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Sample records for adaptive dynamical systems

  1. Adaptive synchronization and anticipatory dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-Jen; Chen, Chun-Chung; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2015-09-01

    Many biological systems can sense periodical variations in a stimulus input and produce well-timed, anticipatory responses after the input is removed. Such systems show memory effects for retaining timing information in the stimulus and cannot be understood from traditional synchronization consideration of passive oscillatory systems. To understand this anticipatory phenomena, we consider oscillators built from excitable systems with the addition of an adaptive dynamics. With such systems, well-timed post-stimulus responses similar to those from experiments can be obtained. Furthermore, a well-known model of working memory is shown to possess similar anticipatory dynamics when the adaptive mechanism is identified with synaptic facilitation. The last finding suggests that this type of oscillator can be common in neuronal systems with plasticity.

  2. Direct adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Tomohisa

    In light of the complex and highly uncertain nature of dynamical systems requiring controls, it is not surprising that reliable system models for many high performance engineering and life science applications are unavailable. In the face of such high levels of system uncertainty, robust controllers may unnecessarily sacrifice system performance whereas adaptive controllers are clearly appropriate since they can tolerate far greater system uncertainty levels to improve system performance. In this dissertation, we develop a Lyapunov-based direct adaptive and neural adaptive control framework that addresses parametric uncertainty, unstructured uncertainty, disturbance rejection, amplitude and rate saturation constraints, and digital implementation issues. Specifically, we consider the following research topics; direct adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems with exogenous disturbances; robust adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems; adaptive control for nonlinear uncertain systems with actuator amplitude and rate saturation constraints; adaptive reduced-order dynamic compensation for nonlinear uncertain systems; direct adaptive control for nonlinear matrix second-order dynamical systems with state-dependent uncertainty; adaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with applications to general anesthesia; direct adaptive control of nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with time delay; adaptive control for nonlinear nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems with applications to clinical pharmacology; neural network adaptive control for nonlinear nonnegative dynamical systems; passivity-based neural network adaptive output feedback control for nonlinear nonnegative dynamical systems; neural network adaptive dynamic output feedback control for nonlinear nonnegative systems using tapped delay memory units; Lyapunov-based adaptive control framework for discrete-time nonlinear systems with exogenous disturbances

  3. Quantitative Adaptation Analytics for Assessing Dynamic Systems of Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, John H.; Miner, Nadine E.; Wilson, Michael L.; Le, Hai D.; Kao, Gio K; Melander, Darryl J.; Longsine, Dennis Earl; Vander Meer, Robert Charles,

    2015-01-01

    Our society is increasingly reliant on systems and interoperating collections of systems, known as systems of systems (SoS). These SoS are often subject to changing missions (e.g., nation- building, arms-control treaties), threats (e.g., asymmetric warfare, terrorism), natural environments (e.g., climate, weather, natural disasters) and budgets. How well can SoS adapt to these types of dynamic conditions? This report details the results of a three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at developing metrics and methodologies for quantifying the adaptability of systems and SoS. Work products include: derivation of a set of adaptability metrics, a method for combining the metrics into a system of systems adaptability index (SoSAI) used to compare adaptability of SoS designs, development of a prototype dynamic SoS (proto-dSoS) simulation environment which provides the ability to investigate the validity of the adaptability metric set, and two test cases that evaluate the usefulness of a subset of the adaptability metrics and SoSAI for distinguishing good from poor adaptability in a SoS. Intellectual property results include three patents pending: A Method For Quantifying Relative System Adaptability, Method for Evaluating System Performance, and A Method for Determining Systems Re-Tasking.

  4. Robust adaptive dynamic programming with an application to power systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2013-07-01

    This brief presents a novel framework of robust adaptive dynamic programming (robust-ADP) aimed at computing globally stabilizing and suboptimal control policies in the presence of dynamic uncertainties. A key strategy is to integrate ADP theory with techniques in modern nonlinear control with a unique objective of filling up a gap in the past literature of ADP without taking into account dynamic uncertainties. Neither the system dynamics nor the system order are required to be precisely known. As an illustrative example, the computational algorithm is applied to the controller design of a two-machine power system. PMID:24808528

  5. Robust adaptive dynamic programming and feedback stabilization of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the robust optimal control design for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems from a perspective of robust adaptive dynamic programming (RADP). The objective is to fill up a gap in the past literature of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) where dynamic uncertainties or unmodeled dynamics are not addressed. A key strategy is to integrate tools from modern nonlinear control theory, such as the robust redesign and the backstepping techniques as well as the nonlinear small-gain theorem, with the theory of ADP. The proposed RADP methodology can be viewed as an extension of ADP to uncertain nonlinear systems. Practical learning algorithms are developed in this paper, and have been applied to the controller design problems for a jet engine and a one-machine power system. PMID:24808035

  6. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  7. On Cognition, Structured Sequence Processing, and Adaptive Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2008-11-01

    Cognitive neuroscience approaches the brain as a cognitive system: a system that functionally is conceptualized in terms of information processing. We outline some aspects of this concept and consider a physical system to be an information processing device when a subclass of its physical states can be viewed as representational/cognitive and transitions between these can be conceptualized as a process operating on these states by implementing operations on the corresponding representational structures. We identify a generic and fundamental problem in cognition: sequentially organized structured processing. Structured sequence processing provides the brain, in an essential sense, with its processing logic. In an approach addressing this problem, we illustrate how to integrate levels of analysis within a framework of adaptive dynamical systems. We note that the dynamical system framework lends itself to a description of asynchronous event-driven devices, which is likely to be important in cognition because the brain appears to be an asynchronous processing system. We use the human language faculty and natural language processing as a concrete example through out.

  8. Dynamic adaptive learning for decision-making supporting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haibo; Cao, Yuan; Chen, Sheng; Desai, Sachi; Hohil, Myron E.

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive learning method for data mining in support of decision-making systems. Due to the inherent characteristics of information ambiguity/uncertainty, high dimensionality and noisy in many homeland security and defense applications, such as surveillances, monitoring, net-centric battlefield, and others, it is critical to develop autonomous learning methods to efficiently learn useful information from raw data to help the decision making process. The proposed method is based on a dynamic learning principle in the feature spaces. Generally speaking, conventional approaches of learning from high dimensional data sets include various feature extraction (principal component analysis, wavelet transform, and others) and feature selection (embedded approach, wrapper approach, filter approach, and others) methods. However, very limited understandings of adaptive learning from different feature spaces have been achieved. We propose an integrative approach that takes advantages of feature selection and hypothesis ensemble techniques to achieve our goal. Based on the training data distributions, a feature score function is used to provide a measurement of the importance of different features for learning purpose. Then multiple hypotheses are iteratively developed in different feature spaces according to their learning capabilities. Unlike the pre-set iteration steps in many of the existing ensemble learning approaches, such as adaptive boosting (AdaBoost) method, the iterative learning process will automatically stop when the intelligent system can not provide a better understanding than a random guess in that particular subset of feature spaces. Finally, a voting algorithm is used to combine all the decisions from different hypotheses to provide the final prediction results. Simulation analyses of the proposed method on classification of different US military aircraft databases show the effectiveness of this method.

  9. Adaptive control of nonlinear systems using multistage dynamic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Madan M.; Rao, Dandina H.

    1992-11-01

    In this paper we present a new architecture of neuron, called the dynamic neural unit (DNU). The topology of the proposed neuronal model embodies delay elements, feedforward and feedback signals weighted by the synaptic weights and a time-varying nonlinear activation function, and is thus different from the conventionally and assumed architecture of neurons. The learning algorithm for the proposed neuronal structure and the corresponding implementation scheme are presented. A multi-stage dynamic neural network is developed using the DNU as the basic processing element. The performance evaluation of the dynamic neural network is presented for nonlinear dynamic systems under various situations. The capabilities of the proposed neural network model not only account for the learning and control actions emulating some of the biological control functions, but also provide a promising parallel-distributed intelligent control scheme for large-scale complex dynamic systems.

  10. A Knowledge-Structure-Based Adaptive Dynamic Assessment System for Calculus Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, M.-Y.; Kuo, B.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a calculus system that was designed using an adaptive dynamic assessment (DA) framework on performance in the "finding an area using an integral". In this study, adaptive testing and dynamic assessment were combined to provide different test items depending on students'…

  11. Generalized synchronization with uncertain parameters of nonlinear dynamic system via adaptive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hsiung; Wu, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive control scheme is developed to study the generalized adaptive chaos synchronization with uncertain chaotic parameters behavior between two identical chaotic dynamic systems. This generalized adaptive chaos synchronization controller is designed based on Lyapunov stability theory and an analytic expression of the adaptive controller with its update laws of uncertain chaotic parameters is shown. The generalized adaptive synchronization with uncertain parameters between two identical new Lorenz-Stenflo systems is taken as three examples to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The numerical simulations are shown to verify the results. PMID:25295292

  12. Intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system based on the adaptive neurocontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, E.; Kovalev, I. V.; Kobezhicov, V.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neuro-controller for intelligent control of non-linear dynamical system. The formed as the fuzzy selective neural net the adaptive neuro-controller on the base of system's state, creates the effective control signal under random perturbations. The validity and advantages of the proposed adaptive neuro-controller are demonstrated by numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the proposed controller scheme achieves real-time control speed and the competitive performance, as compared to PID, fuzzy logic controllers.

  13. An integrated architecture of adaptive neural network control for dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Liu; Tokar, R.; Mcvey, B.

    1994-07-01

    In this study, an integrated neural network control architecture for nonlinear dynamic systems is presented. Most of the recent emphasis in the neural network control field has no error feedback as the control input which rises the adaptation problem. The integrated architecture in this paper combines feed forward control and error feedback adaptive control using neural networks. The paper reveals the different internal functionality of these two kinds of neural network controllers for certain input styles, e.g., state feedback and error feedback. Feed forward neural network controllers with state feedback establish fixed control mappings which can not adapt when model uncertainties present. With error feedbacks, neural network controllers learn the slopes or the gains respecting to the error feedbacks, which are error driven adaptive control systems. The results demonstrate that the two kinds of control scheme can be combined to realize their individual advantages. Testing with disturbances added to the plant shows good tracking and adaptation.

  14. Design implementation and control of MRAS error dynamics. [Model-Reference Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III

    1974-01-01

    Use is made of linearized error characteristic equation for model-reference adaptive systems to determine a parameter adjustment rule for obtaining time-invariant error dynamics. Theoretical justification of error stability is given and an illustrative example included to demonstrate the utility of the proposed technique.

  15. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  16. Adaptive Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, B M

    2007-10-26

    A discrete-time Markov process can be compactly modeled as a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN)--a graphical model with nodes representing random variables and directed edges indicating causality between variables. Each node has a probability distribution, conditional on the variables represented by the parent nodes. A DBN's graphical structure encodes fixed conditional dependencies between variables. But in real-world systems, conditional dependencies between variables may be unknown a priori or may vary over time. Model errors can result if the DBN fails to capture all possible interactions between variables. Thus, we explore the representational framework of adaptive DBNs, whose structure and parameters can change from one time step to the next: a distribution's parameters and its set of conditional variables are dynamic. This work builds on recent work in nonparametric Bayesian modeling, such as hierarchical Dirichlet processes, infinite-state hidden Markov networks and structured priors for Bayes net learning. In this paper, we will explain the motivation for our interest in adaptive DBNs, show how popular nonparametric methods are combined to formulate the foundations for adaptive DBNs, and present preliminary results.

  17. Adaptive Fuzzy Control of Strict-Feedback Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems With Unmodeled Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shen; Shi, Peng; Yang, Hongyan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an approximated-based adaptive fuzzy control approach with only one adaptive parameter is presented for a class of single input single output strict-feedback nonlinear systems in order to deal with phenomena like nonlinear uncertainties, unmodeled dynamics, dynamic disturbances, and unknown time delays. Lyapunov-Krasovskii function approach is employed to compensate the unknown time delays in the design procedure. By combining the advances of the hyperbolic tangent function with adaptive fuzzy backstepping technique, the proposed controller guarantees the semi-globally uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system from the mean square point of view. Two simulation examples are finally provided to show the superior effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26302525

  18. Method and system for training dynamic nonlinear adaptive filters which have embedded memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabinowitz, Matthew (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Described herein is a method and system for training nonlinear adaptive filters (or neural networks) which have embedded memory. Such memory can arise in a multi-layer finite impulse response (FIR) architecture, or an infinite impulse response (IIR) architecture. We focus on filter architectures with separate linear dynamic components and static nonlinear components. Such filters can be structured so as to restrict their degrees of computational freedom based on a priori knowledge about the dynamic operation to be emulated. The method is detailed for an FIR architecture which consists of linear FIR filters together with nonlinear generalized single layer subnets. For the IIR case, we extend the methodology to a general nonlinear architecture which uses feedback. For these dynamic architectures, we describe how one can apply optimization techniques which make updates closer to the Newton direction than those of a steepest descent method, such as backpropagation. We detail a novel adaptive modified Gauss-Newton optimization technique, which uses an adaptive learning rate to determine both the magnitude and direction of update steps. For a wide range of adaptive filtering applications, the new training algorithm converges faster and to a smaller value of cost than both steepest-descent methods such as backpropagation-through-time, and standard quasi-Newton methods. We apply the algorithm to modeling the inverse of a nonlinear dynamic tracking system 5, as well as a nonlinear amplifier 6.

  19. Online adaptive optimal control for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yongfeng; Na, Jing; Yang, Qinmin; Wu, Xing; Guo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    An online adaptive optimal control is proposed for continuous-time nonlinear systems with completely unknown dynamics, which is achieved by developing a novel identifier-critic-based approximate dynamic programming algorithm with a dual neural network (NN) approximation structure. First, an adaptive NN identifier is designed to obviate the requirement of complete knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the optimal value function. Then, the optimal control law is computed based on the information from the identifier NN and the critic NN, so that the actor NN is not needed. In particular, a novel adaptive law design method with the parameter estimation error is proposed to online update the weights of both identifier NN and critic NN simultaneously, which converge to small neighbourhoods around their ideal values. The closed-loop system stability and the convergence to small vicinity around the optimal solution are all proved by means of the Lyapunov theory. The proposed adaptation algorithm is also improved to achieve finite-time convergence of the NN weights. Finally, simulation results are provided to exemplify the efficacy of the proposed methods.

  20. Adaptive identification and control of structural dynamics systems using recursive lattice filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Montgomery, R. C.; Williams, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach for adaptive identification and control of structural dynamic systems by using least squares lattice filters thar are widely used in the signal processing area is presented. Testing procedures for interfacing the lattice filter identification methods and modal control method for stable closed loop adaptive control are presented. The methods are illustrated for a free-free beam and for a complex flexible grid, with the basic control objective being vibration suppression. The approach is validated by using both simulations and experimental facilities available at the Langley Research Center.

  1. Stable indirect adaptive switching control for fuzzy dynamical systems based on T-S multiple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofianos, Nikolaos A.; Boutalis, Yiannis S.

    2013-08-01

    A new indirect adaptive switching fuzzy control method for fuzzy dynamical systems, based on Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) multiple models is proposed in this article. Motivated by the fact that indirect adaptive control techniques suffer from poor transient response, especially when the initialisation of the estimation model is highly inaccurate and the region of uncertainty for the plant parameters is very large, we present a fuzzy control method that utilises the advantages of multiple models strategy. The dynamical system is expressed using the T-S method in order to cope with the nonlinearities. T-S adaptive multiple models of the system to be controlled are constructed using different initial estimations for the parameters while one feedback linearisation controller corresponds to each model according to a specified reference model. The controller to be applied is determined at every time instant by the model which best approximates the plant using a switching rule with a suitable performance index. Lyapunov stability theory is used in order to obtain the adaptive law for the multiple models parameters, ensuring the asymptotic stability of the system while a modification in this law keeps the control input away from singularities. Also, by introducing the next best controller logic, we avoid possible infeasibilities in the control signal. Simulation results are presented, indicating the effectiveness and the advantages of the proposed method.

  2. Adaptive modeling, identification, and control of dynamic structural systems. I. Theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal

    1989-01-01

    A concise review of the theory of adaptive modeling, identification, and control of dynamic structural systems based on discrete-time recordings is presented. Adaptive methods have four major advantages over the classical methods: (1) Removal of the noise from the signal is done over the whole frequency band; (2) time-varying characteristics of systems can be tracked; (3) systems with unknown characteristics can be controlled; and (4) a small segment of the data is needed during the computations. Included in the paper are the discrete-time representation of single-input single-output (SISO) systems, models for SISO systems with noise, the concept of stochastic approximation, recursive prediction error method (RPEM) for system identification, and the adaptive control. Guidelines for model selection and model validation and the computational aspects of the method are also discussed in the paper. The present paper is the first of two companion papers. The theory given in the paper is limited to that which is necessary to follow the examples for applications in structural dynamics presented in the second paper.

  3. On the global dynamics of adaptive systems - A study of an elementary example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espana, Martin D.; Praly, Laurent

    1993-01-01

    The inherent nonlinear character of adaptive systems poses serious theoretical problems for the analysis of their dynamics. On the other hand, the importance of their dynamic behavior is directly related to the practical interest in predicting such undesirable phenomena as nonlinear oscillations, abrupt transients, intermittence or a high sensitivity with respect to initial conditions. A geometrical/qualitative description of the phase portrait of a discrete-time adaptive system with unmodeled disturbances is given. For this, the motions in the phase space are referred to normally hyperbolic (structurally stable) locally invariant sets. The study is complemented with a local stability analysis of the equilibrium point and periodic solutions. The critical character of adaptive systems under rather usual working conditions is discussed. Special emphasis is put on the causes leading to intermittence. A geometric interpretation of the effects of some commonly used palliatives to this problem is given. The 'dead-zone' approach is studied in more detail. The predicted dynamics are compared with simulation results.

  4. Dynamical Adaptation in Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Damon A.; Benichou, Raphael; Meister, Markus; Azeredo da Silveira, Rava

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is at the heart of sensation and nowhere is it more salient than in early visual processing. Light adaptation in photoreceptors is doubly dynamical: it depends upon the temporal structure of the input and it affects the temporal structure of the response. We introduce a non-linear dynamical adaptation model of photoreceptors. It is simple enough that it can be solved exactly and simulated with ease; analytical and numerical approaches combined provide both intuition on the behavior of dynamical adaptation and quantitative results to be compared with data. Yet the model is rich enough to capture intricate phenomenology. First, we show that it reproduces the known phenomenology of light response and short-term adaptation. Second, we present new recordings and demonstrate that the model reproduces cone response with great precision. Third, we derive a number of predictions on the response of photoreceptors to sophisticated stimuli such as periodic inputs, various forms of flickering inputs, and natural inputs. In particular, we demonstrate that photoreceptors undergo rapid adaptation of response gain and time scale, over ∼ 300 ms—i. e., over the time scale of the response itself—and we confirm this prediction with data. For natural inputs, this fast adaptation can modulate the response gain more than tenfold and is hence physiologically relevant. PMID:24244119

  5. Neural-network-observer-based optimal control for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Huang, Yuzhu; Wang, Ding; Wei, Qinglai

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an observer-based optimal control scheme is developed for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm. First, a neural-network (NN) observer is designed to estimate system states. Then, based on the observed states, a neuro-controller is constructed via ADP method to obtain the optimal control. In this design, two NN structures are used: a three-layer NN is used to construct the observer which can be applied to systems with higher degrees of nonlinearity and without a priori knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the value function. The optimal control law is computed using the critic NN and the observer NN. Uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. The actor, critic, and observer structures are all implemented in real-time, continuously and simultaneously. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  6. Blended particle methods with adaptive subspaces for filtering turbulent dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Di; Majda, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    It is a major challenge throughout science and engineering to improve uncertain model predictions by utilizing noisy data sets from nature. Hybrid methods combining the advantages of traditional particle filters and the Kalman filter offer a promising direction for filtering or data assimilation in high dimensional turbulent dynamical systems. In this paper, blended particle filtering methods that exploit the physical structure of turbulent dynamical systems are developed. Non-Gaussian features of the dynamical system are captured adaptively in an evolving-in-time low dimensional subspace through particle methods, while at the same time statistics in the remaining portion of the phase space are amended by conditional Gaussian mixtures interacting with the particles. The importance of both using the adaptively evolving subspace and introducing conditional Gaussian statistics in the orthogonal part is illustrated here by simple examples. For practical implementation of the algorithms, finding the most probable distributions that characterize the statistics in the phase space as well as effective resampling strategies is discussed to handle realizability and stability issues. To test the performance of the blended algorithms, the forty dimensional Lorenz 96 system is utilized with a five dimensional subspace to run particles. The filters are tested extensively in various turbulent regimes with distinct statistics and with changing observation time frequency and both dense and sparse spatial observations. In real applications perfect dynamical models are always inaccessible considering the complexities in both modeling and computation of high dimensional turbulent system. The effects of model errors from imperfect modeling of the systems are also checked for these methods. The blended methods show uniformly high skill in both capturing non-Gaussian statistics and achieving accurate filtering results in various dynamical regimes with and without model errors.

  7. Optimal control for unknown discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems using adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiangnan; He, Haibo; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we develop and analyze an optimal control method for a class of discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems (MJSs) with unknown system dynamics. Specifically, an identifier is established for the unknown systems to approximate system states, and an optimal control approach for nonlinear MJSs is developed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the adaptive dynamic programming technique. We also develop detailed stability analysis of the control approach, including the convergence of the performance index function for nonlinear MJSs and the existence of the corresponding admissible control. Neural network techniques are used to approximate the proposed performance index function and the control law. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, three simulation studies, one linear case, one nonlinear case, and one single link robot arm case, are used to validate the performance of the proposed optimal control method. PMID:25420238

  8. [Dynamic behavior of the adaptive control system, hypothalamus--anterior pituitary--adrenal cortex. Animal experimental study of the adequate system dynamics of the direct and indirect parameters of the adaptive control system].

    PubMed

    Zintzsch, I; Seidel, H; Lantzsch, C; Lantzsch, M

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response of the adaptive closed-loop control system hypothalamus-anterior pituitary-adrenal cortex after application of short-time disturb pulses were examined experimentally in the pig. Blood sampling was performed biologically non-reactive by chronically implanted vascular catheters in the upper vena cava. A circadian biphase periodical dynamics characterizes the distrubance response of the adaptive control system, respectively, its direct and indirect parameters. After distrubance variables induced initial excess the plasma corticosteriods undershoot the basic level over a long period. Conversely, the dynamics of the eosinophils is determined through an initial eosinopenic phase and a subsequent typical overshoot. Periodical dynamic is absent in the steady state. The controller of the adaptive system does not show any spontaneous activity in the steady state without stress. The absence of an endogenic periodicity of the dependent parameters likewise gives evidence of an active oscillator. On the other hand, the controlling unit of the adaptive system constitutes a control response of circadian periodicty after activation by disturbance variables in pulse shape. The high damping of the control system terminates the transient state within 24 hours, and the corticosteriods and the eosinophils reach the steady state level. This control quality of the adaptive control system gains a high importance in the origination of the spontaneous circadian periodicity by corticosteriods and eosinophils and for the biological compensation of exogenous distrubance variables. PMID:233184

  9. Adaptive dynamic surface control for a class of MIMO nonlinear systems with actuator failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezquita S., Kendrick; Yan, Lin; Butt, Waseem A.

    2013-03-01

    In this article, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme for a class of MIMO nonlinear systems with actuator failures and uncertainties is presented. In the proposed control scheme, the dynamic changes and disturbances induced by actuator failures are detected and isolated by means of radial basis function neural networks, which also compensate system uncertainties that arise from the mismatch between nominal model and real plant. In the presence of unknown actuation functions, the effectiveness of the control scheme is guaranteed by imposing a structural condition on the actuation matrix. Moreover, the singularity problem that arises from the approximation of unknown actuation functions is circumvented, and thus the use parameter projection is avoided. In this work, the nominal plant is transformed into a suitable form via diffeomorphism. Dynamic surface control design technique is used to develop the control laws. The closed-loop signals are proven to be uniformly ultimately bounded through Lyapunov approach, and the output tracking error is shown to be bounded within a residual set which can be made arbitrarily small by appropriately tuning the controller parameters. Finally, the proposed adaptive control scheme effectiveness is verified by simulation of the longitudinal dynamics of a twin otter aircraft undergoing actuator failures.

  10. Multipoint dynamically reconfigure adaptive distributed fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for condition based maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained under a Navy SBIR contract by Redondo Optics Inc. (ROI), in collaboration with Northwestern University towards the development and demonstration of a next generation, stand-alone and fully integrated, dynamically reconfigurable, adaptive fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system for the in-situ unattended detection and localization of shock events, impact damage, cracks, voids, and delaminations in new and aging critical infrastructures found in ships, submarines, aircraft, and in next generation weapon systems. ROI's FAESense™ system is based on the integration of proven state-of-the-art technologies: 1) distributed array of in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors sensitive to strain, vibration, and acoustic emissions, 2) adaptive spectral demodulation of FBG sensor dynamic signals using two-wave mixing interferometry on photorefractive semiconductors, and 3) integration of all the sensor system passive and active optoelectronic components within a 0.5-cm x 1-cm photonic integrated circuit microchip. The adaptive TWM demodulation methodology allows the measurement of dynamic high frequnency acoustic emission events, while compensating for passive quasi-static strain and temperature drifts. It features a compact, low power, environmentally robust 1-inch x 1-inch x 4-inch small form factor (SFF) package with no moving parts. The FAESense™ interrogation system is microprocessor-controlled using high data rate signal processing electronics for the FBG sensors calibration, temperature compensation and the detection and analysis of acoustic emission signals. Its miniaturized package, low power operation, state-of-the-art data communications, and low cost makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of applications in naval and maritime industries, aerospace, civil structures, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications.

  11. Truncated adaptation design for decentralised neural dynamic surface control of interconnected nonlinear systems under input saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shigen; Dong, Hairong; Lyu, Shihang; Ning, Bin

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies decentralised neural adaptive control of a class of interconnected nonlinear systems, each subsystem is in the presence of input saturation and external disturbance and has independent system order. Using a novel truncated adaptation design, dynamic surface control technique and minimal-learning-parameters algorithm, the proposed method circumvents the problems of 'explosion of complexity' and 'dimension curse' that exist in the traditional backstepping design. Comparing to the methodology that neural weights are online updated in the controllers, only one scalar needs to be updated in the controllers of each subsystem when dealing with unknown systematic dynamics. Radial basis function neural networks (NNs) are used in the online approximation of unknown systematic dynamics. It is proved using Lyapunov stability theory that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded. The tracking errors of each subsystems, the amplitude of NN approximation residuals and external disturbances can be attenuated to arbitrarily small by tuning proper design parameters. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Learning from adaptive neural dynamic surface control of strict-feedback systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Wang, Cong

    2015-06-01

    Learning plays an essential role in autonomous control systems. However, how to achieve learning in the nonstationary environment for nonlinear systems is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present learning method for a class of n th-order strict-feedback systems by adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) technology, which achieves the human-like ability of learning by doing and doing with learned knowledge. To achieve the learning, this paper first proposes stable adaptive DSC with auxiliary first-order filters, which ensures the boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system and the convergence of tracking errors in a finite time. With the help of DSC, the derivative of the filter output variable is used as the neural network (NN) input instead of traditional intermediate variables. As a result, the proposed adaptive DSC method reduces greatly the dimension of NN inputs, especially for high-order systems. After the stable DSC design, we decompose the stable closed-loop system into a series of linear time-varying perturbed subsystems. Using a recursive design, the recurrent property of NN input variables is easily verified since the complexity is overcome using DSC. Subsequently, the partial persistent excitation condition of the radial basis function NN is satisfied. By combining a state transformation, accurate approximations of the closed-loop system dynamics are recursively achieved in a local region along recurrent orbits. Then, the learning control method using the learned knowledge is proposed to achieve the closed-loop stability and the improved control performance. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the proposed scheme can not only reuse the learned knowledge to achieve the better control performance with the faster tracking convergence rate and the smaller tracking error but also greatly alleviate the computational burden because of reducing the number and complexity of NN input variables. PMID:25069127

  13. Adaptive dynamic surface control for MIMO nonlinear time-varying systems with prescribed tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenliang; Lin, Yan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed for a class of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear time-varying systems. By fusing a bound estimation approach, a smooth function and a time-varying matrix factorisation, the obstacle caused by unknown time-varying parameters is circumvented. The proposed scheme is free of the problem of explosion of complexity and needs only one updated parameter at each design step. Moreover, all tracking errors can converge to predefined arbitrarily small residual sets with a prescribed convergence rate and maximum overshoot. Such features result in a simple adaptive controller which can be easily implemented in applications with less computational burden and satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Adaptation to shape switching by component selection in a constitutional dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Sébastien; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2009-04-22

    Molecules having different accessible shape states, which can be addressed in an effector-controlled manner, may be termed morphological switches. A dynamic covalent system can undergo adaptation to each state of a two-state morphological switch by generation of an optimal constitution through component selection. We have studied such a component selection in the dynamic covalent constituents generated by metal cation-induced shape switching of a core component between two states of W and U shape, characterized by both different geometries and different coordination features. The system performs shape-dependent self-sorting of metal ions and components. The origin of the selectivity was investigated through competition experiments, in solution and by analysis of solid state structures, which reveal the role of the molecular shape in the formation of a particular self-assembled architecture. The coordination features of each state as well as phase change also play an important role, in addition to the shape plasticity, in steering the covalent dynamic system toward the formation of a given entity by the selection of the most appropriate components. Different examples are described which show that the morphological switching of one component of a given self-assembled entity can lead to the exchange of the complementary one, which is no longer the best partner, for a new partner, able to form a more stable new assembly. Thus, the constitutional evolution of these dynamic systems is steered by the shape of a given state via both its geometry and its coordination features toward metal ions, leading to incorporation/decorporation of the most appropriate components. The controlled interconversion of the shape states of the morphological switches, induced by addition/removal of metal ions, results in a constitutional adaptation behavior through inversion of the selection preferences. PMID:19206535

  15. Robust dynamic sliding-mode control using adaptive RENN for magnetic levitation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Chen, Syuan-Yi; Shyu, Kuo-Kai

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, a robust dynamic sliding mode control system (RDSMC) using a recurrent Elman neural network (RENN) is proposed to control the position of a levitated object of a magnetic levitation system considering the uncertainties. First, a dynamic model of the magnetic levitation system is derived. Then, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-type sliding-mode control system (SMC) is adopted for tracking of the reference trajectories. Moreover, a new PID-type dynamic sliding-mode control system (DSMC) is proposed to reduce the chattering phenomenon. However, due to the hardware being limited and the uncertainty bound being unknown of the switching function for the DSMC, an RDSMC is proposed to improve the control performance and further increase the robustness of the magnetic levitation system. In the RDSMC, an RENN estimator is used to estimate an unknown nonlinear function of lumped uncertainty online and replace the switching function in the hitting control of the DSMC directly. The adaptive learning algorithms that trained the parameters of the RENN online are derived using Lyapunov stability theorem. Furthermore, a robust compensator is proposed to confront the uncertainties including approximation error, optimal parameter vectors, and higher order terms in Taylor series. Finally, some experimental results of tracking the various periodic trajectories demonstrate the validity of the proposed RDSMC for practical applications. PMID:19423437

  16. Reliable emotion recognition system based on dynamic adaptive fusion of forehead biopotentials and physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Mahdi; Firoozabadi, Mohammad; Sharafat, Ahmad Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we proposed a new adaptive method for fusing multiple emotional modalities to improve the performance of the emotion recognition system. Three-channel forehead biosignals along with peripheral physiological measurements (blood volume pressure, skin conductance, and interbeat intervals) were utilized as emotional modalities. Six basic emotions, i.e., anger, sadness, fear, disgust, happiness, and surprise were elicited by displaying preselected video clips for each of the 25 participants in the experiment; the physiological signals were collected simultaneously. In our multimodal emotion recognition system, recorded signals with the formation of several classification units identified the emotions independently. Then the results were fused using the adaptive weighted linear model to produce the final result. Each classification unit is assigned a weight that is determined dynamically by considering the performance of the units during the testing phase and the training phase results. This dynamic weighting scheme enables the emotion recognition system to adapt itself to each new user. The results showed that the suggested method outperformed conventional fusion of the features and classification units using the majority voting method. In addition, a considerable improvement, compared to the systems that used the static weighting schemes for fusing classification units, was also shown. Using support vector machine (SVM) and k-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers, the overall classification accuracies of 84.7% and 80% were obtained in identifying the emotions, respectively. In addition, applying the forehead or physiological signals in the proposed scheme indicates that designing a reliable emotion recognition system is feasible without the need for additional emotional modalities. PMID:26253158

  17. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  18. Dynamical consequences of adaptation of the growth rates in a system of three competing populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka I.; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a system of populations competing for the same limited resource for the case where each of the populations adapts its growth rate to the total number of individuals in all populations. We consider regions of parameter space where chaotic motion of the Shilnikov kind exists and present results for two characteristic values of the growth ratio adaptation factor r*: r* = -0.15 and 5. Negative r* can lead to vanishing of regions of chaotic motion and to a stabilization of a fixed point of the studied model system of differential equations. Positive r* lead to changes of the shape of the bifurcation diagrams in comparison with the bifurcation diagrams for the case without adaptation. For the case r* = 5 we observe transition to chaos by period-doubling bifurcations, windows of periodic motion between the regions of chaotic motion and a region of transient chaos after the last window of periodic motion. The Lyapunov dimension for the chaotic attractors is close to two and the Lyapunov spectrum has a structure which allows a topological analysis of the attractors of the investigated system.

  19. Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Pure-Feedback Nonlinear Systems via Dynamic Surface Technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongcheng; Dong, Xinmin; Xue, Jianping; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    This brief addresses the adaptive control problem for a class of pure-feedback systems with nonaffine functions possibly being nondifferentiable. Without using the mean value theorem, the difficulty of the control design for pure-feedback systems is overcome by modeling the nonaffine functions appropriately. With the help of neural network approximators, an adaptive neural controller is developed by combining the dynamic surface control (DSC) and minimal learning parameter (MLP) techniques. The key features of our approach are that, first, the restrictive assumptions on the partial derivative of nonaffine functions are removed, second, the DSC technique is used to avoid "the explosion of complexity" in the backstepping design, and the number of adaptive parameters is reduced significantly using the MLP technique, third, smooth robust compensators are employed to circumvent the influences of approximation errors and disturbances. Furthermore, it is proved that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the designed method. PMID:26277010

  20. Modelling and control issues of dynamically substructured systems: adaptive forward prediction taken as an example

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jia-Ying; Hsiao, Wei-De; Chen, Chih-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Testing techniques of dynamically substructured systems dissects an entire engineering system into parts. Components can be tested via numerical simulation or physical experiments and run synchronously. Additional actuator systems, which interface numerical and physical parts, are required within the physical substructure. A high-quality controller, which is designed to cancel unwanted dynamics introduced by the actuators, is important in order to synchronize the numerical and physical outputs and ensure successful tests. An adaptive forward prediction (AFP) algorithm based on delay compensation concepts has been proposed to deal with substructuring control issues. Although the settling performance and numerical conditions of the AFP controller are improved using new direct-compensation and singular value decomposition methods, the experimental results show that a linear dynamics-based controller still outperforms the AFP controller. Based on experimental observations, the least-squares fitting technique, effectiveness of the AFP compensation and differences between delay and ordinary differential equations are discussed herein, in order to reflect the fundamental issues of actuator modelling in relevant literature and, more specifically, to show that the actuator and numerical substructure are heterogeneous dynamic components and should not be collectively modelled as a homogeneous delay differential equation. PMID:25104902

  1. Nonlinear structural response using adaptive dynamic relaxation on a massively-parallel-processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, David R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A parallel adaptive dynamic relaxation (ADR) algorithm has been developed for nonlinear structural analysis. This algorithm has minimal memory requirements, is easily parallelizable and scalable to many processors, and is generally very reliable and efficient for highly nonlinear problems. Performance evaluations on single-processor computers have shown that the ADR algorithm is reliable and highly vectorizable, and that it is competitive with direct solution methods for the highly nonlinear problems considered. The present algorithm is implemented on the 512-processor Intel Touchstone DELTA system at Caltech, and it is designed to minimize the extent and frequency of interprocessor communication. The algorithm has been used to solve for the nonlinear static response of two and three dimensional hyperelastic systems involving contact. Impressive relative speedups have been achieved and demonstrate the high scalability of the ADR algorithm. For the class of problems addressed, the ADR algorithm represents a very promising approach for parallel-vector processing.

  2. On the optimal reconstruction and control of adaptive optical systems with mirror dynamics.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsár, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    In adaptive optics (AO) the deformable mirror (DM) dynamics are usually neglected because, in general, the DM can be considered infinitely fast. Such assumption may no longer apply for the upcoming Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) with DM that are several meters in diameter with slow and/or resonant responses. For such systems an important challenge is to design an optimal regulator minimizing the variance of the residual phase. In this contribution, the general optimal minimum-variance (MV) solution to the full dynamical reconstruction and control problem of AO systems (AOSs) is established. It can be looked upon as the parent solution from which simpler (used hitherto) suboptimal solutions can be derived as special cases. These include either partial DM-dynamics-free solutions or solutions derived from the static minimum-variance reconstruction (where both atmospheric disturbance and DM dynamics are neglected altogether). Based on a continuous stochastic model of the disturbance, a state-space approach is developed that yields a fully optimal MV solution in the form of a discrete-time linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) regulator design. From this LQG standpoint, the control-oriented state-space model allows one to (1) derive the optimal state-feedback linear regulator and (2) evaluate the performance of both the optimal and the sub-optimal solutions. Performance results are given for weakly damped second-order oscillatory DMs with large-amplitude resonant responses, in conditions representative of an ELT AO system. The highly energetic optical disturbance caused on the tip/tilt (TT) modes by the wind buffeting is considered. Results show that resonant responses are correctly handled with the MV regulator developed here. The use of sub-optimal regulators results in prohibitive performance losses in terms of residual variance; in addition, the closed-loop system may become unstable for resonant frequencies in the range of interest. PMID:20126246

  3. Adaptive fuzzy decentralised fault-tolerant control for nonlinear large-scale systems with actuator failures and unmodelled dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yinyin; Tong, Shaocheng; Li, Yongming

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses the adaptive fuzzy decentralised fault-tolerant control (FTC) problem for a class of nonlinear large-scale systems in strict-feedback form. The systems under study contain the unknown nonlinearities, unmodelled dynamics, actuator faults and without the direct measurements of state variables. With the help of fuzzy logic systems identifying the unknown functions and a fuzzy adaptive observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. By using the backstepping design technique and the dynamic surface control approach and combining with the changing supply function technique, a fuzzy adaptive FTC scheme is developed. The main features of the proposed control approach are that it can guarantee the closed-loop system to be input-to-state practically stable, and also has the robustness to the unmodelled dynamics. Moreover, it can overcome the so-called problem of 'explosion of complexity' existing in the previous literature. Finally, simulation studies are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Enabling the dynamic coupling between sensor web and Earth system models - The Self-Adaptive Earth Predictive Systems (SEPS) framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, L.; Yu, G.; Chen, N.

    2007-12-01

    The self-adaptation concept is the central piece of the control theory widely and successfully used in engineering and military systems. Such a system contains a predictor and a measurer. The predictor takes initial condition and makes an initial prediction and the measurer then measures the state of a real world phenomenon. A feedback mechanism is built in that automatically feeds the measurement back to the predictor. The predictor takes the measurement against the prediction to calculate the prediction error and adjust its internal state based on the error. Thus, the predictor learns from the error and makes a more accurate prediction in the next step. By adopting the self-adaptation concept, we proposed the Self-adaptive Earth Predictive System (SEPS) concept for enabling the dynamic coupling between the sensor web and the Earth system models. The concept treats Earth System Models (ESM) and Earth Observations (EO) as integral components of the SEPS coupled by the SEPS framework. EO measures the Earth system state while ESM predicts the evolution of the state. A feedback mechanism processes EO measurements and feeds them into ESM during model runs or as initial conditions. A feed-forward mechanism analyzes the ESM predictions against science goals for scheduling optimized/targeted observations. The SEPS framework automates the Feedback and Feed-forward mechanisms (the FF-loop). Based on open consensus-based standards, a general SEPS framework can be developed for supporting the dynamic, interoperable coupling between ESMs and EO. Such a framework can support the plug-in-and-play capability of both ESMs and diverse sensors and data systems as long as they support the standard interfaces. This presentation discusses the SEPS concept, the service-oriented architecture (SOA) of SEPS framework, standards of choices for the framework, and the implementation. The presentation also presents examples of SEPS to demonstrate dynamic, interoperable, and live coupling of

  5. Criticality of Adaptive Control Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, Felix; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    We show, that stabilization of a dynamical system can annihilate observable information about its structure. This mechanism induces critical points as attractors in locally adaptive control. It also reveals, that previously reported criticality in simple controllers is caused by adaptation and not by other controller details. We apply these results to a real-system example: human balancing behavior. A model of predictive adaptive closed-loop control subject to some realistic constraints is introduced and shown to reproduce experimental observations in unprecedented detail. Our results suggests, that observed error distributions in between the Lévy and Gaussian regimes may reflect a nearly optimal compromise between the elimination of random local trends and rare large errors.

  6. Policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a new discrete-time policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method for solving the infinite horizon optimal control problem of nonlinear systems. The idea is to use an iterative ADP technique to obtain the iterative control law, which optimizes the iterative performance index function. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the convergence and stability properties of policy iteration method for discrete-time nonlinear systems for the first time. It shows that the iterative performance index function is nonincreasingly convergent to the optimal solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It is also proven that any of the iterative control laws can stabilize the nonlinear systems. Neural networks are used to approximate the performance index function and compute the optimal control law, respectively, for facilitating the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithm, where the convergence of the weight matrices is analyzed. Finally, the numerical results and analysis are presented to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:24807455

  7. An atmospheric turbulence generator for dynamic tests with LINC-NIRVANA's adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschke, D.; Bizenberger, P.; Gaessler, W.; Zhang, X.; Mohr, L.; Baumeister, H.; Diolaiti, E.

    2010-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA[1] (LN) is an instrument for the Large Binocular Telescope[2] (LBT). Its purpose is to combine the light coming from the two primary mirrors in a Fizeau-type interferometer. In order to compensate turbulence-induced dynamic aberrations, the layer oriented adaptive optics system of LN[3] consists of two major subsystems for each side: the Ground-Layer-Wavefront sensor (GLWS) and the Mid- and High-Layer Wavefront sensor (MHLWS). The MHLWS is currently set up in a laboratory at the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. To test the multi-conjugate AO with multiple simulated stars in the laboratory and to develop the necessary control software, a dedicated light source is needed. For this reason, we designed an optical system, operating in visible as well as in infrared light, which imitates the telescope's optical train (f-ratio, pupil position and size, field curvature). By inserting rotating surface etched glass phase screens, artificial aberrations corresponding to the atmospheric turbulence are introduced. In addition, different turbulence altitudes can be simulated depending on the position of these screens along the optical axis. In this way, it is possible to comprehensively test the complete system, including electronics and software, in the laboratory before integration into the final LINC-NIRVANA setup. Combined with an atmospheric piston simulator, also this effect can be taken into account. Since we are building two identical sets, it is possible to feed the complete instrument with light for the interferometric combination during the assembly phase in the integration laboratory.

  8. Dynamic Adaption of Vascular Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here we present a simple two-dimensional model in which, as an alternative approach, the tissue is modeled as a porous medium with intervening sharply defined flow channels. Based on simple, physiologically realistic assumptions, flow-channel structure adapts so as to reach a configuration in which all parts of the tissue are supplied. A set of model parameters uniquely determine the model dynamics, and we have identified the region of the best-performing model parameters (a global optimum). This region is surrounded in parameter space by less optimal model parameter values, and this separation is characterized by steep gradients in the related fitness landscape. Hence it appears that the optimal set of parameters tends to localize close to critical transition zones. Consequently, while the optimal solution is stable for modest parameter perturbations, larger perturbations may cause a profound and permanent shift in systems characteristics. We suggest that the system is driven toward a critical state as a consequence of the ongoing parameter optimization, mimicking an evolutionary pressure on the system. PMID:23060814

  9. Dynamic experiment design regularization approach to adaptive imaging with array radar/SAR sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the "model-free" variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the "model-based" descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations. PMID:22163859

  10. A Stochastic Approach for Automatic and Dynamic Modeling of Students' Learning Styles in Adaptive Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorça, Fabiano Azevedo; Lima, Luciano Vieira; Fernandes, Márcia Aparecida; Lopes, Carlos Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Considering learning and how to improve students' performances, an adaptive educational system must know how an individual learns best. In this context, this work presents an innovative approach for student modeling through probabilistic learning styles combination. Experiments have shown that our approach is able to automatically detect and…

  11. Dynamic optimization and adaptive controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this work I present a new type of controller which is an adaptive tracking controller which employs dynamic optimization for optimizing current value of controller action for the temperature control of nonisothermal continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). We begin with a two-state model of nonisothermal CSTR which are mass and heat balance equations and then add cooling system dynamics to eliminate input multiplicity. The initial design value is obtained using local stability of steady states where approach temperature for cooling action is specified as a steady state and a design specification. Later we make a correction in the dynamics where material balance is manipulated to use feed concentration as a system parameter as an adaptive control measure in order to avoid actuator saturation for the main control loop. The analysis leading to design of dynamic optimization based parameter adaptive controller is presented. The important component of this mathematical framework is reference trajectory generation to form an adaptive control measure.

  12. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  13. Adaptive Control for Linear Uncertain Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics Revisited via Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the optimal control modification for linear uncertain plants. The Lyapunov analysis shows that the modification parameter has a limiting value depending on the nature of the uncertainty. The optimal control modification exhibits a linear asymptotic property that enables it to be analyzed in a linear time invariant framework for linear uncertain plants. The linear asymptotic property shows that the closed-loop plants in the limit possess a scaled input-output mapping. Using this property, we can derive an analytical closed-loop transfer function in the limit as the adaptive gain tends to infinity. The paper revisits the Rohrs counterexample problem that illustrates the nature of non-robustness of model-reference adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. An analytical approach is developed to compute exactly the modification parameter for the optimal control modification that stabilizes the plant in the Rohrs counterexample. The linear asymptotic property is also used to address output feedback adaptive control for non-minimum phase plants with a relative degree 1.

  14. Adaptive dynamic networks as models for the immune system and autocatalytic sets

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Kauffman, S.A.; Packard, N.H.; Perelson, A.S.

    1986-04-01

    A general class of network models is described that can be used to present complex adaptive systems. These models have two purposes: On a practical level they are closely based on real biological phenomena, and are intended to model detailed aspects of them. On a more general level, however, they provide a framework to address broader questions concerning evolution, pattern recognition, and other properties of living systems. This paper concentrates on the more general level, illustrating the basic concepts with two examples, a model of the immune system and a model for the spontaneous emergence of autocatalytic sets in a chemically reactive polymer soup. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Adaptive critics for dynamic optimization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra V; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh Kumar

    2010-06-01

    A novel action-dependent adaptive critic design (ACD) is developed for dynamic optimization. The proposed combination of a particle swarm optimization-based actor and a neural network critic is demonstrated through dynamic sleep scheduling of wireless sensor motes for wildlife monitoring. The objective of the sleep scheduler is to dynamically adapt the sleep duration to node's battery capacity and movement pattern of animals in its environment in order to obtain snapshots of the animal on its trajectory uniformly. Simulation results show that the sleep time of the node determined by the actor critic yields superior quality of sensory data acquisition and enhanced node longevity. PMID:20223635

  16. Dynamic adaptivity of "smart" piezoelectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, Horn-Sen; Zhong, Jianping P.

    1990-10-01

    Active smart" space and machine structures with adaptive dynamic characteristics have long been interested in a variety of high-performance systems, e.g., flexible robots, flexible space structures, "smart" machines, etc. In this paper, an active adaptive structure made of piezoelectric materials is proposed and evaluated. The structural adaptivity is achieved by a voltage feedback (open or closed loops) utilizing the converse piezoelectric effect. A mathematical model is proposed and the electrodynamic equations of motion and the generalized boundary conditions of a generic piezoelectric shell subjected to mechanical and electrical excitations are derived using Hamilton's principle and the linear piezoelectric theory. The dynamic adaptivity of the structure is introduced using a feedback control system. The theory is demonstrated in a case study in which the structural adaptivity (natural frequency) is investigated.

  17. Referral hospitals in the Democratic Republic of Congo as complex adaptive systems: similar program, different dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Karemere, Hermès; Ribesse, Nathalie; Kahindo, Jean-Bosco; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In many African countries, first referral hospitals received little attention from development agencies until recently. We report the evolution of two of them in an unstable region like Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo when receiving the support from development aid program. Specifically, we aimed at studying how actors’ network and institutional framework evolved over time and what could matter the most when looking at their performance in such an environment. Methods We performed two cases studies between 2006 and 2010. We used multiple sources of data: reports to document events; health information system for hospital services production, and “key-informants” interviews to interpret the relation between interventions and services production. Our analysis was inspired from complex adaptive system theory. It started from the analysis of events implementation, to explore interaction process between the main agents in each hospital, and the consequence it could have on hospital health services production. This led to the development of new theoretical propositions. Results Two events implemented in the frame of the development aid program were identified by most of the key-informants interviewed as having the greatest impact on hospital performance: the development of a hospital plan and the performance based financing. They resulted in contrasting interaction process between the main agents between the two hospitals. Two groups of services production were reviewed: consultation at outpatient department and admissions, and surgery. The evolution of both groups of services production were different between both hospitals. Conclusion By studying two first referral hospitals through the lens of a Complex Adaptive System, their performance in a context of development aid takes a different meaning. Success is not only measured through increased hospital production but through meaningful process of hospital agents’” network adaptation. Expected

  18. Observer-based adaptive neural dynamic surface control for a class of non-strict-feedback stochastic nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaoxu; Li, Shugang; Li, Fangfei

    2016-01-01

    The problem of adaptive output feedback stabilisation is addressed for a more general class of non-strict-feedback stochastic nonlinear systems in this paper. The neural network (NN) approximation and the variable separation technique are utilised to deal with the unknown subsystem functions with the whole states. Based on the design of a simple input-driven observer, an adaptive NN output feedback controller which contains only one parameter to be updated is developed for such systems by using the dynamic surface control method. The proposed control scheme ensures that all signals in the closed-loop systems are bounded in probability and the error signals remain semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded in fourth moment (or mean square). Two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design.

  19. Hedgehog signaling mediates adaptive variation in a dynamic functional system in the cichlid feeding apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yinan; Albertson, R. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive variation in the craniofacial skeleton is a key component of resource specialization and habitat divergence in vertebrates, but the proximate genetic mechanisms that underlie complex patterns of craniofacial variation are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates widespread variation across a complex functional system that affects the kinematics of lower jaw depression—the opercular four-bar linkage apparatus—among Lake Malawi cichlids. By using a combined quantitative trait locus mapping and population genetics approach, we show that allelic variation in the Hh receptor, ptch1, affects the development of distinct bony elements in the head that represent two of three movable links in this functional system. The evolutionarily derived allele is found in species that feed from the water column, and is associated with shifts in anatomy that translate to a four-bar system capable of faster jaw rotation. Alternatively, the ancestral allele is found in species that feed on attached algae, and is associated with the development of a four-bar system that predicts slower jaw movement. Experimental manipulation of the Hh pathway during cichlid development recapitulates functionally salient natural variation in craniofacial geometry. In all, these results significantly extend our understanding of the mechanisms that fine-tune the craniofacial skeletal complex during adaptation to new foraging niches. PMID:24912175

  20. Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

  1. Adaptive controller for dynamic power and performance management in the virtualized computing systems.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chengjian; Long, Xiang; Mu, Yifen

    2013-01-01

    Power and performance management problem in large scale computing systems like data centers has attracted a lot of interests from both enterprises and academic researchers as power saving has become more and more important in many fields. Because of the multiple objectives, multiple influential factors and hierarchical structure in the system, the problem is indeed complex and hard. In this paper, the problem will be investigated in a virtualized computing system. Specifically, it is formulated as a power optimization problem with some constraints on performance. Then, the adaptive controller based on least-square self-tuning regulator(LS-STR) is designed to track performance in the first step; and the resource solved by the controller is allocated in order to minimize the power consumption as the second step. Some simulations are designed to test the effectiveness of this method and to compare it with some other controllers. The simulation results show that the adaptive controller is generally effective: it is applicable for different performance metrics, for different workloads, and for single and multiple workloads; it can track the performance requirement effectively and save the power consumption significantly. PMID:23451241

  2. Model-free optimal controller design for continuous-time nonlinear systems by adaptive dynamic programming based on a precompensator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilie; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Wang, Yingchun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of developing a controller for continuous-time nonlinear systems where the equations governing the system are unknown. Using the measurements, two new online schemes are presented for synthesizing a controller without building or assuming a model for the system, by two new implementation schemes based on adaptive dynamic programming (ADP). To circumvent the requirement of the prior knowledge for systems, a precompensator is introduced to construct an augmented system. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is solved by adaptive dynamic programming, which consists of the least-squared technique, neural network approximator and policy iteration (PI) algorithm. The main idea of our method is to sample the information of state, state derivative and input to update the weighs of neural network by least-squared technique. The update process is implemented in the framework of PI. In this paper, two new implementation schemes are presented. Finally, several examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our schemes. PMID:25704057

  3. A knowledge-based approach to identification and adaptation in dynamical systems control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. J.; Wong, C. M.

    1988-01-01

    Artificial intelligence techniques are applied to the problems of model form and parameter identification of large-scale dynamic systems. The object-oriented knowledge representation is discussed in the context of causal modeling and qualitative reasoning. Structured sets of rules are used for implementing qualitative component simulations, for catching qualitative discrepancies and quantitative bound violations, and for making reconfiguration and control decisions that affect the physical system. These decisions are executed by backward-chaining through a knowledge base of control action tasks. This approach was implemented for two examples: a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and a two-phase thermal testbed. Results of tests with both of these systems demonstrate that the software replicates some or most of the functionality of a human operator, thereby reducing the need for a human-in-the-loop in the lower levels of control of these complex systems.

  4. Automated adaptive inference of phenomenological dynamical models

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of complex systems is often driven by large and intricate networks of microscopic interactions, whose sheer size obfuscates understanding. With limited experimental data, many parameters of such dynamics are unknown, and thus detailed, mechanistic models risk overfitting and making faulty predictions. At the other extreme, simple ad hoc models often miss defining features of the underlying systems. Here we develop an approach that instead constructs phenomenological, coarse-grained models of network dynamics that automatically adapt their complexity to the available data. Such adaptive models produce accurate predictions even when microscopic details are unknown. The approach is computationally tractable, even for a relatively large number of dynamical variables. Using simulated data, it correctly infers the phase space structure for planetary motion, avoids overfitting in a biological signalling system and produces accurate predictions for yeast glycolysis with tens of data points and over half of the interacting species unobserved. PMID:26293508

  5. Automated adaptive inference of phenomenological dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Bryan C.; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dynamics of complex systems is often driven by large and intricate networks of microscopic interactions, whose sheer size obfuscates understanding. With limited experimental data, many parameters of such dynamics are unknown, and thus detailed, mechanistic models risk overfitting and making faulty predictions. At the other extreme, simple ad hoc models often miss defining features of the underlying systems. Here we develop an approach that instead constructs phenomenological, coarse-grained models of network dynamics that automatically adapt their complexity to the available data. Such adaptive models produce accurate predictions even when microscopic details are unknown. The approach is computationally tractable, even for a relatively large number of dynamical variables. Using simulated data, it correctly infers the phase space structure for planetary motion, avoids overfitting in a biological signalling system and produces accurate predictions for yeast glycolysis with tens of data points and over half of the interacting species unobserved.

  6. Harm reduction as a complex adaptive system: A dynamic framework for analyzing Tanzanian policies concerning heroin use.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Eric A; Kaduri, Pamela; Masao, Frank; Mbwambo, Jessie K K; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2016-04-01

    Contrary to popular belief, policies on drug use are not always based on scientific evidence or composed in a rational manner. Rather, decisions concerning drug policies reflect the negotiation of actors' ambitions, values, and facts as they organize in different ways around the perceived problems associated with illicit drug use. Drug policy is thus best represented as a complex adaptive system (CAS) that is dynamic, self-organizing, and coevolving. In this analysis, we use a CAS framework to examine how harm reduction emerged around heroin trafficking and use in Tanzania over the past thirty years (1985-present). This account is an organizational ethnography based on of the observant participation of the authors as actors within this system. We review the dynamic history and self-organizing nature of harm reduction, noting how interactions among system actors and components have coevolved with patterns of heroin us, policing, and treatment activities over time. Using a CAS framework, we describe harm reduction as a complex process where ambitions, values, facts, and technologies interact in the Tanzanian sociopolitical environment. We review the dynamic history and self-organizing nature of heroin policies, noting how the interactions within and between competing prohibitionist and harm reduction policies have changed with patterns of heroin use, policing, and treatment activities over time. Actors learn from their experiences to organize with other actors, align their values and facts, and implement new policies. Using a CAS approach provides researchers and policy actors a better understanding of patterns and intricacies in drug policy. This knowledge of how the system works can help improve the policy process through adaptive action to introduce new actors, different ideas, and avenues for communication into the system. PMID:26790689

  7. Facilitating Interdisciplinary Geosciences and Societal Impacts Research and Education via Dynamically Adaptive, Interoperable Data and Forecasting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J.; Domenico, B.; Chiswell, S.; Baltzer, T.

    2005-12-01

    The problems monitoring, predicting, and responding to coastal inundation and inland flooding situations are inherently multidisciplinary. Predicting precipitation and streamflow require expertise in meteorology and hydrology. Oceanography also enters the picture in the cases where the severe storm occurs in a coastal area. Appropriate responses to such natural hazards requires integration of infrastructure and demographics data systems associated with the societal impacts community. Building and disseminating a system that will address this problem in a comprehensive and coherent manner can only be done by a team with the a broad range of technological and scientific expertise and community connections. Efforts are underway to develop interoperable data systems among the atmospheric science, hydrology, coastal oceans, and societal impacts communities, so they may conveniently and rapidly share data among their systems in cases where hazardous events threaten infrastructure and human health. The basic approach is to build on a dynamically adaptive data access and high resolution, local forecasting system being developed for the LEAD (Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery) project. At present, the LEAD technology is confined to local weather forecasts automatically steered by algorithms analyzing data from national forecasts. But efforts are underway to develop an expanded team that would include expertise in coupling atmospheric forecast models with hydrological and storm surge forecast models and, in turn, to coordinate those data systems with those of the GIS (Geographic Information System) community which contain most of the demographic and infrastructure information related to societal impacts. The paper will provide an update on the status of these efforts and a demonstration of how such a dynamically adaptive forecasting system focused high resolution local forecast model runs on Hurricane Katrina.

  8. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system

    PubMed Central

    Vonk, Freek J.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Heimberg, Alysha M.; Jansen, Hans J.; McCleary, Ryan J. R.; Kerkkamp, Harald M. E.; Vos, Rutger A.; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J.; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E.; Logan, Jessica M.; Harrison, Robert A.; Castoe, Todd A.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Pollock, David D.; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B.; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Arntzen, Jan W.; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P.; Spaink, Herman P.; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection. PMID:24297900

  9. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Heimberg, Alysha M; Jansen, Hans J; McCleary, Ryan J R; Kerkkamp, Harald M E; Vos, Rutger A; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E; Logan, Jessica M; Harrison, Robert A; Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Pollock, David D; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S; Ribeiro, José M C; Arntzen, Jan W; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P; Spaink, Herman P; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K

    2013-12-17

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection. PMID:24297900

  10. Adaptive dynamic programming for finite-horizon optimal control of discrete-time nonlinear systems with ε-error bound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Jin, Ning; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the finite-horizon optimal control problem for discrete-time nonlinear systems using the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) approach. The idea is to use an iterative ADP algorithm to obtain the optimal control law which makes the performance index function close to the greatest lower bound of all performance indices within an ε-error bound. The optimal number of control steps can also be obtained by the proposed ADP algorithms. A convergence analysis of the proposed ADP algorithms in terms of performance index function and control policy is made. In order to facilitate the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithms, neural networks are used for approximating the performance index function, computing the optimal control policy, and modeling the nonlinear system. Finally, two simulation examples are employed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:20876014

  11. Adaptive Neural Network Dynamic Surface Control for a Class of Time-Delay Nonlinear Systems With Hysteresis Inputs and Dynamic Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Su, Chun-Yi; Lin, Yan; Ma, Lianwei; Wang, Jianguo

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural network (NN) dynamic surface control is proposed for a class of time-delay nonlinear systems with dynamic uncertainties and unknown hysteresis. The main advantages of the developed scheme are: 1) NNs are utilized to approximately describe nonlinearities and unknown dynamics of the nonlinear time-delay systems, making it possible to deal with unknown nonlinear uncertain systems and pursue the L∞ performance of the tracking error; 2) using the finite covering lemma together with the NNs approximators, the Krasovskii function is abandoned, which paves the way for obtaining the L∞ performance of the tracking error; 3) by introducing an initializing technique, the L∞ performance of the tracking error can be achieved; 4) using a generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii (PI) model, the limitation of the traditional PI hysteresis model is overcome; and 5) by applying the Young's inequalities to deal with the weight vector of the NNs, the updated laws are needed only at the last controller design step with only two parameters being estimated, which reduces the computational burden. It is proved that the proposed scheme can guarantee semiglobal stability of the closed-loop system and achieves the L∞ performance of the tracking error. Simulation results for general second-order time-delay nonlinear systems and the tuning metal cutting system are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:25700473

  12. Verification of Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui; Vassev, Emil; Hinchey, Mike; Rouff, Christopher; Buskens, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

  13. Adaptive Dynamic Event Tree in RAVEN code

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur

    2014-11-01

    RAVEN is a software tool that is focused on performing statistical analysis of stochastic dynamic systems. RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other applications (system codes). Among the several capabilities currently present in RAVEN, there are five different sampling strategies: Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Grid, Adaptive and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampling methodologies. The scope of this paper is to present a new sampling approach, currently under definition and implementation: an evolution of the DET me

  14. Architecture for Adaptive Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    We identify a class of niches to be occupied by 'adaptive intelligent systems (AISs)'. In contrast with niches occupied by typical AI agents, AIS niches present situations that vary dynamically along several key dimensions: different combinations of required tasks, different configurations of available resources, contextual conditions ranging from benign to stressful, and different performance criteria. We present a small class hierarchy of AIS niches that exhibit these dimensions of variability and describe a particular AIS niche, ICU (intensive care unit) patient monitoring, which we use for illustration throughout the paper. We have designed and implemented an agent architecture that supports all of different kinds of adaptation by exploiting a single underlying theoretical concept: An agent dynamically constructs explicit control plans to guide its choices among situation-triggered behaviors. We illustrate the architecture and its support for adaptation with examples from Guardian, an experimental agent for ICU monitoring.

  15. Analysis and modification of Volterra/Wiener neural networks for the adaptive identification of non-linear hysteretic dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J.-S.; Smyth, A. W.; Kosmatopoulos, E. B.

    2004-08-01

    This study attempts to demystify a powerful neural network approach for modelling non-linear hysteretic systems and in turn to streamline its architecture to achieve better computational efficiency. The recently developed neural network modelling approach, the Volterra/Wiener neural network (VWNN), demonstrated its usefulness in identifying the restoring forces for hysteretic systems in an off-line or even in an adaptive (on-line) mode, however, the mechanism of how and why it works has not been thoroughly explored especially in terms of a physical interpretation. Artificial neural network are often treated as "black box" modelling tools, in contrast, here the authors carry out a detailed analysis in terms of problem formulation and network architecture to explore the inner workings of this neural network. Based on the understanding of the dynamics of hysteretic systems, some simplifications and modifications are made to the original VWNN in predicting accelerations of hysteretic systems under arbitrary force excitations. Through further examination of the algorithm related to the VWNN applications, the efficiency of the previously published approach is improved by reducing the number of the hidden nodes without affecting the modelling accuracy of the network. One training example is presented to illustrate the application of the VWNN; and another is provided to demonstrate that the VWNN is able to yield a unique set of weights when the values of the controlling design parameters are fixed. The practical issue of how to choose the values of these important parameters is discussed to aid engineering applications.

  16. A dynamical model of the adaptive immune system: effects of cells promiscuity, antigens and B-B interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolucci, Silvia; Annibale, Alessia

    2015-08-01

    We analyse a minimal model for the primary response in the adaptive immune system comprising three different players: antigens, T and B cells. We assume B-T interactions to be diluted and sampled locally from heterogeneous degree distributions, which mimic B cells receptors' promiscuity. We derive dynamical equations for the order parameters quantifying the B cells activation and study the nature and stability of the stationary solutions using linear stability analysis and Monte Carlo simulations.The system's behaviour is studied in different scaling regimes of the number of B cells, dilution in the interactions and number of antigens. Our analysis shows that: (i) B cells activation depends on the number of receptors in such a way that cells with an insufficient number of triggered receptors cannot be activated; (ii) idiotypic (i.e. B-B) interactions enhance parallel activation of multiple clones, improving the system's ability to fight different pathogens in parallel; (iii) the higher the fraction of antigens within the host the harder is for the system to sustain parallel signalling to B cells, crucial for the homeostatic control of cell numbers.

  17. L1 Adaptive Control Augmentation System with Application to the X-29 Lateral/Directional Dynamics: A Multi-Input Multi-Output Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brian Joseph; Burken, John J.; Xargay, Enric

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an L(sub 1) adaptive control augmentation system design for multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems in the presence of unmatched uncertainties which may exhibit significant cross-coupling effects. A piecewise continuous adaptive law is adopted and extended for applicability to multi-input multi-output systems that explicitly compensates for dynamic cross-coupling. In addition, explicit use of high-fidelity actuator models are added to the L1 architecture to reduce uncertainties in the system. The L(sub 1) multi-input multi-output adaptive control architecture is applied to the X-29 lateral/directional dynamics and results are evaluated against a similar single-input single-output design approach.

  18. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  19. Emerging hierarchies in dynamically adapting webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katifori, Eleni; Graewer, Johannes; Magnasco, Marcelo; Modes, Carl

    Transport networks play a key role across four realms of eukaryotic life: slime molds, fungi, plants, and animals. In addition to the developmental algorithms that build them, many also employ adaptive strategies to respond to stimuli, damage, and other environmental changes. We model these adapting network architectures using a generic dynamical system on weighted graphs and find in simulation that these networks ultimately develop a hierarchical organization of the final weighted architecture accompanied by the formation of a system-spanning backbone. We quantify the hierarchical organization of the networks by developing an algorithm that decomposes the architecture to multiple scales and analyzes how the organization in each scale relates to that of the scale above and below it. The methodologies developed in this work are applicable to a wide range of systems including the slime mold physarum polycephalum, human microvasculature, and force chains in granular media.

  20. Synaptic dynamics: linear model and adaptation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Ali; Dibazar, Alireza A; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-08-01

    In this research, temporal processing in brain neural circuitries is addressed by a dynamic model of synaptic connections in which the synapse model accounts for both pre- and post-synaptic processes determining its temporal dynamics and strength. Neurons, which are excited by the post-synaptic potentials of hundred of the synapses, build the computational engine capable of processing dynamic neural stimuli. Temporal dynamics in neural models with dynamic synapses will be analyzed, and learning algorithms for synaptic adaptation of neural networks with hundreds of synaptic connections are proposed. The paper starts by introducing a linear approximate model for the temporal dynamics of synaptic transmission. The proposed linear model substantially simplifies the analysis and training of spiking neural networks. Furthermore, it is capable of replicating the synaptic response of the non-linear facilitation-depression model with an accuracy better than 92.5%. In the second part of the paper, a supervised spike-in-spike-out learning rule for synaptic adaptation in dynamic synapse neural networks (DSNN) is proposed. The proposed learning rule is a biologically plausible process, and it is capable of simultaneously adjusting both pre- and post-synaptic components of individual synapses. The last section of the paper starts with presenting the rigorous analysis of the learning algorithm in a system identification task with hundreds of synaptic connections which confirms the learning algorithm's accuracy, repeatability and scalability. The DSNN is utilized to predict the spiking activity of cortical neurons and pattern recognition tasks. The DSNN model is demonstrated to be a generative model capable of producing different cortical neuron spiking patterns and CA1 Pyramidal neurons recordings. A single-layer DSNN classifier on a benchmark pattern recognition task outperforms a 2-Layer Neural Network and GMM classifiers while having fewer numbers of free parameters and

  1. Circuit dynamics of adaptive and maladaptive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of technologies for investigating specific components of intact biological systems has allowed elucidation of the neural circuitry underlying adaptive and maladaptive behaviours. Investigators are now able to observe and control, with high spatio-temporal resolution, structurally defined intact pathways along which electrical activity flows during and after the performance of complex behaviours. These investigations have revealed that control of projection-specific dynamics is well suited to modulating behavioural patterns that are relevant to a broad range of psychiatric diseases. Structural dynamics principles have emerged to provide diverse, unexpected and causal insights into the operation of intact and diseased nervous systems, linking form and function in the brain. PMID:24429629

  2. Mental workload dynamics in adaptive interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, Peter A.; Chignell, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    In examining the role of time in mental workload, the authors present a different perspective from which to view the problem of assessment. Mental workload is plotted in three dimensions, whose axes represent effective time for action, perceived distance from desired goal state, level of effort required to achieve the time-constrained goal. This representation allows the generation of isodynamic workload contours that incorporate the factors of operator skill and equifinality of effort. An adaptive interface for dynamic task reallocation is described that uses this form of assessment to reconcile the joint aims of stable operator loading and acceptable primary task performance by the total system.

  3. Design of an adaptive-passive dynamic vibration absorber composed of a string-mass system equipped with negative stiffness tension adjusting mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, M. A.; Yilmaz, C.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a new adaptive-passive dynamic vibration absorber design is discussed. The proposed design is composed of a string under variable tension with a central mass attachment as an undamped dynamic vibration absorber (DVA), a negative stiffness mechanism as a string tension adjustment aid and a tuning controller to make it adaptive. The dependency of the natural frequencies of this system on the string tension is determined analytically and verified using the finite element method. It is analytically shown that with the help of a negative stiffness element, the tuning force requirement is almost zero throughout the whole operation range. A string tension adjustment algorithm is proposed, which tunes the DVA system depending on the magnitude and frequency of the most dominant component of the vibration signal. Finally, a prototype of the system is built and a series of experiments are conducted on the prototype that validate the analytical and numerical calculations.

  4. Dynamic modeling of breast tissue with application of model reference adaptive system identification technique based on clinical robot-assisted palpation.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, M; Mojra, A

    2015-11-01

    Accurate identification of breast tissue's dynamic behavior in physical examination is critical to successful diagnosis and treatment. In this study a model reference adaptive system identification (MRAS) algorithm is utilized to estimate the dynamic behavior of breast tissue from mechanical stress-strain datasets. A robot-assisted device (Robo-Tac-BMI) is going to mimic physical palpation on a 45 year old woman having a benign mass in the left breast. Stress-strain datasets will be collected over 14 regions of both breasts in a specific period of time. Then, a 2nd order linear model is adapted to the experimental datasets. It was confirmed that a unique dynamic model with maximum error about 0.89% is descriptive of the breast tissue behavior meanwhile mass detection may be achieved by 56.1% difference from the normal tissue. PMID:26275489

  5. ADAPTIVE MULTILEVEL SPLITTING IN MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Aristoff, David; Lelièvre, Tony; Mayne, Christopher G.; Teo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Multilevel Splitting (AMS) is a replica-based rare event sampling method that has been used successfully in high-dimensional stochastic simulations to identify trajectories across a high potential barrier separating one metastable state from another, and to estimate the probability of observing such a trajectory. An attractive feature of AMS is that, in the limit of a large number of replicas, it remains valid regardless of the choice of reaction coordinate used to characterize the trajectories. Previous studies have shown AMS to be accurate in Monte Carlo simulations. In this study, we extend the application of AMS to molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate its effectiveness using a simple test system. Our conclusion paves the way for useful applications, such as molecular dynamics calculations of the characteristic time of drug dissociation from a protein target. PMID:26005670

  6. Rotor-bearing system integrated with shape memory alloy springs for ensuring adaptable dynamics and damping enhancement-Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-05-01

    Helical pseudoelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are integrated into a dynamic system consisting of a rigid rotor supported by passive magnetic bearings. The aim is to determine the utility of SMAs for vibration attenuation via their mechanical hysteresis, and for adaptation of the dynamic behaviour via their temperature dependent stiffness properties. The SMA performance, in terms of vibration attenuation and adaptability, is compared to a benchmark configuration of the system having steel springs instead of SMA springs. A theoretical multidisciplinary approach is used to quantify the weakly nonlinear coupled dynamics of the rotor-bearing system. The nonlinear forces from the thermo-mechanical shape memory alloy springs and from the passive magnetic bearings are coupled to the rotor and bearing housing dynamics. The equations of motion describing rotor tilt and bearing housing lateral motion are solved in the time domain. The SMA behaviour is also described by the complex modulus to form approximative equations of motion, which are solved in the frequency domain using continuation techniques. Transient responses, ramp-ups and steady-state frequency responses of the system are investigated experimentally and numerically. By using the proper SMA temperature, vibration reductions up to around 50 percent can be achieved using SMAs instead of steel. Regarding system adaptability, both the critical speeds, the mode shapes and the modes' sensitivity to disturbances (e.g. imbalance) highly depend on the SMA temperature. Examples show that vibration reduction at constant rotational speeds up to around 75 percent can be achieved by changing the SMA temperature, primarily because of stiffness change, whereas hysteresis only limits large vibrations. The model is able to capture and explain the experimental dynamic behaviour.

  7. Opinion dynamics on an adaptive random network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczik, I. J.; Benczik, S. Z.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2009-04-01

    We revisit the classical model for voter dynamics in a two-party system with two basic modifications. In contrast to the original voter model studied in regular lattices, we implement the opinion formation process in a random network of agents in which interactions are no longer restricted by geographical distance. In addition, we incorporate the rapidly changing nature of the interpersonal relations in the model. At each time step, agents can update their relationships. This update is determined by their own opinion, and by their preference to make connections with individuals sharing the same opinion, or rather with opponents. In this way, the network is built in an adaptive manner, in the sense that its structure is correlated and evolves with the dynamics of the agents. The simplicity of the model allows us to examine several issues analytically. We establish criteria to determine whether consensus or polarization will be the outcome of the dynamics and on what time scales these states will be reached. In finite systems consensus is typical, while in infinite systems a disordered metastable state can emerge and persist for infinitely long time before consensus is reached.

  8. Spatio-temporal dynamics of adaptation in the human visual system: A high-density electrical mapping study

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Gizely N.; Butler, John S.; Mercier, Manuel R.; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    When sensory inputs are presented serially, response amplitudes to stimulus repetitions generally decrease as a function of presentation rate, diminishing rapidly as inter-stimulus-intervals (ISIs) fall below a second. This “adaptation” is believed to represent mechanisms by which sensory systems reduce responsivity to consistent environmental inputs, freeing resources to respond to potentially more relevant inputs. While auditory adaptation functions have been relatively well-characterized, considerably less is known about visual adaptation in humans. Here, high-density visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded while two paradigms were used to interrogate visual adaptation. The first presented stimulus pairs with varying ISIs, comparing VEP amplitude to the second stimulus to that of the first (paired-presentation). The second involved blocks of stimulation (N=100) at various ISIs and comparison of VEP amplitude between blocks of differing ISIs (block-presentation). Robust VEP modulations were evident as a function of presentation rate in the block-paradigm with strongest modulations in the 130–150ms and 160–180ms visual processing phases. In paired-presentations, with ISIs of just 200–300 ms, an enhancement of VEP was evident when comparing S2 to S1, with no significant effect of presentation rate. Importantly, in block-presentations, adaptation effects were statistically robust at the individual participant level. These data suggest that a more taxing block-presentation paradigm is better suited to engage visual adaptation mechanisms than a paired-presentation design. The increased sensitivity of the visual processing metric obtained in the block-paradigm has implications for the examination of visual processing deficits in clinical populations. PMID:25688539

  9. Evaluating sustainable adaptation strategies for vulnerable mega-deltas using system dynamics modelling: Rice agriculture in the Mekong Delta's An Giang Province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Alexander; Darby, Stephen

    2016-07-15

    Challenging dynamics are unfolding in social-ecological systems around the globe as society attempts to mitigate and adapt to climate change while sustaining rapid local development. The IPCC's 5th assessment suggests these changing systems are susceptible to unforeseen and dangerous 'emergent risks'. An archetypal example is the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) where the river dyke network has been heightened and extended over the last decade with the dual objectives of (1) adapting the delta's 18 million inhabitants and their livelihoods to increasingly intense river-flooding, and (2) developing rice production through a shift from double to triple-cropping. Negative impacts have been associated with this shift, particularly in relation to its exclusion of fluvial sediment deposition from the floodplain. A deficit in our understanding of the dynamics of the rice-sediment system, which involve unintuitive delays, feedbacks, and tipping points, is addressed here, using a system dynamics (SD) approach to inform sustainable adaptation strategies. Specifically, we develop and test a new SD model which simulates the dynamics between the farmers' economic system and their rice agriculture operations, and uniquely, integrates the role of fluvial sediment deposition within their dyke compartment. We use the model to explore a range of alternative rice cultivation strategies. Our results suggest that the current dominant strategy (triple-cropping) is only optimal for wealthier groups within society and over the short-term (ca. 10years post-implementation). The model suggests that the policy of opening sluice gates and leaving paddies fallow during high-flood years, in order to encourage natural sediment deposition and the nutrient replenishment it supplies, is both a more equitable and a more sustainable policy. But, even with this approach, diminished supplies of sediment-bound nutrients and the consequent need to compensate with artificial fertilisers will mean that smaller

  10. System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  11. Chaos control for the output-constrained system by using adaptive dynamic surface technology and application to the brushless DC motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Hou, Zhiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, chaos control is proposed for the output- constrained system with uncertain control gain and time delay and is applied to the brushless DC motor. Using the dynamic surface technology, the controller overcomes the repetitive differentiation of backstepping and boundedness hypothesis of pre-determined control gain by incorporating radial basis function neural network and adaptive technology. The tangent barrier Lyapunov function is employed for time-delay chaotic system to prevent constraint violation. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee asymptotically stable in the sense of uniformly ultimate boundedness without constraint violation. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated on the brushless DC motor example.

  12. Chaos control for the output-constrained system by using adaptive dynamic surface technology and application to the brushless DC motor

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua; Hou, Zhiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, chaos control is proposed for the output- constrained system with uncertain control gain and time delay and is applied to the brushless DC motor. Using the dynamic surface technology, the controller overcomes the repetitive differentiation of backstepping and boundedness hypothesis of pre-determined control gain by incorporating radial basis function neural network and adaptive technology. The tangent barrier Lyapunov function is employed for time-delay chaotic system to prevent constraint violation. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee asymptotically stable in the sense of uniformly ultimate boundedness without constraint violation. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated on the brushless DC motor example.

  13. Complexity and network dynamics in physiological adaptation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    Baffy, György; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-05-28

    Living organisms constantly interact with their surroundings and sustain internal stability against perturbations. This dynamic process follows three fundamental strategies (restore, explore, and abandon) articulated in historical concepts of physiological adaptation such as homeostasis, allostasis, and the general adaptation syndrome. These strategies correspond to elementary forms of behavior (ordered, chaotic, and static) in complex adaptive systems and invite a network-based analysis of the operational characteristics, allowing us to propose an integrated framework of physiological adaptation from a complex network perspective. Applicability of this concept is illustrated by analyzing molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptation in response to the pervasive challenge of obesity, a chronic condition resulting from sustained nutrient excess that prompts chaotic exploration for system stability associated with tradeoffs and a risk of adverse outcomes such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Deconstruction of this complexity holds the promise of gaining novel insights into physiological adaptation in health and disease. PMID:24751342

  14. Adaptive dynamic FBG interrogation utilising erbium-doped fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, R. N.; Read, I.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2013-04-01

    A dynamic fibre Bragg grating interrogation scheme is investigated using two-wave mixing in erbium-doped fibre, capable of adapting to quasistatic strain and temperature drifts. An interference pattern set up in the erbium-doped fibre creates, due to the photorefractive effect, a dynamic grating capable of wavelength demodulating the FBG signal. The presence of a dynamic grating was verified and then dynamic strain signals from a fibre stretcher were measured. The adaptive nature of the technique was successfully demonstrated by heating the FBG while it underwent dynamic straining leading to detection unlike an alternative arrayed waveguide grating system which simultaneously failed detection. Two gratings were then wavelength division multiplexed with the signal grating receiving approximately 30dB greater signal showing that there was little cross talk in the system.

  15. Reversible adaptation to photoinduced shape switching by oligomer-macrocycle interconversion with component selection in a three-state constitutional dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Vantomme, Ghislaine; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Light irradiation of the molecular photoswitch 1-E causes isomerization into the 1-Z configuration stabilized by an internal hydrogen bond. 1-E bears aldehyde groups allowing for dynamic covalent reaction with linear diamines. On photoinduced E/Z shape switching of 1 in presence of diamines, the system undergoes interconversion between two states, a non-cyclic oligomeric one and a macrocyclic one, corresponding respectively to the E and Z configurations of 1. With a mixture of linear α,ω-diamines, 1-E yields non-selective dynamic oligomers by random incorporation of diamine components. Photoswitching to the 1-Z form leads to constitutional adaptation with preferential formation of the macrocycle incorporating the best suited diamine, H2 N(CH2 )7 NH2 . In presence of metal cations, the E form switches from its unbound W shape to its coordinated U shape and yields the macrocycle resulting from the selective incorporation of the diamine H2 NCH2 CH2 OCH2 CH2 NH2 that contains an additional O coordination site. Taken together, the results obtained describe constitutional adaptation in a triple state system: an oligomeric one and two different macrocyclic ones generated in response to two orthogonal agents, a physical stimulus, light, or a chemical effector, metal cations. These three states present, towards the incorporation of diamine components, respectively no selection, photoselection and metalloselection. PMID:25297846

  16. Adaptive functional systems: Learning with chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, M. A.; Osipov, G. V.; Burtsev, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a new model of adaptive behavior that combines a winnerless competition principle and chaos to learn new functional systems. The model consists of a complex network of nonlinear dynamical elements producing sequences of goal-directed actions. Each element describes dynamics and activity of the functional system which is supposed to be a distributed set of interacting physiological elements such as nerve or muscle that cooperates to obtain certain goal at the level of the whole organism. During "normal" behavior, the dynamics of the system follows heteroclinic channels, but in the novel situation chaotic search is activated and a new channel leading to the target state is gradually created simulating the process of learning. The model was tested in single and multigoal environments and had demonstrated a good potential for generation of new adaptations.

  17. Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks.

    PubMed

    Shkarayev, Maxim S; Schwartz, Ira B; Shaw, Leah B

    2013-01-01

    We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime). PMID:25395989

  18. Adaptive protection algorithm and system

    DOEpatents

    Hedrick, Paul [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M [Mars, PA

    2009-04-28

    An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

  19. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  20. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, D. M. Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long history of their successful use in revealing the importance of various members of the network. However, modeling of covert, terrorist or criminal networks through social graph dose not really provide the hierarchical structure which exist in these networks as these networks are composed of leaders and followers etc. In this research we analyze and predict the most likely role a particular node can adapt once a member of the network is either killed or caught. The adaptation is based on computing Bayes posteriori probability of each node and the level of the said node in the network structure.

  1. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaptation on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady three-dimensional problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Highly refined meshes are required to accurately capture shock waves, contact discontinuities, vortices, and shear layers in fluid flow problems. Adaptive meshes have also proved to be useful in several other areas of computational science and engineering like computer vision and graphics, semiconductor device modeling, and structural mechanics. Local mesh adaptation provides the opportunity to obtain solutions that are comparable to those obtained on globally-refined grids but at a much lower cost. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Adaptive Control for Microgravity Vibration Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Most active vibration isolation systems that try to a provide quiescent acceleration environment for space science experiments have utilized linear design methods. In this paper, we address adaptive control augmentation of an existing classical controller that employs a high-gain acceleration feedback together with a low-gain position feedback to center the isolated platform. The control design feature includes parametric and dynamic uncertainties because the hardware of the isolation system is built as a payload-level isolator, and the acceleration Sensor exhibits a significant bias. A neural network is incorporated to adaptively compensate for the system uncertainties, and a high-pass filter is introduced to mitigate the effect of the measurement bias. Simulations show that the adaptive control improves the performance of the existing acceleration controller and keep the level of the isolated platform deviation to that of the existing control system.

  3. Dynamical singularities in adaptive delayed-feedback control.

    PubMed

    Saito, Asaki; Konishi, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the dynamical characteristics of adaptive delayed-feedback control systems, exploiting a discrete-time adaptive control method derived for carrying out detailed analysis. In particular, the systems exhibit singularities such as power-law decay of the distribution of transient times and almost zero finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We can explain these results by characterizing such systems as having (1) a Jacobian matrix with unity eigenvalue in the whole phase space, and (2) parameters approaching a stability boundary proven to be identical with that of (nonadaptive) delayed-feedback control. PMID:22060398

  4. Target tracking with dynamically adaptive correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaxiola, Leopoldo N.; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.; García-Martínez, Pascuala

    2016-04-01

    A reliable algorithm for target tracking based on dynamically adaptive correlation filtering is presented. The algorithm is capable of tracking with high accuracy the location of a target in an input video sequence without using an offline training process. The target is selected at the beginning of the algorithm. Afterwards, a composite correlation filter optimized for distortion tolerant pattern recognition is designed to recognize the target in the next frame. The filter is dynamically adapted to each frame using information of current and past scene observations. Results obtained with the proposed algorithm in synthetic and real-life video sequences, are analyzed and compared with those obtained with recent state-of-the-art tracking algorithms in terms of objective metrics.

  5. Gradient-based adaptation of continuous dynamic model structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cava, William G.; Danai, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    A gradient-based method of symbolic adaptation is introduced for a class of continuous dynamic models. The proposed model structure adaptation method starts with the first-principles model of the system and adapts its structure after adjusting its individual components in symbolic form. A key contribution of this work is its introduction of the model's parameter sensitivity as the measure of symbolic changes to the model. This measure, which is essential to defining the structural sensitivity of the model, not only accommodates algebraic evaluation of candidate models in lieu of more computationally expensive simulation-based evaluation, but also makes possible the implementation of gradient-based optimisation in symbolic adaptation. The proposed method is applied to models of several virtual and real-world systems that demonstrate its potential utility.

  6. Adaptive security systems -- Combining expert systems with adaptive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.; Loveland, R.; Anderson, K.

    1997-09-01

    The Adaptive Multisensor Integrated Security System (AMISS) uses a variety of computational intelligence techniques to reason from raw sensor data through an array of processing layers to arrive at an assessment for alarm/alert conditions based on human behavior within a secure facility. In this paper, the authors give an overview of the system and briefly describe some of the major components of the system. This system is currently under development and testing in a realistic facility setting.

  7. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics

    PubMed Central

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle—namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  8. Mapping the Dynamic Network Interactions Underpinning Cognition: A cTBS-fMRI Study of the Flexible Adaptive Neural System for Semantics.

    PubMed

    Jung, JeYoung; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2016-08-01

    Higher cognitive function reflects the interaction of a network of multiple brain regions. Previous investigations have plotted out these networks using functional or structural connectivity approaches. While these map the topography of the regions involved, they do not explore the key aspect of this neuroscience principle-namely that the regions interact in a dynamic fashion. Here, we achieved this aim with respect to semantic memory. Although converging evidence implicates the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs), bilaterally, as a crucial component in semantic representation, the underlying neural interplay between the ATLs remains unclear. By combining continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we perturbed the left ventrolateral ATL (vATL) and investigated acute changes in neural activity and effective connectivity of the semantic system. cTBS resulted in decreased activity at the target region and compensatory, increased activity at the contralateral vATL. In addition, there were task-specific increases in effective connectivity between the vATLs, reflecting an increased facilitatory intrinsic connectivity from the right to left vATL. Our results suggest that semantic representation is founded on a flexible, adaptive bilateral neural system and reveals an adaptive plasticity-based mechanism that might support functional recovery after unilateral damage in neurological patients. PMID:27242027

  9. Design, dynamics and control of an Adaptive Singularity-Free Control Moment Gyroscope actuator for microspacecraft Attitude Determination and Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Sasi Prabhakaran

    Design, dynamics, control and implementation of a novel spacecraft attitude control actuator called the "Adaptive Singularity-free Control Moment Gyroscope" (ASCMG) is presented in this dissertation. In order to construct a comprehensive attitude dynamics model of a spacecraft with internal actuators, the dynamics of a spacecraft with an ASCMG, is obtained in the framework of geometric mechanics using the principles of variational mechanics. The resulting dynamics is general and complete model, as it relaxes the simplifying assumptions made in prior literature on Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) and it also addresses the adaptive parameters in the dynamics formulation. The simplifying assumptions include perfect axisymmetry of the rotor and gimbal structures, perfect alignment of the centers of mass of the gimbal and the rotor etc. These set of simplifying assumptions imposed on the design and dynamics of CMGs leads to adverse effects on their performance and results in high manufacturing cost. The dynamics so obtained shows the complex nonlinear coupling between the internal degrees of freedom associated with an ASCMG and the spacecraft bus's attitude motion. By default, the general ASCMG cluster can function as a Variable Speed Control Moment Gyroscope, and reduced to function in CMG mode by spinning the rotor at constant speed, and it is shown that even when operated in CMG mode, the cluster can be free from kinematic singularities. This dynamics model is then extended to include the effects of multiple ASCMGs placed in the spacecraft bus, and sufficient conditions for non-singular ASCMG cluster configurations are obtained to operate the cluster both in VSCMG and CMG modes. The general dynamics model of the ASCMG is then reduced to that of conventional VSCMGs and CMGs by imposing the standard set of simplifying assumptions used in prior literature. The adverse effects of the simplifying assumptions that lead to the complexities in conventional CMG design, and

  10. Adaptive ophthalmologic system

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Thompson, Charles A.; Bauman, Brian J.; Jones, Steve M.; Gavel, Don T.; Awwal, Abdul A.; Eisenbies, Stephen K.; Haney, Steven J.

    2007-03-27

    A system for improving vision that can diagnose monochromatic aberrations within a subject's eyes, apply the wavefront correction, and then enable the patient to view the results of the correction. The system utilizes a laser for producing a beam of light; a corrector; a wavefront sensor; a testing unit; an optic device for directing the beam of light to the corrector, to the retina, from the retina to the wavefront sensor, and to the testing unit; and a computer operatively connected to the wavefront sensor and the corrector.

  11. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations. PMID:25529139

  12. Systems and Methods for Derivative-Free Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive control system is disclosed. The control system can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can employ one or more derivative-free adaptive control architectures. The control system can further employ one or more derivative-free weight update laws. The derivative-free weight update laws can comprise a time-varying estimate of an ideal vector of weights. The control system of the present invention can therefore quickly stabilize systems that undergo sudden changes in dynamics, caused by, for example, sudden changes in weight. Embodiments of the present invention can also provide a less complex control system than existing adaptive control systems. The control system can control aircraft and other dynamic systems, such as, for example, those with non-minimum phase dynamics.

  13. Adaptive output feedback control of flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun

    Neural network-based adaptive output feedback approaches that augment a linear control design are described in this thesis, and emphasis is placed on their real-time implementation with flexible systems. Two different control architectures that are robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodelled dynamics are presented. The unmodelled effects can consist of minimum phase internal dynamics of the system together with external disturbance process. Within this context, adaptive compensation for external disturbances is addressed. In the first approach, internal model-following control, adaptive elements are designed using feedback inversion. The effect of an actuator limit is treated using control hedging, and the effect of other actuation nonlinearities, such as dead zone and backlash, is mitigated by a disturbance observer-based control design. The effectiveness of the approach is illustrated through simulation and experimental testing with a three-disk torsional system, which is subjected to control voltage limit and stiction. While the internal model-following control is limited to minimum phase systems, the second approach, external model-following control, does not involve feedback linearization and can be applied to non-minimum phase systems. The unstable zero dynamics are assumed to have been modelled in the design of the existing linear controller. The laboratory tests for this method include a three-disk torsional pendulum, an inverted pendulum, and a flexible-base robot manipulator. The external model-following control architecture is further extended in three ways. The first extension is an approach for control of multivariable nonlinear systems. The second extension is a decentralized adaptive control approach for large-scale interconnected systems. The third extension is to make use of an adaptive observer to augment a linear observer-based controller. In this extension, augmenting terms for the adaptive observer can be used to achieve adaptation in

  14. Content-adaptive ghost imaging of dynamic scenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; Suo, Jinli; Hu, Xuemei; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    Limited by long acquisition time of 2D ghost imaging, current ghost imaging systems are so far inapplicable for dynamic scenes. However, it's been demonstrated that nature images are spatiotemporally redundant and the redundancy is scene dependent. Inspired by that, we propose a content-adaptive computational ghost imaging approach to achieve high reconstruction quality under a small number of measurements, and thus achieve ghost imaging of dynamic scenes. To utilize content-adaptive inter-frame redundancy, we put the reconstruction under an iterative reweighted optimization, with non-uniform weight computed from temporal-correlated frame sequences. The proposed approach can achieve dynamic imaging at 16fps with 64×64-pixel resolution. PMID:27137022

  15. Dynamic analysis of neural encoding by point process adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Eden, Uri T; Frank, Loren M; Barbieri, Riccardo; Solo, Victor; Brown, Emery N

    2004-05-01

    Neural receptive fields are dynamic in that with experience, neurons change their spiking responses to relevant stimuli. To understand how neural systems adapt their representations of biological information, analyses of receptive field plasticity from experimental measurements are crucial. Adaptive signal processing, the well-established engineering discipline for characterizing the temporal evolution of system parameters, suggests a framework for studying the plasticity of receptive fields. We use the Bayes' rule Chapman-Kolmogorov paradigm with a linear state equation and point process observation models to derive adaptive filters appropriate for estimation from neural spike trains. We derive point process filter analogues of the Kalman filter, recursive least squares, and steepest-descent algorithms and describe the properties of these new filters. We illustrate our algorithms in two simulated data examples. The first is a study of slow and rapid evolution of spatial receptive fields in hippocampal neurons. The second is an adaptive decoding study in which a signal is decoded from ensemble neural spiking activity as the receptive fields of the neurons in the ensemble evolve. Our results provide a paradigm for adaptive estimation for point process observations and suggest a practical approach for constructing filtering algorithms to track neural receptive field dynamics on a millisecond timescale. PMID:15070506

  16. Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Bruce D.; Hines, John W.; Agasid, Elwood F.; Buckley, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The utility of small spacecraft based on the University cubesat standard is becoming evident as more and more agencies and organizations are launching or planning to include nanosatellites in their mission portfolios. Cubesats are typically launched as secondary spacecraft in enclosed, containerized deployers such as the CalPoly Poly Picosat Orbital Deployer (P-POD) system. The P-POD allows for ease of integration and significantly reduces the risk exposure to the primary spacecraft and mission. NASA/ARC and the Operationally Responsive Space office are collaborating to develop a Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS), which can accommodate multiple cubesat or cubesat-derived spacecraft on a single launch vehicle. NLAS is composed of the adapter structure, P-POD or similar spacecraft dispensers, and a sequencer/deployer system. This paper describes the NLAS system and it s future capabilities, and also provides status on the system s development and potential first use in space.

  17. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. PMID:25583299

  18. Adaptive Hypermedia Educational System Based on XML Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Yeongtae; Wang, Changjong; Lee, Sehoon

    This paper proposes an adaptive hypermedia educational system using XML technologies, such as XML, XSL, XSLT, and XLink. Adaptive systems are capable of altering the presentation of the content of the hypermedia on the basis of a dynamic understanding of the individual user. The user profile can be collected in a user model, while the knowledge…

  19. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  20. Adaptive dynamics for physiologically structured population models.

    PubMed

    Durinx, Michel; Metz, J A J Hans; Meszéna, Géza

    2008-05-01

    We develop a systematic toolbox for analyzing the adaptive dynamics of multidimensional traits in physiologically structured population models with point equilibria (sensu Dieckmann et al. in Theor. Popul. Biol. 63:309-338, 2003). Firstly, we show how the canonical equation of adaptive dynamics (Dieckmann and Law in J. Math. Biol. 34:579-612, 1996), an approximation for the rate of evolutionary change in characters under directional selection, can be extended so as to apply to general physiologically structured population models with multiple birth states. Secondly, we show that the invasion fitness function (up to and including second order terms, in the distances of the trait vectors to the singularity) for a community of N coexisting types near an evolutionarily singular point has a rational form, which is model-independent in the following sense: the form depends on the strategies of the residents and the invader, and on the second order partial derivatives of the one-resident fitness function at the singular point. This normal form holds for Lotka-Volterra models as well as for physiologically structured population models with multiple birth states, in discrete as well as continuous time and can thus be considered universal for the evolutionary dynamics in the neighbourhood of singular points. Only in the case of one-dimensional trait spaces or when N = 1 can the normal form be reduced to a Taylor polynomial. Lastly we show, in the form of a stylized recipe, how these results can be combined into a systematic approach for the analysis of the (large) class of evolutionary models that satisfy the above restrictions. PMID:17943289

  1. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-04

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  2. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-01

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  3. Adaptive network dynamics and evolution of leadership in collective migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Darren; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of leadership in migratory populations depends not only on costs and benefits of leadership investments but also on the opportunities for individuals to rely on cues from others through social interactions. We derive an analytically tractable adaptive dynamic network model of collective migration with fast timescale migration dynamics and slow timescale adaptive dynamics of individual leadership investment and social interaction. For large populations, our analysis of bifurcations with respect to investment cost explains the observed hysteretic effect associated with recovery of migration in fragmented environments. Further, we show a minimum connectivity threshold above which there is evolutionary branching into leader and follower populations. For small populations, we show how the topology of the underlying social interaction network influences the emergence and location of leaders in the adaptive system. Our model and analysis can be extended to study the dynamics of collective tracking or collective learning more generally. Thus, this work may inform the design of robotic networks where agents use decentralized strategies that balance direct environmental measurements with agent interactions.

  4. A simplified adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanescu, Liviu; Racine, René; Nadeau, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    Affordable adaptive optics on small telescopes allow to introduce the technology to a large community and provide opportunities to train new specialists in the field. We have developed a low order, low cost adaptive optics system for the 1.6m telescope of the Mont Megantic Observatory. The system corrects tip-tilt, focus, astigmatisms and one trefoil term. It explores a number of new approaches. The sensor receives a single out-of-focus image of the reference star. The central obstruction of the telescope can free the focus detection from the effect of seeing and allows a very small defocus. The deformable mirror is profiled so as to preserve a parabolic shape under pressure from actuators located at its edge. A separate piezoelectric platform drives the tilt mirror.

  5. Motion adaptive signal integration-high dynamic range (MASI-HDR) video processing for dynamic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentino, Michael R.; Berends, David C.; Zhang, David C.; Gudis, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Two of the biggest challenges in designing U×V vision systems are properly representing high dynamic range scene content using low dynamic range components and reducing camera motion blur. SRI's MASI-HDR (Motion Adaptive Signal Integration-High Dynamic Range) is a novel technique for generating blur-reduced video using multiple captures for each displayed frame while increasing the effective camera dynamic range by four bits or more. MASI-HDR processing thus provides high performance video from rapidly moving platforms in real-world conditions in low latency real time, enabling even the most demanding applications on air, ground and water.

  6. Nitric oxide regulates vascular adaptive mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Knaub, Leslie A; Olivera-Fragoso, Luis F; Keller, Amy C; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Watson, Peter A; Reusch, Jane E B

    2013-06-15

    Cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and physical inactivity, are all correlated with impaired endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function and decreased nitric oxide (NO) production. NO-mediated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been established in many tissues, yet the role of eNOS in vascular mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is unclear. We hypothesized that genetic eNOS deletion and 3-day nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents would result in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and defunct fission/fusion and autophagy profiles within the aorta. We observed a significant, eNOS expression-dependent decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunits from complexes I, II, III, and V in eNOS heterozygotes and eNOS null mice compared with age-matched controls. In response to NOS inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment in Sprague Dawley rats, significant decreases were observed in ETC protein subunits from complexes I, III, and IV as well as voltage-dependent anion channel 1. Decreased protein content of upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, cAMP response element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, were observed in response to 3-day L-NAME treatment. Both genetic eNOS deletion and NOS inhibition resulted in decreased manganese superoxide dismutase protein. L-NAME treatment resulted in significant changes to mitochondrial dynamic protein profiles with decreased fusion, increased fission, and minimally perturbed autophagy. In addition, L-NAME treatment blocked mitochondrial adaptation to an exercise intervention in the aorta. These results suggest that eNOS/NO play a role in basal and adaptive mitochondrial biogenesis in the vasculature and regulation of mitochondrial turnover. PMID:23585138

  7. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  8. Analog forecasting with dynamics-adapted kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Analog forecasting is a nonparametric technique introduced by Lorenz in 1969 which predicts the evolution of states of a dynamical system (or observables defined on the states) by following the evolution of the sample in a historical record of observations which most closely resembles the current initial data. Here, we introduce a suite of forecasting methods which improve traditional analog forecasting by combining ideas from kernel methods developed in harmonic analysis and machine learning and state-space reconstruction for dynamical systems. A key ingredient of our approach is to replace single-analog forecasting with weighted ensembles of analogs constructed using local similarity kernels. The kernels used here employ a number of dynamics-dependent features designed to improve forecast skill, including Takens’ delay-coordinate maps (to recover information in the initial data lost through partial observations) and a directional dependence on the dynamical vector field generating the data. Mathematically, our approach is closely related to kernel methods for out-of-sample extension of functions, and we discuss alternative strategies based on the Nyström method and the multiscale Laplacian pyramids technique. We illustrate these techniques in applications to forecasting in a low-order deterministic model for atmospheric dynamics with chaotic metastability, and interannual-scale forecasting in the North Pacific sector of a comprehensive climate model. We find that forecasts based on kernel-weighted ensembles have significantly higher skill than the conventional approach following a single analog.

  9. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  10. Certification Considerations for Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Cofer, Darren; Musliner, David J.; Mueller, Joseph; Engstrom, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Advanced capabilities planned for the next generation of aircraft, including those that will operate within the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), will necessarily include complex new algorithms and non-traditional software elements. These aircraft will likely incorporate adaptive control algorithms that will provide enhanced safety, autonomy, and robustness during adverse conditions. Unmanned aircraft will operate alongside manned aircraft in the National Airspace (NAS), with intelligent software performing the high-level decision-making functions normally performed by human pilots. Even human-piloted aircraft will necessarily include more autonomy. However, there are serious barriers to the deployment of new capabilities, especially for those based upon software including adaptive control (AC) and artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms. Current civil aviation certification processes are based on the idea that the correct behavior of a system must be completely specified and verified prior to operation. This report by Rockwell Collins and SIFT documents our comprehensive study of the state of the art in intelligent and adaptive algorithms for the civil aviation domain, categorizing the approaches used and identifying gaps and challenges associated with certification of each approach.

  11. Null steering of adaptive beamforming using linear constraint minimum variance assisted by particle swarm optimization, dynamic mutated artificial immune system, and gravitational search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ismail, Mahamod; Kibria, Salehin; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program. PMID:25147859

  12. Null Steering of Adaptive Beamforming Using Linear Constraint Minimum Variance Assisted by Particle Swarm Optimization, Dynamic Mutated Artificial Immune System, and Gravitational Search Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Sieh Kiong, Tiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Ismail, Mahamod; Salem, Balasem

    2014-01-01

    Linear constraint minimum variance (LCMV) is one of the adaptive beamforming techniques that is commonly applied to cancel interfering signals and steer or produce a strong beam to the desired signal through its computed weight vectors. However, weights computed by LCMV usually are not able to form the radiation beam towards the target user precisely and not good enough to reduce the interference by placing null at the interference sources. It is difficult to improve and optimize the LCMV beamforming technique through conventional empirical approach. To provide a solution to this problem, artificial intelligence (AI) technique is explored in order to enhance the LCMV beamforming ability. In this paper, particle swarm optimization (PSO), dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS), and gravitational search algorithm (GSA) are incorporated into the existing LCMV technique in order to improve the weights of LCMV. The simulation result demonstrates that received signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR) of target user can be significantly improved by the integration of PSO, DM-AIS, and GSA in LCMV through the suppression of interference in undesired direction. Furthermore, the proposed GSA can be applied as a more effective technique in LCMV beamforming optimization as compared to the PSO technique. The algorithms were implemented using Matlab program. PMID:25147859

  13. Adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrs, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    Stability and robustness properties of a wide class of adaptive control algorithms in the presence of unmodeled dynamics and output disturbances were investigated. The class of adaptive algorithms considered are those commonly referred to as model reference adaptive control algorithms, self-tuning controllers, and dead beat adaptive controllers, developed for both continuous-time systems and discrete-time systems. A unified analytical approach was developed to examine the class of existing adaptive algorithms. It was discovered that all existing algorithms contain an infinite gain operator in the dynamic system that defines command reference errors and parameter errors; it is argued that such an infinite gain operator appears to be generic to all adaptive algorithms, whether they exhibit explicit or implicit parameter identification. It is concluded that none of the adaptive algorithms considered can be used with confidence in a practical control system design, because instability will set in with a high probability.

  14. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  15. Adaptive mesh refinement for 1-dimensional gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.; Rodrigue, G.; Berger, M.; Oliger, J.

    1982-01-01

    We consider the solution of the one-dimensional equation of gas-dynamics. Accurate numerical solutions are difficult to obtain on a given spatial mesh because of the existence of physical regions where components of the exact solution are either discontinuous or have large gradient changes. Numerical methods treat these phenomena in a variety of ways. In this paper, the method of adaptive mesh refinement is used. A thorough description of this method for general hyperbolic systems is given elsewhere and only properties of the method pertinent to the system are elaborated.

  16. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  17. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  18. Adaptable state based control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor); Dvorak, Daniel L. (Inventor); Gostelow, Kim P. (Inventor); Starbird, Thomas W. (Inventor); Gat, Erann (Inventor); Chien, Steve Ankuo (Inventor); Keller, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An autonomous controller, comprised of a state knowledge manager, a control executor, hardware proxies and a statistical estimator collaborates with a goal elaborator, with which it shares common models of the behavior of the system and the controller. The elaborator uses the common models to generate from temporally indeterminate sets of goals, executable goals to be executed by the controller. The controller may be updated to operate in a different system or environment than that for which it was originally designed by the replacement of shared statistical models and by the instantiation of a new set of state variable objects derived from a state variable class. The adaptation of the controller does not require substantial modification of the goal elaborator for its application to the new system or environment.

  19. Space Station Payload Adaptation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Kenneth R.; Adams, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    The development and design of a system of containers for the efficient integration of Space Station payloads is described called the Space Station Payload Adaptation System (SSPAS). The SSPAS was developed to address the incorporation of multiple payloads, the use of a small payload carrier, large numbers of samples, and on-orbit servicing. SSPAS subsystems such as the Spacelab rack are modular and designed for integration into the 'Quick Is Beautiful' (QIB) facility. The QIB is designed to provide access to space for small- and medium-sized microgravity research projects and proof-of-concept investigations. The power-distribution and heat-rejection potential of the QIB are described, and an improved experiment-apparatus container is proposed. The SSPAS rack-mounting and container concepts are concluded to make up an efficent system that can effectively exploit the R&D potential of the Space Station.

  20. Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James; Cappuccio, Gelsomina

    2015-01-01

    The Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) was developed to increase access to space while simplifying the integration process of miniature satellites, called nanosats or CubeSats, onto launch vehicles. A standard CubeSat measures about 10 cm square, and is referred to as a 1-unit (1U) CubeSat. A single NLAS provides the capability to deploy 24U of CubeSats. The system is designed to accommodate satellites measuring 1U, 1.5U, 2U, 3U and 6U sizes for deployment into orbit. The NLAS may be configured for use on different launch vehicles. The system also enables flight demonstrations of new technologies in the space environment.

  1. Generalization in Adaptation to Stable and Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kadiallah, Abdelhamid; Franklin, David W.; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Humans skillfully manipulate objects and tools despite the inherent instability. In order to succeed at these tasks, the sensorimotor control system must build an internal representation of both the force and mechanical impedance. As it is not practical to either learn or store motor commands for every possible future action, the sensorimotor control system generalizes a control strategy for a range of movements based on learning performed over a set of movements. Here, we introduce a computational model for this learning and generalization, which specifies how to learn feedforward muscle activity in a function of the state space. Specifically, by incorporating co-activation as a function of error into the feedback command, we are able to derive an algorithm from a gradient descent minimization of motion error and effort, subject to maintaining a stability margin. This algorithm can be used to learn to coordinate any of a variety of motor primitives such as force fields, muscle synergies, physical models or artificial neural networks. This model for human learning and generalization is able to adapt to both stable and unstable dynamics, and provides a controller for generating efficient adaptive motor behavior in robots. Simulation results exhibit predictions consistent with all experiments on learning of novel dynamics requiring adaptation of force and impedance, and enable us to re-examine some of the previous interpretations of experiments on generalization. PMID:23056191

  2. Generalization in adaptation to stable and unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kadiallah, Abdelhamid; Franklin, David W; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Humans skillfully manipulate objects and tools despite the inherent instability. In order to succeed at these tasks, the sensorimotor control system must build an internal representation of both the force and mechanical impedance. As it is not practical to either learn or store motor commands for every possible future action, the sensorimotor control system generalizes a control strategy for a range of movements based on learning performed over a set of movements. Here, we introduce a computational model for this learning and generalization, which specifies how to learn feedforward muscle activity in a function of the state space. Specifically, by incorporating co-activation as a function of error into the feedback command, we are able to derive an algorithm from a gradient descent minimization of motion error and effort, subject to maintaining a stability margin. This algorithm can be used to learn to coordinate any of a variety of motor primitives such as force fields, muscle synergies, physical models or artificial neural networks. This model for human learning and generalization is able to adapt to both stable and unstable dynamics, and provides a controller for generating efficient adaptive motor behavior in robots. Simulation results exhibit predictions consistent with all experiments on learning of novel dynamics requiring adaptation of force and impedance, and enable us to re-examine some of the previous interpretations of experiments on generalization. PMID:23056191

  3. Adaptive dynamic programming for auto-resilient video streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Li, Xingmei; Wang, Wei; Wu, Guoping

    2007-11-01

    Wireless video transmission encounters higher error rate than in wired network, which introduces distortion into the error-sensitive compressed data, reducing the quality of the playback video. Therefore, to ensure the end-to-end quality, wireless video needs a transmission system including both efficient source coding scheme and transmission technology against the influence of the channel error. This paper tackles a dynamic programming algorithm for robust video streaming over error-prone channels. An auto-resilient multiple-description coding with optimized transmission strategy has been proposed. Further study is done on the computational complexity of rate-distortion optimized video streaming and a dynamic programming algorithm is considered. Experiment results show that video streaming with adaptive dynamic programming gains better playback video quality at the receiver when transmitted through error-prone mobile channel.

  4. Averaging analysis for discrete time and sampled data adaptive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Li-Chen; Bai, Er-Wei; Sastry, Shankar S.

    1986-01-01

    Earlier continuous time averaging theorems are extended to the nonlinear discrete time case. Theorems for the study of the convergence analysis of discrete time adaptive identification and control systems are used. Instability theorems are also derived and used for the study of robust stability and instability of adaptive control schemes applied to sampled data systems. As a by product, the effects of sampling on unmodeled dynamics in continuous time systems are also studied.

  5. Spatial coupled disease-behavior framework as a dynamic and adaptive system. Reply to comments on "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks: A review"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Andrews, Michael A.; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Lin; Bauch, Chris T.

    2015-12-01

    We would like to begin this response by recognizing all the insightful and thought-provoking comments to our review "Coupled disease-behavior dynamics on complex networks" [1]. We find that, with their diverse expertise, all the commentators enrich the discussion on this topic, and also identify important, interesting questions [2-13], indicating how much space there still is for the development of the field. To give the readers a systematic understanding, these opinions and suggestions are roughly divided into two classes: (i) whether the coupled models could be closer to realistic observations, yet simpler [2-5,7-10,13]; and (ii) whether the hypothesis of network models could mimic the empirical networks more accurately [5-8,10-13].

  6. Adaptive dynamic programming as a theory of sensorimotor control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Many characteristics of sensorimotor control can be explained by models based on optimization and optimal control theories. However, most of the previous models assume that the central nervous system has access to the precise knowledge of the sensorimotor system and its interacting environment. This viewpoint is difficult to be justified theoretically and has not been convincingly validated by experiments. To address this problem, this paper presents a new computational mechanism for sensorimotor control from a perspective of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP), which shares some features of reinforcement learning. The ADP-based model for sensorimotor control suggests that a command signal for the human movement is derived directly from the real-time sensory data, without the need to identify the system dynamics. An iterative learning scheme based on the proposed ADP theory is developed, along with rigorous convergence analysis. Interestingly, the computational model as advocated here is able to reproduce the motor learning behavior observed in experiments where a divergent force field or velocity-dependent force field was present. In addition, this modeling strategy provides a clear way to perform stability analysis of the overall system. Hence, we conjecture that human sensorimotor systems use an ADP-type mechanism to control movements and to achieve successful adaptation to uncertainties present in the environment. PMID:24962078

  7. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is to model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.

  8. Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System

    2004-10-14

    EMCAS is a model developed for the simulation and analysis of electricity markets. As power markets are relatively new and still continue to evolve, there is a growing need for advanced modeling approaches that simulate the behavior of electricity markets over time and how market participants may act and react to the changing economic, financial, and regulatory environments in which they operate. A new and rather promising approach applied in the EMCAS software is tomore » model the electricity market as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation scheme. With its unique combination of various novel approaches, the Agent Based Modeling System (ABMS) provides the ability to capture and investigate the complex interactions between the physical infrastructures (generation, transmission, and distribution) and the economic behavior of market participants that are a trademark of the newly emerging markets.« less

  9. Inherent robustness of discrete-time adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Global stability robustness with respect to unmodeled dynamics, arbitrary bounded internal noise, as well as external disturbance is shown to exist for a class of discrete-time adaptive control systems when the regressor vectors of these systems are persistently exciting. Although fast adaptation is definitely undesirable, so far as attaining the greatest amount of global stability robustness is concerned, slow adaptation is shown to be not necessarily beneficial. The entire analysis in this paper holds for systems with slowly varying return difference matrices; the plants in these systems need not be slowly varying.

  10. Dynamic modeling and adaptive control for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, C. H. C.; Wang, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    Of all large space structural systems, space stations present a unique challenge and requirement to advanced control technology. Their operations require control system stability over an extremely broad range of parameter changes and high level of disturbances. During shuttle docking the system mass may suddenly increase by more than 100% and during station assembly the mass may vary even more drastically. These coupled with the inherent dynamic model uncertainties associated with large space structural systems require highly sophisticated control systems that can grow as the stations evolve and cope with the uncertainties and time-varying elements to maintain the stability and pointing of the space stations. The aspects of space station operational properties are first examined, including configurations, dynamic models, shuttle docking contact dynamics, solar panel interaction, and load reduction to yield a set of system models and conditions. A model reference adaptive control algorithm along with the inner-loop plant augmentation design for controlling the space stations under severe operational conditions of shuttle docking, excessive model parameter errors, and model truncation are then investigated. The instability problem caused by the zero-frequency rigid body modes and a proposed solution using plant augmentation are addressed. Two sets of sufficient conditions which guarantee the globablly asymptotic stability for the space station systems are obtained.

  11. Variable neural adaptive robust control: a switched system approach.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Żak, Stanislaw H

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multiinput multioutput uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a novel variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. It can determine the network structure online dynamically by adding or removing RBFs according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is systematically considered in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations. PMID:25881366

  12. Dynamic data-driven sensor network adaptation for border control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bein, Doina; Madan, Bharat B.; Phoha, Shashi; Rajtmajer, Sarah; Rish, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Given a specific scenario for the border control problem, we propose a dynamic data-driven adaptation of the associated sensor network via embedded software agents which make sensor network control, adaptation and collaboration decisions based on the contextual information value of competing data provided by different multi-modal sensors. We further propose the use of influence diagrams to guide data-driven decision making in selecting the appropriate action or course of actions which maximize a given utility function by designing a sensor embedded software agent that uses an influence diagram to make decisions about whether to engage or not engage higher level sensors for accurately detecting human presence in the region. The overarching goal of the sensor system is to increase the probability of target detection and classification and reduce the rate of false alarms. The proposed decision support software agent is validated experimentally on a laboratory testbed for multiple border control scenarios.

  13. The Adaptability Evaluation of Enterprise Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjuan; Xue, Chaogai; Dong, Lili

    In this paper, a set of evaluation system is proposed by GQM (Goal-Question-Metrics) for enterprise information systems. Then based on Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS), the evaluation model is proposed to evaluate enterprise information systems' adaptability. Finally, the application of the evaluation system and model is proved via a case study, which provides references for optimizing enterprise information systems' adaptability.

  14. Solar dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the solar dynamic system is discussed. The benefits of the solar dynamic system over pv systems are enumerated. The history of the solar dynamic development is recounted. The purpose and approach of the advanced development are outlined. Critical concentrator technology and critical heat recover technology are examined.

  15. Neural network with dynamically adaptable neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is an adaptive neuron for use in neural network processors. The adaptive neuron participates in the supervised learning phase of operation on a co-equal basis with the synapse matrix elements by adaptively changing its gain in a similar manner to the change of weights in the synapse IO elements. In this manner, training time is decreased by as much as three orders of magnitude.

  16. The Branching Bifurcation of Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Rossa, Fabio; Dercole, Fabio; Landi, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    We unfold the bifurcation involving the loss of evolutionary stability of an equilibrium of the canonical equation of Adaptive Dynamics (AD). The equation deterministically describes the expected long-term evolution of inheritable traits — phenotypes or strategies — of coevolving populations, in the limit of rare and small mutations. In the vicinity of a stable equilibrium of the AD canonical equation, a mutant type can invade and coexist with the present — resident — types, whereas the fittest always win far from equilibrium. After coexistence, residents and mutants effectively diversify, according to the enlarged canonical equation, only if natural selection favors outer rather than intermediate traits — the equilibrium being evolutionarily unstable, rather than stable. Though the conditions for evolutionary branching — the joint effect of resident-mutant coexistence and evolutionary instability — have been known for long, the unfolding of the bifurcation has remained a missing tile of AD, the reason being related to the nonsmoothness of the mutant invasion fitness after branching. In this paper, we develop a methodology that allows the approximation of the invasion fitness after branching in terms of the expansion of the (smooth) fitness before branching. We then derive a canonical model for the branching bifurcation and perform its unfolding around the loss of evolutionary stability. We cast our analysis in the simplest (but classical) setting of asexual, unstructured populations living in an isolated, homogeneous, and constant abiotic environment; individual traits are one-dimensional; intra- as well as inter-specific ecological interactions are described in the vicinity of a stationary regime.

  17. The Feasibility of Adaptive Unstructured Computations On Petaflops Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Heber, Gerd; Gao, Guang; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the advantages of mesh adaptation, unstructured grids, and dynamic load balancing. It illustrates parallel adaptive communications, and explains PLUM (Parallel dynamic load balancing for adaptive unstructured meshes), and PSAW (Proper Self Avoiding Walks).

  18. Static and dynamic responses of an ultrathin adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro; Brusa, Guido; Gallieni, Daniele; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Davison, Warren B.

    1999-09-01

    We present the results of a compete set of static and dynamic runs of the FEA model of the MMT adaptive secondary. The thin mirror is the most delicate component of the MMT adaptive secondary unit, as it provides the deformable optical surface able to correct the incoming wavefront. The static performances are evaluated as a function of the various load cases arising form gravitational loads and from the forces deriving from the magnetic interactions between actuators. In addition, computations were performed to assess the dynamic response to the high bandwidth, adaptive correcting force.s In both cases, the performances of the adaptive mirror design are able to accommodate the severe specifications.

  19. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, J. M.; Verseux, C.; Gentry, D.; Moffet, A.; Thayabaran, R.; Wong, N.; Rothschild, L.

    2013-12-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates[Wielgoss et al., 2013]. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques[Wassmann et al., 2010]. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols[Alcántara-Díaz et al., 2004; Goldman and Travisano, 2011]. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of

  20. Indirect Adaptive Fuzzy Power System Stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saoudi, Kamel; Bouchama, Ziad; Harmas, Mohamed Naguib; Zehar, Khaled

    2008-06-01

    A power system stabilizer based on adaptive fuzzy technique is presented. The design of a fuzzy logic power system stabilizer (FLPSS) requires the collection of fuzzy IF-THEN rules which are used to initialize an adaptive fuzzy power system AFPSS. The rule-base can be then tuned on-line so that the stabilizer can adapt to the different operating conditions occurring in the power system. The adaptation laws are developed based on a Lyapunov synthesis approach. Assessing the validity of this technique simulation of a power system is conducted and results are discussed.

  1. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, Uliana; Winkler, Roland G.; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  2. Adaptive planning for applications with dynamic objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadavi, Khosrow; Hsu, Wen-Ling; Pinedo, Michael

    1992-01-01

    We devise a qualitative control layer to be integrated into a real-time multi-agent reactive planner. The reactive planning system consists of distributed planning agents attending to various perspectives of the task environment. Each perspective corresponds to an objective. The set of objectives considered are sometimes in conflict with each other. Each agent receives information about events as they occur, and a set of actions based on heuristics can be taken by the agents. Within the qualitative control scheme, we use a set of qualitative feature vectors to describe the effects of applying actions. A qualitative transition vector is used to denote the qualitative distance between the current state and the target state. We will then apply on-line learning at the qualitative control level to achieve adaptive planning. Our goal is to design a mechanism to refine the heuristics used by the reactive planner every time an action is taken toward achieving the objectives, using feedback from the results of the actions. When the outcome is compared with expectations, our prior objectives may be modified and a new set of objectives (or a new assessment of the relative importance of the different objectives) can be introduced. Because we are able to obtain better estimates of the time-varying objectives, the reactive strategies can be improved and better prediction can be achieved.

  3. Structural dynamic health monitoring of adaptive CFRP structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Stephan; Melcher, Joerg; Breitbach, Elmar J.; Sachau, Delf

    1999-07-01

    The DLR Institute of Structural Mechanics is engaged in the construction and optimization of adaptive structures for aerospace and terrestrial applications. Due to the FFS- Project, one of the recent works of the Institute is the reduction of buffet induced vibration loads at a fin. The construction of modern aircrafts is influenced b the increasing use of fiber composites. They have more specific stiffness and strength properties than metals. On the other hand the layered structure leads to new kinds of damages like delaminations. In the fin interface there are actuators and sensors integrated. Therefore the fin is connected with a controller. For the extension of this adaptive system towards an on-line tool for health monitoring this controller can be used as an identifier of the structure's modal parameters. The most promising procedure is based on MX filters. These filters constitute the filter coefficients from which a fast transformation procedure extracts the modal parameters. The changes of these parameters are related to the location and extent of the damage. So when using the already integrate controller for system identification, one can have a low-cost on-line damage detection for dynamic adaptive structures. First off-line test at CFRP plates have shown the ability to detect delaminations.

  4. Optimal spectral tracking--adapting to dynamic regime change.

    PubMed

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Halliday, David M

    2011-01-30

    Real world data do not always obey the statistical restraints imposed upon them by sophisticated analysis techniques. In spectral analysis for instance, an ergodic process--the interchangeability of temporal for spatial averaging--is assumed for a repeat-trial design. Many evolutionary scenarios, such as learning and motor consolidation, do not conform to such linear behaviour and should be approached from a more flexible perspective. To this end we previously introduced the method of optimal spectral tracking (OST) in the study of trial-varying parameters. In this extension to our work we modify the OST routines to provide an adaptive implementation capable of reacting to dynamic transitions in the underlying system state. In so doing, we generalise our approach to characterise both slow-varying and rapid fluctuations in time-series, simultaneously providing a metric of system stability. The approach is first applied to a surrogate dataset and compared to both our original non-adaptive solution and spectrogram approaches. The adaptive OST is seen to display fast convergence and desirable statistical properties. All three approaches are then applied to a neurophysiological recording obtained during a study on anaesthetic monitoring. Local field potentials acquired from the posterior hypothalamic region of a deep brain stimulation patient undergoing anaesthesia were analysed. The characterisation of features such as response delay, time-to-peak and modulation brevity are considered. PMID:21115043

  5. Dynamic mesh adaption for triangular and tetrahedral grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: requirements for dynamic mesh adaption; linked-list data structure; edge-based data structure; adaptive-grid data structure; three types of element subdivision; mesh refinement; mesh coarsening; additional constraints for coarsening; anisotropic error indicator for edges; unstructured-grid Euler solver; inviscid 3-D wing; and mesh quality for solution-adaptive grids. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  7. Adaptable formations utilizing heterogeneous unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Laura E.; Garcia, Richard; Fields, MaryAnne; Valavanis, Kimon

    2009-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling and coordinating heterogeneous unmanned systems required to move as a group while maintaining formation. We propose a strategy to coordinate groups of unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) with one or more unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs can be utilized in one of two ways: (1) as alpha robots to guide the UGVs; and (2) as beta robots to surround the UGVs and adapt accordingly. In the first approach, the UAV guides a swarm of UGVs controlling their overall formation. In the second approach, the UGVs guide the UAVs controlling their formation. The unmanned systems are brought into a formation utilizing artificial potential fields generated from normal and sigmoid functions. These functions control the overall swarm geometry. Nonlinear limiting functions are defined to provide tighter swarm control by modifying and adjusting a set of control variables forcing the swarm to behave according to set constraints. Formations derived are subsets of elliptical curves but can be generalized to any curvilinear shape. Both approaches are demonstrated in simulation and experimentally. To demonstrate the second approach in simulation, a swarm of forty UAVs is utilized in a convoy protection mission. As a convoy of UGVs travels, UAVs dynamically and intelligently adapt their formation in order to protect the convoy of vehicles as it moves. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the approach using a fully autonomous group of three UGVs and a single UAV helicopter for coordination.

  8. Adaptive systems research in the NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R.

    1973-01-01

    The past contributions of NASA to adaptive control technology are reviewed. The review places emphasis on aircraft applications although spacecraft and launch vehicle control applications are included. Particular emphasis is given to the adaptive control system used in the X-15 research aircraft. Problem areas that limited the realizable performance of this adaptive system are discussed. Current technological capabilities are used to extrapolate the present-day potential for adaptive flight control. Specifically, the potential created by use of the modern high-speed digital computer in flight control is discussed. Present plans for research in digital adaptive control systems for the NASA F8-C digital fly-by-wire program are presented. These plans are currently envisioned to include research in at least two types of adaptive controls, the system identification/on-line design type, and the model reference type.

  9. Dynamic modeling of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.; White, J.

    1995-12-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC) Process and Project Engineering (P&PE) personnel continue to refine and modify dynamic modeling or simulations for advanced power systems. P&PE, supported by Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc. (G/C), has adapted PC/TRAX commercial dynamic software to include equipment found in advanced power systems. PC/TRAX`s software contains the equations that describe the operation of standard power plant equipment such as gas turbines, feedwater pumps, and steam turbines. The METC team has incorporated customized dynamic models using Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) code for pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustors, carbonizers, and other components that are found in Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (APFBC) systems. A dynamic model of a commercial-size APFBC power plant was constructed in order to determine representative operating characteristics of the plant and to gain some insight into the best type of control system design. The dynamic model contains both process and control model components. This presentation covers development of a model used to describe the commercial APFBC power plant. Results of exercising the model to simulate plant performance are described and illustrated. Information gained during the APFBC study was applied to a dynamic model of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC system. Some initial results from this study are also presented.

  10. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  11. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  12. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  13. Visual Cues for an Adaptive Expert System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Helen B.

    NCR (National Cash Register) Corporation is pursuing opportunities to make their point of sale (POS) terminals easy to use and easy to learn. To approach the goal of making the technology invisible to the user, NCR has developed an adaptive expert prototype system for a department store POS operation. The structure for the adaptive system, the…

  14. The Computerized Adaptive Testing System Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.; Sympson, J. B.

    The Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) project is a joint Armed Services coordinated effort to develop and evaluate a system for automated, adaptive administration of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The CAT is a system for administering personnel tests that differs from conventional test administration in two major…

  15. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  16. Multithreaded Model for Dynamic Load Balancing Parallel Adaptive PDE Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisochoides, Nikos

    1995-01-01

    We present a multithreaded model for the dynamic load-balancing of numerical, adaptive computations required for the solution of Partial Differential Equations (PDE's) on multiprocessors. Multithreading is used as a means of exploring concurrency in the processor level in order to tolerate synchronization costs inherent to traditional (non-threaded) parallel adaptive PDE solvers. Our preliminary analysis for parallel, adaptive PDE solvers indicates that multithreading can be used an a mechanism to mask overheads required for the dynamic balancing of processor workloads with computations required for the actual numerical solution of the PDE's. Also, multithreading can simplify the implementation of dynamic load-balancing algorithms, a task that is very difficult for traditional data parallel adaptive PDE computations. Unfortunately, multithreading does not always simplify program complexity, often makes code re-usability not an easy task, and increases software complexity.

  17. Self-characterization of linear and nonlinear adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Peter J; Conan, Rodolphe; Keskin, Onur; Bradley, Colin; Agathoklis, Pan

    2008-01-10

    We present methods used to determine the linear or nonlinear static response and the linear dynamic response of an adaptive optics (AO) system. This AO system consists of a nonlinear microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror (DM), a linear tip-tilt mirror (TTM), a control computer, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The system is modeled using a single-input-single-output structure to determine the one-dimensional transfer function of the dynamic response of the chain of system hardware. An AO system has been shown to be able to characterize its own response without additional instrumentation. Experimentally determined models are given for a TTM and a DM. PMID:18188192

  18. Analysis of dynamic deformation processes with adaptive KALMAN-filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the approach of a full system analysis is shown quantifying a dynamic structural ("white-box"-) model for the calculation of thermal deformations of bar-shaped machine elements. The task was motivated from mechanical engineering searching new methods for the precise prediction and computational compensation of thermal influences in the heating and cooling phases of machine tools (i.e. robot arms, etc.). The quantification of thermal deformations under variable dynamic loads requires the modelling of the non-stationary spatial temperature distribution inside the object. Based upon FOURIERS law of heat flow the high-grade non-linear temperature gradient is represented by a system of partial differential equations within the framework of a dynamic Finite Element topology. It is shown that adaptive KALMAN-filtering is suitable to quantify relevant disturbance influences and to identify thermal parameters (i.e. thermal diffusivity) with a deviation of only 0,2%. As result an identified (and verified) parametric model for the realistic prediction respectively simulation of dynamic temperature processes is presented. Classifying the thermal bend as the main deformation quantity of bar-shaped machine tools, the temperature model is extended to a temperature deformation model. In lab tests thermal load steps are applied to an aluminum column. Independent control measurements show that the identified model can be used to predict the columns bend with a mean deviation (r.m.s.) smaller than 10 mgon. These results show that the deformation model is a precise predictor and suitable for realistic simulations of thermal deformations. Experiments with modified heat sources will be necessary to verify the model in further frequency spectra of dynamic thermal loads.

  19. Adaptation and dynamics of cat retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Enroth-Cugell, Christina; Shapley, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. The impulse/quantum (I/Q) ratio was measured as a function of background illumination for rod-dominated, pure central, linear square-wave responses of retinal ganglion cells in the cat. 2. The I/Q ratio was constant at low backgrounds (dark adapted state) and inversely proportional to the 0·9 power of the background at high backgrounds (the light adapted state). There was an abrupt transition from the dark-adapted state to the light-adapted state. 3. It was possible to define the adaptation level at a particular background as the ratio (I/Q ratio at that background)/(dark adapted I/Q ratio). 4. The time course of the square-wave response was correlated with the adaptation level. The response was sustained in the dark-adapted state, partially transient at the transition level, and progressively more transient the lower the impulse/quantum ratio of the ganglion cell became. This was true both for on-centre and off-centre cells. 5. The frequency response of the central response mechanism at different adaptation levels was measured. It was a low-pass characteristic in the dark-adapted state and became progressively more of a bandpass characteristic as the cell became more light-adapted. 6. The rapidity of onset of adaptation was measured with a time-varying adapting light. The impulse/quantum ratio is reset within 100 msec of the onset of the conditioning light, and is kept at the new value throughout the time the conditioning light is on. 7. These results can be explained by a nonlinear feedback model. In the model, it is postulated that the exponential function of the horizontal cell potential controls transmission from rods to bipolars. This model has an abrupt transition from dark- to light-adapted states, and its response dynamics are correlated with adaptation level. PMID:4747229

  20. Waddington, Dynamic Systems, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, Ed; Hunter, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Waddington coined the term “epigenetic” to attempt to explain the complex, dynamic interactions between the developmental environment and the genome that led to the production of phenotype. Waddington's thoughts on the importance of both adaptability and canalization of phenotypic development are worth recalling as well, as they emphasize the available range for epigenetic action and the importance of environmental feedback (or lack thereof) in the development of complex traits. We suggest that a dynamic systems view fits well with Waddington's conception of epigenetics in the developmental context, as well as shedding light on the study of the molecular epigenetic effects of the environment on brain and behavior. Further, the dynamic systems view emphasizes the importance of the multi-directional interchange between the organism, the genome and various aspects of the environment to the ultimate phenotype. PMID:27375447

  1. Dynamics of adaptive agents with asymmetric information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMartino, Andrea; Galla, Tobias

    2005-08-01

    We apply path integral techniques to study the dynamics of agent-based models with asymmetric information structures. In particular, we devise a batch version of a model proposed originally by Berg et al (2001 Quantitative Finance 1 203), and convert the coupled multi-agent processes into an effective-agent problem from which the dynamical order parameters in ergodic regimes can be derived self-consistently together with the corresponding phase structure. Our dynamical study complements and extends the available static theory. Results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  2. Efficient Use of an Adapting Database of Ab Initio Calculations To Generate Accurate Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M C; Jones, R E

    2016-02-01

    We develop and demonstrate a method to efficiently use density functional calculations to drive classical dynamics of complex atomic and molecular systems. The method has the potential to scale to systems and time scales unreachable with current ab initio molecular dynamics schemes. It relies on an adapting dataset of independently computed Hellmann-Feynman forces for atomic configurations endowed with a distance metric. The metric on configurations enables fast database lookup and robust interpolation of the stored forces. We discuss mechanisms for the database to adapt to the needs of the evolving dynamics, while maintaining accuracy, and other extensions of the basic algorithm. PMID:26669825

  3. Dynamics of adaptive structures: Design through simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a helical bi-morph actuator/sensor concept by mimicking the change of helical waveform in bacterial flagella is perhaps the first application of bacterial motions (living species) to longitudinal deployment of space structures. However, no dynamical considerations were analyzed to explain the waveform change mechanisms. The objective is to review various deployment concepts from the dynamics point of view and introduce the dynamical considerations from the outset as part of design considerations. Specifically, the impact of the incorporation of the combined static mechanisms and dynamic design considerations on the deployment performance during the reconfiguration stage is studied in terms of improved controllability, maneuvering duration, and joint singularity index. It is shown that intermediate configurations during articulations play an important role for improved joint mechanisms design and overall structural deployability.

  4. Adaptive control with an expert system based supervisory level. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerald A.

    1991-01-01

    Adaptive control is presently one of the methods available which may be used to control plants with poorly modelled dynamics or time varying dynamics. Although many variations of adaptive controllers exist, a common characteristic of all adaptive control schemes, is that input/output measurements from the plant are used to adjust a control law in an on-line fashion. Ideally the adjustment mechanism of the adaptive controller is able to learn enough about the dynamics of the plant from input/output measurements to effectively control the plant. In practice, problems such as measurement noise, controller saturation, and incorrect model order, to name a few, may prevent proper adjustment of the controller and poor performance or instability result. In this work we set out to avoid the inadequacies of procedurally implemented safety nets, by introducing a two level control scheme in which an expert system based 'supervisor' at the upper level provides all the safety net functions for an adaptive controller at the lower level. The expert system is based on a shell called IPEX, (Interactive Process EXpert), that we developed specifically for the diagnosis and treatment of dynamic systems. Some of the more important functions that the IPEX system provides are: (1) temporal reasoning; (2) planning of diagnostic activities; and (3) interactive diagnosis. Also, because knowledge and control logic are separate, the incorporation of new diagnostic and treatment knowledge is relatively simple. We note that the flexibility available in the system to express diagnostic and treatment knowledge, allows much greater functionality than could ever be reasonably expected from procedural implementations of safety nets. The remainder of this chapter is divided into three sections. In section 1.1 we give a detailed review of the literature in the area of supervisory systems for adaptive controllers. In particular, we describe the evolution of safety nets from simple ad hoc techniques, up

  5. Systemic Cold Stress Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  6. Design of an adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Venayagamoorthy, Ganesh K; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Power system stabilizers (PSS) are used to generate supplementary control signals for the excitation system in order to damp the low frequency power system oscillations. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional PSS (CPSS), numerous techniques have been proposed in the literature. Based on the analysis of existing techniques, this paper presents an indirect adaptive neural network based power system stabilizer (IDNC) design. The proposed IDNC consists of a neuro-controller, which is used to generate a supplementary control signal to the excitation system, and a neuro-identifier, which is used to model the dynamics of the power system and to adapt the neuro-controller parameters. The proposed method has the features of a simple structure, adaptivity and fast response. The proposed IDNC is evaluated on a single machine infinite bus power system under different operating conditions and disturbances to demonstrate its effectiveness and robustness. PMID:12850048

  7. Adaptive Management of Computing and Network Resources for Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Barbara; Welch, Lonnie R.; Detter, Ryan; Tjaden, Brett; Huh, Eui-Nam; Szczur, Martha R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that NASA's future spacecraft systems will consist of distributed processes which will handle dynamically varying workloads in response to perceived scientific events, the spacecraft environment, spacecraft anomalies and user commands. Since all situations and possible uses of sensors cannot be anticipated during pre-deployment phases, an approach for dynamically adapting the allocation of distributed computational and communication resources is needed. To address this, we are evolving the DeSiDeRaTa adaptive resource management approach to enable reconfigurable ground and space information systems. The DeSiDeRaTa approach embodies a set of middleware mechanisms for adapting resource allocations, and a framework for reasoning about the real-time performance of distributed application systems. The framework and middleware will be extended to accommodate (1) the dynamic aspects of intra-constellation network topologies, and (2) the complete real-time path from the instrument to the user. We are developing a ground-based testbed that will enable NASA to perform early evaluation of adaptive resource management techniques without the expense of first deploying them in space. The benefits of the proposed effort are numerous, including the ability to use sensors in new ways not anticipated at design time; the production of information technology that ties the sensor web together; the accommodation of greater numbers of missions with fewer resources; and the opportunity to leverage the DeSiDeRaTa project's expertise, infrastructure and models for adaptive resource management for distributed real-time systems.

  8. Structural self-assembly and avalanchelike dynamics in locally adaptive networks.

    PubMed

    Gräwer, Johannes; Modes, Carl D; Magnasco, Marcelo O; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-07-01

    Transport networks play a key role across four realms of eukaryotic life: slime molds, fungi, plants, and animals. In addition to the developmental algorithms that build them, many also employ adaptive strategies to respond to stimuli, damage, and other environmental changes. We model these adapting network architectures using a generic dynamical system on weighted graphs and find in simulation that these networks ultimately develop a hierarchical organization of the final weighted architecture accompanied by the formation of a system-spanning backbone. In addition, we find that the long term equilibration dynamics exhibit behavior reminiscent of glassy systems characterized by long periods of slow changes punctuated by bursts of reorganization events. PMID:26274219

  9. Structural self-assembly and avalanchelike dynamics in locally adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräwer, Johannes; Modes, Carl D.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.; Katifori, Eleni

    2015-07-01

    Transport networks play a key role across four realms of eukaryotic life: slime molds, fungi, plants, and animals. In addition to the developmental algorithms that build them, many also employ adaptive strategies to respond to stimuli, damage, and other environmental changes. We model these adapting network architectures using a generic dynamical system on weighted graphs and find in simulation that these networks ultimately develop a hierarchical organization of the final weighted architecture accompanied by the formation of a system-spanning backbone. In addition, we find that the long term equilibration dynamics exhibit behavior reminiscent of glassy systems characterized by long periods of slow changes punctuated by bursts of reorganization events.

  10. PAQ: Persistent Adaptive Query Middleware for Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Vasanth; Julien, Christine; Payton, Jamie; Roman, Gruia-Catalin

    Pervasive computing applications often entail continuous monitoring tasks, issuing persistent queries that return continuously updated views of the operational environment. We present PAQ, a middleware that supports applications' needs by approximating a persistent query as a sequence of one-time queries. PAQ introduces an integration strategy abstraction that allows composition of one-time query responses into streams representing sophisticated spatio-temporal phenomena of interest. A distinguishing feature of our middleware is the realization that the suitability of a persistent query's result is a function of the application's tolerance for accuracy weighed against the associated overhead costs. In PAQ, programmers can specify an inquiry strategy that dictates how information is gathered. Since network dynamics impact the suitability of a particular inquiry strategy, PAQ associates an introspection strategy with a persistent query, that evaluates the quality of the query's results. The result of introspection can trigger application-defined adaptation strategies that alter the nature of the query. PAQ's simple API makes developing adaptive querying systems easily realizable. We present the key abstractions, describe their implementations, and demonstrate the middleware's usefulness through application examples and evaluation.

  11. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity. PMID:26949040

  12. Adaptive control of Hammerstein-Wiener nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bi; Hong, Hyokchan; Mao, Zhizhong

    2016-07-01

    The Hammerstein-Wiener model is a block-oriented model, having a linear dynamic block sandwiched by two static nonlinear blocks. This note develops an adaptive controller for a special form of Hammerstein-Wiener nonlinear systems which are parameterized by the key-term separation principle. The adaptive control law and recursive parameter estimation are updated by the use of internal variable estimations. By modeling the errors due to the estimation of internal variables, we establish convergence and stability properties. Theoretical results show that parameter estimation convergence and closed-loop system stability can be guaranteed under sufficient condition. From a qualitative analysis of the sufficient condition, we introduce an adaptive weighted factor to improve the performance of the adaptive controller. Numerical examples are given to confirm the results in this paper.

  13. A massively parallel adaptive finite element method with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Flaherty, J.E.; Wheat, S.R.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-05-01

    We construct massively parallel, adaptive finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on a 1024-processor nCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method. We describe tiling, a dynamic, element-based data migration system. Tiling dynamically maintains global load balance in the adaptive method by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the dynamic load balancing with adaptive p-refinement examples.

  14. Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) is provided that contains information on NLAS' objectives and relevance, structural components and position in the launch vehicle stack, and details on its three main components.

  15. Vulnerability of dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Directed graphs are associated with dynamic systems in order to determine in any given system if each state can be reached by at least one input (input reachability), or can each state reach at least one output (output reachability). Then, the structural perturbations of a dynamic system are identified as lines or points removals from the corresponding digraph, and a system is considered vulnerable at those lines or points of the digraph whose removal destroys its input or output reachability. A suitable framework is formulated for resolving the problems of reachability and vulnerability which applies to both linear and nonlinear systems alike.

  16. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  17. Emergent “quantum” theory in complex adaptive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minic, Djordje; Pajevic, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the question of stability, in this paper we argue that an effective quantum-like theory can emerge in complex adaptive systems. In the concrete example of stochastic Lotka-Volterra dynamics, the relevant effective “Planck constant” associated with such emergent “quantum” theory has the dimensions of the square of the unit of time. Such an emergent quantum-like theory has inherently nonclassical stability as well as coherent properties that are not, in principle, endangered by thermal fluctuations and therefore might be of crucial importance in complex adaptive systems.

  18. Simulation of dynamic processes with adaptive neural networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C. P.

    1998-02-03

    Many industrial processes are highly non-linear and complex. Their simulation with first-principle or conventional input-output correlation models is not satisfactory, either because the process physics is not well understood, or it is so complex that direct simulation is either not adequately accurate, or it requires excessive computation time, especially for on-line applications. Artificial intelligence techniques (neural networks, expert systems, fuzzy logic) or their combination with simple process-physics models can be effectively used for the simulation of such processes. Feedforward (static) neural networks (FNNs) can be used effectively to model steady-state processes. They have also been used to model dynamic (time-varying) processes by adding to the network input layer input nodes that represent values of input variables at previous time steps. The number of previous time steps is problem dependent and, in general, can be determined after extensive testing. This work demonstrates that for dynamic processes that do not vary fast with respect to the retraining time of the neural network, an adaptive feedforward neural network can be an effective simulator that is free of the complexities introduced by the use of input values at previous time steps.

  19. Adaptable and dynamic soft colloidal photonics (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Go, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Existent photonic systems are highly integrated with the active component being completely isolated from the environment as a result of their complex format. There are almost no example for periodic photonic materials, which can interact with their environment by being sensitive to external stimuli while providing the corresponding photonic response. Due to this lack of interaction with the outside world, smart optical components, which are self-healing or adaptable, are almost impossible to achieve. I am going to present an aqueous colloidal system, consisting of core-shell particles with a solid core and a soft shell, bearing both negatively and positively charged groups. The described soft colloids exhibit like charges over a broad range of pH, where they repel each other resulting in a pefect and defect-free photonic crystal. In the absence of a net charge the colloids acquire the arrangement of an amorphous photonic glass. We showcase the applicability of our colloidal system for photonic applications by temporal programming of the photonic system and dynamic switching between ordered and amorphous particle arrangements. We can decrease the pH slowly allowing the particles to transit from negative through neutral to positive, and have them arrange accordingly from crystalline to amorphous and back to crystalline. Thus, we achieve a pre-programmable and autonomous dynamic modulation of the crystallinity of the colloidal arrays and their photonic response. References [1] Go, D., Kodger, T. E., Sprakel, J., and Kuehne, A. J.C. Soft matter. 2014, 10(40), 8060-8065.

  20. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  1. Dynamic Range Adaptation to Sound Level Statistics in the Auditory Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bo; Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The auditory system operates over a vast range of sound pressure levels (100–120 dB) with nearly constant discrimination ability across most of the range, well exceeding the dynamic range of most auditory neurons (20–40 dB). Dean et al. (Nat. Neurosci. 8:1684, 2005) have reported that the dynamic range of midbrain auditory neurons adapts to the distribution of sound levels in a continuous, dynamic stimulus by shifting towards the most frequently occurring level. Here we show that dynamic range adaptation, distinct from classic firing rate adaptation, also occurs in primary auditory neurons in anesthetized cats for tone and noise stimuli. Specifically, the range of sound levels over which firing rates of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers grows rapidly with level shifts nearly linearly with the most probable levels in a dynamic sound stimulus. This dynamic range adaptation was observed for fibers with all characteristic frequencies and spontaneous discharge rates. As in the midbrain, dynamic range adaptation improved the precision of level coding by the AN fiber population for the prevailing sound levels in the stimulus. However, dynamic range adaptation in the AN was weaker than in the midbrain, and not sufficient (0.25 dB/dB on average for broadband noise) to prevent a significant degradation of the precision of level coding by the AN population above 60 dB SPL. These findings suggest that adaptive processing of sound levels first occurs in the auditory periphery and is enhanced along the auditory pathway. PMID:19889991

  2. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method. PMID:26285223

  3. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  4. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations. PMID:26909573

  5. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  6. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  7. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  8. Adaptive environment classification system for hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Luc; Giguère, Christian; Gueaieb, Wail; Aboulnasr, Tyseer; Othman, Hisham

    2010-05-01

    An adaptive sound classification framework is proposed for hearing aid applications. The long-term goal is to develop fully trainable instruments in which both the acoustical environments encountered in daily life and the hearing aid settings preferred by the user in each environmental class could be learned. Two adaptive classifiers are described, one based on minimum distance clustering and one on Bayesian classification. Through unsupervised learning, the adaptive systems allow classes to split or merge based on changes in the ongoing acoustical environments. Performance was evaluated using real-world sounds from a wide range of acoustical environments. The systems were first initialized using two classes, speech and noise, followed by a testing period when a third class, music, was introduced. Both systems were successful in detecting the presence of an additional class and estimating its underlying parameters, reaching a testing accuracy close to the target rates obtained from best-case scenarios derived from non-adaptive supervised versions of the classifiers (about 3% lower performance). The adaptive Bayesian classifier resulted in a 4% higher overall accuracy upon splitting adaptation than the minimum distance classifier. Merging accuracy was found to be the same in the two systems and within 1%-2% of the best-case supervised versions. PMID:21117761

  9. Automated Image Intelligence Adaptive Sensor Management System for High Altitude Long Endurance UAVs in a Dynamic and Anti-Access Area Denial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi Young

    The problem we investigate deals with an Image Intelligence (IMINT) sensor allocation schedule for High Altitude Long Endurance UAVs in a dynamic and Anti-Access Area Denial (A2AD) environment. The objective is to maximize the Situational Awareness (SA) of decision makers. The value of SA can be improved in two different ways. First, if a sensor allocated to an Areas of Interest (AOI) detects target activity, then the SA value will be increased. Second, the SA value increases if an AOI is monitored for a certain period of time, regardless of target detections. These values are functions of the sensor allocation time, sensor type and mode. Relatively few studies in the archival literature have been devoted to an analytic, detailed explanation of the target detection process, and AOI monitoring value dynamics. These two values are the fundamental criteria used to choose the most judicious sensor allocation schedule. This research presents mathematical expressions for target detection processes, and shows the monitoring value dynamics. Furthermore, the dynamics of target detection is the result of combined processes between belligerent behavior (target activity) and friendly behavior (sensor allocation). We investigate these combined processes and derive mathematical expressions for simplified cases. These closed form mathematical models can be used for Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs), i.e., target activity detection to evaluate sensor allocation schedules. We also verify these models with discrete event simulations which can also be used to describe more complex systems. We introduce several methodologies to achieve a judicious sensor allocation schedule focusing on the AOI monitoring value. The first methodology is a discrete time integer programming model which provides an optimal solution but is impractical for real world scenarios due to its computation time. Thus, it is necessary to trade off the quality of solution with computation time. The Myopic Greedy

  10. Adaptive resummation of Markovian quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Felix; Hornberger, Klaus

    2013-06-14

    We introduce a method for obtaining analytic approximations to the evolution of Markovian open quantum systems. It is based on resumming a generalized Dyson series in a way that ensures optimal convergence even in the absence of a small parameter. The power of this approach is demonstrated by two benchmark examples: the spatial detection of a free particle and the Landau-Zener problem in the presence of dephasing. The derived approximations are asymptotically exact and exhibit errors on the per mill level over the entire parameter range. PMID:25165896

  11. Serial and parallel dynamic adaptation of general hybrid meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavouklis, Christos

    The Navier-Stokes equations are a standard mathematical representation of viscous fluid flow. Their numerical solution in three dimensions remains a computationally intensive and challenging task, despite recent advances in computer speed and memory. A strategy to increase accuracy of Navier-Stokes simulations, while maintaining computing resources to a minimum, is local refinement of the associated computational mesh in regions of large solution gradients and coarsening in regions where the solution does not vary appreciably. In this work we consider adaptation of general hybrid meshes for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications. Hybrid meshes are composed of four types of elements; hexahedra, prisms, pyramids and tetrahedra, and have been proven a promising technology in accurately resolving fluid flow for complex geometries. The first part of this dissertation is concerned with the design and implementation of a serial scheme for the adaptation of general three dimensional hybrid meshes. We have defined 29 refinement types, for all four kinds of elements. The core of the present adaptation scheme is an iterative algorithm that flags mesh edges for refinement, so that the adapted mesh is conformal. Of primary importance is considered the design of a suitable dynamic data structure that facilitates refinement and coarsening operations and furthermore minimizes memory requirements. A special dynamic list is defined for mesh elements, in contrast with the usual tree structures. It contains only elements of the current adaptation step and minimal information that is utilized to reconstruct parent elements when the mesh is coarsened. In the second part of this work, a new parallel dynamic mesh adaptation and load balancing algorithm for general hybrid meshes is presented. Partitioning of a hybrid mesh reduces to partitioning of the corresponding dual graph. Communication among processors is based on the faces of the interpartition boundary. The distributed

  12. The Minnesota Adaptive Instructional System: An Intelligent CBI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Briefly reviews theoretical developments in adaptive instructional systems, defines six characteristics of intelligent computer-based management systems, and presents theory and research of Minnesota Adaptive Instructional System (MAIS). Generic programing codes for amount and sequence of instruction, instructional display time, and advisement…

  13. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X.; Miller, Donald T.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  14. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Ferguson, R Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X; Miller, Donald T

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  15. Adaptive control of vibration transmission in a strut system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.-M.; Mahapatra, D. Roy; Balachandran, B.

    2007-04-01

    In this article, theoretical and the experimental studies are reported on the adaptive control of vibration transmission in a strut system subjected to a longitudinal pulse train excitation. In the control scheme, a magneto-strictive actuator is employed at the downstream transmission point in the secondary path. The actuator dynamics is taken into account. The system boundary parameters are first estimated off-line, and later employed to simulate the system dynamics. A Delayed-X Filtered-E spectral algorithm is proposed and implemented in real time. The underlying mechanics based filter construction allows for the time varying system dynamics to be taken into account. This work should be of interest for active control of vibration and noise transmission in helicopter gearbox support struts and other systems.

  16. Parallel tetrahedral mesh adaptation with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Gabow, Harold N.

    2000-06-28

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured grid is a powerful tool for efficiently solving computational problems with evolving physical features. In this paper, we report on our experience parallelizing an edge-based adaptation scheme, called 3D-TAG, using message passing. Results show excellent speedup when a realistic helicopter rotor mesh is randomly refined. However, performance deteriorates when the mesh is refined using a solution-based error indicator since mesh adaptation for practical problems occurs in a localized region, creating a severe load imbalance. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, a global dynamic load balancing framework for adaptive numerical computations. Even though PLUM primarily balances processor workloads for the solution phase, it reduces the load imbalance problem within mesh adaptation by repartitioning the mesh after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual subdivision. This dramatically improves the performance of parallel 3D-TAG since refinement occurs in a more load balanced fashion. We also present optimal and heuristic algorithms that, when applied to the default mapping of a parallel repartitioner, significantly reduce the data redistribution overhead. Finally, portability is examined by comparing performance on three state-of-the-art parallel machines.

  17. Model-adaptive hybrid dynamic control for robotic assembly tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, D.J.; McCarragher, B.J.

    1999-10-01

    A new task-level adaptive controller is presented for the hybrid dynamic control of robotic assembly tasks. Using a hybrid dynamic model of the assembly task, velocity constraints are derived from which satisfactory velocity commands are obtained. Due to modeling errors and parametric uncertainties, the velocity commands may be erroneous and may result in suboptimal performance. Task-level adaptive control schemes, based on the occurrence of discrete events, are used to change the model parameters from which the velocity commands are determined. Two adaptive schemes are presented: the first is based on intuitive reasoning about the vector spaces involved whereas the second uses a search region that is reduced with each iteration. For the first adaptation law, asymptotic convergence to the correct model parameters is proven except for one case. This weakness motivated the development of the second adaptation law, for which asymptotic convergence is proven in all cases. Automated control of a peg-in-hole assembly task is given as an example, and simulations and experiments for this task are presented. These results demonstrate the success of the method and also indicate properties for rapid convergence.

  18. Parallel Tetrahedral Mesh Adaptation with Dynamic Load Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Gabow, Harold N.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured grid is a powerful tool for efficiently solving computational problems with evolving physical features. In this paper, we report on our experience parallelizing an edge-based adaptation scheme, called 3D_TAG. using message passing. Results show excellent speedup when a realistic helicopter rotor mesh is randomly refined. However. performance deteriorates when the mesh is refined using a solution-based error indicator since mesh adaptation for practical problems occurs in a localized region., creating a severe load imbalance. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, a global dynamic load balancing framework for adaptive numerical computations. Even though PLUM primarily balances processor workloads for the solution phase, it reduces the load imbalance problem within mesh adaptation by repartitioning the mesh after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual subdivision. This dramatically improves the performance of parallel 3D_TAG since refinement occurs in a more load balanced fashion. We also present optimal and heuristic algorithms that, when applied to the default mapping of a parallel repartitioner, significantly reduce the data redistribution overhead. Finally, portability is examined by comparing performance on three state-of-the-art parallel machines.

  19. Dynamic system classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpe, Daniel; Greiner, Maksim; Müller, Ewald; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic differential equations describe well many physical, biological, and sociological systems, despite the simplification often made in their derivation. Here the usage of simple stochastic differential equations to characterize and classify complex dynamical systems is proposed within a Bayesian framework. To this end, we develop a dynamic system classifier (DSC). The DSC first abstracts training data of a system in terms of time-dependent coefficients of the descriptive stochastic differential equation. Thereby the DSC identifies unique correlation structures within the training data. For definiteness we restrict the presentation of the DSC to oscillation processes with a time-dependent frequency ω (t ) and damping factor γ (t ) . Although real systems might be more complex, this simple oscillator captures many characteristic features. The ω and γ time lines represent the abstract system characterization and permit the construction of efficient signal classifiers. Numerical experiments show that such classifiers perform well even in the low signal-to-noise regime.

  20. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks, adaptive dynamics and evolutionary rescue theory

    PubMed Central

    Ferriere, Regis; Legendre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive dynamics theory has been devised to account for feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. Doing so opens new dimensions to and raises new challenges about evolutionary rescue. Adaptive dynamics theory predicts that successive trait substitutions driven by eco-evolutionary feedbacks can gradually erode population size or growth rate, thus potentially raising the extinction risk. Even a single trait substitution can suffice to degrade population viability drastically at once and cause ‘evolutionary suicide’. In a changing environment, a population may track a viable evolutionary attractor that leads to evolutionary suicide, a phenomenon called ‘evolutionary trapping’. Evolutionary trapping and suicide are commonly observed in adaptive dynamics models in which the smooth variation of traits causes catastrophic changes in ecological state. In the face of trapping and suicide, evolutionary rescue requires that the population overcome evolutionary threats generated by the adaptive process itself. Evolutionary repellors play an important role in determining how variation in environmental conditions correlates with the occurrence of evolutionary trapping and suicide, and what evolutionary pathways rescue may follow. In contrast with standard predictions of evolutionary rescue theory, low genetic variation may attenuate the threat of evolutionary suicide and small population sizes may facilitate escape from evolutionary traps. PMID:23209163

  1. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  2. Operational Results of an Adaptive SDI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, C. R.; Fitzwater, D. R.

    The Ames Laboratory SDI system requires a minimum of human intervention. The adaptability of the system provides two major contributions to information dissemination. (1) The user benefits proportionately from the amount of effort he expends in setting up his profile and the diligence in sending back responses. (2) The document input has only to…

  3. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaliuk, D. O.; Kovaliuk, Oleg; Burlibay, Aron; Gromaszek, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    The method of acetylene production in acetylene generator was analyzed. It was found that impossible to provide the desired process characteristics by the PID-controller. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator was developed. The proposed system combines the classic controller and fuzzy subsystem for controller parameters tuning.

  4. Adaptive Feedback Linearization Control for Asynchronous Machine with Nonlinear for Natural Dynamic Complete Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentaallah, Abderrahim; Massoum, Ahmed; Benhamida, Farid; Meroufel, Abdelkader

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the nonlinear adaptive control of an induction motor with natural dynamic complete nonlinear observer. The aim of this work is to develop a nonlinear control law and adaptive performance for an asynchronous motor with two main objectives: to improve the continuation of trajectories and the stability, robustness to parametric variations and disturbances rejection. This control law will independently control the speed and flux into the machine by restricting supply. A complete nonlinear observer for dynamic nature ensuring closed loop stability of the entire control and observer has been developed. Several simulations have also been carried out to demonstrate system performance.

  5. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  6. The Dynamics of Vulnerability and Implications for Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Urban Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, L.; Daly, M.; Travis, W.; Wilhelmi, O.; Klein, R.; Kenney, D.; Ray, A. J.; Miller, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent reports and scholarship have suggested that adapting to current climate variability may represent a "no regrets" strategy for adapting to climate change. Filling "adaptation deficits" and other approaches that rely on addressing current vulnerabilities are of course helpful for responding to current climate variability, but we find here that they are not sufficient for adapting to climate change. First, following a comprehensive review and unique synthesis of the natural hazards and climate adaptation literatures, we advance six reasons why adapting to climate variability is not sufficient for adapting to climate change: 1) Vulnerability is different at different levels of exposure; 2) Coping with climate variability is not equivalent to adaptation to longer term change; 3) The socioeconomic context for vulnerability is constantly changing; 4) The perception of risk associated with climate variability does not necessarily promote adaptive behavior in the face of climate change; 5) Adaptations made to short term climate variability may reduce the flexibility of the system in the long term; and 6) Adaptive actions may shift vulnerabilities to other parts of the system or to other people. Instead we suggest that decision makers faced with choices to adapt to climate change must consider the dynamics of vulnerability in a connected system-- how choices made in one part of the system might impact other valued outcomes or even create new vulnerabilities. Furthermore we suggest that rather than expressing climate change adaptation as an extension of adaptation to climate variability, the research and practice communities would do well to articulate adaptation as an imperfect policy, with tradeoffs and consequences and that decisions be prioritized to preserve flexibility be revisited often as climate change unfolds. We then present the results of a number of empirical studies of decision making for drought in urban water systems in the United States to understand

  7. A 3-D adaptive mesh refinement algorithm for multimaterial gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, E.G. ); Saltzman, J.S. )

    1991-08-12

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in conjunction with high order upwind finite difference methods has been used effectively on a variety of problems. In this paper we discuss an implementation of an AMR finite difference method that solves the equations of gas dynamics with two material species in three dimensions. An equation for the evolution of volume fractions augments the gas dynamics system. The material interface is preserved and tracked from the volume fractions using a piecewise linear reconstruction technique. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Adaptive fuzzy system for 3-D vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive fuzzy system using the concept of the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) type neural network architecture and incorporating fuzzy c-means (FCM) system equations for reclassification of cluster centers was developed. The Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) architecture is a hybrid neural-fuzzy system which learns on-line in a stable and efficient manner. The system uses a control structure similar to that found in the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART-1) network to identify the cluster centers initially. The initial classification of an input takes place in a two stage process; a simple competitive stage and a distance metric comparison stage. The cluster prototypes are then incrementally updated by relocating the centroid positions from Fuzzy c-Means (FCM) system equations for the centroids and the membership values. The operational characteristics of AFLC and the critical parameters involved in its operation are discussed. The performance of the AFLC algorithm is presented through application of the algorithm to the Anderson Iris data, and laser-luminescent fingerprint image data. The AFLC algorithm successfully classifies features extracted from real data, discrete or continuous, indicating the potential strength of this new clustering algorithm in analyzing complex data sets. The hybrid neuro-fuzzy AFLC algorithm will enhance analysis of a number of difficult recognition and control problems involved with Tethered Satellite Systems and on-orbit space shuttle attitude controller.

  9. Robust adaptive transient damping in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, D.A.; Sadighi, I.; Trudnowski, D.J.; Smith, J.R.; Nehrir, M.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-09-01

    This Volume 1 of the final report on RP2665-1 contains two parts. part 1 consists of the following: (1) a literature review of real-time parameter identification algorithms which may be used in self-tuning adaptive control; (2) a description of mathematical discrete-time models that are linear in the parameters and that are useful for self-tuning adaptive control; (3) detailed descriptions of several variations of recursive-least-squares algorithms (RLS algorithms) and a unified representation of some of these algorithms; (4) a new variation of RLS called Corrector Least Squares (CLS); (5) a set of practical issues that need to be addressed in the implementation of RLS-based algorithms; (6) a set of simulation examples that illustrate properties of the identification methods; and (7) appendices With FORTRAN listings of several identification codes. Part 2 of this volume addresses the problem of damping electromechanical oscillations in power systems using advanced control theory. Two control strategies are developed. Controllers are then applied to a power system as power system stabilizer (PSS) units. The primary strategy is a decentralized indirect adaptive control scheme where multiple self-tuning adaptive controllers are coordinated. This adaptive scheme is presented in a general format and the stabilizing properties are demonstrated using examples. Both the adaptive and the conventional strategies are applied to a 17-machine computer-simulated power system. PSS units are applied to four generators in the system. Detailed simulation results are presented that show the feasibility and properties of both control schemes. FORTRAN codes for the control simulations are given in appendices of Part 2, as also are FORTRAN codes for the Prony identification method.

  10. An Adaptive Multi-agent System for Project Schedule Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Yongyi; Lai, Changtao

    A multi-agent system is established for project schedule management, considering the need for adaptive and dynamic scheduling under uncertainty. The system is realized using Java. In the proposed system, three types of agents, namely activity agents, resource agents, and a monitoring agent, are designed. Duration and resource requirement self-learning operators are developed for activity agents in order to model the self-learning and adaptive capacities of an agent in its local environment; moreover, a monitoring operator is also presented for the monitoring agent. The system allows the user to set up simulation parameters or scheduling rules according to their own preferences. Simulation results from an example showed that the system is effective in supporting users' decision-making process.

  11. Dynamic Reconstruction and Multivariable Control for Force-Actuated, Thin Facesheet Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grocott, Simon C. O.; Miller, David W.

    1997-01-01

    The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) under development at the University of Arizona takes a new approach in adaptive optics placing a large (0.65 m) force-actuated, thin facesheet deformable mirror at the secondary of an astronomical telescope, thus reducing the effects of emissivity which are important in IR astronomy. However, The large size of the mirror and low stiffness actuators used drive the natural frequencies of the mirror down into the bandwidth of the atmospheric distortion. Conventional adaptive optics takes a quasi-static approach to controlling the, deformable mirror. However, flexibility within the control bandwidth calls for a new approach to adaptive optics. Dynamic influence functions are used to characterize the influence of each actuator on the surface of the deformable mirror. A linearized model of atmospheric distortion is combined with dynamic influence functions to produce a dynamic reconstructor. This dynamic reconstructor is recognized as an optimal control problem. Solving the optimal control problem for a system with hundreds of actuators and sensors is formidable. Exploiting the circularly symmetric geometry of the mirror, and a suitable model of atmospheric distortion, the control problem is divided into a number of smaller decoupled control problems using circulant matrix theory. A hierarchic control scheme which seeks to emulate the quasi-static control approach that is generally used in adaptive optics is compared to the proposed dynamic reconstruction technique. Although dynamic reconstruction requires somewhat more computational power to implement, it achieves better performance with less power usage, and is less sensitive than the hierarchic technique.

  12. Dynamics modeling and adaptive control of flexible manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasiadek, J. Z.

    1991-01-01

    An application of Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) to the position and force control of flexible manipulators and robots is presented. A single-link flexible manipulator is analyzed. The problem was to develop a mathematical model of a flexible robot that is accurate. The objective is to show that the adaptive control works better than 'conventional' systems and is suitable for flexible structure control.

  13. Robust adaptive control of HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, J.; Sultan, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The transient performance of an HVDC power system is highly dependent on the parameters of the current/voltage regulators of the converter controls. In order to better accommodate changes in system structure or dc operating conditions, this paper introduces a new adaptive control strategy. The advantages of automatic tuning for continuous fine tuning are combined with predetermined gain scheduling in order to achieve robustness for large disturbances. Examples are provided for a digitally simulated back-to-back dc system.

  14. Function-valued adaptive dynamics and the calculus of variations.

    PubMed

    Parvinen, Kalle; Dieckmann, Ulf; Heino, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive dynamics has been widely used to study the evolution of scalar-valued, and occasionally vector-valued, strategies in ecologically realistic models. In many ecological situations, however, evolving strategies are best described as function-valued, and thus infinite-dimensional, traits. So far, such evolution has only been studied sporadically, mostly based on quantitative genetics models with limited ecological realism. In this article we show how to apply the calculus of variations to find evolutionarily singular strategies of function-valued adaptive dynamics: such a strategy has to satisfy Euler's equation with environmental feedback. We also demonstrate how second-order derivatives can be used to investigate whether or not a function-valued singular strategy is evolutionarily stable. We illustrate our approach by presenting several worked examples. PMID:16012801

  15. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Meshes using Symmetric Broadcast Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sajal K.; Harvey, Daniel J.; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Many scientific applications involve grids that lack a uniform underlying structure. These applications are often dynamic in the sense that the grid structure significantly changes between successive phases of execution. In parallel computing environments, mesh adaptation of grids through selective refinement/coarsening has proven to be an effective approach. However, achieving load balance while minimizing inter-processor communication and redistribution costs is a difficult problem. Traditional dynamic load balancers are mostly inadequate because they lack a global view across processors. In this paper, we compare a novel load balancer that utilizes symmetric broadcast networks (SBN) to a successful global load balancing environment (PLUM) created to handle adaptive unstructured applications. Our experimental results on the IBM SP2 demonstrate that performance of the proposed SBN load balancer is comparable to results achieved under PLUM.

  16. Adaptive neural information processing with dynamical electrical synapses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Dan-ke; Li, Yuan-qing; Liang, Pei-ji; Wu, Si

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a potential computational role of dynamical electrical synapses in neural information process. Compared with chemical synapses, electrical synapses are more efficient in modulating the concerted activity of neurons. Based on the experimental data, we propose a phenomenological model for short-term facilitation of electrical synapses. The model satisfactorily reproduces the phenomenon that the neuronal correlation increases although the neuronal firing rates attenuate during the luminance adaptation. We explore how the stimulus information is encoded in parallel by firing rates and correlated activity of neurons, and find that dynamical electrical synapses mediate a transition from the firing rate code to the correlation one during the luminance adaptation. The latter encodes the stimulus information by using the concerted, but lower neuronal firing rate, and hence is economically more efficient. PMID:23596413

  17. Final Report - Regulatory Considerations for Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Chris; Lynch, Jonathan; Bharadwaj, Raj

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the findings of a preliminary research study into new approaches to the software design assurance of adaptive systems. We suggest a methodology to overcome the software validation and verification difficulties posed by the underlying assumption of non-adaptive software in the requirementsbased- testing verification methods in RTCA/DO-178B and C. An analysis of the relevant RTCA/DO-178B and C objectives is presented showing the reasons for the difficulties that arise in showing satisfaction of the objectives and suggested additional means by which they could be satisfied. We suggest that the software design assurance problem for adaptive systems is principally one of developing correct and complete high level requirements and system level constraints that define the necessary system functional and safety properties to assure the safe use of adaptive systems. We show how analytical techniques such as model based design, mathematical modeling and formal or formal-like methods can be used to both validate the high level functional and safety requirements, establish necessary constraints and provide the verification evidence for the satisfaction of requirements and constraints that supplements conventional testing. Finally the report identifies the follow-on research topics needed to implement this methodology.

  18. Effects of adaptive dynamical linking in networked games.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihu; Li, Zhi; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2013-10-01

    The role of dynamical topologies in the evolution of cooperation has received considerable attention, as some studies have demonstrated that dynamical networks are much better than static networks in terms of boosting cooperation. Here we study a dynamical model of evolution of cooperation on stochastic dynamical networks in which there are no permanent partners to each agent. Whenever a new link is created, its duration is randomly assigned without any bias or preference. We allow the agent to adaptively adjust the duration of each link during the evolution in accordance with the feedback from game interactions. By Monte Carlo simulations, we find that cooperation can be remarkably promoted by this adaptive dynamical linking mechanism both for the game of pairwise interactions, such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game (PDG), and for the game of group interactions, illustrated by the public goods game (PGG). And the faster the adjusting rate, the more successful the evolution of cooperation. We also show that in this context weak selection favors cooperation much more than strong selection does. What is particularly meaningful is that the prosperity of cooperation in this study indicates that the rationality and selfishness of a single agent in adjusting social ties can lead to the progress of altruism of the whole population. PMID:24229137

  19. Effects of adaptive dynamical linking in networked games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihu; Li, Zhi; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2013-10-01

    The role of dynamical topologies in the evolution of cooperation has received considerable attention, as some studies have demonstrated that dynamical networks are much better than static networks in terms of boosting cooperation. Here we study a dynamical model of evolution of cooperation on stochastic dynamical networks in which there are no permanent partners to each agent. Whenever a new link is created, its duration is randomly assigned without any bias or preference. We allow the agent to adaptively adjust the duration of each link during the evolution in accordance with the feedback from game interactions. By Monte Carlo simulations, we find that cooperation can be remarkably promoted by this adaptive dynamical linking mechanism both for the game of pairwise interactions, such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game (PDG), and for the game of group interactions, illustrated by the public goods game (PGG). And the faster the adjusting rate, the more successful the evolution of cooperation. We also show that in this context weak selection favors cooperation much more than strong selection does. What is particularly meaningful is that the prosperity of cooperation in this study indicates that the rationality and selfishness of a single agent in adjusting social ties can lead to the progress of altruism of the whole population.

  20. Utilizing feedback in adaptive SAR ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Owen; Blacknell, David

    2009-05-01

    Existing SAR ATR systems are usually trained off-line with samples of target imagery or CAD models, prior to conducting a mission. If the training data is not representative of mission conditions, then poor performance may result. In addition, it is difficult to acquire suitable training data for the many target types of interest. The Adaptive SAR ATR Problem Set (AdaptSAPS) program provides a MATLAB framework and image database for developing systems that adapt to mission conditions, meaning less reliance on accurate training data. A key function of an adaptive system is the ability to utilise truth feedback to improve performance, and it is this feature which AdaptSAPS is intended to exploit. This paper presents a new method for SAR ATR that does not use training data, based on supervised learning. This is achieved by using feature-based classification, and several new shadow features have been developed for this purpose. These features allow discrimination of vehicles from clutter, and classification of vehicles into two classes: targets, comprising military combat types, and non-targets, comprising bulldozers and trucks. The performance of the system is assessed using three baseline missions provided with AdaptSAPS, as well as three additional missions. All performance metrics indicate a distinct learning trend over the course of a mission, with most third and fourth quartile performance levels exceeding 85% correct classification. It has been demonstrated that these performance levels can be maintained even when truth feedback rates are reduced by up to 55% over the course of a mission.

  1. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1976-01-01

    A learning control system is developed which blends the gain scheduling and adaptive control into a single learning system that has the advantages of both. An important feature of the developed learning control system is its capability to adjust the gain schedule in a prescribed manner to account for changing aircraft operating characteristics. Furthermore, if tests performed by the criteria of the learning system preclude any possible change in the gain schedule, then the overall system becomes an ordinary gain scheduling system. Examples are discussed.

  2. Integrated optimal allocation model for complex adaptive system of water resources management (I): Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Xu, Chong-Yu; Liu, Dedi; Chen, Lu; Ye, Yushi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the adaption, dynamic and multi-objective characteristics of complex water resources system, it is a considerable challenge to manage water resources in an efficient, equitable and sustainable way. An integrated optimal allocation model is proposed for complex adaptive system of water resources management. The model consists of three modules: (1) an agent-based module for revealing evolution mechanism of complex adaptive system using agent-based, system dynamic and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II methods, (2) an optimal module for deriving decision set of water resources allocation using multi-objective genetic algorithm, and (3) a multi-objective evaluation module for evaluating the efficiency of the optimal module and selecting the optimal water resources allocation scheme using project pursuit method. This study has provided a theoretical framework for adaptive allocation, dynamic allocation and multi-objective optimization for a complex adaptive system of water resources management.

  3. Adaptive multisatellite systems for aeronautical services.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisaga, J. J.; Redisch, W. N.

    1971-01-01

    The use of satellite systems to provide operational communications and ATC services to aircraft flying the oceanic routes has been the subject of considerable interest recently. Since most of the link factors are functions of geometry and the aircraft traffic density varies with time, the satellite power needed to meet the communication demand varies considerably in an oceanic area as a function of both location and time. An adaptive system that tailors the use of system resources to the needs of the user can result in an additional system capacity improvement by a factor of between two and three. Results of studies conducted to date indicate that simple implementation of adaptive techniques in aeronautical satellite systems is feasible. Study is continuing in this area and on the application of satellite multibeam techniques to gain even further increase in capacity.

  4. Indirect learning control for nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Yeong Soon; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    In a previous paper, learning control algorithms were developed based on adaptive control ideas for linear time variant systems. The learning control methods were shown to have certain advantages over their adaptive control counterparts, such as the ability to produce zero tracking error in time varying systems, and the ability to eliminate repetitive disturbances. In recent years, certain adaptive control algorithms have been developed for multi-body dynamic systems such as robots, with global guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error for the nonlinear system euations. In this paper we study the relationship between such adaptive control methods designed for this specific class of nonlinear systems, and the learning control problem for such systems, seeking to converge to zero tracking error in following a specific command repeatedly, starting from the same initial conditions each time. The extension of these methods from the adaptive control problem to the learning control problem is seen to be trivial. The advantages and disadvantages of using learning control based on such adaptive control concepts for nonlinear systems, and the use of other currently available learning control algorithms are discussed.

  5. Adaptive control of systems with unknown time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, James P.

    Control systems, on earth or in outer-space, may exhibit time delays in their dynamic behavior. Aerospace control systems must be able to operate in the presence of time delays both internal to the system and in its inputs and outputs. These delays are often introduced via systems controlled through a network, by information, energy or mass transport phenomena, but can also be caused by computer processing time or by the accumulation of time lags in a number of simple dynamic systems connected in series. When a dynamic system is subject to a time delay, unlike other parameters, this affects the temporal characteristics of the system and exact control over system operation cannot be strictly implemented. Systems with significant time delays are difficult to control using standard feedback controllers. The United States Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is considering the use of router-based data networks on-board next generation satellites and in decentralized control architectures. This approach has the potential to introduce non-constant and non-deterministic communications delays into feedback control loops that make use of these data networks. The desire for rapid deployment of new spacecraft architectures will also introduce many other control issues as the rigorous measurement, calibration and performance tests usually conducted on spacecraft systems to develop a highly precise dynamic model will need to be drastically shortened due to the desired abbreviated build and launch schedule. Due to limited testing and system identification, the spacecraft model will have uncertainties/perturbations from the actual plant. This will require a controller that can robustly control the non-linear dynamic model with limited plant knowledge. The problems created by the control of time delay systems and the limited plant knowledge nature of the systems of interest leads us to the concept of adaptive control. Adaptive control makes adjustment of the controllers

  6. Application of neural adaptive power system stabilizer in a multi-machine power system

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsollahi, P.; Malik, O.P.

    1999-09-01

    Application of a neural adaptive power system stabilizer (NAPSS) to a five-machine power system is described in this paper. The proposed NAPSS comprises two subnetworks. The adaptive neuro-identifier (ANI) to dynamically identify the non-linear plant, and the adaptive neuro-controller (ANC) to damp output oscillations. The back-propagation training method is used on-line to train these subnetworks. The effectiveness of the proposed NAPSS in damping both local and inter-area modes of oscillations and its self-coordination ability are demonstrated.

  7. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-10-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  8. Petascale IO Using The Adaptable IO System

    SciTech Connect

    Lofstead, J.; Klasky, Scott A; Abbasi, H.

    2009-01-01

    ADIOS, the adaptable IO system, has demonstrated excellent scalability to 29,000 cores. With the introduction of the XT5 upgrades to Jaguar, new optimizations are required to successfully reach 140,000+ cores. This paper explains the techniques employed and shows the performance levels attained.

  9. The Elements Of Adaptive Neural Expert Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Michael J.

    1989-03-01

    The generalization properties of a class of neural architectures can be modelled mathematically. The model is a parallel predicate calculus based on pattern recognition and self-organization of long-term memory in a neural network. It may provide the basis for adaptive expert systems capable of inductive learning and rapid processing in a highly complex and changing environment.

  10. Adaptive control system for gas producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, Pashchenko; Sergey, Gulyaev; Alexander, Pashchenko

    2015-03-10

    Optimal adaptive automatic control system for gas producing wells cluster is proposed intended for solving the problem of stabilization of the output gas pressure in the cluster at conditions of changing gas flow rate and changing parameters of the wells themselves, providing the maximum high resource of hardware elements of automation.

  11. ADAPT (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) Beta Version 0.9

    2010-01-07

    The purpose of the ADAPT code is to generate Dynamic Event Trees (DET) using a user specified simulator. ADAPT can utilize any simulation tool which meets a minimal set of requirements. ADAPT is based on the concept of DET which use explicit modeling of the deterministic dynamic processes that take place during a nuclear reactor plant system evolution along with stochastic modeling. When DET are used to model different aspects of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA),more » all accident progression scenarios starting from an initiating event are considered simultaneously. The DET branching occurs at user specified times and/or when an action is required by the system and/or the operator. These outcomes then decide how the dynamic system variables will evolve in time for each DET branch. Since two different outcomes at a DET branching may lead to completely different paths for system evolution, the next branching for these paths may occur not only at different times, but can be based on different branching criteria. The computational infrastructure allows for flexibility in ADAPT to link with different system simulation codes, parallel processing of the scenarios under consideration, on-line scenario management (initiation as well as termination) and user friendly graphical capabilities. The ADAPT system is designed for a distributed computing environment; the scheduler can track multiple concurrent branches simultaneously. The scheduler is modularized so that the DET branching strategy can be modified (e.g. biasing towards the worse case scenario/event). Independent database systems store data from the simulation tasks and the DET structure so that the event tree can be constructed and analyzed later. ADAPT is provided with a user-friendly client which can easily sort through and display the results of an experiment, precluding the need for the user to manually inspect individual simulator runs.« less

  12. Model reference adaptive systems some examples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landau, I. D.; Sinner, E.; Courtiol, B.

    1972-01-01

    A direct design method is derived for several single-input single-output model reference adaptive systems (M.R.A.S.). The approach used helps to clarify the various steps involved in a design, which utilizes the hyperstability concept. An example of a multiinput, multioutput M.R.A.S. is also discussed. Attention is given to the problem of a series compensator. It is pointed out that a series compensator which contains derivative terms must generally be introduced in the adaptation mechanism in order to assure asymptotic hyperstability. Results obtained by the simulation of a M.R.A.S. on an analog computer are also presented.

  13. Adaptive hybrid system for automatic sleep staging.

    PubMed

    Hassaan, Amr A; Morsy, Ahmed A

    2008-01-01

    We present a new adaptive system for automated sleep staging. The proposed system relies on each subject's own data for self-training. Conventional automatic sleep staging algorithms are either rule based, which typically fail to accurately model the complex nature of sleep signals, or numerical methods that use multi-patient training schemes, which suffer from inaccuracies caused by inherent inter-patient variability. The proposed system employs two stages. The first stage is a rule based reasoning engine that can be tuned conservatively to decrease or eliminate false positives, generating just enough samples to train the second stage, which is comprised of a neural network classifier. Results show that this hybrid approach provides an adaptive training scheme that performs more accurately compared to one of the popular commercially available systems. PMID:19162989

  14. An adaptive robust controller for time delay maglev transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Reza Hamidi; Zarabadipour, Hassan; Shahnazi, Reza

    2012-12-01

    For engineering systems, uncertainties and time delays are two important issues that must be considered in control design. Uncertainties are often encountered in various dynamical systems due to modeling errors, measurement noises, linearization and approximations. Time delays have always been among the most difficult problems encountered in process control. In practical applications of feedback control, time delay arises frequently and can severely degrade closed-loop system performance and in some cases, drives the system to instability. Therefore, stability analysis and controller synthesis for uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems are important both in theory and in practice and many analytical techniques have been developed using delay-dependent Lyapunov function. In the past decade the magnetic and levitation (maglev) transportation system as a new system with high functionality has been the focus of numerous studies. However, maglev transportation systems are highly nonlinear and thus designing controller for those are challenging. The main topic of this paper is to design an adaptive robust controller for maglev transportation systems with time-delay, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. In this paper, an adaptive robust control (ARC) is designed for this purpose. It should be noted that the adaptive gain is derived from Lyapunov-Krasovskii synthesis method, therefore asymptotic stability is guaranteed.

  15. Adaptable Transponder for Multiple Telemetry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a stackable telemetry circuit board for use in telemetry systems for satellites and other purposes. The present invention incorporates previously-qualified interchangeable circuit boards, or "decks," that perform functions such as power, signal receiving and transmission, and processing. Each deck is adapted to serve a range of telemetry applications. This provides flexibility in the construction of the stackable telemetry circuit board and significantly reduces the cost and time necessary to develop a telemetry system.

  16. Systems and Methods for Parameter Dependent Riccati Equation Approaches to Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for adaptive control are disclosed. The systems and methods can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can comprise a controller that employs a parameter dependent Riccati equation. The controller can produce a response that causes the state of the system to remain bounded. The control system can control both minimum phase and non-minimum phase systems. The control system can augment an existing, non-adaptive control design without modifying the gains employed in that design. The control system can also avoid the use of high gains in both the observer design and the adaptive control law.

  17. Model of adaptive temporal development of structured finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Jiri; Shaw, Gordon L.; Slansky, Richard; Leng, Xiaodan

    1989-07-01

    The weight systems of level-zero representations of affine Kac-Moody algebras provide an appropriate kinematical framework for studying structured finite systems with adaptive temporal development. Much of the structure is determined by Lie algebra theory, so it is possible to restrict greatly the connection space and analytic results are possible. The time development of these systems often evolves to cyclic temporal-spatial patterns, depending on the definition of the dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to set up the mathematical formalism for this ``memory in Lie algebras'' class of models. An illustration is used to show the kinds of complex behavior that occur in simple cases.

  18. Adaptive Learning Resources Sequencing in Educational Hypermedia Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karampiperis, Pythagoras; Sampson, Demetrios

    2005-01-01

    Adaptive learning resources selection and sequencing is recognized as among the most interesting research questions in adaptive educational hypermedia systems (AEHS). In order to adaptively select and sequence learning resources in AEHS, the definition of adaptation rules contained in the Adaptation Model, is required. Although, some efforts have…

  19. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  20. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2002-01-01

    In these 18 years, the research has touched every major dynamical problem in the solar system, including: the effect of chaotic zones on the distribution of asteroids, the delivery of meteorites along chaotic pathways, the chaotic motion of Pluto, the chaotic motion of the outer planets and that of the whole solar system, the delivery of short period comets from the Kuiper belt, the tidal evolution of the Uranian arid Galilean satellites, the chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and other irregular satellites, the large chaotic variations of the obliquity of Mars, the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and the resonant core- mantle dynamics of Earth and Venus. It has introduced new analytical and numerical tools that are in widespread use. Today, nearly every long-term integration of our solar system, its subsystems, and other solar systems uses algorithms that was invented. This research has all been primarily Supported by this sequence of PGG NASA grants. During this period published major investigations of tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system and of the passage of the Earth and Venus through non-linear core-mantle resonances were completed. It has published a major innovation in symplectic algorithms: the symplectic corrector. A paper was completed on non-perturbative hydrostatic equilibrium.

  1. Cooperative Autonomic Management in Dynamic Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Zhao, Ming; Fortes, José A. B.

    The centralized management of large distributed systems is often impractical, particularly when the both the topology and status of the system change dynamically. This paper proposes an approach to application-centric self-management in large distributed systems consisting of a collection of autonomic components that join and leave the system dynamically. Cooperative autonomic components self-organize into a dynamically created overlay network. Through local information sharing with neighbors, each component gains access to global information as needed for optimizing performance of applications. The approach has been validated and evaluated by developing a decentralized autonomic system consisting of multiple autonomic application managers previously developed for the In-VIGO grid-computing system. Using analytical results from complex random network and measurements done in a prototype system, we demonstrate the robustness, self-organization and adaptability of our approach, both theoretically and experimentally.

  2. Complex ordering in spin networks: Critical role of adaptation rate for dynamically evolving interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anand; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-09-01

    Many complex systems can be represented as networks of dynamical elements whose states evolve in response to interactions with neighboring elements, noise and external stimuli. The collective behavior of such systems can exhibit remarkable ordering phenomena such as chimera order corresponding to coexistence of ordered and disordered regions. Often, the interactions in such systems can also evolve over time responding to changes in the dynamical states of the elements. Link adaptation inspired by Hebbian learning, the dominant paradigm for neuronal plasticity, has been earlier shown to result in structural balance by removing any initial frustration in a system that arises through conflicting interactions. Here we show that the rate of the adaptive dynamics for the interactions is crucial in deciding the emergence of different ordering behavior (including chimera) and frustration in networks of Ising spins. In particular, we observe that small changes in the link adaptation rate about a critical value result in the system exhibiting radically different energy landscapes, viz., smooth landscape corresponding to balanced systems seen for fast learning, and rugged landscapes corresponding to frustrated systems seen for slow learning.

  3. HARNESS: Heterogeneous Adaptable Reconfigurable Networked Systems. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fagg, G. E.

    2004-01-20

    HARNESS was proposed as a system that combined the best of emerging technologies found in current distributed computing research and commercial products into a very flexible, dynamically adaptable framework that could be used by applications to allow them to evolve and better handle their execution environment. The HARNESS system was designed using the considerable experience from previous projects such as PVM, MPI, IceT and Cumulvs. As such, the system was designed to avoid any of the common problems found with using these current systems, such as no single point of failure, ability to survive machine, node and software failures. Additional features included improved intercomponent connectivity, with full support for dynamic down loading of addition components at run-time thus reducing the stress on application developers to build in all the libraries they need in advance.

  4. Adaptive Embedded Digital System for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Angel; Rodríguez, Othoniel; Mangual, Osvaldo; Ponce, Eduardo; Vélez, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    An Adaptive Embedded Digital System to perform plasma diagnostics using electrostatic probes was developed at the Plasma Engineering Laboratory at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. The system will replace the existing instrumentation at the Laboratory, using reconfigurable hardware to minimize the equipment and software needed to perform diagnostics. The adaptability of the design resides on the possibility of replacing the computational algorithm on the fly, allowing to use the same hardware for different probes. The system was prototyped using Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language (VHDL) into an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board. The design of the Embedded Digital System includes a Zero Phase Digital Filter, a Derivative Unit, and a Computational Unit designed using the VHDL-2008 Support Library. The prototype is able to compute the Plasma Electron Temperature and Density from a Single Langmuir probe. The system was tested using real data previously acquired from a single Langmuir probe. The plasma parameters obtained from the embedded system were compared with results computed using matlab yielding excellent matching. The new embedded system operates on 4096 samples versus 500 on the previous system, and completes its computations in 26 milliseconds compared with about 15 seconds on the previous system.

  5. Improving the adaptability of simulated evolutionary swarm robots in dynamically changing environments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store 'good behaviour' and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment. PMID:24599485

  6. Improving the Adaptability of Simulated Evolutionary Swarm Robots in Dynamically Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store ‘good behaviour’ and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment. PMID:24599485

  7. Macroscopic description of complex adaptive networks coevolving with dynamic node states.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F; Heitzig, Jobst; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    In many real-world complex systems, the time evolution of the network's structure and the dynamic state of its nodes are closely entangled. Here we study opinion formation and imitation on an adaptive complex network which is dependent on the individual dynamic state of each node and vice versa to model the coevolution of renewable resources with the dynamics of harvesting agents on a social network. The adaptive voter model is coupled to a set of identical logistic growth models and we mainly find that, in such systems, the rate of interactions between nodes as well as the adaptive rewiring probability are crucial parameters for controlling the sustainability of the system's equilibrium state. We derive a macroscopic description of the system in terms of ordinary differential equations which provides a general framework to model and quantify the influence of single node dynamics on the macroscopic state of the network. The thus obtained framework is applicable to many fields of study, such as epidemic spreading, opinion formation, or socioecological modeling. PMID:26066206

  8. Adaptive backstepping slide mode control of pneumatic position servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haipeng; Fan, Juntao

    2016-06-01

    With the price decreasing of the pneumatic proportional valve and the high performance micro controller, the simple structure and high tracking performance pneumatic servo system demonstrates more application potential in many fields. However, most existing control methods with high tracking performance need to know the model information and to use pressure sensor. This limits the application of the pneumatic servo system. An adaptive backstepping slide mode control method is proposed for pneumatic position servo system. The proposed method designs adaptive slide mode controller using backstepping design technique. The controller parameter adaptive law is derived from Lyapunov analysis to guarantee the stability of the system. A theorem is testified to show that the state of closed-loop system is uniformly bounded, and the closed-loop system is stable. The advantages of the proposed method include that system dynamic model parameters are not required for the controller design, uncertain parameters bounds are not need, and the bulk and expensive pressure sensor is not needed as well. Experimental results show that the designed controller can achieve better tracking performance, as compared with some existing methods.

  9. Development of a dynamically adaptive grid method for multidimensional problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, J. E.; Hindman, R. G.

    1984-06-01

    An approach to solution adaptive grid generation for use with finite difference techniques, previously demonstrated on model problems in one space dimension, has been extended to multidimensional problems. The method is based on the popular elliptic steady grid generators, but is 'dynamically' adaptive in the sense that a grid is maintained at all times satisfying the steady grid law driven by a solution-dependent source term. Testing has been carried out on Burgers' equation in one and two space dimensions. Results appear encouraging both for inviscid wave propagation cases and viscous boundary layer cases, suggesting that application to practical flow problems is now possible. In the course of the work, obstacles relating to grid correction, smoothing of the solution, and elliptic equation solvers have been largely overcome. Concern remains, however, about grid skewness, boundary layer resolution and the need for implicit integration methods. Also, the method in 3-D is expected to be very demanding of computer resources.

  10. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  11. Neural network-based adaptive dynamic surface control for permanent magnet synchronous motors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinpeng; Shi, Peng; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Bing; Lin, Chong

    2015-03-01

    This brief considers the problem of neural networks (NNs)-based adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) for permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) with parameter uncertainties and load torque disturbance. First, NNs are used to approximate the unknown and nonlinear functions of PMSM drive system and a novel adaptive DSC is constructed to avoid the explosion of complexity in the backstepping design. Next, under the proposed adaptive neural DSC, the number of adaptive parameters required is reduced to only one, and the designed neural controllers structure is much simpler than some existing results in literature, which can guarantee that the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Then, simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential of the new design technique. PMID:25720014

  12. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1999-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1". The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have successfully used adaptive optics on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1" resolution images of solar system objects in the far red and near infrared (0.7-2.5 microns), aE wavelengths which best discl"lmlnate their spectral signatures. Our efforts have been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential.

  13. Demonstration of portable solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Dong, Bing

    2012-10-01

    Solar-adaptive optics (AO) are more challenging than night-time AO, in some aspects. A portable solar adaptive optics (PSAO) system featuring compact physical size, low cost, and good performance has been proposed and developed. PSAO can serve as a visiting instrument for any existing ground-based solar telescope to improve solar image quality by replacing just a few optical components. High-level programming language, LabVIEW, is used to develop the wavefront sensing and control software, and general purpose computers are used to drive the whole system. During October 2011, the feasibility and good performance of PSAO was demonstrated with the 61-cm solar telescope at San Fernando Observatory. The image contrast and resolution are noticeably improved after AO correction.

  14. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, M. |; Selverston, A.; Rubchinsky, L.; Huerta, R.

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Dynamics and kinematics of simple neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail; Selverston, Allen; Rubchinsky, Leonid; Huerta, Ramón

    1996-09-01

    The dynamics of simple neural systems is of interest to both biologists and physicists. One of the possible roles of such systems is the production of rhythmic patterns, and their alterations (modification of behavior, processing of sensory information, adaptation, control). In this paper, the neural systems are considered as a subject of modeling by the dynamical systems approach. In particular, we analyze how a stable, ordinary behavior of a small neural system can be described by simple finite automata models, and how more complicated dynamical systems modeling can be used. The approach is illustrated by biological and numerical examples: experiments with and numerical simulations of the stomatogastric central pattern generators network of the California spiny lobster.

  16. PSF halo reduction in adaptive optics using dynamic pupil masking.

    PubMed

    Osborn, James; Myers, Richard M; Love, Gordon D

    2009-09-28

    We describe a method to reduce residual speckles in an adaptive optics system which add to the halo of the point spread function (PSF). The halo is particularly problematic in astronomical applications involving the detection of faint companions. Areas of the pupil are selected where the residual wavefront aberrations are large and these are masked using a spatial light modulator. The method is also suitable for smaller telescopes without adaptive optics as a relatively simple method to increase the resolution of the telescope. We describe the principle of the technique and show simulation results. PMID:19907514

  17. An adaptable neuromorphic model of orientation selectivity based on floating gate dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Markan, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    The biggest challenge that the neuromorphic community faces today is to build systems that can be considered truly cognitive. Adaptation and self-organization are the two basic principles that underlie any cognitive function that the brain performs. If we can replicate this behavior in hardware, we move a step closer to our goal of having cognitive neuromorphic systems. Adaptive feature selectivity is a mechanism by which nature optimizes resources so as to have greater acuity for more abundant features. Developing neuromorphic feature maps can help design generic machines that can emulate this adaptive behavior. Most neuromorphic models that have attempted to build self-organizing systems, follow the approach of modeling abstract theoretical frameworks in hardware. While this is good from a modeling and analysis perspective, it may not lead to the most efficient hardware. On the other hand, exploiting hardware dynamics to build adaptive systems rather than forcing the hardware to behave like mathematical equations, seems to be a more robust methodology when it comes to developing actual hardware for real world applications. In this paper we use a novel time-staggered Winner Take All circuit, that exploits the adaptation dynamics of floating gate transistors, to model an adaptive cortical cell that demonstrates Orientation Selectivity, a well-known biological phenomenon observed in the visual cortex. The cell performs competitive learning, refining its weights in response to input patterns resembling different oriented bars, becoming selective to a particular oriented pattern. Different analysis performed on the cell such as orientation tuning, application of abnormal inputs, response to spatial frequency and periodic patterns reveal close similarity between our cell and its biological counterpart. Embedded in a RC grid, these cells interact diffusively exhibiting cluster formation, making way for adaptively building orientation selective maps in silicon. PMID

  18. The Magellan Telescope adaptive secondary AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Gasho, Victor; Kopon, Derek; Hinz, Phil M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson

    2008-07-01

    The Magellan Clay telescope is a 6.5m Gregorian telescope located in southern Chile at Las Campanas Observatory. The Gregorian design allows for an adaptive secondary mirror that can be tested off-sky in a straight-forward manner. We have fabricated a 85 cm diameter aspheric adaptive secondary with our subcontractors and partners. This secondary has 585 actuators with <1 msec response times. The chopping adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity AO science. We will achieve very high Strehls (~98%) in the Mid-IR AO (8-26 microns) with the BLINC/MIRAC4 Mid-IR science camera. This will allow the first "super-resolution" and nulling Mid-IR studies of dusty southern objects. We will employ a high order (585 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor similar to that used in the Large Binocular Telescope AO systems. The relatively high actuator count will allow modest Strehls to be obtained in the visible (~0.8μm). Our visible light AO (Vis AO) science camera is fed by an advanced ADC and beamsplitter piggy-backed on the WFS optical table. The system science and performance requirements, and an overview the design, interface and schedule for the Magellan AO system are presented here.

  19. Facial Expression Aftereffect Revealed by Adaption to Emotion-Invisible Dynamic Bubbled Faces

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengwen; Wang, Qingyun; Schyns, Philippe G.; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Visual adaptation is a powerful tool to probe the short-term plasticity of the visual system. Adapting to local features such as the oriented lines can distort our judgment of subsequently presented lines, the tilt aftereffect. The tilt aftereffect is believed to be processed at the low-level of the visual cortex, such as V1. Adaptation to faces, on the other hand, can produce significant aftereffects in high-level traits such as identity, expression, and ethnicity. However, whether face adaptation necessitate awareness of face features is debatable. In the current study, we investigated whether facial expression aftereffects (FEAE) can be generated by partially visible faces. We first generated partially visible faces using the bubbles technique, in which the face was seen through randomly positioned circular apertures, and selected the bubbled faces for which the subjects were unable to identify happy or sad expressions. When the subjects adapted to static displays of these partial faces, no significant FEAE was found. However, when the subjects adapted to a dynamic video display of a series of different partial faces, a significant FEAE was observed. In both conditions, subjects could not identify facial expression in the individual adapting faces. These results suggest that our visual system is able to integrate unrecognizable partial faces over a short period of time and that the integrated percept affects our judgment on subsequently presented faces. We conclude that FEAE can be generated by partial face with little facial expression cues, implying that our cognitive system fills-in the missing parts during adaptation, or the subcortical structures are activated by the bubbled faces without conscious recognition of emotion during adaptation. PMID:26717572

  20. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  1. Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Beauchamp, Brock R.; Mauger, G. Joseph; Nelson, Karl E.; Mercer, Michael B.; Pletcher, David C.; Riot, Vincent J.; Schek, James L.; Knapp, David A.

    2006-06-20

    A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

  2. Modeling human target reaching with an adaptive observer implemented with dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Fard, Farzaneh S; Hollensen, Paul; Heinke, Dietmar; Trappenberg, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    Humans can point fairly accurately to memorized states when closing their eyes despite slow or even missing sensory feedback. It is also common that the arm dynamics changes during development or from injuries. We propose a biologically motivated implementation of an arm controller that includes an adaptive observer. Our implementation is based on the neural field framework, and we show how a path integration mechanism can be trained from few examples. Our results illustrate successful generalization of path integration with a dynamic neural field by which the robotic arm can move in arbitrary directions and velocities. Also, by adapting the strength of the motor effect the observer implicitly learns to compensate an image acquisition delay in the sensory system. Our dynamic implementation of an observer successfully guides the arm toward the target in the dark, and the model produces movements with a bell-shaped velocity profile, consistent with human behavior data. PMID:26559472

  3. Ecosystems and the Biosphere as Complex Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Simon A.

    1998-01-01

    Ecosystems are prototypical examples of complex adaptive systems, in which patterns at higher levels emerge from localized interactions and selection processes acting at lower levels. An essential aspect of such systems is nonlinearity, leading to historical dependency and multiple possible outcomes of dynamics. Given this, it is essential to determine the degree to which system features are determined by environmental conditions, and the degree to which they are the result of self-organization. Furthermore, given the multiple levels at which dynamics become apparent and at which selection can act, central issues relate to how evolution shapes ecosystems properties, and whether ecosystems become buffered to changes (more resilient) over their ecological and evolutionary development or proceed to critical states and the edge of chaos.

  4. Feasibility of the adaptive and automatic presentation of tasks (ADAPT) system for rehabilitation of upper extremity function post-stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for rehabilitation of arm and hand function after stroke recommend that motor training focus on realistic tasks that require reaching and manipulation and engage the patient intensively, actively, and adaptively. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a novel robotic task-practice system, ADAPT, designed in accordance with such guidelines. At each trial, ADAPT selects a functional task according to a training schedule and with difficulty based on previous performance. Once the task is selected, the robot picks up and presents the corresponding tool, simulates the dynamics of the tasks, and the patient interacts with the tool to perform the task. Methods Five participants with chronic stroke with mild to moderate impairments (> 9 months post-stroke; Fugl-Meyer arm score 49.2 ± 5.6) practiced four functional tasks (selected out of six in a pre-test) with ADAPT for about one and half hour and 144 trials in a pseudo-random schedule of 3-trial blocks per task. Results No adverse events occurred and ADAPT successfully presented the six functional tasks without human intervention for a total of 900 trials. Qualitative analysis of trajectories showed that ADAPT simulated the desired task dynamics adequately, and participants reported good, although not excellent, task fidelity. During training, the adaptive difficulty algorithm progressively increased task difficulty leading towards an optimal challenge point based on performance; difficulty was then continuously adjusted to keep performance around the challenge point. Furthermore, the time to complete all trained tasks decreased significantly from pretest to one-hour post-test. Finally, post-training questionnaires demonstrated positive patient acceptance of ADAPT. Conclusions ADAPT successfully provided adaptive progressive training for multiple functional tasks based on participant's performance. Our encouraging results establish the feasibility of ADAPT; its efficacy will next be tested

  5. Inter-limb interference during bimanual adaptation to dynamic environments

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Maura; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Squeri, Valentina; Masia, Lorenzo; Morasso, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Skillful manipulation of objects often requires the spatio-temporal coordination of both hands and, at the same time, the compensation of environmental forces. In bimanual coordination, movements of the two hands may be coupled because each hand needs to compensate the forces generated by the other hand or by an object operated by both hands (dynamic coupling), or because the two hands share the same workspace (spatial coupling). We examined how spatial coupling influences bimanual coordination, by looking at the adaptation of velocity-dependent force fields during a task in which the two hands simultaneously perform center-out reaching movements with the same initial position and the same targets, equally spaced on a circle. Subjects were randomly allocated to two groups, which differed in terms of the force fields they were exposed to: in one group (CW-CW), force fields had equal clockwise orientations in both hands; in the other group (CCW-CW), they had opposite orientations. In both groups, in randomly selected trials (catch trials) of the adaptation phase, the force fields were unexpectedly removed. Adaptation was quantified in terms of the changes of directional error for both hand trajectories. Bimanual coordination was quantified in terms of inter-limb longitudinal and sideways displacements, in force field and in catch trials. Experimental results indicate that both arms could simultaneously adapt to the two force fields. However, in the CCW-CW group, adaptation was incomplete for the movements from the central position to the more distant targets with respect to the body. In addition, in this group the left hand systematically leads in the movements toward targets on the left of the starting position, whereas the right hand leads in the movements to targets on the right. We show that these effects are due to a gradual sideways shift of the hands, so that during movements the left hand tends to consistently remain at the left of the right hand. These

  6. Experimental Dynamic Characterization of a Reconfigurable Adaptive Precision Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, J. D.; Peterson, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a reconfigurable adaptive truss structure with non-linear joints is investigated. The objective is to experimentally examine the effects of the local non-linearities on the global dynamics of the structure. Amplitude changes in the frequency response functions are measured at micron levels of motion. The amplitude and frequency variations of a number of modes indicate a non-linear Coulomb friction response. Hysteretic bifurcation behavior is also measured at an amplitude approximately equal to the specified free-play in the joint. Under the 1 g pre-load, however, the non-linearity was dominantly characteristic of Coulomb friction with little evidence of free-play stiffening.

  7. Adaptive integral dynamic surface control of a hypersonic flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam Butt, Waseem; Yan, Lin; Amezquita S., Kendrick

    2015-07-01

    In this article, non-linear adaptive dynamic surface air speed and flight path angle control designs are presented for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle. The tracking performance of the control design is enhanced by introducing a novel integral term that caters to avoiding a large initial control signal. To ensure feasibility, the design scheme incorporates magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator commands. The uncertain non-linear functions are approximated by an efficient use of the neural networks to reduce the computational load. A detailed stability analysis shows that all closed-loop signals are uniformly ultimately bounded and the ? tracking performance is guaranteed. The robustness of the design scheme is verified through numerical simulations of the flexible flight vehicle model.

  8. Gaia as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed Central

    Lenton, Timothy M; van Oijen, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    We define the Gaia system of life and its environment on Earth, review the status of the Gaia theory, introduce potentially relevant concepts from complexity theory, then try to apply them to Gaia. We consider whether Gaia is a complex adaptive system (CAS) in terms of its behaviour and suggest that the system is self-organizing but does not reside in a critical state. Gaia has supported abundant life for most of the last 3.8 Gyr. Large perturbations have occasionally suppressed life but the system has always recovered without losing the capacity for large-scale free energy capture and recycling of essential elements. To illustrate how complexity theory can help us understand the emergence of planetary-scale order, we present a simple cellular automata (CA) model of the imaginary planet Daisyworld. This exhibits emergent self-regulation as a consequence of feedback coupling between life and its environment. Local spatial interaction, which was absent from the original model, can destabilize the system by generating bifurcation regimes. Variation and natural selection tend to remove this instability. With mutation in the model system, it exhibits self-organizing adaptive behaviour in its response to forcing. We close by suggesting how artificial life ('Alife') techniques may enable more comprehensive feasibility tests of Gaia. PMID:12079529

  9. Systems integration of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Zak, Daniel E; Aderem, Alan

    2015-09-29

    The pathogens causing AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis have proven too complex to be overcome by classical approaches to vaccination. The complexities of human immunology and pathogen-induced modulation of the immune system mandate new approaches to vaccine discovery and design. A new field, systems vaccinology, weds holistic analysis of innate and adaptive immunity within a quantitative framework to enable rational design of new vaccines that elicit tailored protective immune responses. A key step in the approach is to discover relationships between the earliest innate inflammatory responses to vaccination and the subsequent vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses and efficacy. Analysis of these responses in clinical studies is complicated by the inaccessibility of relevant tissue compartments (such as the lymph node), necessitating reliance upon peripheral blood responses as surrogates. Blood transcriptomes, although indirect to vaccine mechanisms, have proven very informative in systems vaccinology studies. The approach is most powerful when innate and adaptive immune responses are integrated with vaccine efficacy, which is possible for malaria with the advent of a robust human challenge model. This is more difficult for AIDS and tuberculosis, given that human challenge models are lacking and efficacy observed in clinical trials has been low or highly variable. This challenge can be met by appropriate clinical trial design for partially efficacious vaccines and by analysis of natural infection cohorts. Ultimately, systems vaccinology is an iterative approach in which mechanistic hypotheses-derived from analysis of clinical studies-are evaluated in model systems, and then used to guide the development of new vaccine strategies. In this review, we will illustrate the above facets of the systems vaccinology approach with case studies. PMID:26102534

  10. Ultra-Low Power Dynamic Knob in Adaptive Compressed Sensing Towards Biosignal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aosen; Lin, Feng; Jin, Zhanpeng; Xu, Wenyao

    2016-06-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an emerging sampling paradigm in data acquisition. Its integrated analog-to-information structure can perform simultaneous data sensing and compression with low-complexity hardware. To date, most of the existing CS implementations have a fixed architectural setup, which lacks flexibility and adaptivity for efficient dynamic data sensing. In this paper, we propose a dynamic knob (DK) design to effectively reconfigure the CS architecture by recognizing the biosignals. Specifically, the dynamic knob design is a template-based structure that comprises a supervised learning module and a look-up table module. We model the DK performance in a closed analytic form and optimize the design via a dynamic programming formulation. We present the design on a 130 nm process, with a 0.058 mm (2) fingerprint and a 187.88 nJ/event energy-consumption. Furthermore, we benchmark the design performance using a publicly available dataset. Given the energy constraint in wireless sensing, the adaptive CS architecture can consistently improve the signal reconstruction quality by more than 70%, compared with the traditional CS. The experimental results indicate that the ultra-low power dynamic knob can provide an effective adaptivity and improve the signal quality in compressed sensing towards biosignal dynamics. PMID:26800548

  11. An adaptive approach to the dynamic allocation of buffer storage. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooke, S. C.

    1970-01-01

    Several strategies for the dynamic allocation of buffer storage are simulated and compared. The basic algorithms investigated, using actual statistics observed in the Univac 1108 EXEC 8 System, include the buddy method and the first-fit method. Modifications are made to the basic methods in an effort to improve and to measure allocation performance. A simulation model of an adaptive strategy is developed which permits interchanging the two different methods, the buddy and the first-fit methods with some modifications. Using an adaptive strategy, each method may be employed in the statistical environment in which its performance is superior to the other method.

  12. A Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Controller for a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a Predictor-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control (PMRAC) architecture for a generic transport aircraft. At its core, this architecture features a three-axis, non-linear, dynamic-inversion controller. Command inputs for this baseline controller are provided by pilot roll-rate, pitch-rate, and sideslip commands. This paper will first thoroughly present the baseline controller followed by a description of the PMRAC adaptive augmentation to this control system. Results are presented via a full-scale, nonlinear simulation of NASA s Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  13. A self-adaptive energy harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Hehn, T.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports on a self-adaptive energy harvesting system, which is able to adapt its eigenfrequency to the operating conditions of power units. The power required for frequency tuning is delivered by the energy harvester itself. The tuning mechanism is based on a magnetic concept and incorporates a circular tuning magnet and a coupling magnet. In this manner, both coupling modes (attractive and repulsive) can be utilized for tuning the eigenfrequency of the energy harvester. The tuning range and its center frequency can be tailored to the application by careful design of the spring stiffness and the gap between tuning magnet and coupling magnet. Experimental results demonstrate that, in contrast to a conventional non-tunable vibration energy harvester, the net power can be significantly increased if a self-adaptive system is utilized, although additional power is required for regular adjustments of the eigenfrequency. The outcome confirms that active tuning is a real and practical option to extend the operational frequency range and to increase the net power of a conventional vibration energy harvester.

  14. The Use of Complex Adaptive Systems as a Generative Metaphor in an Action Research Study of an Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Callum

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic behaviour of organisations is challenging and this study uses a model of complex adaptive systems as a generative metaphor to address this challenge. The research question addressed is: How might a conceptual model of complex adaptive systems be used to assist in understanding the dynamic nature of organisations? Using an…

  15. Robust Integrated Neurocontroller for Complex Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zein-Sabatto, S.; Marpaka, D.; Hwang, W.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research effort is to develop an integrated control software environment for the purpose of creating an intelligent neurocontrol system. The system will be capable of estimating states, identifying parameters, diagnosing conditions, planning control strategies, and producing intelligent control actions. The distinct features of such control system are: adaptability and on-line learning capability. The proposed system will be flexible to allow structure adaptability to account for changes in the dynamic system such as: sensory failures and/or component degradations. The developed system should learn system uncertainties and changes, as they occur, while maintaining minimal control level on the dynamic system. The research activities set to achieve the research objective are summarized by the following general items: (1) Development of a system identifier or diagnostic system, (2) Development of a robust neurocontroller system, and 3. Integration of above systems to create a Robust Integrated Control system (RIC-system). Two contrary approaches are investigated in this research: classical (traditional) design approach, and the simultaneous design approach. However, in both approaches neural network is the base for the development of different functions of the system. The two resulting designs will be tested and simulation results will be compared for better possible implementation.

  16. Robust integrated neurocontroller for complex dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zein-Sabbato, S.; Marpaka, D.; Hwang, W.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this research effort is to develop an integrated control software environment for the purpose of creating an intelligent neurocontrol system. The system will be capable of estimating states, identifying parameters, diagnosing conditions, planning control strategies, and producing intelligent control actions. The distinct features of such control system are adaptability and on-line learning capability. The proposed system will be flexible to allow structure adaptability to account for changes in the dynamic system such as sensory failures and/or component degradations. The developed system should learn system uncertainties and changes, as they occur, while maintaining minimal control level on the dynamic system. The research activities set to achieve the research objective are summarized by the following general items: (1) Development of a system identifier or diagnostic system; (2) Development of a robust neurocontroller system, and; (3) Integration of above systems to create a robust Integration Control system (RIC-system). Two contrary approaches are investigated in this research: classical (traditional) design approach, and the simultaneous design approach. However, in both approaches neural network is the base for the development of different functions of the system. The two resulting designs will be tested and simulation results will be compared for better possible implementation.

  17. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-02-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

  18. Social networks as embedded complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Clancy, Thomas R

    2010-09-01

    As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 15th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, the authors discuss healthcare social networks as a hierarchy of embedded complex adaptive systems. The authors further examine the use of social network analysis tools as a means to understand complex communication patterns and reduce medical errors. PMID:20798616

  19. Functional systems with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam; Gasparini, Giulio; Matile, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    This review summarizes the use of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds to build functional systems. Dynamic covalent bonds are unique because of their dual nature. They can be as labile as non-covalent interactions or as permanent as covalent bonds, depending on conditions. Examples from nature, reaching from the role of disulfides in protein folding to thioester exchange in polyketide biosynthesis, indicate how dynamic covalent bonds are best used in functional systems. Several synthetic functional systems that employ a single type of dynamic covalent bonds have been reported. Considering that most functional systems make simultaneous use of several types of non-covalent interactions together, one would expect the literature to contain many examples in which different types of dynamic covalent bonds are similarly used in tandem. However, the incorporation of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds into functional systems is a surprisingly rare and recent development. This review summarizes the available material comprehensively, covering a remarkably diverse collection of functions. However, probably more revealing than the specific functions addressed is that the questions asked are consistently quite unusual, very demanding and highly original, focusing on molecular systems that can self-sort, self-heal, adapt, exchange, replicate, transcribe, or even walk and "think" (logic gates). This focus on adventurous chemistry off the beaten track supports the promise that with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds we can ask questions that otherwise cannot be asked. The broad range of functions and concepts covered should appeal to the supramolecular organic chemist but also to the broader community. PMID:24287608

  20. Innovations in dynamic test restraint systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuld, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent launch system development programs have led to a new generation of large scale dynamic tests. The variety of test scenarios share one common requirement: restrain and capture massive high velocity flight hardware with no structural damage. The Space Systems Lab of McDonnell Douglas developed a remarkably simple and cost effective approach to such testing using ripstitch energy absorbers adapted from the sport of technical rockclimbing. The proven system reliability of the capture system concept has led to a wide variety of applications in test system design and in aerospace hardware design.

  1. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, John

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) type map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.

  2. Dynamic Information Architecture System

    1997-02-12

    The Dynamic Information System (DIAS) is a flexible object-based software framework for concurrent, multidiscplinary modeling of arbitrary (but related) processes. These processes are modeled as interrelated actions caused by and affecting the collection of diverse real-world objects represented in a simulation. The DIAS architecture allows independent process models to work together harmoniously in the same frame of reference and provides a wide range of data ingestion and output capabilities, including Geographic Information System (GIS) typemore » map-based displays and photorealistic visualization of simulations in progress. In the DIAS implementation of the object-based approach, software objects carry within them not only the data which describe their static characteristics, but also the methods, or functions, which describe their dynamic behaviors. There are two categories of objects: (1) Entity objects which have real-world counterparts and are the actors in a simulation, and (2) Software infrastructure objects which make it possible to carry out the simulations. The Entity objects contain lists of Aspect objects, each of which addresses a single aspect of the Entity''s behavior. For example, a DIAS Stream Entity representing a section of a river can have many aspects correspondimg to its behavior in terms of hydrology (as a drainage system component), navigation (as a link in a waterborne transportation system), meteorology (in terms of moisture, heat, and momentum exchange with the atmospheric boundary layer), and visualization (for photorealistic visualization or map type displays), etc. This makes it possible for each real-world object to exhibit any or all of its unique behaviors within the context of a single simulation.« less

  3. Adaptive optics for directly imaging planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Vanessa Perry

    In this dissertation I present the results from five papers (including one in preparation) on giant planets, brown dwarfs, and their environments, as well as on the commissioning and optimization of the Adaptive Optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer. The first three Chapters cover direct imaging results on several distantly-orbiting planets and brown dwarf companions. The boundary between giant planets and brown dwarf companions in wide orbits is a blurry one. In Chapter 2, I use 3--5 mum imaging of several brown dwarf companions, combined with mid-infrared photometry for each system to constrain the circum-substellar disks around the brown dwarfs. I then use this information to discuss limits on scattering events versus in situ formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, I present results from an adaptive optics imaging survey for giant planets, where the target stars were selected based on the properties of their circumstellar debris disks. Specifically, we targeted systems with debris disks whose SEDs indicated gaps, clearings, or truncations; these features may possibly be sculpted by planets. I discuss in detail one planet-mass companion discovered as part of this survey, HD 106906 b. At a projected separation of 650 AU and weighing in at 11 Jupiter masses, a companion such as this is not a common outcome of any planet or binary star formation model. In the remaining three Chapters, I discuss pre-commissioning, on-sky results, and planned work on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer Adaptive Optics system. Before construction of the LBT AO system was complete, I tested a prototype of LBTI's pyramid wavefront sensor unit at the MMT with synthetically-generated calibration files. I present the methodology and MMT on-sky tests in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6, I present the commissioned performance of LBTIAO. Optical imperfections within LBTI limited the quality of the science images, and I describe a simple method to use the adaptive optics system

  4. Grand-Canonical Adaptive Resolution Centroid Molecular Dynamics: Implementation and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Animesh; Delle Site, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    We have implemented the Centroid Molecular Dynamics scheme (CMD) into the Grand Canonical-like version of the Adaptive Resolution Simulation Molecular Dynamics (GC-AdResS) method. We have tested the implementation on two different systems, liquid parahydrogen at extreme thermodynamic conditions and liquid water at ambient conditions; the reproduction of structural as well as dynamical results of reference systems are highly satisfactory. The capability of performing GC-AdResS CMD simulations allows for the treatment of a system characterized by some quantum features and open boundaries. This latter characteristic not only is of computational convenience, allowing for equivalent results of much larger and computationally more expensive systems, but also suggests a tool of analysis so far not explored, that is the unambiguous identification of the essential degrees of freedom required for a given property.

  5. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  6. DKIST Adaptive Optics System: Simulation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    The 4 m class Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), currently under construction, will be equipped with an ultra high order solar adaptive optics (AO) system. The requirements and capabilities of such a solar AO system are beyond those of any other solar AO system currently in operation. We must rely on solar AO simulations to estimate and quantify its performance.We present performance estimation results of the DKIST AO system obtained with a new solar AO simulation tool. This simulation tool is a flexible and fast end-to-end solar AO simulator which produces accurate solar AO simulations while taking advantage of current multi-core computer technology. It relies on full imaging simulations of the extended field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS), which directly includes important secondary effects such as field dependent distortions and varying contrast of the WFS sub-aperture images.

  7. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  8. Risk-return relationship in a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Song, Kunyu; An, Kenan; Yang, Guang; Huang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    For survival and development, autonomous agents in complex adaptive systems involving the human society must compete against or collaborate with others for sharing limited resources or wealth, by using different methods. One method is to invest, in order to obtain payoffs with risk. It is a common belief that investments with a positive risk-return relationship (namely, high risk high return and vice versa) are dominant over those with a negative risk-return relationship (i.e., high risk low return and vice versa) in the human society; the belief has a notable impact on daily investing activities of investors. Here we investigate the risk-return relationship in a model complex adaptive system, in order to study the effect of both market efficiency and closeness that exist in the human society and play an important role in helping to establish traditional finance/economics theories. We conduct a series of computer-aided human experiments, and also perform agent-based simulations and theoretical analysis to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that investments with a negative risk-return relationship have dominance over those with a positive risk-return relationship instead in such a complex adaptive systems. We formulate the dynamical process for the system's evolution, which helps to discover the different role of identical and heterogeneous preferences. This work might be valuable not only to complexity science, but also to finance and economics, to management and social science, and to physics. PMID:22479416

  9. Towards Self-adaptation for Dependable Service-Oriented Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Valeria; Casalicchio, Emiliano; Grassi, Vincenzo; Lo Presti, Francesco; Mirandola, Raffaela

    Increasingly complex information systems operating in dynamic environments ask for management policies able to deal intelligently and autonomously with problems and tasks. An attempt to deal with these aspects can be found in the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) paradigm that foresees the creation of business applications from independently developed services, where services and applications build up complex dependencies. Therefore the dependability of SOA systems strongly depends on their ability to self-manage and adapt themselves to cope with changes in the operating conditions and to meet the required dependability with a minimum of resources. In this paper we propose a model-based approach to the realization of self-adaptable SOA systems, aimed at the fulfillment of dependability requirements. Specifically, we provide a methodology driving the system adaptation and we discuss the architectural issues related to its implementation. To bring this approach to fruition, we developed a prototype tool and we show the results that can be achieved with a simple example.

  10. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  11. Molecular dynamics modelling of mechanical properties of polymers for adaptive aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Drikakis, Dimitris; Asproulis, Nikolaos

    2015-02-01

    The features of adaptive structures depend on the properties of the supporting materials. For example, morphing wing structures require wing skin materials, such as rubbers that can withstand the forces imposed by the internal mechanism while maintaining the required aerodynamic properties of the aircraft. In this study, Molecular Dynamics and Minimization simulations are being used to establish well-equilibrated models of Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) elastomer systems and investigate their mechanical properties.

  12. Adaptive stimulus optimization for sensory systems neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    DiMattina, Christopher; Zhang, Kechen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we review several lines of recent work aimed at developing practical methods for adaptive on-line stimulus generation for sensory neurophysiology. We consider various experimental paradigms where on-line stimulus optimization is utilized, including the classical optimal stimulus paradigm where the goal of experiments is to identify a stimulus which maximizes neural responses, the iso-response paradigm which finds sets of stimuli giving rise to constant responses, and the system identification paradigm where the experimental goal is to estimate and possibly compare sensory processing models. We discuss various theoretical and practical aspects of adaptive firing rate optimization, including optimization with stimulus space constraints, firing rate adaptation, and possible network constraints on the optimal stimulus. We consider the problem of system identification, and show how accurate estimation of non-linear models can be highly dependent on the stimulus set used to probe the network. We suggest that optimizing stimuli for accurate model estimation may make it possible to successfully identify non-linear models which are otherwise intractable, and summarize several recent studies of this type. Finally, we present a two-stage stimulus design procedure which combines the dual goals of model estimation and model comparison and may be especially useful for system identification experiments where the appropriate model is unknown beforehand. We propose that fast, on-line stimulus optimization enabled by increasing computer power can make it practical to move sensory neuroscience away from a descriptive paradigm and toward a new paradigm of real-time model estimation and comparison. PMID:23761737

  13. An adaptive learning control system for large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thau, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the research has been to study the design of adaptive/learning control systems for the control of large flexible structures. In the first activity an adaptive/learning control methodology for flexible space structures was investigated. The approach was based on using a modal model of the flexible structure dynamics and an output-error identification scheme to identify modal parameters. In the second activity, a least-squares identification scheme was proposed for estimating both modal parameters and modal-to-actuator and modal-to-sensor shape functions. The technique was applied to experimental data obtained from the NASA Langley beam experiment. In the third activity, a separable nonlinear least-squares approach was developed for estimating the number of excited modes, shape functions, modal parameters, and modal amplitude and velocity time functions for a flexible structure. In the final research activity, a dual-adaptive control strategy was developed for regulating the modal dynamics and identifying modal parameters of a flexible structure. A min-max approach was used for finding an input to provide modal parameter identification while not exceeding reasonable bounds on modal displacement.

  14. Adaptive Dispatching of Incidences Based on Reputation for SCADA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, Cristina; Agudo, Isaac; Fernandez-Gago, Carmen; Roman, Rodrigo; Fernandez, Gerardo; Lopez, Javier

    SCADA systems represent a challenging scenario where the management of critical alarms is crucial. Their response to these alarms should be efficient and fast in order to mitigate or contain undesired effects. This work presents a mechanism, the Adaptive Assignment Manager (AAM) that will aid to react to incidences in a more efficient way by dynamically assigning alarms to the most suitable human operator. The mechanism uses various inputs for identifying the operators such as their availability, workload and reputation. In fact, we also define a reputation component that stores the reputation of the human operators and uses feedback from past experiences.

  15. Application of network control systems for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eager, Robert J.

    2008-04-01

    The communication architecture for most pointing, tracking, and high order adaptive optics control systems has been based on a centralized point-to-point and bus based approach. With the increased use of larger arrays and multiple sensors, actuators and processing nodes, these evolving systems require decentralized control, modularity, flexibility redundancy, integrated diagnostics, dynamic resource allocation, and ease of maintenance to support a wide range of experiments. Network control systems provide all of these critical functionalities. This paper begins with a quick overview of adaptive optics as a control system and communication architecture. It then provides an introduction to network control systems, identifying the key design areas that impact system performance. The paper then discusses the performance test results of a fielded network control system used to implement an adaptive optics system comprised of: a 10KHz, 32x32 spatial selfreferencing interferometer wave front sensor, a 705 channel "Tweeter" deformable mirror, a 177 channel "Woofer" deformable mirror, ten processing nodes, and six data acquisition nodes. The reconstructor algorithm utilized a modulo-2pi wave front phase measurement and a least-squares phase un-wrapper with branch point correction. The servo control algorithm is a hybrid of exponential and infinite impulse response controllers, with tweeter-to-woofer saturation offloading. This system achieved a first-pixel-out to last-mirror-voltage latency of 86 microseconds, with the network accounting for 4 microseconds of the measured latency. Finally, the extensibility of this architecture will be illustrated, by detailing the integration of a tracking sub-system into the existing network.

  16. Development of HIDEC adaptive engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landy, R. J.; Yonke, W. A.; Stewart, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of NASA's Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) flight research program is the development of integrated flight propulsion control modes, and the evaluation of their benefits aboard an F-15 test aircraft. HIDEC program phases are discussed, with attention to the Adaptive Engine Control System (ADECS I); this involves the upgrading of PW1128 engines for operation at higher engine pressure ratios and the production of greater thrust. ADECS II will involve the development of a constant thrust mode which will significantly reduce turbine operating temperatures.

  17. Comparative Study of Adaptive Type-1 and Type-2 Fuzzy Controls for Nonlinear Systems under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokaddem, S.; Khaber, F.

    2008-06-01

    This work presents a development of adaptive type-1 and type-2 fuzzy controls for uncertain nonlinear systems. Using the adaptive type-1 fuzzy control, the dynamic of the nonlinear systems is approximated with type-1 fuzzy systems whose parameters are adjusted by appropriate law adaptation. For adaptive type-2 fuzzy control, the dynamic of the nonlinear systems is approximated with interval type-2 fuzzy systems. The use of this type-2 control requires an additional operation witch is the type reduction, in comparing with typ-1 control. The closed-loop system stability is guaranteed by the Lyaponov synthesis. To show the performance of the developed controls, a comparative study is realized through the application of these controls so that an inverted pendulum tracks a given trajectory in presence of disturbances.

  18. Adaptive optimal control of highly dissipative nonlinear spatially distributed processes with neuro-dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2015-04-01

    Highly dissipative nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are widely employed to describe the system dynamics of industrial spatially distributed processes (SDPs). In this paper, we consider the optimal control problem of the general highly dissipative SDPs, and propose an adaptive optimal control approach based on neuro-dynamic programming (NDP). Initially, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is employed to compute empirical eigenfunctions (EEFs) of the SDP based on the method of snapshots. These EEFs together with singular perturbation technique are then used to obtain a finite-dimensional slow subsystem of ordinary differential equations that accurately describes the dominant dynamics of the PDE system. Subsequently, the optimal control problem is reformulated on the basis of the slow subsystem, which is further converted to solve a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. HJB equation is a nonlinear PDE that has proven to be impossible to solve analytically. Thus, an adaptive optimal control method is developed via NDP that solves the HJB equation online using neural network (NN) for approximating the value function; and an online NN weight tuning law is proposed without requiring an initial stabilizing control policy. Moreover, by involving the NN estimation error, we prove that the original closed-loop PDE system with the adaptive optimal control policy is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the developed method is tested on a nonlinear diffusion-convection-reaction process and applied to a temperature cooling fin of high-speed aerospace vehicle, and the achieved results show its effectiveness. PMID:25794375

  19. NASA Facts: Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James; Cappuccio, Gelsomina

    2013-01-01

    The Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) was developed to increase access to space while simplifying the integration process of miniature satellites, called nanosats or cubesats, onto launch vehicles. A standard cubesat measures about 4inches (10 cm) long, 4 inches wide,and 4 inches high, and is called a one-unit (1U) cubesat. A single NLAS provides the capability to deploy 24U of cubesats. The system is designed to accommodate satellites measuring 1U, 1.5U, 2U, 3U and 6U sizes for deployment into orbit. The NLAS may be configured for use on different launch vehicles. The system also enables flight demonstrations of new technologies in the space environment.

  20. Adaptation with disturbance attenuation in nonlinear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Basar, T.

    1997-12-31

    We present an optimization-based adaptive controller design for nonlinear systems exhibiting parametric as well as functional uncertainty. The approach involves the formulation of an appropriate cost functional that places positive weight on deviations from the achievement of desired objectives (such as tracking of a reference trajectory while the system exhibits good transient performance) and negative weight on the energy of the uncertainty. This cost functional also translates into a disturbance attenuation inequality which quantifies the effect of the presence of uncertainty on the desired objective, which in turn yields an interpretation for the optimizing control as one that optimally attenuates the disturbance, viewed as the collection of unknown parameters and unknown signals entering the system dynamics. In addition to this disturbance attenuation property, the controllers obtained also feature adaptation in the sense that they help with identification of the unknown parameters, even though this has not been set as the primary goal of the design. In spite of this adaptation/identification role, the controllers obtained are not of certainty-equivalent type, which means that the identification and the control phases of the design are not decoupled.

  1. Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

  2. Adaptive cyber-attack modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Paul G.; Dougherty, Edward T.

    2006-05-01

    The pervasiveness of software and networked information systems is evident across a broad spectrum of business and government sectors. Such reliance provides an ample opportunity not only for the nefarious exploits of lone wolf computer hackers, but for more systematic software attacks from organized entities. Much effort and focus has been placed on preventing and ameliorating network and OS attacks, a concomitant emphasis is required to address protection of mission critical software. Typical software protection technique and methodology evaluation and verification and validation (V&V) involves the use of a team of subject matter experts (SMEs) to mimic potential attackers or hackers. This manpower intensive, time-consuming, and potentially cost-prohibitive approach is not amenable to performing the necessary multiple non-subjective analyses required to support quantifying software protection levels. To facilitate the evaluation and V&V of software protection solutions, we have designed and developed a prototype adaptive cyber attack modeling system. Our approach integrates an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of Bayesian belief network (BN) attack models with an on-line model instantiation, adaptation and knowledge acquisition scheme. Off-line model construction is supported via a knowledge elicitation approach for identifying key domain requirements and a process for translating these requirements into a library of BN-based cyber-attack models. On-line attack modeling and knowledge acquisition is supported via BN evidence propagation and model parameter learning.

  3. A massively parallel adaptive finite element method with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Flaherty, J.E.; Wheat, S.R.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-12-31

    The authors construct massively parallel adaptive finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. They demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on a 1024-processor nCUBE/2 hypercube. They present results using adaptive p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method, and tiling, a dynamic, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance of the adaptive method by overlapping neighborhoods of processors that each perform local balancing.

  4. Self-* and Adaptive Mechanisms for Large Scale Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, P.; Mastroianni, C.; Montero, R.; Andrjezak, A.; Kondo, D.

    Large-scale distributed computing systems and infrastructure, such as Grids, P2P systems and desktop Grid platforms, are decentralized, pervasive, and composed of a large number of autonomous entities. The complexity of these systems is such that human administration is nearly impossible and centralized or hierarchical control is highly inefficient. These systems need to run on highly dynamic environments, where content, network topologies and workloads are continuously changing. Moreover, they are characterized by the high degree of volatility of their components and the need to provide efficient service management and to handle efficiently large amounts of data. This paper describes some of the areas for which adaptation emerges as a key feature, namely, the management of computational Grids, the self-management of desktop Grid platforms and the monitoring and healing of complex applications. It also elaborates on the use of bio-inspired algorithms to achieve self-management. Related future trends and challenges are described.

  5. Community dynamics of cellulose-adapted thermophilic bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Eichorst, Stephanie A; Varanasi, Patanjali; Stavila, Vatalie; Zemla, Marcin; Auer, Manfred; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2013-09-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is a key process in the global carbon cycle and the industrial conversion of biomass to biofuels. In natural environments, cellulose hydrolysis is predominately performed by microbial communities. However, detailed understanding of bacterial cellulose hydrolysis is primarily confined to a few model isolates. Developing models for cellulose hydrolysis by mixed microbial consortia will complement these isolate studies and may reveal new mechanisms for cellulose deconstruction. Microbial communities were adapted to microcrystalline cellulose under aerobic, thermophilic conditions using green waste compost as the inoculum to study cellulose hydrolysis in a microbial consortium. This adaptation selected for three dominant taxa--the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Thermus. A high-resolution profile of community development during the enrichment demonstrated a community transition from Firmicutes to a novel Bacteroidetes population that clusters in the Chitinophagaceae family. A representative strain of this population, strain NYFB, was successfully isolated, and sequencing of a nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene demonstrated that it was only 86% identical compared with other validated strains in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain NYFB grew well on soluble polysaccharide substrates, but grew poorly on insoluble polysaccharide substrates. Similar communities were observed in companion thermophilic enrichments on insoluble wheat arabinoxylan, a hemicellulosic substrate, suggesting a common model for deconstruction of plant polysaccharides. Combining observations of community dynamics and the physiology of strain NYFB, a cooperative successional model for polysaccharide hydrolysis by the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the thermophilic cellulolytic consortia is proposed. PMID:23763762

  6. Fully Threaded Tree for Adaptive Refinement Fluid Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    A fully threaded tree (FTT) for adaptive refinement of regular meshes is described. By using a tree threaded at all levels, tree traversals for finding nearest neighbors are avoided. All operations on a tree including tree modifications are O(N), where N is a number of cells, and are performed in parallel. An efficient implementation of the tree is described that requires 2N words of memory. A filtering algorithm for removing high frequency noise during mesh refinement is described. A FTT can be used in various numerical applications. In this paper, it is applied to the integration of the Euler equations of fluid dynamics. An adaptive mesh time stepping algorithm is described in which different time steps are used at different l evels of the tree. Time stepping and mesh refinement are interleaved to avoid extensive buffer layers of fine mesh which were otherwise required ahead of moving shocks. Test examples are presented, and the FTT performance is evaluated. The three dimensional simulation of the interaction of a shock wave and a spherical bubble is carried out that shows the development of azimuthal perturbations on the bubble surface.

  7. Modular interdependency in complex dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Pollack, Jordan B

    2005-01-01

    Herbert A. Simon's characterization of modularity in dynamical systems describes subsystems as having dynamics that are approximately independent of those of other subsystems (in the short term). This fits with the general intuition that modules must, by definition, be approximately independent. In the evolution of complex systems, such modularity may enable subsystems to be modified and adapted independently of other subsystems, whereas in a nonmodular system, modifications to one part of the system may result in deleterious side effects elsewhere in the system. But this notion of modularity and its effect on evolvability is not well quantified and is rather simplistic. In particular, modularity need not imply that intermodule dependences are weak or unimportant. In dynamical systems this is acknowledged by Simon's suggestion that, in the long term, the dynamical behaviors of subsystems do interact with one another, albeit in an "aggregate" manner--but this kind of intermodule interaction is omitted in models of modularity for evolvability. In this brief discussion we seek to unify notions of modularity in dynamical systems with notions of how modularity affects evolvability. This leads to a quantifiable measure of modularity and a different understanding of its effect on evolvability. PMID:16197673

  8. Contrarian behavior in a complex adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; An, K. N.; Yang, G.; Huang, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Contrarian behavior is a kind of self-organization in complex adaptive systems (CASs). Here we report the existence of a transition point in a model resource-allocation CAS with contrarian behavior by using human experiments, computer simulations, and theoretical analysis. The resource ratio and system predictability serve as the tuning parameter and order parameter, respectively. The transition point helps to reveal the positive or negative role of contrarian behavior. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that contrarian behavior always has a positive role in resource allocation, say, stabilizing resource allocation by shrinking the redundancy or the lack of resources. It is further shown that resource allocation can be optimized at the transition point by adding an appropriate size of contrarians. This work is also expected to be of value to some other fields ranging from management and social science to ecology and evolution.

  9. Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) project is creating a record of forest disturbance and regrowth for North America from the Landsat satellite record, in support of the carbon modeling activities. LEDAPS relies on the decadal Landsat GeoCover data set supplemented by dense image time series for selected locations. Imagery is first atmospherically corrected to surface reflectance, and then change detection algorithms are used to extract disturbance area, type, and frequency. Reuse of the MODIS Land processing system (MODAPS) architecture allows rapid throughput of over 2200 MSS, TM, and ETM+ scenes. Initial ("Beta") surface reflectance products are currently available for testing, and initial continental disturbance products will be available by the middle of 2006.

  10. Determining the Energetics of Small β-Sheet Peptides using Adaptive Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Hailey R; Hershkovits, Eli; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-04-12

    Mechanically driven unfolding is a useful computational tool for extracting the energetics and stretching pathway of peptides. In this work, two representative β-hairpin peptides, chignolin (PDB: 1UAO ) and trpzip1 (PDB: 1LE0 ), were investigated using an adaptive variant of the original steered molecular dynamics method called adaptive steered molecular dynamics (ASMD). The ASMD method makes it possible to perform energetic calculations on increasingly complex biological systems. Although the two peptides are similar in length and have similar secondary structures, their unfolding energetics are quite different. The hydrogen bonding profile and specific residue pair interaction energies provide insight into the differing stabilities of these peptides and reveal which of the pairs provides the most significant stabilization. PMID:26930270

  11. Symmetry-adapted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of chiral carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Amin; Dayal, Kaushik

    2011-06-01

    We report on non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations of chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes using the framework of Objective Structures. This enables us to adapt molecular dynamics to the symmetry of chiral nanotubes and efficiently simulate these systems with small unit cells. We outline the method and the adaptation of a conventional thermostat and barostat to this setting. We then apply the method in order to examine the behavior of nanotubes with various chiralities subject to a constant extensional strain rate. We examine the effects of temperature, strain rate, and pre-compression/pre-tension. We find a range of failure mechanisms, including the formation of Stone-Wales defects, the opening of voids, and the motion of atoms out of the cross-section.

  12. The Dynamics of Multiagent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssefmir, Michael

    Large distributed multiagent systems are characterized by vast numbers of agents trying to gain access to limited resources in a changing and unpredictable environment. Key issues in the study and design of such systems involve the trade-off between local procedures that agents follow and global controls for the whole system. On one hand, the need for fast responses, reduced spatial complexity, and low bandwidth dictates the use of local rather than global control procedures. On the other hand, local controls may not be well suited to the achievement of a desired global stability. It is interesting to note, however, that many systems such as financial markets achieve a measure of stability even though not all agents have access to perfect information. This thesis investigates the nature of this type of aggregate stability in a particular model of a multiagent system. Drawing a correspondence from economic institutions, we model agents as locally maximizing their perceived payoffs given incomplete information and as locally adapting their crude processing abilities. As the dynamics of the multiagent system unfold, and equilibrium is achieved, the system explores a set of strategy distributions consistent with overall equilibrium. The aggregate stability is achieved without any agent forming a complete local model of the macroscopic system. This equilibrium state, however, is punctuated by episodes of instability that take place at random. These bursts are the resultant of the fact that the system can explore a wealth of degenerate strategy distributions consistent with the overall equilibrium. These instabilities occur near the stability boundary in the space of strategies and are then quenched as the system "relearns" a stable configuration. This thesis characterizes the types of instabilities, illustrates their relevant signatures, and discusses the relevance of this work to economic systems. Sudden instabilities do indeed appear in economic time series in the

  13. Landscape Construction in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ying; Yuan, Ruoshi; Wang, Gaowei; Ao, Ping

    The idea of landscape has been recently applied to study various of biological problems. We demonstrate that a dynamical structure built into nonlinear dynamical systems allows us to construct such a global optimization landscape, which serves as the Lyapunov function for the ordinary differential equation. We find exact constructions on the landscape for a class of dynamical systems, including a van der Pol type oscillator, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, and a chaotic system. The landscape constructed provides a new angle for understanding and modelling biological network dynamics.

  14. Dynamic Nature of Noncoding RNA Regulation of Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Curtale, Graziella; Citarella, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Immune response plays a fundamental role in protecting the organism from infections; however, dysregulation often occurs and can be detrimental for the organism, leading to a variety of immune-mediated diseases. Recently our understanding of the molecular and cellular networks regulating the immune response, and, in particular, adaptive immunity, has improved dramatically. For many years, much of the focus has been on the study of protein regulators; nevertheless, recent evidence points to a fundamental role for specific classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in regulating development, activation and homeostasis of the immune system. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are the most comprehensive and well-studied, a number of reports suggest the exciting possibility that long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) could mediate host response and immune function. Finally, evidence is also accumulating that suggests a role for miRNAs and other small ncRNAs in autocrine, paracrine and exocrine signaling events, thus highlighting an elaborate network of regulatory interactions mediated by different classes of ncRNAs during immune response. This review will explore the multifaceted roles of ncRNAs in the adaptive immune response. In particular, we will focus on the well-established role of miRNAs and on the emerging role of lncRNAs and circulating ncRNAs, which all make indispensable contributions to the understanding of the multilayered modulation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:23975170

  15. Plant adaptation to dynamically changing environment: the shade avoidance response.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, I; Sessa, G; Ciolfi, A; Possenti, M; Carabelli, M; Morelli, G

    2012-01-01

    The success of competitive interactions between plants determines the chance of survival of individuals and eventually of whole plant species. Shade-tolerant plants have adapted their photosynthesis to function optimally under low-light conditions. These plants are therefore capable of long-term survival under a canopy shade. In contrast, shade-avoiding plants adapt their growth to perceive maximum sunlight and therefore rapidly dominate gaps in a canopy. Daylight contains roughly equal proportions of red and far-red light, but within vegetation that ratio is lowered as a result of red absorption by photosynthetic pigments. This light quality change is perceived through the phytochrome system as an unambiguous signal of the proximity of neighbors resulting in a suite of developmental responses (termed the shade avoidance response) that, when successful, result in the overgrowth of those neighbors. Shoot elongation induced by low red/far-red light may confer high relative fitness in natural dense communities. However, since elongation is often achieved at the expense of leaf and root growth, shade avoidance may lead to reduction in crop plant productivity. Over the past decade, major progresses have been achieved in the understanding of the molecular basis of shade avoidance. However, uncovering the mechanisms underpinning plant response and adaptation to changes in the ratio of red to far-red light is key to design new strategies to precise modulate shade avoidance in time and space without impairing the overall crop ability to compete for light. PMID:21888962

  16. The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering parameters), resource constraints (expressed th...

  17. Flipping Adapters for Space Launch System

    NASA Video Gallery

    The structural test article adapter is flipped at Marshall testing facility Building 4705. The turnover is an important step in finishing the machining work on the adapter, which will undergo tests...

  18. Dynamic optical aberration correction with adaptive coded apertures techniques in conformal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Bin; Zhang, Pengbin; Zhang, Binglong

    2015-02-01

    Conformal imaging systems are confronted with dynamic aberration in optical design processing. In classical optical designs, for combination high requirements of field of view, optical speed, environmental adaption and imaging quality, further enhancements can be achieved only by the introduction of increased complexity of aberration corrector. In recent years of computational imaging, the adaptive coded apertures techniques which has several potential advantages over more traditional optical systems is particularly suitable for military infrared imaging systems. The merits of this new concept include low mass, volume and moments of inertia, potentially lower costs, graceful failure modes, steerable fields of regard with no macroscopic moving parts. Example application for conformal imaging system design where the elements of a set of binary coded aperture masks are applied are optimization designed is presented in this paper, simulation results show that the optical performance is closely related to the mask design and the reconstruction algorithm optimization. As a dynamic aberration corrector, a binary-amplitude mask located at the aperture stop is optimized to mitigate dynamic optical aberrations when the field of regard changes and allow sufficient information to be recorded by the detector for the recovery of a sharp image using digital image restoration in conformal optical system.

  19. Intercellular Communication in the Adaptive Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup

    2004-03-01

    Higher organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that can respond to pathogens that have not been encountered before. T lymphocytes (T cells) are the orchestrators of the adaptive immune response. They interact with cells, called antigen presenting cells (APC), that display molecular signatures of pathogens. Recently, video microscopy experiments have revealed that when T cells detect antigen on APC surfaces, a spatially patterned supramolecular assembly of different types of molecules forms in the junction between cell membranes. This recognition motif is implicated in information transfer between APC and T cells, and so, is labeled the immunological synapse. The observation of synapse formation sparked two broad questions: How does the synapse form? Why does the synapse form? I will describe progress made in answering these fundamental questions in biology by synergistic use of statistical mechanical theory/computation, chemical engineering principles, and genetic and biochemical experiments. The talk will also touch upon mechanisms that may underlie the extreme sensitivity with which T cells discriminate between self and non-self.

  20. Dynamic skeletal muscle stimulation and its potential in bone adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y-X.; Lam, H.; Ferreri, S.; Rubin, C.

    2016-01-01

    To identify mechanotransductive signals for combating musculoskeletal deterioration, it is essential to determine the components and mechanisms critical to the anabolic processes of musculoskeletal tissues. It is hypothesized that the interaction between bone and muscle may depend on fluid exchange in these tissues by mechanical loading. It has been shown that intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia. Optimized MS signals, i.e., low-intensity and high frequency, may be critical in maintaining bone mass and mitigating muscle atrophy. The objectives for this review are to discuss the potential for MS to induce ImP and strains on bone, to regulate bone adaptation, and to identify optimized stimulation frequency in the loading regimen. The potential for MS to regulate blood and fluid flow will also be discussed. The results suggest that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone. The response was shown to be dependent on loading frequency, serving as a critical mediator in mitigating bone loss. A specific regimen of dynamic MS may be optimized in vivo to attenuate disuse osteopenia and serve as a biomechanical intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:20190376

  1. Emergence, institutionalization and renewal: Rhythms of adaptive governance in complex social-ecological systems.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Brian C; Gunderson, Lance H

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive governance provides the capacity for environmental managers and decision makers to confront variable degrees of uncertainty inherent to complex social-ecological systems. Current theoretical conceptualizations of adaptive governance represent a series of structures and processes best suited for either adapting or transforming existing environmental governance regimes towards forms flexible enough to confront rapid ecological change. As the number of empirical examples of adaptive governance described in the literature grows, the conceptual basis of adaptive governance remains largely under theorized. We argue that reconnecting adaptive governance with foundational concepts of ecological resilience-specifically Panarchy and the adaptive cycle of complex systems-highlights the importance of episodic disturbances and cross-scale interactions in triggering reorganizations in governance. By envisioning the processes of adaptive governance through the lens of Panarchy, scholars and practitioners alike will be better able to identify the emergence of adaptive governance, as well as take advantage of opportunities to institutionalize this type of governance in pursuit of sustainability outcomes. The synergistic analysis of adaptive governance and Panarchy can provide critical insight for analyzing the role of social dynamics during oscillating periods of stability and instability in social-ecological systems. A deeper understanding of the potential for cross-scale interactions to shape adaptive governance regimes may be useful as society faces the challenge of mitigating the impacts of global environmental change. PMID:26426283

  2. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches. PMID:27472336

  3. Complex Features in Lotka-Volterra Systems with Behavioral Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebaldi, Claudio; Lacitignola, Deborah

    Lotka-Volterra systems have played a fundamental role for mathematical modelling in many branches of theoretical biology and proved to describe, at least qualitatively, the essential features of many phenomena, see for example Murray [Murray 2002]. Furthermore models of that kind have been considered successfully also in quite different and less mathematically formalized context: Goodwin' s model of economic growth cycles [Goodwin 1967] and urban dynamics [Dendrinos 1992] are only two of a number of examples. Such systems can certainly be defined as complex ones and in fact the aim of modelling was essentially to clarify mechanims rather than to provide actual precise simulations and predictions. With regards to complex systems, we recall that one of their main feature, no matter of the specific definition one has in mind, is adaptation, i. e. the ability to adjust.

  4. The curvature adaptive optics system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiang

    A curvature adaptive optics (AO) simulation system has been built. The simulation is based on the Hokupa'a-36 AO system for the NASA IRTF 3m telescope and the Hokupa'a-85 AO system for the Gemini Near Infrared Coronagraphic Imager. Several sub-models are built separately for the AO simulation system, and they are: (1) generation and propagation of atmospheric phase screens, (2) the bimorph deformable mirror (DM), (3) the curvature wave-front sensor (CWFS), (4) generation of response functions, interaction matrices and calculation of command matrices, (5) Fresnel propagation from the DM pupil to the lenslet pupil, (6) AO servo loop, and (7) post processing. The AO simulation system is then applied to the effects of DM hysteresis, and to the optimization of DM actuator patterns for the Hokupa'a-85 and Hokupa'a-36 AO systems. In the first application, an enhancing Coleman-Hodgdon model is introduced to approximate the hysteresis curves, and then the Lambert W function is introduced to calculate the inverse of the Coleman-Hodgdon equation. Step response, transfer functions and Strehl Ratios from the AO system have been compared under the cases with/without DM hysteresis. The servo-loop results show that the bandwidth of an AO system is improved greatly after the DM hysteresis is corrected. In the second application, many issues of the bimorph mirror will be considered to optimize the DM patterns, and they include the type and length of the edge benders, gap size of electrodes, DM size, and DM curvature limit.

  5. Dynamic stability of sequential stimulus representations in adapting neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Renato C. F.; Morrison, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire and maintain appropriate representations of time-varying, sequential stimulus events is a fundamental feature of neocortical circuits and a necessary first step toward more specialized information processing. The dynamical properties of such representations depend on the current state of the circuit, which is determined primarily by the ongoing, internally generated activity, setting the ground state from which input-specific transformations emerge. Here, we begin by demonstrating that timing-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms have an important role to play in the active maintenance of an ongoing dynamics characterized by asynchronous and irregular firing, closely resembling cortical activity in vivo. Incoming stimuli, acting as perturbations of the local balance of excitation and inhibition, require fast adaptive responses to prevent the development of unstable activity regimes, such as those characterized by a high degree of population-wide synchrony. We establish a link between such pathological network activity, which is circumvented by the action of plasticity, and a reduced computational capacity. Additionally, we demonstrate that the action of plasticity shapes and stabilizes the transient network states exhibited in the presence of sequentially presented stimulus events, allowing the development of adequate and discernible stimulus representations. The main feature responsible for the increased discriminability of stimulus-driven population responses in plastic networks is shown to be the decorrelating action of inhibitory plasticity and the consequent maintenance of the asynchronous irregular dynamic regime both for ongoing activity and stimulus-driven responses, whereas excitatory plasticity is shown to play only a marginal role. PMID:25374534

  6. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M; Lee, Vo

    2014-04-15

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  7. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-11-18

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  8. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  9. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  10. A dynamically reconfigurable data stream processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Nogiec, J.M.; Trombly-Freytag, K.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a component-based framework for data stream processing that allows for configuration, tailoring, and runtime system reconfiguration. The system's architecture is based on a pipes and filters pattern, where data is passed through routes between components. A network of pipes and filters can be dynamically reconfigured in response to a preplanned sequence of processing steps, operator intervention, or a change in one or more data streams. This framework provides several mechanisms supporting dynamic reconfiguration and can be used to build static data stream processing applications such as monitoring or data acquisition systems, as well as self-adjusting systems that can adapt their processing algorithm, presentation layer, or data persistency layer in response to changes in input data streams.

  11. Effects of adaptive protective behavior on the dynamics of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Michael A L; Eisenberg, Marisa C

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to present a complex and costly challenge to public health programs. The preferences and social dynamics of a population can have a large impact on the course of an outbreak as well as the effectiveness of interventions intended to influence individual behavior. In addition, individuals may alter their sexual behavior in response to the presence of STIs, creating a feedback loop between transmission and behavior. We investigate the consequences of modeling the interaction between STI transmission and prophylactic use with a model that links a Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS) system to evolutionary game dynamics that determine the effective contact rate. The combined model framework allows us to address protective behavior by both infected and susceptible individuals. Feedback between behavioral adaptation and prevalence creates a wide range of dynamic behaviors in the combined model, including damped and sustained oscillations as well as bistability, depending on the behavioral parameters and disease growth rate. We found that disease extinction is possible for multiple regions where R0>1, due to behavior adaptation driving the epidemic downward, although conversely endemic prevalence for arbitrarily low R0 is also possible if contact rates are sufficiently high. We also tested how model misspecification might affect disease forecasting and estimation of the model parameters and R0. We found that alternative models that neglect the behavioral feedback or only consider behavior adaptation by susceptible individuals can potentially yield misleading parameter estimates or omit significant features of the disease trajectory. PMID:26362102

  12. Adaptive-passive vibration control systems for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Pfeiffer, T.; Vrbata, J.; Melz, T.

    2015-04-01

    Tuned vibration absorbers have become common for passive vibration reduction in many industrial applications. Lightly damped absorbers (also called neutralizers) can be used to suppress narrowband disturbances by tuning them to the excitation frequency. If the resonance is adapted in-operation, the performance of those devices can be significantly enhanced, or inertial mass can be decreased. However, the integration of actuators, sensors and control electronics into the system raises new design challenges. In this work, the development of adaptive-passive systems for vibration reduction at an industrial scale is presented. As an example, vibration reduction of a ship engine was studied in a full scale test. Simulations were used to study the feasibility and evaluate the system concept at an early stage. Several ways to adjust the resonance of the neutralizer were evaluated, including piezoelectric actuation and common mechatronic drives. Prototypes were implemented and tested. Since vibration absorbers suffer from high dynamic loads, reliability tests were used to assess the long-term behavior under operational conditions and to improve the components. It was proved that the adaptive systems are capable to withstand the mechanical loads in an industrial application. Also a control strategy had to be implemented in order to track the excitation frequency. The most mature concepts were integrated into the full scale test. An imbalance exciter was used to simulate the engine vibrations at a realistic level experimentally. The neutralizers were tested at varying excitation frequencies to evaluate the tracking capabilities of the control system. It was proved that a significant vibration reduction is possible.

  13. Preliminary images from an adaptive imaging system.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, J A; Metaxas, M G; Pani, S; Schulerud, H; Esbrand, C; Royle, G J; Price, B; Rokvic, T; Longo, R; Asimidis, A; Bletsas, E; Cavouras, D; Fant, A; Gasiorek, P; Georgiou, H; Hall, G; Jones, J; Leaver, J; Li, G; Machin, D; Manthos, N; Matheson, J; Noy, M; Ostby, J M; Psomadellis, F; van der Stelt, P F; Theodoridis, S; Triantis, F; Turchetta, R; Venanzi, C; Speller, R D

    2008-06-01

    I-ImaS (Intelligent Imaging Sensors) is a European project aiming to produce real-time adaptive X-ray imaging systems using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) to create images with maximum diagnostic information within given dose constraints. Initial systems concentrate on mammography and cephalography. In our system, the exposure in each image region is optimised and the beam intensity is a function of tissue thickness and attenuation, and also of local physical and statistical parameters in the image. Using a linear array of detectors, the system will perform on-line analysis of the image during the scan, followed by optimisation of the X-ray intensity to obtain the maximum diagnostic information from the region of interest while minimising exposure of diagnostically less important regions. This paper presents preliminary images obtained with a small area CMOS detector developed for this application. Wedge systems were used to modulate the beam intensity during breast and dental imaging using suitable X-ray spectra. The sensitive imaging area of the sensor is 512 x 32 pixels 32 x 32 microm(2) in size. The sensors' X-ray sensitivity was increased by coupling to a structured CsI(Tl) scintillator. In order to develop the I-ImaS prototype, the on-line data analysis and data acquisition control are based on custom-developed electronics using multiple FPGAs. Images of both breast tissues and jaw samples were acquired and different exposure optimisation algorithms applied. Results are very promising since the average dose has been reduced to around 60% of the dose delivered by conventional imaging systems without decrease in the visibility of details. PMID:18291697

  14. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  15. Space Launch System Implementation of Adaptive Augmenting Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2014-01-01

    Given the complex structural dynamics, challenging ascent performance requirements, and rigorous flight certification constraints owing to its manned capability, the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle requires a proven thrust vector control algorithm design with highly optimized parameters to robustly demonstrate stable and high performance flight. On its development path to preliminary design review (PDR), the stability of the SLS flight control system has been challenged by significant vehicle flexibility, aerodynamics, and sloshing propellant dynamics. While the design has been able to meet all robust stability criteria, it has done so with little excess margin. Through significant development work, an adaptive augmenting control (AAC) algorithm previously presented by Orr and VanZwieten, has been shown to extend the envelope of failures and flight anomalies for which the SLS control system can accommodate while maintaining a direct link to flight control stability criteria (e.g. gain & phase margin). In this paper, the work performed to mature the AAC algorithm as a baseline component of the SLS flight control system is presented. The progress to date has brought the algorithm design to the PDR level of maturity. The algorithm has been extended to augment the SLS digital 3-axis autopilot, including existing load-relief elements, and necessary steps for integration with the production flight software prototype have been implemented. Several updates to the adaptive algorithm to increase its performance, decrease its sensitivity to expected external commands, and safeguard against limitations in the digital implementation are discussed with illustrating results. Monte Carlo simulations and selected stressing case results are shown to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to increase the robustness of the integrated SLS flight control system.

  16. Adaptive fuzzy-neural-network control for maglev transportation system.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2008-01-01

    A magnetic-levitation (maglev) transportation system including levitation and propulsion control is a subject of considerable scientific interest because of highly nonlinear and unstable behaviors. In this paper, the dynamic model of a maglev transportation system including levitated electromagnets and a propulsive linear induction motor (LIM) based on the concepts of mechanical geometry and motion dynamics is developed first. Then, a model-based sliding-mode control (SMC) strategy is introduced. In order to alleviate chattering phenomena caused by the inappropriate selection of uncertainty bound, a simple bound estimation algorithm is embedded in the SMC strategy to form an adaptive sliding-mode control (ASMC) scheme. However, this estimation algorithm is always a positive value so that tracking errors introduced by any uncertainty will cause the estimated bound increase even to infinity with time. Therefore, it further designs an adaptive fuzzy-neural-network control (AFNNC) scheme by imitating the SMC strategy for the maglev transportation system. In the model-free AFNNC, online learning algorithms are designed to cope with the problem of chattering phenomena caused by the sign action in SMC design, and to ensure the stability of the controlled system without the requirement of auxiliary compensated controllers despite the existence of uncertainties. The outputs of the AFNNC scheme can be directly supplied to the electromagnets and LIM without complicated control transformations for relaxing strict constrains in conventional model-based control methodologies. The effectiveness of the proposed control schemes for the maglev transportation system is verified by numerical simulations, and the superiority of the AFNNC scheme is indicated in comparison with the SMC and ASMC strategies. PMID:18269938

  17. Turing pattern dynamics and adaptive discretization for a super-diffusive Lotka-Volterra model.

    PubMed

    Bendahmane, Mostafa; Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Tian, Canrong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of introducing the fractional-in-space operator into a Lotka-Volterra competitive model describing population super-diffusion. First, we study how cross super-diffusion influences the formation of spatial patterns: a linear stability analysis is carried out, showing that cross super-diffusion triggers Turing instabilities, whereas classical (self) super-diffusion does not. In addition we perform a weakly nonlinear analysis yielding a system of amplitude equations, whose study shows the stability of Turing steady states. A second goal of this contribution is to propose a fully adaptive multiresolution finite volume method that employs shifted Grünwald gradient approximations, and which is tailored for a larger class of systems involving fractional diffusion operators. The scheme is aimed at efficient dynamic mesh adaptation and substantial savings in computational burden. A numerical simulation of the model was performed near the instability boundaries, confirming the behavior predicted by our analysis. PMID:26219250

  18. Multi-agent system for target-adaptive radar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Alan C.

    2012-06-01

    Sensor systems such as distributed sensor networks and radar systems are potentially agile - they have parameters that can be adjusted in real-time to improve the quality of data obtained for state-estimation and decision-making. The integration of such sensors with cyber systems involving many users or agents permits greater flexibility in choosing measurement actions. This paper considers the problem of selecting radar waveforms to minimize uncertainty about the state of a tracked target. Past work gave a tractable method for optimizing the choice of measurements when an accurate dynamical model is available. However, prior knowledge about a system is often not precise, for example, if the target under observation is an adversary. A multiple agent system is proposed to solve the problem in the case of uncertain target dynamics. Each agent has a different target model and the agents compete to explain past data and select the parameters of future measurements. Collaboration or competition between these agents determines which obtains access to the limited physical sensing resources. This interaction produces a self-aware sensor that adapts to changing information requirements.

  19. Vertebrate gravity sensors as dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers verterbrate gravity receptors as dynamic sensors. That is, it is hypothesized that gravity is a constant force to which an acceleration-sensing system would readily adapt. Premises are considered in light of the presence of kinocilia on hair cells of vertebrate gravity sensors; differences in loading of the sensors among species; and of possible reduction in loading by inclusion of much organic material in otoconia. Moreover, organic-inorganic interfaces may confer a piezoelectric property upon otoconia, which increase the sensitivity of the sensory system to small accelerations. Comparisons with man-made accelerometers are briefly taken up.

  20. Dynamic adaptation of the peripheral circulation to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephen S; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-01-01

    Humans residing or working in cold environments exhibit a stronger cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction in the peripheral microvasculature than those living in warm regions of the world, leading to a general assumption that thermal responses to local cold exposure can be systematically improved by natural acclimatization or specific acclimation. However, it remains unclear whether this improved tolerance is actually due to systematic acclimatization, or alternately due to the genetic pre-disposition or self-selection for such occupations. Longitudinal studies of repeated extremity exposure to cold demonstrate only ambiguous adaptive responses. In field studies, general cold acclimation may lead to increased sympathetic activity that results in reduced finger blood flow. Laboratory studies offer more control over confounding parameters, but in most studies, no consistent changes in peripheral blood flow occur even after repeated exposure for several weeks. Most studies are performed on a limited amount of subjects only, and the variability of the CIVD response demands more subjects to obtain significant results. This review systematically surveys the trainability of CIVD, concluding that repeated local cold exposure does not alter circulatory dynamics in the peripheries, and that humans remain at risk of cold injuries even after extended stays in cold environments. PMID:21851473

  1. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, Serena; Vucelja, Marija; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a ``winner-take-all'' scenario, leading to a specialized spacer distribution. Bacteria can interpolate between these limiting behaviors by actively tuning their overall acquisition rate.

  2. Plant toxicity, adaptive herbivory, and plant community dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Z.; Liu, R.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Bryant, J.P.; Kielland, K.; Stuart, Chapin F.; Swihart, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    We model effects of interspecific plant competition, herbivory, and a plant's toxic defenses against herbivores on vegetation dynamics. The model predicts that, when a generalist herbivore feeds in the absence of plant toxins, adaptive foraging generally increases the probability of coexistence of plant species populations, because the herbivore switches more of its effort to whichever plant species is more common and accessible. In contrast, toxin-determined selective herbivory can drive plant succession toward dominance by the more toxic species, as previously documented in boreal forests and prairies. When the toxin concentrations in different plant species are similar, but species have different toxins with nonadditive effects, herbivores tend to diversify foraging efforts to avoid high intakes of any one toxin. This diversification leads the herbivore to focus more feeding on the less common plant species. Thus, uncommon plants may experience depensatory mortality from herbivory, reducing local species diversity. The depensatory effect of herbivory may inhibit the invasion of other plant species that are more palatable or have different toxins. These predictions were tested and confirmed in the Alaskan boreal forest. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  3. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  4. Adaptive optimal spectral range for dynamically changing scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Siman-tov, Avihay; Peles, David

    2012-06-01

    A novel multispectral video system that continuously optimizes both its spectral range channels and the exposure time of each channel autonomously, under dynamic scenes, varying from short range-clear scene to long range-poor visibility, is currently being developed. Transparency and contrast of high scattering medium of channels with spectral ranges in the near infrared is superior to the visible channels, particularly to the blue range. Longer wavelength spectral ranges that induce higher contrast are therefore favored. Images of 3 spectral channels are fused and displayed for (pseudo) color visualization, as an integrated high contrast video stream. In addition to the dynamic optimization of the spectral channels, optimal real-time exposure time is adjusted simultaneously and autonomously for each channel. A criterion of maximum average signal, derived dynamically from previous frames of the video stream is used (Patent Application - International Publication Number: WO2009/093110 A2, 30.07.2009). This configuration enables dynamic compatibility with the optimal exposure time of a dynamically changing scene. It also maximizes the signal to noise ratio and compensates each channel for the specified value of daylight reflections and sensors response for each spectral range. A possible implementation is a color video camera based on 4 synchronized, highly responsive, CCD imaging detectors, attached to a 4CCD dichroic prism and combined with a common, color corrected, lens. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) technique is then applied for real time "dimensional collapse" in color space, in order to select and fuse, for clear color visualization, the 3 most significant principal channels out of at least 4 characterized by high contrast and rich details in the image data.

  5. Fast adaptive OFDM-PON over single fiber loopback transmission using dynamic rate adaptation-based algorithm for channel performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartiwa, Iwa; Jung, Sang-Min; Hong, Moon-Ki; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel fast adaptive approach that was applied to an OFDM-PON 20-km single fiber loopback transmission system to improve channel performance in term of stabilized BER below 2 × 10-3 and higher throughput beyond 10 Gb/s. The upstream transmission is performed through light source-seeded modulation using 1-GHz RSOA at the ONU. Experimental results indicated that the dynamic rate adaptation algorithm based on greedy Levin-Campello could be an effective solution to mitigate channel instability and data rate degradation caused by the Rayleigh back scattering effect and inefficient resource subcarrier allocation.

  6. Mathematical model for adaptive control system of ASEA robot at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic properties and the mathematical model for the adaptive control of the robotic system presently under investigation at Robotic Application and Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center are discussed. NASA is currently investigating the use of robotic manipulators for mating and demating of fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch. The Robotic system used as a testbed for this purpose is an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot with adaptive control capabilities. The system was tested and it's performance with respect to stability was improved by using an analogue force controller. The objective of this research project is to determine the mathematical model of the system operating under force feedback control with varying dynamic internal perturbation in order to provide continuous stable operation under variable load conditions. A series of lumped parameter models are developed. The models include some effects of robot structural dynamics, sensor compliance, and workpiece dynamics.

  7. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  8. Workload Model Based Dynamic Adaptation of Social Internet of Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Alam, Kazi Masudul; Saini, Mukesh; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2015-01-01

    Social Internet of Things (SIoT) has gained much interest among different research groups in recent times. As a key member of a smart city, the vehicular domain of SIoT (SIoV) is also undergoing steep development. In the SIoV, vehicles work as sensor-hub to capture surrounding information using the in-vehicle and Smartphone sensors and later publish them for the consumers. A cloud centric cyber-physical system better describes the SIoV model where physical sensing-actuation process affects the cloud based service sharing or computation in a feedback loop or vice versa. The cyber based social relationship abstraction enables distributed, easily navigable and scalable peer-to-peer communication among the SIoV subsystems. These cyber-physical interactions involve a huge amount of data and it is difficult to form a real instance of the system to test the feasibility of SIoV applications. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to measure the workloads of various subsystems involved in the SIoV process. We present the basic model which is further extended to incorporate complex scenarios. We provide extensive simulation results for different parameter settings of the SIoV system. The findings of the analyses are further used to design example adaptation strategies for the SIoV subsystems which would foster deployment of intelligent transport systems. PMID:26389905

  9. Workload Model Based Dynamic Adaptation of Social Internet of Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Kazi Masudul; Saini, Mukesh; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2015-01-01

    Social Internet of Things (SIoT) has gained much interest among different research groups in recent times. As a key member of a smart city, the vehicular domain of SIoT (SIoV) is also undergoing steep development. In the SIoV, vehicles work as sensor-hub to capture surrounding information using the in-vehicle and Smartphone sensors and later publish them for the consumers. A cloud centric cyber-physical system better describes the SIoV model where physical sensing-actuation process affects the cloud based service sharing or computation in a feedback loop or vice versa. The cyber based social relationship abstraction enables distributed, easily navigable and scalable peer-to-peer communication among the SIoV subsystems. These cyber-physical interactions involve a huge amount of data and it is difficult to form a real instance of the system to test the feasibility of SIoV applications. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to measure the workloads of various subsystems involved in the SIoV process. We present the basic model which is further extended to incorporate complex scenarios. We provide extensive simulation results for different parameter settings of the SIoV system. The findings of the analyses are further used to design example adaptation strategies for the SIoV subsystems which would foster deployment of intelligent transport systems. PMID:26389905

  10. Implementation of an Adaptive Learning System Using a Bayesian Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Keiji; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Hata, Yoko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive learning system is proposed that incorporates a Bayesian network to efficiently gauge learners' understanding at the course-unit level. Also, learners receive content that is adapted to their measured level of understanding. The system works on an iPad via the Edmodo platform. A field experiment using the system in an elementary school…

  11. Isoplanatism in a multiconjugate adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Tokovinin, A; Le Louarn, M; Sarazin, M

    2000-10-01

    Turbulence correction in a large field of view by use of an adaptive optics imaging system with several deformable mirrors (DM's) conjugated to various heights is considered. The residual phase variance is computed for an optimized linear algorithm in which a correction of each turbulent layer is achieved by applying a combination of suitably smoothed and scaled input phase screens to all DM's. Finite turbulence outer scale and finite spatial resolution of the DM's are taken into account. A general expression for the isoplanatic angle thetaM of a system with M mirrors is derived in the limiting case of infinitely large apertures and Kolmogorov turbulence. Like Fried's isoplanatic angle theta0,thetaM is a function only of the turbulence vertical profile, is scalable with wavelength, and is independent of the telescope diameter. Use of angle thetaM permits the gain in the field of view due to the increased number of DM's to be quantified and their optimal conjugate heights to be found. Calculations with real turbulence profiles show that with three DM's a gain of 7-10x is possible, giving the typical and best isoplanatic field-of-view radii of 16 and 30 arcseconds, respectively, at lambda = 0.5 microm. It is shown that in the actual systems the isoplanatic field will be somewhat larger than thetaM owing to the combined effects of finite aperture diameter, finite outer scale, and optimized wave-front spatial filtering. However, this additional gain is not dramatic; it is less than 1.5x for large-aperture telescopes. PMID:11028530

  12. Climate change adaptation for the US National Wildlife Refuge System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Brad; Scott, J. Michael; Adamcik, Robert S.; Ashe, Daniel; Czech, Brian; Fischman, Robert; Gonzalez, Patrick; Lawler, Joshua J.; McGuire, A. David; Pidgorna, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) has grown to 635 units and 37 Wetland Management Districts in the United States and its territories. These units provide the seasonal habitats necessary for migratory waterfowl and other species to complete their annual life cycles. Habitat conversion and fragmentation, invasive species, pollution, and competition for water have stressed refuges for decades, but the interaction of climate change with these stressors presents the most recent, pervasive, and complex conservation challenge to the NWRS. Geographic isolation and small unit size compound the challenges of climate change, but a combined emphasis on species that refuges were established to conserve and on maintaining biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health provides the NWRS with substantial latitude to respond. Individual symptoms of climate change can be addressed at the refuge level, but the strategic response requires system-wide planning. A dynamic vision of the NWRS in a changing climate, an explicit national strategic plan to implement that vision, and an assessment of representation, redundancy, size, and total number of units in relation to conservation targets are the first steps toward adaptation. This adaptation must begin immediately and be built on more closely integrated research and management. Rigorous projections of possible futures are required to facilitate adaptation to change. Furthermore, the effective conservation footprint of the NWRS must be increased through land acquisition, creative partnerships, and educational programs in order for the NWRS to meet its legal mandate to maintain the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system and the species and ecosystems that it supports.

  13. Climate change adaptation for the US National Wildlife Refuge System.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Brad; Scott, J Michael; Adamcik, Robert; Ashe, Daniel; Czech, Brian; Fischman, Robert; Gonzalez, Patrick; Lawler, Joshua; McGuire, A David; Pidgorna, Anna

    2009-12-01

    Since its establishment in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) has grown to 635 units and 37 Wetland Management Districts in the United States and its territories. These units provide the seasonal habitats necessary for migratory waterfowl and other species to complete their annual life cycles. Habitat conversion and fragmentation, invasive species, pollution, and competition for water have stressed refuges for decades, but the interaction of climate change with these stressors presents the most recent, pervasive, and complex conservation challenge to the NWRS. Geographic isolation and small unit size compound the challenges of climate change, but a combined emphasis on species that refuges were established to conserve and on maintaining biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health provides the NWRS with substantial latitude to respond. Individual symptoms of climate change can be addressed at the refuge level, but the strategic response requires system-wide planning. A dynamic vision of the NWRS in a changing climate, an explicit national strategic plan to implement that vision, and an assessment of representation, redundancy, size, and total number of units in relation to conservation targets are the first steps toward adaptation. This adaptation must begin immediately and be built on more closely integrated research and management. Rigorous projections of possible futures are required to facilitate adaptation to change. Furthermore, the effective conservation footprint of the NWRS must be increased through land acquisition, creative partnerships, and educational programs in order for the NWRS to meet its legal mandate to maintain the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system and the species and ecosystems that it supports. PMID:19548023

  14. Complexity Thinking in PE: Game-Centred Approaches, Games as Complex Adaptive Systems, and Ecological Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Brian; Butler, Joy

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article draws on the literature relating to game-centred approaches (GCAs), such as Teaching Games for Understanding, and dynamical systems views of motor learning to demonstrate a convergence of ideas around games as complex adaptive learning systems. This convergence is organized under the title "complexity thinking"…

  15. Experience with automatic, dynamic load balancing and adaptive finite element computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, S.R.; Devine, K.D.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-10-01

    Distributed memory, Massively Parallel (MP), MIMD technology has enabled the development of applications requiring computational resources previously unobtainable. Structural mechanics and fluid dynamics applications, for example, are often solved by finite element methods (FEMs) requiring, millions of degrees of freedom to accurately simulate physical phenomenon. Adaptive methods, which automatically refine or coarsen meshes and vary the order of accuracy of the numerical solution, offer greater robustness and computational efficiency than traditional FEMs by reducing the amount of computation required away from physical structures such as shock waves and boundary layers. On MP computers, FEMs frequently result in distributed processor load imbalances. To overcome load imbalance, many MP FEMs use static load balancing as a preprocessor to the finite element calculation. Adaptive methods complicate the load imbalance problem since the work per element is not uniform across the solution domain and changes as the computation proceeds. Therefore, dynamic load balancing is required to maintain global load balance. We describe a dynamic, fine-grained, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance and is effective in the presence of changing work loads. Global load balance is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method utilizes an automatic element management system library to which a programmer integrates the application`s computational description. The library`s flexibility supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications.

  16. Valuation of design adaptability in aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Martin, Ismael

    As more information is brought into early stages of the design, more pressure is put on engineers to produce a reliable, high quality, and financially sustainable product. Unfortunately, requirements established at the beginning of a new project by customers, and the environment that surrounds them, continue to change in some unpredictable ways. The risk of designing a system that may become obsolete during early stages of production is currently tackled by the use of robust design simulation, a method that allows to simultaneously explore a plethora of design alternatives and requirements with the intention of accounting for uncertain factors in the future. Whereas this design technique has proven to be quite an improvement in design methods, under certain conditions, it fails to account for the change of uncertainty over time and the intrinsic value embedded in the system when certain design features are activated. This thesis introduces the concepts of adaptability and real options to manage risk foreseen in the face of uncertainty at early design stages. The method described herein allows decision-makers to foresee the financial impact of their decisions at the design level, as well as the final exposure to risk. In this thesis, cash flow models, traditionally used to obtain the forecast of a project's value over the years, were replaced with surrogate models that are capable of showing fluctuations on value every few days. This allowed a better implementation of real options valuation, optimization, and strategy selection. Through the option analysis model, an optimization exercise allows the user to obtain the best implementation strategy in the face of uncertainty as well as the overall value of the design feature. Here implementation strategy refers to the decision to include a new design feature in the system, after the design has been finalized, but before the end of its production life. The ability to do this in a cost efficient manner after the system

  17. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the "dynamic granularity" G dyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector's spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. This relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal's photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system's performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. This article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia's Z-Backlighter facility.

  18. Voter dynamics on an adaptive network with finite average connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Schmittmann, Beate

    2009-03-01

    We study a simple model for voter dynamics in a two-party system. The opinion formation process is implemented in a random network of agents in which interactions are not restricted by geographical distance. In addition, we incorporate the rapidly changing nature of the interpersonal relations in the model. At each time step, agents can update their relationships, so that there is no history dependence in the model. This update is determined by their own opinion, and by their preference to make connections with individuals sharing the same opinion and with opponents. Using simulations and analytic arguments, we determine the final steady states and the relaxation into these states for different system sizes. In contrast to earlier studies, the average connectivity (``degree'') of each agent is constant here, independent of the system size. This has significant consequences for the long-time behavior of the model.

  19. Adaptive Partitioning QM/MM Dynamics Simulations for Substrate Uptake, Product Release, and Solvent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Duster, A; Garza, C; Lin, H

    2016-01-01

    Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) plays an important role in multiscale simulations of biological systems including enzymes. The adaptive-partitioning (AP) schemes surpass the conventional QM/MM methods in that they allow the on-the-fly, smooth exchange of particles between QM and MM subsystems in molecular dynamics simulations, leading to a seamless and dynamic integration of the QM and MM realms. Originally developed for simulating ion solvation in bulk solutions, the AP schemes have recently been extended to the treatment of proteins, fostering applications in the simulations of enzymes. The present contribution provides a detailed account of the AP schemes. We delineate the background of the algorithms and their parallel implementation, as well as offer practical advice and examples for their applications in the simulations of biological systems. PMID:27498644

  20. Aircraft as adaptive nonlinear system which must be in the adaptational maximum zone for safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ignative, M.; Simatos, N.; Sivasundaram, S.

    1994-12-31

    Safety is a main problem in aircraft. We are considering this problem from the point of view related to existence of the adaptational maximum in complex developing systems. Safety space of aircraft parameters are determined. This space is transformed to different regimes of flight, when one engine malfunctions etc., are considered. Also it is shown that maximum safety is in adaptational maximum zone.

  1. Network and adaptive system of systems modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E. Dr.; Anderson, Dennis James; Eddy, John P.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled ''Network and Adaptive System of Systems Modeling and Analysis'' that was conducted during FY 2005 and FY 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate network communications modeling into existing System of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling, particularly for the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, is conducted under the assumption that communication between the various systems is always possible and occurs instantaneously. A more realistic representation of these communications allows for better, more accurate simulation results. The current approach to meeting this objective has been to use existing capabilities to model network hardware reliability and adding capabilities to use that information to model the impact on the sustainment supply chain and operational availability.

  2. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  3. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  4. An adaptive model order reduction by proper snapshot selection for nonlinear dynamical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, P. S. B.; Anndif, M.; Teixeira, Y.; Pimenta, P. M.; Wriggers, P.

    2016-04-01

    Model Order Reduction (MOR) methods are employed in many fields of Engineering in order to reduce the processing time of complex computational simulations. A usual approach to achieve this is the application of Galerkin projection to generate representative subspaces (reduced spaces). However, when strong nonlinearities in a dynamical system are present and this technique is employed several times along the simulation, it can be very inefficient. This work proposes a new adaptive strategy, which ensures low computational cost and small error to deal with this problem. This work also presents a new method to select snapshots named Proper Snapshot Selection (PSS). The objective of the PSS is to obtain a good balance between accuracy and computational cost by improving the adaptive strategy through a better snapshot selection in real time (online analysis). With this method, it is possible a substantial reduction of the subspace, keeping the quality of the model without the use of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD).

  5. Investigation of the Multiple Method Adaptive Control (MMAC) method for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Baram, Y.; Castanon, D.; Dunn, K. P.; Green, C. S.; Lee, W. H.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Willsky, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The stochastic adaptive control of the NASA F-8C digital-fly-by-wire aircraft using the multiple model adaptive control (MMAC) method is presented. The selection of the performance criteria for the lateral and the longitudinal dynamics, the design of the Kalman filters for different operating conditions, the identification algorithm associated with the MMAC method, the control system design, and simulation results obtained using the real time simulator of the F-8 aircraft at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed.

  6. Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ianculescu, G. D.; Klop, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom are designed using a continuous rigid body model of the solar array gimbal assembly containing both linear and nonlinear dynamics due to various friction components. The robustness of the design solution is examined by performing a series of sensitivity analysis studies. Adaptive control strategies are examined in order to compensate for the unfavorable effect of static nonlinearities, such as dead-zone uncertainties.

  7. A framework for constructing adaptive and reconfigurable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Poirot, Pierre-Etienne; Nogiec, Jerzy; Ren, Shangping; /IIT, Chicago

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a software approach to augmenting existing real-time systems with self-adaptation capabilities. In this approach, based on the control loop paradigm commonly used in industrial control, self-adaptation is decomposed into observing system events, inferring necessary changes based on a system's functional model, and activating appropriate adaptation procedures. The solution adopts an architectural decomposition that emphasizes independence and separation of concerns. It encapsulates observation, modeling and correction into separate modules to allow for easier customization of the adaptive behavior and flexibility in selecting implementation technologies.

  8. Adaptive dynamic load-balancing with irregular domain decomposition for particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begau, Christoph; Sutmann, Godehard

    2015-05-01

    We present a flexible and fully adaptive dynamic load-balancing scheme, which is designed for particle simulations of three-dimensional systems with short ranged interactions. The method is based on domain decomposition with non-orthogonal non-convex domains, which are constructed based on a local repartitioning of computational work between neighbouring processors. Domains are dynamically adjusted in a flexible way under the condition that the original topology is not changed, i.e. neighbour relations between domains are retained, which guarantees a fixed communication pattern for each domain during a simulation. Extensions of this scheme are discussed and illustrated with examples, which generalise the communication patterns and do not fully restrict data exchange to direct neighbours. The proposed method relies on a linked cell algorithm, which makes it compatible with existing implementations in particle codes and does not modify the underlying algorithm for calculating the forces between particles. The method has been implemented into the molecular dynamics community code IMD and performance has been measured for various molecular dynamics simulations of systems representing realistic problems from materials science. It is found that the method proves to balance the work between processors in simulations with strongly inhomogeneous and dynamically changing particle distributions, which results in a significant increase of the efficiency of the parallel code compared both to unbalanced simulations and conventional load-balancing strategies.

  9. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  10. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  11. Nonequilibrium Enhances Adaptation Efficiency of Stochastic Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chen; Qian, Minping

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a crucial biological function possessed by many sensory systems. Early work has shown that some influential equilibrium models can achieve accurate adaptation. However, recent studies indicate that there are close relationships between adaptation and nonequilibrium. In this paper, we provide an explanation of these two seemingly contradictory results based on Markov models with relatively simple networks. We show that as the nonequilibrium driving becomes stronger, the system under consideration will undergo a phase transition along a fixed direction: from non-adaptation to simple adaptation then to oscillatory adaptation, while the transition in the opposite direction is forbidden. This indicates that although adaptation may be observed in equilibrium systems, it tends to occur in systems far away from equilibrium. In addition, we find that nonequilibrium will improve the performance of adaptation by enhancing the adaptation efficiency. All these results provide a deeper insight into the connection between adaptation and nonequilibrium. Finally, we use a more complicated network model of bacterial chemotaxis to validate the main results of this paper. PMID:27195482

  12. Nonequilibrium Enhances Adaptation Efficiency of Stochastic Biochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chen; Qian, Minping

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a crucial biological function possessed by many sensory systems. Early work has shown that some influential equilibrium models can achieve accurate adaptation. However, recent studies indicate that there are close relationships between adaptation and nonequilibrium. In this paper, we provide an explanation of these two seemingly contradictory results based on Markov models with relatively simple networks. We show that as the nonequilibrium driving becomes stronger, the system under consideration will undergo a phase transition along a fixed direction: from non-adaptation to simple adaptation then to oscillatory adaptation, while the transition in the opposite direction is forbidden. This indicates that although adaptation may be observed in equilibrium systems, it tends to occur in systems far away from equilibrium. In addition, we find that nonequilibrium will improve the performance of adaptation by enhancing the adaptation efficiency. All these results provide a deeper insight into the connection between adaptation and nonequilibrium. Finally, we use a more complicated network model of bacterial chemotaxis to validate the main results of this paper. PMID:27195482

  13. Dynamic data filtering system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-04-29

    A computer-implemented dynamic data filtering system and method for selectively choosing operating data of a monitored asset that modifies or expands a learned scope of an empirical model of normal operation of the monitored asset while simultaneously rejecting operating data of the monitored asset that is indicative of excessive degradation or impending failure of the monitored asset, and utilizing the selectively chosen data for adaptively recalibrating the empirical model to more accurately monitor asset aging changes or operating condition changes of the monitored asset.

  14. Adaptive fusion of infrared and visible images in dynamic scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yin, Yafeng; Man, Hong; Desai, Sachi

    2011-11-01

    Multiple modalities sensor fusion has been widely employed in various surveillance and military applications. A variety of image fusion techniques including PCA, wavelet, curvelet and HSV has been proposed in recent years to improve human visual perception for object detection. One of the main challenges for visible and infrared image fusion is to automatically determine an optimal fusion strategy for different input scenes along with an acceptable computational cost. This paper, we propose a fast and adaptive feature selection based image fusion method to obtain high a contrast image from visible and infrared sensors for targets detection. At first, fuzzy c-means clustering is applied on the infrared image to highlight possible hotspot regions, which will be considered as potential targets' locations. After that, the region surrounding the target area is segmented as the background regions. Then image fusion is locally applied on the selected target and background regions by computing different linear combination of color components from registered visible and infrared images. After obtaining different fused images, histogram distributions are computed on these local fusion images as the fusion feature set. The variance ratio which is based on Linear Discriminative Analysis (LDA) measure is employed to sort the feature set and the most discriminative one is selected for the whole image fusion. As the feature selection is performed over time, the process will dynamically determine the most suitable feature for the image fusion in different scenes. Experiment is conducted on the OSU Color-Thermal database, and TNO Human Factor dataset. The fusion results indicate that our proposed method achieved a competitive performance compared with other fusion algorithms at a relatively low computational cost.

  15. Flight Results of the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Aircraft with Adaptation to a Longitudinally Destabilized Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. The goal for the adaptive system is to provide an increase in survivability in the event that these extreme changes occur. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane. The adaptive element was incorporated into a dynamic inversion controller with explicit reference model-following. As a test the system was subjected to an abrupt change in plant stability simulating a destabilizing failure. Flight evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to stabilize the vehicle and reestablish good onboard reference model-following. Flight evaluation with the simulated destabilizing failure and adaptation engaged showed improvement in the vehicle stability margins. The convergent properties of this initial system warrant additional improvement since continued maneuvering caused continued adaptation change. Compared to the non-adaptive system the adaptive system provided better closed-loop behavior with improved matching of the onboard reference model. A detailed discussion of the flight results is presented.

  16. Application of Non-Kolmogorovian Probability and Quantum Adaptive Dynamics to Unconscious Inference in Visual Perception Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Recently a novel quantum information formalism — quantum adaptive dynamics — was developed and applied to modelling of information processing by bio-systems including cognitive phenomena: from molecular biology (glucose-lactose metabolism for E.coli bacteria, epigenetic evolution) to cognition, psychology. From the foundational point of view quantum adaptive dynamics describes mutual adapting of the information states of two interacting systems (physical or biological) as well as adapting of co-observations performed by the systems. In this paper we apply this formalism to model unconscious inference: the process of transition from sensation to perception. The paper combines theory and experiment. Statistical data collected in an experimental study on recognition of a particular ambiguous figure, the Schröder stairs, support the viability of the quantum(-like) model of unconscious inference including modelling of biases generated by rotation-contexts. From the probabilistic point of view, we study (for concrete experimental data) the problem of contextuality of probability, its dependence on experimental contexts. Mathematically contextuality leads to non-Komogorovness: probability distributions generated by various rotation contexts cannot be treated in the Kolmogorovian framework. At the same time they can be embedded in a “big Kolmogorov space” as conditional probabilities. However, such a Kolmogorov space has too complex structure and the operational quantum formalism in the form of quantum adaptive dynamics simplifies the modelling essentially.

  17. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  18. Space Launch System Implementation of Adaptive Augmenting Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; VanZwieten, Tannen S.

    2014-01-01

    Given the complex structural dynamics, challenging ascent performance requirements, and rigorous flight certification constraints owing to its manned capability, the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle requires a proven thrust vector control algorithm design with highly optimized parameters to provide stable and high-performance flight. On its development path to Preliminary Design Review (PDR), the SLS flight control system has been challenged by significant vehicle flexibility, aerodynamics, and sloshing propellant. While the design has been able to meet all robust stability criteria, it has done so with little excess margin. Through significant development work, an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm has been shown to extend the envelope of failures and flight anomalies the SLS control system can accommodate while maintaining a direct link to flight control stability criteria such as classical gain and phase margin. In this paper, the work performed to mature the AAC algorithm as a baseline component of the SLS flight control system is presented. The progress to date has brought the algorithm design to the PDR level of maturity. The algorithm has been extended to augment the full SLS digital 3-axis autopilot, including existing load-relief elements, and the necessary steps for integration with the production flight software prototype have been implemented. Several updates which have been made to the adaptive algorithm to increase its performance, decrease its sensitivity to expected external commands, and safeguard against limitations in the digital implementation are discussed with illustrating results. Monte Carlo simulations and selected stressing case results are also shown to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to increase the robustness of the integrated SLS flight control system.

  19. Concept Based Approach for Adaptive Personalized Course Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salahli, Mehmet Ali; Özdemir, Muzaffer; Yasar, Cumali

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors for improving the personalization aspects of learning systems is to enable adaptive properties to them. The aim of the adaptive personalized learning system is to offer the most appropriate learning path and learning materials to learners by taking into account their profiles. In this paper, a new approach to…

  20. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  1. Management Strategies for Complex Adaptive Systems: Sensemaking, Learning, and Improvisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Reuben R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Misspecification of the nature of organizations may be a major reason for difficulty in achieving performance improvement. Organizations are often viewed as machine-like, but complexity science suggests that organizations should be viewed as complex adaptive systems. I identify the characteristics of complex adaptive systems and give examples of…

  2. Adaptive structures for precision controlled large space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garba, John A.; Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The stringent accuracy and ground test validation requirements of some of the future space missions will require new approaches in structural design. Adaptive structures, structural systems that can vary their geometric congiguration as well as their physical properties, are primary candidates for meeting the functional requirements for such missions. Research performed in the development of such adaptive structural systems is described.

  3. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  4. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  5. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  6. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  7. New Directions in Asymptotically Stable Finite-dimensional Adaptive Control of Linear Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Distributed Parameter Systems (DPS), such as systems described by partial differential equations, require infinite-dimensional state space descriptions to correctly model their dynamical behavior. However, any adaptive control algorithm must be finite-dimensional in order to be implemented via on-line digital computers. Finite-dimensional adaptive control of linear DPS requires stability analysis of nonlinear, time-varying, infinite-dimensional systems. The structure of nonadaptive finite-dimensional control of linear DPS is summarized as it relates to the existence of limiting systems for adaptive control. Two candidate schemes for finite-dimensional adaptive control of DPS are described and critical issues in infinite-dimensional stability analysis are discussed, in particular, the invariance principle, center manifold theory, and relationships between input-output and internal stability.

  8. Data-based virtual unmodeled dynamics driven multivariable nonlinear adaptive switching control.

    PubMed

    Chai, Tianyou; Zhang, Yajun; Wang, Hong; Su, Chun-Yi; Sun, Jing

    2011-12-01

    For a complex industrial system, its multivariable and nonlinear nature generally make it very difficult, if not impossible, to obtain an accurate model, especially when the model structure is unknown. The control of this class of complex systems is difficult to handle by the traditional controller designs around their operating points. This paper, however, explores the concepts of controller-driven model and virtual unmodeled dynamics to propose a new design framework. The design consists of two controllers with distinct functions. First, using input and output data, a self-tuning controller is constructed based on a linear controller-driven model. Then the output signals of the controller-driven model are compared with the true outputs of the system to produce so-called virtual unmodeled dynamics. Based on the compensator of the virtual unmodeled dynamics, the second controller based on a nonlinear controller-driven model is proposed. Those two controllers are integrated by an adaptive switching control algorithm to take advantage of their complementary features: one offers stabilization function and another provides improved performance. The conditions on the stability and convergence of the closed-loop system are analyzed. Both simulation and experimental tests on a heavily coupled nonlinear twin-tank system are carried out to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:22106143

  9. Realization of dynamical electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammari, Elena; Catthoor, Francky; Iasemidis, Leonidas; Kjeldsberg, Per Gunnar; Huisken, Jos; Tsakalis, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    This article gives an overview of a methodology for building dynamical electronic systems. As an example a part of a system for epileptic seizure prediction is used, which monitors EEG signals and continuously calculates the largest short-term Lyapunov exponents. In dynamical electronic systems, the cost of exploitation, for instance energy consumption, may vary substantially with the values of input signals. In addition, the functions describing the variations are not known at the time the system is designed. As a result, the architecture of the system must accommodate for the worst case exploitation costs, which rapidly exceed the available resources (for instance battery life) when accumulated over time. The presented system scenario methodology solves these challenges by identifying at design time groups of possible exploitation costs, called system scenarios, and implementing a mechanism to detect system scenarios at run time and re-configure the system to cost-efficiently accommodate them. During reconfiguration, the optimized system architecture settings for the active system scenario are selected and the total exploitation cost is reduced. When the dynamic behavior is due to input data variables with a large number of possible values, current techniques for bottom-up scenario identification and detection becomes too complex. A new top-down technique, based on polygonal regions, is presented in this paper. The results for the example system indicate that with 10 system scenarios the average energy consumption of the system can be reduced by 28% and brought within 5% of the theoretically best solution.

  10. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  11. Solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped satellites and the origin of Kirkwood Gaps are discussed. The chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and the anomalously low eccentricity of Deimos are examined. The Digital Orrery is used to explore the phase space of the ellipic restricted three body problem near the principal commensurabilities (2/1, 5/2, 3/1, and 3/2). The results for the 3/1 commensurability are in close agreement with those found earlier with the algebraic mapping method. Large chaotic zones are associated with the 3/1, 2/1 and 5/2 resonances, where there are gaps in the distribution of asteroids. The region near the 3/2 resonance, where the Hilda group of asteroids is located, is largely devoid of chaotic behavior. Thus, there is a qualitative agreement between the character of the motion and the distribution of asteroids.

  12. Nonlinear dynamical systems analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Adrian S.; Johnson, Martin; Jones, Robin

    1994-10-01

    Computationally intensive algorithms are an ever more common requirement of modern signal processing. Following the work of Gentleman and Kung, McWhirter, Shepherd and Proudler suggested that certain matrix-orientated algorithms can be mapped onto systolic array architectures for adaptive linear signal processing. This has been extended by Broomhead et al. to the calculation of nonlinear predictive models and applied by Jones et al. to target identification and recognition. We shall show that predictive models are extremely sharp discriminators. Our chosen problem, if implemented as a systolic array, would require 3403 processors which would result in high through-put rate at excessive cost. We are developing an efficient sub-optimally implemented systolic array; one processor servicing more than one systolic node. We describe a prototype Heuristic Processor which computes a multi- dimensional, nonlinear, predictive model. It consists of a Radial Basis Function Network and a least squares optimizer using QR decomposition. The optimized solution of a set of simultaneous equations in 81 unknowns is calculated in 150 (mu) S. The QR section emulates a triangular systolic array by the novel use of an array of 40 mature silicon DSP chips costing under DOL100 each. The DSP chips operate in synchronism at a 50 MHz clock rate passing data to each other through multi-port memories on a dead-letter box principle; there are no memory access conflicts and only two-port and three-port memories are required. The processor provides 1-GFlop of computing power per cubic-foot of electronics for a component cost of approximately DOL15,000.

  13. Dynamically programmable electronic pill dispenser system.

    PubMed

    Boquete, Luciano; Rodriguez-Ascariz, Jose Manuel; Artacho, Irene; Cantos-Frontela, Joaquin; Peixoto, Nathalia

    2010-06-01

    Compliance in medicine dispensation has proven critical for dosage control, diagnosis, and treatment. We have designed, manufactured, and characterized a novel dynamically programmable e-pill dispensing system. Our system is initially programmed remotely through a cell phone. After programming, the system may be reconfigured in order to adapt pill dispensation to new conditions. In this paper we describe the mechanics, electronics, control, and communication protocols implemented. Our dyn-e-pill devices can be actuated for over 350 h with two pill retrievals per hour. We challenged the charging circuit and demonstrated that the system has a lifetime longer than 6 h with a 30 min charging cycle, while it lasts for 14 h of uninterrupted use with a full charge. PMID:20503621

  14. Calibrated Methodology for Assessing Adaptation Costs for Urban Drainage Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in precipitation patterns associated with climate change may pose significant challenges for storm water management systems across much of the U.S. In particular, adapting these systems to more intense rainfall events will require significant investment. The assessment ...

  15. A single-rate context-dependent learning process underlies rapid adaptation to familiar object dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ingram, James N; Howard, Ian S; Flanagan, J Randall; Wolpert, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    Motor learning has been extensively studied using dynamic (force-field) perturbations. These induce movement errors that result in adaptive changes to the motor commands. Several state-space models have been developed to explain how trial-by-trial errors drive the progressive adaptation observed in such studies. These models have been applied to adaptation involving novel dynamics, which typically occurs over tens to hundreds of trials, and which appears to be mediated by a dual-rate adaptation process. In contrast, when manipulating objects with familiar dynamics, subjects adapt rapidly within a few trials. Here, we apply state-space models to familiar dynamics, asking whether adaptation is mediated by a single-rate or dual-rate process. Previously, we reported a task in which subjects rotate an object with known dynamics. By presenting the object at different visual orientations, adaptation was shown to be context-specific, with limited generalization to novel orientations. Here we show that a multiple-context state-space model, with a generalization function tuned to visual object orientation, can reproduce the time-course of adaptation and de-adaptation as well as the observed context-dependent behavior. In contrast to the dual-rate process associated with novel dynamics, we show that a single-rate process mediates adaptation to familiar object dynamics. The model predicts that during exposure to the object across multiple orientations, there will be a degree of independence for adaptation and de-adaptation within each context, and that the states associated with all contexts will slowly de-adapt during exposure in one particular context. We confirm these predictions in two new experiments. Results of the current study thus highlight similarities and differences in the processes engaged during exposure to novel versus familiar dynamics. In both cases, adaptation is mediated by multiple context-specific representations. In the case of familiar object dynamics

  16. Multivariable output feedback robust adaptive tracking control design for a class of delayed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Gutman, Per-Olof

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a model reference adaptive control scheme for a class of multi-input multi-output nonlinearly perturbed dynamic systems with unknown time-varying state delays which is also robust with respect to an external disturbance with unknown bounds. The output feedback adaptive control scheme uses feedback actions only, and thus does not require a direct measurement of the command or disturbance signals. A suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii type functional is introduced to design the adaptation algorithms and to prove stability.

  17. Robust adaptive control of spacecraft proximity maneuvers under dynamic coupling and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang; Huo, Wei

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a solution for the position tracking and attitude synchronization problem of the close proximity phase in spacecraft rendezvous and docking. The chaser spacecraft must be driven to a certain fixed position along the docking port direction of the target spacecraft, while the attitude of the two spacecraft must be synchronized for subsequent docking operations. The kinematics and dynamics for relative position and relative attitude are modeled considering dynamic coupling, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. The relative motion model has a new form with a novel definition of the unknown parameters. An original robust adaptive control method is developed for the concerned problem, and a proof of the asymptotic stability is given for the six degrees of freedom closed-loop system. A numerical example is displayed in simulation to verify the theoretical results.

  18. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  19. Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    Some progress has been made in a continuing effort to develop mathematical models of the behaviors of multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology (e.g., systems ranging from single or a few biomolecules to many interacting higher organisms). Living systems can be characterized by nonlinear evolution of probability distributions over different possible choices of the next steps in their motions. One of the main challenges in mathematical modeling of living systems is to distinguish between random walks of purely physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) and those of biological origin. Following a line of reasoning from prior research, it has been assumed, in the present development, that a biological random walk can be represented by a nonlinear mathematical model that represents coupled mental and motor dynamics incorporating the psychological concept of reflection or self-image. The nonlinear dynamics impart the lifelike ability to behave in ways and to exhibit patterns that depart from thermodynamic equilibrium. Reflection or self-image has traditionally been recognized as a basic element of intelligence. The nonlinear mathematical models of the present development are denoted self-supervised dynamical systems. They include (1) equations of classical dynamics, including random components caused by uncertainties in initial conditions and by Langevin forces, coupled with (2) the corresponding Liouville or Fokker-Planck equations that describe the evolutions of probability densities that represent the uncertainties. The coupling is effected by fictitious information-based forces, denoted supervising forces, composed of probability densities and functionals thereof. The equations of classical mechanics represent motor dynamics that is, dynamics in the traditional sense, signifying Newton s equations of motion. The evolution of the probability densities represents mental dynamics or self-image. Then the interaction between the physical and

  20. Dynamically reconfigurable photovoltaic system

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-05-31

    A PV system composed of sub-arrays, each having a group of PV cells that are electrically connected to each other. A power management circuit for each sub-array has a communications interface and serves to connect or disconnect the sub-array to a programmable power grid. The power grid has bus rows and bus columns. A bus management circuit is positioned at a respective junction of a bus column and a bus row and is programmable through its communication interface to connect or disconnect a power path in the grid. As a result, selected sub-arrays are connected by selected power paths to be in parallel so as to produce a low system voltage, and, alternately in series so as to produce a high system voltage that is greater than the low voltage by at least a factor of ten.

  1. Constraint elimination in dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, R. P.; Likins, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    Large space structures (LSSs) and other dynamical systems of current interest are often extremely complex assemblies of rigid and flexible bodies subjected to kinematical constraints. A formulation is presented for the governing equations of constrained multibody systems via the application of singular value decomposition (SVD). The resulting equations of motion are shown to be of minimum dimension.

  2. Achieving Optimal Self-Adaptivity for Dynamic Tuning of Organic Semiconductors through Resonance Engineering.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Xu, Lijia; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Runfeng; Li, Huanhuan; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Current static-state explorations of organic semiconductors for optimal material properties and device performance are hindered by limited insights into the dynamically changed molecular states and charge transport and energy transfer processes upon device operation. Here, we propose a simple yet successful strategy, resonance variation-based dynamic adaptation (RVDA), to realize optimized self-adaptive properties in donor-resonance-acceptor molecules by engineering the resonance variation for dynamic tuning of organic semiconductors. Organic light-emitting diodes hosted by these RVDA materials exhibit remarkably high performance, with external quantum efficiencies up to 21.7% and favorable device stability. Our approach, which supports simultaneous realization of dynamically adapted and selectively enhanced properties via resonance engineering, illustrates a feasible design map for the preparation of smart organic semiconductors capable of dynamic structure and property modulations, promoting the studies of organic electronics from static to dynamic. PMID:27403886

  3. Managing Complex Dynamical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, John C.; Webster, Robert L.; Curry, Jeanie A.; Hammond, Kevin L.

    2011-01-01

    Management commonly engages in a variety of research designed to provide insight into the motivation and relationships of individuals, departments, organizations, etc. This paper demonstrates how the application of concepts associated with the analysis of complex systems applied to such data sets can yield enhanced insights for managerial action.

  4. Dynamic modeling, property investigation, and adaptive controller design of serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesar, Delbert; Tosunoglu, Sabri; Lin, Shyng-Her

    1990-01-01

    Research results on general serial robotic manipulators modeled with structural compliances are presented. Two compliant manipulator modeling approaches, distributed and lumped parameter models, are used in this study. System dynamic equations for both compliant models are derived by using the first and second order influence coefficients. Also, the properties of compliant manipulator system dynamics are investigated. One of the properties, which is defined as inaccessibility of vibratory modes, is shown to display a distinct character associated with compliant manipulators. This property indicates the impact of robot geometry on the control of structural oscillations. Example studies are provided to illustrate the physical interpretation of inaccessibility of vibratory modes. Two types of controllers are designed for compliant manipulators modeled by either lumped or distributed parameter techniques. In order to maintain the generality of the results, neither linearization is introduced. Example simulations are given to demonstrate the controller performance. The second type controller is also built for general serial robot arms and is adaptive in nature which can estimate uncertain payload parameters on-line and simultaneously maintain trajectory tracking properties. The relation between manipulator motion tracking capability and convergence of parameter estimation properties is discussed through example case studies. The effect of control input update delays on adaptive controller performance is also studied.

  5. Direct Adaptive Control of Systems with Actuator Failures: State of the Art and Continuing Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of controlling systems with failures and faults is introduced, and an overview of recent work on direct adaptive control for compensation of uncertain actuator failures is presented. Actuator failures may be characterized by some unknown system inputs being stuck at some unknown (fixed or varying) values at unknown time instants, that cannot be influenced by the control signals. The key task of adaptive compensation is to design the control signals in such a manner that the remaining actuators can automatically and seamlessly take over for the failed ones, and achieve desired stability and asymptotic tracking. A certain degree of redundancy is necessary to accomplish failure compensation. The objective of adaptive control design is to effectively use the available actuation redundancy to handle failures without the knowledge of the failure patterns, parameters, and time of occurrence. This is a challenging problem because failures introduce large uncertainties in the dynamic structure of the system, in addition to parametric uncertainties and unknown disturbances. The paper addresses some theoretical issues in adaptive actuator failure compensation: actuator failure modeling, redundant actuation requirements, plant-model matching, error system dynamics, adaptation laws, and stability, tracking, and performance analysis. Adaptive control designs can be shown to effectively handle uncertain actuator failures without explicit failure detection. Some open technical challenges and research problems in this important research area are discussed.

  6. Hormesis and adaptive cellular control systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hormetic dose response occurs for many endpoints associated with exposures of biological organisms to environmental stressors. Cell-based U- or inverted U-shaped responses may derive from common processes involved in activation of adaptive responses required to protect cells from...

  7. Adaptive Learning Systems: Beyond Teaching Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Nuri; Sevim, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Since 1950s, teaching machines have changed a lot. Today, we have different ideas about how people learn, what instructor should do to help students during their learning process. We have adaptive learning technologies that can create much more student oriented learning environments. The purpose of this article is to present these changes and its…

  8. A Guide to Computer Adaptive Testing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Some brand names are used generically to describe an entire class of products that perform the same function. "Kleenex," "Xerox," "Thermos," and "Band-Aid" are good examples. The term "computerized adaptive testing" (CAT) is similar in that it is often applied uniformly across a diverse family of testing methods. Although the various members of…

  9. Dynamic Implicit 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Non-Equilibrium Radiation Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Bobby; Wang, Zhen; Berrill, Mark A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Pernice, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multiphysics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multiphysics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent linear solver convergence.

  10. Fast and Adaptive Lossless Onboard Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kimesh, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern hyperspectral imaging systems are able to acquire far more data than can be downlinked from a spacecraft. Onboard data compression helps to alleviate this problem, but requires a system capable of power efficiency and high throughput. Software solutions have limited throughput performance and are power-hungry. Dedicated hardware solutions can provide both high throughput and power efficiency, while taking the load off of the main processor. Thus a hardware compression system was developed. The implementation uses a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data (NPO-42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which achieves excellent compression performance and has low complexity. This algorithm performs predictive compression using an adaptive filtering method, and uses adaptive Golomb coding. The implementation also packetizes the coded data. The FL algorithm is well suited for implementation in hardware. In the FPGA implementation, one sample is compressed every clock cycle, which makes for a fast and practical realtime solution for space applications. Benefits of this implementation are: 1) The underlying algorithm achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that exceeds that of techniques currently in use. 2) The algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. 3) Hardware acceleration provides a throughput improvement of 10 to 100 times vs. the software implementation. A prototype of the compressor is available in software, but it runs at a speed that does not meet spacecraft requirements. The hardware implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex IV FPGAs, and makes the use of this compressor practical for Earth satellites as well as beyond-Earth missions with hyperspectral instruments.

  11. Configurable multiplier modules for an adaptive computing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfänder, O. A.; Pfleiderer, H.-J.; Lachowicz, S. W.

    2006-09-01

    The importance of reconfigurable hardware is increasing steadily. For example, the primary approach of using adaptive systems based on programmable gate arrays and configurable routing resources has gone mainstream and high-performance programmable logic devices are rivaling traditional application-specific hardwired integrated circuits. Also, the idea of moving from the 2-D domain into a 3-D design which stacks several active layers above each other is gaining momentum in research and industry, to cope with the demand for smaller devices with a higher scale of integration. However, optimized arithmetic blocks in course-grain reconfigurable arrays as well as field-programmable architectures still play an important role. In countless digital systems and signal processing applications, the multiplication is one of the critical challenges, where in many cases a trade-off between area usage and data throughput has to be made. But the a priori choice of word-length and number representation can also be replaced by a dynamic choice at run-time, in order to improve flexibility, area efficiency and the level of parallelism in computation. In this contribution, we look at an adaptive computing system called 3-D-SoftChip to point out what parameters are crucial to implement flexible multiplier blocks into optimized elements for accelerated processing. The 3-D-SoftChip architecture uses a novel approach to 3-dimensional integration based on flip-chip bonding with indium bumps. The modular construction, the introduction of interfaces to realize the exchange of intermediate data, and the reconfigurable sign handling approach will be explained, as well as a beneficial way to handle and distribute the numerous required control signals.

  12. Adaptive management of social-ecological systems: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management remains at the forefront of environmental management nearly 40 years after its original conception, largely because we have yet to develop other methodologies that offer the same promise. Despite the criticisms of adaptive management and the numerous failed attempts to implement it, adaptive management has yet to be replaced with a better alternative. The concept persists because it is simple, allows action despite uncertainty, and fosters learning. Moving forward, adaptive management of social-ecological systems provides policymakers, managers and scientists a powerful tool for managing for resilience in the face of uncertainty.

  13. The Development and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de-la-Torre, Roberto; Vispoel, Walter P.

    The development and preliminary evaluation of the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS), a new testing package for IBM-compatible microcomputers, are described. CATSYS can be used to administer and score operational adaptive tests or to conduct on-line computer simulation studies. The package incorporates several innovative features,…

  14. A new approach for designing self-organizing systems and application to adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramamoorthy, P. A.; Zhang, Shi; Lin, Yueqing; Huang, Song

    1993-01-01

    There is tremendous interest in the design of intelligent machines capable of autonomous learning and skillful performance under complex environments. A major task in designing such systems is to make the system plastic and adaptive when presented with new and useful information and stable in response to irrelevant events. A great body of knowledge, based on neuro-physiological concepts, has evolved as a possible solution to this problem. Adaptive resonance theory (ART) is a classical example under this category. The system dynamics of an ART network is described by a set of differential equations with nonlinear functions. An approach for designing self-organizing networks characterized by nonlinear differential equations is proposed.

  15. Adaptive control applied to Space Station attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Quang M.; Chipman, Richard; Hu, Tsay-Hsin G.; Holmes, Eric B.; Sunkel, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control approach to enhance the performance of current attitude control system used by the Space Station Freedom. The proposed control law was developed based on the direct adaptive control or model reference adaptive control scheme. Performance comparisons, subject to inertia variation, of the adaptive controller and the fixed-gain linear quadratic regulator currently implemented for the Space Station are conducted. Both the fixed-gain and the adaptive gain controllers are able to maintain the Station stability for inertia variations of up to 35 percent. However, when a 50 percent inertia variation is applied to the Station, only the adaptive controller is able to maintain the Station attitude.

  16. Coherent structures and dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1987-01-01

    Any flow of a viscous fluid has a finite number of degrees of freedom, and can therefore be seen as a dynamical system. A coherent structure can be thought of as a lower dimensional manifold in whose neighborhood the dynamical system spends a substantial fraction of its time. If such a manifold exists, and if its dimensionality is substantially lower that that of the full flow, it is conceivable that the flow could be described in terms of the reduced set of degrees of freedom, and that such a description would be simpler than one in which the existence of structure was not recognized. Several examples are briefly summarized.

  17. Adaptive autonomous sampling toward the study of microbial carbon and energy fluxes in a dynamic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfort, L.; Seaton, C. M.; Wilkin, M.; Baptista, A. M.; Roman, B.; Preston, C. M.; Scholin, C. A.; Melançon, C.; Simon, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    An autonomous microbial sampling device was integrated with a long-term (endurance) environmental sensor system to investigate variation in microbial composition and activities related to complex estuarine dynamics. This integration was a part of ongoing efforts in the Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) to study estuarine carbon and nitrogen cycling using an observation and prediction system (SATURN, http://www.stccmop.org/saturn) as foundational infrastructure. The two endurance stations fitted with physical and biogeochemical sensors that were used in this study are located in the SATURN observation network. The microbial sampler is the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), a commercially available electromechanical/fluidic system designed for automated collection, preservation and in situ analyses of marine water samples. The primary goal of the integration was to demonstrate that the ESP, developed for sampling of pelagic oceanic environments, could be successfully deployed for autonomous sample acquisition in the highly dynamic and turbid Columbia River estuary. The ability of the ESP to collect material at both pre-determined times and automatically in response to local conditions was tested. Pre-designated samples were acquired at specific times to capture variability in the tidal cycle. Autonomous, adaptive sampling was triggered when conditions associated with specific water masses were detected in real-time by the SATURN station's sensors and then communicated to the ESP via the station computer to initiate sample collection. Triggering criteria were based on our understanding of estuary dynamics, as provided by the analysis of extensive archives of high-resolution, long-term SATURN observations and simulations. In this manner, we used the ESP to selectively sample various microbial consortia in the estuary to facilitate the study of ephemeral microbial-driven processes. For example, during the summer of 2013 the adaptive sampling

  18. A low-cost compact metric adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, Justin D.; Henderson, Brian; Wiesner, Brennen; Praus, Robert; Coy, Steve

    2007-09-01

    The application of adaptive optics has been hindered by the cost, size, and complexity of the systems. We describe here progress we have made toward creating low-cost compact turn-key adaptive optics systems. We describe our new low-cost deformable mirror technology developed using polymer membranes, the associated USB interface drive electronics, and different ways that this technology can be configured into a low-cost compact adaptive optics system. We also present results of a parametric study of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) control algorithm.

  19. Subjective evaluation of H.265/HEVC based dynamic adaptive video streaming over HTTP (HEVC-DASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) standard is becoming increasingly popular for real-time adaptive HTTP streaming of internet video in response to unstable network conditions. Integration of DASH streaming techniques with the new H.265/HEVC video coding standard is a promising area of research. The performance of HEVC-DASH systems has been previously evaluated by a few researchers using objective metrics, however subjective evaluation would provide a better measure of the user's Quality of Experience (QoE) and overall performance of the system. This paper presents a subjective evaluation of an HEVC-DASH system implemented in a hardware testbed. Previous studies in this area have focused on using the current H.264/AVC (Advanced Video Coding) or H.264/SVC (Scalable Video Coding) codecs and moreover, there has been no established standard test procedure for the subjective evaluation of DASH adaptive streaming. In this paper, we define a test plan for HEVC-DASH with a carefully justified data set employing longer video sequences that would be sufficient to demonstrate the bitrate switching operations in response to various network condition patterns. We evaluate the end user's real-time QoE online by investigating the perceived impact of delay, different packet loss rates, fluctuating bandwidth, and the perceived quality of using different DASH video stream segment sizes on a video streaming session using different video sequences. The Mean Opinion Score (MOS) results give an insight into the performance of the system and expectation of the users. The results from this study show the impact of different network impairments and different video segments on users' QoE and further analysis and study may help in optimizing system performance.

  20. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musetti, B.; Cibrario, B.; Bussolino, L.; Bodley, C. S.; Flanders, H. A.; Mowery, D. K.; Tomlin, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The first tethered satellite system, scheduled for launch in May 1991, is reviewed. The system dynamics, dynamics control, and dynamics simulations are discussed. Particular attention is given to in-plane and out-of-plane librations; tether oscillation modes; orbiter and sub-satellite dynamics; deployer control system; the sub-satellite attitude measurement and control system; the Aeritalia Dynamics Model; the Martin-Marietta and NASA-MSFC Dynamics Model; and simulation results.

  1. Disgust as an adaptive system for disease avoidance behaviour.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Valerie; de Barra, Mícheál; Aunger, Robert

    2011-02-12

    Disgust is an evolved psychological system for protecting organisms from infection through disease avoidant behaviour. This 'behavioural immune system', present in a diverse array of species, exhibits universal features that orchestrate hygienic behaviour in response to cues of risk of contact with pathogens. However, disgust is also a dynamic adaptive system. Individuals show variation in pathogen avoidance associated with psychological traits like having a neurotic personality, as well as a consequence of being in certain physiological states such as pregnancy or infancy. Three specialized learning mechanisms modify the disgust response: the Garcia effect, evaluative conditioning and the law of contagion. Hygiene behaviour is influenced at the group level through social learning heuristics such as 'copy the frequent'. Finally, group hygiene is extended symbolically to cultural rules about purity and pollution, which create social separations and are enforced as manners. Cooperative hygiene endeavours such as sanitation also reduce pathogen prevalence. Our model allows us to integrate perspectives from psychology, ecology and cultural evolution with those of epidemiology and anthropology. Understanding the nature of disease avoidance psychology at all levels of human organization can inform the design of programmes to improve public health. PMID:21199843

  2. Model adaptation in a central controller for a sewer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nooijen, Ronald; Kolechkina, Alla; Mol, Bart

    2013-04-01

    For small sewer systems that combine foul water and storm water sewer functions in flat terrain, central control of the sewer system may have problems during dry weather. These systems are a combination of local gravity flow networks connected by pumps. Under those conditions the level in the wet well (local storage at the pumping station) should be kept below the entrance pipe but above the top of the intake of the pump. The pumps are dimensioned to cope with the combined flow of foul water and precipitation run off so their capacity is relatively large when compared wityh the volume available in the wet well. Under local control this is not a major problem because the effective controller time step is very short. For central control the control time step can become a problem. Especially when there is uncertainty about the relation between level and volume in the wet well. In this paper we describe a way to dynamically adapt the level to volume relation based on dry weather behaviour. This is important because a better estimate of this volume will reduce the number of on/off cycles for the pumps. It will also allow detection and correction for changes in pump performance due to aging.

  3. Modeling high-resolution broadband discourse in complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J; Corman, Steven R; McPhee, Robert D; Kuhn, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Numerous researchers and practitioners have turned to complexity science to better understand human systems. Simulation can be used to observe how the microlevel actions of many human agents create emergent structures and novel behavior in complex adaptive systems. In such simulations, communication between human agents is often modeled simply as message passing, where a message or text may transfer data, trigger action, or inform context. Human communication involves more than the transmission of texts and messages, however. Such a perspective is likely to limit the effectiveness and insight that we can gain from simulations, and complexity science itself. In this paper, we propose a model of how close analysis of discursive processes between individuals (high-resolution), which occur simultaneously across a human system (broadband), dynamically evolve. We propose six different processes that describe how evolutionary variation can occur in texts-recontextualization, pruning, chunking, merging, appropriation, and mutation. These process models can facilitate the simulation of high-resolution, broadband discourse processes, and can aid in the analysis of data from such processes. Examples are used to illustrate each process. We make the tentative suggestion that discourse may evolve to the "edge of chaos." We conclude with a discussion concerning how high-resolution, broadband discourse data could actually be collected. PMID:12876447

  4. System dynamics and energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The goals of the project were to evaluate the importance of process dynamics in building HVAC systems. The specific objectives were: 1. To study the dynamics of a building HVAC system using test data and computer models; 2. To determine the effect of the time between control decisions on the energy consumption of an HVAC system; 3. To determine dynamic HVAC operating strategies that will potentially reduce energy consumption. The HVAC system of the 11 story IBM building in Atlanta, Georgia, was studied using a combination of data collected at the site and models of the components. The HVAC system consists of two 550 ton centrifugal chillers, a cooling tower with two cells and a two speed fan in each cell, and variable and constant air volume air distribution systems. An energy management and control system (EMCS) that monitors the flow rates, temperatures, and pressures throughout the system, controls the operating modes, and sets the status of major components was installed in the building.

  5. Adaptive-mesh algorithms for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kenneth G.; Roe, Philip L.; Quirk, James

    1993-01-01

    The basic goal of adaptive-mesh algorithms is to distribute computational resources wisely by increasing the resolution of 'important' regions of the flow and decreasing the resolution of regions that are less important. While this goal is one that is worthwhile, implementing schemes that have this degree of sophistication remains more of an art than a science. In this paper, the basic pieces of adaptive-mesh algorithms are described and some of the possible ways to implement them are discussed and compared. These basic pieces are the data structure to be used, the generation of an initial mesh, the criterion to be used to adapt the mesh to the solution, and the flow-solver algorithm on the resulting mesh. Each of these is discussed, with particular emphasis on methods suitable for the computation of compressible flows.

  6. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  7. ALEGRA -- A massively parallel h-adaptive code for solid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, R.M.; Wong, M.K.; Boucheron, E.A.; Weatherby, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    ALEGRA is a multi-material, arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) code for solid dynamics designed to run on massively parallel (MP) computers. It combines the features of modern Eulerian shock codes, such as CTH, with modern Lagrangian structural analysis codes using an unstructured grid. ALEGRA is being developed for use on the teraflop supercomputers to conduct advanced three-dimensional (3D) simulations of shock phenomena important to a variety of systems. ALEGRA was designed with the Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) paradigm, in which the mesh is decomposed into sub-meshes so that each processor gets a single sub-mesh with approximately the same number of elements. Using this approach the authors have been able to produce a single code that can scale from one processor to thousands of processors. A current major effort is to develop efficient, high precision simulation capabilities for ALEGRA, without the computational cost of using a global highly resolved mesh, through flexible, robust h-adaptivity of finite elements. H-adaptivity is the dynamic refinement of the mesh by subdividing elements, thus changing the characteristic element size and reducing numerical error. The authors are working on several major technical challenges that must be met to make effective use of HAMMER on MP computers.

  8. Adaption of a corrector module to the IMP dynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The corrector module of the RAEIOS program and the IMP dynamics computer program were combined to achieve a date-fitting capability with the more general spacecraft dynamics models of the IMP program. The IMP dynamics program presents models of spacecraft dynamics for satellites with long, flexible booms. The properties of the corrector are discussed and a description is presented of the performance criteria and search logic for parameter estimation. A description is also given of the modifications made to add the corrector to the IMP program. This includes subroutine descriptions, common definitions, definition of input, and a description of output.

  9. Adaptive routing for dynamic on-body wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Maskooki, Arash; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay Soon

    2015-03-01

    Energy is scarce in mobile computing devices including wearable and implantable devices in a wireless body area network. In this paper, an adaptive routing protocol is developed and analyzed which minimizes the energy cost per bit of information by using the channel information to choose the best strategy to route data. In this approach, the source node will switch between direct and relayed communication based on the quality of the link and will use the relay only if the channel quality is below a certain threshold. The mathematical model is then validated through simulations which shows that the adaptive routing strategy can improve energy efficiency significantly compared with existing methods. PMID:24686306

  10. Free energy calculations from adaptive molecular dynamics simulations with adiabatic reweighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lingling; Stoltz, Gabriel; Lelièvre, Tony; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Athènes, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We propose an adiabatic reweighting algorithm for computing the free energy along an external parameter from adaptive molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive bias is estimated using Bayes identity and information from all the sampled configurations. We apply the algorithm to a structural transition in a cluster and to the migration of a crystalline defect along a reaction coordinate. Compared to standard adaptive molecular dynamics, we observe an acceleration of convergence. With the aid of the algorithm, it is also possible to iteratively construct the free energy along the reaction coordinate without having to differentiate the gradient of the reaction coordinate or any biasing potential.

  11. Dynamics of Variable Mass Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of mass loss on the attitude behavior of spinning bodies in flight. The principal goal is to determine whether there are circumstances under which the motion of variable mass systems can become unstable in the sense that their transverse angular velocities become unbounded. Obviously, results from a study of this kind would find immediate application in the aerospace field. The first part of this study features a complete and mathematically rigorous derivation of a set of equations that govern both the translational and rotational motions of general variable mass systems. The remainder of the study is then devoted to the application of the equations obtained to a systematic investigation of the effect of various mass loss scenarios on the dynamics of increasingly complex models of variable mass systems. It is found that mass loss can have a major impact on the dynamics of mechanical systems, including a possible change in the systems stability picture. Factors such as nozzle geometry, combustion chamber geometry, propellant's initial shape, size and relative mass, and propellant location can all have important influences on the system's dynamic behavior. The relative importance of these parameters on-system motion are quantified in a way that is useful for design purposes.

  12. A parallel dynamic load balancing algorithm for 3-D adaptive unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidwans, A.; Kallinderis, Y.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive local grid refinement and coarsening results in unequal distribution of workload among the processors of a parallel system. A novel method for balancing the load in cases of dynamically changing tetrahedral grids is developed. The approach employs local exchange of cells among processors in order to redistribute the load equally. An important part of the load balancing algorithm is the method employed by a processor to determine which cells within its subdomain are to be exchanged. Two such methods are presented and compared. The strategy for load balancing is based on the Divide-and-Conquer approach which leads to an efficient parallel algorithm. This method is implemented on a distributed-memory MIMD system.

  13. The AdaptiV Approach to Verification of Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rouff, Christopher; Buskens, Richard; Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui; Hinchey, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

  14. Dynamic Operations of Thought Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Reports on two studies on the dynamic relationships among parts of a thought system. The first study examines the effects of changes in the desirability or likelihood of a core event on thoughts about antecedents and consequences; the second examines the effects of changes in the antecedents and consequences on the core thought. (FMW)

  15. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  16. Computerized Adaptive Testing System Design: Preliminary Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croll, Paul R.

    A functional design model for a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system was developed and presented through a series of hierarchy plus input-process-output (HIPO) diagrams. System functions were translated into system structure: specifically, into 34 software components. Implementation of the design in a physical system was addressed through…

  17. RASCAL: A Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John Christopher

    Both the background of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems in general and the requirements of a computer-aided learning system which would be a reasonable assistant to a teacher are discussed. RASCAL (Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning) is a first attempt at defining a CAI system which would individualize the learning…

  18. Architecture and performance of astronomical adaptive optics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the technological advances of adaptive optics have enabled a great deal of innovative science. In this lecture I review the system-level design of modern astronomical AO instruments, and discuss their current capabilities.

  19. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study identifies basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  20. Global adaptive control for uncertain nonaffine nonlinear hysteretic systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Huang, Liangpei; Xiao, Dongming; Guo, Yong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the global output tracking is investigated for a class of uncertain nonlinear hysteretic systems with nonaffine structures. By combining the solution properties of the hysteresis model with the novel backstepping approach, a robust adaptive control algorithm is developed without constructing a hysteresis inverse. The proposed control scheme is further modified to tackle the bounded disturbances by adaptively estimating their bounds. It is rigorously proven that the designed adaptive controllers can guarantee global stability of the closed-loop system. Two numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes. PMID:26169122

  1. Analog computation with dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegelmann, Hava T.; Fishman, Shmuel

    1998-09-01

    Physical systems exhibit various levels of complexity: their long term dynamics may converge to fixed points or exhibit complex chaotic behavior. This paper presents a theory that enables to interpret natural processes as special purpose analog computers. Since physical systems are naturally described in continuous time, a definition of computational complexity for continuous time systems is required. In analogy with the classical discrete theory we develop fundamentals of computational complexity for dynamical systems, discrete or continuous in time, on the basis of an intrinsic time scale of the system. Dissipative dynamical systems are classified into the computational complexity classes P d, Co-RP d, NP d and EXP d, corresponding to their standard counterparts, according to the complexity of their long term behavior. The complexity of chaotic attractors relative to regular ones leads to the conjecture P d ≠ NP d. Continuous time flows have been proven useful in solving various practical problems. Our theory provides the tools for an algorithmic analysis of such flows. As an example we analyze the continuous Hopfield network.

  2. Dynamics of dual prism adaptation: relating novel experimental results to a minimalistic neural model.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Orlando; Bornschlegl, Mona A; Eberhardt, Sven; Ernst, Udo; Pawelzik, Klaus; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo-motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements ('dual-adaptation'). A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual-adaptation be faster if switches ('phase changes') between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual-adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo-motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual-adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual-adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of prism adaptation, as

  3. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  4. Disgust as an adaptive system for disease avoidance behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Valerie; de Barra, Mícheál; Aunger, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Disgust is an evolved psychological system for protecting organisms from infection through disease avoidant behaviour. This ‘behavioural immune system’, present in a diverse array of species, exhibits universal features that orchestrate hygienic behaviour in response to cues of risk of contact with pathogens. However, disgust is also a dynamic adaptive system. Individuals show variation in pathogen avoidance associated with psychological traits like having a neurotic personality, as well as a consequence of being in certain physiological states such as pregnancy or infancy. Three specialized learning mechanisms modify the disgust response: the Garcia effect, evaluative conditioning and the law of contagion. Hygiene behaviour is influenced at the group level through social learning heuristics such as ‘copy the frequent’. Finally, group hygiene is extended symbolically to cultural rules about purity and pollution, which create social separations and are enforced as manners. Cooperative hygiene endeavours such as sanitation also reduce pathogen prevalence. Our model allows us to integrate perspectives from psychology, ecology and cultural evolution with those of epidemiology and anthropology. Understanding the nature of disease avoidance psychology at all levels of human organization can inform the design of programmes to improve public health. PMID:21199843

  5. Silicon-Neuron Design: A Dynamical Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, John V.; Boahen, Kwabena

    2010-01-01

    We present an approach to design spiking silicon neurons based on dynamical systems theory. Dynamical systems theory aids in choosing the appropriate level of abstraction, prescribing a neuron model with the desired dynamics while maintaining simplicity. Further, we provide a procedure to transform the prescribed equations into subthreshold current-mode circuits. We present a circuit design example, a positive-feedback integrate-and-fire neuron, fabricated in 0.25 μm CMOS. We analyze and characterize the circuit, and demonstrate that it can be configured to exhibit desired behaviors, including spike-frequency adaptation and two forms of bursting. PMID:21617741

  6. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  7. Optimizing Input/Output Using Adaptive File System Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Elford, Christopher L.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1996-01-01

    Parallel input/output characterization studies and experiments with flexible resource management algorithms indicate that adaptivity is crucial to file system performance. In this paper we propose an automatic technique for selecting and refining file system policies based on application access patterns and execution environment. An automatic classification framework allows the file system to select appropriate caching and pre-fetching policies, while performance sensors provide feedback used to tune policy parameters for specific system environments. To illustrate the potential performance improvements possible using adaptive file system policies, we present results from experiments involving classification-based and performance-based steering.

  8. Applying Parallel Adaptive Methods with GeoFEST/PYRAMID to Simulate Earth Surface Crustal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Charles D.; Lyzenga, Greg; Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Li, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) in simulating the Crustal Dynamics of Earth's Surface. AMR simultaneously improves solution quality, time to solution, and computer memory requirements when compared to generating/running on a globally fine mesh. The use of AMR in simulating the dynamics of the Earth's Surface is spurred by future proposed NASA missions, such as InSAR for Earth surface deformation and other measurements. These missions will require support for large-scale adaptive numerical methods using AMR to model observations. AMR was chosen because it has been successful in computation fluid dynamics for predictive simulation of complex flows around complex structures.

  9. Adaptive Systems Engineering: A Medical Paradigm for Practicing Systems Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    R. Douglas Hamelin; Ron D. Klingler; Christopher Dieckmann

    2011-06-01

    From its inception in the defense and aerospace industries, SE has applied holistic, interdisciplinary tools and work-process to improve the design and management of 'large, complex engineering projects.' The traditional scope of engineering in general embraces the design, development, production, and operation of physical systems, and SE, as originally conceived, falls within that scope. While this 'traditional' view has expanded over the years to embrace wider, more holistic applications, much of the literature and training currently available is still directed almost entirely at addressing the large, complex, NASA and defense-sized systems wherein the 'ideal' practice of SE provides the cradle-to-grave foundation for system development and deployment. Under such scenarios, systems engineers are viewed as an integral part of the system and project life-cycle from conception to decommissioning. In far less 'ideal' applications, SE principles are equally applicable to a growing number of complex systems and projects that need to be 'rescued' from overwhelming challenges that threaten imminent failure. The medical profession provides a unique analogy for this latter concept and offers a useful paradigm for tailoring our 'practice' of SE to address the unexpected dynamics of applying SE in the real world. In short, we can be much more effective as systems engineers as we change some of the paradigms under which we teach and 'practice' SE.

  10. Testing and analysis of dual-mode adaptive landing gear, taxi mode test system for YF-12A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dual mode adaptive landing gear system in reducing the dynamic response of an airplane during ground taxiing was studied. The dynamic taxi tests of the YF-12A research airplane are presented. A digital computer program which simulated the test conditions is discussed. The dual mode system as tested provides dynamic taxi response reductions of 25 percent at the cg and 30 to 45 percent at the cockpit.

  11. An adaptive tracking observer for failure-detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The design problem of adaptive observers applied to linear, constant and variable parameters, multi-input, multi-output systems, is considered. It is shown that, in order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate (FAR) under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable proper matching between the observer (or KF) model and the system parameters. An adaptive observer algorithm is introduced in order to maintain desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching and/or system parameter variations. Only a properly designed adaptive observer is able to detect abrupt changes in the system (actuator, sensor failures, etc.) with adequate reliability and FAR. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process were obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors and accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases.

  12. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  13. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  14. Dynamics of Dual Prism Adaptation: Relating Novel Experimental Results to a Minimalistic Neural Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo, Orlando; Bornschlegl, Mona A.; Eberhardt, Sven; Ernst, Udo; Pawelzik, Klaus; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo–motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements (‘dual–adaptation’). A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual–adaptation be faster if switches (‘phase changes’) between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual–adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo–motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual–adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual–adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of

  15. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Aoife C. Potestio, Raffaello Kremer, Kurt

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  16. Transforming the sensing and numerical prediction of high-impact local weather through dynamic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K

    2009-03-13

    Mesoscale weather, such as convective systems, intense local rainfall resulting in flash floods and lake effect snows, frequently is characterized by unpredictable rapid onset and evolution, heterogeneity and spatial and temporal intermittency. Ironically, most of the technologies used to observe the atmosphere, predict its evolution and compute, transmit or store information about it, operate in a static pre-scheduled framework that is fundamentally inconsistent with, and does not accommodate, the dynamic behaviour of mesoscale weather. As a result, today's weather technology is highly constrained and far from optimal when applied to any particular situation. This paper describes a new cyberinfrastructure framework, in which remote and in situ atmospheric sensors, data acquisition and storage systems, assimilation and prediction codes, data mining and visualization engines, and the information technology frameworks within which they operate, can change configuration automatically, in response to evolving weather. Such dynamic adaptation is designed to allow system components to achieve greater overall effectiveness, relative to their static counterparts, for any given situation. The associated service-oriented architecture, known as Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD), makes advanced meteorological and cyber tools as easy to use as ordering a book on the web. LEAD has been applied in a variety of settings, including experimental forecasting by the US National Weather Service, and allows users to focus much more attention on the problem at hand and less on the nuances of data formats, communication protocols and job execution environments. PMID:19087934

  17. Hidden attractors in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Jafari, Sajad; Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.; Prasad, Awadhesh

    2016-06-01

    Complex dynamical systems, ranging from the climate, ecosystems to financial markets and engineering applications typically have many coexisting attractors. This property of the system is called multistability. The final state, i.e., the attractor on which the multistable system evolves strongly depends on the initial conditions. Additionally, such systems are very sensitive towards noise and system parameters so a sudden shift to a contrasting regime may occur. To understand the dynamics of these systems one has to identify all possible attractors and their basins of attraction. Recently, it has been shown that multistability is connected with the occurrence of unpredictable attractors which have been called hidden attractors. The basins of attraction of the hidden attractors do not touch unstable fixed points (if exists) and are located far away from such points. Numerical localization of the hidden attractors is not straightforward since there are no transient processes leading to them from the neighborhoods of unstable fixed points and one has to use the special analytical-numerical procedures. From the viewpoint of applications, the identification of hidden attractors is the major issue. The knowledge about the emergence and properties of hidden attractors can increase the likelihood that the system will remain on the most desirable attractor and reduce the risk of the sudden jump to undesired behavior. We review the most representative examples of hidden attractors, discuss their theoretical properties and experimental observations. We also describe numerical methods which allow identification of the hidden attractors.

  18. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  19. Error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted optimal control problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Ding

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we establish error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted infinite-horizon optimal control problems of discrete-time deterministic nonlinear systems. We consider approximation errors in the update equations of both value function and control policy. We utilize a new assumption instead of the contraction assumption in discounted optimal control problems. We establish the error bounds for approximate value iteration based on a new error condition. Furthermore, we also establish the error bounds for approximate policy iteration and approximate optimistic policy iteration algorithms. It is shown that the iterative approximate value function can converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal value function under some conditions. To implement the developed algorithms, critic and action neural networks are used to approximate the value function and control policy, respectively. Finally, a simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed algorithms. PMID:25751878

  20. Adaptive controller for a needle free jet-injector system.

    PubMed

    Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-08-01

    A nonlinear, sliding mode adaptive controller was created for a needle-free jet injection system. The controller was based on a simplified lumped-sum parameter model of the jet-injection mechanics. The adaptive control scheme was compared to a currently-used Feed-forward+PID controller in both ejection of water into air, and injection of dye into ex-vivo porcine tissue. The adaptive controller was more successful in trajectory tracking and was more robust to the biological variations caused by a tissue load. PMID:26737988

  1. Adaptive stochastic control for a class of linear systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, E.; Athans, M.

    1972-01-01

    The problem considered in this paper deals with the control of linear discrete-time stochastic systems with unknown (possibly time-varying and random) gain parameters. The philosophy of control is based on the use of an open-loop feedback optimal (OLFO) control using a quadratic index of performance. It is shown that the OLFO system consists of (1) an identifier that estimates the system state variables and gain parameters and (2) a controller described by an 'adaptive' gain and correction term. Several qualitative properties and asymptotic properties of the OLFO adaptive system are discussed. Simulation results dealing with the control of stable and unstable third-order plants are presented. The key quantitative result is the precise variation of the control system adaptive gains as a function of the future expected uncertainty of the parameters; thus, in this problem the ordinary 'separation theorem' does not hold.

  2. Adaptive Fuzzy Systems in Computational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in computational intelligence techniques, which currently includes neural networks, fuzzy systems, and evolutionary programming, has grown significantly and a number of their applications have been developed in the government and industry. In future, an essential element in these systems will be fuzzy systems that can learn from experience by using neural network in refining their performances. The GARIC architecture, introduced earlier, is an example of a fuzzy reinforcement learning system which has been applied in several control domains such as cart-pole balancing, simulation of to Space Shuttle orbital operations, and tether control. A number of examples from GARIC's applications in these domains will be demonstrated.

  3. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  4. On the role of prediction tools for adaptive rotor system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kube, R.; Klöppel, V.

    2001-02-01

    Within the guide concept AROSYS (Adaptive Rotor Systems), the partners Eurocopter Deutschland (ECD), EADS München and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) developed active control technologies for helicopters. A trailing edge flap, direct twist and adaptive profile geometry system is investigated to reduce the rotor-induced vibrations and noise emissions and to expand the helicopter flight envelope. The advantageous effects of a profile geometry adaption in the form of a dynamical nose droop could be shown within the scope of unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations. Wind tunnel tests with the piezoelectric actuated trailing edge flap demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of the system. Its potential for vibration and noise reduction is compared with that of the direct twist concept and assessed on the basis of numerical rotor simulations.

  5. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware. PMID:22356955

  6. The Bilingual as an Adaptive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Dijkstra and van Heuven lucidly summarize the important research generated by the BIA model and provide an excellent case for the BIA+ model with its critical separation of the identification system from the task/decision system. A keynote article necessarily offers a selective exposition of the authors' thinking and so my remarks are an…

  7. On Rank Driven Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Prieto, F. J.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a class of models related to the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model, initially proposed to study evolution. The BS model is extremely simple and yet captures some forms of "complex behavior" such as self-organized criticality that is often observed in physical and biological systems. In this model, random fitnesses in are associated to agents located at the vertices of a graph . Their fitnesses are ranked from worst (0) to best (1). At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and some others with a priori given rank probabilities are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. We consider two cases: The exogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from an a priori fixed distribution, and the endogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from the current distribution as it evolves. We approximate the dynamics by making a simplifying independence assumption. We use Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems to define a rank-driven dynamical system that approximates the evolution of the distribution of the fitnesses in these rank-driven models, as well as in the BS model. For this simplified model we can find the limiting marginal distribution as a function of the initial conditions. Agreement with experimental results of the BS model is excellent.

  8. From dynamical systems to renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Menous, Frédéric

    2013-09-15

    In this paper we study logarithmic derivatives associated to derivations on completed graded Lie algebra, as well as the existence of inverses. These logarithmic derivatives, when invertible, generalize the exp-log correspondence between a Lie algebra and its Lie group. Such correspondences occur naturally in the study of dynamical systems when dealing with the linearization of vector fields and the non linearizability of a resonant vector fields corresponds to the non invertibility of a logarithmic derivative and to the existence of normal forms. These concepts, stemming from the theory of dynamical systems, can be rephrased in the abstract setting of Lie algebra and the same difficulties as in perturbative quantum field theory (pQFT) arise here. Surprisingly, one can adopt the same ideas as in pQFT with fruitful results such as new constructions of normal forms with the help of the Birkhoff decomposition. The analogy goes even further (locality of counter terms, choice of a renormalization scheme) and shall lead to more interactions between dynamical systems and quantum field theory.

  9. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-30

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  10. MACAO-VLTI adaptive optics systems performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Donaldson, Rob; Dupuy, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Hubin, Norbert N.; Ivanescu, Liviu; Kasper, Markus E.; Oberti, Sylvain; Paufique, Jerome; Rossi, Silvio; Silber, Armin; Delabre, Bernhard; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Gigan, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    In April and August "03 two MACAO-VLTI curvature AO systems were installed on the VLT telescopes unit 2 and 3 in Paranal (Chile). These are 60 element systems using a 150mm bimorph deformable mirror and 60 APD"s as WFS detectors. Valuable integration & commissioning experience has been gained during these 2 missions. Several tests have been performed in order to evaluate system performance on the sky. The systems have proven to be extremely robust, performing in a stable fashion in extreme seeing condition (seeing up to 3"). Strehl ratio of 0.65 and residual tilt smaller than 10 mas have been obtained on the sky in 0.8" seeing condition. Weak guide source performance is also excellent with a strehl of 0.26 on a V~16 magnitude star. Several functionalities have been successfully tested including: chopping, off-axis guiding, atmospheric refraction compensation etc. The AO system can be used in a totally automatic fashion with a small overhead: the AO loop can be closed on the target less than 60 sec after star acquisition by the telescope. It includes reading the seeing value given by the site monitor, evaluate the guide star magnitude (cycling through neutral density filters) setting the close-loop AO parameters (system gain and vibrating membrane mirror stroke) including calculation of the command-matrix. The last 2 systems will be installed in August "04 and in the course of 2005.

  11. Distributed adaptive fuzzy iterative learning control of coordination problems for higher order multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinsha; Li, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the adaptive fuzzy iterative learning control scheme is proposed for coordination problems of Mth order (M ≥ 2) distributed multi-agent systems. Every follower agent has a higher order integrator with unknown nonlinear dynamics and input disturbance. The dynamics of the leader are a higher order nonlinear systems and only available to a portion of the follower agents. With distributed initial state learning, the unified distributed protocols combined time-domain and iteration-domain adaptive laws guarantee that the follower agents track the leader uniformly on [0, T]. Then, the proposed algorithm extends to achieve the formation control. A numerical example and a multiple robotic system are provided to demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach.

  12. Adaptive capacity indicators to assess sustainability of urban water systems - Current application.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Sustainability is commonly assessed along environmental, societal, economic and technological dimensions. A crucial aspect of sustainability is that inter-generational equality must be ensured. This requires that sustainability is attained in the here and now as well as into the future. Therefore, what is perceived as 'sustainable' changes as a function of societal opinion and technological and scientific progress. A concept that describes the ability of systems to change is adaptive capacity. Literature suggests that the ability of systems to adapt is an integral part of sustainable development. This paper demonstrates that indicators measuring adaptive capacity are underrepresented in current urban water sustainability studies. Furthermore, it is discussed under which sustainability dimensions adaptive capacity indicators are lacking and why. Of the >90 indicators analysed, only nine are adaptive capacity indicators, of which six are socio-cultural, two technological, one economical and none environmental. This infrequent use of adaptive capacity indicators in sustainability assessments led to the conclusion that the challenge of dynamic and uncertain urban water systems is, with the exception of the socio-cultural dimension, not yet sufficiently reflected in the application of urban water sustainability indicators. This raises concerns about the progress towards urban water systems that can transform as a response variation and change. Therefore, research should focus on developing methods and indicators that can define, evaluate and quantify adaptive capacity under the economic, environmental and technical dimension of sustainability. Furthermore, it should be evaluated whether sustainability frameworks that focus on the control processes of urban water systems are more suitable for measuring adaptive capacity, than the assessments along environmental, economic, socio-cultural and technological dimensions. PMID:27390059

  13. Dynamic Force Sensing Using an Optically Trapped Probing System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanan; Cheng, Peng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive observer that is implemented to enable real-time dynamic force sensing and parameter estimation in an optically trapped probing system. According to the principle of separation of estimation and control, the design of this observer is independent of that of the feedback controller when operating within the linear range of the optical trap. Dynamic force sensing, probe steering/clamping, and Brownian motion control can, therefore, be developed separately and activated simultaneously. The adaptive observer utilizes the measured motion of the trapped probe and input control effort to recursively estimate the probe-sample interaction force in real time, along with the estimation of the probing system's trapping bandwidth. This capability is very important to achieving accurate dynamic force sensing in a time-varying process, wherein the trapping dynamics is nonstationary due to local variations of the surrounding medium. The adaptive estimator utilizes the Kalman filter algorithm to compute the time-varying gain in real time and minimize the estimation error for force probing. A series of experiments are conducted to validate the design of and assess the performance of the adaptive observer. PMID:24382944

  14. Screening systems adapt to changing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    Prep plants are installing larger screening systems and synthetic media is meeting those challenges. The largest manufacturer of synthetic screen media is Polydeck located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The company's primary product lines include modular polyurethane and rubber screen panels and the frame systems to support the media. The modular approach overcomes a wear problem in one area of the deck common on Banana screens and facilitates maintenance. A rubber formation used in 1- x 2-pt screen panels called the Flexi design is softer and allows more vibration than standard urethane panels. The Maxi screen panel design combined with the PipeTop II frame makes the system highly versatile. 1 photo.

  15. A dynamical systems view of network centrality.

    PubMed

    Grindrod, Peter; Higham, Desmond J

    2014-05-01

    To gain insights about dynamic networks, the dominant paradigm is to study discrete snapshots, or timeslices, as the interactions evolve. Here, we develop and test a new mathematical framework where network evolution is handled over continuous time, giving an elegant dynamical systems representation for the important concept of node centrality. The resulting system allows us to track the relative influence of each individual. This new setting is natural in many digital applications, offering both conceptual and computational advantages. The novel differential equations approach is convenient for modelling and analysis of network evolution and gives rise to an interesting application of the matrix logarithm function. From a computational perspective, it avoids the awkward up-front compromises between accuracy, efficiency and redundancy required in the prevalent discrete-time setting. Instead, we can rely on state-of-the-art ODE software, where discretization takes place adaptively in response to the prevailing system dynamics. The new centrality system generalizes the widely used Katz measure, and allows us to identify and track, at any resolution, the most influential nodes in terms of broadcasting and receiving information through time-dependent links. In addition to the classical static network notion of attenuation across edges, the new ODE also allows for attenuation over time, as information becomes stale. This allows 'running measures' to be computed, so that networks can be monitored in real time over arbitrarily long intervals. With regard to computational efficiency, we explain why it is cheaper to track good receivers of information than good broadcasters. An important consequence is that the overall broadcast activity in the network can also be monitored efficiently. We use two synthetic examples to validate the relevance of the new measures. We then illustrate the ideas on a large-scale voice call network, where key features are discovered that are not

  16. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  17. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1978-01-01

    A learning control system and its utilization as a flight control system for F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) research aircraft is studied. The system has the ability to adjust a gain schedule to account for changing plant characteristics and to improve its performance and the plant's performance in the course of its own operation. Three subsystems are detailed: (1) the information acquisition subsystem which identifies the plant's parameters at a given operating condition; (2) the learning algorithm subsystem which relates the identified parameters to predetermined analytical expressions describing the behavior of the parameters over a range of operating conditions; and (3) the memory and control process subsystem which consists of the collection of updated coefficients (memory) and the derived control laws. Simulation experiments indicate that the learning control system is effective in compensating for parameter variations caused by changes in flight conditions.

  18. Synthesis of oscillating adaptive feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smay, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A synthesis theory is developed which allows system design to proceed from practical specifications on system command and/or disturbance response to a design which is very nearly optimal in terms of feedback sensor noise effects. The approach taken is to replace the nonlinear element by a mean square error minimizing approximation (dual-input describing function), and then use linear frequency domain synthesis techniques subject to additional constraints imposed by the limit cycle and the approximator. Synthesis techniques are also developed for a similar system using an externally excited oscillating signal with the above approach. The results remove the design of the systems considered from the realm of simulation and experimentation, permitting true synthesis and the optimization that accompanies it.

  19. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  20. Dynamic security assessment processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    The architecture of dynamic security assessment processing system (DSAPS) is proposed to address online dynamic security assessment (DSA) with focus of the dissertation on low-probability, high-consequence events. DSAPS upgrades current online DSA functions and adds new functions to fit into the modern power grid. Trajectory sensitivity analysis is introduced and its applications in power system are reviewed. An index is presented to assess transient voltage dips quantitatively using trajectory sensitivities. Then the framework of anticipatory computing system (ACS) for cascading defense is presented as an important function of DSAPS. ACS addresses various security problems and the uncertainties in cascading outages. Corrective control design is automated to mitigate the system stress in cascading progressions. The corrective controls introduced in the dissertation include corrective security constrained optimal power flow, a two-stage load control for severe under-frequency conditions, and transient stability constrained optimal power flow for cascading outages. With state-of-the-art computing facilities to perform high-speed extended-term time-domain simulation and optimization for large-scale systems, DSAPS/ACS efficiently addresses online DSA for low-probability, high-consequence events, which are not addressed by today's industrial practice. Human interference is reduced in the computationally burdensome analysis.