕ2 °(3π/2) 180 ° on channel I and S, where ϕ1 = 3π/2n, ϕ2 = π2/n and n is number of blocks in a two rotor period. The recoupling pulse sequences mix the y magnetization. We show that four pulse recoupling is more broadband compared to three pulse recoupling [1]. Experimental quantification of this method is shown for 13Cα-13CO, homonuclear recoupling in a sample of Glycine and 15N-13Cα, heteronuclear recoupling in Alanine. Application of this method is demonstrated on a sample of tripeptide N-formyl-[U-13C,15N]-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF).

  13. Pulse subtraction Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahue, Veronique; Mari, Jean Martial; Eckersley, Robert J.; Caro, Colin G.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have demonstrated the feasibility of molecular imaging using targeted microbubbles and ultrasound. One technical challenge is to selectively detect attached bubbles from those freely flowing bubbles and surrounding tissue. Pulse Inversion Doppler is an imaging technique enabling the selective detection of both static and moving ultrasound contrast agents: linear scatterers generate a single band Doppler spectrum, while non-linear scatterers generate a double band spectrum, one being uniquely correlated with the presence of contrast agents and non-linear tissue signals. We demonstrate that similar spectrums, and thus the same discrimination, can be obtained through a Doppler implementation of Pulse Subtraction. This is achieved by reconstructing a virtual echo using the echo generated from a short pulse transmission. Moreover by subtracting from this virtual echo the one generated from a longer pulse transmission, it is possible to fully suppress the echo from linear scatterers, while for non-linear scatterers, a signal will remain, allowing classical agent detection. Simulations of a single moving microbubble and a moving linear scatterer subject to these pulses show that when the virtual echo and the long pulse echo are used to perform pulsed Doppler, the power Doppler spectrum allows separation of linear and non-linear moving scattering. Similar results are obtained on experimental data acquired on a flow containing either microbubble contrast agents or linear blood mimicking fluid. This new Doppler method constitutes an alternative to Pulse Inversion Doppler and preliminary results suggest that similar dual band spectrums could be obtained by the combination of any non-linear detection technique with Doppler demodulation.

  14. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  15. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  16. Pulse magnetic welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

  17. A versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarr, C. E.; Nickerson, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A digital pulse programmer producing the standard pulse sequences required for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is described. In addition, a 'saturation burst' sequence, useful in the measurement of long relaxation times in solids, is provided. Both positive and negative 4 V trigger pulses are produced that are fully synchronous with a crystal-controlled time base, and the pulse programmer may be phase-locked with a maximum pulse jitter of 3 ns to the oscillator of a coherent pulse spectrometer. Medium speed TTL integrated circuits are used throughout.

  18. [Theoretical investigation of the saturation correction for ionization chambers irradiated with pulsed beams of arbitrary pulse length].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In ionization chambers, not all released charge is collected due to the recombination of charge carriers. This effect is taken into account by the saturation correction factor kS. A physical description of the correction factor has been established for pulsed radiation. However, it is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared with the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this paper we develop a description of the saturation correction for radiation pulses of arbitrary length. For this, a system of partial differential equations is solved iteratively. The numerical solutions are verified experimentally for a Roos ionization chamber (PTW TM34001) exposed to a pulsed electron beam. The results of this iterative procedure describe the experimental data well. The calculations are also possible for beam structures which are experimentally hard to get and thereby contribute to a better understanding and correct description of the saturation correction at arbitrary pulse length. Among other things the pulse length dependent distributions of the charge carriers in the ionization chamber is calculated, inclusive of the transition to the conditions prevailing in the case of continuous irradiation. Furthermore is shown that the formula for kS established by Hochhäuser and Balk is applicable even at arbitrary pulse length, if pulse duration dependent effective values are used for the parameters a and p. These effective values have been determined for the Roos chamber at pulse lengths up to 300 μs.

  19. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  20. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  1. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  2. Differential effects of the histamine H3 receptor agonist methimepip on dentate granule cell excitability, paired-pulse plasticity and long-term potentiation in prenatal alcohol-exposed rats

    PubMed Central

    Varaschin, Rafael K.; Rosenberg, Martina J.; Hamilton, Derek A.; Savage, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that prenatal alcohol-induced deficits in dentate gyrus (DG) long-term potentiation (LTP) are ameliorated by the histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist ABT-239. ABT-239 did not enhance LTP in control rats, suggesting a heightened H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamate release in prenatal alcohol-exposed (PAE) offspring. As the modulation of glutamate release is one important facet of LTP, we examined the effect of methimepip, a histamine H3 receptor agonist, on DG granule cell excitability, glutamate release and LTP in control and PAE rats. Long-Evans rat dams voluntarily consumed either a 0% or 5% ethanol solution four hours daily throughout gestation. Male adult offspring were anesthetized with urethane and electrodes implanted into the entorhinal cortex and DG. PAE reduced coupling of excitatory post-synaptic field potentials to population spikes, an effect mimicked in control rats treated with 1 mg/kg methimepip. Methimepip decreased release probability in controls but not in PAE offspring. GABAergic feedback inhibition of granule cell responsiveness was not affected by either PAE or methimepip. PAE reduced LTP in the DG, another effect mimicked in methimepip-treated control rats. Again, methimepip did not exacerbate the PAE-induced LTP deficit. Thus, while methimepip treatment of control rats mimicked some baseline and activity-dependent deficits observed in saline-treated PAE offspring, methimepip treatment of PAE rats did not exacerbate these deficits. Whether the absence of an added methimepip effect in PAE offspring is a consequence of a “floor effect” for the responses measured or is due to differential drug dose responsiveness will require further investigation. Further, more detailed studies of H3 receptor-mediated responses in vitro may provide clearer insights into the role of the H3 receptor regulation of excitatory transmission at the perforant path - DG synapse in PAE rats. PMID:24818819

  3. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  4. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  5. Efficient optical pulse stacker system

    DOEpatents

    Seppala, Lynn G.; Haas, Roger A.

    1982-01-01

    Method and apparatus for spreading and angle-encoding each pulse of a multiplicity of small area, short pulses into several temporally staggered pulses by use of appropriate beam splitters, with the optical elements being arranged so that each staggered pulse is contiguous with one or two other such pulses, and the entire sequence of stacked pulses comprising a single, continuous long pulse. The single long pulse is expanded in area, and then doubly passed through a nonstorage laser amplifier such as KrF. After amplification, the physically separated, angle-encoded and temporally staggered pulses are recombined into a single pulse of short duration. This high intensity output beam is well collimated and may be propagated over long distance, or used for irradiating inertial confinement fusion targets.

  6. High voltage pulse generator

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  7. Lossless compression of hyperspectral images using conventional recursive least-squares predictor with adaptive prediction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Guo, Shuxu

    2016-01-01

    An efficient lossless compression scheme for hyperspectral images using conventional recursive least-squares (CRLS) predictor with adaptive prediction bands is proposed. The proposed scheme first calculates the preliminary estimates to form the input vector of the CRLS predictor. Then the number of bands used in prediction is adaptively selected by an exhaustive search for the number that minimizes the prediction residual. Finally, after prediction, the prediction residuals are sent to an adaptive arithmetic coder. Experiments on the newer airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) images in the consultative committee for space data systems (CCSDS) test set show that the proposed scheme yields an average compression performance of 3.29 (bits/pixel), 5.57 (bits/pixel), and 2.44 (bits/pixel) on the 16-bit calibrated images, the 16-bit uncalibrated images, and the 12-bit uncalibrated images, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme obtains compression results very close to clustered differential pulse code modulation-with-adaptive-prediction-length, which achieves best lossless compression performance for AVIRIS images in the CCSDS test set, and outperforms other current state-of-the-art schemes with relatively low computation complexity.

  8. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  9. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  10. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  11. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dwight W.; Kline, Lloyd W.

    The traditional educational structure requires the teacher to be part bookkeeper, part clerical assistant, and part psychologist, among other roles, while his salary scale is based on length of service. Differentiated staffing offers ways of changing this pattern. The details of differentiated duties are largely a matter of local option and…

  12. HydroPulse Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  13. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  14. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  15. Differentially Private Distributed Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.

    2016-12-11

    The growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) creates the possibility of decentralized systems of sensing and actuation, potentially on a global scale. IoT devices connected to cloud networks can offer Sensing and Actuation as a Service (SAaaS) enabling networks of sensors to grow to a global scale. But extremely large sensor networks can violate privacy, especially in the case where IoT devices are mobile and connected directly to the behaviors of people. The thesis of this paper is that by adapting differential privacy (adding statistically appropriate noise to query results) to groups of geographically distributed sensors privacy could be maintained without ever sending all values up to a central curator and without compromising the overall accuracy of the data collected. This paper outlines such a scheme and performs an analysis of differential privacy techniques adapted to edge computing in a simulated sensor network where ground truth is known. The positive and negative outcomes of employing differential privacy in distributed networks of devices are discussed and a brief research agenda is presented.

  16. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A. D