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Sample records for adaptive dispersion compensation

  1. Dispersion compensation for attosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Peter; Baumgarten, Cory; Batelaan, Herman; Centurion, Martin

    2012-08-20

    We propose a device to compensate for the dispersion of attosecond electron pulses. The device uses only static electric and magnetic fields and therefore does not require synchronization to the pulsed electron source. Analogous to the well-known optical dispersion compensator, an electron dispersion compensator separates paths by energy in space. Magnetic fields are used as the dispersing element, while a Wien filter is used for compensation of the electron arrival times. We analyze a device with a size of centimeters, which can be applied to ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy, and fundamental studies.

  2. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  3. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  4. Optimal packaging of dispersion-compensating fibers for matched nonlinear compensation and reduced optical noise.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haiqing; Plant, David V

    2005-09-15

    A method of packaging dispersion-compensating fibers (DCFs) is discussed that achieves optimal nonlinearity compensation and a good signal-to-noise ratio simultaneously. An optimally packaged dispersion-compensating module (DCM) may consist of portions of DCFs with higher and lower loss coefficients. Such optimized DCMs may be paired with transmission fibers to form scaled translation-symmetric lines that could effectively compensate for signal distortions due to dispersion and nonlinearity, with or without optical phase conjugation. PMID:16196322

  5. Dispersion Compensation of Fiber Optic Systems for KSC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozaitis, Samuel P.; Hand, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Installed fibers such as those at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are optimized for use at 1310 nm because they have zero dispersion at that wavelength. An installed fiber system designed to operate at 1310 nm will operate at a much lower data rate when operated at 1550 nm because the dispersion is not zero at 1550 nm. Using dispersion measurements of both installed and dispersion compensating fibers, we compensated a 21.04 km length of installed fiber with 4.25 km of dispersion compensating fiber. Using the compensated fiber-optic link, we reduced the dispersion to 0.494 ps/nm-km, from an uncompensated dispersion of 16.8 ps/nm-km. The main disadvantage of the compensated link using DC fiber was an increase in attenuation. Although the increase was not necessarily severe, it could be significant when insertion losses, connector losses, and fiber attenuation are taken into account.

  6. Dispersion compensation in chirped pulse amplification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A.

    2014-07-15

    A chirped pulse amplification system includes a laser source providing an input laser pulse along an optical path. The input laser pulse is characterized by a first temporal duration. The system also includes a multi-pass pulse stretcher disposed along the optical path. The multi-pass pulse stretcher includes a first set of mirrors operable to receive input light in a first plane and output light in a second plane parallel to the first plane and a first diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher also includes a second set of mirrors operable to receive light diffracted from the first diffraction grating and a second diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher further includes a reflective element operable to reflect light diffracted from the second diffraction grating. The system further includes an amplifier, a pulse compressor, and a passive dispersion compensator disposed along the optical path.

  7. Adaptive compensation for an optical tracking telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.; Winston, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    The application of model referenced adaptive control theory to an optical tracking telescope is discussed. The capability of the adaptive technique to compensate for mount irregularities such as inertial variations and bearing friction is demonstrated via field test results on a large tracking telescope. Results are presented which show a 6 to 1 improvement in tracking accuracy for a worst-case satellite trajectory.

  8. Compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel CS method that incorporates dispersion compensation into the CS reconstruction of spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) signal. We show that A-scans with dispersion compensation can be obtained by multiplying the dispersion correcting term to the undersampled linear-in-wavenumber spectral data before the CS reconstruction. We also implemented fast CS reconstruction by taking the advantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The matrix-vector multiplication commonly used in the CS reconstruction is implemented by a two-step procedure. Compared to the CS reconstruction with matrix multiplication, our method can obtain dispersion compensated A-scan at least 5 times faster. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve high quality image with dispersion compensation.

  9. Three dispersion compensation methods for radio-over-fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Tao; Meng, Fanqiu; Zhao, Jiyong; Fang, Tao; Zheng, Jilin; Huang, Long

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces three different dispersion compensation methods based on superstructure fiber Bragg grating (SSFBG) and an injection distributed feedback (DFB) laser. First, an SSFBG with a nonlinearity group delay spectrum was designed to achieve tunable dispersion compensation. Second, an approach is proposed for realizing single-sideband modulation with an optimum optical carrier to sideband ratio for maximizing the transmission performance of a radio-over-fiber (RoF) system based on a strong optical injection-locked DFB laser. Finally, a broadband chromatic dispersion compensation scheme using an optical phase conjugator based on a DFB semiconductor laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in RoF links.

  10. Mode separation of Lamb waves based on dispersion compensation method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; Moilanen, Petro; Wang, Weiqi

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasonic Lamb modes typically propagate as a combination of multiple dispersive wave packets. Frequency components of each mode distribute widely in time domain due to dispersion and it is very challenging to separate individual modes by traditional signal processing methods. In the present study, a method of dispersion compensation is proposed for the purpose of mode separation. This numerical method compensates, i.e., compresses, the individual dispersive waveforms into temporal pulses, which thereby become nearly un-overlapped in time and frequency and can thus be extracted individually by rectangular time windows. It was further illustrated that the dispersion compensation also provided a method for predicting the plate thickness. Finally, based on reversibility of the numerical compensation method, an artificial dispersion technique was used to restore the original waveform of each mode from the separated compensated pulse. Performances of the compensation separation techniques were evaluated by processing synthetic and experimental signals which consisted of multiple Lamb modes with high dispersion. Individual modes were extracted with good accordance with the original waveforms and theoretical predictions. PMID:22501050

  11. Adaptive temperature compensation in circadian oscillations.

    PubMed

    François, Paul; Despierre, Nicolas; Siggia, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    A temperature independent period and temperature entrainment are two defining features of circadian oscillators. A default model of distributed temperature compensation satisfies these basic facts yet is not easily reconciled with other properties of circadian clocks, such as many mutants with altered but temperature compensated periods. The default model also suggests that the shape of the circadian limit cycle and the associated phase response curves (PRC) will vary since the average concentrations of clock proteins change with temperature. We propose an alternative class of models where the twin properties of a fixed period and entrainment are structural and arise from an underlying adaptive system that buffers temperature changes. These models are distinguished by a PRC whose shape is temperature independent and orbits whose extrema are temperature independent. They are readily evolved by local, hill climbing, optimization of gene networks for a common quality measure of biological clocks, phase anticipation. Interestingly a standard realization of the Goodwin model for temperature compensation displays properties of adaptive rather than distributed temperature compensation. PMID:22807663

  12. Adaptive Temperature Compensation in Circadian Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    François, Paul; Despierre, Nicolas; Siggia, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    A temperature independent period and temperature entrainment are two defining features of circadian oscillators. A default model of distributed temperature compensation satisfies these basic facts yet is not easily reconciled with other properties of circadian clocks, such as many mutants with altered but temperature compensated periods. The default model also suggests that the shape of the circadian limit cycle and the associated phase response curves (PRC) will vary since the average concentrations of clock proteins change with temperature. We propose an alternative class of models where the twin properties of a fixed period and entrainment are structural and arise from an underlying adaptive system that buffers temperature changes. These models are distinguished by a PRC whose shape is temperature independent and orbits whose extrema are temperature independent. They are readily evolved by local, hill climbing, optimization of gene networks for a common quality measure of biological clocks, phase anticipation. Interestingly a standard realization of the Goodwin model for temperature compensation displays properties of adaptive rather than distributed temperature compensation. PMID:22807663

  13. Chirped-cavity dispersion-compensation filter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Chen, Sheng-Hui; Lee, Cheng-Chung

    2006-03-01

    A new basic structure of a dispersive-compensation filter, called a chirped-cavity dispersion-compensator (CCDC) filter, was designed to offer the advantages of small ripples in both reflectance and group-delay dispersion (GDD). This filter provides a high dispersion compensation, like the Gires-Tournois interferometer (GTI) filter, and a wide working bandwidth, like the chirped mirror (CM). The structure of the CCDC is a cavity-type Fabry-Perot filter with a spacer layer (2 mH or 2 mL) and a chirped high reflector. The CCDC filter can provide a negative GDD of -50 fs2 over a bandwidth of 56 THz with half the optical thickness of the CM or the GTI.

  14. Design optimization of flattop interleaver and its dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Lit, J W Y

    2007-05-14

    The objective of this paper is to present a general strategy for design optimization of flattop interleavers, and dispersion compensation for the interleavers, in order to achieve superior optical performance. The interleaver is formed by two multi-cavity Gire-Tournois etalons (MC-GTE) in a Michelson Interferometer (MI). An interleaver that has m cavities in one etalon and n cavities in the other is called an mn-GTE interleaver. Our optimization strategy exploits the general flattop condition and the technique of ripple equalization. Any mn-GTE interleaver may be optimized. The spectral performance can be greatly improved by the optimization process. As an illustration, we present a comprehensive analysis for a 11-GTE and a 21-GTE interleaver. The analytical expressions for flattop conditions, peak and trough positions are derived for optimization. The optimal performance of the interleavers can be controlled by the reflection coefficients and the parameters m and n. To achieve low-dispersion mn-GTE flattop interleavers, we propose to use one additional MC-GTE as a dispersion compensator to compensate for the chromatic dispersion. The analytical expressions of group delays and chromatic dispersions for an MC-GTE interleaver are derived. The optimization strategy of dispersion-ripple equalization is explained. The results show that the dispersion performance can be tailored by changing the reflection coefficients of the MC-GTE, and the dispersion and bandwidth can be enhanced by increasing the number of cavities of the MC-GTE. PMID:19546950

  15. Kerr-lens mode locking without dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Gatz, S; Herrmann, J; Müller, M

    1996-10-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a novel operating regime of femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked solidstate lasers that avoids group-velocity dispersion compensation by use of a nonresonant semiconductor plate in the focused resonator section that provides an overall negative nonlinear refractive index per round trip. The saturable loss of the laser resonator with an effective self-defocusing nonlinearity is derived from a generalized ABCD matrix formalism, and the correspondingly calculated steady-state pulse parameters show that a Kerrlens mode-locked laser with an overall negative nonlinear refractive index generates stable femtosecond pulses without any dispersion compensation. PMID:19881729

  16. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  17. Optical dispersion compensation in 300-pin MSA transponders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

    2005-02-01

    The 300-pin Multi Source Agreement (MSA) and other MSAs provide basic requirements from a transponder or transceiver used in 10Gb/s optical networks. These MSAs typically address a wide range of applications, including: SONET/SDH, 10GbE and 10GFC for Metro, long-haul (LH) and ultra-long-haul (ULH) networks. Nonetheless, being a basic standard, the 300-pin MSA addresses the minimal required specifications set and does not cover the whole set of requirements and applications that system vendors are interested in. For example, widely tunable and extended reach transponders are not included in the 300-pin MSA. Chromatic dispersion is one of the major reach limiting factors in optical networks. In reconfigurable optical networks, chunks of DWDM channels may travel through different routes and therefore require tunable dispersion compensation. In static ULH optical networks, the number of dispersion compensation fibers (DCFs) dictates the amount of residual chromatic dispersion. This residual chromatic dispersion differs from one DWDM channel to the other. Unless it is compensated at the receiver, it further restricts the link length and reduces the distance between one regenerator to the other. This results in shorter links and more O-E-O blocks, which dramatically increases the cost of the network. This paper discusses a specially designed optical dispersion compensation (ODC) device that is packaged in a standard butterfly package and can fit into a 300-pin MSA transponder. A transponder with the proposed ODC can still satisfy all the basic requirements that are described in the 300-pin MSA while providing improved chromatic dispersion tolerance.

  18. Kerr-lens mode locking without dispersion compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Gatz, S.; Herrmann, J.; Mueller, M.

    1996-10-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a novel operating regime of femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked solid-state lasers that avoids group-velocity dispersion compensation by use of a nonresonant semiconductor plate in the focused resonator section that provides an overall negative nonlinear refractive index per round trip. The saturable loss of the laser resonator with an effective self-defocusing nonlinearity is derived from a generalized {ital ABCD} matrix formalism, and the correspondingly calculated steady-state pulse parameters show that a Kerr-lens mode-locked laser with an overall negative nonlinear refractive index generates stable femtosecond pulses without any dispersion compensation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  19. Dispersion Compensation Requirements for Optical CDMA Using WDM Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A J; Hendandez, V J; Feng, H X C; Heritage, J P; Lennon, W J

    2001-12-10

    Optical code division multiple access (O-CDMA) uses very narrow transmission pulses and is thus susceptible to fiber optic link impairments. When the O-CDMA is implemented as wavelength/time (W/T) matrices which use wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) sources such as multi-frequency laser transmitters, the susceptibility may be higher due to: (a) the large bandwidth utilized and (b) the requirement that the various wavelength components of the codes be synchronized at the point of modulation and encoding as well as after (optical) correlation. A computer simulation based on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, developed to study optical networking on the National Transparent Optical Network (NTON), was modified to characterize the impairments on the propagation and decoding of W/T matrix codes over a link of the NTON. Three critical link impairments were identified by the simulation: group velocity dispersion (GVD); the flatness of the optical amplifier gain; and the slope of the GVD. Subsequently, experiments were carried out on the NTON link to verify and refine the simulations as well as to suggest improvements in the W/T matrix signal processing design. The NTON link measurements quantified the O-CDMA dispersion compensation requirements. Dispersion compensation management is essential to assure the performance of W/T matrix codes.

  20. An Efficient Adaptive Angle-Doppler Compensation Approach for Non-Sidelooking Airborne Radar STAP.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingwei; Yu, Jia; Wu, Di; Zhu, Daiyin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of non-sidelooking airborne radar clutter dispersion on space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is considered, and an efficient adaptive angle-Doppler compensation (EAADC) approach is proposed to improve the clutter suppression performance. In order to reduce the computational complexity, the reduced-dimension sparse reconstruction (RDSR) technique is introduced into the angle-Doppler spectrum estimation to extract the required parameters for compensating the clutter spectral center misalignment. Simulation results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are presented. PMID:26053755

  1. Flexible OFDM-based access systems with intrinsic function of chromatic dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Tsuyoshi; Murakawa, Takuya; Nagashima, Tomotaka; Hasegawa, Makoto; Shimizu, Satoshi; Hattori, Kuninori; Okuno, Masayuki; Mino, Shinji; Himeno, Akira; Uenohara, Hiroyuki; Wada, Naoya; Cincotti, Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Cost-effective and tunable chromatic dispersion compensation in a fiber link are still an open issue in metro and access networks to cope with increasing costs and power consumption. Intrinsic chromatic dispersion compensation functionality of optical fractional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing is discussed and experimentally demonstrated using dispersion-tunable transmitter and receiver based on wavelength selective switching devices.

  2. Optical pulse compression using the combination of phase modulation and high-order dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guo; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua

    2010-09-01

    Optical pulse compression using high-order dispersion compensation is proposed and theoretically analyzed. Firstly, the required dispersion profile for the high-order dispersion compensation is derived, according to the linear chirp and the nonlinear chirp of a phase-modulated continuous-wave (CW) laser source. With the use of the high-order dispersion compensation, such as the combination compensation of the second order dispersion (SOD) and the fourth order dispersion (FOD), an efficient pulse compression having a less time-bandwidth product and a greater peak power is realized. A sampled fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with both the SOD and the FOD is then designed using the equivalent chirp and the reconstruction algorithm. Finally, in the numerical simulation an optical pulse with a time-bandwidth product of 0.79 is generated via high-order dispersion compensation that is performed by using the sampled FBG.

  3. Dispersion-compensating dual-mode optical fibers desirable for erbium-doped-fiber-amplified systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eguchi, Masashi

    2001-06-01

    A broadband dispersion-compensating dual-mode optical fiber with a double-layer profile core is proposed to compensate for positive dispersion in conventional single-mode optical fibers operating near 1.55 {mu}m. This wavelength band is suitable for erbium-doped-fiber-amplified systems. It is known that the first higher-order mode of dual-mode fibers exhibits large negative waveguide dispersion, and double-layer profile core fibers are dispersion-shifted fibers whose transmission and bending losses are lower than those of simple core-cladding dispersion-shifted fibers. Such advantages are attractive for commercial devices or modules. Here, a dispersion-compensating dual-mode fiber with a double-layer profile core that satisfies both low bending loss and broadband dispersion compensation is proposed. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  4. Efficient reflection grisms for pulse compression and dispersion compensation of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Emily A.; Gaudiosi, David M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Kane, Steve; Huff, Rachel; Durfee, Charles; Squier, Jeff

    2006-11-01

    Efficient reflection grisms for pulse-compression and material-dispersion compensation have been designed and demonstrated in a 40 fs, 300 μJ, 5 kHz downchirped pulse amplification system for the first time to our knowledge. A grism design for 800nm femtosecond laser pulse dispersion compensation applications is realized by using standard, commercial diffraction gratings.

  5. A novel method for combating dispersion induced power fading in dispersion compensating fiber.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Alexander; Olmos, J J Vegas; Iglesias, Miguel; Forchhammer, Søren; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the performance of 60 GHz double sideband (DSB) radio over fiber (RoF) links that employ dispersion compensating fiber (DCF). Error free transmission of 3 Gbps signals over 1 m of wireless distance is reported. In order to overcome experimentally observed chromatic dispersion (CD) induced power fading of radio frequency (RF) signal, we propose a method for improvement of RF carrier-to-noise (C/N) ratio through introduction of a degree of RF frequency tunability. Overall results improve important aspects of directly modulated RoF systems and demonstrate the feasibility of high carrier frequency and wide bandwidth RF signals delivery in RoF links including DCF fiber. Error free performance that we obtain for 3 Gbps amplitude shift-keying (ASK) signals enables uncompressed high-definition 1080p video delivery. PMID:23736614

  6. Enhanced dispersion compensation capability of angular elements based on beam expansion.

    PubMed

    Du, Rui; Jiang, Runhua; Fu, Ling

    2009-09-14

    We demonstrate that beam size manipulation plays an important role in dispersion compensation. With expanded beam, the maximal negative group delay dispersion (GDD) provided by angular elements increases by an order of magnitude compared with original beam. Both calculation and experimental results show that a modest 2 x and 4 x expanded beams can improve dispersion compensation capability of prisms or acousto-optical deflectors: the restored minimal pulse width decreases by 50% and the corresponding distance between angular elements is shortened more than 70 cm. These findings will be helpful for designing dispersion compensation schemes for femtosecond pulse laser application systems such as multiphoton microscopy or laser micromachining. PMID:19770855

  7. Impulse radar imaging for dispersive concrete using inverse adaptive filtering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, J.; Hernandez, J.M.; Brase, J.

    1993-05-01

    This publication addresses applications of a delayed inverse model adaptive filter for modeled data obtained from short-pulse radar reflectometry. To determine the integrity of concrete, a digital adaptive filter was used, which allows compensation of dispersion and clutter generated by the concrete. A standard set of weights produced by an adaptive filter are used on modeled data to obtain the inverse-impulse response of the concrete. The data for this report include: Multiple target, nondispersive data; single-target, variable-size dispersive data; single-target, variable-depth dispersive data; and single-target, variable transmitted-pulse-width dispersive data. Results of this simulation indicate that data generated by the weights of the adaptive filter, coupled with a two-dimensional, synthetic-aperture focusing technique, successfully generate two-dimensional images of targets within the concrete from modeled data.

  8. Cancellation of third-order nonlinear effects in amplified fiber links by dispersion compensation, phase conjugation, and alternating dispersion.

    PubMed

    Marhic, M E; Kagi, N; Chiang, T K; Kazovsky, L G

    1995-04-15

    We show that in principle it is possible to cancel third-order nonlinear effects in optical fiber links. The necessary conditions exist in two-segment links, with dispersion compensation, phase conjugation, and amplification between the two, as well as opposite chromatic dispersion coefficients in the segments. The cancellation is independent of loss, modulation format, and modulation frequency. PMID:19859355

  9. Adaptive optimization for pilot-tone aided phase noise compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; Xu, Mengran; Xia, Wenjuan; Ke, Chanjian; Xia, Zijie; Liu, Deming

    2015-11-01

    Pilot-tone (PT) aided phase noise compensation algorithm is very simple and effective, especially for flexible optical networks, because the phase noise coming from both Tx/Rx lasers and nonlinear cross phase modulation (XPM) during transmission can be adaptively compensated without high computational cost nonlinear operations, or the information of the neighboring channels and the optical link configuration. But to achieve the best performance the two key parameters, i.e. the pilot to signal power ratio and pilot bandpass filter bandwidth need to be optimized. In this paper it is demonstrated that constellation information can be used to adjust the two parameters adaptively to achieve the minimum BER in both homogenous and hybrid single carrier transmission systems with different LPN, XPM and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise distortions.

  10. All-channel tunable optical dispersion compensator based on linear translation of a waveguide grating router.

    PubMed

    Sinefeld, David; Ben-Ezra, Shalva; Doerr, Christopher R; Marom, Dan M

    2011-04-15

    We propose and demonstrate a compact tunable optical dispersion compensation (TODC) device with a 100 GHz free spectral range capable of mitigating chromatic dispersion impairments. The TODC is based on longitudinal movement of a waveguide grating router, resulting in chromatic dispersion compensation of ±1000 ps/nm. We employed our TODC device for compensating 42.8 Gbit/sec differential phase-shifting keying signal, transmitted over 50 km fiber with a -2 dB power penalty at 10⁻⁹. PMID:21499373

  11. Numerical comparison between conventional dispersion compensating fibers and photonic crystal fibers as lumped Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, C E S; Cani, S P N; Segatto, M E V; Pontes, M J; Romero, M A

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the use of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) as discrete devices for simultaneous wideband dispersion compensation and Raman amplification. The performance of the PCFs in terms of gain, ripple, optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and required fiber length for complete dispersion compensation is compared with conventional dispersion compensating fibers (DCFs). The main goal is to determine the minimum PCF loss beyond which its performance surpasses a state-of-the-art DCF and justifies practical use in telecommunication systems. PMID:20052245

  12. An adaptive algorithm for motion compensated color image coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwatra, Subhash C.; Whyte, Wayne A.; Lin, Chow-Ming

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive algorithm for motion compensated color image coding. The algorithm can be used for video teleconferencing or broadcast signals. Activity segmentation is used to reduce the bit rate and a variable stage search is conducted to save computations. The adaptive algorithm is compared with the nonadaptive algorithm and it is shown that with approximately 60 percent savings in computing the motion vector and 33 percent additional compression, the performance of the adaptive algorithm is similar to the nonadaptive algorithm. The adaptive algorithm results also show improvement of up to 1 bit/pel over interframe DPCM coding with nonuniform quantization. The test pictures used for this study were recorded directly from broadcast video in color.

  13. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  14. Design and Fabrication of Efficient Reflection Grisms for Pulse Compression and Dispersion Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Steve; Tortajada, Fred; Dinger, Herb; Touzet, Bruno; Huff, Rachel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles; Gibson, Emily; Jimenez, Ralph; Gaudiosi, David; Kapteyn, Henry

    Efficient reflection grisms for pulse compression and material-dispersion compensation have been designed and demonstrated in a CPA system. Designs for 800-nm and 1030-nm ultrafast applications are characterized using off-the-shelf diffraction gratings.

  15. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth. PMID:26766675

  16. Ultrashort Laguerre-Gaussian pulses with angular and group velocity dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Zeylikovich, I; Sztul, H I; Kartazaev, V; Le, T; Alfano, R R

    2007-07-15

    Coherent optical vortices are generated from ultrashort 6.4 fs pulses. Our results demonstrate angular dispersion compensation of ultrashort 6.4 fs Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) pulses as well as what is believed to be the first direct autocorrelation measurement of 80 fs LG amplified pulses. A reflective-mirror-based 4f-compressor is proposed to compensate the angular and group velocity dispersion of the ultrashort LG pulses. PMID:17632631

  17. Adaptive feed-forward hysteresis compensation for piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eielsen, Arnfinn Aas; Gravdahl, Jan Tommy; Pettersen, Kristin Y.

    2012-08-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are often employed for high-resolution positioning tasks. Hysteresis and creep nonlinearities inherent in such actuators deteriorate positioning accuracy. An online adaptive nonlinear hysteresis compensation scheme for the case of symmetric hysteretic responses and certain periodic reference trajectories is presented. The method has low complexity and is well suited for real-time implementation. Experimental results are presented in order to verify the method, and it is seen that the error due to hysteresis is reduced by more than 90% compared to when assuming a linear response.

  18. Compensating for dispersion and the nonlinear Kerr effect without phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Paré, C; Villeneuve, A; Bélanger, P A; Doran, N J

    1996-04-01

    We propose the use of a dispersive medium with a negative nonlinear refractive-index coefficient as a way to compensate for the dispersion and the nonlinear effects resulting from pulse propagation in an optical fiber. The undoing of pulse interaction might allow for increased bit rates. PMID:19865438

  19. Effective dispersion compensation of variable-linewidth fiber amplifier by single-multilayer dielectric grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Jianhua; Hu, Man; Liu, Guangbo; Chen, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Gong, Weichao; Bai, Gang; Bai, Yang; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We achieve effective dispersion compensation by employing a single-multilayer dielectric diffraction grating and a variable-linewidth fiber amplifier. Both theoretical and experimental studies on the diffracted beam quality have been performed. The experimental results show that when the linewidth reaches 0.41 nm the beam quality in the dispersive plane reduces dramatically from 5.4 for the first-time diffracted beam to 2.08 for the second-time diffracted beam. This dispersion compensation technology relaxes the requirement on the linewidth of the incident beam source, which is beneficial for high-brightness spectral beam combining.

  20. Dual-core chiral planar waveguide-based compact and efficient dispersion compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, N.; Choudhury, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the design of dispersion compensator comprised of dual-core planar chiral waveguide having different refractive indices, and cladded with homogeneous dielectric mediums. It has been found that the supermodes play vital role in tuning the group velocity dispersion (GVD) with the aid of chirality parameters, which is evident from the achieved giant GVD with narrow bandwidth. Apart from the material parameters, the effect of core spacing on the features of GVD is also investigated. It is expected that such dispersion compensators would be trendy and greatly useful in communication systems.

  1. Motion compensation for adaptive horizontal line array processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.

    2003-01-01

    Large aperture horizontal line arrays have small resolution cells and can be used to separate a target signal from an interference signal by array beamforming. High-resolution adaptive array processing can be used to place a null at the interference signal so that the array gain can be much higher than that of conventional beamforming. But these nice features are significantly degraded by the source motion, which reduces the time period under which the environment can be considered stationary from the array processing point of view. For adaptive array processing, a large number of data samples are generally required to minimize the variance of the cross-spectral density, or the covariance matrix, between the array elements. For a moving source and interference, the penalty of integrating over a large number of samples is the spread of signal and interference energy to more than one or two eigenvalues. The signal and interference are no longer clearly identified by the eigenvectors and, consequently, the ability to suppress the interference suffers. We show in this paper that the effect of source motion can be compensated for the (signal) beam covariance matrix, thus allowing integration over a large number of data samples without loss in the signal beam power. We employ an equivalent of a rotating coordinate frame to track the signal bearing change and use the waveguide invariant theory to compensate the signal range change by frequency shifting.

  2. Broadband dispersion-compensating fiber for high-bit-rate transmission network use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. A.; Belov, A. V.; Dianov, E. M.; Abramov, A. A.; Bubnov, M. M.; Semjonov, S. L.; Shchebunjaev, A. G.; Khopin, V. F.; Guryanov, A. N.; Vechkanov, N. N.

    1995-08-01

    The optimum refractive-index profile and drawing temperature were investigated so as to maximize the figure of merit for multicladding broadband dispersion-compensating fibers. Based on the results of the investigation, the authors have fabricated a highly bend-resistant fiber with a 92.6-ps/(nm dB) figure of merit using the modified chemical-vapor deposition method for dispersion compensation in the 1.5-1.6- mu m wavelength region. The manufactured dispersion compensator does not suffer bend loss at 1.55 mu m for curvatures of radia of 6.3 and 3.3 cm, and it has a 1.1-dB/km bend loss at a curvature of radius of 1.6 cm. Codoping the germanium silicate core with fluorine diminishes the optical loss down to 0.70 dB/km at a 1.55- mu m wavelength.

  3. Broadband dispersion-compensating fiber for high-bit-rate transmission network use.

    PubMed

    Semenov, V A; Belov, A V; Dianov, E M; Abramov, A A; Bubnov, M M; Semjonov, S L; Shchebunjaev, A G; Khopin, V F; Guryanov, A N; Vechkanov, N N

    1995-08-20

    The optimum refractive-index profile and drawing temperature were investigated so as to maximize the figure of merit for multicladding broadband dispersion-compensating fibers. Based on the results of the investigation, the authors have fabricated a highly bend-resistant fiber with a 92.6-ps/(nm dB) figure of merit using the modified chemical-vapor deposition method for dispersion compensation in the 1.5-1.6-µm wavelength region. The manufactured dispersion compensator does not suffer bend loss at 1.55 µm for curvatures of radia of 6.3 and 3.3 cm, and it has a 1.1-dB/km bend loss at a curvature of radius of 1.6 cm. Codoping the germanium silicate core with fluorine diminishes the optical loss down to 0.70 dB/km at a 1.55-µm wavelength. PMID:21060352

  4. Design and performance evaluation of a dispersion compensation unit using several chirping functions in a tanh apodized FBG and comparison with dispersion compensation fiber.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Nazmi A; Solaiman, Mohammad; Aly, Moustafa H

    2014-10-10

    In this work, various dispersion compensation methods are designed and evaluated to search for a cost-effective technique with remarkable dispersion compensation and a good pulse shape. The techniques consist of different chirp functions applied to a tanh fiber Bragg grating (FBG), a dispersion compensation fiber (DCF), and a DCF merged with an optimized linearly chirped tanh FBG (joint technique). The techniques are evaluated using a standard 10 Gb/s optical link over a 100 km long haul. The linear chirp function is the most appropriate choice of chirping function, with a pulse width reduction percentage (PWRP) of 75.15%, lower price, and poor pulse shape. The DCF yields an enhanced PWRP of 93.34% with a better pulse quality; however, it is the most costly of the evaluated techniques. Finally, the joint technique achieved the optimum PWRP (96.36%) among all the evaluated techniques and exhibited a remarkable pulse shape; it is less costly than the DCF, but more expensive than the chirped tanh FBG. PMID:25322426

  5. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems.

  6. High gain Raman amplifier with inherent gain flattening and dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakkar, Charu; Thyagarajan, K.

    2005-06-01

    We report here an inherently gain-flattened, high-gain discrete Raman fiber amplifier design with 21 dB net gain (±1.4 dB gain ripple) over 25 nm bandwidth. The amplifier design is based on a W-shape highly nonlinear fiber, in which, optimized spectral variation of leakage loss has been used to achieve inherent gain flattening of Raman gain. The proposed fiber has an additional advantage of having a high negative dispersion coefficient (∼-84 ps/km nm) over the operating range of wavelength and thus the designed discrete amplifier module, based on this fiber, is also capable of compensating dispersion accumulated in one span (70 km) of transmission through G.652 fiber. Hence, the designed module is proposed as a composite amplifier and dispersion-compensating unit for 25 nm bandwidth, which is capable of handling both attenuation and dispersion of one span of G. 652 transmission.

  7. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  8. Achromatic flat optical components via compensation between structure and material dispersions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Xiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhao, Zeyu; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yanqin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    Chromatism causes great quality degradation of the imaging system, especially for diffraction imaging. The most commonly method to overcome chromatism is refractive/diffractive hybrid optical system which, however, sacrifices the light weight and integration property of diffraction elements. A method through compensation between the structure dispersion and material dispersion is proposed to overcome the chromatism in flat integrated optical components. This method is demonstrated by making use of silver nano-slits waveguides to supply structure dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide to compensate the material dispersion of metal. A broadband deflector and lens are designed to prove the achromatic property of this method. The method demonstrated here may serve as a solution of broadband light manipulation in flat integrated optical systems. PMID:26794855

  9. Active compensation of large dispersion of femtosecond pulses for precision laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Keunwoo; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2011-02-28

    We describe an active way of compensation for large dispersion induced in the femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. The pulse duration is consistently regulated at 250 fs by dispersion control, allowing sub-micrometer resolution in measuring long distances by means of time-of-flight measurement. This method could facilitate more reliable applications of femtosecond pulses for satellite laser ranging, laser altimetry and active LIDAR applications. PMID:21369227

  10. Compensation of nonlinear phase shifts with third-order dispersion in short-pulse fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shian; Kuznetsova, Lyuba; Chong, Andy; Wise, Frank

    2005-06-27

    We show that nonlinear phase shifts and third-order dispersion can compensate each other in short-pulse fiber amplifiers. This compen-sation can be exploited in any implementation of chirped-pulse amplification, with stretching and compression accomplished with diffraction gratings, single-mode fiber, microstructure fiber, fiber Bragg gratings, etc. In particular, we consider chirped-pulse fiber amplifiers at wavelengths for which the fiber dispersion is normal. The nonlinear phase shift accumulated in the amplifier can be compensated by the third-order dispersion of the combination of a fiber stretcher and grating compressor. A numerical model is used to predict the compensation, and experimental results that exhibit the main features of the calculations are presented. In the presence of third-order dispersion, an optimal nonlinear phase shift reduces the pulse duration, and enhances the peak power and pulse contrast compared to the pulse produced in linear propagation. Contrary to common belief, fiber stretchers can perform as well or better than grating stretchers in fiber amplifiers, while offering the major practical advantages of a waveguide medium. PMID:19498473

  11. An Experiment of GMPLS-Based Dispersion Compensation Control over In-Field Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Shoichiro; Horiuchi, Eiichi; Yoshida, Sota; Sugihara, Takashi; Onohara, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Misato; Baba, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kazuo; Mizuochi, Takashi

    As ROADMs (Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexers) are becoming widely used in metro/core networks, distributed control of wavelength paths by extended GMPLS (Generalized MultiProtocol Label Switching) protocols has attracted much attention. For the automatic establishment of an arbitrary wavelength path satisfying dynamic traffic demands over a ROADM or WXC (Wavelength Cross Connect)-based network, precise determination of chromatic dispersion over the path and optimized assignment of dispersion compensation capabilities at related nodes are essential. This paper reports an experiment over in-field fibers where GMPLS-based control was applied for the automatic discovery of chromatic dispersion, path computation, and wavelength path establishment with dynamic adjustment of variable dispersion compensation. The GMPLS-based control scheme, which the authors called GMPLS-Plus, extended GMPLS's distributed control architecture with attributes for automatic discovery, advertisement, and signaling of chromatic dispersion. In this experiment, wavelength paths with distances of 24km and 360km were successfully established and error-free data transmission was verified. The experiment also confirmed path restoration with dynamic compensation adjustment upon fiber failure.

  12. A CD adaptive monitoring and compensation method based on the average of the autocorrelation matrix eigenvalue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Lei, Jianming; Guo, Junhui; Zou, Xuecheng; Li, Bin; Lu, Li

    2014-02-01

    A new autocorrelation matrix eigenvalue based digital signal processing (DSP) chromatic dispersion (CD) adaptive monitoring and compensation method is proposed. It employs the average of the autocorrelation matrix eigenvalue instead of eigenvalue spread to be the metric of scanning. The average calculation has been effective in relieving the degradation of performance caused by the fluctuation of autocorrelation matrix eigenvalue. Compare with the eigenvalue spread scanning algorithm, this method reduces the monitoring errors to below 10 ps/nm from more than 200 ps/nm, while not increasing its computation complexity. Simulation results show that in 100 Gbit/s polarization division multiplexing (PDM) quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) coherent optical transmission system, this method improves the bit error rate (BER) performance and the system robustness against the amplified-spontaneous-emission noise.

  13. Numerical compensation of system polarization mode dispersion in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ellen Ziyi; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Villiger, Martin L.; Chen, Liang; Bouma, Brett E.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Polarization mode dispersion (PMD), which can be induced by circulators or even moderate lengths of optical fiber, is known to be a dominant source of instrumentation noise in fiber-based PS-OCT systems. In this paper we propose a novel PMD compensation method that measures system PMD using three fixed calibration signals, numerically corrects for these instrument effects and reconstructs an improved sample image. Using a frequency multiplexed PS-OFDI setup, we validate the proposed method by comparing birefringence noise in images of intralipid, muscle, and tendon with and without PMD compensation. PMID:23389009

  14. Fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with adaptive motion compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean; Stone, James; Neil, Mark; Paterson, Carl; Knight, Jonathan; French, Paul; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of sample motion during in vivo imaging, we present a fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with active axial motion compensation. The position of the sample surface is measured using optical coherence tomography and fed back to a piezo actuator that adjusts the axial location of the objective to compensate for sample motion. We characterise the system’s performance and demonstrate that it can compensate for axial sample velocities up to 700 µm/s. Finally we illustrate the impact of motion compensation when imaging multiphoton excited autofluorescence in ex vivo mouse skin. PMID:26137387

  15. Vector-dispersion compensation and pulse pedestal cancellation in a femtosecond nonlinear amplification fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Liu, Bowen; Niu, Hailiang; Song, Youjian; Li, Yi; Hu, Minglie; Zhang, Yueguang; Shen, Weidong; Liu, Xu; Wang, Chingyue

    2011-11-01

    We report on a femtosecond nonlinear amplification fiber laser system using a vector-dispersion compressor, which consists of a transmission grating pair and multipass cell based Gires-Tournois interferometer mirrors. The mirror is designed with nearly zero group-delay dispersion and large negative third-order dispersion. As a result, the third-order dispersion of the compressor can be adjusted independently to compensate the nonlinear phase shift of amplified pulses to reduce the pulse pedestal. With this scheme, the system outputs 44  fs laser pulses with little wing at 26.6  W output average power and 531  nJ pulse energy, corresponding to 10.8  MW peak power. PMID:22048347

  16. Computation of Parameters for Dispersion Compensating Photonic Crystal Fiber Using a Novel Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Changiz; Ehteshami, Nasrin

    2012-06-01

    In this article, an efficient compact two dimensional finite-difference frequency-domain (2-D FDFD) method has been used to model photonic Crystal fiber (PCF). Different values of dispersion coefficient can be obtained by changing fiber parameters using FDFD method. Since for each one of these parameters there exists a different value for dispersion coefficient, selection of optimal point will be a time consuming process. Here, first of all, we calculate parameter K, which is the key factor to design dispersion compensated fibers, so the design process will be faster and easier. The optimal value for K parameter is around 301.8 nm for transmission line fibers. So, it is enough to sketch both dispersion curve and K parameter versus PCF parameters, in a single coordinate system. Proper parameters will be obtained by analyzing the curves.

  17. Increased range of ultrasonic guided wave testing of overhead transmission line cables using dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Yücel, Mehmet K; Kappatos, Vassilios; Selcuk, Cem; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2015-09-01

    Overhead Transmission Line (OVTL) cables can experience structural defects and are, therefore, inspected using Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques. Ultrasonic Guided Waves (UGW) is one NDT technique that has been investigated for inspection of these cables. For practical use, it is desirable to be able to inspect as long a section of cable as possible from a single location. This paper investigates increasing the UGW inspection range on Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cables by compensating for dispersion using dispersion curve data. For ACSR cables, it was considered to be difficult to obtain accurate dispersion curves using modelling due to the complex geometry and unknown coupling between wire strands. Group velocity dispersion curves were, therefore, measured experimentally on an untensioned, 26.5m long cable and a method of calculating theoretical dispersion curves was obtained. Attenuation and dispersion compensation were then performed for a broadband Maximum Length Sequence (MLS) excitation signal. An increase in the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of about 4-8dB compared to that of the dispersed signal was obtained. However, the main benefit was the increased ability to resolve the individual echoes from the end of the cable and an introduced defect in the form of a cut, which was 7 to at least 13dB greater than that of the dispersed signal. Five echoes were able to be clearly detected using MLS excitation signal, indicating the potential for an inspection range of up to 130m in each direction. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the longest inspection range for ACSR cables reported in the literature, where typically cables, which were only one or two meter long, have been investigated previously. Narrow band tone burst and Hann windowed tone burst excitation signal also showed increased SNR and ability to resolve closely spaced echoes. PMID:25991388

  18. Pulsed bismuth fibre laser with the intracavity-compensated group velocity dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Aleksandr A; Kryukov, P G; Dianov, Evgenii M; Okhotnikov, O G; Guina, M

    2009-01-31

    Passive mode locking is achieved in a bismuth-doped fibre laser with the help of a SESAM saturable absorber optimised for operation in the spectra range from 1100 to 1200 nm. Pumping was performed by a 2-W cw ytterbium fibre laser at 1075 nm. The oscillation of the laser with an intracavity group-velocity-dispersion compensator based on a pair of diffraction gratings is studied. Laser pulses with the minimum duration of {approx}5 ps are generated. (lasers)

  19. The key to OC-192 deployment dispersion compensation using fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Kung, Peter; Loh, W. H.

    1998-12-01

    The effects and characteristics of group delay ripple of chirped fiber gratings on the performance of a 10 Gb/s NRZ transmission system has been experimentally investigated. For the power penalty less than 1 dB at bit-error-rate of 10-9, our experiment results show that the ripple magnitude of dispersion compensating gratings should be less than +/- 20 ps within its pass-band for 10 Gb/s systems.

  20. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Flight Control Using Engine Differentials: Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Liu; Xidong, Tang; Gang, Tao; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of using engine thrust differentials to compensate for rudder and aileron failures in aircraft flight control is addressed in this paper in a new framework. A nonlinear aircraft model that incorporates engine di erentials in the dynamic equations is employed and linearized to describe the aircraft s longitudinal and lateral motion. In this model two engine thrusts of an aircraft can be adjusted independently so as to provide the control flexibility for rudder or aileron failure compensation. A direct adaptive compensation scheme for asymptotic regulation is developed to handle uncertain actuator failures in the linearized system. A design condition is specified to characterize the system redundancy needed for failure compensation. The adaptive regulation control scheme is applied to the linearized model of a large transport aircraft in which the longitudinal and lateral motions are coupled as the result of using engine thrust differentials. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive compensation scheme.

  1. Electronic dispersion compensation for PMD in 40-GB/s optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kang; Liu, Jianfei; Zeng, Xiangye

    2009-11-01

    In 40-Gb/s optical systems, it is impossible to neglect the electronic dispersion of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD). As the data rate is increased, the maximum useful length of the fiber decreases according to the square of the increase. With the development of VLSI and DSP technologies, the electronic dispersion compensation for optical network has aroused greater world attention. In this paper, the performance of decision feedback equalizer (DFE) in PMD-limited 40-GB/s optical links is analyzed by using Matlab/Simulink. A simple equalizer circuit, in fold-cascade traveling-wave filter topology, is presented and the results based on S-parameter simulations show that a DFE equalizer consisting of a 3-tap feed forward equalizer (FFE) and a 2-tap feed back equalizer (FBE) can mitigate PMD effectively.

  2. Compensation of a distorted N-fold orbital angular momentum multicasting link using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    By using an adaptive feedback correction technique, we experimentally demonstrate turbulence compensation for free-space four-fold and eight-fold 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) multicasting links. The performance of multicasted OAM beams through emulated atmospheric turbulence and adaptive optics assisted compensation loop is investigated. The experimental results show that the scheme can efficiently compensate for the atmospheric turbulence induced distortions, i.e., reducing power fluctuation of multicasted OAM channels, suppressing inter-channel crosstalk, and improving the bit-error rate (BER) performance. PMID:27192267

  3. New Adaptive Method for IQ Imbalance Compensation of Quadrature Modulators in Predistortion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareian, Hassan; Vakili, Vahid Tabataba

    2009-12-01

    Imperfections in quadrature modulators (QMs), such as inphase and quadrature (IQ) imbalance, can severely impact the performance of power amplifier (PA) linearization systems, in particular in adaptive digital predistorters (PDs). In this paper, we first analyze the effect of IQ imbalance on the performance of a memory orthogonal polynomials predistorter (MOP PD), and then we propose a new adaptive algorithm to estimate and compensate the unknown IQ imbalance in QM. Unlike previous compensation techniques, the proposed method was capable of online IQ imbalance compensation with faster convergence, and no special calibration or training signals were needed. The effectiveness of the proposed IQ imbalance compensator was validated by simulations. The results clearly show the performance of the MOP PD to be enhanced significantly by adding the proposed IQ imbalance compensator.

  4. Chromatic dispersion and nonlinear phase noise compensation based on KLMS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Mahdi; Shayesteh, Mahrokh G.; Farhangian, Nooshin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, kernel least mean square (KLMS) algorithm with fractionally spaced equalizing structure is proposed for electrical compensation of chromatic dispersion (CD) and nonlinear phase noise (NLPN) in a dual polarization optical communications system with coherent detection. We consider single mode fiber channel. At the receiver, the additive optical noise is represented as additive white Gaussian noise. Phase modification is utilized at high signal powers to maintain the validity of Gaussian model of noise. We consider QAM and PSK modulations and evaluate the performance of the proposed method in terms of error rate, phase error, and error vector magnitude (EVM). The results are obtained in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the linear region, the KLMS algorithm can compensate CD and NLPN effectively and outperforms the existing compensation methods such as LMS, minimum mean square error (MMSE), and time domain FIR filter. In nonlinear regime, where the input power is higher, NLPN is stronger which results in compensation performance degradation. However, KLMS still achieves better results than the above algorithms.

  5. A current-mode DC—DC buck converter with adaptive zero compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yang; Guoding, Dai; Chongwei, Xu; Yuezhi, Liu

    2013-08-01

    To achieve fast transient response for a DC—DC buck converter, an adaptive zero compensation circuit is presented. The compensation resistance is dynamically adjusted according to the different output load conditions, and achieves an adequate system phase margin under the different conditions. An improved capacitor multiplier circuit is adopted to realize the minimized compensation capacitance size. In addition, analysis of the small-signal model shows the correctness of the mechanism of the proposed adaptive zero compensation technique. A current-mode DC—DC buck converter with the proposed structure has been implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process, and the die size is only 800 × 1040 μm2. The experimental results show that the transient undershoot/overshoot voltage and the recovery times do not exceed 40 mV and 30 μs for a load current variation from 100 mA to 1 A.

  6. A Study of Dispersion Compensation of Polarization Multiplexing-Based OFDM-OCDMA for Radio-over-Fiber Transmissions.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Ta; Chen, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatic dispersion from optical fiber is the most important problem that produces temporal skews and destroys the rectangular structure of code patterns in the spectra-amplitude-coding-based optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA) system. Thus, the balance detection scheme does not work perfectly to cancel multiple access interference (MAI) and the system performance will be degraded. Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is the fastest developing technology in the academic and industrial fields of wireless transmission. In this study, the radio-over-fiber system is realized by integrating OFDM and OCDMA via polarization multiplexing scheme. The electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) equalizer element of OFDM integrated with the dispersion compensation fiber (DCF) is used in the proposed radio-over-fiber (RoF) system, which can efficiently suppress the chromatic dispersion influence in long-haul transmitted distance. A set of length differences for 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) and 4 km-long DCF is to verify the compensation scheme by relative equalizer algorithms and constellation diagrams. In the simulation result, the proposed dispersion mechanism successfully compensates the dispersion from SMF and the system performance with dispersion equalizer is highly improved. PMID:27618042

  7. Adaptive filter design based on the LMS algorithm for delay elimination in TCR/FC compensators.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Rahmat Allah; Torabian Esfahani, Mahdi

    2011-04-01

    Thyristor controlled reactor with fixed capacitor (TCR/FC) compensators have the capability of compensating reactive power and improving power quality phenomena. Delay in the response of such compensators degrades their performance. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive filters (AF) is proposed in order to eliminate delay and increase the response of the TCR compensator. The algorithm designed for the adaptive filters is performed based on the least mean square (LMS) algorithm. In this design, instead of fixed capacitors, band-pass LC filters are used. To evaluate the filter, a TCR/FC compensator was used for nonlinear and time varying loads of electric arc furnaces (EAFs). These loads caused occurrence of power quality phenomena in the supplying system, such as voltage fluctuation and flicker, odd and even harmonics and unbalancing in voltage and current. The above design was implemented in a realistic system model of a steel complex. The simulation results show that applying the proposed control in the TCR/FC compensator efficiently eliminated delay in the response and improved the performance of the compensator in the power system. PMID:21193194

  8. Multi-channel nonlinearity compensation of PDM-QPSK signals in dispersion-managed transmission using dispersion-folded digital backward propagation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cen; Liu, Xiang; Chandrasekhar, S; Fontaine, N K; Zhu, Likai; Li, G

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate nonlinearity compensation of 37.5-GHz-spaced 128-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signals using dispersion-folded digital-backward-propagation and a spectrally-sliced receiver that simultaneously receives three WDM signals, showing mitigation of intra-channel and inter-channel nonlinear effects in a 2560-km dispersion-managed TWRS-fiber link. Intra-channel and adjacent inter-channel nonlinear compensation gains when WDM channels are fully populated in the C-band are estimated based on the GN-model. PMID:24663923

  9. High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped dispersion compensation free fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Ortaç, B; Schmidt, O; Schreiber, T; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Hideur, A

    2007-08-20

    We report on a mode-locked high energy fiber laser operating in the dispersion compensation free regime. The sigma cavity is constructed with a saturable absorber mirror and short-length large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber. The laser generates positively-chirped pulses with an energy of 265 nJ at a repetition rate of 10.18 MHz in a stable and self-starting operation. The pulses are compressible down to 400 fs leading to a peak power of 500 kW. Numerical simulations accurately reflect the experimental results and reveal the mechanisms for self consistent intracavity pulse evolution. With this performance mode-locked fiber lasers can compete with state-of-the-art bulk femtosecond oscillators for the first time and pulse energy scaling beyond the muJ-level appears to be feasible. PMID:19547427

  10. Single sub-50-attosecond pulse generation from chirp-compensated harmonic radiation using material dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung Taec; Kim, Chul Min; Umesh, G.; Nam, Chang Hee; Baik, Moon-Gu

    2004-05-01

    A method for obtaining a single sub-50-attosecond pulse using harmonic radiation is proposed. For the generation of broad harmonic radiation during a single half-optical cycle, atoms are driven by a femtosecond laser pulse with intensity above the saturation intensity for optical field ionization and hence experience a large nonadiabatic increase of the laser electric field between optical cycles. Although the chirped structure of the harmonic radiation imposes a limit on the minimum achievable pulse duration, we demonstrate that its positive chirp can be compensated by the negative group delay dispersion of an appropriately selected x-ray filter material, used also for the spectral selection, resulting in a single attosecond pulse with a duration less than 50 as.

  11. Linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with scaled dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Simon A.; Beer, Matthias; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-11-14

    We present a linear-scaling symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) method that is based on an atomic orbital (AO) formulation of zeroth-order SAPT (SAPT0). The non-dispersive terms are realized with linear-scaling cost using both the continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) and the linear exchange (LinK) approach for integral contractions as well as our efficient Laplace-based coupled-perturbed self-consistent field method (DL-CPSCF) for evaluating response densities. The reformulation of the dispersion term is based on our linear-scaling AO Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (AO-MP2) method, that uses our recently introduced QQR-type screening [S. A. Maurer, D. S. Lambrecht, J. Kussmann, and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 014101 (2013)] for preselecting numerically significant energy contributions. Similar to scaled opposite-spin MP2, we neglect the exchange-dispersion term in SAPT and introduce a scaling factor for the dispersion term, which compensates for the error and at the same time accounts for basis set incompleteness effects and intramonomer correlation. We show in extensive benchmark calculations that the new scaled-dispersion (sd-)SAPT0 approach provides reliable results for small and large interacting systems where the results with a small 6-31G** basis are roughly comparable to supermolecular MP2 calculations in a triple-zeta basis. The performance of our method is demonstrated with timings on cellulose fragments, DNA systems, and cutouts of a protein-ligand complex with up to 1100 atoms on a single computer core.

  12. Brewster-angled chirped mirrors for high-fidelity dispersion compensation and bandwidths exceeding one optical octave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmeyer, G.

    2003-09-01

    A novel design approach for dispersion-compensating chirped mirrors with greater-than-octave bandwidth is proposed. The commonly encountered problem of dispersion ripple is overcome by impedance matching via Brewster incidence in respect to the top-layer coating material. This approach totally suppresses undesired reflections off the interface to the ambient medium without any need for complicated matching sections. It is shown that Brewster-angled chirped mirrors can deliver ultrabroadband dispersion compensation over a much wider bandwidth than conventional doublechirped mirrors and without the mechanical complexity of back-deposition approaches. Due to their relatively simple structure, the sensitivity of the dispersion of the Brewster-angled designs towards growth errors is greatly reduced. Therefore, this new generation of chirped mirrors appears ideal for compression of continuum pulses with a potential of pulse durations in the single-cycle regime.

  13. Dispersion compensation in an Yb-doped fiber oscillator for generating transform-limited, wing-free pulses.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Takashi; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effect of dispersion compensation on temporal characteristics in mode-locking by nonlinear polarization rotation in an ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) oscillator with intracavity and external grating pairs. A short fixed length YDF was spliced with a longer single-mode fiber (SMF). Using experimentally measured dispersion characteristics of the YDF, SMF and cavity optics, we control the group velocity dispersion (GVD) and spectral broadening in a cavity by changing the SMF length. As a result, the oscillator generated 29.4-fs transform-limited wing-free pulses, which are to our knowledge the shortest and cleanest pulses achieved without the use of additional optics like a prism pair for high-order dispersion compensation. The results show that a precise balance of higher order terms of the GVD and self-phase modulation is essential for shortening pulse duration. PMID:22273911

  14. Method based on chirp decomposition for dispersion mismatch compensation in precision absolute distance measurement using swept-wavelength interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Hu, Tao; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-12-14

    We establish a theoretical model of dispersion mismatch in absolute distance measurements using swept-wavelength interferometry (SWI) and propose a novel dispersion mismatch compensation method called chirp decomposition. This method separates the dispersion coefficient and distance under test, which ensures dispersion mismatch compensation without introducing additional random errors. In the measurement of a target located at 3.9 m, a measurement resolution of 45.9 μm is obtained, which is close to the theoretical resolution, and a standard deviation of 0.74 μm is obtained, which is better than the traditional method. The measurement results are compared to a single-frequency laser interferometer. The target moves from 1 m to 3.7 m, and the measurement precision using the new method is less than 0.81 μm. PMID:26698959

  15. Prediction of longitudinal dispersion coefficient using multivariate adaptive regression splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiabi, Amir Hamzeh

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) was developed as a novel soft-computing technique for predicting longitudinal dispersion coefficient (D L ) in rivers. As mentioned in the literature, experimental dataset related to D L was collected and used for preparing MARS model. Results of MARS model were compared with multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. To define the most effective parameters on D L , the Gamma test was used. Performance of MARS model was assessed by calculation of standard error indices. Error indices showed that MARS model has suitable performance and is more accurate compared to multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. Results of the Gamma test and MARS model showed that flow depth (H) and ratio of the mean velocity to shear velocity (u/u ∗) were the most effective parameters on the D L .

  16. Prediction of longitudinal dispersion coefficient using multivariate adaptive regression splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiabi, Amir Hamzeh

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) was developed as a novel soft-computing technique for predicting longitudinal dispersion coefficient ( D L ) in rivers. As mentioned in the literature, experimental dataset related to D L was collected and used for preparing MARS model. Results of MARS model were compared with multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. To define the most effective parameters on D L , the Gamma test was used. Performance of MARS model was assessed by calculation of standard error indices. Error indices showed that MARS model has suitable performance and is more accurate compared to multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. Results of the Gamma test and MARS model showed that flow depth ( H) and ratio of the mean velocity to shear velocity ( u/ u ∗) were the most effective parameters on the D L .

  17. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  18. Impact of branch points in adaptive optics compensation of thermal blooming and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Mark F.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.

    2011-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can be used to mitigate turbulence; however, when a single deformable mirror is used for phaseonly compensation of thermal blooming, analysis predicts the possibility of instability. This instability is appropriately termed phase compensation instability (PCI) and arises with the time-dependent development of spatial perturbations found within the high-energy laser (HEL) beam. These spatial perturbations act as local hot spots that produce negativelens- like optical effects in the atmosphere. An AO system corrects for the hot spots by applying positive-lens-like phase compensations. In turn, this increases the strength of the thermal blooming and leads to a runaway condition, i.e., positive feedback, in the AO control loop. This study uses computational wave-optics simulations to model horizontal propagation with the effects of thermal blooming and turbulence for a focused Gaussian HEL beam. A point-source beacon and nominal AO system are used for phase compensation. Previous results show that a high number of branch points limit the development of PCI for phase compensation of only thermal blooming. For phase compensation of thermal blooming and turbulence, the number of branch points decreases and system performance is reduced. A series of computational wave-optics experiments are presented which explore the possibility for PCI.

  19. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  20. Spaceborne multiview image compression based on adaptive disparity compensation with rate-distortion optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shigao; Su, Kehua; Jia, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Disparity compensation (DC) and transform coding are incorporated into a hybrid coding to reduce the code-rate of multiview images. However, occlusion and inaccurate disparity estimations (DE) impair the performance of DC, especially in spaceborne images. This paper proposes an adaptive disparity-compensation scheme for the compression of spaceborne multiview images, including stereo image pairs and three-line-scanner images. DC with adaptive loop filter is used to remove redundancy between reference images and target images and a wavelet-based coding method is used to encode reference images and residue images. In occlusion regions, the DC efficiency may be poor because no interview correlation exists. A rate-distortion optimization method is thus designed to select the best prediction mode for local regions. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can provide significant coding gain compared with some other similar coding schemes, and the time complexity is also competitive.

  1. Adaptive data rate control TDMA systems as a rain attenuation compensation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Masaki; Wakana, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Takashi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Minoru

    1993-01-01

    Rainfall attenuation has a severe effect on signal strength and impairs communication links for future mobile and personal satellite communications using Ka-band and millimeter wave frequencies. As rain attenuation compensation techniques, several methods such as uplink power control, site diversity, and adaptive control of data rate or forward error correction have been proposed. In this paper, we propose a TDMA system that can compensate rain attenuation by adaptive control of transmission rates. To evaluate the performance of this TDMA terminal, we carried out three types of experiments: experiments using a Japanese CS-3 satellite with Ka-band transponders, in house IF loop-back experiments, and computer simulations. Experimental results show that this TDMA system has advantages over the conventional constant-rate TDMA systems, as resource sharing technique, in both bit error rate and total TDMA burst lengths required for transmitting given information.

  2. Adaptive IF selection and IQ mismatch compensation in a low-IF GSM receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhang; Lifang, Wang; Xi, Tan; Hao, Min

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that can adaptively select the intermediate frequency (IF) and compensate the IQ mismatch according to the power ratio of the adjacent channel interference to the desired signal in a low-IF GSM receiver. The IF can be adaptively selected between 100 and 130 kHz. Test result shows an improvement of phase error from 6.78° to 3.23°. Also a least mean squares (LMS) based IQ mismatch compensation algorithm is applied to improve image rejection ratio (IRR) for the desired signal along with strong adjacent channel interference. The IRR is improved from 29.1 to 44.3 dB in measurement. The design is verified in a low-IF GSM receiver fabricated in SMIC 0.13 μm RF CMOS process with a working voltage of 1.2 V.

  3. Increase in the compensated field of view with a double-conjugate adaptive-optics system.

    PubMed

    Baharav, Y; Shamir, J

    1995-04-20

    We analyze and quantify the capabilities and limitations of a double-conjugate adaptive-optics system. In the proposed system the contribution of two turbulent layers is treated separately, with Rayleigh guide stars for the bottom layer, sodium guide stars for the top layer, and two adaptive mirrors conjugate to the respective layers. The system substantially increases the compensated field of view. We give calculated results for the estimated number of guide stars needed, the wave-front sensor, and the adaptive-mirror resolution. Simulation results are also presented, and the residual error remaining after correction in our proposed system is compared with a conventional single-adaptive-mirror system. PMID:21037756

  4. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  5. Cold adaptation mechanisms in the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis: Metabolic regulation and thermal compensation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xuan; Meng, Qian; Shu, Ruihao; Wang, Menglong; Zhou, Guiling; Wang, Hongtuo; Miao, Lin; Zhang, Jihong; Qin, Qilian

    2016-02-01

    Ghost moths (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) are cold-adapted stenothermal species inhabiting alpine meadows on the Tibetan Plateau. They have an optimal developmental temperature of 12-16°C but can maintain feeding and growth at 0°C. Their survival strategies have received little attention, but these insects are a promising model for environmental adaptation. Here, biochemical adaptations and energy metabolism in response to cold were investigated in larvae of the ghost moth Hepialus xiaojinensis. Metabolic rate and respiratory quotient decreased dramatically with decreasing temperature (15-4°C), suggesting that the energy metabolism of ghost moths, especially glycometabolism, was sensitive to cold. However, the metabolic rate at 4°C increased with the duration of cold exposure, indicating thermal compensation to sustain energy budgets under cold conditions. Underlying regulation strategies were studied by analyzing metabolic differences between cold-acclimated (4°C for 48h) and control larvae (15°C). In cold-acclimated larvae, the energy generating pathways of carbohydrates, instead of the overall consumption of carbohydrates, was compensated in the fat body by improving the transcription of related enzymes. The mobilization of lipids was also promoted, with higher diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol and free fatty acid content in hemolymph. These results indicated that cold acclimation induced a reorganization on metabolic structure to prioritise energy metabolism. Within the aerobic process, flux throughout the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was encouraged in the fat body, and the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was the likely compensation target. Increased mitochondrial cristae density was observed in the midgut of cold-acclimated larvae. The thermal compensation strategies in this ghost moth span the entire process of energy metabolism, including degration of metabolic substrate, TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, and from an energy budget

  6. A model following inverse controller with adaptive compensation for General Aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Hugh S.

    The theory for an adaptive inverse flight controller, suitable for use on General Aviation aircraft, is developed in this research. The objectives of this controller are to separate the normally coupled modes of the basic aircraft and thereby permit direct control of airspeed and flight-path angle, meet prescribed performance characteristics as defined by damping ratio and natural frequency, adapt to uncertainties in the physical plant, and be computationally efficient. The three basic elements of the controller are a linear prefilter, an inverse transfer function, and an adaptive neural network compensator. The linear prefilter shapes accelerations required of the overall system in order to achieve the desired system performance characteristics. The inverse transfer function is used to compute the aircraft control inputs required to achieve the necessary accelerations. The adaptive neural network compensator is used to compensate for modeling errors during design or real-time changes in the physical plant. This architecture is patterned after the work of Calise, but differs by not requiring dynamic feedback of the state variables. The controller is coded in ANSI C and integrated with a simulation of a typical General Aviation aircraft. Twenty-three cases are simulated to prove that the objectives for the controller are met. Among these cases are simulated stability and controllability failures in the physical plant, as well as several simulated failures of the neural network. With the exception of some bounded speed-tracking error, the controller is capable of continued flight with any foreseeable failure of the neural network. Recommendations are provided for follow-on investigations by other researchers.

  7. Adaptive Gas Turbine Engine Control for Deterioration Compensation Due to Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Parker, Khary I.; Chatterjee, Santanu

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an ad hoc adaptive, multivariable controller tuning rule that compensates for a thrust response variation in an engine whose performance has been degraded though use and wear. The upset appears when a large throttle transient is performed such that the engine controller switches from low-speed to high-speed mode. A relationship was observed between the level of engine degradation and the overshoot in engine temperature ratio, which was determined to cause the thrust response variation. This relationship was used to adapt the controller. The method is shown to work very well up to the operability limits of the engine. Additionally, since the level of degradation can be estimated from sensor data, it would be feasible to implement the adaptive control algorithm on-line.

  8. Enhancement of Corneal Visibility in Optical Coherence Tomography Images Using Corneal Adaptive Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Michaël J. A.; Ang, Marcus; Chung, Cheuk Wang; Farook, Mohamed; Strouthidis, Nick; Mehta, Jod S.; Mari, Jean Martial

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the contrast of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the cornea (post processing). Methods: We have recently developed standard compensation (SC) algorithms to remove light attenuation artifacts. A more recent approach, namely adaptive compensation (AC), further limited noise overamplification within deep tissue regions. AC was shown to work efficiently when all A-scan signals were fully attenuated at high depth. But in many imaging applications (e.g., OCT imaging of the cornea), such an assumption is not satisfied, which can result in strong noise overamplification. A corneal adaptive compensation (CAC) algorithm was therefore developed to overcome such limitation. CAC benefited from local A-scan processing (rather than global as in AC) and its performance was compared with that of SC and AC using Fourier-domain OCT images of four human corneas. Results: CAC provided considerably superior image contrast improvement than SC or AC did, with excellent visibility of the corneal stroma, low noise overamplification, homogeneous signal amplification, and high contrast. Specifically, CAC provided mean interlayer contrasts (a measure of high stromal visibility and low noise) greater than 0.97, while SC and AC provided lower values ranging from 0.38 to 1.00. Conclusion: CAC provided considerable improvement compared with SC and AC by eliminating noise overamplification, while maintaining all benefits of compensation, thus making the corneal endothelium and corneal thickness easily identifiable. Translational Relevance: CAC may find wide applicability in clinical practice and could contribute to improved morphometric and biomechanical understanding of the cornea. PMID:26046005

  9. Centroid gain compensation in Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics systems with natural or laser guide star

    PubMed

    Veran; Herriot

    2000-08-01

    In an adaptive optics system with an undersampled Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS), variations in seeing, laser guide star quality, and sodium layer thickness and range distance all combine to vary WFS centroid gain across the pupil during an exposure. While using the minimum of 4 pixels per WFS subaperture improves frame rate and read noise, the WFS centroid gain uncertainty may introduce static aberrations and degrade servo loop phase margin. We present a novel method to estimate and compensate WFS gains of each subaperture individually in real time for both natural and laser guide stars. PMID:10935871

  10. Adaptive tracking and compensation of laser spot based on ant colony optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihong; Ke, Xizheng; Bai, Runbing; Hu, Qidi

    2009-05-01

    Because the effect of atmospheric scattering and atmospheric turbulence on laser signal of atmospheric absorption,laser spot twinkling, beam drift and spot split-up occur ,when laser signal transmits in the atmospheric channel. The phenomenon will be seriously affects the stability and the reliability of laser spot receiving system. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric turbulence, we adopt optimum control thoughts in the field of artificial intelligence, propose a novel adaptive optical control technology-- model-free optimized adaptive control technology, analyze low-order pattern wave-front error theory, in which an -adaptive optical system is employed to adjust errors, and design its adaptive structure system. Ant colony algorithm is the control core algorithm, which is characteristic of positive feedback, distributed computing and greedy heuristic search. . The ant colony algorithm optimization of adaptive optical phase compensation is simulated. Simulation result shows that, the algorithm can effectively control laser energy distribution, improve laser light beam quality, and enhance signal-to-noise ratio of received signal.

  11. Adaptive-optics compensation by distributed beacons for non-kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Rao, C; Jiang, W; Ling, N

    2001-07-20

    In optical propagation through atmospheric turbulence, the performance of compensation with adaptive optics depends on a beacon's spatial distribution. With distributed beacons, the inefficiency of the modal correction, which is defined as the ratio of the anisoplanatic error of the jth mode and the Zernike-coefficient variance, is derived by use of the wave-front expansion on the Zernike polynomials for non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Numerical results are presented for laser beam propagation through constant turbulence with an offset point beacon and an on-axis uniform circular beacon. The results show that compensation for an on-axis uniform circular beacon is much more effective than that for an offset point beacon. The low-order modes are much more correlated than the higher-order modes. The larger the power-law exponent of the refractive-index power spectrum beta, the smaller the propagation path length L and the larger the diameter D of the telescope aperture, the more effective the compensation is. For a specific extended degree of beacon for which there are a maximum number of modes N(max) to be corrected, only low-order-correction systems are useful. PMID:18360369

  12. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  13. Local adaptation limits lifetime reproductive success of dispersers in a wild salmon metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Daniel A; Hilborn, Ray; Hauser, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Demographic and evolutionary dynamics in wild metapopulations are critically affected by the balance between dispersal and local adaptation. Where populations are demographically interconnected by migration, gene flow is often assumed to prevent local adaptation. However, reduced fitness of immigrants may limit gene flow between populations adapted to distinct habitat types, although direct quantification of the lifetime reproductive success of immigrants in the wild is lacking. Here, we show that dispersers between stream-spawning populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) had similar reproductive success to those that spawned in their natal stream, whereas dispersers from a different habitat (nearby lake beaches) produced half as many offspring. The stream- and beach-spawning ecotypes exhibited striking morphological differences despite their close spatial proximity, yet dispersal from the beach to the streams was more common than dispersal between streams, presenting empirical evidence that variation in immigrant reproductive success is important for the maintenance of intraspecific biodiversity. PMID:24739514

  14. Optimization algorithm in adaptive PMD compensation in 10Gb/s optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Cao; Li, Tangjun; Wang, Muguang; Gong, Xiangfeng

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, the optimization algorithms are introduced in adaptive PMD compensation in 10Gb/s optical communication system. The PMD monitoring technique based on degree of polarization (DOP) is adopted. DOP can be a good indicator of PMD with monotonically deceasing of DOP as differential group delay (DGD) increasing. In order to use DOP as PMD monitoring feedback signal, it is required to emulate the state of DGD in the transmission circuitry. A PMD emulator is designed. A polarization controller (PC) is used in fiber multiplexer to adjust the polarization state of optical signal, and at the output of the fiber multiplexer a polarizer is used. After the feedback signal reach the control computer, the optimization program run to search the global optimization spot and through the PC to control the PMD. Several popular modern nonlinear optimization algorithms (Tabu Search, Simulated Annealing, Genetic Algorithm, Artificial Neural Networks, Ant Colony Optimization etc.) are discussed and the comparisons among them are made to choose the best optimization algorithm. Every algorithm has its advantage and disadvantage, but in this circs the Genetic Algorithm (GA) may be the best. It eliminates the worsen spots constantly and lets them have no chance to enter the circulation. So it has the quicker convergence velocity and less time. The PMD can be compensated in very few steps by using this algorithm. As a result, the maximum compensation ability of the one-stage PMD and two-stage PMD can be made in very short time, and the dynamic compensation time is no more than 10ms.

  15. Object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction for depth video coding in 3D video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Jaejoon; Lim, Ilsoon; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the 3D video system using the MVD (multi-view video plus depth) data format is being actively studied. The system has many advantages with respect to virtual view synthesis such as an auto-stereoscopic functionality, but compression of huge input data remains a problem. Therefore, efficient 3D data compression is extremely important in the system, and problems of low temporal consistency and viewpoint correlation should be resolved for efficient depth video coding. In this paper, we propose an object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction method to resolve the problems where object-adaptive mean-depth difference between a current block, to be coded, and a reference block are compensated during inter prediction. In addition, unique properties of depth video are exploited to reduce side information required for signaling decoder to conduct the same process. To evaluate the coding performance, we have implemented the proposed method into MVC (multiview video coding) reference software, JMVC 8.2. Experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed method is especially efficient for depth videos estimated by DERS (depth estimation reference software) discussed in the MPEG 3DV coding group. The coding gain was up to 11.69% bit-saving, and it was even increased when we evaluated it on synthesized views of virtual viewpoints.

  16. Helix-length compensation studies reveal the adaptability of the VS ribozyme architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix-Labonté, Julie; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Compensatory mutations in RNA are generally regarded as those that maintain base pairing, and their identification forms the basis of phylogenetic predictions of RNA secondary structure. However, other types of compensatory mutations can provide higher-order structural and evolutionary information. Here, we present a helix-length compensation study for investigating structure–function relationships in RNA. The approach is demonstrated for stem-loop I and stem-loop V of the Neurospora VS ribozyme, which form a kissing–loop interaction important for substrate recognition. To rapidly characterize the substrate specificity (kcat/KM) of several substrate/ribozyme pairs, a procedure was established for simultaneous kinetic characterization of multiple substrates. Several active substrate/ribozyme pairs were identified, indicating the presence of limited substrate promiscuity for stem Ib variants and helix-length compensation between stems Ib and V. 3D models of the I/V interaction were generated that are compatible with the kinetic data. These models further illustrate the adaptability of the VS ribozyme architecture for substrate cleavage and provide global structural information on the I/V kissing–loop interaction. By exploring higher-order compensatory mutations in RNA our approach brings a deeper understanding of the adaptability of RNA structure, while opening new avenues for RNA research. PMID:22086962

  17. Automatic balancing of AMB systems using plural notch filter and adaptive synchronous compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    To achieve automatic balancing in active magnetic bearing (AMB) system, a control method with notch filters and synchronous compensators is widely employed. However, the control precision is significantly affected by the synchronous compensation error, which is caused by parameter errors and variations of the power amplifiers. Furthermore, the computation effort may become intolerable if a 4-degree-of-freedom (dof) AMB system is studied. To solve these problems, an adaptive automatic balancing control method in the AMB system is presented in this study. Firstly, a 4-dof radial AMB system is described and analyzed. To simplify the controller design, the 4-dof dynamic equations are transferred into two plural functions related to translation and rotation, respectively. Next, to achieve automatic balancing of the AMB system, two synchronous equations are formed. Solution of them leads to a control strategy based on notch filters and feedforward controllers with an inverse function of the power amplifier. The feedforward controllers can be simplified as synchronous phases and amplitudes. Then, a plural phase-shift notch filter which can identify the synchronous components in 2-dof motions is formulated, and an adaptive compensation method that can form two closed-loop systems to tune the synchronous amplitude of the feedforward controller and the phase of the plural notch filter is proposed. Finally, the proposed control strategy is verified by both simulations and experiments on a test rig of magnetically suspended control moment gyro. The results indicate that this method can fulfill the automatic balancing of the AMB system with a light computational load.

  18. 10.8 kW spectral beam combination of eight all-fiber superfluorescent sources and their dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Jianhua; Hu, Man; Liu, Guangbo; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Chun; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2016-05-30

    We report an 8-element spectral beam combination of Yb-doped all fiber superfluorescent sources around 1070 nm wavelength. Each source consists of a 60 mW front-end and a 1.5 kW three-stage fiber amplifier chain. The eight output beamlets are spectrally combined using a home-made polarization-independent multilayer dielectric reflective diffraction grating. 10.8 kW output power is achieved with an efficiency of 94%. Besides, both theoretical and experimental studies of dual grating dispersion compensation scheme have been performed, which is proved to be a prospective way for high brightness spectral beam combination. PMID:27410127

  19. Compromised intestinal epithelial barrier induces adaptive immune compensation that protects from colitis

    PubMed Central

    Khounlotham, Manirath; Kim, Wooki; Peatman, Eric; Nava, Porfirio; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Addis, Caroline; Koch, Stefan; Fournier, Benedicte; Nusrat, Asma; Denning, Timothy L.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mice lacking Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A, encoded by F11r) exhibit enhanced intestinal epithelial permeability, bacterial translocation, and elevated colonic lymphocyte numbers, yet do not develop colitis. To investigate the contribution of adaptive immune compensation in response to increased intestinal epithelial permeability, we examined the susceptibility of F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice to acute colitis. Although negligible contributions of adaptive immunity in F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice were observed, F11r-/-Rag1-/- mice exhibited increased microflora-dependent colitis. Elimination of T cell subsets and cytokine analyses revealed a protective role for TGF-β-producing CD4+ T cells in F11r-/- mice. Additionally, loss of JAM-A resulted in elevated mucosal and serum IgA that was dependent upon CD4+ T cells and TGF-β. Absence of IgA in F11r+/+Igha-/- mice did not affect disease whereas F11r-/-Igha-/- mice displayed markedly increased susceptibility to acute injury induced colitis. These data establish a role for adaptive immune mediated protection from acute colitis under conditions of intestinal epithelial barrier compromise. PMID:22981539

  20. Alignment of a petawatt-class pulse compressor with the third-order dispersion completely compensated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanlei; Zhou, Kainan; Wu, Zhaohui; Wang, Xiao; Xie, Na; Su, Jingqin; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to eliminate third-order dispersion to acquire an ultrashort pulse of less than 30 fs. We demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the alignment of a petawatt-class laser compressor using the equiphase lines in the spatial and spectral interference patterns. Third-order dispersion has been completely eliminated and a Fourier-transform-limited pulsewidth of 19.6 fs has been approached.

  1. Signal to noise ratio of free space homodyne coherent optical communication after adaptive optics compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Mei, Haiping; Deng, Ke; Kang, Li; Zhu, Wenyue; Yao, Zhoushi

    2015-12-01

    Designing and evaluating the adaptive optics system for coherent optical communication link through atmosphere requires to distinguish the effects of the residual wavefront and disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Based on the new definition of coherent efficiency, a formula of signal to noise ratio for describing the performance of coherent optical communication link after wavefront compensation is derived in the form of amplitude non-uniformity and wavefront error separated. A beam quality metric is deduced mathematically to evaluate the effect of disturbed amplitude to the signal to noise ratio. Experimental results show that the amplitude fluctuation on the receiver aperture may reduce the signal to noise ratio about 24% on average when Fried coherent length r0=16 cm.

  2. A Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for advection-dispersion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, Y.; Karasaki, K.

    1994-02-01

    In the present paper, a Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for solving advection-dispersion equations is described. The code creates new grid points in the vicinity of sharp fronts at every time step in order to reduce numerical dispersion. The code yields quite accurate solutions for a wide range of mesh Peclet numbers and for mesh Courant numbers well in excess of 1.

  3. Nanoparticle-dispersed metamaterial sensors for adaptive coded aperture imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehmetallah, Georges; Banerjee, Partha; Aylo, Rola; Rogers, Stanley

    2011-09-01

    We propose tunable single-layer and multi-layer (periodic and with defect) structures comprising nanoparticle dispersed metamaterials in suitable hosts, including adaptive coded aperture constructs, for possible Adaptive Coded Aperture Imaging (ACAI) applications such as in microbolometry, pressure/temperature sensors, and directed energy transfer, over a wide frequency range, from visible to terahertz. These structures are easy to fabricate, are low-cost and tunable, and offer enhanced functionality, such as perfect absorption (in the case of bolometry) and low cross-talk (for sensors). Properties of the nanoparticle dispersed metamaterial are determined using effective medium theory.

  4. Analysis and compensation of dispersion-induced bit loss in a photonic A/D converter using time-wavelength interweaved sampling clock.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wu, Guiling; Guo, Pan; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jianping

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, the timing jitter induced by the fiber dispersion in photonic A/D converters using time-wavelength interweaved sampling clocks generated by optical time-division-multiplexing (OTDM) with fiber delay lines is analyzed and effective bit loss is calculated. A compensation method is proposed to decrease the dispersion-induced jitter. Simulations are performed and the results show the validity of the proposed compensation method. An experimental demonstration is carried out to verify the theoretical expression derived. PMID:19907563

  5. Studying the VCSEL to VCSEL injection locking for enhanced chromatic dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linfu

    2010-11-01

    In order to supply a theoretical guide for digital chaotic telecommunication, the technique of Optical injection locking (OIL) of semiconductor lasers on the chaotic communication have been investigated based on the theoretical models used to describe the dynamics of solitary VCSEL subjected to the external optical injection and signal transmission in fiber. The numerical simulation results show that, the frequency chirp and time-resolved chirp are reduced in magnitude, using a VCSEL laser as master and another VCSEL as slave, it leads to a no-penalty transmission over 50 km of uncompensated in SSMF at 10Gb/s, and it could be higher rate and more remote if there were appropriate compensation.

  6. On the evolutionary interplay between dispersal and local adaptation in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Andrew; Torney, Colin J; Schertzer, Emmanuel; Levin, Simon A

    2015-06-01

    Dispersal, whether in the form of a dandelion seed drifting on the breeze, or a salmon migrating upstream to breed in a nonnatal stream, transports genes between locations. At these locations, local adaptation modifies the gene frequencies so their carriers are better suited to particular conditions, be those of newly disturbed soil or a quiet river pool. Both dispersal and local adaptation are major drivers of population structure; however, in general, their respective roles are not independent and the two may often be at odds with one another evolutionarily, each one exhibiting negative feedback on the evolution of the other. Here, we investigate their joint evolution within a simple, discrete-time, metapopulation model. Depending on environmental conditions, their evolutionary interplay leads to either a monomorphic population of highly dispersing generalists or a collection of rarely dispersing, locally adapted, polymorphic sub-populations, each adapted to a particular habitat type. A critical value of environmental heterogeneity divides these two selection regimes and the nature of the transition between them is determined by the level of kin competition. When kin competition is low, at the transition we observe discontinuities, bistability, and hysteresis in the evolved strategies; however, when high, kin competition moderates the evolutionary feedback and the transition is smooth. PMID:25908012

  7. Evolution of the fruit endocarp: molecular mechanisms underlying adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant evolution is largely driven by adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies that allow diversification into new niches. This is evident by the tremendous variation in flowering and fruiting structures present both across and within different plant lineages. Within a single plant f...

  8. The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: High intestinal paracellular absorption compensates for smaller guts

    PubMed Central

    Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; McWhorter, Todd J.; Lavin, Shana R.; Chediack, Juan G.; Tracy, Christopher R.; Karasov, William H.

    2007-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that birds have smaller intestines than mammals. In the present analysis, we show that small birds and bats have significantly shorter small intestines and less small intestine nominal (smooth bore tube) surface area than similarly sized nonflying mammals. The corresponding >50% reduction in intestinal volume and hence mass of digesta carried is advantageous because the energetic costs of flight increase with load carried. But, a central dilemma is how birds and bats satisfy relatively high energy needs with less absorptive surface area. Here, we further show that an enhanced paracellular pathway for intestinal absorption of water-soluble nutrients such as glucose and amino acids may compensate for reduced small intestines in volant vertebrates. The evidence is that l-rhamnose and other similarly sized, metabolically inert, nonactively transported monosaccharides are absorbed significantly more in small birds and bats than in nonflying mammals. To broaden our comparison and test the veracity of our finding we surveyed the literature for other similar studies of paracellular absorption. The patterns found in our focal species held up when we included other species surveyed in our analysis. Significantly greater amplification of digestive surface area by villi in small birds, also uncovered by our analysis, may provide one mechanistic explanation for the observation of higher paracellular absorption relative to nonflying mammals. It appears that reduced intestinal size and relatively enhanced intestinal paracellular absorption can be added to the suite of adaptations that have evolved in actively flying vertebrates. PMID:18025481

  9. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  10. Adaptive settings of distance relay for MOV-protected series compensated line with distributed capacitance considering wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivov, Oleg Viktorovich

    Series compensated lines are protected from overvoltage by metal-oxide-varistors (MOVs) connected in parallel with the capacitor bank. The nonlinear characteristics of MOV devices add complexity to fault analysis and distance protection operation. During faults, the impedance of the line is modified by an equivalent impedance of the parallel MOV/capacitor circuit, which affects the distance protection. The intermittent wind generation introduces additional complexity to the system performance and distance protection. Wind variation affects the fault current level and equivalent MOV/capacitor impedance during a fault, and hence the distance relay operation. This thesis studies the impact of the intermittent wind power generation on the operation of MOV during faults. For the purpose of simulation, an equivalent wind farm model is proposed to generate a wind generation profile using wind farm generation from California independent system operator (ISO) as a guide for wind power variation to perform the study. The IEEE 12-bus test system is modified to include MOV-protected series capacitor and the equivalent wind farm model. The modified test system is simulated in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The study has been achieved considering three phase and single line to ground (SLG) faults on the series compensated line to show the effect of wind variation on the MOV operation. This thesis proposes an adaptive setting method for the mho relay distance protection of series compensated line considering effects of wind power variation and MOV operation. The distributed parameters of a transmission line are taken into account to avoid overreaching and underreaching of distance relays. The study shows that variable wind power affects system power flow and fault current in the compensated line during a fault which affects the operation of MOVs for different fault conditions. The equivalent per-phase impedance of the MOV/capacitor circuit has an effect on the system operation

  11. Simulation of the dispersion of nuclear contamination using an adaptive Eulerian grid model.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, I; Kármán, D; Turányi, T; Tomlin, A S; Haszpra, L

    2004-01-01

    Application of an Eulerian model using layered adaptive unstructured grids coupled to a meso-scale meteorological model is presented for modelling the dispersion of nuclear contamination following the accidental release from a single but strong source to the atmosphere. The model automatically places a finer resolution grid, adaptively in time, in regions were high spatial numerical error is expected. The high-resolution grid region follows the movement of the contaminated air over time. Using this method, grid resolutions of the order of 6 km can be achieved in a computationally effective way. The concept is illustrated by the simulation of hypothetical nuclear accidents at the Paks NPP, in Central Hungary. The paper demonstrates that the adaptive model can achieve accuracy comparable to that of a high-resolution Eulerian model using significantly less grid points and computer simulation time. PMID:15149762

  12. Programmable eye-opener lattice filter for multi-channel dispersion compensation using an integrated compact low-loss silicon nitride platform.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Renan; Gundavarapu, Sarat; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2016-07-25

    A tunable eye-opening lattice filter for dispersion compensation is demonstrated on an ultra low-loss waveguide platform based on a compact high-aspect ratio Si3N4 core. A programmable 10th order lattice filter is demonstrated by cascading a total of 21 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with programmable delay lines of lengths designed at the baseband data rate. The filter has a footprint of 2.23 cm2 with continuously tunable dispersion from -500 ps/nm to 500 ps/nm. The filter shows a periodic transfer function with a measured FSR of 100 GHz capable of compensating multiple WDM channels with a single device. PMID:27464127

  13. Dispersion-compensation-free femtosecond Tm-doped all-fiber laser with a 248  MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Biao; Luo, Jiaqi; Ng, Boon Ping; Yu, Xia

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report a dispersion-compensation-free ultrafast thulium-doped all-fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) mode locking, delivering 330 fs soliton pulses at 1950 nm. A multifunctional hybrid fiberized device was applied in the oscillator to minimize the physical cavity length to ∼80  cm with a total dispersion of -0.045  ps2, enabling a state-of-the-art fundamental mode-locking repetition rate of 248 MHz in an NPE-based oscillator at ∼2  μm. PMID:27607970

  14. Static and quasi-static behavior of an adaptive system to compensate path errors for smart fiber placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, M.; Monner, H. P.; Krombholz, C.; Kruse, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    Smart fiber placement is an ambitious topic in current research for automated manufacturing of large-scale composite structures, e.g. wing covers. Adaptive systems get in focus to obtain a high degree of observability and controllability of the manufacturing process. In particular, vibrational issues and material failure have to be studied to significantly increase the production rate with no loss in accuracy of the fiber layup. As one contribution, an adaptive system has been developed to be integrated into the fiber placement head. It decouples the compaction roller from disturbances caused by misalignments, varying components' behavior over a large work area and acceleration changes during operation. Therefore, the smart system axially adapts the position of the compaction roller in case of disturbances. This paper investigates the behavior of the system to compensate quasi-static deviations from the desired path. In particular, the compensation efficiency of a constant offset, a linear drift with constant gradient and a single-curved drift is studied. Thus, the test bed with measurement devices and scenarios is explained. Based on the knowledge obtained by the experimental data, the paper concludes with a discussion of the proposed approach for its use under operating conditions and further implementation.

  15. An adaptive compensation algorithm for temperature drift of micro-electro-mechanical systems gyroscopes using a strong tracking Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to -2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation. PMID:25985165

  16. An Adaptive Compensation Algorithm for Temperature Drift of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Gyroscopes Using a Strong Tracking Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to −2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation. PMID:25985165

  17. Deep turbulence effects compensation experiments with a cascaded adaptive optics system using a 3.63 m telescope.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Mikhail; Riker, Jim; Carhart, Gary; Gudimetla, V S Rao; Beresnev, Leonid; Weyrauch, Thomas; Roberts, Lewis C

    2009-01-01

    Compensation of extended (deep) turbulence effects is one of the most challenging problems in adaptive optics (AO). In the AO approach described, the deep turbulence wave propagation regime was achieved by imaging stars at low elevation angles when image quality improvement with conventional AO was poor. These experiments were conducted at the U.S. Air Force Maui Optical and Supercomputing Site (AMOS) by using the 3.63 m telescope located on Haleakala, Maui. To enhance compensation performance we used a cascaded AO system composed of a conventional AO system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror with 941 actuators, and an AO system based on stochastic parallel gradient descent optimization with four deformable mirrors (75 control channels). This first-time field demonstration of a cascaded AO system achieved considerably improved performance of wavefront phase aberration compensation. Image quality was improved in a repeatable way in the presence of stressing atmospheric conditions obtained by using stars at elevation angles as low as 15 degrees. PMID:19107154

  18. Optical tracking telescope compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In order to minimize the effects of parameter variations in the dynamics of an optical tracking telescope, a model referenced parameter adaptive control system is described that - in conjunction with more traditional forms of compensation - achieves a reduction of rms pointing error by more than a factor of six. The adaptive compensation system utilizes open loop compensation, closed loop compensation, and model reference compensation to provide the precise input to force telescope axis velocity to follow the ideal velocity.

  19. Novel adaptive neural control design for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle based on actuator compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; He, Guangjun; Huang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the design of a novel adaptive neural controller for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with control input constraints. To reduce the complexity of controller design, the vehicle dynamics is decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem, respectively. For each subsystem, only one neural network is utilized to approach the lumped unknown function. By employing a minimal-learning parameter method to estimate the norm of ideal weight vectors rather than their elements, there are only two adaptive parameters required for neural approximation. Thus, the computational burden is lower than the ones derived from neural back-stepping schemes. Specially, to deal with the control input constraints, additional systems are exploited to compensate the actuators. Lyapunov synthesis proves that all the closed-loop signals involved are uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, simulation results show that the adopted compensation scheme can tackle actuator constraint effectively and moreover velocity and altitude can stably track their reference trajectories even when the physical limitations on control inputs are in effect.

  20. Feedforward compensation control of rotor imbalance for high-speed magnetically suspended centrifugal compressors using a novel adaptive notch filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shiqiang; Feng, Rui

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a feedforward control strategy combined with a novel adaptive notch filter to solve the problem of rotor imbalance in high-speed Magnetically Suspended Centrifugal Compressors (MSCCs). Unbalance vibration force of rotor in MSCC is mainly composed of current stiffness force and displacement stiffness force. In this paper, the mathematical model of the unbalance vibration with the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control laws is presented. In order to reduce the unbalance vibration, a novel adaptive notch filter is proposed to identify the synchronous frequency displacement of the rotor as a compensation signal to eliminate the current stiffness force. In addition, a feedforward channel from position component to control output is introduced to compensate displacement stiffness force to achieve a better performance. A simplified inverse model of power amplifier is included in the feedforward channel to reject the degrade performance caused by its low-pass characteristic. Simulation and experimental results on a MSCC demonstrate a significant effect on the synchronous vibration suppression of the magnetically suspended rotor at a high speed.

  1. Adaptive Control Parameters for Dispersal of Multi-Agent Mobile Ad Hoc Network (MANET) Swarms

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2013-11-01

    A mobile ad hoc network is a collection of independent nodes that communicate wirelessly with one another. This paper investigates nodes that are swarm robots with communications and sensing capabilities. Each robot in the swarm may operate in a distributed and decentralized manner to achieve some goal. This paper presents a novel approach to dynamically adapting control parameters to achieve mesh configuration stability. The presented approach to robot interaction is based on spring force laws (attraction and repulsion laws) to create near-optimal mesh like configurations. In prior work, we presented the extended virtual spring mesh (EVSM) algorithm for the dispersion of robot swarms. This paper extends the EVSM framework by providing the first known study on the effects of adaptive versus static control parameters on robot swarm stability. The EVSM algorithm provides the following novelties: 1) improved performance with adaptive control parameters and 2) accelerated convergence with high formation effectiveness. Simulation results show that 120 robots reach convergence using adaptive control parameters more than twice as fast as with static control parameters in a multiple obstacle environment.

  2. Design of chirped distributed Bragg reflector for octave-spanning frequency group velocity dispersion compensation in terahertz quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Ban, Dayan

    2016-06-13

    The strategies and approaches of designing chirped Distributed Bragg Reflector for group velocity compensation in metal-metal waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser are investigated through 1D and 3D models. The results show the depth of the corrugation periods plays an important role on achieving broad-band group velocity compensation in terahertz range. However, the deep corrugation also brings distortion to the group delay behavior. A two-section chirped DBR is proposed to provide smoother group delay compensation while still maintain the broad frequency range (octave) operation within 2 THz to 4 THz. PMID:27410366

  3. Changing demography and dispersal behaviour: ecological adaptations in an alpine butterfly.

    PubMed

    Junker, Marius; Wagner, Stefan; Gros, Patrick; Schmitt, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    High mountain ecosystems are extreme habitats for all organisms and therefore demand specific adaptations. In this context, we studied the ecology of the butterfly Euphydryas aurinia debilis in the High Tauern (Austria) and compared the obtained data against the ecology of the species in lower elevation habitats. We performed mark-release-recapture studies over the entire flight periods (end of June to end of July) in 2007 and 2008 to analyse the fundamental ecological parameters of a population. The demography of males and females was similar in both years, and no indication of typical protandry was detected. We observed a generally low dispersal of the individuals in both years, but males dispersed significantly more than females in 2008; this finding of low vagility was supported by allozyme analyses. Furthermore, butterflies survived periods of several days of continuously closed snow cover without any indication of increased mortality rates. In these three traits, this alpine population of E. aurinia apparently has ecological and physiological adaptations to the extreme requirements of high-altitude habitats and strongly deviates from the lower elevation populations. PMID:20652595

  4. Closed-loop adaptive optics using a spatial light modulator for sensing and compensating of optical aberrations in ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akondi, Vyas; Jewel, Md. Atikur Rahman; Vohnsen, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Sensing and compensating of optical aberrations in closed-loop mode using a single spatial light modulator (SLM) for ophthalmic applications is demonstrated. Notwithstanding the disadvantages of the SLM, in certain cases, this multitasking capability of the device makes it advantageous over existing deformable mirrors (DMs), which are expensive and in general used for aberration compensation alone. A closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) system based on a single SLM was built. Beam resizing optics were used to utilize the large active area of the device and hence make it feasible to generate 137 active subapertures for wavefront sensing. While correcting Zernike aberrations up to fourth order introduced with the help of a DM (for testing purposes), diffraction-limited resolution was achieved. It is shown that matched filter and intensity-weighted centroiding techniques stand out among others. Closed-loop wavefront correction of aberrations in backscattered light from the eyes of three healthy human subjects was demonstrated after satisfactory results were obtained using an artificial eye, which was simulated with a short focal length lens and a sheet of white paper as diffuser. It is shown that the closed-loop AO system based on a single SLM is capable of diffraction-limited correction for ophthalmic applications.

  5. Adaptive phase-locked fiber array with wavefront phase tip-tilt compensation using piezoelectric fiber positioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ling; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Polnau, Ernst; Weyrauch, Thomas; Beresnev, Leonid A.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we present the recent development of a conformal optical system with three adaptive phase-locked fiber elements. The coherent beam combining based on stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is investigated. We implement both phase-locking control and wavefront phase tip-tilt control in our conformal optical system. The phase-locking control is performed with fiber-coupled lithium niobate phase shifters which are modulated by an AVR micro-processor based SPGD controller. The perturbation rate of this SPGD controller is ~95,000 iterations per second. Phase-locking compensation bandwidth for phase distortion amplitude of 2π-radian phase shift is >100Hz. The tip-tilt control is realized with piezoelectric fiber positioners which are modulated by a computer-based software SPGD controller. The perturbation rate of the tip-tilt SPGD controller is up to ~950 iterations per second. The tip-tilt compensation bandwidth using fiber positioners is ~10Hz at 60-μrad. jitter swing angle.

  6. Adaptive Control Law Development for Failure Compensation Using Neural Networks on a NASA F-15 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: 1) Brief explanation of Generation II Flight Program; 2) Motivation for Neural Network Adaptive Systems; 3) Past/ Current/ Future IFCS programs; 4) Dynamic Inverse Controller with Explicit Model; 5) Types of Neural Networks Investigated; and 6) Brief example

  7. A comparison of operational Lagrangian particle and adaptive puff models for plume dispersion forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, M. J.; Souto, J. A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Casares, J. J.; Bermúdez, J. L.

    Transport and dispersion of pollutants in the lower atmosphere are predicted by using both a Lagrangian particle model (LPM) and an adaptive puff model (APM2) coupled to the same mesoscale meteorological prediction model PMETEO. LPM and APM2 apply the same numerical solutions for plume rise; but, for advection and plume growth, LPM uses a stochastic surrogate to the pollutant conservation equation, and APM2 applies interpolated winds and standard deviations from the meteorological model, using a step-wise Gaussian approach. The results of both models in forecasting the SO 2 ground level concentration (glc) around the 1400 MWe coal-fired As Pontes Power Plant are compared under unstable conditions. In addition, meteorological and SO 2 glc numerical results are compared to field measurements provided by 17 fully automated SO 2 glc remote stations, nine meteorological towers and one Remtech PA-3 SODAR, from a meteorological and air quality monitoring network located 30 km around the power plant.

  8. Micro-force compensation in automated micro-object positioning using adaptive neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahini, M.; Melek, W. W.; Yeow, J. T. W.

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for controlled pushing of a micro-sized object along a desired path. Challenges associated with this control task due to the presence of dominating micro-forces are carefully studied and a solution based on the application of artificial neural networks is introduced. A nonlinear controller is proposed for controlled pushing of micro-objects which guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system in the Lyapunov sense. An experimental setup is designed to validate the performance of the proposed controller. Results suggest that artificial neural networks present a promising tool for design of adaptive controllers to accurately manipulate objects in the microscopic scale.

  9. Low DSP complexity mid-haul mode-division multiplexing links utilizing wideband modal dispersion compensated two-mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantopoulos, N. P.; Nakazawa, M.; Yoshida, Y.; Maruta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Kuwaki, N.; Matsuo, S.; Kitayama, K.

    2015-11-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) over wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) networks is studied, particularly for the deployment of metro area networks (MAN) using two-mode fibers (TMF). Full C-band differential mode group delay (DMGD)-compensated TMF links are adopted for decreasing the computational complexity of real-time multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) signal processing. The effect of modal crosstalk to the maximum delay spread of the channel is validated through numerical simulations. Finally, the 2×2 MIMO channel state information (CSI) of a 102.6-km DMGD-compensated TMF link is experimentally estimated for mode path provisioning based upon routing and mode assignment (RMA) in MDM networks. The results confirm close-to-zero total DMGD value over the entire C-band.

  10. Stability Metrics for Simulation and Flight-Software Assessment and Monitoring of Adaptive Control Assist Compensators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodel, A. S.; Whorton, Mark; Zhu, J. Jim

    2008-01-01

    Due to a need for improved reliability and performance in aerospace systems, there is increased interest in the use of adaptive control or other nonlinear, time-varying control designs in aerospace vehicles. While such techniques are built on Lyapunov stability theory, they lack an accompanying set of metrics for the assessment of stability margins such as the classical gain and phase margins used in linear time-invariant systems. Such metrics must both be physically meaningful and permit the user to draw conclusions in a straightforward fashion. We present in this paper a roadmap to the development of metrics appropriate to nonlinear, time-varying systems. We also present two case studies in which frozen-time gain and phase margins incorrectly predict stability or instability. We then present a multi-resolution analysis approach that permits on-line real-time stability assessment of nonlinear systems.

  11. Heterodyne detection using spectral line pairing for spectral phase encoding optical code division multiple access and dynamic dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Foster, Mark; Khurgin, Jacob B; Cooper, A Brinton

    2012-07-30

    A novel coherent optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) scheme is proposed that uses spectral line pairing to generate signals suitable for heterodyne decoding. Both signal and local reference are transmitted via a single optical fiber and a simple balanced receiver performs sourceless heterodyne detection, canceling speckle noise and multiple-access interference (MAI). To validate the idea, a 16 user fully loaded phase encoded system is simulated. Effects of fiber dispersion on system performance are studied as well. Both second and third order dispersion management is achieved by using a spectral phase encoder to adjust phase shifts of spectral components at the optical network unit (ONU). PMID:23038313

  12. Dispersal strategies of phytophagous insects at a local scale: adaptive potential of aphids in an agricultural environment

    PubMed Central

    Lombaert, Eric; Boll, Roger; Lapchin, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Background The spread of agriculture greatly modified the selective pressures exerted by plants on phytophagous insects, by providing these insects with a high-level resource, structured in time and space. The life history, behavioural and physiological traits of some insect species may have evolved in response to these changes, allowing them to crowd on crops and to become agricultural pests. Dispersal, which is one of these traits, is a key concept in evolutionary biology but has been over-simplified in most theoretical studies. We evaluated the impact of the local-scale dispersal strategy of phytophagous insects on their fitness, using an individual-based model to simulate population dynamics and dispersal between leaves and plants, by walking and flying, of the aphid Aphis gossypii, a major agricultural pest, in a melon field. We compared the optimal values for dispersal parameters in the model with the corresponding observed values in experimental trials. Results We show that the rates of walking and flying disperser production on leaves were the most important traits determining the fitness criteria, whereas dispersal distance and the clustering of flying dispersers on the target plant had no effect. We further show that the effect of dispersal parameters on aphid fitness depended strongly on plant characteristics. Conclusion Parameters defining the dispersal strategies of aphids at a local scale are key components of the fitness of these insects and may thus be essential in the adaptation to agricultural environments that are structured in space and time. Moreover, the fact that the effect of dispersal parameters on aphid fitness depends strongly on plant characteristics suggests that traits defining aphid dispersal strategies may be a cornerstone of host-plant specialization. PMID:17014710

  13. Evolution of the fruit endocarp: molecular mechanisms underlying adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dardick, Chris; Callahan, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Plant evolution is largely driven by adaptations in seed protection and dispersal strategies that allow diversification into new niches. This is evident by the tremendous variation in flowering and fruiting structures present both across and within different plant lineages. Within a single plant family a staggering variety of fruit types can be found such as fleshy fruits including berries, pomes, and drupes and dry fruit structures like achenes, capsules, and follicles. What are the evolutionary mechanisms that enable such dramatic shifts to occur in a relatively short period of time? This remains a fundamental question of plant biology today. On the surface it seems that these extreme differences in form and function must be the consequence of very different developmental programs that require unique sets of genes. Yet as we begin to decipher the molecular and genetic basis underlying fruit form it is becoming apparent that simple genetic changes in key developmental regulatory genes can have profound anatomical effects. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of fruit endocarp tissue differentiation that have contributed to species diversification within three plant lineages. PMID:25009543

  14. A New Model Based on Adaptation of the External Loop to Compensate the Hysteresis of Tactile Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Durán, José A.; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to compensate for hysteresis nonlinearities observed in the response of a tactile sensor. The External Loop Adaptation Method (ELAM) performs a piecewise linear mapping of the experimentally measured external curves of the hysteresis loop to obtain all possible internal cycles. The optimal division of the input interval where the curve is approximated is provided by the error minimization algorithm. This process is carried out off line and provides parameters to compute the split point in real time. A different linear transformation is then performed at the left and right of this point and a more precise fitting is achieved. The models obtained with the ELAM method are compared with those obtained from three other approaches. The results show that the ELAM method achieves a more accurate fitting. Moreover, the involved mathematical operations are simpler and therefore easier to implement in devices such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) for real time applications. Furthermore, the method needs to identify fewer parameters and requires no previous selection process of operators or functions. Finally, the method can be applied to other sensors or actuators with complex hysteresis loop shapes. PMID:26501279

  15. A new model based on adaptation of the external loop to compensate the hysteresis of tactile sensors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Durán, José A; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to compensate for hysteresis nonlinearities observed in the response of a tactile sensor. The External Loop Adaptation Method (ELAM) performs a piecewise linear mapping of the experimentally measured external curves of the hysteresis loop to obtain all possible internal cycles. The optimal division of the input interval where the curve is approximated is provided by the error minimization algorithm. This process is carried out off line and provides parameters to compute the split point in real time. A different linear transformation is then performed at the left and right of this point and a more precise fitting is achieved. The models obtained with the ELAM method are compared with those obtained from three other approaches. The results show that the ELAM method achieves a more accurate fitting. Moreover, the involved mathematical operations are simpler and therefore easier to implement in devices such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) for real time applications. Furthermore, the method needs to identify fewer parameters and requires no previous selection process of operators or functions. Finally, the method can be applied to other sensors or actuators with complex hysteresis loop shapes. PMID:26501279

  16. 10.7 Gb/s electronic predistortion transmitter using commercial FPGAs and D/A converters implementing real-time DSP for chromatic dispersion and SPM compensation.

    PubMed

    Waegemans, Robert; Herbst, Stefan; Holbein, Ludwig; Watts, Philip; Bayvel, Polina; Fürst, Cornelius; Killey, Robert I

    2009-05-11

    We present an experimental demonstration of simultaneous chromatic dispersion and self-phase modulation compensation at 10.7 Gb/s using real-time electronic digital signal processing. This was achieved using a pre-distorting transmitter based on commercially available field programmable gate arrays and 21.4 GS/s, 6-bit resolution digital-to-analog converters. The digital signal processing employed look-up tables stored in RAM. This resulted in the achievement of a BER of 10(-6) at an OSNR of 16 dB after transmission over a 450 km link of uncompensated standard single mode fiber with + 4 dBm launch power. PMID:19434196

  17. Compensation of chromatic-dispersion for full-duplex radio-over-fiber links with vector signal transmission using frequency tripling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Huang, Shanguo; Xiao, Jinghua; Gao, Xinlu; Wang, Qian; Wei, Yongfeng; Zhai, Wensheng; Xu, Wenjing; Gu, Wanyi

    2014-10-01

    This paper demonstrates the theory of chromatic dispersion (CD)-induced constellation rotation (CR) in a radio-over-fiber (ROF) link, and a symmetry theory for compensation. A 60 GHz full-duplex ROF system with vector signal transmission using frequency-tripling modulation (FTM) is also proposed. The simulations for both 5 Gbps and 200 Mbps 16 QAM signal transmission show that the CD-induced CR can be entirely overcome due to the proposed method, and the proposed ROF schedule still maintains good performance even after 500 km of 200 Mbps vector signal transmission. Meanwhile, the central station is significantly simplified and cost-effective since only one 15 GHz local oscillator is needed for both the generation of an optical millimeter-wave signal and the carrier of the downlink intermediate-frequency (IF) signal.

  18. Temperature and refractive index sensing characteristics of an MZI-based multimode fiber-dispersion compensation fiber-multimode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Shen; Zhang, Jing; Rong, Qiangzhou; Liang, Lei; Xu, Qinfang; Xiang, Guanghua; Feng, Dingyi; Du, Yanying; Feng, Zhongyao; Qiao, Xueguang; Hu, Manli

    2012-12-01

    We proposed an optical fiber sensor with simple multimode fiber (MMF)-dispersion compensation fiber (DCF)-multimode fiber structure based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) and researched its temperature and refractive index (RI) sensing characteristics. The sensing principle is based on the interference between core and cladding modes of DCF due to the large core diameter mismatch. Spectral analyses demonstrate that the transmission spectrum is mainly formed by the interference between the dominant excited cladding mode and core modes. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor has high temperature sensitivity of 0.118 nm/°C in the range of 20-250 °C and RI sensitivity of 66.32 nm/RIU within the linear sensing range of 1.33-1.39 RIU. Therefore, the characteristics of compact size, low cost, easy fabrication, high sensitivities, and good anti-interference ability make this sensor have extensive application prospects.

  19. Generation of multiple laser lines by sum-frequency mixing of continuous-wave Raman emissions from a dispersion-compensated optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niigaki, Ryu; Kida, Yuichiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2016-02-01

    Three color continuous-wave (CW) laser emissions with constant frequency separation are generated in the near-infrared (NIR) region using a dispersion-compensated optical cavity filled with hydrogen gas. By focusing these laser emissions into second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystals, multiple second harmonic signals and sum-frequency signals are generated in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) with a constant frequency spacing. Up to five colors of these NUV CW laser emissions can be generated simultaneously by using SHG crystals with different orientations. The interference between the second-harmonic signal of one NIR laser emission and the sum-frequency signal of the other two NIR emissions was observed experimentally, indicating mutual phase coherence among the NIR laser emissions. The phase coherence allows the synthesis of a train of ultrashort pulses with a THz repetition rate in both the NUV and the NIR by using the CW emission lines.

  20. Self-stabilized and dispersion-compensated passively mode-locked Yb:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, A.; Guandalini, A.; Reali, G.

    2005-04-01

    Self-stabilized passive mode-locking of a diode-pumped Yb:yttrium aluminum garnet laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber was achieved using an off-phase-matching second-harmonic crystal. According to the numerical model, such a condition is accomplished by self-defocusing in the nonlinear crystal in the presence of positive intracavity dispersion. Robust mode locking with Fourier-limited 1.0-ps pulses was obtained, whereas mode locking, unassisted by the nonlinear crystal, yielded 2.2-ps pulses, with the laser operating near the edge of the stability region in order to minimize the saturation energy of the semiconductor device.

  1. Side mode suppression and dispersion compensation analysis of a 60 GHz radio-over-fibre system based on a gain switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Eamonn; Barry, Liam

    2014-02-01

    The research and technical community have designated a band of 7 GHz between 57 and 64 GHz for short-range wireless communications. This paper utilizes a simple and cost effective technique for generating a 60 GHz millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal using an optical comb source based on a gain-switched laser (GSL). This research investigates the effects unwanted comb lines have on the overall system performance with 2.5 Gb/s data transmission. To do this, a programmable optical filter is used to suppress the unwanted comb lines to varying levels. Bit-error rate (BER) measurements were carried out against received optical power to demonstrate the detrimental effects the unwanted comb lines have on the modulated mm-wave signal when not sufficiently suppressed. As chromatic dispersion is a limiting factor to the system's transmission distance, this work also investigates pre-compensation for dispersion utilizing the programmable group delay capabilities of the programmable optical filter, demonstrating the ability to extend the transmission distance by 12 km. All experimental results obtained are reinforced through simulation.

  2. Novel design of inherently gain-flattened discrete highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber Raman amplifier and dispersion compensation using a single pump in C-band.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Shailendra; Fujisawa, Takeshi; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Koshiba, Masanori

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, an inherently gain-flattened discrete highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (HNPCF) Raman amplifier (HNPCF-RA) design which shows 13.7 dB of net gain (with +/-0.85-dB gain ripple) over 28-nm bandwidth. The wavelength dependent leakage loss property of HNPCF is used to flatten the Raman gain of the amplifier module. The PCF structural design is based on W-shaped refractive index profile where the fiber parameters are well optimized by homely developed genetic algorithm optimization tool integrated with an efficient vectorial finite element method (V-FEM). The proposed fiber design has a high Raman gain efficiency of 4.88 W(-1) . km(-1) at a frequency shift of 13.1 THz, which is precisely evaluated through V-FEM. Additionally, the designed module, which shows ultra-wide single mode operation, has a slowly varying negative dispersion coefficient (-107.5 ps/nm/km at 1550 nm) over the operating range of wavelengths. Therefore, our proposed HNPCF-RA module acts as a composite amplifier with dispersion compensator functionality in a single component using a single pump. PMID:19503154

  3. Optical-pulse generation and compression using a comb-driven gain-switched laser diode and chromatic-dispersion compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Sumeeta

    both the comb-generator pulses and the non-regular, data-like "1011" pulse pattern, we study the impact of chromatic dispersion on the optical pulse width and pulse performance. Chromatic dispersion has been used in previous studies as a means of compressing the gain-switched pulses. For comb-generated pulses, we find that an increase in the bias current applied to the laser diode results in a decrease in the magnitude of chromatic dispersion required to compress the gain-switched optical pulse. Also the percentage change in the width of the gain-switched pulse on passing through a dispersion source increases with the increase in bias current even though the applied chromatic dispersion is decreased. The optical pulses generated using data pattern are more uniform in terms of peak power of the optical pulses when chromatic dispersion in a particular range is applied. A reduction in jitter is also seen for that range of dispersion while it increases for higher and lower values of dispersion. During the course of my thesis work, I activated a gain-switched optical pulse source in the Photonic Systems Laboratory at RIT for the first time. This source will be used to support future research projects. I also developed a suite of MATLAB code for study of gain-switching and dispersion compensation.

  4. Tip-tilt compensation: Resolution limits for ground-based telescopes using laser guide star adaptive optics. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Brase, J.M.

    1992-10-08

    The angular resolution of long-exposure images from ground-based telescopes equipped with laser guide star adaptive optics systems is fundamentally limited by the the accuracy with which the tip-tilt aberrations introduced by the atmosphere can be corrected. Assuming that a natural star is used as the tilt reference, the residual error due to tilt anisoplanatism can significantly degrade the long-exposure resolution even if the tilt reference star is separated from the object being imaged by a small angle. Given the observed distribution of stars in the sky, the need to find a tilt reference star quite close to the object restricts the fraction of the sky over which long-exposure images with diffraction limited resolution can be obtained. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive performance analysis of tip-tilt compensation systems that use a natural star as a tilt reference, taking into account properties of the atmosphere and of the Galactic stellar populations, and optimizing over the system operating parameters to determine the fundamental limits to the long-exposure resolution. Their results show that for a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea, if the image of the tilt reference star is uncorrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 60 milli-arc-seconds (mas), while if the image of the tilt reference star is fully corrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 16 mas. Furthermore, V band images long-exposure resolution of less than 16 mas may be obtained with a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea for unresolved objects brighter than magnitude 22 that are fully corrected by a laser guide star adaptive optics system. This level of resolution represents about 70% of the diffraction limit of a ten meter telescope in the V band and is more than a factor of 45 better than the median seeing in the V band on Mauna Kea.

  5. Adaptive rain fade compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rautio, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A large available margin must be provided for satellite communications systems operating near 20 GHz, which occasionally experience fades due to rain attenuation. It is proposed that this margin may be achieved in high-capacity FDMA satellites by dynamically providing a large margin to those links which are experiencing deep fades, while maintaining a small fade margin on all others. Single-beam SCPC operation and multiple-beam, satellite-switched FDMA systems are described, and the optimization of the dynamic FDMA links in a severely fading environment is investigated. A solution is derived which takes into account: (1) transponder intermodulation distortion, (2) cochannel and cross-polarization antenna interference, and (3) rain fade characteristics. The sample system configuration presented shows that such systems reach availability levels approaching 0.9999 at Ka-Band.

  6. Alterations in β-Cell Calcium Dynamics and Efficacy Outweigh Islet Mass Adaptation in Compensation of Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes Onset.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunguang; Chmelova, Helena; Cohrs, Christian M; Chouinard, Julie A; Jahn, Stephan R; Stertmann, Julia; Uphues, Ingo; Speier, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging insulin resistance is normally compensated by increased insulin production of pancreatic β-cells, thereby maintaining normoglycemia. However, it is unclear whether this is achieved by adaptation of β-cell function, mass, or both. Most importantly, it is still unknown which of these adaptive mechanisms fail when type 2 diabetes develops. We performed longitudinal in vivo imaging of β-cell calcium dynamics and islet mass of transplanted islets of Langerhans throughout diet-induced progression from normal glucose homeostasis, through compensation of insulin resistance, to prediabetes. The results show that compensation of insulin resistance is predominated by alterations of β-cell function, while islet mass only gradually expands. Hereby, functional adaptation is mediated by increased calcium efficacy, which involves Epac signaling. Prior to prediabetes, β-cell function displays decreased stimulated calcium dynamics, whereas islet mass continues to increase through prediabetes onset. Thus, our data reveal a predominant role of islet function with distinct contributions of triggering and amplifying pathway in the in vivo processes preceding diabetes onset. These findings support protection and recovery of β-cell function as primary goals for prevention and treatment of diabetes and provide insight into potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27207518

  7. Common approach for compensation of axial motion artifacts in swept-source OCT and dispersion in Fourier-domain OCT.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Dierck; Bonin, Tim; Lührs, Christian; Franke, Gesa; Hagen-Eggert, Martin; Koch, Peter; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2012-03-12

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is sensitive to sample motion during the wavelength sweep, which leads to image blurring and image artifacts. In line-field and full-field SS-OCT parallelization is achieved by using a line or area detector, respectively. Thus, approximately 1000 lines or images at different wavenumbers are acquired. The sweep duration is identically with the acquisition time of a complete B-scan or volume, rendering parallel SS-OCT more sensitive to motion artifacts than scanning OCT. The effect of axial motion on the measured spectra is similar to the effect of non-balanced group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the interferometer arms. It causes the apparent optical path lengths in the sample arm to vary with the wavenumber. Here we propose the cross-correlation of sub-bandwidth reconstructions (CCSBR) as a new algorithm that is capable of detecting and correcting the artifacts induced by axial motion in line-field or full-field SS-OCT as well as GVD mismatch in any Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT) setup. By cross-correlating images which were reconstructed from a limited spectral range of the interference signal, a phase error is determined which is used to correct the spectral modulation prior to the calculation of the A-scans. Performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on in vivo full-field SS-OCT images of skin and scanning FD-OCT of skin and retina. PMID:22418560

  8. 140-fs duration and 60-W peak power blue-violet optical pulses generated by a dispersion-compensated GaInN mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using a nonlinear pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Kono, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hideki; Koda, Rintaro; Fuutagawa, Noriyuki; Narui, Hironobu

    2015-12-14

    Blue-violet optical pulses of 140-fs duration and 60-W peak power were obtained from a dispersion-compensated GaInN mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using a nonlinear pulse compression technique. Wavelength-dependent group velocity dispersion expressed by third-order phase dispersion was applied to the optical pulses using a pulse compressor with a spatial light modulator. The obtained optical pulses had the shortest duration ever obtained for a mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using edge-emitting type devices. PMID:26698968

  9. Selection and sex-biased dispersal in a coastal shark: the influence of philopatry on adaptive variation.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, D S; Puritz, J B; Hollenbeck, C M; Gelsleichter, J; Chapman, D; Gold, J R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is expected to homogenize nuclear genetic variation relative to variation in genetic material inherited through the philopatric sex. When site fidelity occurs across a heterogeneous environment, local selective regimes may alter this pattern. We assessed spatial patterns of variation in nuclear-encoded, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences of the mitochondrial control region in bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo), a species thought to exhibit female philopatry, collected from summer habitats used for gestation. Geographic patterns of mtDNA haplotypes and putatively neutral SNPs confirmed female philopatry and male-mediated gene flow along the northeastern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. A total of 30 outlier SNP loci were identified; alleles at over half of these loci exhibited signatures of latitude-associated selection. Our results indicate that in species with sex-biased dispersal, philopatry can facilitate sorting of locally adaptive variation, with the dispersing sex facilitating movement of potentially adaptive variation among locations and environments. PMID:26518727

  10. Real-time adaptive optics testbed to investigate point-ahead angle in pre-compensation of Earth-to-GEO optical communication.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Nina; Berlich, René; Minardi, Stefano; Barth, Alexander; Mauch, Steffen; Mocci, Jacopo; Goy, Matthias; Appelfelder, Michael; Beckert, Erik; Reinlein, Claudia

    2016-06-13

    We explore adaptive optics (AO) pre-compensation for optical communication between Earth and geostationary (GEO) satellites in a laboratory experiment. Thus, we built a rapid control prototyping breadboard with an adjustable point-ahead angle where downlink and uplink can operate both at 1064 nm and 1550 nm wavelength. With our real-time system, beam wander resulting from artificial turbulence was reduced such that the beam hits the satellite at least 66% of the time as compared to merely 3% without correction. A seven-fold increase of the average Strehl ratio to (28 ± 15)% at 18 μrad point-ahead angle leads to a considerable reduction of the calculated fading probability. These results make AO pre-compensation a viable technique to enhance Earth-to-GEO optical communication. PMID:27410333

  11. The Theory of Adaptive Dispersion and Acoustic-phonetic Properties of Cross-language Lexical-tone Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Jennifer Alexandra

    Lexical-tone languages use fundamental frequency (F0/pitch) to convey word meaning. About 41.8% of the world's languages use lexical tone (Maddieson, 2008), yet those systems are under-studied. I aim to increase our understanding of speech-sound inventory organization by extending to tone-systems a model of vowel-system organization, the Theory of Adaptive Dispersion (TAD) (Liljencrants and Lindblom, 1972). This is a cross-language investigation of whether and how the size of a tonal inventory affects (A) acoustic tone-space size and (B) dispersion of tone categories within the tone-space. I compared five languages with very different tone inventories: Cantonese (3 contour, 3 level tones); Mandarin (3 contour, 1 level tone); Thai (2 contour, 3 level tones); Yoruba (3 level tones only); and Igbo (2 level tones only). Six native speakers (3 female) of each language produced 18 CV syllables in isolation, with each of his/her language's tones, six times. I measured tonal F0 across the vowel at onset, midpoint, and offglide. Tone-space size was the F0 difference in semitones (ST) between each language's highest and lowest tones. Tone dispersion was the F0 distance (ST) between two tones shared by multiple languages. Following the TAD, I predicted that languages with larger tone inventories would have larger tone-spaces. Against expectations, tone-space size was fixed across level-tone languages at midpoint and offglide, and across contour-tone languages (except Thai) at offglide. However, within each language type (level-tone vs. contour-tone), languages with smaller tone inventories had larger tone spaces at onset. Tone-dispersion results were also unexpected. The Cantonese mid-level tone was further dispersed from a tonal baseline than the Yoruba mid-level tone; Cantonese mid-level tone dispersion was therefore greater than theoretically necessary. The Cantonese high-level tone was also further dispersed from baseline than the Mandarin high-level tone -- at midpoint

  12. Possibilities of joint application of adaptive optics technique and nonlinear optical phase conjugation to compensate for turbulent distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Kanev, F. Yu; Kulagin, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of integrating the nonlinear optical technique based on forming a reverse wavefront and the conventional adaptive optics into a unified complex (for example, for adaptive focusing of quasi-cw laser radiation) is demonstrated. Nonlinear optical phase conjugation may provide more exact information about the phase fluctuations in the corrected wavefront in comparison with the adaptive optics methods. At the same time, the conventional methods of adaptive optics provide an efficient control of a laser beam projected onto a target for a rather long time.

  13. SIMULATION OF DISPERSION OF A POWER PLANT PLUME USING AN ADAPTIVE GRID ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new dynamic adaptive grid algorithm has been developed for use in air quality modeling. This algorithm uses a higher order numerical scheme?the piecewise parabolic method (PPM)?for computing advective solution fields; a weight function capable of promoting grid node clustering ...

  14. Limited Pollen Dispersal Contributes to Population Genetic Structure but Not Local Adaptation in Quercus oleoides Forests of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Nicholas John; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Background Quercus oleoides Cham. and Schlect., tropical live oak, is a species of conservation importance in its southern range limit of northwestern Costa Rica. It occurs in high-density stands across a fragmented landscape spanning a contrasting elevation and precipitation gradient. We examined genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure in this geographically isolated and genetically distinct population. We characterized population genetic diversity at 11 nuclear microsatellite loci in 260 individuals from 13 sites. We monitored flowering time at 10 sites, and characterized the local environment in order to compare observed spatial genetic structure to hypotheses of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment. Finally, we quantified pollen dispersal distances and tested for local adaptation through a reciprocal transplant experiment in order to experimentally address these hypotheses. Results High genetic diversity is maintained in the population and the genetic variation is significantly structured among sampled sites. We identified 5 distinct genetic clusters and average pollen dispersal predominately occurred over short distances. Differences among sites in flowering phenology and environmental factors, however, were not strictly associated with genetic differentiation. Growth and survival of upland and lowland progeny in their native and foreign environments was expected to exhibit evidence of local adaptation due to the more extreme dry season in the lowlands. Seedlings planted in the lowland garden experienced much higher mortality than seedlings in the upland garden, but we did not identify evidence for local adaptation. Conclusion Overall, this study indicates that the Costa Rican Q. oleoides population has a rich population genetic history. Despite environmental heterogeneity and habitat fragmentation, isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment alone do not explain spatial genetic structure. These results add to studies of genetic

  15. Population genomics of Pacific lamprey: adaptive variation in a highly dispersive species.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jon E; Campbell, Nathan R; Close, David A; Docker, Margaret F; Narum, Shawn R

    2013-06-01

    Unlike most anadromous fishes that have evolved strict homing behaviour, Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) seem to lack philopatry as evidenced by minimal population structure across the species range. Yet unexplained findings of within-region population genetic heterogeneity coupled with the morphological and behavioural diversity described for the species suggest that adaptive genetic variation underlying fitness traits may be responsible. We employed restriction site-associated DNA sequencing to genotype 4439 quality filtered single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci for 518 individuals collected across a broad geographical area including British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and California. A subset of putatively neutral markers (N = 4068) identified a significant amount of variation among three broad populations: northern British Columbia, Columbia River/southern coast and 'dwarf' adults (F(CT) = 0.02, P ≪ 0.001). Additionally, 162 SNPs were identified as adaptive through outlier tests, and inclusion of these markers revealed a signal of adaptive variation related to geography and life history. The majority of the 162 adaptive SNPs were not independent and formed four groups of linked loci. Analyses with matsam software found that 42 of these outlier SNPs were significantly associated with geography, run timing and dwarf life history, and 27 of these 42 SNPs aligned with known genes or highly conserved genomic regions using the genome browser available for sea lamprey. This study provides both neutral and adaptive context for observed genetic divergence among collections and thus reconciles previous findings of population genetic heterogeneity within a species that displays extensive gene flow. PMID:23205767

  16. Decentralized adaptive robust control based on sliding mode and nonlinear compensator for the control of ankle movement using functional electrical stimulation of agonist-antagonist muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobravi, Hamid-Reza; Erfanian, Abbas

    2009-08-01

    A decentralized control methodology is designed for the control of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion in paraplegic subjects with electrical stimulation of tibialis anterior and calf muscles. Each muscle joint is considered as a subsystem and individual controllers are designed for each subsystem. Each controller operates solely on its associated subsystem, with no exchange of information between the subsystems. The interactions between the subsystems are taken as external disturbances for each isolated subsystem. In order to achieve robustness with respect to external disturbances, unmodeled dynamics, model uncertainty and time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, a robust control framework is proposed which is based on the synergistic combination of an adaptive nonlinear compensator with a sliding mode control and is referred to as an adaptive robust control. Extensive simulations and experiments on healthy and paraplegic subjects were performed to demonstrate the robustness against the time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, day-to-day variations, subject-to-subject variations, fast convergence, stability and tracking accuracy of the proposed method. The results indicate that the decentralized robust control provides excellent tracking control for different reference trajectories and can generate control signals to compensate the muscle fatigue and reject the external disturbance. Moreover, the controller is able to automatically regulate the interaction between agonist and antagonist muscles under different conditions of operating without any preprogrammed antagonist activities.

  17. A wide load range, multi-mode synchronous buck DC—DC converter with a dynamic mode controller and adaptive slope compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunhong, Zhang; Haigang, Yang; Shi, Richard

    2013-06-01

    A synchronous buck DC—DC converter with an adaptive multi-mode controller is proposed. In order to achieve high efficiency over its entire load range, pulse-width modulation (PWM), pulse-skip modulation (PSM) and pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) modes were integrated in the proposed DC—DC converter. With a highly accurate current sensor and a dynamic mode controller on chip, the converter can dynamically change among PWM, PSM and PFM control according to the load requirements. In addition, to avoid power device damage caused by inrush current at the start up state, a soft-start circuit is presented to suppress the inrush current. Furthermore, an adaptive slope compensation (SC) technique is proposed to stabilize the current programmed PWM controller for duty cycle passes over 50%, and improve the degraded load capability due to traditional slope compensation. The buck converter chip was simulated and manufactured under a 0.35 μm standard CMOS process. Experimental results show that the chip can achieve 79% to 91% efficiency over the load range of 0.1 to 1000 mA

  18. Hysteresis compensation of the piezoelectric ceramic actuators-based tip/tilt mirror with a neural network method in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongchong; Wang, Yukun; Hu, Lifa; Wang, Shaoxin; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Li, Dayu; Yang, Chengliang; Xuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    The intrinsic hysteresis nonlinearity of the piezo-actuators can severely degrade the positioning accuracy of a tip-tilt mirror (TTM) in an adaptive optics system. This paper focuses on compensating this hysteresis nonlinearity by feed-forward linearization with an inverse hysteresis model. This inverse hysteresis model is based on the classical Presiach model, and the neural network (NN) is used to describe the hysteresis loop. In order to apply it in the real-time adaptive correction, an analytical nonlinear function derived from the NN is introduced to compute the inverse hysteresis model output instead of the time-consuming NN simulation process. Experimental results show that the proposed method effectively linearized the TTM behavior with the static hysteresis nonlinearity of TTM reducing from 15.6% to 1.4%. In addition, the tip-tilt tracking experiments using the integrator with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted. The wavefront tip-tilt aberration rejection ability of the TTM control system is significantly improved with the -3 dB error rejection bandwidth increasing from 46 to 62 Hz.

  19. Prehistoric Human Dispersal to the Tibetan Plateau and Adaptation to the High Altitude Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongju; Dong, Guanghui; Chen, Fahu

    2016-04-01

    Human history of the Tibetan Plateau and human adaptation to the high altitude environment is hotly debated in the past decade among archaeological, anthropological, genetic, and even past climate change studies. Based on previous studies on the Tibetan Plateau and our own archaeological studies in northeastern Tibetan Plateau (NETP), we propose that human migrated to the Tibetan Plateau from the last Deglacial period to late Holocene mainly from North China via Yellow River valley and its tributary valleys in NETP. This migration is constituted of four stages (Upper Paleolithic, Epi-Paleolithic, Neolithic and Bronze Age) when human adapted to the high altitude environment and climate change with different strategies and techniques. Particularly, the prevail of microlithic technology in North China provoked hunter-gatherers' first visit to the NETP in relatively ameliorated last Deglacial period, and the quick development of millet farming and subsequent mixed barley-wheat farming and sheep herding facilitated farmers and herders permanently settled in NETP, even above 3000 masl, during mid- and late Holocene.

  20. Adaptive compensation of lower order thermal aberrations in concave-convex power oscillators under variable pump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon

    2000-09-01

    A Nd:Cr:GSGG concave-convex power oscillator was developed that utilized both an adaptive mirror comprised of spherical and cylindrical optical elements together with a Faraday rotator to dynamically eliminate lower order aberrations (thermal focusing, astigmatism, and bipolar focusing). An adaptively controlled collimating lens corrected for shifts in the mode-waist position. The addition of a polarizer and a reentrant mirror totally eliminated thermal birefringence losses. The techniques developed are attractive in any solid state laser that must work under changing pump power conditions.

  1. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  2. Transcontinental dispersal, ecological opportunity and origins of an adaptive radiation in the Neotropical catfish genus Hypostomus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel S C; Roxo, Fábio F; Lujan, Nathan K; Tagliacollo, Victor A; Zawadzki, Claudio H; Oliveira, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Ecological opportunity is often proposed as a driver of accelerated diversification, but evidence has been largely derived from either contemporary island radiations or the fossil record. Here, we investigate the potential influence of ecological opportunity on a transcontinental radiation of South American freshwater fishes. We generate a species-dense, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny for the suckermouth armored catfish subfamily Hypostominae, with a focus on the species-rich and geographically widespread genus Hypostomus. We use the resulting chronogram to estimate ancestral geographical ranges, infer historical rates of cladogenesis and diversification in habitat and body size and shape, and test the hypothesis that invasions of previously unoccupied river drainages accelerated evolution and contributed to adaptive radiation. Both the subfamily Hypostominae and the included genus Hypostomus originated in the Amazon/Orinoco ecoregion. Hypostomus subsequently dispersed throughout tropical South America east of the Andes Mountains. Consequent to invasion of the peripheral, low-diversity Paraná River basin in southeastern Brazil approximately 12.5 Mya, Paraná lineages of Hypostomus, experienced increased rates of cladogenesis and ecological and morphological diversification. Contemporary lineages of Paraná Hypostomus are less species rich but more phenotypically diverse than their congeners elsewhere. Accelerated speciation and morphological diversification rates within Paraná basin Hypostomus are consistent with adaptive radiation. The geographical remoteness of the Paraná River basin, its recent history of marine incursion, and its continuing exclusion of many species that are widespread in other tropical South American rivers suggest that ecological opportunity played an important role in facilitating the observed accelerations in diversification. PMID:26863936

  3. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  4. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  5. Liquid Crystal based adaptive optics system to compensate both low and high order aberrations in a model eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Xuan, Li

    2007-02-01

    Based on a simple eye model system, a high resolution adaptive optics retina imaging system was built to demonstrate the availability of using liquid crystal devices as a wave-front corrector for both low and high order aberrations. Myopia glass was used to introduce large low order aberrations. A fiber bundle was used to simulate the retina. After correction, its image at different diopters became very clear. We can get a root mean square (RMS) correction precision of lower than 0.049λ (λ=0.63μm) for over to 10 diopters and the modulation transfer function (MTF) retains 511p/mm, which is nearly the diffraction limited resolution for a 2.7mm pupil diameter. The closed loop bandwidth was nearly 4 Hz, which is capable to track most of the aberration dynamics in a real eye.

  6. Adaptation of Sonication-Assisted Matrix Solid Phase Dispersion of Tissues for the Subsequent Extraction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Gulf Menhaden (Brevoortia patronus)

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Gregory M.; Meyer, Buffy M.; Portier, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    A new adaptation based on matrix solid phase dispersion of tissue for the subsequent isolation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was developed and used for extractions of Gulf menhaden caught during the summer of 2011. Many Matrix Solid Phase Dispersion (MSPD) methods require specific cartridges and other clean-up materials in order to achieve proper extraction. For this study, the tissues were lyophilized prior to applying the adapted MSPD method allowing for a much more complete homogenization with the C18 silica. The tissue was spiked with phenanthrene d10 as a surrogate as a measure of PAH recovery prior to the lyophilisation process to determine if any target compounds were lost and prior to sonication as per the finalized adaptation procedure to determine method efficiency. This technique used C18 silica in a 1 : 1 ratio as the primary homogenizing material for the menhaden tissue matrix and was eluted with dichloromethane (DCM) until visibly clear. The overall study mean recovery was 88% ± 5% with method detection limits between 0.4 ng/g and 4.4 ng/g tissue dry weight. This adapted protocol has been used exclusively on the analysis of high lipid content fish stocks affected by dispersed and weathered oil from the BP Horizon incident. PMID:24738032

  7. Adaptive Advantage of Myrmecochory in the Ant-Dispersed Herb Lamium amplexicaule (Lamiaceae): Predation Avoidance through the Deterrence of Post-Dispersal Seed Predators

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Koki; Ogata, Kanako; Mukai, Hiromi; Yamawo, Akira; Tokuda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory) is found worldwide, but the benefits that plants obtain from this mutualism remain uncertain. In the present study, we conducted laboratory experiments to demonstrate seed predator avoidance as a benefit of myrmecochory using the annual ant-dispersed herb Lamium amplexicaule, the disperser ant Tetramorium tsushimae, and the seed predatory burrower bug Adomerus rotundus. We compared the predation intensity of Lamium amplexicaule seeds by Adomerus rotundus under the presence or absence of Tetramorium tsushimae. Both the number of seeds sucked by Adomerus rotundus adults and the feeding duration of sucked seeds by nymphs were significantly reduced in the presence of ants. This effect was most likely due to the behavioral alteration of Adomerus rotundus in response to the ant presence, because ants seldom predated Adomerus rotundus during the experiment. Our results demonstrated that the presence of ants decreases post-dispersal seed predation, even when the ants do not bury the seeds. The present study thus suggests that the non-consumptive effects of ants on seed predators benefit myrmecochorous plants. PMID:26197397

  8. Adaptive Advantage of Myrmecochory in the Ant-Dispersed Herb Lamium amplexicaule (Lamiaceae): Predation Avoidance through the Deterrence of Post-Dispersal Seed Predators.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koki; Ogata, Kanako; Mukai, Hiromi; Yamawo, Akira; Tokuda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory) is found worldwide, but the benefits that plants obtain from this mutualism remain uncertain. In the present study, we conducted laboratory experiments to demonstrate seed predator avoidance as a benefit of myrmecochory using the annual ant-dispersed herb Lamium amplexicaule, the disperser ant Tetramorium tsushimae, and the seed predatory burrower bug Adomerus rotundus. We compared the predation intensity of Lamium amplexicaule seeds by Adomerus rotundus under the presence or absence of Tetramorium tsushimae. Both the number of seeds sucked by Adomerus rotundus adults and the feeding duration of sucked seeds by nymphs were significantly reduced in the presence of ants. This effect was most likely due to the behavioral alteration of Adomerus rotundus in response to the ant presence, because ants seldom predated Adomerus rotundus during the experiment. Our results demonstrated that the presence of ants decreases post-dispersal seed predation, even when the ants do not bury the seeds. The present study thus suggests that the non-consumptive effects of ants on seed predators benefit myrmecochorous plants. PMID:26197397

  9. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  10. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  11. The ground states of iron(III) porphines: role of entropy-enthalpy compensation, Fermi correlation, dispersion, and zero-point energies.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2011-10-01

    Porphyrins are much studied due to their biochemical relevance and many applications. The density functional TPSSh has previously accurately described the energy of close-lying electronic states of transition metal systems such as porphyrins. However, a recent study questioned this conclusion based on calculations of five iron(III) porphines. Here, we compute the geometries of 80 different electronic configurations and the free energies of the most stable configurations with the functionals TPSSh, TPSS, and B3LYP. Zero-point energies and entropy favor high-spin by ~4kJ/mol and 0-10kJ/mol, respectively. When these effects are included, and all electronic configurations are evaluated, TPSSh correctly predicts the spin of all the four difficult phenylporphine cases and is within the lower bound of uncertainty of any known theoretical method for the fifth, iron(III) chloroporphine. Dispersion computed with DFT-D3 favors low-spin by 3-53kJ/mol (TPSSh) or 4-15kJ/mol (B3LYP) due to the attractive r(-6) term and the shorter distances in low-spin. The very large and diverse corrections from TPSS and TPSSh seem less consistent with the similarity of the systems than when calculated from B3LYP. If the functional-specific corrections are used, B3LYP and TPSSh are of equal accuracy, and TPSS is much worse, whereas if the physically reasonable B3LYP-computed dispersion effect is used for all functionals, TPSSh is accurate for all systems. B3LYP is significantly more accurate when dispersion is added, confirming previous results. PMID:21855825

  12. Compensation Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roady, Celia

    2008-01-01

    Congress, the news media, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) continue to cast a wary eye on the compensation of nonprofit leaders. Hence, any college or university board that falls short of IRS expectations in its procedures for setting the president's compensation is putting the president, other senior officials, and board members at…

  13. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  14. Exo-planet Direct Imaging with On-Axis and/or Segmented Apertures in Space: Adaptive Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi

    Capitalizing on a recent breakthrough in wavefront control theory for obscured apertures made by our group, we propose to demonstrate a method to achieve high contrast exoplanet imaging with on-axis obscured apertures. Our new algorithm, which we named Adaptive Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD), provides the ability to compensate for aperture discontinuities (segment gaps and/or secondary mirror supports) by controlling deformable mirrors in a nonlinear wavefront control regime not utilized before but conceptually similar to the beam reshaping used in PIAA coronagraphy. We propose here an in-air demonstration at 1E- 7 contrast, enabled by adding a second deformable mirror to our current test-bed. This expansion of the scope of our current efforts in exoplanet imaging technologies will enabling us to demonstrate an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. It is directly applicable at scales from moderate-cost exoplanet probe missions to the 2.4 m AFTA telescopes to future flagship UVOIR observatories with apertures potentially 16-20 m. Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging is one of the top scientific priorities established by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Achieving this ambitious goal will require 1e-10 contrast on a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of nearby stars. Such a mission must of course also be realized at an achievable cost. Lightweight segmented mirror technology allows larger diameter optics to fit in any given launch vehicle as compared to monolithic mirrors, and lowers total life-cycle costs from construction through integration & test, making it a compelling option for future large space telescopes. At smaller scales, on-axis designs with secondary obscurations and supports are less challenging to fabricate and thus more affordable than the off-axis unobscured primary mirror designs

  15. Vultures of the seas: hyperacidic stomachs in wandering albatrosses as an adaptation to dispersed food resources, including fishery wastes.

    PubMed

    Grémillet, David; Prudor, Aurélien; le Maho, Yvon; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Animals are primarily limited by their capacity to acquire food, yet digestive performance also conditions energy acquisition, and ultimately fitness. Optimal foraging theory predicts that organisms feeding on patchy resources should maximize their food loads within each patch, and should digest these loads quickly to minimize travelling costs between food patches. We tested the prediction of high digestive performance in wandering albatrosses, which can ingest prey of up to 3 kg, and feed on highly dispersed food resources across the southern ocean. GPS-tracking of 40 wandering albatrosses from the Crozet archipelago during the incubation phase confirmed foraging movements of between 475-4705 km, which give birds access to a variety of prey, including fishery wastes. Moreover, using miniaturized, autonomous data recorders placed in the stomach of three birds, we performed the first-ever measurements of gastric pH and temperature in procellariformes. These revealed surprisingly low pH levels (average 1.50±0.13), markedly lower than in other seabirds, and comparable to those of vultures feeding on carrion. Such low stomach pH gives wandering albatrosses a strategic advantage since it allows them a rapid chemical breakdown of ingested food and therefore a rapid digestion. This is useful for feeding on patchy, natural prey, but also on fishery wastes, which might be an important additional food resource for wandering albatrosses. PMID:22701581

  16. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Rodney D.; Wen, Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M.

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  17. An overview of turbulence compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Klamer; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-09-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which type of scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  18. The theory of compensated laser propagation through strong thermal blooming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    An account is given of the theory of adaptive compensation for a laser beam's thermal blooming in atmospheric transmission, giving attention to MOLLY, a highly realistic computer simulation of adaptively compensated laser propagation which illustrates the effects of atmospheric turbulence and thermal blooming. Robust experimental signatures have been developed for such important fundamental processes as phase-compensation instability (PCI), which is caused by positive feedback between an adaptive optics system and laser-induced atmospheric heating. The physics of uncompensated and compensated thermal blooming is discussed, in conjunction with the architecture of MOLLY and an analysis of PCI that takes detailed adaptive-optics hardware structures into account.

  19. When is dispersal for dispersal? Unifying marine and terrestrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Scott C; Baskett, Marissa L; Grosberg, Richard K; Morgan, Steven G; Strathmann, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    Recent syntheses on the evolutionary causes of dispersal have focused on dispersal as a direct adaptation, but many traits that influence dispersal have other functions, raising the question: when is dispersal 'for' dispersal? We review and critically evaluate the ecological causes of selection on traits that give rise to dispersal in marine and terrestrial organisms. In the sea, passive dispersal is relatively easy and specific morphological, behavioural, and physiological adaptations for dispersal are rare. Instead, there may often be selection to limit dispersal. On land, dispersal is relatively difficult without specific adaptations, which are relatively common. Although selection for dispersal is expected in both systems and traits leading to dispersal are often linked to fitness, systems may differ in the extent to which dispersal in nature arises from direct selection for dispersal or as a by-product of selection on traits with other functions. Our analysis highlights incompleteness of theories that assume a simple and direct relationship between dispersal and fitness, not just insofar as they ignore a vast array of taxa in the marine realm, but also because they may be missing critically important effects of traits influencing dispersal in all realms. PMID:26118564

  20. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  1. Further evaluation of the constrained least squares electromagnetic compensation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William T.

    1991-01-01

    Technologies exist for construction of antennas with adaptive surfaces that can compensate for many of the larger distortions caused by thermal and gravitational forces. However, as the frequency and size of reflectors increase, the subtle surface errors become significant and degrade the overall electromagnetic performance. Electromagnetic (EM) compensation through an adaptive feed array offers means for mitigation of surface distortion effects. Implementation of EM compensation is investigated with the measured surface errors of the NASA 15 meter hoop/column reflector antenna. Computer simulations are presented for: (1) a hybrid EM compensation technique, and (2) evaluating the performance of a given EM compensation method when implemented with discretized weights.

  2. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  3. Adaptive compensation of atmospheric turbulence utilizing an interferometric wave-front sensor and a high-resolution MEMS-based spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Wilks, S; Olivier, S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-12

    Horizontal path correction of optical beam propagation presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by propagation along these paths. The system presented operates with nearly monochromatic light. It does not require a global reconstruction of the phase, thereby eliminating issues with branch points and making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The systems pixel count, 1024, and relatively high correction speed, in excess of 800 Hz, enable its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. We present results from laboratory and field tests of the system in which we have achieved Strehl ratios greater than 0.5.

  4. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  5. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  6. Design of adaptation actions to compensate the hydrological impact of the river regulation by dams on the Ebro Delta (Spain): combining modeling and field work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Darío; Jurado, Alicia; Carpintero, Miriam; Rovira, Albert; Polo, María J.

    2016-04-01

    River regulation by dams for both flood control and water storage has allowed to decrease both uncertainty and risks associated to extreme hydrological events. However, the alteration of the natural river flow regime and the detraction of high water volumes usually lead to significant effects downstream on the morphology, water quality, ecological status of water… and this is particularly relevant in the transitional waters since the sea level rise poses an additional threat on such conditions. The Ebro River, in northeastern Spain, is one of the highly regulated rivers in Spain with the dams located in the mainstream. Besides an estimated decrease of a 30% of the freshwater inputs, the sediment delivery to the final delta in the Mediterranean has dramatically been decreased up to a 99%, with environmental risks associated to the reduction of the emerged areas from the loss of sediment supply, the impact on the subsidence dynamics, and the sea level rise. The Ebro Delta suffers a mean regression of 10 m per year, and the persistence of macrophyte development in the final reach of the river due to the low water mean flow regime. The project LIFE EBRO-ADMICLIM (ENV/ES/001182), coordinated by the IRTA in Catalonia (Spain), puts forwards pilot actions for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change in the Ebro Delta. An integrated approach is proposed for managing water, sediment and habitats (rice fields and wetlands), with the multiple aim of optimizing ground elevation, reducing coastal erosion, increasing the accumulation (sequestration) of carbon in the soil, reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and improving water quality. This work presents the pilot actions included in the project to mitigate the loss of water flow and sediment supply to the delta. Sediment injections at different points upstream have been designed to calibrate and validate a sediment transport model coupled to a 2D-hydrodinamic model of the river. The combination of an a

  7. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  8. Temperature compensated well logging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Riedesel, R.G.; Nussbaum, T.W.; Warren, W.F.

    1984-01-24

    A well logging tool adapted for use in a borehole traversing an earth formation includes at least one sensor sensing at least one characteristic of the earth formation. Another sensor senses the ambient temperature and provides a corresponding temperature signal. An output circuit provides a temperature compensated output signal corresponding to the sensed characteristic of the earth formation in accordance with the temperature signal and the characteristic signal.

  9. Adaptive-feedback spectral-phase control for interactions with transform-limited ultrashort high-power laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Gregory; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhao, Baozhen; Powers, Nathan; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Umstadter, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited light pulses were obtained at the laser-plasma interaction point of a 100-TW peak-power laser in vacuum. The spectral-phase distortion induced by the dispersion mismatching between the stretcher, compressor, and dispersive materials was fully compensated for by means of an adaptive closed-loop. The coherent temporal contrast on the sub-picosecond time scale was two orders of magnitude higher than that without adaptive control. This novel phase control capability enabled the experimental study of the dependence of laser wakefield acceleration on the spectral phase of intense laser light. PMID:24365827

  10. Compensation Review Analyst

    2003-06-03

    COMPERA is a decision support system designed to facilitate the compensation review process. With parameters provided by the user(s), the system generates recommendations for base increases and nonbase compensation that strives to align total compensation with performance compensation targets. The user(s) prescribe(s) compensation targets according to performance (or value of contribution) designators. These targets are presented in look-up tables, which are then used by embedded formulas in the worksheet to determine the recommended compensation formore » each individual.« less

  11. Optimizing single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy by in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donghai; Deng, Yongkai; Chu, Saisai; Jiang, Hongbing; Wang, Shufeng; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-07-01

    Single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy shows great application potential in super-resolution cell imaging. Here, we report in situ adaptive optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon luminescence signals by phase and polarization modulations of broadband laser pulses. For polarization-independent quantum dots, phase-only optimization was carried out to compensate the phase dispersion at the focus of the objective. Enhancement of the two-photon excitation fluorescence intensity under dispersion-compensated femtosecond pulses was achieved. For polarization-dependent single gold nanorod, in situ polarization optimization resulted in further enhancement of two-photon photoluminescence intensity than phase-only optimization. The application of in situ adaptive control of femtosecond pulse provides a way for object-oriented optimization of single-nanoparticle two-photon microscopy for its future applications.

  12. Oil dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a symposium of the American Society for Testing and Materials. The topics covered include: The effect of elastomers on the efficiency of oil spill dispersants; planning for dispersant use; field experience with dispersants for oil spills on land; and measurements on natural dispersion.

  13. Compensated pulsed alternator

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.; Driga, Mircea D.; Woodson, Herbert H.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an electromechanical energy converter with inertial energy storage. The device, a single phase, two or multi-pole alternator with stationary field coils, and a rotating armature is provided. The rotor itself may be of laminated steel for slower pulses or for faster pulses should be nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive in order to allow rapid penetration of the field as the armature coil rotates. The armature coil comprises a plurality of power generating conductors mounted on the rotor. The alternator may also include a stationary or counterrotating compensating coil to increase the output voltage thereof and to reduce the internal impedance of the alternator at the moment of peak outout. As the machine voltage rises sinusoidally, an external trigger switch is adapted to be closed at the appropriate time to create the desired output current from said alternator to an external load circuit, and as the output current passes through zero a self-commutating effect is provided to allow the switch to disconnect the generator from the external circuit.

  14. PMD tolerant nonlinear compensation using in-line phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M E; Al Kahteeb, M A Z; Ferreira, F M; Ellis, A D

    2016-02-22

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the impact of polarisation mode dispersion on the efficiency of compensation of nonlinear transmission penalties for systems employing one of more inline phase conjugation devices. We will show that reducing the spacing between phase conjugations allows for significantly improved performance in the presence polarisation mode dispersion or a significant relaxation in the acceptable level of polarization mode dispersion. We show that these results are consistent with previously presented full statistical analysis of nonlinear transmission appropriately adjusted for the reduced section length undergoing compensation. PMID:26906997

  15. Robust springback compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleer, Bart; Grimm, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Springback simulation and springback compensation are more and more applied in productive use of die engineering. In order to successfully compensate a tool accurate springback results are needed as well as an effective compensation approach. In this paper a methodology has been introduce in order to effectively compensate tools. First step is the full process simulation meaning that not only the drawing operation will be simulated but also all secondary operations like trimming and flanging. Second will be the verification whether the process is robust meaning that it obtains repeatable results. In order to effectively compensate a minimum clamping concept will be defined. Once these preconditions are fulfilled the tools can be compensated effectively.

  16. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  17. Teaching Light Compensation Point: A New Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aston, T. J.; Robinson, G.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for measuring respiration, net photosynthesis, and compensation points of plants in relation to light intensity. Outlines how the method can be used in teaching physiological adaptation. Includes a set of the experiment's results. (ML)

  18. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  19. Implementation of routine ash predictions using a general purpose atmospheric dispersion model (HYSPLIT) adapted for calculating ash thickness on the ground.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Tony; Davis, Cory; Deligne, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    GNS Science currently produces twice-daily forecasts of the likely ash deposition if any of the active or recently active volcanoes in New Zealand was to erupt, with a number of alternative possible eruptions for each volcano. These use our ASHFALL program for calculating ash thickness, which uses 1-D wind profiles at the location of each volcano derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model output supplied by MetService. HYSPLIT is a hybrid Lagrangian dispersion model, developed by NOAA/ARL, which is used by MetService in its role as a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, to model airborne volcanic ash, with meteorological data provided by external and in-house NWP models. A by-product of the HYSPLIT volcanic ash dispersion simulations is the deposition rate at the ground surface. Comparison of HYSPLIT with ASHFALL showed that alterations to the standard fall velocity model were required to deal with ash particles larger than about 50 microns, which make up the bulk of ash deposits near a volcano. It also required the ash injected into the dispersion model to have a concentration based on a typical umbrella-shaped eruption column, rather than uniform across all levels. The different parameters used in HYSPLIT also caused us to revisit what possible combinations of eruption size and column height were appropriate to model as a likely eruption. We are now running HYSPLIT to produce alternative ash forecasts. It is apparent that there are many times at which the 3-D wind model used in HYSPLIT gives a substantially different ash deposition pattern to the 1-D wind model of ASHFALL, and the use of HYSPLIT will give more accurate predictions. ASHFALL is likely still to be used for probabilistic hazard forecasting, in which very large numbers of runs are required, as HYSPLIT takes much more computer time.

  20. Gmti Motion Compensation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2004-07-20

    Movement of a GMTI radar during a coherent processing interval over which a set of radar pulses are processed may cause defocusing of a range-Doppler map in the video signal. This problem may be compensated by varying waveform or sampling parameters of each pulse to compensate for distortions caused by variations in viewing angles from the radar to the target.

  1. Neurovestibular Compensation following Ototoxic Lesion and Labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Ashouri, Anousheh; Kaufman, Galen

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Unilateral labyrinthectomy and intra-tympanic gentamycin have been employed in the treatment of Ménière's disease, but the efficacy of these techniques has not been well established. Objective The objective of this study is to measure the time course of recovery from a unilateral labyrinthectomy either after ipsilateral topical treatment with gentamicin to the inner ear or without the previous insult. Methods Twenty-nine adult Mongolian gerbils were randomized into two experimental groups. Group 1 (n = 17) received a right ear gentamicin drug-induced lesion by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Group 2 (n = 12) only received a right unilateral labyrinthectomy lesion. We measured the horizontal vestibulo-ocular responses in gerbils before and after the lesion. The gerbils received an angular acceleration stimulus and their eye movements were recorded. Results The gentamicin lesion resulted in a quicker recovery. Experimental groups underwent a similar time course of recovery. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups. Both groups displayed adaptation to the lesion by day 21, but long-term compensation did not completely revert to the original pre-lesion state. Conclusions In a lesion requiring both static and dynamic compensation as in UL, the need for a static compensation may alter pre-existing compensation from a previous dynamic insult and require a new compensation. A previous lesion and adaptation is not preserved for a second lesion and the subject has to re-compensate. Therefore, surgical treatment in Meniere's disease such as UL can be considered without prior gentamicin treatment. Static and dynamic compensations do not appear to be as independent as previous studies have suggested. PMID:27096015

  2. Neurovestibular Compensation following Ototoxic Lesion and Labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Ashouri, Anousheh; Kaufman, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unilateral labyrinthectomy and intra-tympanic gentamycin have been employed in the treatment of Ménière's disease, but the efficacy of these techniques has not been well established. Objective The objective of this study is to measure the time course of recovery from a unilateral labyrinthectomy either after ipsilateral topical treatment with gentamicin to the inner ear or without the previous insult. Methods Twenty-nine adult Mongolian gerbils were randomized into two experimental groups. Group 1 (n = 17) received a right ear gentamicin drug-induced lesion by unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Group 2 (n = 12) only received a right unilateral labyrinthectomy lesion. We measured the horizontal vestibulo-ocular responses in gerbils before and after the lesion. The gerbils received an angular acceleration stimulus and their eye movements were recorded. Results The gentamicin lesion resulted in a quicker recovery. Experimental groups underwent a similar time course of recovery. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups. Both groups displayed adaptation to the lesion by day 21, but long-term compensation did not completely revert to the original pre-lesion state. Conclusions In a lesion requiring both static and dynamic compensation as in UL, the need for a static compensation may alter pre-existing compensation from a previous dynamic insult and require a new compensation. A previous lesion and adaptation is not preserved for a second lesion and the subject has to re-compensate. Therefore, surgical treatment in Meniere's disease such as UL can be considered without prior gentamicin treatment. Static and dynamic compensations do not appear to be as independent as previous studies have suggested. PMID:27096015

  3. A prototype automatic phase compensation module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The growing demands for high gain and accurate satellite communication systems will necessitate the utilization of large reflector systems. One area of concern of reflector based satellite communication is large scale surface deformations due to thermal effects. These distortions, when present, can degrade the performance of the reflector system appreciable. This performance degradation is manifested by a decrease in peak gain, and increase in sidelobe level, and pointing errors. It is essential to compensate for these distortion effects and to maintain the required system performance in the operating space environment. For this reason the development of a technique to offset the degradation effects is highly desirable. Currently, most research is direct at developing better material for the reflector. These materials have a lower coefficient of linear expansion thereby reducing the surface errors. Alternatively, one can minimize the distortion effects of these large scale errors by adaptive phased array compensation. Adaptive phased array techniques have been studied extensively at NASA and elsewhere. Presented in this paper is a prototype automatic phase compensation module designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center which is the first stage of development for an adaptive array compensation module.

  4. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  5. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  6. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  7. Phase tracking with differential dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, Xavier; Lacour, Sylvestre; Perrin, Guy S.; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Eisenhauer, Frank; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Straubmeier, Christian; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Differential chromatic dispersion in single-mode optical fibres leads to a loss of contrast of the white light fringe. For the GRAVITY instrument, this aspect is critical since it limits the fringe tracking performance. We present a real-time algorithm that compensates for differential dispersion due to varying fibre lengths using prior calibration of the optical fibres. This correction is limited by the accuracy to which the fibres stretch is known. We show how this affects the SNR on the white light fringe for different scenarios and we estimate how this phenomenon might eventually impact the astrometric accuracy of GRAVITY observations.

  8. Chromatic compensation of broadband light diffraction: ABCD-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jésus; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Climent, Vicent; Andrés, Pedro; Caraquitena, José

    2004-10-01

    Compensation of chromatic dispersion for the optical implementation of mathematical transformations has proved to be an important tool in the design of new optical methods for full-color signal processing. A novel approach for designing dispersion-compensated, broadband optical transformers, both Fourier and Fresnel, based on the collimated Fresnel number is introduced. In a second stage, the above framework is fully exploited to achieve the optical implementation of the fractional Fourier transform (FRT) of any diffracting screen with broadband illumination. Moreover, we demonstrate that the amount of shift variance of the dispersion-compensated FRT can be tuned continuously from the spatial domain, which is totally space variant, to the spectral domain, which is totally space invariant, with the chromatic correction remaining unaltered. PMID:15497415

  9. The American compensation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bale, A

    1990-01-01

    In this article, the author defines the occupational safety and health domain, characterizes the distinct compensation phenomenon in the United States, and briefly reviews important developments in the last decade involving Karen Silkwood, intentional torts, and asbestos litigation. He examines the class conflict over the value and meaning of work-related injuries and illnesses involved in the practical activity of making claims and turning them into money through compensation inquiries. Juries, attributions of fault, and medicolegal discourse play key roles in the compensation phenomenon. This article demonstrates the extensive, probing inquiry through workers' bodies constituted by the American compensation phenomenon into the moral basis of elements of the system of production. PMID:2139638

  10. Impairment assessment of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing over dispersion-managed links in backbone and backhaul networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamilarasan, Ilavarasan; Saminathan, Brindha; Murugappan, Meenakshi

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has seen the phenomenal usage of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) in the wired as well as wireless communication domains, and it is also proposed in the literature as a future proof technique for the implementation of flexible resource allocation in cognitive optical networks. Fiber impairment assessment and adaptive compensation becomes critical in such implementations. A comprehensive analytical model for impairments in OFDM-based fiber links is developed. The proposed model includes the combined impact of laser phase fluctuations, fiber dispersion, self phase modulation, cross phase modulation, four-wave mixing, the nonlinear phase noise due to the interaction of amplified spontaneous emission with fiber nonlinearities, and the photodetector noises. The bit error rate expression for the proposed model is derived based on error vector magnitude estimation. The performance analysis of the proposed model is presented and compared for dispersion compensated and uncompensated backbone/backhaul links. The results suggest that OFDM would perform better for uncompensated links than the compensated links due to the negligible FWM effects and there is a need for flexible compensation. The proposed model can be employed in cognitive optical networks for accurate assessment of fiber-related impairments.

  11. A Comprehensive Study of Three Delay Compensation Algorithms for Flight Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Kelly, Lon C.; Wolters, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes a comprehensive study of three predictors used for compensating the transport delay in a flight simulator; The McFarland, Adaptive and State Space Predictors. The paper presents proof that the stochastic approximation algorithm can achieve the best compensation among all four adaptive predictors, and intensively investigates the relationship between the state space predictor s compensation quality and its reference model. Piloted simulation tests show that the adaptive predictor and state space predictor can achieve better compensation of transport delay than the McFarland predictor.

  12. Error-Compensated Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Stacy, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed reflecting telescope includes large, low-precision primary mirror stage and small, precise correcting mirror. Correcting mirror machined under computer control to compensate for error in primary mirror. Correcting mirror machined by diamond cutting tool. Computer analyzes interferometric measurements of primary mirror to determine shape of surface of correcting mirror needed to compensate for errors in wave front reflected from primary mirror and commands position and movement of cutting tool accordingly.

  13. Evaluating the Photoprotective Effects of Ochre on Human Skin by In Vivo SPF Assessment: Implications for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin, Riaan F.; Dayet, Laure; Queffelec, Alain; Summers, Beverley; Lategan, Marlize; d’Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological indicators of cognitively modern behaviour become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age (MSA). Although the exploitation of ochre is viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour, the uses to which ochre and ochre-based mixtures were put remain ambiguous. Here we present the results of an experimental study exploring the efficacy of ochre as a topical photoprotective compound. This is achieved through the in vivo calculation of the sun protection factor (SPF) values of ochre samples obtained from Ovahimba women (Kunene Region, Northern Namibia) and the Palaeozoic Bokkeveld Group deposits of the Cape Supergroup (Western Cape Province, South Africa). We employ visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and granulometric analyses to characterise ochre samples. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the harmful effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is confirmed and the mechanisms implicated in the efficacy of ochre as a sunscreen identified. It is posited that the habitual application of ochre may have represented a crucial innovation for MSA humans by limiting the adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure. This may have facilitated the colonisation of geographic regions largely unfavourable to the constitutive skin colour of newly arriving populations. PMID:26353012

  14. Evaluating the Photoprotective Effects of Ochre on Human Skin by In Vivo SPF Assessment: Implications for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Riaan F; Dayet, Laure; Queffelec, Alain; Summers, Beverley; Lategan, Marlize; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological indicators of cognitively modern behaviour become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age (MSA). Although the exploitation of ochre is viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour, the uses to which ochre and ochre-based mixtures were put remain ambiguous. Here we present the results of an experimental study exploring the efficacy of ochre as a topical photoprotective compound. This is achieved through the in vivo calculation of the sun protection factor (SPF) values of ochre samples obtained from Ovahimba women (Kunene Region, Northern Namibia) and the Palaeozoic Bokkeveld Group deposits of the Cape Supergroup (Western Cape Province, South Africa). We employ visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and granulometric analyses to characterise ochre samples. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the harmful effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is confirmed and the mechanisms implicated in the efficacy of ochre as a sunscreen identified. It is posited that the habitual application of ochre may have represented a crucial innovation for MSA humans by limiting the adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure. This may have facilitated the colonisation of geographic regions largely unfavourable to the constitutive skin colour of newly arriving populations. PMID:26353012

  15. Adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jr., Robert L. (Inventor); Vipperman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cole, Daniel G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm implemented in digital or analog form is used in conjunction with a voltage controlled amplifier to compensate for the feedthrough capacitance of piezoelectric sensoriactuator. The mechanical response of the piezoelectric sensoriactuator is resolved from the electrical response by adaptively altering the gain imposed on the electrical circuit used for compensation. For wideband, stochastic input disturbances, the feedthrough capacitance of the sensoriactuator can be identified on-line, providing a means of implementing direct-rate-feedback control in analog hardware. The device is capable of on-line system health monitoring since a quasi-stable dynamic capacitance is indicative of sustained health of the piezoelectric element.

  16. Analysis and modeling of thermal-blooming compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    1990-05-01

    The present evaluation of recent progress in the analysis and computer modeling of adaptive optics hardware applicable to compensation for thermal blooming gives attention to an analytical theory of phase-compensation instability (PCI) that incorporates the actuator geometry of real deformable mirrors, as well as to novel algorithms for computer simulation of adaptive optics hardware. An analytical formalism is presented which facilitates the quantitative analysis of the effects of the adaptive-optics control system on PCI, and leads to both a universality theorem for PCI growth rates and the realization that wind exerts a greater influence on PCI growth rates than previously suspected. The analysis and algorithms are illustrated by the results of the time-dependent adaptively-compensated laser propagation code for thermal blooming, MOLLY, which has been optimized for the Cray-2 supercomputer.

  17. An unconventional adaptation of a classical Gaussian plume dispersion scheme for the fast assessment of external irradiation from a radioactive cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecha, Petr; Pechova, Emilie

    2014-06-01

    This article focuses on derivation of an effective algorithm for the fast estimation of cloudshine doses/dose rates induced by a large mixture of radionuclides discharged into the atmosphere. A certain special modification of the classical Gaussian plume approach is proposed for approximation of the near-field dispersion problem. Specifically, the accidental radioactivity release is subdivided into consecutive one-hour Gaussian segments, each driven by a short-term meteorological forecast for the respective hours. Determination of the physical quantity of photon fluence rate from an ambient cloud irradiation is coupled to a special decomposition of the Gaussian plume shape into the equivalent virtual elliptic disks. It facilitates solution of the formerly used time-consuming 3-D integration and provides advantages with regard to acceleration of the computational process on a local scale. An optimal choice of integration limit is adopted on the basis of the mean free path of γ-photons in the air. An efficient approach is introduced for treatment of a wide range of energetic spectrum of the emitted photons when the usual multi-nuclide approach is replaced by a new multi-group scheme. The algorithm is capable of generating the radiological responses in a large net of spatial nodes. It predetermines the proposed procedure such as a proper tool for online data assimilation analysis in the near-field areas. A specific technique for numerical integration is verified on the basis of comparison with a partial analytical solution. Convergence of the finite cloud approximation to the tabulated semi-infinite cloud values for dose conversion factors was validated.

  18. Thermotolerance adaptation to human-modified habitats occurs in the native range of the invasive ant Wasmannia auropunctata before long-distance dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Foucaud, Julien; Rey, Olivier; Robert, Stéphanie; Crespin, Laurent; Orivel, Jérôme; Facon, Benoit; Loiseau, Anne; Jourdan, Hervé; Kenne, Martin; Masse, Paul Serge Mbenoun; Tindo, Maurice; Vonshak, Merav; Estoup, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Key evolutionary events associated with invasion success are traditionally thought to occur in the introduced, rather than the native range of species. In the invasive ant Wasmannia auropunctata, however, a shift in reproductive system has been demonstrated within the native range, from the sexual non-dominant populations of natural habitats to the clonal dominant populations of human-modified habitats. Because abiotic conditions of human- modified habitats are hotter and dryer, we performed lab experiments on workers from a set of native and introduced populations, to investigate whether these ecological and genetic transitions were accompanied by a change in thermotolerance and whether such changes occurred before establishment in the introduced range. Thermotolerance levels were higher in native populations from human-modified habitats than in native populations from natural habitats, but were similar in native and introduced populations from human-modified habitats. Differences in thermotolerance could not be accounted for by differences in body size. A scenario based on local adaptation in the native range before introduction in remote areas represents the most parsimonious hypothesis to account for the observed phenotypic pattern. These findings highlight the importance of human land use in explaining major contemporary evolutionary changes. PMID:23789036

  19. Intra-channel nonlinearity compensation for PM-16 QAM traffic co-propagating with 28 Gbaud m-ary QAM neighbours.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Danish; Sygletos, Stylianos; Ellis, Andrew D

    2013-02-25

    We quantify the benefits of intra-channel nonlinear compensation in meshed optical networks, in view of network configuration, fibre design aspect, and dispersion management. We report that for a WDM optical transport network employing flexible 28Gbaud PM-mQAM transponders with no in-line dispersion compensation, intra-channel nonlinear compensation, for PM-16QAM through traffic, offers significant improvements of up to 4dB in nonlinear tolerance (Q-factor) irrespective of the co-propagating modulation format, and that this benefit is further enhanced (1.5dB) by increasing local link dispersion. For dispersion managed links, we further report that advantages of intra-channel nonlinear compensation increase with in-line dispersion compensation ratio, with 1.5dB improvements after 95% in-line dispersion compensation, compared to uncompensated transmission. PMID:23481951

  20. Workers' Compensation and Teacher Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the Workers' Compensation system and teacher stress to determine if a burned-out teacher should be eligible for Workers' Compensation benefits. Concludes that although most states do not allow Workers' Compensation benefits to burned-out teachers, compensation should be granted because the injuries are real and work-related. (Contains 48…

  1. A Pulsed Power Supply with Sag Compensation using Controlled Gradational Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamada, Masaki; Tashiro, Shojirou; Iwata, Akihiko

    A pulsed power supply with sag compensation using controlled gradational voltage to increase the flatness of output waveforms has been developed.The sag compensation circuit consists of compensation units connected in series. Each compensation unit consists of capacitances, diodes, and semiconductor switches. The capacitances of each unit are charged with different voltages by 2n (V0, 2V0, 4V0, ···). The compensation voltages, which has 2n-1 steps, is generated by switching the semiconductor switches of each unit in a binary sequence. Using this method, compensation voltage waveforms up to 6.2kV with 31 steps can be obtained with 5 compensation units. The sag compensation circuit has been adapted to a direct switch type pulsed power supply, which generates 7kV pulsed voltage with a pulse width of 700μs, thus realizing sag compensation.

  2. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  3. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  4. Backlash compensator mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Chrislock, Jerry L.

    1979-01-01

    Mechanism which compensates for backlash error in a lead screw position indicator by decoupling the indicator shaft from the lead screw when reversing rotation. The position indicator then displays correct information regardless of the direction of rotation of the lead screw.

  5. Teacher Compensation and Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    Examines changes in the conceptualization of schooling over time from an organizational perspective. Explores how compensation systems might be better designed to match alternative organizational designs, considering scientific management, effective schools, content-driven schooling, and high standards/high involvement schools as organizational…

  6. The Compensation Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richwine, Jason; Biggs, Andrew; Mishel, Lawrence; Roy, Joydeep

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, as cash-strapped states and school districts have faced tough budget decisions, spending on teacher compensation has come under the microscope. The underlying question is whether, when you take everything into account, today's teachers are fairly paid, underpaid, or overpaid. In this forum, two pairs of respected…

  7. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  8. Absolute Bragg wavelength and dispersion determination in dispersive incoherent OFDR interrogators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J.; Torregrosa, G.; Hervás, J.; Fernández-Pousa, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on an incoherent OFDR interrogator of FBG arrays based on the concept of dispersive wavelength to time delay mapping. The system is specifically designed to show stability to environmental thermal variations by the incorporation of a composite dispersive delay and weak broadband reflectors for delay and dispersion monitoring. Dispersion is imparted by the combination of a fiber coil and an athermally-packaged chirped fiber Bragg grating for dispersion compensation. Using differential measurements over a single acquisition trace, the values of Bragg wavelengths and dispersion are determined from the delays experienced by the FBGs and by additional reference wavelengths reflected in the broadband reflectors. The results show maximum deviations of 20 pm and 0.2 ps/nm with respect to OSA measurements of Bragg wavelengths and nominal dispersion values, respectively.

  9. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  10. Friction compensation strategies in large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.; Souccar, Kamal

    2010-07-01

    For large telescopes, management of axis friction presents a significant challenge. In some cases, this is avoided or minimized in the design stage by employing hydrostatic bearings. However, the main axis servo systems of many large telescopes must cope with bearing or wheel friction. This friction affects or limits servo control performance in several ways. The most obvious is the stick-slip limit cycle that is characteristic of trying to hold position with an integrating control system in the presence of friction. If it is not taken into account, friction also introduces effects into the state estimation in model-based controllers. There are several standard approaches to friction compensation. These include dithering (introducing a noise signal to the drive motors), direct Coulomb friction compensation (sending an additional torque based on the rate command), and adaptive techniques based on monitoring of the final drive velocities. In this work, we experimentally compare different friction compensation approaches on the static positioning performance of the Large Millimeter Telescope/Gran Telescopio Milimetrico (LMT). Single and double integrator systems are investigated, as well as direct Coulomb friction compensation.

  11. T1 VSAT Fade Compensation Statistical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra K.; Acosta, Roberto; Ugweje, Oke

    2000-01-01

    New satellite communication systems are steadily seeking to use higher frequency bands to accommodate the requirements for additional capacity. At these higher frequencies, propagation impairments that did not significantly affect the signal at lower frequencies begin to have considerable impact. In Ka-band. the next logical commercial frequency band to be used for satellite communication, attenuation of the signal due to rain is a primary concern. An experimental satellite built by NASA, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). launched in September 1993, is the first U.S. communication satellite operating in the Ka-band. In addition to higher carrier frequencies, a number of other new technologies, including on-board baseband processing. multiple beam antennas, and rain fade detection and compensation techniques, were designed into the ACTS. Verification experiments have been conducted since the launch to characterize the new technologies. The focus of this paper is to characterize the method used by the ACTS TI Very Small Aperture Terminal (TI VSAT) ground stations in detecting the presence of fade in the communication signal and to adaptively compensate for it by the addition of burst rate reduction and forward error correction. Measured data obtained from the ACTS program was used to validate the compensation technique. A software process was developed and demonstrated to statistically characterize the increased availability achieved by the compensation techniques in terms of the bit error rate time enhancement factor. Several improvements to the ACTS technique are discussed and possible implementations for future Ka band system are offered.

  12. Deferred Compensation Becomes More Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2006-01-01

    A key part of the compensation package for some college and university presidents is money that they do not receive in their paychecks. Formally known as deferred compensation, such payments can take many forms, including supplemental retirement pay, severance pay, or even bonuses. With large institutions leading the way, deferred compensation has…

  13. The Federal Employees' Compensation Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordlund, Willis J.

    1991-01-01

    The 1916 Federal Employees' Compensation Act is still the focal point around which the federal workers compensation program works today. The program has gone through many changes on its way to becoming a modern means of compensating workers for job-related injury, disease, and death. (Author)

  14. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  15. Ground difference compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2005-10-25

    A method of ground level compensation includes measuring a voltage of at least one signal with respect to a primary ground potential and measuring, with respect to the primary ground potential, a voltage level associated with a secondary ground potential. A difference between the voltage level associated with the secondary ground potential and an expected value is calculated. The measured voltage of the at least one signal is adjusted by an amount corresponding to the calculated difference.

  16. Unbalance vibratory displacement compensation for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Xu, Longxiang; Zhu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    As the dynamic stiffness of radial magnetic bearings is not big enough, when the rotor spins at high speed, unbalance displacement vibration phenomenon will be produced. The most effective way for reducing the displacement vibration is to enhance the radial magnetic bearing stiffness through increasing the control currents, but the suitable control currents are not easy to be provided, especially, to be provided in real time. To implement real time unbalance displacement vibration compensation, through analyzing active magnetic bearings (AMB) mathematical model, the existence of radial displacement runout is demonstrated. To restrain the runout, a new control scheme-adaptive iterative learning control (AILC) is proposed in view of rotor frequency periodic uncertainties during the startup process. The previous error signal is added into AILC learning law to enhance the convergence speed, and an impacting factor β influenced by the rotor rotating frequency is introduced as learning output coefficient to improve the rotor control effects. As a feed-forward compensation controller, AILC can provide one unknown and perfect compensatory signal to make the rotor rotate around its geometric axis through power amplifier and radial magnetic bearings. To improve AMB closed-loop control system robust stability, one kind of incomplete differential PID feedback controller is adopted. The correctness of the AILC algorithm is validated by the simulation of AMB mathematical model adding AILC compensation algorithm through MATLAB soft. And the compensation for fixed rotational frequency is implemented in the actual AMB system. The simulation and experiment results show that the compensation scheme based on AILC algorithm as feed-forward compensation and PID algorithm as close-loop control can realize AMB system displacement minimum compensation at one fixed frequency, and improve the stability of the control system. The proposed research provides a new adaptive iterative learning

  17. Rote of adaptation exercises in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, M V

    1999-04-01

    Adaptation, habitution and compensation are the mechanisms involved in rehabilitation of vertigo patients. In Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT), patients are advised to perform a series of maneuvers involving head, eye and body movements which stimulate the in-built adaptive mechanisms. Cawthorne and Cooksey were the first to describe adaptation exercises, which are further modified. Norre has designed VRT test battery of specific exercises. Drug treatment used along with VRT should not interfere with the compensation mechanism. Anti-vertigo drug Betahistine has been shown to hasten the compensation and hence is suitable for use with VRT. PMID:23119512

  18. Evolution of dispersal under a fecundity-dispersal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Weigang, Helene C; Kisdi, Éva

    2015-04-21

    Resources invested in dispersal structures as well as time and energy spent during transfer may often decrease fecundity. Here we analyse an extended version of the Hamilton-May model of dispersal evolution, where we include a fecundity-dispersal trade-off and also mortality between competition and reproduction. With adaptive dynamics and critical function analysis we investigate the evolution of dispersal strategies and ask whether adaptive diversification is possible. We exclude evolutionary branching for concave trade-offs and show that for convex trade-offs diversification is promoted in a narrow parameter range. We provide theoretical evidence that dispersal strategies can monotonically decrease with increasing survival during dispersal. Moreover, we illustrate the existence of two alternative attracting dispersal strategies. The model exhibits fold bifurcation points where slight changes in survival can lead to evolutionary catastrophes. PMID:25702937

  19. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  20. Adaptive Force Control in Compliant Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a manipulator in compliant motion while in contact with an environment having an unknown stiffness. Two classes of solutions are discussed: adaptive admittance control and adaptive compliance control. In both admittance and compliance control schemes, compensator adaptation is used to ensure a stable and uniform system performance.

  1. Deconvolution of partially compensated solar images from additional wavefront sensing.

    PubMed

    Miura, Noriaki; Oh-Ishi, Akira; Kuwamura, Susumu; Baba, Naoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A technique for restoring solar images partially compensated with adaptive optics is developed. An additional wavefront sensor is installed in an adaptive optics system to acquire residual wavefront information simultaneously to a solar image. A point spread function is derived from the wavefront information and used to deconvolve the solar image. Successful image restorations are demonstrated when the estimated point spread functions have relatively high Strehl ratios. PMID:27139647

  2. Laboratory atmospheric compensation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drutman, C.; Moran, James P.; Faria-e-Maia, Francisco; Hyman, Howard; Russell, Jeffrey A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes an in-house experiment that was performed at the Avco Research Labs/Textron to test a proprietary atmospheric phase compensation algorithm. Since the laser energies of interest were small enough that thermal blooming was not an issue, it was only necessary to simulate the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This was achieved by fabricating phase screens that mimicked Kolmogorov phase statistics. A simulated atmosphere was constructed from these phase screens and the phase at the simulated ground was measured with a digital heterodyne interferometer. The result of this effort was an initial verification of our proprietary algorithm two years before the field experiment.

  3. Issues in the digital implementation of control compensators. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, P.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques developed for the finite-precision implementation of digital filters were used, adapted, and extended for digital feedback compensators, with particular emphasis on steady state, linear-quadratic-Gaussian compensators. Topics covered include: (1) the linear-quadratic-Gaussian problem; (2) compensator structures; (3) architectural issues: serialism, parallelism, and pipelining; (4) finite wordlength effects: quantization noise, quantizing the coefficients, and limit cycles; and (5) the optimization of structures.

  4. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  5. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  6. Extrathermodynamics: Varieties of Compensation Effect.

    PubMed

    Khakhel', Oleg A; Romashko, Tamila P

    2016-03-31

    There are several types of the ΔH compensation. Along with well-known phenomenon of the ΔH - ΔS compensation, two more types of the ΔH - (ΔS + RΔ ln Ω) compensation are observed in some series of systems. The nature of these phenomena is connected with the behavior of phase volume of systems, Ω. The role of other thermodynamic parameters, which describe series in manifestation of this or that types of the ΔH compensation, is shown in light of molecular statistical mechanics. PMID:26949977

  7. Compensations during Unsteady Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-12-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady, but the mechanisms used by animals to power and control unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) are not well understood. We use behavioral, morphological, and impulsive perturbations to determine the compensations used during unsteady locomotion. At the level both of the whole-body and of joints, quasi-stiffness models are useful for describing adjustments to the functioning of legs and joints during maneuvers. However, alterations to the mechanics of legs and joints often are distinct for different phases of the step cycle or for specific joints. For example, negotiating steps involves independent changes of leg stiffness during compression and thrust phases of stance. Unsteady locomotion also involves parameters that are not part of the simplest reduced-parameter models of locomotion (e.g., the spring-loaded inverted pendulum) such as moments of the hip joint. Extensive coupling among translational and rotational parameters must be taken into account to stabilize locomotion or maneuver. For example, maneuvers with morphological perturbations (increased rotational inertial turns) involve changes to several aspects of movement, including the initial conditions of rotation and ground-reaction forces. Coupled changes to several parameters may be employed to control maneuvers on a trial-by-trial basis. Compensating for increased rotational inertia of the body during turns is facilitated by the opposing effects of several mechanical and behavioral parameters. However, the specific rules used by animals to control translation and rotation of the body to maintain stability or maneuver have not been fully characterized. We initiated direct-perturbation experiments to investigate the strategies used by humans to maintain stability following center-of-mass (COM) perturbations. When walking, humans showed more resistance to medio-lateral perturbations (lower COM displacement). However, when running, humans

  8. Summing pressure compensation control

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, H.A.

    1988-04-26

    This patent describes a summing pressure compensator control for hydraulic loads with at least one of the hydraulic loads being a variable displacement motor having servo means for controlling the displacement thereof, first hydraulic means responsive to the supply of fluid to the variable displacement motor to provide a first pressure signal, second hydraulic means responsive to the supply of fluid to a second hydraulic load to provide a second pressure signal, summing means for receiving the first and second pressure signals and providing a control signal proportional to the sum of the first and second pressure signals, the control signal being applied to the servo means to increase the displacement of the variable displacement motor.

  9. Adaptive optics revisited.

    PubMed

    Babcock, H W

    1990-07-20

    From the earliest days and nights of telescopic astronomy, atmospheric turbulence has been a serious detriment to optical performance. The new technology of adaptive optics can overcome this problem by compensating for the wavefront distortion that results from turbulence. The result will be large gains in resolving power and limiting magnitude, closely approaching the theoretical limit. In other words, telescopic images will be very significantly sharpened. Rapid and accelerating progress is being made today by several groups. Adaptive optics, together with the closely related technology of active optics, seems certain to be utilized in large astronomical telescopes of the future. This may entail significant changes in telescope design. PMID:17750109

  10. Processing and error compensation of diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Hui; Li, Junqi; Mai, Yuying

    2014-09-01

    Diffractive optical element (DOE) shows high diffraction efficiency and good dispersion performance, which makes the optical system becoming light-weight and more miniature. In this paper, the design, processing, testing, compensation of DOE are discussed, especially the analyzing of compensation technology which based on the analyzing the DOE measurement date from Taylor Hobson PGI 1250. In this method, the relationship between shadowing effect with diamond tool and processing accuracy are analyzed. According to verification processing on the Taylor Hobson NANOFORM 250 lathe, the results indicate that the PV reaches 0.539 micron, the surface roughness reaches 4nm, the step position error is smaller than λ /10 and the step height error is less than 0.23 micron after compensation processing one time.

  11. Optimizing optical pre-dispersion using transmit DSP for mitigation of Kerr nonlinearities in dispersion managed cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, James; Gaudette, Jamie; Mehta, Priyanth

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of digital signal processing (DSP) in optical transmitters and receivers, the ability to finely tune the ratio of pre and post dispersion compensation can be exploited to best mitigate the nonlinear penalties caused by the Kerr effect. A portion of the nonlinear penalty in optical communication channels has been explained by an increase in peak to average power ratio (PAPR) inherent in highly dispersed signals. The standard approach for minimizing these impairments applies 50% pre dispersion compensation and 50% post dispersion compensation, thereby decreasing average PAPR along the length of the cable, as compared with either 100% pre or post dispersion compensation. In this paper we demonstrate that simply considering the net accumulated dispersion, and applying 50/50 pre/post dispersion is not necessarily the best way to minimize PAPR and subsequent Kerr nonlinearities. Instead, we consider the cumulative dispersion along the entire length of the cable, and, taking into account this additional information, derive an analytic formula for the minimization of PAPR. Alignment with simulation and experimental measurements is presented using a commercially available 100Gb/s dual-polarization binary phase-shift-keying (DP-BPSK) coherent modem, with transmitter and receiver DSP. Measurements are provided from two different 5000km dispersion managed Submarine test-beds, as well as a 3800km terrestrial test-bed with a mixture of SMF-28 and TWRS optical fiber. This method is shown to deviate significantly from the conventional 50/50 method described above, in dispersion managed communications systems, and more closely aligns with results obtained from simulation and data collected from laboratory test-beds.

  12. New Predictive Filters for Compensating the Transport Delay on a Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Houck, Jacob A.; Kelly, Lon C.; Wolters, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    The problems of transport delay in a flight simulator, such as its sources and effects, are reviewed. Then their effects on a pilot-in-the-loop control system are investigated with simulations. Three current prominent delay compensators the lead/lag filter, McFarland filter, and the Sobiski/Cardullo filter were analyzed and compared. This paper introduces two novel delay compensation techniques an adaptive predictor using the Kalman estimator and a state space predictive filter using a reference aerodynamic model. Applications of these two new compensators on recorded data from the NASA Langley Research Center Visual Motion Simulator show that they achieve better compensation over the current ones.

  13. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  14. 38 CFR 3.4 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compensation. 3.4 Section 3.4 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.4 Compensation. (a) Compensation. This term means a monthly payment made by...

  15. Research on the critical parameters initialization of optical PMD compensator in high bit-rate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Zhang, Haiyi; Ji, Yuefeng; Xu, Daxiong

    2004-05-01

    Based on the proposed polarization mode dispersion (PMD) compensation simulation model and statistical analysis method (Monte-Carlo), the critical parameters initialization of two typical optical domain PMD compensators, which include optical PMD method with fixed compensation differential group delay (DGD) and that with variable compensation DGD, are detailedly investigated by numerical method. In the simulation, the line PMD values are chosen as 3ps, 4ps and 5ps and run samples are set to 1000 in order to achieve statistical evaluation for PMD compensated systems, respectively. The simulation results show that for the PMD value pre-known systems, the value of the fixed DGD compensator should be set to 1.5~1.6 times of line PMD value in order to reach the optimum performance, but for the second kind of PMD compensator, the DGD range of lower limit should be 1.5~1.6 times of line PMD provided that of upper limit is set to 3 times of line PMD, if no effective ways are chosen to resolve the problem of local minimum in optimum process. Another conclusion can be drawn from the simulation is that, although the second PMD compensator holds higher PMD compensation performance, it will spend more feedback loops to look up the optimum DGD value in the real PMD compensation realization, and this will bring more requirements on adjustable DGD device, not only wider adjustable range, but rapid adjusting speed for real time PMD equalization.

  16. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    PubMed

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people. PMID:24502905

  17. Tailoring compensation effects of health-unrelated food properties.

    PubMed

    Mai, Robert; Zahn, Susann; Hoppert, Karin; Hoffmann, Stefan; Rohm, Harald

    2014-09-01

    With the steady rise of the adiposity epidemic, there are increasing calls to stimulate healthier food choices. This is difficult, however, because consumers hold the nearly universal belief that healthy foods are less tasty. To increase their attractiveness, optimizing certain health-unrelated food attributes may help compensate for the loss in taste that is caused by the reduction of fat or sugar. The overall objective of this paper is to examine the boundary conditions under which such compensation effects emerge. Using the example of cookies, we examine how compensation effects depend on (i) the consumer segment, (ii) the configuration of the food product, and (iii) the type of evaluation process. This paper empirically tests compensation effects for optimized flavor intensity. We apply a combination of adaptive conjoint analysis and sensory preference tests. Market simulations and sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the intricate interplay among the three contingency variables is far more important than the question of whether compensation effects emerge or not. The analyses uncover four distinct segments and they show that compensation effects depend on which type of health-related attribute is reduced and whether the health-unrelated attribute is improved intrinsically or extrinsically. PMID:24852221

  18. Chromatic effects of the atmosphere on astronomical adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Devaney, Nicholas; Goncharov, Alexander V; Dainty, J Christopher

    2008-03-10

    The atmosphere introduces chromatic errors that may limit the performance of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large telescopes. Various aspects of this problem have been considered in the literature over the past two decades. It is necessary to revisit this problem in order to examine the effect on currently planned systems, including very high-order AO on current 8-10 m class telescopes and on future 30-42 m extremely large telescopes. We review the literature on chromatic effects and combine an analysis of all effects in one place. We examine implications for AO and point out some effects that should be taken into account in the design of future systems. In particular we show that attention should be paid to chromatic pupil shifts, which may arise in components such as atmospheric dispersion compensators. PMID:18327278

  19. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  20. Advanced Transport Delay Compensation Algorithms: Results of Delay Measurement and Piloted Performance Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of delay measurement and piloted performance tests that were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the adaptive compensator and the state space compensator for alleviating the phase distortion of transport delay in the visual system in the VMS at the NASA Langley Research Center. Piloted simulation tests were conducted to assess the effectiveness of two novel compensators in comparison to the McFarland predictor and the baseline system with no compensation. Thirteen pilots with heterogeneous flight experience executed straight-in and offset approaches, at various delay configurations, on a flight simulator where different predictors were applied to compensate for transport delay. The glideslope and touchdown errors, power spectral density of the pilot control inputs, NASA Task Load Index, and Cooper-Harper rating of the handling qualities were employed for the analyses. The overall analyses show that the adaptive predictor results in slightly poorer compensation for short added delay (up to 48 ms) and better compensation for long added delay (up to 192 ms) than the McFarland compensator. The analyses also show that the state space predictor is fairly superior for short delay and significantly superior for long delay than the McFarland compensator.

  1. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  2. Analytical expressions for group-delay dispersion and third-order dispersion of a reflection grism-pair compressor.

    PubMed

    Su, Juan; Feng, Guoying

    2012-05-10

    We provide a detailed analytical expression of group-delay dispersion (GDD) and third-order dispersion (TOD) for a reflection grism-pair compressor without the first-order approximation of grating diffraction. The analytical expressions can be used to design a grism-pair compressor for compensating the dispersive material without ray tracing. Furthermore, the dispersion performance of the grism pair compressor, depending on compressor parameters, is comprehensively analyzed. Results are shown that we can adjust several parameters to obtain a certain GDD and TOD, such as the incidence angle of the beam, refractive index of the prism, grating constant, and the separation of the grism pair. PMID:22614499

  3. Effects of dispersal plasticity on population divergence and speciation.

    PubMed

    Arendt, J D

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is thought to have a role in driving population establishment, local adaptation and speciation. However, dispersal plasticity has been underappreciated in this literature. Plasticity in the decision to disperse is taxonomically widespread and I provide examples for insects, molluscs, polychaetes, vertebrates and flowering plants. Theoretical work is limited but indicates an interaction between dispersal distance and plasticity in the decision to disperse. When dispersal is confined to adjacent patches, dispersal plasticity may enhance local adaptation over unconditional (non-plastic) dispersal. However, when dispersal distances are greater, plasticity in dispersal decisions strongly reduces the potential for local adaptation and population divergence. Upon dispersal, settlement may be random, biased but genetically determined, or biased but plastically determined. Theory shows that biased settlement of either type increases population divergence over random settlement. One model suggests that plasticity further enhances chances of speciation. However, there are many strategies for deciding on where to settle such as a best-of-N strategy, sequential sampling with a threshold for acceptance or matching with natal habitat. To date, these strategies do not seem to have been compared within a single model. Although we are just beginning to explore evolutionary effects of dispersal plasticity, it clearly has the potential to enhance as well as inhibit population divergence. Additional work should pay particular attention to dispersal distance and the strategy used to decide on where to settle. PMID:25806544

  4. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... claimant must include an accounting, including the source and value, of all other compensation...

  5. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, T. Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-11-15

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  6. Temperature-compensating dc restorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit provides stable references restoration in addition to temperature compensation. Possible TV monitor applications include traffic and security surveillance systems, where cameras are subject to environmental extremes, as in unheated warehouses or outdoors.

  7. Economics of static VAR compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, F.L.; DeMarco, C.; Jung, T.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1992-09-01

    This project was initiated in anticipation of widened use of static VAR (volt-ampere-reactive) compensation on US bulk-power transmission systems to increase levels of secure power transfer. Project objectives were to deten-nine power system cost savings and reliability benefits resulting from such use. System operating cost and stability probabilities were compared with and without static VAR compensation, applying simulation techniques. For the particular system model studied, there was a 21.4 percent reduction in operating costs taking into account losses added by the static VAR compensator. A procedure was developed to compare instability probabilities for various loadings and static VAR compensator sizes on a power system. For the particular system model studied, the static VAR compensator provided a significant increase in stability but over a narrow range of loading. Static VAR compensation is one of a number of promising FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission System) technologies for handling the demands of increased power transfers on power systems where transmission lines cannot be built or as a short-term altemative to building additional lines.

  8. ICA-based compensation for IQ imbalance in OFDM optical fiber communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Hu, Guijun; Li, Zhaoxi; Mu, Liping; Zhang, Jingdong

    2014-01-01

    A method based on the independent component analysis (ICA) is proposed to compensate the in-phase and quadrature-phase the (IQ) imbalance in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) optical fiber communication systems. The mathematical model of IQ imbalance system has been analyzed. Then, ICA algorithm is applied in the system to combat the mirror interference introduced by IQ imbalance. This algorithm can realize the joint compensation of both transmitter and receiver IQ imbalance with the optical channel that contains noise, attenuation and chromatic dispersion. The simulation shows that the performance degradation caused by IQ imbalance can be compensated by ICA algorithm effectively.

  9. Dispersal syndromes and the use of life-histories to predict dispersal.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Virginie M; Trochet, Audrey; Blanchet, Simon; Moulherat, Sylvain; Clobert, Jean; Baguette, Michel

    2013-06-01

    Due to its impact on local adaptation, population functioning or range shifts, dispersal is considered a central process for population persistence and species evolution. However, measuring dispersal is complicated, which justifies the use of dispersal proxies. Although appealing, and despite its general relationship with dispersal, body size has however proven unsatisfactory as a dispersal proxy. Our hypothesis here is that, given the existence of dispersal syndromes, suites of life-history traits may be alternative, more appropriate proxies for dispersal. We tested this idea by using butterflies as a model system. We demonstrate that different elements of the dispersal process (i.e., individual movement rates, distances, and gene flow) are correlated with different suites of life-history traits: these various elements of dispersal form separate syndromes and must be considered real axes of a species' niche. We then showed that these syndromes allowed accurate predictions of dispersal. The use of life-history traits improved the precision of the inferences made from wing size alone by up to five times. Such trait-based predictions thus provided reliable dispersal inferences that can feed simulation models aiming at investigating the dynamics and evolution of butterfly populations, and possibly of other organisms, under environmental changes, to help their conservation. PMID:23789030

  10. Dispersal syndromes and the use of life-histories to predict dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Virginie M; Trochet, Audrey; Blanchet, Simon; Moulherat, Sylvain; Clobert, Jean; Baguette, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Due to its impact on local adaptation, population functioning or range shifts, dispersal is considered a central process for population persistence and species evolution. However, measuring dispersal is complicated, which justifies the use of dispersal proxies. Although appealing, and despite its general relationship with dispersal, body size has however proven unsatisfactory as a dispersal proxy. Our hypothesis here is that, given the existence of dispersal syndromes, suites of life-history traits may be alternative, more appropriate proxies for dispersal. We tested this idea by using butterflies as a model system. We demonstrate that different elements of the dispersal process (i.e., individual movement rates, distances, and gene flow) are correlated with different suites of life-history traits: these various elements of dispersal form separate syndromes and must be considered real axes of a species' niche. We then showed that these syndromes allowed accurate predictions of dispersal. The use of life-history traits improved the precision of the inferences made from wing size alone by up to five times. Such trait-based predictions thus provided reliable dispersal inferences that can feed simulation models aiming at investigating the dynamics and evolution of butterfly populations, and possibly of other organisms, under environmental changes, to help their conservation. PMID:23789030

  11. Compensating the Fitness Costs of Synonymous Mutations.

    PubMed

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-06-01

    Synonymous mutations do not change the sequence of the polypeptide but they may still influence fitness. We investigated in Salmonella enterica how four synonymous mutations in the rpsT gene (encoding ribosomal protein S20) reduce fitness (i.e., growth rate) and the mechanisms by which this cost can be genetically compensated. The reduced growth rates of the synonymous mutants were correlated with reduced levels of the rpsT transcript and S20 protein. In an adaptive evolution experiment, these fitness impairments could be compensated by mutations that either caused up-regulation of S20 through increased gene dosage (due to duplications), increased transcription of the rpsT gene (due to an rpoD mutation or mutations in rpsT), or increased translation from the rpsT transcript (due to rpsT mutations). We suggest that the reduced levels of S20 in the synonymous mutants result in production of a defective subpopulation of 30S subunits lacking S20 that reduce protein synthesis and bacterial growth and that the compensatory mutations restore S20 levels and the number of functional ribosomes. Our results demonstrate how specific synonymous mutations can cause substantial fitness reductions and that many different types of intra- and extragenic compensatory mutations can efficiently restore fitness. Furthermore, this study highlights that also synonymous sites can be under strong selection, which may have implications for the use of dN/dS ratios as signature for selection. PMID:26882986

  12. Compensating the Fitness Costs of Synonymous Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Synonymous mutations do not change the sequence of the polypeptide but they may still influence fitness. We investigated in Salmonella enterica how four synonymous mutations in the rpsT gene (encoding ribosomal protein S20) reduce fitness (i.e., growth rate) and the mechanisms by which this cost can be genetically compensated. The reduced growth rates of the synonymous mutants were correlated with reduced levels of the rpsT transcript and S20 protein. In an adaptive evolution experiment, these fitness impairments could be compensated by mutations that either caused up-regulation of S20 through increased gene dosage (due to duplications), increased transcription of the rpsT gene (due to an rpoD mutation or mutations in rpsT), or increased translation from the rpsT transcript (due to rpsT mutations). We suggest that the reduced levels of S20 in the synonymous mutants result in production of a defective subpopulation of 30S subunits lacking S20 that reduce protein synthesis and bacterial growth and that the compensatory mutations restore S20 levels and the number of functional ribosomes. Our results demonstrate how specific synonymous mutations can cause substantial fitness reductions and that many different types of intra- and extragenic compensatory mutations can efficiently restore fitness. Furthermore, this study highlights that also synonymous sites can be under strong selection, which may have implications for the use of dN/dS ratios as signature for selection. PMID:26882986

  13. Aeroballistic analyses for the Atmospheric Compensation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (ACE) involved illuminating a sounding rocket payload with a low power laser from the Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS), Mt. Haleakala, HI. This experiment, sponsored by DARPA and SDIO, included four launches of Terrier Malemute II rocket vehicles from the Kauai Test Facility during the period July through Dec., 1985. The purpose of ACE was to demonstrate an adaptive optics technology that allowed the efficient transfer of power from the laser to the space target. This paper discusses the rationale used in selecting the launch site and the requirements for the carrier rocket system. Each payload carried a light detector array along its longitudinal axis, and it was necessary that this array be oriented perpendicular to the line of sight from AMOS to the payload. The design requirements for the payload attitude control system to satisfy this requirement are presented. Flight test results from the four tests showing flight performance and payload pointing data are included.

  14. Self-compensation in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsur, Y.; Riess, I.

    1999-09-01

    The problem of self-compensation of charged dopants is analyzed. Special emphasis is given to dopants in binary oxides. It is shown that one can determine the degree of self-compensation from the properties of the host material and dopant concentration alone. It is further shown that for a native p-type semiconductor, donors are compensated, mostly, by native ionic defects. On the other hand, doping with acceptors allows us to increase significantly the hole concentration, i.e., self-compensation is low under high doping levels. For a native n-type semiconductor the opposite is true, namely, extrinsic acceptors are mainly compensated by native ionic defects. It is shown that the changes in concentration of all the charged defects are simply related by a single factor, the doping factor f, or its power fk where k depends solely on the defect's charge. Quantitative calculations of f and defect concentrations are presented for Cu2O, which was used as a model material. It is found that for p-type Cu2O doping with donors results in f within the range of 1-10, depending on the dopant concentration and P(O2). This means that the hole concentration decreases and the electron concentration increases at most by a factor of 10. Therefore one does not expect to obtain a changeover from p- to n-type cuprous oxide by doping, under equilibrium conditions. Most of the donors are compensated by negative ionic defects. Self-compensation in the presence of amphoteric defects and Fermi level stabilization are discussed, using the former formalism.

  15. 29 CFR 525.6 - Compensable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compensable time. 525.6 Section 525.6 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.6 Compensable time. Individuals employed subject to this part must be compensated for all hours worked. Compensable time includes not only those...

  16. 29 CFR 525.6 - Compensable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensable time. 525.6 Section 525.6 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.6 Compensable time. Individuals employed subject to this part must be compensated for all hours worked. Compensable time includes not only those...

  17. 48 CFR 752.7007 - Personnel compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personnel compensation... Personnel compensation. The following clause shall be used in all USAID cost-reimbursement contracts. Personnel Compensation (JUL 2007) (a) Direct compensation of the Contractor's personnel will be...

  18. 38 CFR 3.459 - Death compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death compensation. 3.459 Section 3.459 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.459 Death compensation. (a)...

  19. 29 CFR 525.6 - Compensable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensable time. 525.6 Section 525.6 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.6 Compensable time. Individuals employed subject to this part must be compensated for all hours worked. Compensable time includes not only those...

  20. 38 CFR 3.459 - Death compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Death compensation. 3.459 Section 3.459 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.459 Death compensation. (a)...

  1. 38 CFR 3.459 - Death compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Death compensation. 3.459 Section 3.459 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.459 Death compensation. (a)...

  2. 38 CFR 3.459 - Death compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Death compensation. 3.459 Section 3.459 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.459 Death compensation. (a)...

  3. 38 CFR 3.459 - Death compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Death compensation. 3.459 Section 3.459 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Apportionments § 3.459 Death compensation. (a)...

  4. 48 CFR 970.2270 - Unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Unemployment compensation... Unemployment compensation. (a) Each state has its own unemployment compensation system to provide payments to... unemployment compensation benefits through a payroll tax on employers. Most DOE contractors are subject to...

  5. 48 CFR 970.2270 - Unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Unemployment compensation... Unemployment compensation. (a) Each state has its own unemployment compensation system to provide payments to... unemployment compensation benefits through a payroll tax on employers. Most DOE contractors are subject to...

  6. 48 CFR 970.2270 - Unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Unemployment compensation... Unemployment compensation. (a) Each state has its own unemployment compensation system to provide payments to... unemployment compensation benefits through a payroll tax on employers. Most DOE contractors are subject to...

  7. 48 CFR 970.2270 - Unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unemployment compensation... Unemployment compensation. (a) Each state has its own unemployment compensation system to provide payments to... unemployment compensation benefits through a payroll tax on employers. Most DOE contractors are subject to...

  8. 48 CFR 970.2270 - Unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unemployment compensation... Unemployment compensation. (a) Each state has its own unemployment compensation system to provide payments to... unemployment compensation benefits through a payroll tax on employers. Most DOE contractors are subject to...

  9. 29 CFR 525.6 - Compensable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compensable time. 525.6 Section 525.6 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.6 Compensable time. Individuals employed subject to this part must be compensated for all hours worked. Compensable time includes not only those...

  10. 29 CFR 525.6 - Compensable time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compensable time. 525.6 Section 525.6 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.6 Compensable time. Individuals employed subject to this part must be compensated for all hours worked. Compensable time includes not only those...

  11. An ultra large negative dispersion regular octagonal PCF with liquid infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangmin; Li, Xinlu; Jiang, Xingfang; Tang, Bin

    2015-10-01

    For solving the problem of dispersion in fiber communication, this article designed a ultra large negative dispersion regular octagonal PCF with liquid infiltration. The effects of air-hole diameter (d), layer-to-layer spacing (Λ) and refractive index of the infiltrating liquid (nL) on dispersion have been obtained based on Finite Element Method (FEM) by using COMSOL Multiphysics. The results show that with an increase of nL, the dispersion gets blue-shifted and the negative dispersion will increase. However, with the increase of Λ, the dispersion is red-shifted and the negative dispersion will reduce. Again, with the increase of d, the dispersion is red-shifted but with an augment of negative dispersion. This paper's theoretical study shows a high negative dispersion of -13000ps/(nm·km) around 1550nm when d=1.000μm, Λ=1.500μm and nL=1.374. The Dispersion Compensating Fiber (DCF) can effectively compensate the single mode fiber G. 652, which has been widely used. One meter the DCF can compensate 650 meters G. 652.

  12. Adaptation, Compensation, and Recovery: Unraveling the Mechanisms through Genomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  13. On Appropriacy of Thanking: Dynamic Compensation and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Baiqiu

    2013-01-01

    Appropriacy is the paramount consideration of such an inherently polite speech act as thanking in its use. Traditional study of thanking focuses more on the quantitative investigation of its diverse forms and functions than on interpretation of the process in which it is used appropriately and adequately or not among English native or nonnative…

  14. Compensation, radiographic changes, and survival in applicants for asbestosis compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, W O; Musk, A W; Glancy, J J; de Klerk, N H; Yin, R; Mele, R; Carr, N G; Armstrong, B K; Hobbs, M S

    1985-01-01

    The survival of 354 claimants for compensation for pulmonary asbestosis among former workers of the Wittenoom crocidolite mine and mill in Western Australia has been examined. There were 118 deaths up to December 1982. The median time between start of work and claim for compensation was 17 years. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for deaths from all causes was 2.65 (p less than 0.0001). The SMR for pneumoconiosis was 177.2 (p less than 0.0001), bronchitis and emphysema 2.6 (p = 0.04), tuberculosis 44.6 (p less than 0.0001), respiratory cancer (including five deaths from malignant pleural mesothelioma) 6.4 (p less than 0.0001), gastrointestinal cancer 1.6 (p = 0.22), all other cancers 1.6 (p = 0.17), heart disease 1.4 (p = 0.07), and all other causes 2.18 (p = 0.004). Plain chest radiographs taken within two years of claiming compensation were found for 238 subjects and were categorised independently by two observers according to the International Labour Organisation criteria without knowledge of exposure or compensation details. Profusion of radiographic opacities, age at claiming compensation, work in the Wittenoom mill, and degree of disability awarded by the pneumoconiosis medical board were significant predictors of survival, but total estimated exposure to asbestos was not. Radiographic profusion and degree of disability were, however, predictable by total exposure. The median survival from claim for compensation was 17 years in subjects with ILO category 1 pneumoconiosis, 12 years in category 2, and three years in category 3. PMID:2990524

  15. Comparison of delay compensation methods for real-time hybrid simulation using frequency-domain evaluation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijie, Xu; Tong, Guo; Cheng, Chen

    2016-03-01

    The delay compensation method plays an essential role in maintaining the stability and achieving accurate real-time hybrid simulation results. The effectiveness of various compensation methods in different test scenarios, however, needs to be quantitatively evaluated. In this study, four compensation methods (i.e., the polynomial extrapolation, the linear acceleration extrapolation, the inverse compensation and the adaptive inverse compensation) are selected and compared experimentally using a frequency evaluation index (FEI) method. The effectiveness of the FEI method is first verified through comparison with the discrete transfer function approach for compensation methods assuming constant delay. Incomparable advantage is further demonstrated for the FEI method when applied to adaptive compensation methods, where the discrete transfer function approach is difficult to implement. Both numerical simulation and laboratory tests with predefined displacements are conducted using sinusoidal signals and random signals as inputs. Findings from numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FEI method is an efficient and effective approach to compare the performance of different compensation methods, especially for those requiring adaptation of compensation parameters.

  16. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  17. Phase Adaptation and Correction by Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiziani, Hans J.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive optical elements and systems for imaging or laser beam propagation are used for some time in particular in astronomy, where the image quality is degraded by atmospheric turbulence. In astronomical telescopes a deformable mirror is frequently used to compensate wavefront-errors due to deformations of the large mirror, vibrations as well as turbulence and hence to increase the image quality. In the last few years interesting elements like Spatial Light Modulators, SLM's, such as photorefractive crystals, liquid crystals and micro mirrors and membrane mirrors were introduced. The development of liquid crystals and micro mirrors was driven by data projectors as consumer products. They contain typically a matrix of individually addressable pixels of liquid crystals and flip mirrors respectively or more recently piston mirrors for special applications. Pixel sizes are in the order of a few microns and therefore also appropriate as active diffractive elements in digital holography or miniature masks. Although liquid crystals are mainly optimized for intensity modulation; they can be used for phase modulation. Adaptive optics is a technology for beam shaping and wavefront adaptation. The application of spatial light modulators for wavefront adaptation and correction and defect analysis as well as sensing will be discussed. Dynamic digital holograms are generated with liquid crystal devices (LCD) and used for wavefront correction as well as for beam shaping and phase manipulation, for instance. Furthermore, adaptive optics is very useful to extend the measuring range of wavefront sensors and for the wavefront adaptation in order to measure and compare the shape of high precision aspherical surfaces.

  18. Compensation for electrical converter nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Perisic, Milun; Ransom, Ray M; Kajouke, Lateef A

    2013-11-19

    Systems and methods are provided for delivering energy from an input interface to an output interface. An electrical system includes an input interface, an output interface, an energy conversion module between the input interface and the output interface, an inductive element between the input interface and the energy conversion module, and a control module. The control module determines a compensated duty cycle control value for operating the energy conversion module to produce a desired voltage at the output interface and operates the energy conversion module to deliver energy to the output interface with a duty cycle that is influenced by the compensated duty cycle control value. The compensated duty cycle control value is influenced by the current through the inductive element and accounts for voltage across the switching elements of the energy conversion module.

  19. Compensation and Recovery From Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Rodney K.

    1984-01-01

    Workers' compensation laws influence recovery from injury. They affect the “cause” of disease, access to care, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, response to treatment and residual disability. Paradoxically, financial compensation may discourage return to work, the appeal process may increase disability, an open claim may inhibit return to work and recovering patients may be unable to return to work. Physicians may help improve the prospects of returning patients to work by providing care that is medical, caring and independent. It is essential that the treatment of back pain be based on the known natural history and on the understanding that the management of acute pain differs from that of chronic pain. Increased awareness of the factors controlling return to work should motivate legislative bodies, labor and industry to alter those features of the compensation system that interfere with the return to work of injured workers. PMID:6233794

  20. Simulation of selective passive compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Spikings, C.R.; Putley, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Compulsators have attracted a great deal of interest over the last few years as a way of providing repetitive high current millisecond pulses. The compulsator stores energy in a rotational form and works on a similar principle to a conventional alternator except that its internal impedance is reduced through compensating currents allowing greater currents to be drawn. This paper presents the theory behind selective passive compensation and presents some results from the computer simulation of a railgun powered by a selective passive compulsator. These results show that compulsator can be configured to produce flat topped current pulses into a railgun load. A test compulsator with active compensation has previously been designed and built by Culham Laboratory.

  1. Network compensation for missing sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1991-01-01

    A network learning translation invariance algorithm to compute interpolation functions is presented. This algorithm with one fixed receptive field can construct a linear transformation compensating for gain changes, sensor position jitter, and sensor loss when there are enough remaining sensors to adequately sample the input images. However, when the images are undersampled and complete compensation is not possible, the algorithm need to be modified. For moderate sensor losses, the algorithm works if the transformation weight adjustment is restricted to the weights to output units affected by the loss.

  2. Polarization compensator for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Abshire, J. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An optical data communication system is provided whereby two orthogonal polarization states of a light beam carrier correspond to digital states. In such a system, automatic polarization compensation is provided by applying a dither modulating voltage to a cell exhibiting the electro-optic effect. The cell controls the relative phase of electric field components of an input light beam enabling the dither frequency component of the difference of the instantaneous powers in the two polarization states to be coherently detected. A signal derived from the coherent detection process is fed back to the cell via an integrator to form polarization bias compensating servo loop ot Type 1.

  3. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  4. System overview on electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.; Zaman, A. J.; Terry, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The system requirements and hardware implementation for electromagnetic compensation of antenna performance degradations due to thermal effects was investigated. Future commercial space communication antenna systems will utilize the 20/30 GHz frequency spectrum and support very narrow multiple beams (0.3 deg) over wide angle field of view (15-20 beamwidth). On the ground, portable and inexpensive very small aperture terminals (VSAT) for transmitting and receiving video, facsimile and data will be employed. These types of communication system puts a very stringent requirement on spacecraft antenna beam pointing stability (less than .01 deg), high gain (greater than 50 dB) and very lowside lobes (less than -25 dB). Thermal analysis performed on the advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) has shown that the reflector surfaces, the mechanical supporting structures and metallic surfaces on the spacecraft body will distort due thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The antenna performance characteristics (e.g., pointing stability, gain, side lobe, etc.) will degrade due to thermal distortion in the reflector surface and supporting structures. Specifically, antenna RF radiation analysis has shown that pointing error is the most sensitive antenna performance parameter to thermal distortions. Other antenna parameters like peak gain, cross polarization level (beam isolation), and side lobe level will also degrade with thermal distortions. In order to restore pointing stability and in general antenna performance several compensation methods were proposed. In general these compensation methods can be classified as being either of mechanical or electromagnetic type. This paper will address only the later one. In this approach an adaptive phased array antenna feed is used to compensate for the antenna performance degradation. Extensive work has been devoted to demonstrate the feasibility of adaptive feed compensation on space communication antenna systems. This

  5. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  6. Saccade Adaptation and Visual Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Souto, David; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.; Schütz, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Visual uncertainty may affect saccade adaptation in two complementary ways. First, an ideal adaptor should take into account the reliability of visual information for determining the amount of correction, predicting that increasing visual uncertainty should decrease adaptation rates. We tested this by comparing observers' direction discrimination and adaptation rates in an intra-saccadic-step paradigm. Second, clearly visible target steps may generate a slower adaptation rate since the error can be attributed to an external cause, instead of an internal change in the visuo-motor mapping that needs to be compensated. We tested this prediction by measuring saccade adaptation to different step sizes. Most remarkably, we found little correlation between estimates of visual uncertainty and adaptation rates and no slower adaptation rates with more visible step sizes. Additionally, we show that for low contrast targets backward steps are perceived as stationary after the saccade, but that adaptation rates are independent of contrast. We suggest that the saccadic system uses different position signals for adapting dysmetric saccades and for generating a trans-saccadic stable visual percept, explaining that saccade adaptation is found to be independent of visual uncertainty. PMID:27252635

  7. Antenna gain of actively compensated free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Juan C; Brown, David M; Young, David W

    2014-05-19

    Current Strehl ratio models for actively compensated free-space optical communications terminals do not accurately predict system performance under strong turbulence conditions as they are based on weak turbulence theory. For evaluation of compensated systems, we present an approach for simulating the Strehl ratio with both low-order (tip/tilt) and higher-order (adaptive optics) correction. Our simulation results are then compared to the published models and their range of turbulence validity is assessed. Finally, we propose a new Strehl ratio model and antenna gain equation that are valid for general turbulence conditions independent of the degree of compensation. PMID:24921373

  8. Prediction of the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy using computational intelligence.

    PubMed

    Dehlaghi, Vahab; Taghipour, Mostafa; Haghparast, Abbas; Roshani, Gholam Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas; Shayesteh, Sajjad Pashootan; Adineh-Vand, Ayoub; Karimi, Gholam Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are investigated to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy. In the proposed models, the input parameters are field size (S), off-axis distance, and relative dose (D/D0), and the output is the thickness of the compensator. The obtained results show that the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are useful, reliable, and cheap tools to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in intensity-modulated radiation therapy. PMID:25498836

  9. Swarm intelligence for atmospheric compensation in free space optical communication-Modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaokun; Cao, Jingtai; Zhao, Xiaohui; Liu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    A conventional adaptive optics (AO) system is widely used to compensate atmospheric turbulence in free space optical (FSO) communication systems, but wavefront measurements based on phase-conjugation principle are not desired under strong scintillation circumstances. In this study we propose a novel swarm intelligence optimization algorithm, which is called modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm (MSFL), to compensate the wavefront aberration. Simulation and experiments results show that MSFL algorithm performs well in the atmospheric compensation and it can increase the coupling efficiency in receiver terminal and significantly improve the performance of the FSO communication systems.

  10. Prediction of the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy using computational intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Dehlaghi, Vahab; Taghipour, Mostafa; Haghparast, Abbas; Roshani, Gholam Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas; Shayesteh, Sajjad Pashootan; Adineh-Vand, Ayoub; Karimi, Gholam Reza

    2015-04-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are investigated to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy. In the proposed models, the input parameters are field size (S), off-axis distance, and relative dose (D/D{sub 0}), and the output is the thickness of the compensator. The obtained results show that the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are useful, reliable, and cheap tools to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  11. New Ideas in Educational Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Eric; Kaplan, Harold

    This report suggests some possibilities open to school boards for improving compensation methods and presents some new avenues of exploration and study for boards wishing to pursue such possibilities. Subjects covered in the report include (1) the concept of accountability, (2) differentiated staffing, (3) merit pay plans, (4) performance…

  12. Can Education Compensate for Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which education can compensate for social disadvantage is a matter of political controversy, especially in the context of policies for social mobility. On the one hand, to blame poor achievement on social class or poverty was seen to dodge the professional responsibility of teachers. On the other, the strong correlation between…

  13. Concealing compensation from the IRS.

    PubMed

    Burda, D; Greene, J

    1991-01-28

    Tougher reporting requirements from the Internal Revenue Service are prompting some not-for-profit hospitals to seek ways to hide compensation arrangements from the public and the media. Critics believe those tactics could get hospitals in hot water with the law, especially now that the IRS has launched a new, aggressive auditing offensive. PMID:10108763

  14. Merit Compensation and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    The concept of merit compensation is clarified from both administrative and faculty perspectives, and the conceptual sources of the controversy surrounding "merit" are addressed. Using the lexical tradition of the verb "to merit," four distinct semantic components are identified: to earn, to deserve, to value or give preference, and to obtain…

  15. 78 FR 28441 - Executive Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... level or range of compensation. \\11\\ For example, the financial crisis of 2008 caused Congress to enact...-- Interim Final Rule with Request for Comments, 73 FR 53356 (September 16, 2008), with Correcting Amendments at 73 FR 54309 (September 19, 2008) and 73 FR 54673 (September 23, 2008), codified at 12 CFR...

  16. Clarification of Workmen's Compensation Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Allen E.

    This document attempts to answer questions resulting from the 1972 Michigan Supreme Court Ruling relative to agricultural employees under the Workmen's Compensation Act (WCA). The sections of this paper outline a history of the WCA; employers covered; definition of "regularly employ"; clarification of "thirteen weeks"; employees (minors, partners,…

  17. CFO compensation reaches record levels.

    PubMed

    2001-06-01

    HFMA's 2001 CFO compensation survey finds that CFOs of hospitals and health systems are receiving higher compensation today than ever before. The current average compensation of $127,00--15.5 percent higher than was reported in a similar survey conducted in 1999--is the highest ever recorded by HFMA. Moreover, comparison of the 2001 findings with results of previous surveys shows that the earnings gains for CFOs over the past two years are stronger than they have been at many times in recent history. Factors that were found to influence CFO compensation in 2001 are location, years of service, number of employees reporting to the CFO, supervisory responsibility at the system versus hospital level, experience, and gender. Significant findings of the survey were that the average earnings of CFOs in urban areas are nearly twice those of CFOs in rural areas and that the average difference between earnings of male and female CFOs narrowed from $45,100 in 1999 to $36,800 in 2001. PMID:11407122

  18. Management Compensation: A Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstad, Bill; And Others

    This examination of the current status of compensation for community college management and administrative personnel first summarizes the findings of a study conducted by Howard R. Bowen, which determined that, compared to business executives in comparable jobs within organizations of similar sizes, academic administrators were indeed underpaid.…

  19. Synchrony - Cyberknife Respiratory Compensation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ozhasoglu, Cihat Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Burton, Steven; Komanduri, Krishna; Yue, Ning J.; Huq, Saiful M.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of organs in the thorax and abdomen have shown that these organs can move as much as 40 mm due to respiratory motion. Without compensation for this motion during the course of external beam radiation therapy, the dose coverage to target may be compromised. On the other hand, if compensation of this motion is by expansion of the margin around the target, a significant volume of normal tissue may be unnecessarily irradiated. In hypofractionated regimens, the issue of respiratory compensation becomes an important factor and is critical in single-fraction extracranial radiosurgery applications. CyberKnife is an image-guided radiosurgery system that consists of a 6-MV LINAC mounted to a robotic arm coupled through a control loop to a digital diagnostic x-ray imaging system. The robotic arm can point the beam anywhere in space with 6 degrees of freedom, without being constrained to a conventional isocenter. The CyberKnife has been recently upgraded with a real-time respiratory tracking and compensation system called Synchrony. Using external markers in conjunction with diagnostic x-ray images, Synchrony helps guide the robotic arm to move the radiation beam in real time such that the beam always remains aligned with the target. With the aid of Synchrony, the tumor motion can be tracked in three-dimensional space, and the motion-induced dosimetric change to target can be minimized with a limited margin. The working principles, advantages, limitations, and our clinical experience with this new technology will be discussed.

  20. Compensation for oil pollution damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matugina, E. G.; Glyzina, T. S.; Kolbysheva, Yu V.; Klyuchnikov, A. S.; Vusovich, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    The commitment of national industries to traditional energy sources, as well as constantly growing energy demand combined with adverse environmental impact of petroleum production and transportation urge to establish and maintain an appropriate legal and administrative framework for oil pollution damage compensation. The article considers management strategies for petroleum companies that embrace not only production benefits but also environmental issues.

  1. Strategic Design of Teacher Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis

    2012-01-01

    Spurred by the national focus on revitalizing the teacher evaluation and support/development process, as well as the current economic downturn, many school districts are reviewing how teachers are compensated. While a few courageous districts have completely upended current structures, most districts are undertaking changes that leave the most…

  2. Annual Pay and Compensation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocino, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents results of the 2002 Human Resource Management Compensation Survey (n=1,084) indicating that salaries for training and development professionals increased only 1.8 percent over 2001. Tables depict salaries at various levels, by geographic area, and by industry. (JOW)

  3. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Concepts Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soni, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the summary of work accomplished during summer of 2000 by Mr. Chad Hammons, undergraduate senior student, Mississippi State University/ERC in support of NASA/MSFC mission pertinent to Altitude compensating nozzle concepts evaluations. In particular, the development of automatic grid generator applicable in conducting sensitivity analysis involving Aerospike engine is described.

  4. How to Treat Compensated Absences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Raymond J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses compensated absences such as future vacation, sick leave, and other absences that must be recognized for accounting and financial reporting purposes. Explains Governmental Accounting Standards Board distinctions between governmental and proprietary fund models. School districts and municipalities must now account for compensated…

  5. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  6. Electronic post-compensation of WDM transmission impairments using coherent detection and digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Chen, Xin; Goldfarb, Gilad; Mateo, Eduardo; Kim, Inwoong; Yaman, Fatih; Li, Guifang

    2008-01-21

    A universal post-compensation scheme for fiber impairments in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) systems is proposed based on coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Transmission of 10 x 10 Gbit/s binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals at a channel spacing of 20 GHz over 800 km dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) has been demonstrated numerically. PMID:18542162

  7. Compensation of the volume charge of ions in a time-of-flight mass analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimov, A. M.; Nuruyev, K. Z.; Gurbanov, K. B.; Nurubeyli, Z. K.; Nurubeyli, T. K.

    2007-11-01

    A method of forced compensation of the volume charge of ions leading to considerable deterioration of the dispersion characteristics of a time-of-flight mass analyzer with a sector electrostatic field is described. It is shown that recompensation of the voluem charge also deteriorates the resolution of the instrument.

  8. Optimization of TE-TM mode converters on X-cut, Y-propagation LiNbO3 used for PMD compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandare, S.; Noé, R.

    2001-10-01

    Two-phase and three-phase TE-TM mode converters for integrated optic polarization mode dispersion compensation are compared, and the latter are found to have a slightly better electro-optic efficiency. If a small differential group delay is needed, compensation performance can be drastically improved by a waveguide tilt in the YZ plane.

  9. Gone with the wind and the stream: Dispersal in the invasive species Ailanthus altissima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchuelo, Greg; Catalán, Pablo; Delgado, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Dispersal is a key process in plant invasions and is strongly related to diaspore morphology. Often, dispersal comprises more than one step, and morphologies adapted to a primary dispersal mechanism can aid or detract from a secondary one. The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between primary wind dispersal and secondary water dispersal in Ailanthus altissima, an invasive tree species. Wind and water dispersal potential and their association with the morphological characteristics of samaras were assessed under controlled conditions to ensure the repeatability of the measurements. We found a direct positive relationship between primary wind and secondary water dispersal in A. altissima. The main morphological characteristics of the samara that affected the success of the two types of dispersal were side perimeter and mass. However, a possibility of dispersal specialisation exists, as one morphological characteristic (samara width) affects wind dispersal negatively but water dispersal positively, and dispersal potential and samara morphology have been shown to differ across individuals.

  10. All-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed dissipative soliton nanotube mode-locked laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Popa, D. Wittwer, V. J.; Milana, S.; Hasan, T.; Jiang, Z.; Ferrari, A. C.; Ilday, F. Ö.

    2015-12-14

    We report dissipative soliton generation from an Yb-doped all-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed nanotube mode-locked laser. A simple all-fiber ring cavity exploits a photonic crystal fiber for both nonlinearity enhancement and dispersion compensation. The laser generates stable dissipative solitons with large linear chirp in the net normal dispersion regime. Pulses that are 8.7 ps long are externally compressed to 118 fs, outperforming current nanotube-based Yb-doped fiber laser designs.

  11. 38 CFR 3.809 - Specially adapted housing under 38 U.S.C. 2101(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specially adapted housing under 38 U.S.C. 2101(a). 3.809 Section 3.809 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.809 Specially adapted...

  12. 38 CFR 3.809 - Specially adapted housing under 38 U.S.C. 2101(a).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specially adapted housing under 38 U.S.C. 2101(a). 3.809 Section 3.809 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.809 Specially adapted...

  13. The discrete-time compensated Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. H.; Athans, M.

    1978-01-01

    A suboptimal dynamic compensator to be used in conjunction with the ordinary discrete time Kalman filter was derived. The resultant compensated Kalman Filter has the property that steady state bias estimation errors, resulting from modelling errors, were eliminated.

  14. Temperature compensation for miniaturized magnetic sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Temperature compensation for a magnetic sector used in mass spectrometry. A high temperature dependant magnetic sector is used. This magnetic sector is compensated by a magnetic shunt that has opposite temperature characteristics to those of the magnet.

  15. 75 FR 22679 - Sound Incentive Compensation Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... incentive compensation practices in the banking industry by providing a common prudential foundation for incentive compensation arrangements across banking organizations and promoting the overall movement of the industry towards better practices. Supervisory action could play a critical role in addressing...

  16. 75 FR 76079 - Sound Incentive Compensation Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... incentive compensation practices in the banking industry by providing a common prudential foundation for incentive compensation arrangements across banking organizations and promoting the overall movement of the industry towards better practices. Supervisory action could play a critical role in addressing...

  17. 75 FR 53023 - Sound Incentive Compensation Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... incentive compensation practices in the banking industry by providing a common prudential foundation for incentive compensation arrangements across banking organizations and promoting the overall movement of the industry towards better practices. Supervisory action could play a critical role in addressing...

  18. Model reference adaptive systems some examples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landau, I. D.; Sinner, E.; Courtiol, B.

    1972-01-01

    A direct design method is derived for several single-input single-output model reference adaptive systems (M.R.A.S.). The approach used helps to clarify the various steps involved in a design, which utilizes the hyperstability concept. An example of a multiinput, multioutput M.R.A.S. is also discussed. Attention is given to the problem of a series compensator. It is pointed out that a series compensator which contains derivative terms must generally be introduced in the adaptation mechanism in order to assure asymptotic hyperstability. Results obtained by the simulation of a M.R.A.S. on an analog computer are also presented.

  19. Comparison of swarm intelligence algorithms in atmospheric compensation for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaokun; Cao, Jingtai; Liu, Wei; Feng, Jianfeng; Zhao, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    We use conventional adaptive optical system to compensate atmospheric turbulence in free space optical (FSO) communication system under strong scintillation circumstances, undesired wave-front measurements based on Shark-Hartman sensor (SH). Since wavefront sensor-less adaptive optics is a feasible option, we propose several swarm intelligence algorithms to compensate the wavefront aberration from atmospheric interference in FSO and mainly discuss the algorithm principle, basic flows, and simulation result. The numerical simulation experiment and result analysis show that compared with SPGD algorithm, the proposed algorithms can effectively restrain wavefront aberration, and improve convergence rate of the algorithms and the coupling efficiency of receiver in large extent.

  20. Compensation of dogleg effect in Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaobiao Huang; Sho Ohnuma

    2003-10-06

    The edge focusing of dogleg magnets in Fermilab Booster has been causing severe distortion to the horizontal linear optics. The doglegs are vertical rectangular bends, therefore the vertical edge focusing is canceled by body focusing and the overall effect is focusing in the horizontal plane. The maximum horizontal beta function is changed from 33.7m to 46.9m and maximum dispersion from 3.19m to 6.14m. Beam size increases accordingly. This is believed to be one of the major reasons of beam loss. In this technote we demonstrate that this effect can be effectively corrected with Booster's quadrupole correctors in short straight sections (QS). There are 24 QS correctors which can alter horizontal linear optics with negligible perturbation to the vertical plane. The currents of correctors are determined by harmonic compensation, i.e., cancellation of dogleg's harmonics that are responsible for the distortion with that of QS correctors. By considering a few leading harmonics, the ideal lattice can be partly restored. For the current dogleg layout, maximum {beta}{sub x} is reduced to 40.6m and maximum D{sub x} is reduced to 4.19m. This scheme can be useful after the dogleg in section No.3 is repositioned. In this case it can bring {beta}{sub x} from 40.9m down to 37.7m, D{sub x} from 4.57m to 4.01m.

  1. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission shall not compensate advisory...

  2. 12 CFR 7.2011 - Compensation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation plans. 7.2011 Section 7.2011 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2011 Compensation plans. Consistent with safe and sound banking practices and the compensation provisions of 12 CFR part 30,...

  3. 12 CFR 620.31 - Compensation committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Association Audit and Compensation Committees § 620.31 Compensation committees. Each Farm Credit bank and association must establish and maintain a compensation committee by adopting a written charter describing the committee's composition, authorities, and responsibilities in accordance with this section. All...

  4. Incentives, School Organization and Teacher Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    In order for teacher compensation to serve as an incentive that reinforces broader organizational goals, the norms of the compensation structure must be aligned with the norms of the school organization. The first section of this paper presents a brief overview of changes in teacher compensation from 1820 to 1950. It describes how such changes…

  5. 14 CFR 158.53 - Collection compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collection compensation. 158.53 Section 158...) AIRPORTS PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Collection, Handling, and Remittance of PFC's § 158.53 Collection compensation. (a) As compensation for collecting, handling, and remitting the PFC revenue,...

  6. 14 CFR 158.53 - Collection compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collection compensation. 158.53 Section 158...) AIRPORTS PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Collection, Handling, and Remittance of PFC's § 158.53 Collection compensation. (a) As compensation for collecting, handling, and remitting the PFC revenue,...

  7. 14 CFR 158.53 - Collection compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection compensation. 158.53 Section 158...) AIRPORTS PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Collection, Handling, and Remittance of PFC's § 158.53 Collection compensation. (a) As compensation for collecting, handling, and remitting the PFC revenue,...

  8. 14 CFR 158.53 - Collection compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collection compensation. 158.53 Section 158...) AIRPORTS PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Collection, Handling, and Remittance of PFC's § 158.53 Collection compensation. (a) As compensation for collecting, handling, and remitting the PFC revenue,...

  9. 14 CFR 158.53 - Collection compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collection compensation. 158.53 Section 158...) AIRPORTS PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Collection, Handling, and Remittance of PFC's § 158.53 Collection compensation. (a) As compensation for collecting, handling, and remitting the PFC revenue,...

  10. 16 CFR 1105.11 - Compensable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensable costs. 1105.11 Section 1105.11... TO COSTS OF PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY STANDARDS § 1105.11 Compensable costs. The Commission may compensate participants for any or all of the following costs: (a)...

  11. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation,...

  12. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation,...

  13. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation,...

  14. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation,...

  15. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis and compensation in Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Westerfield, B.T.

    1993-04-01

    Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis has been a compensable disease since the 1960s. In 1987 the Kentucky Workers' Compensation Law was changed to provide reduced benefits for coal miners with radiographic evidence of Black Lung Disease, but little or no respiratory impairment. This paper reports a typical case of Black Lung today and discusses the status of workers' compensation for this disease in Kentucky.

  16. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  17. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  18. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  19. Focus compensation techniques for reconnaissance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeough, J.; Glavich, T.

    1979-01-01

    To maintain optimum resolution under varying environmental conditions, a focusing compensation system has been developed. The system is capable of detecting not only changes in pressure (altitude) and the general lens temperature but also the radial thermal gradients in the lens. Theoretical considerations show that the lens is most affected by these factors. The developed system uses a laser measurement system with environmental sensors to generate a focus correction for environment and range changes.

  20. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  1. 38 CFR 21.3023 - Nonduplication; pension, compensation, and dependency and indemnity compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nonduplication; pension, compensation, and dependency and indemnity compensation. 21.3023 Section 21.3023 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Nonduplication; pension, compensation, and dependency and indemnity compensation. (a) Child; age 18. A child...

  2. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal

    2011-05-01

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  3. Robust adaptive control for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahveci, Nazli E.

    The objective of meeting higher endurance requirements remains a challenging task for any type and size of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). According to recent research studies significant energy savings can be realized through utilization of thermal currents. The navigation strategies followed across thermal regions, however, are based on rather intuitive assessments of remote pilots and lack any systematic path planning approaches. Various methods to enhance the autonomy of UAVs in soaring applications are investigated while seeking guarantees for flight performance improvements. The dynamics of the aircraft, small UAVs in particular, are affected by the environmental conditions, whereas unmodeled dynamics possibly become significant during aggressive flight maneuvers. Besides, the demanded control inputs might have a magnitude range beyond the limits dictated by the control surface actuators. The consequences of ignoring these issues can be catastrophic. Supporting this claim NASA Dryden Flight Research Center reports considerable performance degradation and even loss of stability in autonomous soaring flight tests with the subsequent risk of an aircraft crash. The existing control schemes are concluded to suffer from limited performance. Considering the aircraft dynamics and the thermal characteristics we define a vehicle-specific trajectory optimization problem to achieve increased cross-country speed and extended range of flight. In an environment with geographically dispersed set of thermals of possibly limited lifespan, we identify the similarities to the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) and provide both exact and approximate guidance algorithms for the navigation of automated UAVs. An additional stochastic approach is used to quantify the performance losses due to incorrect thermal data while dealing with random gust disturbances and onboard sensor measurement inaccuracies. One of the main contributions of this research is a novel adaptive control design with

  4. Nonlinearity correction and dispersion analysis in FMCW laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hao; Liu, Bingguo; Liu, Guodong; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Yu, Yahui; Gan, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave laser radar is one of the most important ways to measure the large-size targets , combining the advantages of laser with conventional FMCW radar. Dispersion compensation and non-linear calibration are two key aspects in FMCW laser radar measurement. The paper studies the method of frequency-sampling to correct the Nonlinearity and analyzes the importance of dispersion compensation. We set up experimental verification platform, choose 1550nm band continuously tunable external cavity infrared laser as the light source, use all-fiber optical device structures, choose balanced detectors as photoelectric conversion, and finally acquire data with high speed PCI-E data acquisition card, write a measurement software with Labview. We measured the gage block 1 meter away. The experiment results show that the frequency sampling method correct the Nonlinearity well and there is a significant impact on the accuracy because of the fiber dispersion, dispersion must be compensated to obtain high accuracy. The experiment lays the foundation for further research on FMCW Laser radar.

  5. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. I.; Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Delayed auditory feedback disrupts the production of speech, causing an increase in speech duration as well as many articulatory errors. To determine whether prolonged exposure to delayed auditory feedback (DAF) leads to adaptive compensations in speech production, 10 subjects were exposed in separate experimental sessions to both incremental and constant-delay exposure conditions. Significant adaptation occurred for syntactically structured stimuli in the form of increased speaking rates. After DAF was removed, aftereffects were apparent for all stimulus types in terms of increased speech rates. A carry-over effect from the first to the second experimental session was evident as long as 29 days after the first session. The use of strategies to overcome DAF and the differences between adaptation to DAF and adaptation to visual rearrangement are discussed.

  6. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  7. Study on Reactive Automatic Compensation System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Qingyang, Liang; Peiqing, Luo; Chenfei, Zhang

    At present, low-voltage side of transformer is public in urban distribution network, as inductive load of household appliances is increasing, the power factor decreased, this lead to a large loss of public transformer low voltage side, the supply voltage indicators can not meet user's requirements. Therefore, the design of reactive power compensation system has become another popular research. This paper introduces the principle of reactive power compensation, analyzes key technologies of reactive power compensation, design an overall program of reactive power automatic compensation system to conquer various deficiencies of reactive power automatic compensation equipment.

  8. 78 FR 68867 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, (OWCP) administers...

  9. Quantification of microcirculatory parameters by joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) data.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Knutsson, Linda; Wirestam, Ronnie; Nilsson, Markus; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel; Lasič, Samo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy and precision of perfusion fraction and blood velocity dispersion estimates in intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging, using joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated motion-encoded MRI data. A double diffusion encoding sequence capable of switching between flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated encoding modes was implemented. In vivo brain data were collected in eight healthy volunteers and processed using the joint analysis. Simulations were used to compare the performance of the proposed analysis method with conventional IVIM analysis. With flow compensation, strong rephasing was observed for the in vivo data, approximately cancelling the IVIM effect. The joint analysis yielded physiologically reasonable perfusion fraction maps. Estimated perfusion fractions were 2.43 ± 0.81% in gray matter, 1.81 ± 0.90% in deep gray matter, and 1.64 ± 0.72% in white matter (mean ± SD, n = 8). Simulations showed improved accuracy and precision when using joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated data, compared with conventional IVIM analysis. Double diffusion encoding with flow compensation was feasible for in vivo imaging of the perfusion fraction in the brain. The strong rephasing implied that blood flowing through the cerebral microvascular system was closer to the ballistic limit than the diffusive limit. © 2016 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26952166

  10. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  11. Insular avian adaptations on two Neotropical continental islands

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Natalie A.; Steadman, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Most studies of avian insular adaptations have focused on oceanic islands, which may not allow characters that are insular adaptations to be teased apart from those that benefit dispersal and colonization. Using birds on continental islands, we investigated characters that evolved in situ in response to insular environments created by late Pleistocene sea level rise. Location Trinidad and Tobago, nearby Caribbean islands and continental South America. Methods We weighed fresh flight muscles and measured museum skeletal specimens of seven species of birds common to the continental islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Results When corrected for body size, study species exhibited significantly smaller flight muscles, sterna and sternal keels on Tobago than on larger Trinidad and continental South America. Tobago populations were more ‘insular’ in their morphologies than conspecifics on Trinidad or the continent in other ways as well, including having longer bills, longer wings, longer tails and longer legs. Main conclusions We hypothesize that the longer bills enhance foraging diversity, the longer wings and tails compensate for the smaller pectoral assemblage (allowing for retention of volancy, but with a probable reduction in flight power and speed), and the longer legs expand perching ability. Each of these differences is likely to be related to the lower diversity and fewer potential predators and competitors on Tobago compared with Trinidad. These patterns of smaller flight muscles and larger bills, legs, wings and tails in island birds are not the results of selection for island dispersal and colonization, but probably arose from selection pressures acting on populations already inhabiting these islands. PMID:23066173

  12. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  14. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  15. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  16. Ant semiochemicals limit apterous aphid dispersal.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas H; Mashanova, Alla; Leather, Simon R; Cook, James M; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2007-12-22

    Some organisms can manipulate the nervous systems of others or alter their physiology in order to obtain benefit. Ants are known to limit alate aphid dispersal by physically removing wings and also through chemical manipulation of the alate developmental pathway. This results in reduced dispersal and higher local densities of aphids, which benefit ants in terms of increased honeydew and prey availability. Here, we show that the walking movement of mutualistic apterous aphids is also reduced by ant semiochemicals. Aphids walk slower and their dispersal from an unsuitable patch is hampered by ants. If aphid walking dispersal has evolved as a means of natural enemy escape, then ant chemicals may act as a signal indicating protection; hence, reduced dispersal could be adaptive for aphids. If, however, dispersal is primarily a means to reduce competition or to maintain persistent metapopulations, then manipulation by ants could be detrimental. Such manipulation strategies, common in host-parasite and predator-prey interactions, may be more common in mutualism than expected. PMID:17925280

  17. Dispersion and space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  18. Motion-adaptive compressive coded apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmany, Zachary T.; Oh, Albert; Marcia, Roummel; Willett, Rebecca

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes an adaptive compressive coded aperture imaging system for video based on motion-compensated video sparsity models. In particular, motion models based on optical flow and sparse deviations from optical flow (i.e. salient motion) can be used to (a) predict future video frames from previous compressive measurements, (b) perform reconstruction using efficient online convex programming techniques, and (c) adapt the coded aperture to yield higher reconstruction fidelity in the vicinity of this salient motion.

  19. Compensating For GPS Ephemeris Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong

    1992-01-01

    Method of computing position of user station receiving signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) of navigational satellites compensates for most of GPS ephemeris error. Present method enables user station to reduce error in its computed position substantially. User station must have access to two or more reference stations at precisely known positions several hundred kilometers apart and must be in neighborhood of reference stations. Based on fact that when GPS data used to compute baseline between reference station and user station, vector error in computed baseline is proportional ephemeris error and length of baseline.

  20. DC-Compensated Current Transformer.

    PubMed

    Ripka, Pavel; Draxler, Karel; Styblíková, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Instrument current transformers (CTs) measure AC currents. The DC component in the measured current can saturate the transformer and cause gross error. We use fluxgate detection and digital feedback compensation of the DC flux to suppress the overall error to 0.15%. This concept can be used not only for high-end CTs with a nanocrystalline core, but it also works for low-cost CTs with FeSi cores. The method described here allows simultaneous measurements of the DC current component. PMID:26805830

  1. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  2. Compensation issues tough to navigate

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-02-12

    Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald - excerpt pasted below: Most industries out there are feeling the shift to a more educated, thus more empowered consumer. The legal field is no exception, which is why it's no surprise that lawsuits are on the rise. Today's society is one in which people are more aware than ever of their rights, and often equally convinced of their entitlements in a number of areas. For business owners, employees represent a major source of potential lawsuits. And compensation is an area of particular concern given that many complaints against employers revolve around it in some way.

  3. Driver Compensation: Impairment or Improvement?

    PubMed

    Young, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Strayer et al.'s conclusion that their "cognitive distraction scale" for auditory-vocal tasks indicates "significant impairments to driving" is not supported by their data. Additional analysis demonstrates that slower brake reaction times during auditory-vocal tasks were fully compensated for by longer following distances to the lead car. Naturalistic driving data demonstrate that cellular conversation decreases crash risk, the opposite of the article's assumption. Hence, the scale's internal and external validities for indicating driving impairment are highly questionable. PMID:26534851

  4. Gravity Compensation for Improvement of Operationarity in Bilateral Teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Takayoshi; Shimono, Tomoyuki; Kubo, Ryogo; Nishi, Hiroaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    In this paper, the estimation method of only gravity and the compensation method of only the disturbance caused by gravity are proposed. The proposed method is able to estimate gravity, even when the system has the unknown posture. The proposed method is based on the concept of “environment quarrier”. Then, environment quarry is expanded to multilateral control. In this paper, two dummy robots that are the environment quarrier are implemented besides master-slave system, in order to abstract only gravity disturbance. The proposed method is adaptable, even when mass of master system differs from one of slave system. To verify the viability of the proposed method, experimental results are shown.

  5. Ecological compensation in Dutch highway planning.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, R; Bakermans, M M; De Haes, H A; Canters, K J

    2001-01-01

    The ecological compensation principle was introduced by the Dutch government in 1993. This principle is designed to enhance the input of nature conservation interests in decision-making on large-scale development projects and to counterbalance the ecological impacts of such developments when implemented. This article evaluates the application of the Dutch compensation principle in highway planning. Six current highway projects reveal consistent implementation of this principle, although provincial policies on compensation and a national method for identifying compensation measures are still under development. As the planning process has not yet been completed for all the projects, no general conclusions can be drawn on the impact of the compensation principle on highway decision-making. Nevertheless, several examples show that the principle stimulates project initiators to develop alternative routes or route sections in order to avoid or reduce ecological impacts and the need for coherent compensation measures. If the compensation principle is to be properly implemented in the context of highway planning, particular attention should be paid to the following aspects: (1) sequential assessment of overall project legitimacy and the necessity of intersecting protected areas and compensation measures. (2) the initiator's attempts to avoid and mitigate ecological impacts in developing alternative routes prior to compensation for impacts, and (3) the role of uncertain ecological impacts in identifying compensation measures, especially those concerning habitat isolation. PMID:11083910

  6. Executive compensation in the multiaffiliate corporation.

    PubMed

    Browdy, J D

    1986-06-01

    Designing compensation programs for the growing number of multiaffiliate health care corporations is a complex task. Compensation structures should be based on responsibility, not organization affiliation, to avoid the perception that corporate-level positions are always worth more than affiliate-level ones. To accomplish this, administrators must identify characteristics shared by key corporate and affiliate positions, including having direct responsibility for implementing board policies and taking actions that directly affect the organization's viability. Position titles and salary structure should reflect similar responsibility levels. When analyzing salary surveys, administrators must determine affiliates' autonomy within the corporation; institutions with direct corporate supervision may have lower compensation levels than free-standing ones. Corporate executive compensation may emphasize fringe benefits rather than base salary; differentials here should also reflect position responsibility. Incentive awards, a growing factor in executive compensation, should be based on predetermined, quantifiable objectives. Awards may vary because corporate, affiliate, and proprietary executives have different goals. The responsibility for the organization's compensation program belongs to the corporate board. It can best discharge this responsibility through an executive compensation committee. The committee's duties include evaluating the CEO, establishing a compensation philosophy, ensuring consistency in program application, and integrating compensation with long-range plans. Committee members must be objective, recognize the organization's need for executive talent, have corporate experience, and view executive compensation in "global" rather than local terms. PMID:10276817

  7. Enhancement of Electrolaryngeal Speech by Adaptive Filtering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy-Wilson, Carol Y.; Chari, Venkatesh R.; MacAuslan, Joel M.; Huang, Caroline B.; Walsh, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A study tested the quality and intelligibility, as judged by several listeners, of four users' electrolaryngeal speech, with and without filtering to compensate for perceptually objectionable acoustic characteristics. Results indicated that an adaptive filtering technique produced a noticeable improvement in the quality of the Transcutaneous…

  8. Simple adaptive tracking control for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobtsov, Alexey; Faronov, Maxim; Kolyubin, Sergey; Pyrkin, Anton

    2014-12-01

    The problem of simple adaptive and robust control is studied for the case of parametric and dynamic dimension uncertainties: only the maximum possible relative degree of the plant model is known. The control approach "consecutive compensator" is investigated. To illustrate the efficiency of proposed approach an example with the mobile robot motion control using computer vision system is considered.

  9. Ideal optical backpropagation of scalar NLSE using dispersion-decreasing fibers for WDM transmission.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojun; Kumar, Shiva; Shao, Jing

    2013-11-18

    An ideal optical backpropagation (OBP) scheme to compensate for dispersion and nonlinear effects of the transmission fibers is proposed. The scheme consists of an optical phase conjugator (OPC), N spans of dispersion-decreasing fibers (DDFs) and amplifiers, placed at the end of the fiber optic link. In order to compensate for the nonlinear effects of the transmission fibers exactly, the nonlinear coefficient of the backpropagation fiber has to increase exponentially with distance or equivalently the power in the backpropagation fiber should increase exponentially with distance if the nonlinear coefficient is constant. In this paper, it is shown that a combination of DDFs and amplifiers can compensate for the nonlinear effects exactly. An analytical expression for the dispersion profile of the DDF is derived. Numerical simulation of a long haul wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber optic system with the proposed OBP scheme shows that the system reach can be enhanced by 54% as compared to digital backpropagation (DBP). PMID:24514378

  10. Risk compensation and bicycle helmets.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ross Owen; Fyhri, Aslak; Sagberg, Fridulv

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated risk compensation by cyclists in response to bicycle helmet wearing by observing changes in cycling behavior, reported experience of risk, and a possible objective measure of experienced risk. The suitability of heart rate variability (HRV) as an objective measure of experienced risk was assessed beforehand by recording HRV measures in nine participants watching a thriller film. We observed a significant decrease in HRV in line with expected increases in psychological challenge presented by the film. HRV was then used along with cycling pace and self-reported risk in a field experiment in which 35 cyclist volunteers cycled 0.4 km downhill, once with and once without a helmet. Routine helmet users reported higher experienced risk and cycled slower when they did not wear their helmet in the experiment than when they did wear their helmet, although there was no corresponding change in HRV. For cyclists not accustomed to helmets, there were no changes in speed, perceived risk, or any other measures when cycling with versus without a helmet. The findings are consistent with the notion that those who use helmets routinely perceive reduced risk when wearing a helmet, and compensate by cycling faster. They thus give some support to those urging caution in the use of helmet laws. PMID:21418079

  11. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  12. Infectious Diseases Physician Compensation: An Improved Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jethro Trees; Lynch, John B.; MacIntyre, Ann T.; Trotman, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Negotiating physician compensation can be complicated because many factors now influence the ways in which physicians can be compensated. Infectious diseases (ID) specialists typically provide a wide array of services, ranging from patient care to administrative leadership. Compensation surveys from national organizations have produced results based on small samples and often are not congruent with ID physicians’ perceptions. In July of 2015, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) conducted a compensation survey to assess current compensation earned by the diverse ID specialists within its membership. Members of IDSA's Clinical Affairs Committee report the results from the 2015 IDSA Physician Compensation survey, with a particular focus on the findings from respondents who indicate “patient care” as their primary responsibility and present a discussion that compares and contrasts results against other survey data. PMID:27419159

  13. Pointing compensation system for spacecraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A closed loop system reduces pointing errors in one or more spacecraft instruments. Associated with each instrument is a electronics package (3) for commanding motion in that instrument and a pointing control system (5) for imparting motion in that instrument in response to a command (4) from the commanding package (3). Spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) compensates for instrument pointing errors caused by instrument-motion-induced spacecraft motion. Any finite number of instruments can be so compensated, by providing each pointing control system (5) and each commanding package (3), for the instruments desired to be compensated, with a link to the spacecraft motion compensation logic (25). The spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) is an electronic manifestation of the algebraic negative of a model of the dynamics of motion of the spacecraft. An example of a suitable model, and computer-simulated results, are presented.

  14. CEO Compensation and Hospital Financial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Kristin L.; Sandoval, Guillermo A.; Brown, Adalsteinn D.; Pink, George H.

    2010-01-01

    Growing interest in pay-for-performance and the level of CEO pay raises questions about the link between performance and compensation in the health sector. This study compares the compensation of non-profit hospital Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) in Ontario, Canada to the three longest reported and most used measures of hospital financial performance. Our sample consisted of 132 CEOs from 92 hospitals between 1999 and 2006. Unbalanced panel data were analyzed using fixed effects regression. Results suggest that CEO compensation was largely unrelated to hospital financial performance. Inflation-adjusted salaries appeared to increase over time independent of hospital performance, and hospital size was positively correlated with CEO compensation. The apparent upward trend in salary despite some declines in financial performance challenges the fundamental assumption underlying this paper, that is, financial performance is likely linked to CEO compensation in Ontario. Further research is needed to understand long-term performance related to compensation incentives. PMID:19605619

  15. How to avoid deferred-compensation troubles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Todd I

    2005-06-01

    Executive compensation packages have long included stock options and deferred compensation plans in order to compete for talent. Last year, Congress passed a law in response to the Enron debacle, in which executives were perceived to be protecting their deferred compensation at the expense of employees, creditors, and investors. The new law is designed to protect companies and their shareholders from being raided by the very executives that guided the company to financial ruin. Physicians who are part owners of medical practices need to know about the changes in the law regarding deferred compensation and how to avoid costly tax penalties. This article discusses how the changes affect medical practices as well as steps physician-owned clinics can take to avoid the risk of penalty, such as freezing deferred compensation and creating a new deferred compensation plan. PMID:16050311

  16. Compensation of static deformation and vibrations of antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Peter; Loecker, Claudius; Algermissen, Stephan; Sekora, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The effect of vibrations and static deformations on aerospace platforms and their influence on the performance of radar, navigation or communication systems are currently studied in the scope of the NATO Research Task Groups SET-131. The deformations may be caused by different effects, e.g. aerodynamic loads, vehicle motion, moving parts such as rudders or turbines, or the impact of a collision. Depending on their strength and the function of the wireless system, they may have a significant impact on the system performance. Structural aspects of the platform such as mechanical or thermal stability, aerodynamics or outer appearance are of great importance. The present paper gives an overview of the scope of work of the group and on-going investigations on system performance analysis and compensation methods such as adaptive signal processing or electronic phase compensation for military key applications such as RADAR, Communication, Electronic Support Measures (ESM) or Command and Control (C2). In addition, the development of an antenna array demonstrator with active vibration compensation using piezo sensors and actuators and control algorithms will be shown, including simulated as well as experimental results.

  17. Motion compensation technique for wide beam synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose E.; Cook, Daniel A.; Christoff, James T.

    2002-05-01

    Optimal performance of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) systems requires accurate motion and medium compensation. Any uncorrected deviations from those assumed during the SAS beam formation process can degrade the beam pattern of the SA in various ways (broadening and distortion of the main lobe, increased side lobes and grating lobes levels, etc.). These would manifest in the imagery in the form of degraded resolution, blurring, target ghosts, etc. An accurate technique capable of estimating motion and medium fluctuations has been developed. The concept is to adaptively track a small patch on the sea bottom, which is in the order of a resolution cell, by steering the SAS beam as the platform moves in its trajectory. Any path length differences to that patch (other than the quadratic function product of the steering process) will be due to relative displacements caused by motion and/or medium fluctuations and can be detected by cross-correlation methods. This technique has advantages over other data driven motion compensation techniques because it operates in a much higher signal-to-noise beam space domain. The wide beam motion compensation technique was implemented in MATLAB and its performance evaluated via simulations. An overview of the technique, simulation, and results obtained are presented.

  18. Temperature compensation and temperature sensation in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Philip B.; Young, Michael W.; Siggia, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    All known circadian clocks have an endogenous period that is remarkably insensitive to temperature, a property known as temperature compensation, while at the same time being readily entrained by a diurnal temperature oscillation. Although temperature compensation and entrainment are defining features of circadian clocks, their mechanisms remain poorly understood. Most models presume that multiple steps in the circadian cycle are temperature-dependent, thus facilitating temperature entrainment, but then insist that the effect of changes around the cycle sums to zero to enforce temperature compensation. An alternative theory proposes that the circadian oscillator evolved from an adaptive temperature sensor: a gene circuit that responds only to temperature changes. This theory implies that temperature changes should linearly rescale the amplitudes of clock component oscillations but leave phase relationships and shapes unchanged. We show using timeless luciferase reporter measurements and Western blots against TIMELESS protein that this prediction is satisfied by the Drosophila circadian clock. We also review evidence for pathways that couple temperature to the circadian clock, and show previously unidentified evidence for coupling between the Drosophila clock and the heat-shock pathway. PMID:26578788

  19. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  20. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  1. Polarization-based compensation of astigmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Dola Roy; Bhattacharya, Kallol; Chakraborty, Ajay K.; Ghosh, Raja

    2004-02-01

    One approach to aberration compensation of an imaging system is to introduce a suitable phase mask at the aperture plane of an imaging system. We utilize this principle for the compensation of astigmatism. A suitable polarization mask used on the aperture plane together with a polarizer-retarder combination at the input of the imaging system provides the compensating polarization-induced phase steps at different quadrants of the apertures masked by different polarizers. The aberrant phase can be considerably compensated by the proper choice of a polarization mask and suitable selection of the polarization parameters involved. The results presented here bear out our theoretical expectation.

  2. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  3. Lithium compensation for full cell operation

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Jie; Zheng, Jianming; Chen, Xilin; Lu, Dongping; Liu, Jun; Jiguang, Jiguang

    2016-05-17

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of a lithium-ion battery system comprising an anode, an anode current collector, and a layer of lithium metal in contact with the current collector, but not in contact with the anode. The lithium compensation layer dissolves into the electrolyte to compensate for the loss of lithium ions during usage of the full cell. The specific placement of the lithium compensation layer, such that there is no direct physical contact between the lithium compensation layer and the anode, provides certain advantages.

  4. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, W.

    1985-02-08

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifer circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedstock loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  5. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  6. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  7. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Fade Compensation Protocol Impact on Very Small-Aperture Terminal Bit Error Rate Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Christina B.; Coney, Thom A.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) communications system operates at Ka band. ACTS uses an adaptive rain fade compensation protocol to reduce the impact of signal attenuation resulting from propagation effects. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an analysis characterizing the improvement in VSAT performance provided by this protocol. The metric for performance is VSAT bit error rate (BER) availability. The acceptable availability defined by communication system design specifications is 99.5% for a BER of 5E-7 or better. VSAT BER availabilities with and without rain fade compensation are presented. A comparison shows the improvement in BER availability realized with rain fade compensation. Results are presented for an eight-month period and for 24 months spread over a three-year period. The two time periods represent two different configurations of the fade compensation protocol. Index Terms-Adaptive coding, attenuation, propagation, rain, satellite communication, satellites.

  8. Assessing the impacts of nonrandom seed dispersal by multiple frugivore partners on plant recruitment.

    PubMed

    Razafindratsima, Onja H; Dunham, Amy E

    2015-01-01

    Directed dispersal is defined as enhanced dispersal of seeds into suitable microhabitats, resulting in higher recruitment than if seeds were dispersed randomly. While this constitutes one of the main explanations for the adaptive value of frugivore-mediated seed dispersal, the generality of this advantage has received little study, particularly when multiple dispersers are involved. We used probability recruitment models of a long-lived rainforest tree in Madagascar to compare recruitment success under dispersal by multiple frugivores, no dispersal, and random dispersal. Models were parameterized using a three-year recruitment experiment and observational data of dispersal events by three frugivorous lemur species that commonly disperse its seeds. Frugivore-mediated seed dispersal was nonrandom with respect to canopy cover and increased modeled per-seed sapling recruitment fourfold compared to no dispersal. Seeds dispersed by one frugivore, Eulemur rubriventer, had higher modeled recruitment probability than seeds dispersed randomly. However, as a group, our models suggest that seeds dispersed by lemurs would have lower recruitment than if dispersal were random. Results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the contribution of multiple frugivores to plant recruitment for understanding plant population dynamics and the ecological and evolutionary significance of seed dispersal. PMID:26236886

  9. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  10. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  11. Self-compensating solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, Fritz H. (Inventor); Matsumoto, Yutaka (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A solenoid valve is described in which both an inlet and an outlet of the valve are sealed when the valve is closed. This double seal compensates for leakage at either the inlet or the outlet by making the other seal more effective in response to the leakage and allows the reversal of the flow direction by simply switching the inlet and outlet connections. The solenoid valve has a valve chamber within the valve body. Inlet and outlet tubes extend through a plate into the chamber. A movable core in the chamber extends into the solenoid coil. The distal end of the core has a silicone rubber plug. Other than when the solenoid is energized, the compressed spring biases the core downward so that the surface of the plug is in sealing engagement with the ends of the tubes. A leak at either end increases the pressure in the chamber, resulting in increased sealing force of the plug.

  12. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-01-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants. PMID:12117658

  13. Thieving rodents as substitute dispersers of megafaunal seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Hirsch, Ben T.; Emsens, Willem-Jan; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica; Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropics have many plant species that seem to be adapted for seed dispersal by megafauna that went extinct in the late Pleistocene. Given the crucial importance of seed dispersal for plant persistence, it remains a mystery how these plants have survived more than 10,000 y without their mutualist dispersers. Here we present support for the hypothesis that secondary seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents has facilitated the persistence of these large-seeded species. We used miniature radio transmitters to track the dispersal of reputedly megafaunal seeds by Central American agoutis, which scatter-hoard seeds in shallow caches in the soil throughout the forest. We found that seeds were initially cached at mostly short distances and then quickly dug up again. However, rather than eating the recovered seeds, agoutis continued to move and recache the seeds, up to 36 times. Agoutis dispersed an estimated 35% of seeds for >100 m. An estimated 14% of the cached seeds survived to the next year, when a new fruit crop became available to the rodents. Serial video-monitoring of cached seeds revealed that the stepwise dispersal was caused by agoutis repeatedly stealing and recaching each other’s buried seeds. Although previous studies suggest that rodents are poor dispersers, we demonstrate that communities of rodents can in fact provide highly effective long-distance seed dispersal. Our findings suggest that thieving scatter-hoarding rodents could substitute for extinct megafaunal seed dispersers of tropical large-seeded trees. PMID:22802644

  14. Accuracy of numerically produced compensators.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H; Evans, M D; Fallone, B G

    1999-01-01

    A feasibility study is performed to assess the utility of a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill to produce compensating filters for conventional clinical use and for the delivery of intensity-modulated beams. A computer aided machining (CAM) software is used to assist in the design and construction of such filters. Geometric measurements of stepped and wedged surfaces are made to examine the accuracy of surface milling. Molds are milled and filled with molten alloy to produce filters, and both the molds and filters are examined for consistency and accuracy. Results show that the deviation of the filter surfaces from design does not exceed 1.5%. The effective attenuation coefficient is measured for CadFree, a cadmium-free alloy, in a 6 MV photon beam. The effective attenuation coefficients at the depth of maximum dose (1.5 cm) and at 10 cm in solid water phantom are found to be 0.546 cm-1 and 0.522 cm-1, respectively. Further attenuation measurements are made with Cerrobend to assess the variations of the effective attenuation coefficient with field size and source-surface distance. The ability of the CNC mill to accurately produce surfaces is verified with dose profile measurements in a 6 MV photon beam. The test phantom is composed of a 10 degrees polystyrene wedge and a 30 degrees polystyrene wedge, presenting both a sharp discontinuity and sloped surfaces. Dose profiles, measured at the depth of compensation (10 cm) beneath the test phantom and beneath a flat phantom, are compared to those produced by a commercial treatment planning system. Agreement between measured and predicted profiles is within 2%, indicating the viability of the system for filter production. PMID:10100166

  15. Impact of spatial resolution on thermal blooming phase compensation instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Mark F.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Schmidt, Jason D.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2010-08-01

    Phase compensation instability (PCI) is the time-dependent development of spatial perturbations that occur within thermally bloomed high-energy laser (HEL) beams. These types of spatial perturbations act as local hot spots that create small negative lenses within the HEL beam. Closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) corrects for these spatial perturbations by applying small positive-lens phase compensations, which only increases the strength of the local hot spots and leads to runaway in the adaptive-optics servo. This study uses a straightforward wave-optics code to model horizontal propagation with the effects of thermal blooming for a focused Gaussian beam. The strength of the thermal blooming effects is characterized using the classic dimensionless distortion number. A nominal AO system is used to mitigate phase distortions accumulated from thermal blooming. Parameters within the AO system, such as the number of actuators on the deformable mirror and the resolution of the wavefront sensor, are varied to determine the impact of spatial resolution in the development of the PCI. A discussion is given on the potential use of control theory to diminish the effects of the PCI.

  16. Impact of multiple bird partners on the seed dispersal effectiveness of China's relic trees.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Li, Xin-Hai; An, Shu-Qing; Lu, Chang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Frugivorous birds generally exhibit an unequal contribution to dispersal effectiveness of plant species as a function of their habitat adaptation and body size. In our study, we compared the effectiveness of multiple bird species that contribute to the dispersal of the endangered relic Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis. Seven bird species dispersed T. chinensis seeds, with Picus canus, Turdus hortulorum, and Urocissa erythrorhyncha being the main dispersers. The quantity part of dispersal effectiveness was strongly influenced by two inherent characteristics of disperser species: body size and habitat adaptation. However, the quality part of dispersal effectiveness was only influenced by disperser type. For instance, small generalist birds and large specialist birds removed more seeds than other type dispersers. Moreover, small birds and specialist birds contributed slightly more to the dispersal quality of T. chinensis than large birds and generalist birds respectively; however, these differences were not significant. Our results suggest that dispersal effectiveness is affected by variety in the body size and habitat adaptation of different dispersers. Therefore, such variation should be incorporated into spatial and temporal management actions of relic plant species in patchy, human-disturbed habitats. PMID:26725517

  17. Impact of multiple bird partners on the seed dispersal effectiveness of China’s relic trees

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Li, Xin-hai; An, Shu-qing; Lu, Chang-hu

    2016-01-01

    Frugivorous birds generally exhibit an unequal contribution to dispersal effectiveness of plant species as a function of their habitat adaptation and body size. In our study, we compared the effectiveness of multiple bird species that contribute to the dispersal of the endangered relic Chinese yew, Taxus chinensis. Seven bird species dispersed T. chinensis seeds, with Picus canus, Turdus hortulorum, and Urocissa erythrorhyncha being the main dispersers. The quantity part of dispersal effectiveness was strongly influenced by two inherent characteristics of disperser species: body size and habitat adaptation. However, the quality part of dispersal effectiveness was only influenced by disperser type. For instance, small generalist birds and large specialist birds removed more seeds than other type dispersers. Moreover, small birds and specialist birds contributed slightly more to the dispersal quality of T. chinensis than large birds and generalist birds respectively; however, these differences were not significant. Our results suggest that dispersal effectiveness is affected by variety in the body size and habitat adaptation of different dispersers. Therefore, such variation should be incorporated into spatial and temporal management actions of relic plant species in patchy, human-disturbed habitats. PMID:26725517

  18. 38 CFR 3.351 - Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's compensation ratings. 3.351 Section 3.351 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION...

  19. 38 CFR 3.351 - Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special monthly dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, pension and spouse's compensation ratings. 3.351 Section 3.351 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION...

  20. Soliton Pulse Compression in a Dispersion Decreasing Elliptic Birefringent Fiber with Effective Gain and Effective Phase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Kuriakose, V. C.

    We have considered soliton pulse compression in a dispersion decreasing ideal elliptical birefringent fiber with phase modulation. We have shown that there is exact balancing between the effective gain and the effective phase modulation and as a result arrive at the fundamental soliton solution. For the various dispersion decreasing profiles we have considered, we have shown that the hyperbolic profile is the best suitable choice for the dispersion decreasing profile as it provides fairly good compression even after compensating for the fiber loss.

  1. Fourier-transform electron spin resonance with bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Electron spin echo experiments using chirp pulses at X-band around 9 GHz have been performed with a home-built spectrometer based on an arbitrary waveform generator. Primary echoes without phase dispersion were obtained by employing the Böhlen-Bodenhausen scheme with the refocusing pulse being half as long as the coherence-generating pulse. To account for physical bandwidth limitation by the resonator, the instantaneous sweep rate of the chirps was adapted to the spectrometer’s frequency response function, which can be recorded from the sample under study within a few minutes. Such bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses are experimentally shown to achieve an almost uniform excitation bandwidth that exceeds the resonator bandwidth. This uniform excitation allows for computing frequency-domain spectra by Fourier-transformation (FT) of the echo signal. For a nitroxide in dilute solid solution with a spectral width of 200 MHz, the FT EPR spectrum agrees remarkably well with a field-swept echo-detected EPR spectrum. The overall spectral perturbation for operation far beyond the resonator bandwidth was characterized by acquiring a 700 MHz wide spectral range of a copper (II) EPR spectrum with nearly uniform amplitude with excitation and refocusing pulses of 200 and 100 ns, respectively. Furthermore, peculiarities were observed in solid-state FT EPR spectra of disordered systems. To understand these peculiarities two-dimensional data sets were acquired that correlate the FT EPR spectrum to inversion recovery or nuclear modulation. The echo envelope modulation experiments reveal echo decay rates increased by enhanced instantaneous diffusion and passage-specific effects in the nuclear modulations. The latter effect can be suppressed by nuclear modulation averaging. Apparent longitudinal relaxation times for a given subset of orientations are influenced by nuclear modulation effects. Proper extraction of orientation-dependent relaxation times thus requires an experimental

  2. Fourier-transform electron spin resonance with bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses.

    PubMed

    Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Electron spin echo experiments using chirp pulses at X-band around 9GHz have been performed with a home-built spectrometer based on an arbitrary waveform generator. Primary echoes without phase dispersion were obtained by employing the Böhlen-Bodenhausen scheme with the refocusing pulse being half as long as the coherence-generating pulse. To account for physical bandwidth limitation by the resonator, the instantaneous sweep rate of the chirps was adapted to the spectrometer's frequency response function, which can be recorded from the sample under study within a few minutes. Such bandwidth-compensated chirp pulses are experimentally shown to achieve an almost uniform excitation bandwidth that exceeds the resonator bandwidth. This uniform excitation allows for computing frequency-domain spectra by Fourier-transformation (FT) of the echo signal. For a nitroxide in dilute solid solution with a spectral width of 200MHz, the FT EPR spectrum agrees remarkably well with a field-swept echo-detected EPR spectrum. The overall spectral perturbation for operation far beyond the resonator bandwidth was characterized by acquiring a 700MHz wide spectral range of a copper (II) EPR spectrum with nearly uniform amplitude with excitation and refocusing pulses of 200 and 100ns, respectively. Furthermore, peculiarities were observed in solid-state FT EPR spectra of disordered systems. To understand these peculiarities two-dimensional data sets were acquired that correlate the FT EPR spectrum to inversion recovery or nuclear modulation. The echo envelope modulation experiments reveal echo decay rates increased by enhanced instantaneous diffusion and passage-specific effects in the nuclear modulations. The latter effect can be suppressed by nuclear modulation averaging. Apparent longitudinal relaxation times for a given subset of orientations are influenced by nuclear modulation effects. Proper extraction of orientation-dependent relaxation times thus requires an experimental setup

  3. Fiber looped phase conjugation of polarization multiplexed signals for pre-compensation of fiber nonlinearity effect.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, Mark D

    2013-09-01

    Compensation of nonlinear distortion of polarization-multiplexed (PolMux) signals in optical fiber is evaluated experimentally using all-optical signal pre-distortion and fiber loop phase-conjugation at the transmitter. An improved bit error rate is shown for high baud rate, 80 Gb/s RZ-DPSK PolMux signals before transmission in a 728 km long dispersion-managed fiber link employing a direct detection receiver. The partial compensation of nonlinear distortion for both single channel and 3 × 80 Gb/s WDM PolMux signals is observed, despite the impact from the inter-polarization nonlinearity and the associated polarization scattering. Evidence of the limited compensation of inter-polarization nonlinearity is shown. PMID:24104017

  4. Low redundancy in seed dispersal within an island frugivore community

    PubMed Central

    McConkey, Kim R.; Drake, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    The low species diversity that often characterizes island ecosystems could result in low functional redundancy within communities. Flying foxes (large fruit bats) are important seed dispersers of large-seeded species, but their redundancy within island communities has never been explicitly tested. In a Pacific archipelago, we found that flying foxes were the sole effective disperser of 57 % of the plant species whose fruits they consume. They were essential for the dispersal of these species either because they handled >90 % of consumed fruit, or were the only animal depositing seeds away from the parent canopy, or both. Flying foxes were especially important for larger-seeded fruit (>13 mm wide), with 76 % of consumed species dependent on them for dispersal, compared with 31 % of small-seeded species. As flying foxes decrease in abundance, they cease to function as dispersers long before they become rare. We compared the seed dispersal effectiveness (measured as the proportion of diaspores dispersed beyond parent crowns) of all frugivores for four plant species in sites where flying foxes were, and were not, functionally extinct. At both low and high abundance, flying foxes consumed most available fruit of these species, but the proportion of handled diaspores dispersed away from parent crowns (quality) was significantly reduced at low abundance. Since alternative consumers (birds, rodents and land crabs) were unable to compensate as dispersers when flying foxes were functionally extinct, we conclude that there is almost no redundancy in the seed dispersal function of flying foxes in this island system, and potentially on other islands where they occur. Given that oceanic island communities are often simpler than continental communities, evaluating the extent of redundancy across different ecological functions on islands is extremely important. PMID:26194167

  5. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  6. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  7. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  8. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  9. Children's Compensations for Poorly Automated Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczyk, Jeffrey J.; Marsiglia, Cheryl S.; Johns, Amanda K.; Bryan, Keli S.

    2004-01-01

    The compensatory-encoding model (CEM) postulates that readers whose decoding of words or verbal working memory capacities is inefficient can compensate so that literal comprehension of text is not deleteriously affected. However, the use of compensations may draw cognitive resources away from higher level reading activities such as comprehension…

  10. Displacement Compensation of Temperature Probe Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.; Hubert, James A.; Barber, Patrick G.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of temperature data from a probe in a vertical Bridgman furnace growing germanium crystals revealed a displacement of the temperature profile due to conduction error. A theoretical analysis shows that the displacement compensation is independent of local temperature gradient. A displacement compensation value should become a standard characteristic of temperature probes used for temperature profile measurements.

  11. 7 CFR 301.74-5 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensation. 301.74-5 Section 301.74-5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-5 Compensation. (a) Eligibility. The following individuals are eligible...

  12. 7 CFR 301.74-5 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compensation. 301.74-5 Section 301.74-5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-5 Compensation. (a) Eligibility. The following individuals are eligible...

  13. Tilt/Integral/Derivative Compensators For Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1995-01-01

    Tilt/integral/derivative (TID) compensators for tunable feedback control systems offer advantages over proportional/integral/derivative compensators. Designed and adjusted more easily, and made to reject disturbances more strongly and less sensitive to variations in parameters of controlled system.

  14. 28 CFR 345.54 - Overtime compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overtime compensation. 345.54 Section 345.54 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.54 Overtime compensation. An...

  15. 28 CFR 345.54 - Overtime compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overtime compensation. 345.54 Section 345.54 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.54 Overtime compensation. An...

  16. 28 CFR 345.54 - Overtime compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overtime compensation. 345.54 Section 345.54 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.54 Overtime compensation. An...

  17. 28 CFR 345.54 - Overtime compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overtime compensation. 345.54 Section 345.54 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.54 Overtime compensation. An...

  18. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or...

  19. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or...

  20. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or...

  1. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or...

  2. 12 CFR 2.5 - Bank compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bank compensation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SALES OF CREDIT LIFE INSURANCE § 2.5 Bank compensation. (a) Nothing contained in this part prohibits a bank employee, officer, director, or...

  3. Compensating linkage for main rotor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffery, P. A. E.; Huber, R. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A compensating linkage for the rotor control system on rotary wing aircraft is described. The main rotor and transmission are isolated from the airframe structure by clastic suspension. The compensating linkage prevents unwanted signal inputs to the rotor control system caused by relative motion of the airframe structure and the main rotor and transmission.

  4. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  5. Reinventing Teacher Compensation Systems. CPRE Finance Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Carolyn; Odden, Allan

    Other organizations in the United States have successfully implemented new compensation structures. This publication argues that it is time for education to join these successful efforts and revise teacher-pay systems. The brief provides a short history of changes in teacher compensation over the last century and a discussion of key organizational…

  6. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other compensation. 136.113 Section 136.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS PROCEDURES; DESIGNATION OF SOURCE; AND...

  7. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other compensation. 136.113 Section 136.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  8. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other compensation. 136.113 Section 136.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  9. 47 CFR 32.24 - Compensated absences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compensated absences. 32.24 Section 32.24 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.24 Compensated absences. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 136.205 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.205 Section 136.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  11. 33 CFR 136.211 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.211 Section 136.211 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  12. 33 CFR 136.223 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.223 Section 136.223 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  13. 33 CFR 136.217 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.217 Section 136.217 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  14. 33 CFR 136.229 - Compensation allowable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensation allowable. 136.229 Section 136.229 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  15. 33 CFR 136.113 - Other compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other compensation. 136.113 Section 136.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND;...

  16. 22 CFR 96.34 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Financial and Risk Management § 96.34 Compensation. (a) The agency or person does not compensate any... actually rendered, taking into account the country in which the adoption services are provided and norms... rendered, taking into account the same factors listed in paragraph (d) of this section and its...

  17. 22 CFR 96.34 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Financial and Risk Management § 96.34 Compensation. (a) The agency or person does not compensate any... actually rendered, taking into account the country in which the adoption services are provided and norms... rendered, taking into account the same factors listed in paragraph (d) of this section and its...

  18. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836.577 Section 836.577 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer...

  19. The Older Worker's Stake in Workers' Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Monroe

    1975-01-01

    State Workers' Compensation programs can add another barrier for older workers to surmount at the hiring gate. State programs do not furnish adequate or equitable protection, and the National Commission on State Workmen's Compensation Laws has made recommendations to improve coverage; new standards must be met by July, 1975. (Author)

  20. Flight Simulator Visual-Display Delay Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. Francis

    1981-01-01

    A piloted aircraft can be viewed as a closed-loop man-machine control system. When a simulator pilot is performing a precision maneuver, a delay in the visual display of aircraft response to pilot-control input decreases the stability of the pilot-aircraft system. The less stable system is more difficult to control precisely. Pilot dynamic response and performance change as the pilot attempts to compensate for the decrease in system stability. The changes in pilot dynamic response and performance bias the simulation results by influencing the pilot's rating of the handling qualities of the simulated aircraft. The study reported here evaluated an approach to visual-display delay compensation. The objective of the compensation was to minimize delay-induced change in pilot performance and workload, The compensation was effective. Because the compensation design approach is based on well-established control-system design principles, prospects are favorable for successful application of the approach in other simulations.

  1. 20 CFR 10.15 - May compensation rights be waived?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May compensation rights be waived? 10.15 Section 10.15 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT,...

  2. 20 CFR 10.15 - May compensation rights be waived?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true May compensation rights be waived? 10.15 Section 10.15 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT,...

  3. 28 CFR 104.21 - Filing for compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filing for compensation. 104.21 Section 104.21 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Filing for Compensation; Application for Advance Benefits § 104.21 Filing for compensation. (a) Compensation form; “filing.” Except...

  4. A symbiont's dispersal strategy: condition-dependent dispersal underlies predictable variation in direct transmission among hosts.

    PubMed

    Skelton, James; Creed, Robert P; Brown, Bryan L

    2015-11-22

    Direct horizontal transmission of pathogenic and mutualistic symbionts has profound consequences for host and symbiont fitness alike. While the importance of contact rates for transmission is widely recognized, the processes that underlie variation in transmission during contact are rarely considered. Here, we took a symbiont's perspective of transmission as a form of dispersal and adopted the concept of condition-dependent dispersal strategies from the study of free-living organisms to understand and predict variation in transmission in the cleaning symbiosis between crayfish and ectosymbiotic branchiobdellidan worms. Field study showed that symbiont reproductive success was correlated with host size and competition among worms for microhabitats. Laboratory experiments demonstrated high variability in transmission among host contacts. Moreover, symbionts were more likely to disperse when host size and competition for microhabitat created a fitness environment below a discrete minimum threshold. A predictive model based on a condition-dependent symbiont dispersal strategy correctly predicted transmission in 95% of experimental host encounters and the exact magnitude of transmission in 67%, both significantly better than predictions that assumed a fixed transmission rate. Our work provides a dispersal-based understanding of symbiont transmission and suggests adaptive symbiont dispersal strategies can explain variation in transmission dynamics and complex patterns of host infection. PMID:26559953

  5. Cauchy's dispersion equation reconsidered : dispersion in silicate glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Physics; Univ. of Vermont; St. Michael's College

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a novel method of characterizing optically transparent substances using dispersion theory. The refractive index is given by a generalized Cauchy dispersion equation with coefficients that are moments of the uv and ir absorptions. Mean dispersion, Abbe number, and partial dispersion are combinations of these moments. The empirical relation between index and dispersion for families of glasses appears as a consequence of Beer's law applied to the uv spectra.

  6. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  7. Fog dispersal technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in fog dispersal technology is briefly discussed. Fog is categorized as supercooled fog, occurring in air temperatures below freezing, and warm fog, occurring at above-freezing temperatures. Operational techniques are available to disperse supercooled fog in the airport area. It is much more difficult to cope with warm fog. Various known concepts to disperse warm fog are evaluated as to their operational merits. The most effective concept for immediate use involves heating the air to cause fog evaporation. Use of helicopter downwash has some application, possibly complementing the promising concept of seeding with sized hygroscopic particles. These latter two concepts appear to have future application, pending further research. The concept using polyelectrolytes is of uncertain value, lacking both a scientific explanation and a substantive evaluation of reported operational successes.

  8. Drilling mud dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P. A.; Brase, I. E.

    1985-05-21

    Dispersants useful in aqueous drilling mud formulations employed in the drilling of subterranean wells where high temperature and high pressure environments are encountered are disclosed. The dispersants, when used in amounts of about 0.1 to 25 ppb provide muds containing colloidal material suspended in an aqueous medium with improved high temperature and high pressure stability. The dispersants are water soluble sulfonated vinyl toluene-maleic anhydride copolymers which have a molar ratio of vinyl toluene to maleic anhydride of about 1:1 to less than about 2:1, a molecular weight of 1,000 to 25,000 and at least about 0.7 sulfonic acid groups per vinyl toluene unit.

  9. Radially varying dispersion in high-numerical-aperture focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michiel; Brakenhoff, G. J.; Simon, Ulrich; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    1998-05-01

    Over the last few years a number of microscopical techniques have been developed that take advantage of ultrashort optical pulses. All these techniques rely on temporal pulse integrity at the focal point of a high-numerical aperture (NA) focusing system. We have investigated the dispersion induced broadening for pulses on the optical axis, using the two-photon absorption autocorrelation (TPAA) technique. We demonstrate that the induced broadening can be pre- compensated for by a properly designed dispersion pre- compensation unit for pulses as short as 15 femtosecond. Another source of pulse broadening in high-NA focusing systems is due to radial variations in the dispersion over the pupil of the objective. This may cause differences in the group delay between on-axis and outer ray wave packets, as well as differences in the broadening of the wave packets themselves. In this paper we present experimental results on the measurement of these radial variations in the dispersion characteristics over the aperture of high-NA microscope objectives, using a slightly modified TPAA technique.

  10. A New Technique for Compensating Joint Limits in a Robot Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan; Hickman, Andre; Guo, Ten-Huei

    1996-01-01

    A new robust, optimal, adaptive technique for compensating rate and position limits in the joints of a six degree-of-freedom elbow manipulator is presented. In this new algorithm, the unmet demand as a result of actuator saturation is redistributed among the remaining unsaturated joints. The scheme is used to compensate for inadequate path planning, problems such as joint limiting, joint freezing, or even obstacle avoidance, where a desired position and orientation are not attainable due to an unrealizable joint command. Once a joint encounters a limit, supplemental commands are sent to other joints to best track, according to a selected criterion, the desired trajectory.

  11. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  12. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  13. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  14. Study on APD real time compensation methods of laser Detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Feng; He, Zhang; Xiangjin, Zhang; Kun, Liu

    2011-02-01

    their operating principles. The constant false alarm rate compensation can't detect the pulse signal which comes randomly. Therefore real-time performance can't be realized. The noise compensation can meet the request of real-time performance. If it is used in the environment where background light is intense or changes acutely, there is a better effect. The temperature compensation can also achieve the real-time performance request. If it is used in the environment where temperature changes acutely, there is also a better effect. Aim at such problems, this paper presents that different APD real-time compensations should be adopt to adapt to different environments. The exiting temperature compensation adjusts output voltage by using variable resistance to regulate input voltage. Its structure is complex; the real-time performance is worse. In order to remedy these defects, a real-time temperature compensation which is based on switch on-off time of switching power supply is designed. Its feasibility and operating stability are confirmed by plate making and experiment. At last, the comparison experiments between the real-time noise compensation and the real-time temperature compensation is carried out in the environments where temperature is almost invariant and background light acutely changes from5lux to150lux . The result shows that the operating effect of the real-time noise compensation is better here, the noise minifies to a sixth of original noise. The comparison experiments between the real-time noise compensation and the real-time temperature compensation is carried out in darkroom where background light is 5lux and temperature almost rapidly changes from -20°C to 80°C. The result shows that the operating effect of the real-time temperature compensation is better here, the noise minifies to a seventh of original noise. Moreover, these methods can be applied to other type detection systems of weak photoelectric signal; they have high actual application value.

  15. Dispersion correction and identification of ocean acoustic normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poplawski, James Edward

    1998-08-01

    The average temperature of the ocean can be determined by measuring the traveltimes of acoustic signals from a source to a receiver. In the temperate deep ocean, a narrow acoustic pulse transmitted from a source results in a reception at long ranges consisting of many (possibly overlapping) arrivals. One of the mathematical structures used to describe and interpret acoustic propagation in the ocean is normal mode theory. The identification of individual normal mode arrivals in a reception is difficult because modal arrivals are spread in time by geometric dispersion causing them to overlap and interfere with each other. Current signal processing methods aimed at identifying individual normal mode arrivals require the use of vertical arrays of receivers which are rare because they are very expensive to build and deploy. A new signal processing method using phase-only filters to compensate for the geometric dispersion of normal mode arrivals is presented. This compensation increases the peak signal to noise ratio of the individual modal arrivals while simultaneously compressing them in time, helping to isolate them and their arrival times from overlapping neighbors. The properties of the phase-only filters and their ability to help isolate and identify modal arrivals is investigated through the processing of computer simulated receptions. By processing a reception with a bank of phase-only filters characterized by different amounts of dispersion compensation, a plot dubbed the Dispersion Diagnostic (DD) Display is generated. The use of phase-only filters does not require vertical arrays of receivers because modal phase is constant across depth. DD Displays generated for a reception from a receiver at a single depth show compressed modes which are isolated from their neighbors and for which traveltimes can be determined. Thus, the dispersion processing opens up the use of horizontal arrays or single hydrophones in mode identification, broadening the capabilities of

  16. COMPENSATION OF DETECTOR SOLENOID IN SUPER-B

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The SUPER-B detector solenoid has a strong 1.5 T field in the Interaction Region (IR) area, and its tails extend over the range of several meters. The main effect of the solenoid field is coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion which must be corrected in order to preserve the small design beam size at the Interaction Point. The additional effects are orbit and dispersion caused by the angle between the solenoid and beam trajectories. The proposed correction system provides local compensation of the solenoid effects independently for each side of the IR. It includes 'bucking' solenoids to remove the solenoid field tails and a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and anti-solenoids to cancel linear perturbations to the optics. Details of the correction system are presented.

  17. Offshore and coastal dispersion (OCD) model. Users guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Schulman, L.L.; Paine, R.J.; Pleim, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model was adapted from the EPA guideline model MPTER to simulate the effect of offshore emissions from point sources in coastal regions. Modifications were made to incorporate overwater plume transport and dispersion as well as changes that occur as the plume crosses the shoreline. Hourly meteorological data are needed from overwater and overland locations. Turbulence intensities are used but are not mandatory. For overwater dispersion, the turbulence intensities are parameterized from boundary-layer similarity relationships if they are not measured. Specifications of emission characteristics and receptor locations are the same as for MPTER; 250 point sources and 180 receptors may be used.

  18. Offshore and coastal dispersion (OCD) model. User's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Schulman, L.L.; Paine, R.J.; Pleim, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Offshore Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model was adapted from the EPA guideline model MPTER to simulate the effect of offshore emissions from point sources in coastal regions. Modifications were made to incorporate overwater plume transport and dispersion as well as changes that occur as the plume crosses the shoreline. Hourly meteorological data are needed from overwater and overland locations. For overwater dispersion, the turbulence intensities are parameterized from boundary layer similarity relationships if they are not measured. A virtual source technique is used to change the rate of plume growth as the overwater plume intercepts the overland internal boundary layer.

  19. Cold adaptation in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Johnston, I A

    1990-01-30

    Animals from polar seas exhibit numerous so called resistance adaptations that serve to maintain homeostasis at low temperature and prevent lethal freezing injury. Specialization to temperatures at or below 0 degrees C is associated with an inability to survive at temperatures above 3-8 degrees C. Polar fish synthesize various types of glycoproteins or peptides to lower the freezing point of most extracellular fluid compartments in a non-colligative manner. Antifreeze production is seasonal in boreal species and is often initiated by environmental cues other than low temperature, particularly short day lengths. Most of the adaptations that enable intertidal invertebrates to survive freezing are associated with their ability to withstand ariel exposure. Unique adaptations for freezing avoidance include the synthesis of low molecular mass ice-nucleating proteins that control and induce extracellular ice-formation. Marine poikilotherms also exhibit a range of capacity adaptations that increase the rate of some physiological processes so as to partially compensate for the effects of low temperature. However, the rate of embryonic development in a diverse range of marine organisms shows no evidence of temperature compensation. This results in a significant lengthening of the time from fertilization to hatching in polar, relative to temperate, species. Some aspects of the physiology of polar marine species, such as low metabolic and slow growth rates, probably result from a combination of low temperature and other factors such as the highly seasonal nature of food supplies. Although neuromuscular function shows a partial capacity adaptation in Antarctic fish, maximum swimming speeds are lower than for temperate and tropical species, particularly for early stages in the life history. PMID:1969650

  20. Compensation Following Bilateral Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Yates, Bill J.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained. PMID:22207864

  1. Self Organization in Compensated Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2004-03-01

    In partially compensated semiconductor (PCS) Fermi level is pinned to donor sub-band. Due to positional randomness and almost isoenergetic hoppings, donor-spanned electronic subsystem in PCS forms fluid-like highly mobile collective state. This makes PCS playground for pattern formation, self-organization, complexity emergence, electronic neural networks, and perhaps even for origins of life, bioevolution and consciousness. Through effects of impact and/or Auger ionization of donor sites, whole PCS may collapse (spinodal decomposition) into microblocks potentially capable of replication and protobiological activity (DNA analogue). Electronic screening effects may act in RNA fashion by introducing additional length scale(s) to system. Spontaneous quantum computing on charged/neutral sites becomes potential generator of informationally loaded microstructures akin to "Carl Sagan Effect" (hidden messages in Pi in his "Contact") or informational self-organization of "Library of Babel" of J.L. Borges. Even general relativity effects at Planck scale (R.Penrose) may affect the dynamics through (e.g.) isotopic variations of atomic mass and local density (A.A.Berezin, 1992). Thus, PCS can serve as toy model (experimental and computational) at interface of physics and life sciences.

  2. Acousto-optic tunable filter for dispersion characterization of time-domain optical coherence tomography systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Catherine; Toadere, Florin; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Moselund, Peter; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-07-20

    A broadband supercontinuum light source with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) are used to characterize dispersion in two time-domain OCT systems, at 850 and 1300 nm. The filter is designed to sweep across two spectral ranges, which are restricted here from 800 to 900 nm and from 1200 to 1500 nm, respectively. Dispersion compensation for 850 nm was achieved with a spectral delay line. Dispersion compensation for 1300 nm was achieved using BK 7 rod glasses in the reference arm. The AOTF allows evaluation of dispersion in under as well as overcompensated systems. The AOTF method is based on wavelength dependence of the optical path difference corresponding to the maximum strength of the interference signal recorded using a mirror as object. Comparison is made between the AOTF method and the more usual method based on measurement of the full width at half-maximum of the autocorrelation peak. This comparison shows that the AOTF method is more accurate in terms of evaluation of the dispersion left uncompensated after each adjustment. The AOTF method additionally provides information on the direction of dispersion compensation. PMID:27463927

  3. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  4. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  5. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  6. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  7. Compensator configurations for load currents' symmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinaru, D.; Manescu, L. G.; Dinu, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    This paper approaches aspects regarding the mitigation effects of asymmetries in 3-phase 3-wire networks. The measure consisting in connecting of load current symmetrization devices at the load coupling point is presented. A time-variation of compensators parameters is determined as a function of the time-recorded electrical values. The general sizing principle of the load current symmetrization reactive components is based on a simple equivalent model of the unbalanced 3-phase loads. By using these compensators a certain control of the power components transits is ensured in the network. The control is based on the variations laws of the compensators parameters as functions of the recorded electrical values: [B] = [T]·[M]. The link between compensator parameters and measured values is ensured by a transformation matrix [T] for each operation conditions of the supply network. Additional conditions for improving of energy and efficiency performance of the compensator are considered: i.e. reactive power compensation. The compensator sizing algorithm was implemented into a MATLAB environment software, which generate the time-evolution of the parameters of load current symmetrization device. The input data of application takes into account time-recording of the electrical values. By using the compensator sizing software, some results were achieved for the case of a consumer connected at 20 kV busbar of a distribution substation, during 24 hours measurement session. Even the sizing of the compensators aimed some additional network operation aspects (power factor correction) correlated with the total or major load symmetrizations, the harmonics aspects of the network values were neglected.

  8. Optical pulse propagation in fibers with random dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, F. Kh.; Navotny, D. V.; Baizakov, B. B.

    2004-05-01

    The propagation of optical pulses in two types of fibers with randomly varying dispersion is investigated. The first type refers to a uniform fiber dispersion superimposed by random modulations with a zero mean. The second type is the dispersion-managed fiber line with fluctuating parameters of the dispersion map. Application of the mean field method leads to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) with a dissipation term, expressed by a fourth-order derivative of the wave envelope. The prediction of the mean field approach regarding the decay rate of a soliton is compared with that of the perturbation theory based on the inverse scattering transform (IST). A good agreement between these two approaches is found. Possible ways of compensation of the radiative decay of solitons using the linear and nonlinear amplification are explored. The corresponding mean field equation coincides with the complex Swift-Hohenberg equation. The condition for the autosolitonic regime in propagation of optical pulses along a fiber line with fluctuating dispersion is derived and the existence of autosoliton (dissipative soliton) is confirmed by direct numerical simulation of the stochastic NLSE. The dynamics of solitons in optical communication systems with random dispersion-management is further studied applying the variational principle to the mean field NLSE, which results in a system of ODEs for soliton parameters. Extensive numerical simulations of the stochastic NLSE, mean field equation and corresponding set of ODEs are performed to verify the predictions of the developed theory.

  9. Secondary dispersal of bigcone Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga macrocarpa ) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Wall, Stephen B.; Borchert, Mark I.; Gworek, Jennifer R.

    2006-07-01

    Large-seeded pines ( Pinus spp.) are known to be dispersed by seed-caching corvids (i.e. jays and nutcrackers) and rodents (e.g. chipmunks and mice), with a concomitant decrease in seed dispersability by wind. We tested the idea that seeds of bigcone Douglas-fir ( Pseudotsuga macrocarpa), which are winged but larger than the seeds of other members of Pseudotsuga, are dispersed by a combination of wind and seed-caching rodents. We compared characteristics of seeds from P. macrocarpa in southern California (mean seed mass 132.6 mg) to seeds of a population of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) in northern California (24.8 mg). We also tested whether rodents would cache seeds of P. macrocarpa. Seeds of P. macrocarpa had greater wing loadings (1.37 mg/mm 2) and descent velocities (2.47 m/s) than those of P. menziesii (0.52 mg/mm 2 and 1.28 m/s, respectively). These data indicate that the wind dispersability of P. macrocarpa is likely to be less than that of P. menziesii, but this loss of wind dispersability is partially compensated for by secondary dispersal of seeds by rodents, which readily gathered and cached the larger seeds of P. macrocarpa up to 34 m from source trees. Large seed size confers several advantages to P. macrocarpa, most importantly attracting seed-caching animals that effectively bury seeds.

  10. Conjugate field approaches for active array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for calculating the compensating feed array complex excitations are namely, the indirect conjugate field matching (ICFM) and the direct conjugate field matching (DCFM) approach. In the ICFM approach the compensating feed array excitations are determined by considering the transmitting mode and the reciprocity principle. The DCF, in contrast calculates the array excitations by integrating directly the induced surface currents on the reflector under a receiving mode. DCFM allows the reflector to be illuminated by an incident plane wave with a tapered amplitude. The level of taper can effectively control the sidelobe level of the compensated antenna pattern. Both approaches are examined briefly.

  11. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  12. Protein Adaptations in Archaeal Extremophiles

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Christopher J.; Lewis, Hunter; Trejo, Eric; Winston, Vern; Evilia, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Extremophiles, especially those in Archaea, have a myriad of adaptations that keep their cellular proteins stable and active under the extreme conditions in which they live. Rather than having one basic set of adaptations that works for all environments, Archaea have evolved separate protein features that are customized for each environment. We categorized the Archaea into three general groups to describe what is known about their protein adaptations: thermophilic, psychrophilic, and halophilic. Thermophilic proteins tend to have a prominent hydrophobic core and increased electrostatic interactions to maintain activity at high temperatures. Psychrophilic proteins have a reduced hydrophobic core and a less charged protein surface to maintain flexibility and activity under cold temperatures. Halophilic proteins are characterized by increased negative surface charge due to increased acidic amino acid content and peptide insertions, which compensates for the extreme ionic conditions. While acidophiles, alkaliphiles, and piezophiles are their own class of Archaea, their protein adaptations toward pH and pressure are less discernible. By understanding the protein adaptations used by archaeal extremophiles, we hope to be able to engineer and utilize proteins for industrial, environmental, and biotechnological applications where function in extreme conditions is required for activity. PMID:24151449

  13. Adaptive support vector regression for UAV flight control.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jongho; Jin Kim, H; Kim, Youdan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores an application of support vector regression for adaptive control of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Unlike neural networks, support vector regression (SVR) generates global solutions, because SVR basically solves quadratic programming (QP) problems. With this advantage, the input-output feedback-linearized inverse dynamic model and the compensation term for the inversion error are identified off-line, which we call I-SVR (inversion SVR) and C-SVR (compensation SVR), respectively. In order to compensate for the inversion error and the unexpected uncertainty, an online adaptation algorithm for the C-SVR is proposed. Then, the stability of the overall error dynamics is analyzed by the uniformly ultimately bounded property in the nonlinear system theory. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive controller, numerical simulations are performed on the UAV model. PMID:20970303

  14. Application of positive-real functions in hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive system design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmarkar, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Proposal of an algorithmic procedure, based on mathematical programming methods, to design compensators for hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive systems (MRAS). The objective of the compensator is to render the MRAS insensitive to initial parameter estimates within a maximized hypercube in the model parameter space.

  15. Adaptive nonlinear flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysdyk, Rolf Theoduor

    1998-08-01

    Research under supervision of Dr. Calise and Dr. Prasad at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Aerospace Engineering. has demonstrated the applicability of an adaptive controller architecture. The architecture successfully combines model inversion control with adaptive neural network (NN) compensation to cancel the inversion error. The tiltrotor aircraft provides a specifically interesting control design challenge. The tiltrotor aircraft is capable of converting from stable responsive fixed wing flight to unstable sluggish hover in helicopter configuration. It is desirable to provide the pilot with consistency in handling qualities through a conversion from fixed wing flight to hover. The linear model inversion architecture was adapted by providing frequency separation in the command filter and the error-dynamics, while not exiting the actuator modes. This design of the architecture provides for a model following setup with guaranteed performance. This in turn allowed for convenient implementation of guaranteed handling qualities. A rigorous proof of boundedness is presented making use of compact sets and the LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem. The analysis allows for the addition of the e-modification which guarantees boundedness of the NN weights in the absence of persistent excitation. The controller is demonstrated on the Generic Tiltrotor Simulator of Bell-Textron and NASA Ames R.C. The model inversion implementation is robustified with respect to unmodeled input dynamics, by adding dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness of signals in the system is included. The effectiveness of the robustification is also demonstrated on the XV-15 tiltrotor. The SHL Perceptron NN provides a more powerful application, based on the universal approximation property of this type of NN. The SHL NN based architecture is also robustified with the dynamic nonlinear damping. A proof of boundedness extends the SHL NN augmentation with robustness to unmodeled actuator

  16. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  17. Tiled-grating compressor with uncompensated dispersion for near-field-intensity smoothing.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Kessler, Terrance

    2007-07-01

    A tiled-grating compressor, in which the spatial dispersion is not completely compensated, reduces the near-field-intensity modulation caused by tiling gaps and provides near-field spatial filtering of the input laser beam, thus reducing the laser damage to the final optics. PMID:17603592

  18. Fitness consequences of dispersal: is leaving home the best of a bad lot?

    PubMed

    Waser, P M; Nichols, K M; Hadfield, J D

    2013-06-01

    Using 20 years of demographic and genetic data from four populations of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis), we asked whether dispersing individuals gain benefits during adulthood that might compensate for the substantial survival costs they experience as juveniles. Compared to philopatric animals, within- and between-population dispersers gained no measureable advantages in adult survival, fecundity, or probability of recruiting offspring to adulthood. Restricting analyses to members of two central populations living more than 15 times the median dispersal distance from the study site edge, and using peripheral populations only to detect dispersal or offspring recruitment "offsite," did not change this result. Population density during year of birth had small negative effects on adult survival and fecundity, but there were no interactions with dispersal phenotype. We found no evidence that dispersers gained access to superior habitat or that their offspring suffered less inbreeding depression. Our results are consistent with fitness advantages being indirect; by leaving, dispersers release their kin from competition. Our results are also consistent with the possibility that dispersal is the "best of a bad lot." If dispersal is a conditional strategy, then the benefits may be obscured in observational data that compare dispersing individuals to philopatric individuals rather than to individuals whose dispersal phenotype is experimentally manipulated. PMID:23923492

  19. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  20. 28 CFR 34.111 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE OJJDP COMPETITION AND PEER REVIEW PROCEDURES Peer Review § 34.111 Compensation. All peer reviewers will be eligible to be paid according to applicable regulations... provided in the OJJDP “Peer Review Guideline”....