Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive frequency tracking

  1. Micromotion feature extraction of radar target using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequency adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yijun; Zhang, Qun; Ma, Changzheng; Luo, Ying; Yeo, Tat Soon

    2014-01-01

    In multifunction phased array radar systems, different activities (e.g., tracking, searching, imaging, feature extraction, recognition, etc.) would need to be performed simultaneously. To relieve the conflict of the radar resource distribution, a micromotion feature extraction method using tracking pulses with adaptive pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) is proposed in this paper. In this method, the idea of a varying PRF is utilized to solve the frequency-domain aliasing problem of the micro-Doppler signal. With appropriate atom set construction, the micromotion feature can be extracted and the image of the target can be obtained based on the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit algorithm. In our algorithm, the micromotion feature of a radar target is extracted from the tracking pulses and the quality of the constructed image is fed back into the radar system to adaptively adjust the PRF of the tracking pulses. Finally, simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Fast adaptive schemes for tracking voltage phasor and local frequency in power transmission and distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kamwa, I.; Grondin, R. )

    1992-04-01

    Real-time measurements of voltage phasor and local frequency deviation find applications in computer-based relaying, static state estimation, disturbance monitoring and control. This paper proposes two learning schemes for fast estimation of these basic quantities. We attacked the problem from a system identification perspective, in opposition to the well-established Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF) technique. It is shown that, from a simple non-linear model of the system voltage which involves only two parameters, the Recursive Least Squares (RLS) and the Least Means Squares (LMS) algorithms can each provide dynamic estimates of the voltage phasor. The finite derivative of the phase deviation, followed by a moving-average filter, then leads to the local frequency deviation. A constant forgetting factor included in these algorithms provides both fast adaptation in time-varying situations and good smoothing of the estimates when necessary.

  3. Adaptive Objectness for Object Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pengpeng; Pang, Yu; Liao, Chunyuan; Mei, Xue; Ling, Haibin

    2016-07-01

    Object tracking is a long standing problem in vision. While great efforts have been spent to improve tracking performance, a simple yet reliable prior knowledge is left unexploited: the target object in tracking must be an object other than non-object. The recently proposed and popularized objectness measure provides a natural way to model such prior in visual tracking. Thus motivated, in this paper we propose to adapt objectness for visual object tracking. Instead of directly applying an existing objectness measure that is generic and handles various objects and environments, we adapt it to be compatible to the specific tracking sequence and object. More specifically, we use the newly proposed BING objectness as the base, and then train an object-adaptive objectness for each tracking task. The training is implemented by using an adaptive support vector machine that integrates information from the specific tracking target into the BING measure. We emphasize that the benefit of the proposed adaptive objectness, named ADOBING, is generic. To show this, we combine ADOBING with seven top performed trackers in recent evaluations. We run the ADOBING-enhanced trackers with their base trackers on two popular benchmarks, the CVPR2013 benchmark (50 sequences) and the Princeton Tracking Benchmark (100 sequences). On both benchmarks, our methods not only consistently improve the base trackers, but also achieve the best known performances. Noting that the way we integrate objectness in visual tracking is generic and straightforward, we expect even more improvement by using tracker-specific objectness.

  4. Frequency-Tracking-Error Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Frequency-tracking-error detector compares average period of output signal from band-pass tracking filter with average period of signal of frequency 100 f(sub 0) that controls center frequency f(sub 0) of tracking filter. Measures difference between f(sub 0) and frequency of one of periodic components in output of bearing sensor. Bearing sensor is accelerometer, strain gauge, or deflectometer mounted on bearing housing. Detector part of system of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery.

  5. Frequency Synthesizer For Tracking Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Digital frequency-synthesizing subsystem generates trains of pulses, free of jitter, for use as frequency-control signals in tracking filters. Part of assembly of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery. Designed to meet requirements for tracking narrow-band cage-rotation and ball-pass components of vibrations, as discussed in "Frequency-Tracking Error Detector" (MFS-29538) and "Ball-Pass Cage-Modulation Detector" (MFS-29539). Synthesizer includes preset counter, output of which controls signal for ball-pass filter. Input to this preset counter updated every 2 microseconds: responds almost immediately, effectively eliminating relatively long response time (lock-in time) and phase jitter.

  6. Adaptive DFT-based Interferometer Fringe Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Pedretti, Ettore; Bregman, Jesse; Mah, Robert W.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic interferometer fringe tracking system has been developed, implemented, and tested at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) observatory at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. The system can minimize the optical path differences (OPDs) for all three baselines of the Michelson stellar interferometer at IOTA. Based on sliding window discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculations that were optimized for computational efficiency and robustness to atmospheric disturbances, the algorithm has also been tested extensively on off-line data. Implemented in ANSI C on the 266 MHz PowerPC processor running the VxWorks real-time operating system, the algorithm runs in approximately 2.0 milliseconds per scan (including all three interferograms), using the science camera and piezo scanners to measure and correct the OPDs. The adaptive DFT-based tracking algorithm should be applicable to other systems where there is a need to detect or track a signal with an approximately constant-frequency carrier pulse.

  7. Adaptive compensation for an optical tracking telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.; Winston, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    The application of model referenced adaptive control theory to an optical tracking telescope is discussed. The capability of the adaptive technique to compensate for mount irregularities such as inertial variations and bearing friction is demonstrated via field test results on a large tracking telescope. Results are presented which show a 6 to 1 improvement in tracking accuracy for a worst-case satellite trajectory.

  8. Detection and frequency tracking of chirping signals

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.; Stearns, S.D.

    1990-08-01

    This paper discusses several methods to detect the presence of and track the frequency of a chirping signal in broadband noise. The dynamic behavior of each of the methods is described and tracking error bounds are investigated in terms of the chirp rate. Frequency tracking and behavior in the presence of varying levels of noise are illustrated in examples. 11 refs., 29 figs.

  9. Adaptive DFT-Based Interferometer Fringe Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Edward; Pedretti, Ettore; Bregman, Jesse; Mah, Robert W.; Traub, Wesley A.

    An automatic interferometer fringe tracking system has been developed, implemented, and tested at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) Observatory at Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The system can minimize the optical path differences (OPDs) for all three baselines of the Michelson stellar interferometer at IOTA. Based on sliding window discrete Fourier-transform (DFT) calculations that were optimized for computational efficiency and robustness to atmospheric disturbances, the algorithm has also been tested extensively on offline data. Implemented in ANSI C on the 266 MHz PowerPC processor running the VxWorks real-time operating system, the algorithm runs in approximately 2.0 milliseconds per scan (including all three interferograms), using the science camera and piezo scanners to measure and correct the OPDs. The adaptive DFT-based tracking algorithm should be applicable to other systems where there is a need to detect or track a signal with an approximately constant-frequency carrier pulse. One example of such an application might be to the field of thin-film measurement by ellipsometry, using a broadband light source and a Fourier-transform spectrometer to detect the resulting fringe patterns.

  10. Target tracking with dynamically adaptive correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaxiola, Leopoldo N.; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.; García-Martínez, Pascuala

    2016-04-01

    A reliable algorithm for target tracking based on dynamically adaptive correlation filtering is presented. The algorithm is capable of tracking with high accuracy the location of a target in an input video sequence without using an offline training process. The target is selected at the beginning of the algorithm. Afterwards, a composite correlation filter optimized for distortion tolerant pattern recognition is designed to recognize the target in the next frame. The filter is dynamically adapted to each frame using information of current and past scene observations. Results obtained with the proposed algorithm in synthetic and real-life video sequences, are analyzed and compared with those obtained with recent state-of-the-art tracking algorithms in terms of objective metrics.

  11. Adaptive optics for space debris tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennet, Francis; D'Orgeville, Celine; Gao, Yue; Gardhouse, William; Paulin, Nicolas; Price, Ian; Rigaut, Francois; Ritchie, Ian T.; Smith, Craig H.; Uhlendorf, Kristina; Wang, Yanjie

    2014-07-01

    Space debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is becoming an increasing threat to satellite and spacecraft. A reliable and cost effective method for detecting possible collisions between orbiting objects is required to prevent an exponential growth in the number of debris. Current RADAR survey technologies used to monitor the orbits of thousands of space debris objects are relied upon to manoeuvre operational satellites to prevent possible collisions. A complimentary technique, ground-based laser LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) have been used to track much smaller objects with higher accuracy than RADAR, giving greater prediction of possible collisions and avoiding unnecessary manoeuvring. Adaptive optics will play a key role in any ground based LIDAR tracking system as a cost effective way of utilising smaller ground stations or less powerful lasers. The use of high power and high energy lasers for the orbital modification of debris objects will also require an adaptive optic system to achieve the high photon intensity on the target required for photon momentum transfer and laser ablation. EOS Space Systems have pioneered the development of automated laser space debris tracking for objects in low Earth orbit. The Australian National University have been developing an adaptive optics system to improve this space debris tracking capability at the EOS Space Systems Mount Stromlo facility in Canberra, Australia. The system is integrated with the telescope and commissioned as an NGS AO system before moving on to LGS AO and tracking operations. A pulsed laser propagated through the telescope is used to range the target using time of flight data. Adaptive optics is used to increase the maximum range and number or targets available to the LIDAR system, by correcting the uplink laser beam. Such a system presents some unique challenges for adaptive optics: high power lasers reflecting off deformable mirrors, high slew rate tracking, and variable off-axis tracking correction. A

  12. Adaptive Tracking of Atmospheric Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D; Calhoun, R

    2002-01-31

    When dangerous chemical or biological releases occur in the atmosphere, emergency responders and decision makers must assess exposure rates to the affected population, establish evacuation routes, and allocate medical resources We have been working to improve the scientific basis for making such decisions. We believe that future rapid response teams, from LLNI, and other centers of expertise, will use a variety of atmospheric sensors and atmospheric computer models to predict and characterize the movement of chemical or biological releases in urban environments, and that LLNL is likely to contribute expertise in this area. A key advance will be to merge the information and capabilities of computer models with real-time atmospheric data from sensors. The resulting product will dynamically interpolate and extrapolate the raw sensor data into a coordinated ''picture'' or interpretation of the developing flow scenario. The scientific focus of the project was the exploration and development of algorithms to fuse lidar data (which measure wind speed much as a police radar measures vehicle speed) and a dispersion model into a single system. Our goal was to provide the scientific foundation for a combined lidar/model approach capable of accurately tracking the evolution of atmospheric releases on distance scales of about 20 km. The fundamental idea is to create feedbacks, so that lidar data can be used for wind field inputs into a dispersion model, which would, in turn, guide lidar data acquisition by directing more intensive scanning to regions where more data are key to improving the modeling. We created a database of synthetic lidar data that can be used to test algorithms relating to a combined lidar/dispersion model. We obtained the data, which represent nocturnal atmospheric drainage flows in the Salt Lake City Basin, from calculations on the LLNL ASCI White supercomputer with a computational fluid dynamics model running in large-eddy simulation mode. A simple

  13. Adaptive and accelerated tracking-learning-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Pengyu; Li, Xin; Ding, Shaowen; Tian, Zunhua; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2013-08-01

    An improved online long-term visual tracking algorithm, named adaptive and accelerated TLD (AA-TLD) based on Tracking-Learning-Detection (TLD) which is a novel tracking framework has been introduced in this paper. The improvement focuses on two aspects, one is adaption, which makes the algorithm not dependent on the pre-defined scanning grids by online generating scale space, and the other is efficiency, which uses not only algorithm-level acceleration like scale prediction that employs auto-regression and moving average (ARMA) model to learn the object motion to lessen the detector's searching range and the fixed number of positive and negative samples that ensures a constant retrieving time, but also CPU and GPU parallel technology to achieve hardware acceleration. In addition, in order to obtain a better effect, some TLD's details are redesigned, which uses a weight including both normalized correlation coefficient and scale size to integrate results, and adjusts distance metric thresholds online. A contrastive experiment on success rate, center location error and execution time, is carried out to show a performance and efficiency upgrade over state-of-the-art TLD with partial TLD datasets and Shenzhou IX return capsule image sequences. The algorithm can be used in the field of video surveillance to meet the need of real-time video tracking.

  14. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  15. Multiple model adaptive tracking of airborne targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, John E.

    1988-12-01

    Over the past ten years considerable work has been accomplished at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) towards improving the ability of tracking airborne targets. Motivated by the performance advantages in using established models of tracking environment variables within a Kalman filter, an advanced tracking algorithm has been developed based on adaptive estimation filter structures. A multiple model bank of filters that have been designed for various target dynamics, which each accounting for atmospheric disturbance of the Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) sensor data and mechanical vibrations of the sensor platform, outperforms a correlator tracker. The bank of filters provides the estimation capability to guide the pointing mechanisms of a shared aperture laser/sensor system. The data is provided to the tracking algorithm via an (8 x 8)-pixel tracking Field of View (FOV) from the FLIR image plane. Data at each sample period is compared by an enhanced correlator to a target template. These offsets are measurements to a bank of linear Kalman filters which provide estimates of the target's location in azimuth and elevation coordinates based on a Gauss-Markov acceleration model, and a reduced form of the atmospheric jitter model for the disturbance in the IR wavefront carrying future measurements.

  16. Semiconductor Laser Tracking Frequency Distance Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James D.; Reasenberg, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced astronomical missions with greatly enhanced resolution and physics missions of unprecedented accuracy will require a spaceworthy laser distance gauge of substantially improved performance. The Tracking Frequency Gauge (TFG) uses a single beam, locking a laser to the measurement interferometer. We have demonstrated this technique with pm (10(exp -12) m) performance. We report on the version we are now developing based on space-qualifiable, fiber-coupled distributed-feedback semiconductor lasers.

  17. An input adaptive, pursuit tracking model of the human opertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Developed and evaluated is a simple model of the input adaptive behavior of the human operator (HO) in a pursuit tracking task in which the plant controlled consists of a pure gain. If it is assumed that the HO is approximately an optimal predictor using only position and velocity information, then there is a simple method of computing the values of the model parameters in terms of the autocorrelation function of the input signal. Experimental evidence indicates that the ability of the HO to use velocity information decreases with increasing signal velocity indicating that a biased estimator of the velocity weighting should be used. A suitable approximation is derived which has rapid convergence and low variance. The model thus derived is compared to actual subject transfer functions and is found to be in close agreement. In addition to tracking random processes the model can adapt to and track deterministic signals, such as sine waves, up to approximately the frequency at which human operators begin to track precognitively.

  18. Adaptive resource allocation architecture applied to line tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Mark W.; Pace, Donald W.

    2000-04-01

    Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of a multiple hypothesis, multiple model sonar line tracking solution, achieved at significant computational cost. We have developed an adaptive architecture that trades computational resources for algorithm complexity based on environmental conditions. A Fuzzy Logic Rule-Based approach is applied to adaptively assign algorithmic resources to meet system requirements. The resources allocated by the Fuzzy Logic algorithm include (1) the number of hypotheses permitted (yielding multi-hypothesis and single-hypothesis modes), (2) the number of signal models to use (yielding an interacting multiple model capability), (3) a new track likelihood for hypothesis generation, (4) track attribute evaluator activation (for signal to noise ratio, frequency bandwidth, and others), and (5) adaptive cluster threshold control. Algorithm allocation is driven by a comparison of current throughput rates to a desired real time rate. The Fuzzy Logic Controlled (FLC) line tracker, a single hypothesis line tracker, and a multiple hypothesis line tracker are compared on real sonar data. System resource usage results demonstrate the utility of the FLC line tracker.

  19. Objects tracking with adaptive correlation filters and Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros-Gallardo, Sergio E.; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Object tracking is commonly used for applications such as video surveillance, motion based recognition, and vehicle navigation. In this work, a tracking system using adaptive correlation filters and robust Kalman prediction of target locations is proposed. Tracking is performed by means of multiple object detections in reduced frame areas. A bank of filters is designed from multiple views of a target using synthetic discriminant functions. An adaptive approach is used to improve discrimination capability of the synthesized filters adapting them to multiple types of backgrounds. With the help of computer simulation, the performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated in terms of detection efficiency and accuracy of object tracking.

  20. Gradual adaptation to auditory frequency mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Svirsky, Mario A.; Talavage, Thomas M.; Sinha, Shivank; Neuburger, Heidi; Azadpour, Mahan

    2014-01-01

    What is the best way to help humans adapt to a distorted sensory input? Interest in this question is more than academic. The answer may help facilitate auditory learning by people who became deaf after learning language and later received a cochlear implant (a neural prosthesis that restores hearing through direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve). There is evidence that some cochlear implants (which provide information that is spectrally degraded to begin with) stimulate neurons with higher characteristic frequency than the acoustic frequency of the original stimulus. In other words, the stimulus is shifted in frequency with respect to what the listener expects to hear. This frequency misalignment may have a negative influence on speech perception by CI users. However, a perfect frequency-place alignment may result in the loss of important low frequency speech information. A trade-off may involve a gradual approach: start with correct frequency-place alignment to allow listeners to adapt to the spectrally degraded signal first, and then gradually increase the frequency shift to allow them to adapt to it over time. We used an acoustic model of a cochlear implant to measure adaptation to a frequency-shifted signal, using either the gradual approach or the “standard” approach (sudden imposition of the frequency shift). Listeners in both groups showed substantial auditory learning, as measured by increases in speech perception scores over the course of fifteen one-hour training sessions. However, the learning process was faster for listeners who were exposed to the gradual approach. These results suggest that gradual rather than sudden exposure may facilitate perceptual learning in the face of a spectrally degraded, frequency-shifted input. PMID:25445816

  1. Gradual adaptation to auditory frequency mismatch.

    PubMed

    Svirsky, Mario A; Talavage, Thomas M; Sinha, Shivank; Neuburger, Heidi; Azadpour, Mahan

    2015-04-01

    What is the best way to help humans adapt to a distorted sensory input? Interest in this question is more than academic. The answer may help facilitate auditory learning by people who became deaf after learning language and later received a cochlear implant (a neural prosthesis that restores hearing through direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve). There is evidence that some cochlear implants (which provide information that is spectrally degraded to begin with) stimulate neurons with higher characteristic frequency than the acoustic frequency of the original stimulus. In other words, the stimulus is shifted in frequency with respect to what the listener expects to hear. This frequency misalignment may have a negative influence on speech perception by CI users. However, a perfect frequency-place alignment may result in the loss of important low frequency speech information. A trade-off may involve a gradual approach: start with correct frequency-place alignment to allow listeners to adapt to the spectrally degraded signal first, and then gradually increase the frequency shift to allow them to adapt to it over time. We used an acoustic model of a cochlear implant to measure adaptation to a frequency-shifted signal, using either the gradual approach or the "standard" approach (sudden imposition of the frequency shift). Listeners in both groups showed substantial auditory learning, as measured by increases in speech perception scores over the course of fifteen one-hour training sessions. However, the learning process was faster for listeners who were exposed to the gradual approach. These results suggest that gradual rather than sudden exposure may facilitate perceptual learning in the face of a spectrally degraded, frequency-shifted input. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25445816

  2. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X.; Miller, Donald T.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  3. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography with dynamic retinal tracking.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Ferguson, R Daniel; Jonnal, Ravi S; Liu, Zhuolin; Wang, Qiang; Hammer, Daniel X; Miller, Donald T

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) is a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for three dimensional imaging of the microscopic retina. Like all in vivo retinal imaging techniques, however, it suffers the effects of involuntary eye movements that occur even under normal fixation. In this study we investigated dynamic retinal tracking to measure and correct eye motion at KHz rates for AO-OCT imaging. A customized retina tracking module was integrated into the sample arm of the 2nd-generation Indiana AO-OCT system and images were acquired on three subjects. Analyses were developed based on temporal amplitude and spatial power spectra in conjunction with strip-wise registration to independently measure AO-OCT tracking performance. After optimization of the tracker parameters, the system was found to correct eye movements up to 100 Hz and reduce residual motion to 10 µm root mean square. Between session precision was 33 µm. Performance was limited by tracker-generated noise at high temporal frequencies. PMID:25071963

  4. Robust adaptive tracking control for nonholonomic mobile manipulator with uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jinzhu; Yu, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, mobile manipulator is divided into two subsystems, that is, nonholonomic mobile platform subsystem and holonomic manipulator subsystem. First, the kinematic controller of the mobile platform is derived to obtain a desired velocity. Second, regarding the coupling between the two subsystems as disturbances, Lyapunov functions of the two subsystems are designed respectively. Third, a robust adaptive tracking controller is proposed to deal with the unknown upper bounds of parameter uncertainties and disturbances. According to the Lyapunov stability theory, the derived robust adaptive controller guarantees global stability of the closed-loop system, and the tracking errors and adaptive coefficient errors are all bounded. Finally, simulation results show that the proposed robust adaptive tracking controller for nonholonomic mobile manipulator is effective and has good tracking capacity. PMID:24917071

  5. Adaptive contrast imaging: transmit frequency optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménigot, Sébastien; Novell, Anthony; Voicu, Iulian; Bouakaz, Ayache; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Since the introduction of ultrasound (US) contrast imaging, the imaging systems use a fixed emitting frequency. However it is known that the insonified medium is time-varying and therefore an adapted time-varying excitation is expected. We suggest an adaptive imaging technique which selects the optimal transmit frequency that maximizes the acoustic contrast. Two algorithms have been proposed to find an US excitation for which the frequency was optimal with microbubbles. Methods and Materials: Simulations were carried out for encapsulated microbubbles of 2 microns by considering the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation for 2 MHz transmit frequency and for various pressure levels (20 kPa up to 420kPa). In vitro experiments were carried out using a transducer operating at 2 MHz and using a programmable waveform generator. Contrast agent was then injected into a small container filled with water. Results and discussions: We show through simulations and in vitro experiments that our adaptive imaging technique gives: 1) in case of simulations, a gain of acoustic contrast which can reach 9 dB compared to the traditional technique without optimization and 2) for in vitro experiments, a gain which can reach 18 dB. There is a non negligible discrepancy between simulations and experiments. These differences are certainly due to the fact that our simulations do not take into account the diffraction and nonlinear propagation effects. Further optimizations are underway.

  6. Adaptive modeling of compression hearing aids: Convergence and tracking issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Vijay; Jamieson, Donald

    2003-10-01

    Typical measurements of electroacoustic performance of hearing aids include frequency response, compression ratio, threshold and time constants, equivalent input noise, and total harmonic distortion. These measurements employ artificial test signals and do not relate well to perceptual indices of hearing aid performance. Speech-based electroacoustic measures provide means to quantify the real world performance of hearing aids and have been shown to correlate better with perceptual data. This paper investigates the application of system identification paradigm for deriving the speech-based measures, where the hearing aid is modeled as a linear time-varying system and its response to speech stimuli is predicted using a linear adaptive filter. The performance of three adaptive filtering algorithms, viz. the Least Mean Square (LMS), Normalized LMS, and the Affine Projection Algorithm (APA) was investigated using simulated and real digital hearing aids. In particular, the convergence and tracking behavior of these algorithms in modeling compression hearing aids was thoroughly investigated for a range of compression ratio and threshold parameters, and attack and release time constants. Our results show that the NLMS and APA algorithms are capable of modeling digital hearing aids under a variety of compression conditions, and are suitable for deriving speech-based metrics of hearing aid performance.

  7. Simple adaptive tracking control for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobtsov, Alexey; Faronov, Maxim; Kolyubin, Sergey; Pyrkin, Anton

    2014-12-01

    The problem of simple adaptive and robust control is studied for the case of parametric and dynamic dimension uncertainties: only the maximum possible relative degree of the plant model is known. The control approach "consecutive compensator" is investigated. To illustrate the efficiency of proposed approach an example with the mobile robot motion control using computer vision system is considered.

  8. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  9. GNSS triple-frequency geometry-free and ionosphere-free track-to-track ambiguities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Rothacher, Markus

    2015-06-01

    During the last few years, more and more GNSS satellites have become available sending signals on three or even more frequencies. Examples are the GPS Block IIF and the Galileo In-Orbit-Validation (IOV) satellites. Various investigations have been performed to make use of the increasing number of frequencies to find a compromise between eliminating different error sources and minimizing the noise level, including the investigations in the triple-frequency geometry-free (GF) and ionosphere-free (IF) linear combinations, which eliminate all the geometry-related errors and the first-order term of the ionospheric delays. In contrast to the double-difference GF and IF ambiguity resolution, the resolution of the so-called track-to-track GF and IF ambiguities between two tracks of a satellite observed by the same station only requires one receiver and one satellite. Most of the remaining errors like receiver and satellite delays (electronics, cables, etc.) are eliminated, if they are not changing rapidly in time, and the noise level is reduced theoretically by a factor of square root of two compared to double-differences. This paper presents first results concerning track-to-track ambiguity resolution using triple-frequency GF and IF linear combinations based on data from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) from April 29 to May 9, 2012 and from December 23 to December 29, 2012. This includes triple-frequency phase and code observations with different combinations of receiver tracking modes. The results show that it is possible to resolve the combined track-to-track ambiguities of the best two triple-frequency GF and IF linear combinations for the Galileo frequency triplet E1, E5b and E5a with more than 99.6% of the fractional ambiguities for the best linear combination being located within ± 0.03 cycles and more than 98.8% of the fractional ambiguities for the second best linear combination within ± 0.2 cycles, while the fractional parts of the ambiguities for the GPS

  10. Track and vertex reconstruction: From classical to adaptive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Strandlie, Are; Fruehwirth, Rudolf

    2010-04-15

    This paper reviews classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction in particle physics experiments. Adaptive methods have been developed to meet the experimental challenges at high-energy colliders, in particular, the CERN Large Hadron Collider. They can be characterized by the obliteration of the traditional boundaries between pattern recognition and statistical estimation, by the competition between different hypotheses about what constitutes a track or a vertex, and by a high level of flexibility and robustness achieved with a minimum of assumptions about the data. The theoretical background of some of the adaptive methods is described, and it is shown that there is a close connection between the two main branches of adaptive methods: neural networks and deformable templates, on the one hand, and robust stochastic filters with annealing, on the other hand. As both classical and adaptive methods of track and vertex reconstruction presuppose precise knowledge of the positions of the sensitive detector elements, the paper includes an overview of detector alignment methods and a survey of the alignment strategies employed by past and current experiments.

  11. An adaptive selective frequency damping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Bastien; Cotter, Colin; Sherwin, Spencer

    2015-03-01

    The selective frequency damping (SFD) method is used to obtain unstable steady-state solutions of dynamical systems. The stability of this method is governed by two parameters that are the control coefficient and the filter width. Convergence is not guaranteed for arbitrary choice of these parameters. Even when the method does converge, the time necessary to reach a steady-state solution may be very long. We present an adaptive SFD method. We show that by modifying the control coefficient and the filter width all along the solver execution, we can reach an optimum convergence rate. This method is based on successive approximations of the dominant eigenvalue of the flow studied. We design a one-dimensional model to select SFD parameters that enable us to control the evolution of the least stable eigenvalue of the system. These parameters are then used for the application of the SFD method to the multi-dimensional flow problem. We apply this adaptive method to a set of classical test cases of computational fluid dynamics and show that the steady-state solutions obtained are similar to what can be found in the literature. Then we apply it to a specific vortex dominated flow (of interest for the automotive industry) whose stability had never been studied before. Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission - ANADE project under Grant Contract PITN-GA-289428.

  12. Adaptive Jacobian Fuzzy Attitude Control for Flexible Spacecraft Combined Attitude and Sun Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chak, Yew-Chung; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2016-07-01

    Many spacecraft attitude control systems today use reaction wheels to deliver precise torques to achieve three-axis attitude stabilization. However, irrecoverable mechanical failure of reaction wheels could potentially lead to mission interruption or total loss. The electrically-powered Solar Array Drive Assemblies (SADA) are usually installed in the pitch axis which rotate the solar arrays to track the Sun, can produce torques to compensate for the pitch-axis wheel failure. In addition, the attitude control of a flexible spacecraft poses a difficult problem. These difficulties include the strong nonlinear coupled dynamics between the rigid hub and flexible solar arrays, and the imprecisely known system parameters, such as inertia matrix, damping ratios, and flexible mode frequencies. In order to overcome these drawbacks, the adaptive Jacobian tracking fuzzy control is proposed for the combined attitude and sun-tracking control problem of a flexible spacecraft during attitude maneuvers in this work. For the adaptation of kinematic and dynamic uncertainties, the proposed scheme uses an adaptive sliding vector based on estimated attitude velocity via approximate Jacobian matrix. The unknown nonlinearities are approximated by deriving the fuzzy models with a set of linguistic If-Then rules using the idea of sector nonlinearity and local approximation in fuzzy partition spaces. The uncertain parameters of the estimated nonlinearities and the Jacobian matrix are being adjusted online by an adaptive law to realize feedback control. The attitude of the spacecraft can be directly controlled with the Jacobian feedback control when the attitude pointing trajectory is designed with respect to the spacecraft coordinate frame itself. A significant feature of this work is that the proposed adaptive Jacobian tracking scheme will result in not only the convergence of angular position and angular velocity tracking errors, but also the convergence of estimated angular velocity to

  13. Adaptive optics with pupil tracking for high resolution retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Betul; Lamory, Barbara; Levecq, Xavier; Harms, Fabrice; Dainty, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive optics, when integrated into retinal imaging systems, compensates for rapidly changing ocular aberrations in real time and results in improved high resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. Imaging the retina at high resolution has numerous potential medical applications, and yet for the development of commercial products that can be used in the clinic, the complexity and high cost of the present research systems have to be addressed. We present a new method to control the deformable mirror in real time based on pupil tracking measurements which uses the default camera for the alignment of the eye in the retinal imaging system and requires no extra cost or hardware. We also present the first experiments done with a compact adaptive optics flood illumination fundus camera where it was possible to compensate for the higher order aberrations of a moving model eye and in vivo in real time based on pupil tracking measurements, without the real time contribution of a wavefront sensor. As an outcome of this research, we showed that pupil tracking can be effectively used as a low cost and practical adaptive optics tool for high resolution retinal imaging because eye movements constitute an important part of the ocular wavefront dynamics. PMID:22312577

  14. Memory recall and spike-frequency adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, James P.; Sander, Leonard M.; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain can reproduce memories from partial data; this ability is critical for memory recall. The process of memory recall has been studied using autoassociative networks such as the Hopfield model. This kind of model reliably converges to stored patterns that contain the memory. However, it is unclear how the behavior is controlled by the brain so that after convergence to one configuration, it can proceed with recognition of another one. In the Hopfield model, this happens only through unrealistic changes of an effective global temperature that destabilizes all stored configurations. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation (SFA), a common mechanism affecting neuron activation in the brain, can provide state-dependent control of pattern retrieval. We demonstrate this in a Hopfield network modified to include SFA, and also in a model network of biophysical neurons. In both cases, SFA allows for selective stabilization of attractors with different basins of attraction, and also for temporal dynamics of attractor switching that is not possible in standard autoassociative schemes. The dynamics of our models give a plausible account of different sorts of memory retrieval. PMID:27300910

  15. Memory recall and spike-frequency adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, James P.; Sander, Leonard M.; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-05-01

    The brain can reproduce memories from partial data; this ability is critical for memory recall. The process of memory recall has been studied using autoassociative networks such as the Hopfield model. This kind of model reliably converges to stored patterns that contain the memory. However, it is unclear how the behavior is controlled by the brain so that after convergence to one configuration, it can proceed with recognition of another one. In the Hopfield model, this happens only through unrealistic changes of an effective global temperature that destabilizes all stored configurations. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation (SFA), a common mechanism affecting neuron activation in the brain, can provide state-dependent control of pattern retrieval. We demonstrate this in a Hopfield network modified to include SFA, and also in a model network of biophysical neurons. In both cases, SFA allows for selective stabilization of attractors with different basins of attraction, and also for temporal dynamics of attractor switching that is not possible in standard autoassociative schemes. The dynamics of our models give a plausible account of different sorts of memory retrieval.

  16. Interference signal frequency tracking for extracting phase in frequency scanning interferometry using an extended Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Liu, Zhigang; Deng, Zhongwen; Tao, Long

    2016-04-10

    Optical frequency scanning nonlinearity seriously affects interference signal phase extraction accuracy in frequency-scanning interferometry systems using external cavity diode lasers. In this paper, an interference signal frequency tracking method using an extended Kalman filter is proposed. The interferometric phase is obtained by integrating the estimated instantaneous frequency over time. The method is independent of the laser's optical frequency scanning nonlinearity. The method is validated through simulations and experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the relative phase extraction error in the fractional part is <1.5% with the proposed method and the standard deviation of absolute distance measurement is <2.4  μm. PMID:27139864

  17. An adaptive tracking observer for failure-detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The design problem of adaptive observers applied to linear, constant and variable parameters, multi-input, multi-output systems, is considered. It is shown that, in order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate (FAR) under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable proper matching between the observer (or KF) model and the system parameters. An adaptive observer algorithm is introduced in order to maintain desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching and/or system parameter variations. Only a properly designed adaptive observer is able to detect abrupt changes in the system (actuator, sensor failures, etc.) with adequate reliability and FAR. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process were obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors and accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases.

  18. Unveiling adaptation using high-resolution lineage tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Jamie; Levy, Sasha; Fisher, Daniel; Petrov, Dmitri; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Human diseases such as cancer and microbial infections are adaptive processes inside the human body with enormous population sizes: between 106 -1012 cells. In spite of this our understanding of adaptation in large populations is limited. The key problem is the difficulty in identifying anything more than a handful of rare, large-effect beneficial mutations. The development and use of molecular barcodes allows us to uniquely tag hundreds of thousands of cells and enable us to track tens of thousands of adaptive mutations in large yeast populations. We use this system to test some of the key theories on which our understanding of adaptation in large populations is based. We (i) measure the fitness distribution in an evolving population at different times, (ii) identify when an appreciable fraction of clones in the population have at most a single adaptive mutation and isolate a large number of clones with independent single adaptive mutations, and (iii) use this clone collection to determine the distribution of fitness effects of single beneficial mutations.

  19. Remote tracking of a magnetic receiver using low frequency beacons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Ginzburg, Boris; Salomonski, Nizan; Frumkis, Lev; Kaplan, Ben-Zion

    2014-10-01

    Low frequency magnetic fields feature high penetration ability, which allows communication, localization, and tracking in environments where radio or acoustic waves are blocked or distorted by multipath interferences. In the present work, we propose a method for tracking a magnetic receiver using beacons of low frequency magnetic field, where the receiver includes a tri-axial search-coil magnetometer. Measuring the beacons’ magnetic fields and calculating the total-field signals enables localization without restrictions on magnetometer orientation, allowing on-the-move tracking. The total-field signals are used by a global search method, e.g., simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, to localize the receiver. The magnetic field produced by each beacon has a dipole structure and is governed by the beacon’s position and magnetic moment. We have investigated two different methods for estimating beacons’ magnetic moments prior to localization. The first method requires directional measurements, whereas for the second method the total-field signal is used. Effectiveness of these methods has been proved in numerous field tests. In the present work, we introduce a method for tracking a moving receiver by successive localizations. Using previous localization as a starting point of the search method for the next localization can reduce execution time and chances for divergence. The proposed method has been tested using numerous computer simulations. Successful system operation has been verified in field conditions. The good tracking capability together with simple implementation makes the proposed method attractive for real-time, low power field applications, such as mobile robots navigation.

  20. Adaptive tracking of maneuvering targets based on IR image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maybeck, Peter S.

    1989-06-01

    The capability of tracking dynamic targets from forward looking infrared (FLIR) measurements was improved substantially by replacing standard correlation trackers with adaptive extended Kalman filters or enhanced correlator/Kalman filter combinations. A tracker able to handle multiple hot-spot targets, in which digital and/or optical signal processing is employed on the FLIR data to identify the underlying target shape is investigated. Furthermore, multiple model adaptive filtering is investigated as a means of changing the field-of-view as well as the tracker bandwidth when target acceleration can vary over a wide range. Enhancements are developed and analyzed: (1) allowing some of the elemental filters within the adaptive algorithm to have rectangular fields-of-view and to be tuned for target dynamics that are harsher in one direction than others; (2) considering both Gauss-Markov acceleration models and constant turn-rate models for target dynamics; and (3) devising an initial target acquisition algorithm to remove important biases in the estimated target template to be used within the tracker. The performance potential of such a tracking algorithm is shown to be substantial.

  1. An adaptive multigrid model for hurricane track prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a simple numerical model for hurricane track prediction which uses a multigrid method to adapt the model resolution as the vortex moves. The model is based on the modified barotropic vorticity equation, discretized in space by conservative finite differences and in time by a Runge-Kutta scheme. A multigrid method is used to solve an elliptic problem for the streamfunction at each time step. Nonuniform resolution is obtained by superimposing uniform grids of different spatial extent; these grids move with the vortex as it moves. Preliminary numerical results indicate that the local mesh refinement allows accurate prediction of the hurricane track with substantially less computer time than required on a single uniform grid.

  2. Frequency encoded auditory display of the critical tracking task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of auditory displays for selected cockpit instruments was examined. In auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual compensatory displays of a vertical axis, critical tracking task were studied. The visual display encoded vertical error as the position of a dot on a 17.78 cm, center marked CRT. The auditory display encoded vertical error as log frequency with a six octave range; the center point at 1 kHz was marked by a 20-dB amplitude notch, one-third octave wide. Asymptotic performance on the critical tracking task was significantly better when using combined displays rather than the visual only mode. At asymptote, the combined display was slightly, but significantly, better than the visual only mode. The maximum controllable bandwidth using the auditory mode was only 60% of the maximum controllable bandwidth using the visual mode. Redundant cueing increased the rate of improvement of tracking performance, and the asymptotic performance level. This enhancement increases with the amount of redundant cueing used. This effect appears most prominent when the bandwidth of the forcing function is substantially less than the upper limit of controllability frequency.

  3. Characterizing DSN System Frequency Stability with Spacecraft Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, T.; Machuzak, R.; Bedrossian, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a recent effort in characterizing frequency stability performance of the ground system in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Unlike the traditional approach where performance is obtained from special calibration sessions that are both time consuming and require manual setup, the new method taps into the daily spacecraft tracking data. This method significantly increases the amount of data available for analysis, roughly by two orders of magnitude; making it possible to conduct trend analysis with reasonable confidence. Since the system is monitored daily, any significant variation in performance can be detected timely. This helps the DSN maintain its performance commitment to customers.

  4. Synchrony capture filterbank: auditory-inspired signal processing for tracking individual frequency components in speech.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Ramdas; Peddinti, Vijay Kumar; Cariani, Peter

    2013-06-01

    A processing scheme for speech signals is proposed that emulates synchrony capture in the auditory nerve. The role of stimulus-locked spike timing is important for representation of stimulus periodicity, low frequency spectrum, and spatial location. In synchrony capture, dominant single frequency components in each frequency region impress their time structures on temporal firing patterns of auditory nerve fibers with nearby characteristic frequencies (CFs). At low frequencies, for voiced sounds, synchrony capture divides the nerve into discrete CF territories associated with individual harmonics. An adaptive, synchrony capture filterbank (SCFB) consisting of a fixed array of traditional, passive linear (gammatone) filters cascaded with a bank of adaptively tunable, bandpass filter triplets is proposed. Differences in triplet output envelopes steer triplet center frequencies via voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs). The SCFB exhibits some cochlea-like responses, such as two-tone suppression and distortion products, and possesses many desirable properties for processing speech, music, and natural sounds. Strong signal components dominate relatively greater numbers of filter channels, thereby yielding robust encodings of relative component intensities. The VCOs precisely lock onto harmonics most important for formant tracking, pitch perception, and sound separation. PMID:23742379

  5. Adaptive sensing for target tracking in covert operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Patricia R.; Chong, Edwin K. P.

    2009-05-01

    Multisensor applications rely on effectively managing sensor resources. In particular, next-generation multifunctional agile radars demand innovative resource management techniques to achieve a common sensing goal while satisfying resource constraints. We consider an active sensing platform where multiple waveform-agile radars scan a hostile surveillance area for targets. A central controller adaptively selects which transmitters should be active and which waveforms should be transmitted. The controller's goal is to choose the sequence of (transmitter, waveform) pairs that yields the most accurate tracking estimate. We formulate this problem as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), and propose a novel "two-level" scheduling scheme that uses two distinct schedulers: (1) at the lower level, a myopic waveform scheduler; and (2) at the upper level, a non-myopic transmitter scheduler. Scheduling decisions at these two levels are carried out differently. While waveforms are updated at every radar scan, a new set of transmitters only becomes active if the overall tracking accuracy falls below a given threshold, or if the "detection risk" is exceeded, given by a limit on the number of consecutive scans during which a set of transmitters is active. By simultaneously exploiting myopic and non-myopic scheduling schemes, we benefit from trading off short-term for long-term performance, while maintaining low computational costs. Moreover, in certain situations, the myopic scheduling of waveforms at each radar scan improves on non-myopic actions taken in the past. Monte Carlo simulations are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed adaptive sensing scheme in a multitarget tracking setting.

  6. Optimal spectral tracking--adapting to dynamic regime change.

    PubMed

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Halliday, David M

    2011-01-30

    Real world data do not always obey the statistical restraints imposed upon them by sophisticated analysis techniques. In spectral analysis for instance, an ergodic process--the interchangeability of temporal for spatial averaging--is assumed for a repeat-trial design. Many evolutionary scenarios, such as learning and motor consolidation, do not conform to such linear behaviour and should be approached from a more flexible perspective. To this end we previously introduced the method of optimal spectral tracking (OST) in the study of trial-varying parameters. In this extension to our work we modify the OST routines to provide an adaptive implementation capable of reacting to dynamic transitions in the underlying system state. In so doing, we generalise our approach to characterise both slow-varying and rapid fluctuations in time-series, simultaneously providing a metric of system stability. The approach is first applied to a surrogate dataset and compared to both our original non-adaptive solution and spectrogram approaches. The adaptive OST is seen to display fast convergence and desirable statistical properties. All three approaches are then applied to a neurophysiological recording obtained during a study on anaesthetic monitoring. Local field potentials acquired from the posterior hypothalamic region of a deep brain stimulation patient undergoing anaesthesia were analysed. The characterisation of features such as response delay, time-to-peak and modulation brevity are considered. PMID:21115043

  7. Object tracking with adaptive HOG detector and adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Stefano; Paleari, Marco; Ariano, Paolo; Bona, Basilio

    2012-01-01

    Scenarios for a manned mission to the Moon or Mars call for astronaut teams to be accompanied by semiautonomous robots. A prerequisite for human-robot interaction is the capability of successfully tracking humans and objects in the environment. In this paper we present a system for real-time visual object tracking in 2D images for mobile robotic systems. The proposed algorithm is able to specialize to individual objects and to adapt to substantial changes in illumination and object appearance during tracking. The algorithm is composed by two main blocks: a detector based on Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) descriptors and linear Support Vector Machines (SVM), and a tracker which is implemented by an adaptive Rao-Blackwellised particle filter (RBPF). The SVM is re-trained online on new samples taken from previous predicted positions. We use the effective sample size to decide when the classifier needs to be re-trained. Position hypotheses for the tracked object are the result of a clustering procedure applied on the set of particles. The algorithm has been tested on challenging video sequences presenting strong changes in object appearance, illumination, and occlusion. Experimental tests show that the presented method is able to achieve near real-time performances with a precision of about 7 pixels on standard video sequences of dimensions 320 × 240.

  8. Precision targeting with a tracking adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Hodnett, Harvey M.; Imholte, Michelle L.; Kumru, Semih S.; McCall, Michelle N.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2006-02-01

    Precise targeting of retinal structures including retinal pigment epithelial cells, feeder vessels, ganglion cells, photoreceptors, and other cells important for light transduction may enable earlier disease intervention with laser therapies and advanced methods for vision studies. A novel imaging system based upon scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) with adaptive optics (AO) and active image stabilization was designed, developed, and tested in humans and animals. An additional port allows delivery of aberration-corrected therapeutic/stimulus laser sources. The system design includes simultaneous presentation of non-AO, wide-field (~40 deg) and AO, high-magnification (1-2 deg) retinal scans easily positioned anywhere on the retina in a drag-and-drop manner. The AO optical design achieves an error of <0.45 waves (at 800 nm) over +/-6 deg on the retina. A MEMS-based deformable mirror (Boston Micromachines Inc.) is used for wave-front correction. The third generation retinal tracking system achieves a bandwidth of greater than 1 kHz allowing acquisition of stabilized AO images with an accuracy of ~10 μm. Normal adult human volunteers and animals with previously-placed lesions (cynomolgus monkeys) were tested to optimize the tracking instrumentation and to characterize AO imaging performance. Ultrafast laser pulses were delivered to monkeys to characterize the ability to precisely place lesions and stimulus beams. Other advanced features such as real-time image averaging, automatic highresolution mosaic generation, and automatic blink detection and tracking re-lock were also tested. The system has the potential to become an important tool to clinicians and researchers for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

  9. Numerical modeling of seismic waves using frequency-adaptive meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinyin; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    An improved modeling algorithm using frequency-adaptive meshes is applied to meet the computational requirements of all seismic frequency components. It automatically adopts coarse meshes for low-frequency computations and fine meshes for high-frequency computations. The grid intervals are adaptively calculated based on a smooth inversely proportional function of grid size with respect to the frequency. In regular grid-based methods, the uniform mesh or non-uniform mesh is used for frequency-domain wave propagators and it is fixed for all frequencies. A too coarse mesh results in inaccurate high-frequency wavefields and unacceptable numerical dispersion; on the other hand, an overly fine mesh may cause storage and computational overburdens as well as invalid propagation angles of low-frequency wavefields. Experiments on the Padé generalized screen propagator indicate that the Adaptive mesh effectively solves these drawbacks of regular fixed-mesh methods, thus accurately computing the wavefield and its propagation angle in a wide frequency band. Several synthetic examples also demonstrate its feasibility for seismic modeling and migration.

  10. Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems

    DOEpatents

    Kerner, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

  11. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image field to be corrected at any retinal coordinates of interest in a field of >25 deg. AO performance was assessed by imaging individuals with a range of refractive errors. In most subjects, image contrast was measurable at spatial frequencies close to the diffraction limit. Closed-loop optical (hardware) tracking performance was assessed by comparing sequential image series with and without stabilization. Though usually better than 10 μm rms, or 0.03 deg, tracking does not yet stabilize to single cone precision but significantly improves average image quality and increases the number of frames that can be successfully aligned by software-based post-processing methods. The new optical interface allows the high-resolution imaging field to be placed anywhere within the wide field without requiring the subject to re-fixate, enabling easier retinal navigation and faster, more efficient AOSLO montage capture and stitching. PMID:21045887

  12. Adaptive tracking control for double-pendulum overhead cranes subject to tracking error limitation, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Menghua; Ma, Xin; Rong, Xuewen; Tian, Xincheng; Li, Yibin

    2016-08-01

    In a practical application, overhead cranes are usually subjected to system parameter uncertainties, such as uncertain payload masses, cable lengths, frictions, and external disturbances, such as air resistance. Most existing crane control methods treat the payload swing as that of a single-pendulum. However, certain types of payloads and hoisting mechanisms result in double-pendulum dynamics. The double-pendulum effects will make most existing crane control methods fail to work normally. Therefore, an adaptive tracking controller for double-pendulum overhead cranes subject to parametric uncertainties and external disturbances is developed in this paper. The proposed adaptive tracking control method guarantees that the trolley tracking error is always within a prior set of boundary conditions and converges to zero rapidly. The asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system's equilibrium point is assured by Lyapunov techniques and Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive tracking control method is robust with respect to system parametric uncertainties and external disturbances.

  13. Auditory frequency perception adapts rapidly to the immediate past.

    PubMed

    Alais, David; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Van der Burg, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Frequency modulation is critical to human speech. Evidence from psychophysics, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging suggests that there are neuronal populations tuned to this property of speech. Consistent with this, extended exposure to frequency change produces direction specific aftereffects in frequency change detection. We show that this aftereffect occurs extremely rapidly, requiring only a single trial of just 100-ms duration. We demonstrate this using a long, randomized series of frequency sweeps (both upward and downward, by varying amounts) and analyzing intertrial adaptation effects. We show the point of constant frequency is shifted systematically towards the previous trial's sweep direction (i.e., a frequency sweep aftereffect). Furthermore, the perception of glide direction is also independently influenced by the glide presented two trials previously. The aftereffect is frequency tuned, as exposure to a frequency sweep from a set centered on 1,000 Hz does not influence a subsequent trial drawn from a set centered on 400 Hz. More generally, the rapidity of adaptation suggests the auditory system is constantly adapting and "tuning" itself to the most recent environmental conditions. PMID:25522831

  14. Differential time scales of change to learning frequency structures of isometric force tracking.

    PubMed

    Studenka, Breanna E; King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple processes support the persistent (learning) and transient (adaptive) change in behavior over time. We investigated whether practice and rest influence similarly the learning and adaptation of slow and fast frequency structures in isometric force tracking of pathways that varied in their regularity. Participants practiced 25 trials on each of 5 days in either a constant force target or 1 with the 1/f distributional properties of brown or pink noise. There was a reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) as well as an increasing positive correlation between force output and the target pathway for all noise conditions over days. The spectral frequency analysis of force output and RMSE revealed task dependent outcomes of learning and adaptation as a function of the relatively slow (0-4 Hz) and fast (8-12 Hz) oscillatory time scales. These contrasting findings show that the persistent and transient properties of learning occur across different timescales and dimensions of behavior (force output and outcome-RMSE). PMID:24911014

  15. Multi-agent system for target-adaptive radar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Alan C.

    2012-06-01

    Sensor systems such as distributed sensor networks and radar systems are potentially agile - they have parameters that can be adjusted in real-time to improve the quality of data obtained for state-estimation and decision-making. The integration of such sensors with cyber systems involving many users or agents permits greater flexibility in choosing measurement actions. This paper considers the problem of selecting radar waveforms to minimize uncertainty about the state of a tracked target. Past work gave a tractable method for optimizing the choice of measurements when an accurate dynamical model is available. However, prior knowledge about a system is often not precise, for example, if the target under observation is an adversary. A multiple agent system is proposed to solve the problem in the case of uncertain target dynamics. Each agent has a different target model and the agents compete to explain past data and select the parameters of future measurements. Collaboration or competition between these agents determines which obtains access to the limited physical sensing resources. This interaction produces a self-aware sensor that adapts to changing information requirements.

  16. Self-Tuning Adaptive-Controller Using Online Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, W. W.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A real time adaptive controller was designed and tested successfully on a fourth order laboratory dynamic system which features very low structural damping and a noncolocated actuator sensor pair. The controller, implemented in a digital minicomputer, consists of a state estimator, a set of state feedback gains, and a frequency locked loop (FLL) for real time parameter identification. The FLL can detect the closed loop natural frequency of the system being controlled, calculate the mismatch between a plant parameter and its counterpart in the state estimator, and correct the estimator parameter in real time. The adaptation algorithm can correct the controller error and stabilize the system for more than 50% variation in the plant natural frequency, compared with a 10% stability margin in frequency variation for a fixed gain controller having the same performance at the nominal plant condition. After it has locked to the correct plant frequency, the adaptive controller works as well as the fixed gain controller does when there is no parameter mismatch. The very rapid convergence of this adaptive system is demonstrated experimentally, and can also be proven with simple root locus methods.

  17. Micro-miniature radio frequency transmitter for communication and tracking applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crutcher, R.I.; Emery, M.S.; Falter, K.G.; Nowlin, C.H.; Rochelle, J.M.; Clonts, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    A micro-miniature radio frequency (rf) transmitter has been developed and demonstrated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the rf transmitter development was to maximize the transmission distance while drastically shrinking the overall transmitter size, including antenna. Based on analysis and testing, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a 16-GHz gallium arsenide (GaAs) oscillator and integrated on-chip antenna was designed and fabricated using microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) technology. Details of the development and the results of various field tests will be discussed. The rf transmitter is applicable to covert surveillance and tracking scenarios due to its small size of 2.2 x 2.2 mm, including the antenna. Additionally, the 16-GHz frequency is well above the operational range of consumer-grade radio scanners, providing a degree of protection from unauthorized interception. Variations of the transmitter design have been demonstrated for tracking and tagging beacons, transmission of digital data, and transmission of real-time analog video from a surveillance camera. Preliminary laboratory measurements indicate adaptability to direct-sequence spread-spectrum transmission, providing a low probability of intercept and/or detection. Concepts related to law enforcement applications will be presented.

  18. Context dependence in complex adaptive landscapes: frequency and trait-dependent selection surfaces within an adaptive radiation of Caribbean pupfishes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H

    2016-06-01

    The adaptive landscape provides the foundational bridge between micro- and macroevolution. One well-known caveat to this perspective is that fitness surfaces depend on ecological context, including competitor frequency, traits measured, and resource abundance. However, this view is based largely on intraspecific studies. It is still unknown how context-dependence affects the larger features of peaks and valleys on the landscape which ultimately drive speciation and adaptive radiation. Here, I explore this question using one of the most complex fitness landscapes measured in the wild in a sympatric pupfish radiation endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas by tracking survival and growth of laboratory-reared F2 hybrids. I present new analyses of the effects of competitor frequency, dietary isotopes, and trait subsets on this fitness landscape. Contrary to expectations, decreasing competitor frequency increased survival only among very common phenotypes, whereas less common phenotypes rarely survived despite few competitors, suggesting that performance, not competitor frequency, shapes large-scale features of the fitness landscape. Dietary isotopes were weakly correlated with phenotype and growth, but did not explain additional survival variation. Nonlinear fitness surfaces varied substantially among trait subsets, revealing one-, two-, and three-peak landscapes, demonstrating the complexity of selection in the wild, even among similar functional traits. PMID:27130447

  19. Improved relocatable over-the-horizon radar detection and tracking using the maximum likelihood adaptive neural system algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I.; Webb, Virgil H.; Bradley, Scott R.; Hansen, Christopher A.

    1998-07-01

    An advanced detection and tracking system is being developed for the U.S. Navy's Relocatable Over-the-Horizon Radar (ROTHR) to provide improved tracking performance against small aircraft typically used in drug-smuggling activities. The development is based on the Maximum Likelihood Adaptive Neural System (MLANS), a model-based neural network that combines advantages of neural network and model-based algorithmic approaches. The objective of the MLANS tracker development effort is to address user requirements for increased detection and tracking capability in clutter and improved track position, heading, and speed accuracy. The MLANS tracker is expected to outperform other approaches to detection and tracking for the following reasons. It incorporates adaptive internal models of target return signals, target tracks and maneuvers, and clutter signals, which leads to concurrent clutter suppression, detection, and tracking (track-before-detect). It is not combinatorial and thus does not require any thresholding or peak picking and can track in low signal-to-noise conditions. It incorporates superresolution spectrum estimation techniques exceeding the performance of conventional maximum likelihood and maximum entropy methods. The unique spectrum estimation method is based on the Einsteinian interpretation of the ROTHR received energy spectrum as a probability density of signal frequency. The MLANS neural architecture and learning mechanism are founded on spectrum models and maximization of the "Einsteinian" likelihood, allowing knowledge of the physical behavior of both targets and clutter to be injected into the tracker algorithms. The paper describes the addressed requirements and expected improvements, theoretical foundations, engineering methodology, and results of the development effort to date.

  20. A Windowing Frequency Domain Adaptive Filter for Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng; Qiu, Xiaojun

    This letter proposes a windowing frequency domain adaptive algorithm, which reuses the filtering error to apply window function in the filter updating symmetrically. By using a proper window function to reduce the negative influence of the spectral leakage, the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the performance of the acoustic echo cancellation for speech signals.

  1. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Satyabrata; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  2. Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: From fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lindsay Margaret

    hundred milliwatts and are falling steadily as improvements are made, it is feasible to use energy harvesting to power WSNs. This research begins by presenting the results of a thorough survey of ambient vibrations in the machine room of a large campus building, which found that ambient vibrations are low frequency, low amplitude, time varying, and multi-frequency. The modeling and design of fixed-frequency micro scale energy harvesters are then presented. The model is able to take into account rotational inertia of the harvester's proof mass and it accepts arbitrary measured acceleration input, calculating the energy harvester's voltage as an output. The fabrication of the micro electromechanical system (MEMS) energy harvesters is discussed and results of the devices harvesting energy from ambient vibrations are presented. The harvesters had resonance frequencies ranging from 31 - 232 Hz, which was the lowest reported in literature for a MEMS device, and produced 24 pW/g2 - 10 nW/g2 of harvested power from ambient vibrations. A novel method for frequency modification of the released harvester devices using a dispenser printed mass is then presented, demonstrating a frequency shift of 20 Hz. Optimization of the MEMS energy harvester connected to a resistive load is then presented, finding that the harvested power output can be increased to several microwatts with the optimized design as long as the driving frequency matches the harvester's resonance frequency. A framework is then presented to allow a similar optimization to be conducted with the harvester connected to a synchronously switched pre-bias circuit. With the realization that the optimized energy harvester only produces usable amounts of power if the resonance frequency and driving frequency match, which is an unrealistic situation in the case of ambient vibrations which change over time and are not always known a priori, an adaptable-frequency energy harvester was designed. The adaptable-frequency

  3. Sparse time-frequency decomposition based on dictionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Thomas Y; Shi, Zuoqiang

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we propose a time-frequency analysis method to obtain instantaneous frequencies and the corresponding decomposition by solving an optimization problem. In this optimization problem, the basis that is used to decompose the signal is not known a priori. Instead, it is adapted to the signal and is determined as part of the optimization problem. In this sense, this optimization problem can be seen as a dictionary adaptation problem, in which the dictionary is adaptive to one signal rather than a training set in dictionary learning. This dictionary adaptation problem is solved by using the augmented Lagrangian multiplier (ALM) method iteratively. We further accelerate the ALM method in each iteration by using the fast wavelet transform. We apply our method to decompose several signals, including signals with poor scale separation, signals with outliers and polluted by noise and a real signal. The results show that this method can give accurate recovery of both the instantaneous frequencies and the intrinsic mode functions. PMID:26953172

  4. Specificity of the Human Frequency Following Response for Carrier and Modulation Frequency Assessed Using Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Hedwig E; Krugliak, Alexandra; Plack, Christopher J; Carlyon, Robert P

    2015-12-01

    The frequency following response (FFR) is a scalp-recorded measure of phase-locked brainstem activity to stimulus-related periodicities. Three experiments investigated the specificity of the FFR for carrier and modulation frequency using adaptation. FFR waveforms evoked by alternating-polarity stimuli were averaged for each polarity and added, to enhance envelope, or subtracted, to enhance temporal fine structure information. The first experiment investigated peristimulus adaptation of the FFR for pure and complex tones as a function of stimulus frequency and fundamental frequency (F0). It showed more adaptation of the FFR in response to sounds with higher frequencies or F0s than to sounds with lower frequency or F0s. The second experiment investigated tuning to modulation rate in the FFR. The FFR to a complex tone with a modulation rate of 213 Hz was not reduced more by an adaptor that had the same modulation rate than by an adaptor with a different modulation rate (90 or 504 Hz), thus providing no evidence that the FFR originates mainly from neurons that respond selectively to the modulation rate of the stimulus. The third experiment investigated tuning to audio frequency in the FFR using pure tones. An adaptor that had the same frequency as the target (213 or 504 Hz) did not generally reduce the FFR to the target more than an adaptor that differed in frequency (by 1.24 octaves). Thus, there was no evidence that the FFR originated mainly from neurons tuned to the frequency of the target. Instead, the results are consistent with the suggestion that the FFR for low-frequency pure tones at medium to high levels mainly originates from neurons tuned to higher frequencies. Implications for the use and interpretation of the FFR are discussed. PMID:26162415

  5. Temporal Adaptation to Audiovisual Asynchrony Generalizes Across Different Sound Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Navarra, Jordi; García-Morera, Joel; Spence, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The human brain exhibits a highly adaptive ability to reduce natural asynchronies between visual and auditory signals. Even though this mechanism robustly modulates the subsequent perception of sounds and visual stimuli, it is still unclear how such a temporal realignment is attained. In the present study, we investigated whether or not temporal adaptation generalizes across different auditory frequencies. In a first exposure phase, participants adapted to a fixed 220-ms audiovisual asynchrony or else to synchrony for 3 min. In a second phase, the participants performed simultaneity judgments (SJs) regarding pairs of audiovisual stimuli that were presented at different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and included either the same tone as in the exposure phase (a 250 Hz beep), another low-pitched beep (300 Hz), or a high-pitched beep (2500 Hz). Temporal realignment was always observed (when comparing SJ performance after exposure to asynchrony vs. synchrony), regardless of the frequency of the sound tested. This suggests that temporal recalibration influences the audiovisual perception of sounds in a frequency non-specific manner and may imply the participation of non-primary perceptual areas of the brain that are not constrained by certain physical features such as sound frequency. PMID:22615705

  6. Unscented fuzzy-controlled current statistic model and adaptive filtering for tracking maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongtao; Jing, Zhongliang; Hu, Shiqiang

    2006-12-01

    A novel adaptive algorithm for tracking maneuvering targets is proposed. The algorithm is implemented with fuzzy-controlled current statistic model adaptive filtering and unscented transformation. A fuzzy system allows the filter to tune the magnitude of maximum accelerations to adapt to different target maneuvers, and unscented transformation can effectively handle nonlinear system. A bearing-only tracking scenario simulation results show the proposed algorithm has a robust advantage over a wide range of maneuvers and overcomes the shortcoming of the traditional current statistic model and adaptive filtering algorithm.

  7. Frequency based design of modal controllers for adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Agapito, Guido; Battistelli, Giorgio; Mari, Daniele; Selvi, Daniela; Tesi, Alberto; Tesi, Pietro

    2012-11-19

    This paper addresses the problem of reducing the effects of wavefront distortions in ground-based telescopes within a "Modal-Control" framework. The proposed approach allows the designer to optimize the Youla parameter of a given modal controller with respect to a relevant adaptive optics performance criterion defined on a "sampled" frequency domain. This feature makes it possible to use turbulence/vibration profiles of arbitrary complexity (even empirical power spectral densities from data), while keeping the controller order at a moderate value. Effectiveness of the proposed solution is also illustrated through an adaptive optics numerical simulator. PMID:23187567

  8. Exoskeleton control for lower-extremity assistance based on adaptive frequency oscillators: adaptation of muscle activation and movement frequency.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ollinger, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a novel strategy for assisting the lower extremities based on adaptive frequency oscillators. Our aim is to use the control algorithm presented here as a building block for the control of powered lower-limb exoskeletons. The algorithm assists cyclic movements of the human extremities by synchronizing actuator torques with the estimated net torque exerted by the muscles. Synchronization is produced by a nonlinear dynamical system combining an adaptive frequency oscillator with a form of adaptive Fourier analysis. The system extracts, in real time, the fundamental frequency component of the net muscle torque acting on a specific joint. Said component, nearly sinusoidal in shape, is the basis for the assistive torque waveform delivered by the exoskeleton. The action of the exoskeleton can be interpreted as a virtual reduction in the mechanical impedance of the leg. We studied the ability of human subjects to adapt their muscle activation to the assistive torque. Ten subjects swung their extended leg while coupled to a stationary hip joint exoskeleton. The experiment yielded a significant decrease, with respect to unassisted movement, of the activation levels of an agonist/antagonist pair of muscles controlling the hip joint's motion, which suggests the exoskeleton control has potential for assisting human gait. A moderate increase in swing frequency was observed as well. We theorize that the increase in frequency can be explained by the impedance model of the assisted leg. Per this model, subjects adjust their swing frequency in order to control the amount of reduction in net muscle torque. PMID:25655955

  9. Tracking Jupiter at microwave frequencies after the 2009 impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; García-Miró, Cristina; Rizzo, Ricardo; Forster, James; Hofstadter, Mark; Dorcey, Ryan; Jauncey, David; de Pater, Imke; Baines, Graham; Sotuela, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    On 19 July 2009, amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley located near Canberra, Australia, discovered an anomalous dark feature near Jupiter's south pole. It was soon confirmed with additional observations that the new feature was an impact site created by an unknown object. The only other observed collision with Jupiter occurred 15 years earlier with the catastrophic impact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet (SL9). Unlike the well-predicted SL9 event, the biggest question to answer this time is whether the impact body was a comet or an asteroid. We started a campaign to track Jupiter at microwave frequencies with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), in Canberra, Goldstone (California), and Madrid, and the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) in California. A 34m DSN radio telescope at Goldstone was operated by students through GAVRT program. Our primary goal was first to detect molecular radio emissions possibly originating from cometary core components, such as OH, H2O, and NH3, and second to detect radio burst in non-thermal continuum emissions, as observed after the SL-9 impact 15 years ago. We used a 70m radio telescope in Canberra and another 70m in Madrid to search for molecular emissions at 1.6 GHz for OH, 22 GHz for water vapors, 23 GHz for ammonia. Several radio spectroscopy observing sessions have been successfully conducted from 23 July to 1 August. We also started continuum emission monitoring, mainly at 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz using 34m and 70m DSN telescopes and the ATA. At early stage of this still on-going monitoring, joint observations were conducted with two 34m telescopes in Canberra and the ATA on 30 July and 9 August in order to have long continuous time coverage and to check flux density scales using a common calibrator source. To highlight this campaign, on 22 November we undertook the Jupiter: Project 24 for the International Year of Astronomy. This campaign was over 24 hours of continuous observation of Jupiter using all three DSN complexes around the world. A couple

  10. Noise Reduction using Frequency Sub-Band Adaptive Spectral Subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David

    2000-01-01

    A frequency sub-band based adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to remove noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the estimate of the statistics of the noise. The statistics of the noise are estimated during time frames that do not contain speech. These statistics are used to determine if future time frames contain speech. During speech time frames, the algorithm determines which frequency sub-bands contain useful speech information and which frequency sub-bands contain only noise. The frequency sub-bands, which contain only noise, are subtracted off at a larger proportion so the noise does not compete with the speech information. Simulation results are presented.

  11. Robust time and frequency domain estimation methods in adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard Orville

    1987-01-01

    A robust identification method was developed for use in an adaptive control system. The type of estimator is called the robust estimator, since it is robust to the effects of both unmodeled dynamics and an unmeasurable disturbance. The development of the robust estimator was motivated by a need to provide guarantees in the identification part of an adaptive controller. To enable the design of a robust control system, a nominal model as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling uncertainty associated with this nominal model must be provided. Two estimation methods are presented for finding parameter estimates, and, hence, a nominal model. One of these methods is based on the well developed field of time-domain parameter estimation. In a second method of finding parameter estimates, a type of weighted least-squares fitting to a frequency-domain estimated model is used. The frequency-domain estimator is shown to perform better, in general, than the time-domain parameter estimator. In addition, a methodology for finding a frequency-domain bounding function on the disturbance is used to compute a frequency-domain bounding function on the additive modeling error due to the effects of the disturbance and the use of finite-length data. The performance of the robust estimator in both open-loop and closed-loop situations is examined through the use of simulations.

  12. Control of resonant frequencies in adaptive structures by prestressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baycan, Can M.; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1992-01-01

    The natural vibration frequencies of a structure can be affected by inducing stress in the structure. The success of this kind of control of the resonant frequencies of a truss structure depends on the geometry of the structure. It is shown that in adaptive truss structures the method is effective for vibrations in less stiff directions, such as the normal direction of the plane containing all of the bars of a node, suggesting its applicability for cable, membrane, and thin plate and shell structures.

  13. Experimental study of adaptive pointing and tracking for large flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.; Bayard, D. S.; Ih, C.; Wang, S. J.; Ahmed, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of adaptive pointing and tracking control for flexible spacecraft conducted on a complex ground experiment facility. The algorithm used in this study is based on a multivariable direct model reference adaptive control law. Several experimental validation studies were performed earlier using this algorithm for vibration damping and robust regulation, with excellent results. The current work extends previous studies by addressing the pointing and tracking problem. As is consistent with an adaptive control framework, the plant is assumed to be poorly known to the extent that only system level knowledge of its dynamics is available. Explicit bounds on the steady-state pointing error are derived as functions of the adaptive controller design parameters. It is shown that good tracking performance can be achieved in an experimental setting by adjusting adaptive controller design weightings according to the guidelines indicated by the analytical expressions for the error.

  14. Adaptive frequency estimation by MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhunen, Juha; Nieminen, Esko; Joutsensalo, Jyrki

    During the last years, the eigenvector-based method called MUSIC has become very popular in estimating the frequencies of sinusoids in additive white noise. Adaptive realizations of the MUSIC method are studied using simulated data. Several of the adaptive realizations seem to give in practice equally good results as the nonadaptive standard realization. The only exceptions are instantaneous gradient type algorithms that need considerably more samples to achieve a comparable performance. A new method is proposed for constructing initial estimates to the signal subspace. The method improves often dramatically the performance of instantaneous gradient type algorithms. The new signal subspace estimate can also be used to define a frequency estimator directly or to simplify eigenvector computation.

  15. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Dwight P; George, Sahara E; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-07-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%-80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  16. The Future of Hazardous Waste Tracking: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability and performance of various RFID technologies to track hazardous wastes and materials (HAZMAT) across international borders will be verified in the El Paso, Texas-Ciudad Juarez, Mexico area under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV)/Environmental and S...

  17. Time-frequency processing of track irregularities in high-speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jing; Lin, Jianhui; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Track irregularities are the main source of vehicle vibration. With the increase in the speed, the track irregularities have become a more significant issue of concerned. The axle box acceleration signals can be obtained for analyzing the track irregularities, but the signals are usually non-stationary and signal processing results are not normally satisfied with the ordinary way. Thus, time-frequency distribution analysis is proposed to use in this study. To minimize the cross-terms, a new method based on Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Cohen's class distribution has been developed and advanced. This approach has been tested with three typical simulation signals and then applied to analyze the track irregularities. The result is consistent with the result from track inspection cars. This indicates this new algorithm is suitable for analyzing the track irregularities. It can be applied in rail irregularity measurement to compensate some shortages of the track inspection cars.

  18. Adaptive optics enables three-dimensional single particle tracking at the sub-millisecond scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juette, Manuel F.; Rivera-Molina, Felix E.; Toomre, Derek K.; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-04-01

    We present the integration of an adaptive optics element into a feedback-driven single particle tracking microscope. Our instrument captures three-dimensional (3D) trajectories with down to 130 μs temporal resolution for dynamic studies on the nanoscale. Our 3D beam steering approach tracks particles over an axial range of >6 μm with ˜2 ms mechanical response times and isolates the sample from any tracking motion. Tracking of transport vesicles containing Alexa488-labeled transferrin glycoprotein in living cells demonstrates the speed and sensitivity of our instrument.

  19. Natural frequency identification of smart washer by using adaptive observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Okugawa, Masayuki

    2014-04-01

    Bolted joints are used in many machines/structures and some of them have been loosened during long time use, and unluckily these bolt loosening may cause a great accident of machines/structures system. These bolted joint, especially in important places, are main object of maintenance inspection. Maintenance inspection with human- involvement is desired to be improved owing to time-consuming, labor-intensive and high-cost. By remote and full automation monitoring of the bolt loosening, constantly monitoring of bolted joint is achieved. In order to detect loosening of bolted joints without human-involvement, applying a structural health monitoring technique and smart structures/materials concept is the key objective. In this study, a new method of bolt loosening detection by adopting a smart washer has been proposed, and the basic detection principle was discussed with numerical analysis about frequency equation of the system, was confirmed experimentally. The smart washer used in this study is in cantilever type with piezoelectric material, which adds the washer the self-sensing and actuation function. The principle used to detect the loosening of the bolts is a method of a bolt loosening detection noted that the natural frequency of a smart washer system is decreasing by the change of the bolt tightening axial tension. The feature of this proposed method is achieving to identify the natural frequency at current condition on demand by adopting the self-sensing and actuation function and system identification algorithm for varying the natural frequency depending the bolt tightening axial tension. A novel bolt loosening detection method by adopting adaptive observer is proposed in this paper. The numerical simulations are performed to verify the possibility of the adaptive observer-based loosening detection. Improvement of the detection accuracy for a bolt loosening is confirmed by adopting initial parameter and variable adaptive gain by numerical simulation.

  20. Mean-shift tracking algorithm based on adaptive fusion of multi-feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Xiao, Yanghui; Wang, Ende; Feng, Junhui

    2015-10-01

    The classic mean-shift tracking algorithm has achieved success in the field of computer vision because of its speediness and efficiency. However, classic mean-shift tracking algorithm would fail to track in some complicated conditions such as some parts of the target are occluded, little color difference between the target and background exists, or sudden change of illumination and so on. In order to solve the problems, an improved algorithm is proposed based on the mean-shift tracking algorithm and adaptive fusion of features. Color, edges and corners of the target are used to describe the target in the feature space, and a method for measuring the discrimination of various features is presented to make feature selection adaptive. Then the improved mean-shift tracking algorithm is introduced based on the fusion of various features. For the purpose of solving the problem that mean-shift tracking algorithm with the single color feature is vulnerable to sudden change of illumination, we eliminate the effects by the fusion of affine illumination model and color feature space which ensures the correctness and stability of target tracking in that condition. Using a group of videos to test the proposed algorithm, the results show that the tracking correctness and stability of this algorithm are better than the mean-shift tracking algorithm with single feature space. Furthermore the proposed algorithm is more robust than the classic algorithm in the conditions of occlusion, target similar with background or illumination change.

  1. Tracking word frequency effects through 130 years of sound change.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer B; Pierrehumbert, Janet B; Walker, Abby J; LaShell, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary New Zealand English has distinctive pronunciations of three characteristic vowels. Did the evolution of these distinctive pronunciations occur in all words at the same time or were different words affected differently? We analyze the changing pronunciation of New Zealand English in a large set of recordings of speakers born over a 130 year period. We show that low frequency words were at the forefront of these changes and higher frequency words lagged behind. A long-standing debate exists between authors claiming that high frequency words lead regular sound change and others claiming that there are no frequency effects. The leading role of low frequency words is surprising in this context. It can be elucidated in models of lexical processing that include detailed word-specific memories. PMID:25813345

  2. Dual baseline and frequency along-track interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) L-band along-track interferometer images currents and waves on the ocean surface. By modifying the operating procedure of this two antenna interferometer, a technique has been developed to enable interferometric measurements to be made simultaneously at two different baselines. The availability of such data allows measurement of the decorrelation process of the ocean in greater detail. The coherence time of the ocean surface can be measured at high resolution over large areas. In addition to the L-band interferometer, a C-band along-track interferometer has been developed. It allows C-band dual-baseline measurements to be made simultaneous with the L-band measurements. The dual-baseline technique and AIRSAR implementation are described, and some example data are presented.

  3. The research and application of visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine in target tracking field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuantao; Xu, Weihong; Kuang, Fangjun; Gao, Shangbing

    2013-01-01

    The efficient target tracking algorithm researches have become current research focus of intelligent robots. The main problems of target tracking process in mobile robot face environmental uncertainty. They are very difficult to estimate the target states, illumination change, target shape changes, complex backgrounds, and other factors and all affect the occlusion in tracking robustness. To further improve the target tracking's accuracy and reliability, we present a novel target tracking algorithm to use visual saliency and adaptive support vector machine (ASVM). Furthermore, the paper's algorithm has been based on the mixture saliency of image features. These features include color, brightness, and sport feature. The execution process used visual saliency features and those common characteristics have been expressed as the target's saliency. Numerous experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and timeliness of the proposed target tracking algorithm in video sequences where the target objects undergo large changes in pose, scale, and illumination. PMID:24363779

  4. Pedestrian tracking and navigation using an adaptive knowledge system based on neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota A.; Toth, Charles; Moafipoor, Shahram

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of the research presented here is to develop theoretical foundations and implementation algorithms, which integrate the Global Positioning System (GPS), micro-electromechanical inertial measurement unit (MEMS IMU), digital barometer, electronic compass, and human pedometry to provide navigation and tracking of military and rescue ground personnel. This paper discusses the design, implementation and the performance analyses of the personal navigator prototype, with a special emphasis on dead-reckoning (DR) navigation supported by the human locomotion model. The adaptive knowledge system, based on the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), is implemented to support this functionality. The knowledge system is trained during the GPS signal reception and is used to support navigation under GPS-denied conditions. The human locomotion parameters, step frequency (SF) and step length (SL), are extracted from GPS-timed impact switches (step frequency) and GPS/IMU data (step length), respectively, during the system calibration period. SL is correlated with several data types, such as acceleration, acceleration variation, SF, terrain slope, etc. that constitute the input parameters to the ANN-based knowledge system. The ANN-predicted SL, together with the heading information from the compass and gyro, support DR navigation. The current target accuracy of the system is 3-5 m CEP (circular error probable) 50%.

  5. Online tracking of instantaneous frequency and amplitude of dynamical system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank Pai, P.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a sliding-window tracking (SWT) method for accurate tracking of the instantaneous frequency and amplitude of arbitrary dynamic response by processing only three (or more) most recent data points. Teager-Kaiser algorithm (TKA) is a well-known four-point method for online tracking of frequency and amplitude. Because finite difference is used in TKA, its accuracy is easily destroyed by measurement and/or signal-processing noise. Moreover, because TKA assumes the processed signal to be a pure harmonic, any moving average in the signal can destroy the accuracy of TKA. On the other hand, because SWT uses a constant and a pair of windowed regular harmonics to fit the data and estimate the instantaneous frequency and amplitude, the influence of any moving average is eliminated. Moreover, noise filtering is an implicit capability of SWT when more than three data points are used, and this capability increases with the number of processed data points. To compare the accuracy of SWT and TKA, Hilbert-Huang transform is used to extract accurate time-varying frequencies and amplitudes by processing the whole data set without assuming the signal to be harmonic. Frequency and amplitude trackings of different amplitude- and frequency-modulated signals, vibrato in music, and nonlinear stationary and non-stationary dynamic signals are studied. Results show that SWT is more accurate, robust, and versatile than TKA for online tracking of frequency and amplitude.

  6. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs’ tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N0), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods. PMID:26805853

  7. An Adaptive INS-Aided PLL Tracking Method for GNSS Receivers in Harsh Environments.

    PubMed

    Cong, Li; Li, Xin; Jin, Tian; Yue, Song; Xue, Rui

    2016-01-01

    As the weak link in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal processing, the phase-locked loop (PLL) is easily influenced with frequent cycle slips and loss of lock as a result of higher vehicle dynamics and lower signal-to-noise ratios. With inertial navigation system (INS) aid, PLLs' tracking performance can be improved. However, for harsh environments with high dynamics and signal attenuation, the traditional INS-aided PLL with fixed loop parameters has some limitations to improve the tracking adaptability. In this paper, an adaptive INS-aided PLL capable of adjusting its noise bandwidth and coherent integration time has been proposed. Through theoretical analysis, the relation between INS-aided PLL phase tracking error and carrier to noise density ratio (C/N₀), vehicle dynamics, aiding information update time, noise bandwidth, and coherent integration time has been built. The relation formulae are used to choose the optimal integration time and bandwidth for a given application under the minimum tracking error criterion. Software and hardware simulation results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the adaptive tracking method can effectively improve the PLL tracking ability and integrated GNSS/INS navigation performance. For harsh environments, the tracking sensitivity is increased by 3 to 5 dB, velocity errors are decreased by 36% to 50% and position errors are decreased by 6% to 24% when compared with other INS-aided PLL methods. PMID:26805853

  8. Adaptive DFT-based fringe tracking and prediction at IOTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Edward; Pedretti, Ettore; Bregman, Jesse; Mah, Robert W.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2004-10-01

    An automatic fringe tracking system has been developed and implemented at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA). In testing during May 2002, the system successfully minimized the optical path differences (OPDs) for all three baselines at IOTA. Based on sliding window discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculations that were optimized for computational efficiency and robustness to atmospheric disturbances, the algorithm has also been tested extensively on off-line data. Implemented in ANSI C on the 266 MHz PowerPC processor running the VxWorks real-time operating system, the algorithm runs in approximately 2.0 milliseconds per scan (including all three interferograms), using the science camera and piezo scanners to measure and correct the OPDs. Preliminary analysis on an extension of this algorithm indicates a potential for predictive tracking, although at present, real-time implementation of this extension would require significantly more computational capacity.

  9. Adaptive DIT-Based Fringe Tracking and Prediction at IOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Pedretti, Ettore; Bregman, Jesse; Mah, Robert W.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic fringe tracking system has been developed and implemented at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA). In testing during May 2002, the system successfully minimized the optical path differences (OPDs) for all three baselines at IOTA. Based on sliding window discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculations that were optimized for computational efficiency and robustness to atmospheric disturbances, the algorithm has also been tested extensively on off-line data. Implemented in ANSI C on the 266 MHZ PowerPC processor running the VxWorks real-time operating system, the algorithm runs in approximately 2.0 milliseconds per scan (including all three interferograms), using the science camera and piezo scanners to measure and correct the OPDs. Preliminary analysis on an extension of this algorithm indicates a potential for predictive tracking, although at present, real-time implementation of this extension would require significantly more computational capacity.

  10. Segmentation of Tracking Sequences Using Dynamically Updated Adaptive Learning

    PubMed Central

    Michailovich, Oleg; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    The problem of segmentation of tracking sequences is of central importance in a multitude of applications. In the current paper, a different approach to the problem is discussed. Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm is implemented in conjunction with estimation of the dynamic parameters of moving objects represented by the tracking sequence. While the information on objects’ motion allows one to transfer some valuable segmentation priors along the tracking sequence, the segmentation allows substantially reducing the complexity of motion estimation, thereby facilitating the computation. Thus, in the proposed methodology, the processes of segmentation and motion estimation work simultaneously, in a sort of “collaborative” manner. The Bayesian estimation framework is used here to perform the segmentation, while Kalman filtering is used to estimate the motion and to convey useful segmentation information along the image sequence. The proposed method is demonstrated on a number of both computed-simulated and real-life examples, and the obtained results indicate its advantages over some alternative approaches. PMID:19004712

  11. Adaptive time-frequency parametrization of epileptic spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, Piotr J.

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals have proven to be a valuable tool in electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis and research, where it is believed that oscillatory phenomena play a crucial role in the brain’s information processing. This paper extends this paradigm to the nonoscillating structures such as the epileptic EEG spikes, and presents the advantages of their parametrization in general terms such as amplitude and half-width. A simple detector of epileptic spikes in the space of these parameters, tested on a limited data set, gives very promising results. It also provides a direct distinction between randomly occurring spikes or spike/wave complexes and rhythmic discharges.

  12. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients †

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  13. Adaptive Environmental Source Localization and Tracking with Unknown Permittivity and Path Loss Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Barış; Umay, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Accurate signal-source and signal-reflector target localization tasks via mobile sensory units and wireless sensor networks (WSNs), including those for environmental monitoring via sensory UAVs, require precise knowledge of specific signal propagation properties of the environment, which are permittivity and path loss coefficients for the electromagnetic signal case. Thus, accurate estimation of these coefficients has significant importance for the accuracy of location estimates. In this paper, we propose a geometric cooperative technique to instantaneously estimate such coefficients, with details provided for received signal strength (RSS) and time-of-flight (TOF)-based range sensors. The proposed technique is integrated to a recursive least squares (RLS)-based adaptive localization scheme and an adaptive motion control law, to construct adaptive target localization and adaptive target tracking algorithms, respectively, that are robust to uncertainties in aforementioned environmental signal propagation coefficients. The efficiency of the proposed adaptive localization and tracking techniques are both mathematically analysed and verified via simulation experiments. PMID:26690441

  14. Object Tracking Using Adaptive Covariance Descriptor and Clustering-Based Model Updating for Visual Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Snoussi, Hichem; Abdallah, Fahed

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for tracking an arbitrary object in video sequences for visual surveillance. The first contribution of this work is an automatic feature extraction method that is able to extract compact discriminative features from a feature pool before computing the region covariance descriptor. As the feature extraction method is adaptive to a specific object of interest, we refer to the region covariance descriptor computed using the extracted features as the adaptive covariance descriptor. The second contribution is to propose a weakly supervised method for updating the object appearance model during tracking. The method performs a mean-shift clustering procedure among the tracking result samples accumulated during a period of time and selects a group of reliable samples for updating the object appearance model. As such, the object appearance model is kept up-to-date and is prevented from contamination even in case of tracking mistakes. We conducted comparing experiments on real-world video sequences, which confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed approaches. The tracking system that integrates the adaptive covariance descriptor and the clustering-based model updating method accomplished stable object tracking on challenging video sequences. PMID:24865883

  15. Modelling the performance of USV manoeuvring and target tracking: an approach using frequency modulated continuous wave radar rotary system.

    PubMed

    Onunka, Chiemela; Nnadozie, Remigius Chidozie

    2013-12-01

    The performance of frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar in tracking targets is presented and analysed. Obstacle detection, target tracking and radar target tracking performance models are developed and were used to investigate and to propose ways of improving the autonomous motion of unmanned surface vehicle (USV). Possible factors affecting the performance of FMCW radar in tracking targets are discussed and analysed. PMID:23853743

  16. Fixed lag smoothers for carrier phase and frequency tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Hurd, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The application of fixed lag smoothing algorithms are presented for the problem of estimation of the phase and frequency of a sinusoidal carrier received in the presence of process noise and additive observation noise. A suboptimal structure consists of a phase-locked loop (PLL) followed by a post loop correction to the phase and frequency estimates. When the PLL is operating under a high signal-to-noise ratio, the phase detector is approximately linear, and the smoother equations then correspond to the optimal linear equations for an equivalent linear signal model. The performance of such a smoother can be predicted by the linear filtering theory. However, if the PLL is operating near the threshold region of the signal to noise ratio, the phase detector cannot be assumed to be linear. Then the actual performance of the smoother can significantly differ from that predicted by linear filtering theory. Both the theoretical and simulated performance of such smoothers derived on the basis of various models for the phase of frequency processes are presented.

  17. Fast frequency acquisition via adaptive least squares algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1986-01-01

    A new least squares algorithm is proposed and investigated for fast frequency and phase acquisition of sinusoids in the presence of noise. This algorithm is a special case of more general, adaptive parameter-estimation techniques. The advantages of the algorithms are their conceptual simplicity, flexibility and applicability to general situations. For example, the frequency to be acquired can be time varying, and the noise can be nonGaussian, nonstationary and colored. As the proposed algorithm can be made recursive in the number of observations, it is not necessary to have a priori knowledge of the received signal-to-noise ratio or to specify the measurement time. This would be required for batch processing techniques, such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT). The proposed algorithm improves the frequency estimate on a recursive basis as more and more observations are obtained. When the algorithm is applied in real time, it has the extra advantage that the observations need not be stored. The algorithm also yields a real time confidence measure as to the accuracy of the estimator.

  18. Signal Adaptive System for Space/Spatial-Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanović, Veselin N.; Jovanovski, Srdjan

    2010-12-01

    This paper outlines the development of a multiple-clock-cycle implementation (MCI) of a signal adaptive two-dimensional (2D) system for space/spatial-frequency (S/SF) signal analysis. The design is based on a method for improved S/SF representation of the analyzed 2D signals, also proposed here. The proposed MCI design optimizes critical design performances related to hardware complexity, making it a suitable system for real time implementation on an integrated chip. Additionally, the design allows the implemented system to take a variable number of clock cycles (CLKs) (the only necessary ones regarding desirable—2D Wigner distribution-presentation of autoterms) in different frequency-frequency points during the execution. This ability represents a major advantage of the proposed design which helps to optimize the time required for execution and produce an improved, cross-terms-free S/SF signal representation. The design has been verified by a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) circuit design, capable of performing S/SF analysis of 2D signals in real time.

  19. A wide range sigma—delta fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianjun, Wei; Hanjun, Jiang; Lingwei, Zhang; Jingjing, Dong; Fule, Li; Zhihua, Wang; Chun, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    A wide range fractional-N frequency synthesizer in 0.18 μm RF CMOS technology is implemented. A switched-capacitors bank LC-tank VCO and an adaptive frequency calibration technique are used to expand the frequency range. A 16-bit third-order sigma—delta modulator with dither is used to randomize the fractional spur. The active area is 0.6 mm2. The experimental results show the proposed frequency synthesizer consumes 4.3 mA from a single 1.8 V supply voltage except for buffers. The frequency range is 1.44-2.11 GHz and the frequency resolution is less than 0.4 kHz. The phase noise is -94 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz and -121 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz at the output of the prescaler with a loop bandwidth of approximately 120 kHz. The performance meets the requirements for the multi-band and multi-mode transceiver applications.

  20. Tracking electric field exposure levels through radio frequency dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, P.D.; Moore, M.R.; Rochelle, R.W.; Thomas, R.S.; Hess, R.A.; Hoffheins, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) dosimeter developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a portable, pocket-sized cumulative-dose recording device designed to detect and record the strengths and durations of electric fields present in the work areas of naval vessels. The device measures an integrated dose and records the electric fields that exceed the permissible levels set by the American National Standards Institute. Features of the rf dosimeter include a frequency range of 30 MHz to 10 GHz and a three-dimensional sensor. Data obtained with the rf dosimeter will be used to determine the ambient field-strength profile for shipboard personnel over an extended time. Readings are acquired and averaged over a 6-min period corresponding to the rise time of the core body temperature. These values are stored for up to 6 months, after which the data are transferred to a computer via the dosimeter's serial port. The rf dosimeter should increase knowledge of the levels of electric fields to which individuals are exposed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The Tracking Study: Description of a randomized controlled trial of variations on weight tracking frequency in a behavioral weight loss program

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Jennifer A.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Crow, Scott J.; Brelje, Kerrin L.; Pacanowski, Carly R.; Gavin, Kara L.; Smolenski, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence from behavioral weight control trials and community studies suggests that greater frequency of weighing oneself, or tracking weight, is associated with better weight outcomes. Conversely, it has also been suggested that frequent weight tracking may have a negative impact on mental health and outcomes during weight loss, but there are minimal experimental data that address this concern in the context of an active weight loss program. To achieve the long-term goal of strengthening behavioral weight loss programs, the purpose of this randomized controlled trial (the Tracking Study) is to test variations on frequency of self-weighing during a behavioral weight loss program, and to examine psychosocial and mental health correlates of weight tracking and weight loss outcomes. Three hundred thirty-nine overweight and obese adults were recruited and randomized to one of three variations on weight tracking frequency during a 12-month weight loss program with a 12-month follow-up: daily weight tracking, weekly weight tracking, or no weight tracking. The primary outcome is weight in kilograms at 24 months. The weight loss program integrates each weight tracking instruction with standard behavioral weight loss techniques (goal setting, self-monitoring, stimulus control, dietary and physical activity enhancements, lifestyle modifications); participants in weight tracking conditions were provided with wireless Internet technology (Wi-Fi-enabled digital scales and touchscreen personal devices) to facilitate weight tracking during the study. This paper describes the study design, intervention features, recruitment, and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the Tracking Study. PMID:25533727

  2. Stimulus change detection in phasic auditory units in the frog midbrain: frequency and ear specific adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ponnath, Abhilash; Hoke, Kim L.

    2013-01-01

    Neural adaptation, a reduction in the response to a maintained stimulus, is an important mechanism for detecting stimulus change. Contributing to change detection is the fact that adaptation is often stimulus specific: adaptation to a particular stimulus reduces excitability to a specific subset of stimuli, while the ability to respond to other stimuli is unaffected. Phasic cells (e.g., cells responding to stimulus onset) are good candidates for detecting the most rapid changes in natural auditory scenes, as they exhibit fast and complete adaptation to an initial stimulus presentation. We made recordings of single phasic auditory units in the frog midbrain to determine if adaptation was specific to stimulus frequency and ear of input. In response to an instantaneous frequency step in a tone, 28 % of phasic cells exhibited frequency specific adaptation based on a relative frequency change (delta-f = ±16 %). Frequency specific adaptation was not limited to frequency steps, however, as adaptation was also overcome during continuous frequency modulated stimuli and in response to spectral transients interrupting tones. The results suggest that adaptation is separated for peripheral (e.g., frequency) channels. This was tested directly using dichotic stimuli. In 45 % of binaural phasic units, adaptation was ear specific: adaptation to stimulation of one ear did not affect responses to stimulation of the other ear. Thus, adaptation exhibited specificity for stimulus frequency and lateralization at the level of the midbrain. This mechanism could be employed to detect rapid stimulus change within and between sound sources in complex acoustic environments. PMID:23344947

  3. Adaptive Neural Star Tracker Calibration for Precision Spacecraft Pointing and Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1996-01-01

    The Star Tracker is an essential sensor for precision pointing and tracking in most 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. In the interest (of) improving pointing performance by taking advantage of dramatic increases in flight computer power and memory anticipated over the next decade, this paper investigates the use of a neural net for adaptive in-flight calibration of the Star Tracker.

  4. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue. PMID:26600996

  5. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D.; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue. PMID:26600996

  6. Performance-Based Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control for Networked Industrial Processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Qiu, Jianbin; Yin, Shen; Gao, Huijun; Fan, Jialu; Chai, Tianyou

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the performance-based control design problem for double-layer networked industrial processes is investigated. At the device layer, the prescribed performance functions are first given to describe the output tracking performance, and then by using backstepping technique, new adaptive fuzzy controllers are designed to guarantee the tracking performance under the effects of input dead-zone and the constraint of prescribed tracking performance functions. At operation layer, by considering the stochastic disturbance, actual index value, target index value, and index prediction simultaneously, an adaptive inverse optimal controller in discrete-time form is designed to optimize the overall performance and stabilize the overall nonlinear system. Finally, a simulation example of continuous stirred tank reactor system is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:27168605

  7. Real-Time Tracking Framework with Adaptive Features and Constrained Labels.

    PubMed

    Li, Daqun; Xu, Tingfa; Chen, Shuoyang; Zhang, Jizhou; Jiang, Shenwang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel tracking framework with adaptive features and constrained labels (AFCL) to handle illumination variation, occlusion and appearance changes caused by the variation of positions. The novel ensemble classifier, including the Forward-Backward error and the location constraint is applied, to get the precise coordinates of the promising bounding boxes. The Forward-Backward error can enhance the adaptation and accuracy of the binary features, whereas the location constraint can overcome the label noise to a certain degree. We use the combiner which can evaluate the online templates and the outputs of the classifier to accommodate the complex situation. Evaluation of the widely used tracking benchmark shows that the proposed framework can significantly improve the tracking accuracy, and thus reduce the processing time. The proposed framework has been tested and implemented on the embedded system using TMS320C6416 and Cyclone Ⅲ kernel processors. The outputs show that achievable and satisfying results can be obtained. PMID:27618052

  8. H∞ Adaptive tracking control for switched systems based on an average dwell-time method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caiyun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the H∞ state tracking model reference adaptive control (MRAC) problem for a class of switched systems using an average dwell-time method. First, a stability criterion is established for a switched reference model. Then, an adaptive controller is designed and the state tracking control problem is converted into the stability analysis. The global practical stability of the error switched system can be guaranteed under a class of switching signals characterised by an average dwell time. Consequently, sufficient conditions for the solvability of the H∞ state tracking MRAC problem are derived. An example of highly manoeuvrable aircraft technology vehicle is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  9. Particle filter based visual tracking with multi-cue adaptive fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Anping; Jing, Zhongliang; Hu, Shiqiang

    2005-06-01

    To improve the robustness of visual tracking in complex environments such as: cluttered backgrounds, partial occlusions, similar distraction and pose variations, a novel tracking method based on adaptive fusion and particle filter is proposed in this paper. In this method, the image color and shape cues are adaptively fused to represent the target observation; fuzzy logic is applied to dynamically adjust each cue weight according to its associated reliability in the past frame; particle filter is adopted to deal with non-linear and non-Gaussian problems in visual tracking. The method is demonstrated to be robust to illumination changes, pose variations, partial occlusions, cluttered backgrounds and camera motion for a test image sequence.

  10. Adaptive back-stepping tracking control for rotor shaft tilting of active magnetically suspended momentum wheel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan-jin; Fang, Jian-cheng; Xiang, Biao; Wang, Chun-e

    2014-11-01

    Two-dimensional gyroscopic torque can be produced by tilting the rotor shaft of the active magnetically suspended momentum wheel. The nonlinear magnetic torque is analyzed and then an adaptive back-stepping tracking method is proposed to deal with the nonlinearity and uncertainty. The nonlinearity of magnetic torque is represented as bounded unknown uncertainty stiffness, and an adaptive law is proposed to estimate the stiffness. Combined with back-stepping method, the proposed method can deal with the uncertainty. This method is designed by Lyapunov stability theory to ensure the stability, and its effectiveness is validated by simulations and experiments. These results indicate that this method can realize higher tracking precision and faster tracking velocity than the conventional cross feedback method to provide high precision and wide bandwidth outputting torque. PMID:25104645

  11. Adaptive Failure Compensation for Aircraft Tracking Control Using Engine Differential Based Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Xidong; Tao, Gang; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft model that incorporates independently adjustable engine throttles and ailerons is employed to develop an adaptive control scheme in the presence of actuator failures. This model captures the key features of aircraft flight dynamics when in the engine differential mode. Based on this model an adaptive feedback control scheme for asymptotic state tracking is developed and applied to a transport aircraft model in the presence of two types of failures during operation, rudder failure and aileron failure. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the adaptive failure compensation scheme.

  12. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  13. Stress adaptation and low-frequency impedance of rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Peslin, R; Duvivier, C; Bekkari, H; Reichart, E; Gallina, C

    1990-09-01

    At transpulmonary pressures (Ptp) of 7-12 cmH2O, pressure-volume hysteresis of isolated cat lungs has been found to be 20-50% larger than predicted from their amount of stress adaptation (J. Hildebrandt, J. Appl. Physiol. 28: 365-372, 1970). This behavior is inconsistent with linear viscoelasticity and has been interpreted in terms of plastoelasticity. We have reinvestigated this phenomenon in isolated lungs from 12 Wistar rats by measuring 1) the changes in Ptp after 0.5-ml step volume changes (initial Ptp of 5 cmH2O) and 2) their response to sinusoidal pressure forcing from 0.01 to 0.67 Hz (2 cmH2O peak to peak, mean Ptp of 6 cmH2O). Stress adaptation curves were found to fit approximately Hildebrandt's logarithmic model [delta Ptp/delta V = A - B.log(t)] from 0.2 to 100 s, where delta V is the step volume change, A and B are coefficients, and t is time. A and B averaged 1.06 +/- 0.11 and 0.173 +/- 0.019 cmH2O/ml, respectively, with minor differences between stress relaxation and stress recovery curves. The response to sinusoidal forcing was characterized by the effective resistance (Re) and elastance (EL). Re decreased from 2.48 +/- 0.41 cmH2O.ml-1.s at 0.01 Hz to 0.18 +/- 0.03 cmH2O.ml-1.s at 0.5 Hz, and EL increased from 0.99 +/- 0.10 to 1.26 +/- 0.20 cmH2O/ml on the same frequency range. These data were analyzed with the frequency-domain version of the same model, complemented by a Newtonian resistance (R) to account for airway resistance: Re = R + B/ (9.2f) and EL = A + 0.25B + B . log 2 pi f, where f is the frequency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2246156

  14. Understanding Climate Adaptation on Public Lands in the Upper Midwest: Implications for Monitoring and Tracking Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt-Depies, Christine M.; Knoot, Tricia Gorby; Rissman, Adena R.; Sharp, Anthony K.; Martin, Karl J.

    2016-05-01

    There are limited examples of efforts to systematically monitor and track climate change adaptation progress in the context of natural resource management, despite substantial investments in adaptation initiatives. To better understand the status of adaptation within state natural resource agencies, we utilized and problematized a rational decision-making framework to characterize adaptation at the level of public land managers in the Upper Midwest. We conducted in-depth interviews with 29 biologists and foresters to provide an understanding of managers' experiences with, and perceptions of, climate change impacts, efforts towards planning for climate change, and a full range of actions implemented to address climate change. While the majority of managers identified climate change impacts affecting their region, they expressed significant uncertainty in interpreting those signals. Just under half of managers indicated planning efforts are underway, although most planning is remote from local management. Actions already implemented include both forward-looking measures and those aimed at coping with current impacts. In addition, cross-scale dynamics emerged as an important theme related to the overall adaptation process. The results hold implications for tracking future progress on climate change adaptation. Common definitions or measures of adaptation (e.g., presence of planning documents) may need to be reassessed for applicability at the level of public land managers.

  15. Understanding Climate Adaptation on Public Lands in the Upper Midwest: Implications for Monitoring and Tracking Progress.

    PubMed

    Anhalt-Depies, Christine M; Knoot, Tricia Gorby; Rissman, Adena R; Sharp, Anthony K; Martin, Karl J

    2016-05-01

    There are limited examples of efforts to systematically monitor and track climate change adaptation progress in the context of natural resource management, despite substantial investments in adaptation initiatives. To better understand the status of adaptation within state natural resource agencies, we utilized and problematized a rational decision-making framework to characterize adaptation at the level of public land managers in the Upper Midwest. We conducted in-depth interviews with 29 biologists and foresters to provide an understanding of managers' experiences with, and perceptions of, climate change impacts, efforts towards planning for climate change, and a full range of actions implemented to address climate change. While the majority of managers identified climate change impacts affecting their region, they expressed significant uncertainty in interpreting those signals. Just under half of managers indicated planning efforts are underway, although most planning is remote from local management. Actions already implemented include both forward-looking measures and those aimed at coping with current impacts. In addition, cross-scale dynamics emerged as an important theme related to the overall adaptation process. The results hold implications for tracking future progress on climate change adaptation. Common definitions or measures of adaptation (e.g., presence of planning documents) may need to be reassessed for applicability at the level of public land managers. PMID:26888074

  16. Observed-Based Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control for Switched Nonlinear Systems With Dead-Zone.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shaocheng; Sui, Shuai; Li, Yongming

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control is investigated for a class of uncertain switched nonlinear systems in strict-feedback form. The considered switched systems contain unknown nonlinearities, dead-zone, and immeasurable states. Fuzzy logic systems are utilized to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, a switched fuzzy state observer is designed and thus the immeasurable states are obtained by it. By applying the adaptive backstepping design principle and the average dwell time method, an adaptive fuzzy output-feedback tracking control approach is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all the variables in the closed-loop system are bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, and also that the system output can track a given reference signal as closely as possible. The simulation results are given to check the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25594991

  17. A quadrature demodulation method based on tracking the ultrasound echo frequency.

    PubMed

    Feng, Naizhang; Zhang, Jianqiu; Wang, Weiqi

    2006-12-22

    The ultrasound echo attenuation depends on frequency, propagating depth and tissue characteristics. Thus, the attenuation dependent on frequency results in a larger attenuation of high frequencies than lower when the wave propagates through the tissue. As a result, the central frequency of the echo generates the increasing downshift with the increasing of depth. In the traditional I/Q demodulation method, it is assumed that the central frequency of the echo is the same as the transmitting frequency and unchanged all time. The assumption directly causes that the acquired I/Q signals are not perfect baseband ones but biased due to the echo attenuation. In addition, the unreasonable assumption will keep the echo from getting better signal-to-noise ratio. A quadrature demodulation method based on tracking the ultrasound echo frequency is proposed in this paper. The method consists of the traditional I/Q demodulator, the frequency tracking module, the phase compensation module and the dynamic filtering module. The outputs of I/Q demodulator are biased. Autocorrelation technique is utilized in the frequency tracking unit to estimate the frequency bias according to the outputs of I/Q demodulator. The estimated bias feeds to the phase compensation unit which can eliminate the frequency bias by simple trigonometric function transform. The compensated signals feed to the dynamic filter and are further processed. The bandwidth of the dynamic filter decreases with the increasing of the depth, which makes the echo acquire better SNR in different depth. The efficiency of the proposed method is testified by both simulations and experiments. PMID:16860363

  18. Operational stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards. [analysis of equipment performance at NASA tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing various rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions for use in NASA tracking stations, about 55 unit-years of relative frequency measurements for averaging times from 10 to 10 to the 7th power have been accumulated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Statistics on the behavior of rubidium and cesium standards under controlled laboratory conditions have been published, but it was not known to what extent the lesser controlled environments of NASA tracking stations affected the performance of the standards. The purpose of this report is to present estimates of the frequency stability of rubidium and cesium frequency standards under operational conditions based on the data accumulated at GSFC.

  19. The analysis of frequency domain characteristics of emotional images in eye-tracking experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boqiang; Ma, Huimin; Wang, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Although recently eye-tracking method has been introduced into behavioral experiments based on dot-probe paradigm, some characteristics in eye-tracking data do not draw as much attention as traditional characteristics like reaction time. It is also necessary to associate eye-tracking data to characteristics of images shown in experiments. In this research, new variables, such as fixation length, times of fixation and times of eye movement, in eye-tracking data were extracted from a behavioral experiment based on dot probe paradigm. They were analyzed and compared to traditional reaction time. After the analysis of positive and negative scenery images, parameters such as hue frequency spectrum PAR (Peak to Average Ratio) were extracted and showed difference between negative and positive images. These parameters of emotional images could discriminate scenery images according to their emotions in an SVM classifier well. Besides, it was found that images' hue frequency spectrum PAR is obviously relevant to eye-tracking statistics. When the dot was on the negative side, negative images' hue frequency spectrum PAR and horizontal eye-jumps confirmed to hyperbolic distribution, while that of positive images was linear with horizontal eye-jumps. The result could help to explain the mechanism of human's attention and boost the study in computer vision.

  20. Spatial vision of the achromat: spatial frequency and orientation-specific adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, M W; Magnussen, S; Nordby, K

    1988-01-01

    1. The psychophysical technique of selective adaptation to stationary sine-wave gratings of varying spatial frequency and orientation was used to investigate the central processing of spatial information in the visual system of the complete achromat. 2. For adapting spatial frequencies of 1 and 2 cycles/deg, the spatial frequency and orientation selectivity of contrast threshold elevation is similar for achromatic and trichromatic vision. 3. For adapting frequencies below 1 cycle/deg, the achromat shows threshold elevations of normal magnitude with symmetrical spatial frequency and orientation tuning for adapting frequencies as low as 0.09 cycles/deg with 'bandwidth' estimates similar to those found at high frequencies in the trichromat. Below 0.66 cycles/deg no after-effect could be obtained in the trichromat, and the frequency tuning at 0.66 cycles/deg was skewed towards higher frequencies. 4. The interocular transfer of low-frequency adaptation in the achromat was 50%, which is the same value obtained at higher frequencies. 5. The time course of the decay of low spatial frequency adaptation in the achromat was similar to that found at higher frequencies. 6. Control experiments show no low-frequency adaptation in peripheral vision or in central vision in the dark-adapted trichromat indicating that low spatial frequency adaptation cannot be elicited through the rod system of the trichromat. 7. It is proposed that the observed range shift of adaptable spatial frequency mechanisms in the achromat's visual cortex is the result of an arrest at an early stage of sensory development. The visual cortex of the achromat is comparable, with respect to spatial processing, to that of the young, visually normal human infant. PMID:3261791

  1. Beam width and transmitter power adaptive to tracking system performance for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S; Kopeika, N S

    1997-08-20

    The basic free-space optical communication system includes at least two satellites. To communicate between them, the transmitter satellite must track the beacon of the receiver satellite and point the information optical beam in its direction. Optical tracking and pointing systems for free space suffer during tracking from high-amplitude vibration because of background radiation from interstellar objects such as the Sun, Moon, Earth, and stars in the tracking field of view or the mechanical impact from satellite internal and external sources. The vibrations of beam pointing increase the bit error rate and jam communication between the two satellites. One way to overcome this problem is to increase the satellite receiver beacon power. However, this solution requires increased power consumption and weight, both of which are disadvantageous in satellite development. Considering these facts, we derive a mathematical model of a communication system that adapts optimally the transmitter beam width and the transmitted power to the tracking system performance. Based on this model, we investigate the performance of a communication system with discrete element optical phased array transmitter telescope gain. An example for a practical communication system between a Low Earth Orbit Satellite and a Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite is presented. From the results of this research it can be seen that a four-element adaptive transmitter telescope is sufficient to compensate for vibration amplitude doubling. The benefits of the proposed model are less required transmitter power and improved communication system performance. PMID:18259455

  2. Evolutionary adaptive eye tracking for low-cost human computer interaction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Shin, Hak Chul; Sung, Won Jun; Khim, Sarang; Kim, Honglak; Rhee, Phill Kyu

    2013-01-01

    We present an evolutionary adaptive eye-tracking framework aiming for low-cost human computer interaction. The main focus is to guarantee eye-tracking performance without using high-cost devices and strongly controlled situations. The performance optimization of eye tracking is formulated into the dynamic control problem of deciding on an eye tracking algorithm structure and associated thresholds/parameters, where the dynamic control space is denoted by genotype and phenotype spaces. The evolutionary algorithm is responsible for exploring the genotype control space, and the reinforcement learning algorithm organizes the evolved genotype into a reactive phenotype. The evolutionary algorithm encodes an eye-tracking scheme as a genetic code based on image variation analysis. Then, the reinforcement learning algorithm defines internal states in a phenotype control space limited by the perceived genetic code and carries out interactive adaptations. The proposed method can achieve optimal performance by compromising the difficulty in the real-time performance of the evolutionary algorithm and the drawback of the huge search space of the reinforcement learning algorithm. Extensive experiments were carried out using webcam image sequences and yielded very encouraging results. The framework can be readily applied to other low-cost vision-based human computer interactions in solving their intrinsic brittleness in unstable operational environments.

  3. Globally stable control laws for the attitude maneuver problem - Tracking control and adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    An approach using a globally nonsingular representation is proposed for the attitude control problem of a rigid body. The attitude dynamics are described by the nonlinear Euler equation together with the nonlinear kinematic equations which relate a representation of attitude to the angular velocity of the body. When this approach is combined with an energy-motivated Lyapunov function, a large class of globally stable attitude control laws can be derived. This class includes model-independent tracking control, model-dependent tracking control, and adaptive control, allowing tradeoffs between controller complexity, attainable performance, and available model information.

  4. Adaptive multimode signal reconstruction from time–frequency representations

    PubMed Central

    Meignen, Sylvain; Oberlin, Thomas; Depalle, Philippe; Flandrin, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses methods for the adaptive reconstruction of the modes of multicomponent AM–FM signals by their time–frequency (TF) representation derived from their short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The STFT of an AM–FM component or mode spreads the information relative to that mode in the TF plane around curves commonly called ridges. An alternative view is to consider a mode as a particular TF domain termed a basin of attraction. Here we discuss two new approaches to mode reconstruction. The first determines the ridge associated with a mode by considering the location where the direction of the reassignment vector sharply changes, the technique used to determine the basin of attraction being directly derived from that used for ridge extraction. A second uses the fact that the STFT of a signal is fully characterized by its zeros (and then the particular distribution of these zeros for Gaussian noise) to deduce an algorithm to compute the mode domains. For both techniques, mode reconstruction is then carried out by simply integrating the information inside these basins of attraction or domains. PMID:26953184

  5. Adaptive multimode signal reconstruction from time-frequency representations.

    PubMed

    Meignen, Sylvain; Oberlin, Thomas; Depalle, Philippe; Flandrin, Patrick; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    This paper discusses methods for the adaptive reconstruction of the modes of multicomponent AM-FM signals by their time-frequency (TF) representation derived from their short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The STFT of an AM-FM component or mode spreads the information relative to that mode in the TF plane around curves commonly called ridges. An alternative view is to consider a mode as a particular TF domain termed a basin of attraction. Here we discuss two new approaches to mode reconstruction. The first determines the ridge associated with a mode by considering the location where the direction of the reassignment vector sharply changes, the technique used to determine the basin of attraction being directly derived from that used for ridge extraction. A second uses the fact that the STFT of a signal is fully characterized by its zeros (and then the particular distribution of these zeros for Gaussian noise) to deduce an algorithm to compute the mode domains. For both techniques, mode reconstruction is then carried out by simply integrating the information inside these basins of attraction or domains. PMID:26953184

  6. Stay tuned: active amplification tunes tree cricket ears to track temperature-dependent song frequency.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, Natasha; Pollack, Gerald; Mason, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Tree cricket males produce tonal songs, used for mate attraction and male-male interactions. Active mechanics tunes hearing to conspecific song frequency. However, tree cricket song frequency increases with temperature, presenting a problem for tuned listeners. We show that the actively amplified frequency increases with temperature, thus shifting mechanical and neuronal auditory tuning to maintain a match with conspecific song frequency. Active auditory processes are known from several taxa, but their adaptive function has rarely been demonstrated. We show that tree crickets harness active processes to ensure that auditory tuning remains matched to conspecific song frequency, despite changing environmental conditions and signal characteristics. Adaptive tuning allows tree crickets to selectively detect potential mates or rivals over large distances and is likely to bestow a strong selective advantage by reducing mate-finding effort and facilitating intermale interactions. PMID:27122007

  7. Odors Pulsed at Wing Beat Frequencies are Tracked by Primary Olfactory Networks and Enhance Odor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Shreejoy J.; Peters, Oakland J.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Kalwar, Faizan R.; Hatfield, Mandy N.; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Each down stroke of an insect's wings accelerates axial airflow over the antennae. Modeling studies suggest that this can greatly enhance penetration of air and air-born odorants through the antennal sensilla thereby periodically increasing odorant-receptor interactions. Do these periodic changes result in entrainment of neural responses in the antenna and antennal lobe (AL)? Does this entrainment affect olfactory acuity? To address these questions, we monitored antennal and AL responses in the moth Manduca sexta while odorants were pulsed at frequencies from 10–72 Hz, encompassing the natural wingbeat frequency. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis was used to identify entrainment of neural activity. Statistical analysis of PSDs indicates that the antennal nerve tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, at least 50% of AL local field potentials (LFPs) and between 7–25% of unitary spiking responses also tracked pulsed odor up to 30 Hz in a frequency-locked manner. Application of bicuculline (200 μM) abolished pulse tracking in both LFP and unitary responses suggesting that GABAA receptor activation is necessary for pulse tracking within the AL. Finally, psychophysical measures of odor detection establish that detection thresholds are lowered when odor is pulsed at 20 Hz. These results suggest that AL networks can respond to the oscillatory dynamics of stimuli such as those imposed by the wing beat in a manner analogous to mammalian sniffing. PMID:20407584

  8. Sensorless control of salient PMSM with adaptive integrator and resistance online identification using strong tracking filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaokang; Wu, Peijun; Ji, Jinhu; Li, Xuchun

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a sensorless control approach of salient PMSM with an online parameter identifier. Adaptive Integrator is proposed and utilised for the estimation of active flux and rotor position. As a result, integrator overflow caused by DC offset is avoided. Meanwhile, an online stator resistance identification algorithm using strong tracking filter is employed, and the identified stator resistance is fed back to the estimating algorithm. Thus, the estimating algorithm can calculate the rotor position correctly. Simulations and experimental results validate the feasibility of both adaptive integrator and the parameter identification method.

  9. Adaptive dynamic surface control for MIMO nonlinear time-varying systems with prescribed tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenliang; Lin, Yan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed for a class of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear time-varying systems. By fusing a bound estimation approach, a smooth function and a time-varying matrix factorisation, the obstacle caused by unknown time-varying parameters is circumvented. The proposed scheme is free of the problem of explosion of complexity and needs only one updated parameter at each design step. Moreover, all tracking errors can converge to predefined arbitrarily small residual sets with a prescribed convergence rate and maximum overshoot. Such features result in a simple adaptive controller which can be easily implemented in applications with less computational burden and satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  10. Robust adaptive tracking control of MIMO nonlinear systems in the presence of actuator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guiyuan; Ou, Linlin; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    Adaptive tracking control of a class of MIMO nonlinear system preceded by unknown hysteresis is investigated. Based on dynamic surface control, an adaptive robust control law is developed and compensators are designed to mitigate the influences of both the unknown bounded external uncertainties and the unknown Prandtl-Islinskii hysteresis. By adopting the low-pass filters, the explosion of complexity caused by tedious computation of the time derivatives of the virtual control laws is overcome. With the proposed control scheme, the closed-loop system is proved to be semi-globally ultimately bounded by the Lyapunov stability theory, and the output of the controlled system can track the desired trajectories with an arbitrarily small error. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  12. Adaptive control of piezoelectric fast steering mirror for high precision tracking application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geng; Rao, Changhui

    2015-03-01

    A piezoelectric fast steering mirror (PFSM) is a complex, strong coupling nonlinear system that integrates optics, mechanics, electrics, and control. Due to the existence of hysteresis nonlinearity, mechanical resonance, and all kinds of disturbances, precise tracking control of a PFSM is a challenging task. This paper presents a comprehensive study of modeling, controller design, and simulation evaluation for a PFSM system. First a general model of a PFSM system integrating mechanical dynamics, electrical dynamics, and hysteresis nonlinearity is proposed, and then a robust adaptive controller is developed under both unknown hysteresis nonlinearities and parameter uncertainties. The parameters needed directly in the formulation of the controller are adaptively estimated. The proposed control law ensures the uniform boundedness of all signals in the closed-loop system. Furthermore, a stability analysis of the control system is performed to guarantee that the output tracking error converges to zero asymptotically. Finally, simulation tests with different motion trajectories are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Adaptive H∞ nonlinear velocity tracking using RBFNN for linear DC brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ching-Chih; Chan, Cheng-Kain; Li, Yi Yu

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an adaptive H ∞ nonlinear velocity control for a linear DC brushless motor. A simplified model of this motor with friction is briefly recalled. The friction dynamics is described by the Lu Gre model and the online tuning radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used to parameterise the nonlinear friction function and un-modelled errors. An adaptive nonlinear H ∞ control method is then proposed to achieve velocity tracking, by assuming that the upper bounds of the ripple force, the changeable load and the nonlinear friction can be learned by the RBFNN. The closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly bounded using the Lyapunov stability theory. The feasibility and the efficacy of the proposed control are exemplified by conducting two velocity tracking experiments.

  14. Cardiac fiber tracking using adaptive particle filtering based on tensor rotation invariant in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanhui; Liu, Wanyu; Magnin, Isabelle E.; Zhu, Yuemin

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a non-invasive method currently available for cardiac fiber tracking. However, accurate and efficient cardiac fiber tracking is still a challenge. This paper presents a probabilistic cardiac fiber tracking method based on particle filtering. In this framework, an adaptive sampling technique is presented to describe the posterior distribution of fiber orientations by adjusting the number and status of particles according to the fractional anisotropy of diffusion. An observation model is then proposed to update the weight of particles by rotating diffusion tensor from the primary eigenvector to a given fiber orientation while keeping the shape of the tensor invariant. The results on human cardiac dMRI show that the proposed method is robust to noise and outperforms conventional streamline and particle filtering techniques.

  15. Frequency and timing system for the consolidated DSN and STDN tracking network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, R. C.; Johnson, D. E.; Kuhnle, P. F.

    1981-01-01

    The consolidation on the existing Deep Space Network (DSN) and colocated Goddard Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) stations into a multiple antenna array is discussed. Each site includes a signal processing center (SPC) centered in an array of four or five antennas each located within approximately 300 to 800 meters of the SPC. A central frequency and timing system (FTS) located in the SPC contains reference frequency, timing and time code generation, and distribution equipment for both the SPC and each antenna with its associated front end antenna control building. The reference frequency distribution and clock equipment are driven by a hydrogen maser as the prime frequency standard with cesium beam frequency standard as the secondary.

  16. An adaptive 6-DOF tracking method by hybrid sensing for ultrasonic endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Du, Chengyang; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi; Li, Junwei; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid sensing method for tracking an ultrasonic endoscope within the gastrointestinal (GI) track is presented, and the prototype of the tracking system is also developed. We implement 6-DOF localization by sensing integration and information fusion. On the hardware level, a tri-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, and a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) sensor array are attached at the end of endoscopes, and three symmetric cylindrical coils are placed around patients' abdomens. On the algorithm level, an adaptive fast quaternion convergence (AFQC) algorithm is introduced to determine the orientation by fusing inertial/magnetic measurements, in which the effects of magnetic disturbance and acceleration are estimated to gain an adaptive convergence output. A simplified electro-magnetic tracking (SEMT) algorithm for dimensional position is also implemented, which can easily integrate the AFQC's results and magnetic measurements. Subsequently, the average position error is under 0.3 cm by reasonable setting, and the average orientation error is 1° without noise. If magnetic disturbance or acceleration exists, the average orientation error can be controlled to less than 3.5°. PMID:24915179

  17. An Adaptive 6-DOF Tracking Method by Hybrid Sensing for Ultrasonic Endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chengyang; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi; Li, Junwei; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid sensing method for tracking an ultrasonic endoscope within the gastrointestinal (GI) track is presented, and the prototype of the tracking system is also developed. We implement 6-DOF localization by sensing integration and information fusion. On the hardware level, a tri-axis gyroscope and accelerometer, and a magnetic angular rate and gravity (MARG) sensor array are attached at the end of endoscopes, and three symmetric cylindrical coils are placed around patients' abdomens. On the algorithm level, an adaptive fast quaternion convergence (AFQC) algorithm is introduced to determine the orientation by fusing inertial/magnetic measurements, in which the effects of magnetic disturbance and acceleration are estimated to gain an adaptive convergence output. A simplified electro-magnetic tracking (SEMT) algorithm for dimensional position is also implemented, which can easily integrate the AFQC's results and magnetic measurements. Subsequently, the average position error is under 0.3 cm by reasonable setting, and the average orientation error is 1° without noise. If magnetic disturbance or acceleration exists, the average orientation error can be controlled to less than 3.5°. PMID:24915179

  18. Efficient integration of spectral features for vehicle tracking utilizing an adaptive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzkent, Burak; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Vodacek, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Object tracking in urban environments is an important and challenging problem that is traditionally tackled using visible and near infrared wavelengths. By inserting extended data such as spectral features of the objects one can improve the reliability of the identification process. However, huge increase in data created by hyperspectral imaging is usually prohibitive. To overcome the complexity problem, we propose a persistent air-to-ground target tracking system inspired by a state-of-the-art, adaptive, multi-modal sensor. The adaptive sensor is capable of providing panchromatic images as well as the spectra of desired pixels. This addresses the data challenge of hyperspectral tracking by only recording spectral data as needed. Spectral likelihoods are integrated into a data association algorithm in a Bayesian fashion to minimize the likelihood of misidentification. A framework for controlling spectral data collection is developed by incorporating motion segmentation information and prior information from a Gaussian Sum filter (GSF) movement predictions from a multi-model forecasting set. An intersection mask of the surveillance area is extracted from OpenStreetMap source and incorporated into the tracking algorithm to perform online refinement of multiple model set. The proposed system is tested using challenging and realistic scenarios generated in an adverse environment.

  19. Measuring and tracking the flow of climate change adaptation aid to the developing world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Simon D.; Kandlikar, Milind; Webber, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    The developed world has pledged to mobilize at least US 100 billion per year of ‘new’ and ‘additional’ funds by 2020 to help the developing world respond to climate change. Tracking this finance is particularly problematic for climate change adaptation, as there is no clear definition of what separates adaptation aid from standard development aid. Here we use a historical database of overseas development assistance projects to test the effect of different accounting assumptions on the delivery of adaptation finance to the developing countries of Oceania, using machine algorithms developed from a manual pilot study. The results show that explicit adaptation finance grew to 3%–4% of all development aid to Oceania by the 2008–2012 period, but that total adaptation finance could be as high as 37% of all aid, depending on potentially politically motivated assumptions about what counts as adaptation. There was also an uneven distribution of adaptation aid between countries facing similar challenges like Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, and the Federated States of Micronesia. The analysis indicates that data allowing individual projects to be weighted by their climate change relevance is needed. A robust and mandatory metadata system for all aid projects would allow multilateral aid agencies and independent third parties to perform their own analyses using different assumptions and definitions, and serve as a key check on international climate aid promises.

  20. Combined effects of frequency and layer removal on background track characteristics of ECE polycarbonate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Soltani, Zahra; Hakimi, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD) when electrochemically etched (ECE) provide excellent characteristics for registering relatively lower-LET charged particles (e.g. alphas, fast-neutron-induced recoils) for many health physics and ion detection applications.The layer removal method of PCTDs by ethylenediamine (EDA) developed in our laboratory reduces the background track (BGT) density significantly. The frequency of the applied electric field strongly affects the BGT density and diameter and thus affects the minimum detection limit (MDL). In order to study the combined effects of the frequency and layer removal on the BGT density and thus on the MDL, this research was conducted. The BGT density versus the layer thickness removed at frequencies up to 12 kHz decrease rapidly to about 10-20 μm above which they reach a minimum constant level, while the mean BGT diameter verses layer removed at all frequencies are constant with flat responses. On the other hand the BGT density and diameter versus frequency at different layers removed up to ~50 μm increase till 4 kHz above which they reach plateaus. The PCTDs with ~20 μm layer removal at frequencies up 1 to 2 kHz showed the lowest MDL. The results are presented and discussed.

  1. Fixed lag smoothing target tracking in clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Uzair; Shi, Yi Fang; Song, Taek Lyul

    2015-12-01

    A new method to smooth the target hybrid state with Gaussian mixture measurement likelihood-integrated track splitting (GMM-ITS) in the presence of clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) radar is proposed. This method smooths the target state at fixed lag N and considers all feasible multi-scan target existence sequences in the temporal window of scans in order to smooth the target hybrid state. The smoothing window can be of any length N. The proposed method to smooth the target hybrid state at fixed lag is also applied to the enhanced multiple model (EMM) tracking algorithm. Simulation results indicate that the performance of fixed lag smoothing GMM-ITS significantly improves false track discrimination and root mean square errors (RMSEs).

  2. Broadband lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper using self-induced auto-tracking filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Shiyuan; Luo, Sha; Yuan, Quan; Ma, Rui; Ge, Chunfeng; Yang, Tianxin

    2015-08-24

    We present a scheme to broaden the sweeping span of lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper (LSFS) by using self-induced auto-tracking filter (SIATF). It is based on spatial-hole-burning effect in unpumped erbium-doped fiber (EDF), equivalent to introducing a Bragg grating. This Bragg grating works as the SIAFT, tracks the frequency of the incident optical signal automatically. It broadens LSFS's sweeping span limited by the homogeneous broadening of EDF. The scheme is demonstrated experimentally that the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise is effectively suppressed meanwhile sweeping span of LSFS is enlarged. 12.48nm sweeping span within 3.5dB power change is obtained, which corresponds to 1.56THz sweeping span. PMID:26368187

  3. Practical Method of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Noel, Camille E.; Baker, Kenneth; Santanam, Lakshmi; Michalski, Jeff M.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have created an automated process using real-time tracking data to evaluate the adequacy of planning target volume (PTV) margins in prostate cancer, allowing a process of adaptive radiotherapy with minimal physician workload. We present an analysis of PTV adequacy and a proposed adaptive process. Methods and Materials: Tracking data were analyzed for 15 patients who underwent step-and-shoot multi-leaf collimation (SMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with uniform 5-mm PTV margins for prostate cancer using the Calypso Registered-Sign Localization System. Additional plans were generated with 0- and 3-mm margins. A custom software application using the planned dose distribution and structure location from computed tomography (CT) simulation was developed to evaluate the dosimetric impact to the target due to motion. The dose delivered to the prostate was calculated for the initial three, five, and 10 fractions, and for the entire treatment. Treatment was accepted as adequate if the minimum delivered prostate dose (D{sub min}) was at least 98% of the planned D{sub min}. Results: For 0-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, adequate treatment was obtained in 3 of 15, 12 of 15, and 15 of 15 patients, and the delivered D{sub min} ranged from 78% to 99%, 96% to 100%, and 99% to 100% of the planned D{sub min}. Changes in D{sub min} did not correlate with magnitude of prostate motion. Treatment adequacy during the first 10 fractions predicted sufficient dose delivery for the entire treatment for all patients and margins. Conclusions: Our adaptive process successfully used real-time tracking data to predict the need for PTV modifications, without the added burden of physician contouring and image analysis. Our methods are applicable to other uses of real-time tracking, including hypofractionated treatment.

  4. Selective visual scaling of time-scale processes facilitates broadband learning of isometric force frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2015-10-01

    The experiment investigated the effect of selectively augmenting faster time scales of visual feedback information on the learning and transfer of continuous isometric force tracking tasks to test the generality of the self-organization of 1/f properties of force output. Three experimental groups tracked an irregular target pattern either under a standard fixed gain condition or with selectively enhancement in the visual feedback display of intermediate (4-8 Hz) or high (8-12 Hz) frequency components of the force output. All groups reduced tracking error over practice, with the error lowest in the intermediate scaling condition followed by the high scaling and fixed gain conditions, respectively. Selective visual scaling induced persistent changes across the frequency spectrum, with the strongest effect in the intermediate scaling condition and positive transfer to novel feedback displays. The findings reveal an interdependence of the timescales in the learning and transfer of isometric force output frequency structures consistent with 1/f process models of the time scales of motor output variability. PMID:26041272

  5. Role of timbre and fundamental frequency in voice gender adaptation.

    PubMed

    Skuk, Verena G; Dammann, Lea M; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2015-08-01

    Prior adaptation to male (or female) voices causes androgynous voices to be perceived as more female (or male). Using a selective adaptation paradigm the authors investigate the relative impact of the vocal fold vibration rate (F0) and timbre (operationally in this paper as characteristics that differentiate two voices of the same F0 and loudness) on this basic voice gender aftereffect. TANDEM-STRAIGHT was used to morph between 10 pairs of male and female speakers uttering 2 different vowel-consonant-vowel sequences (20 continua). Adaptor stimuli had one parameter (either F0 or timbre) set at a clearly male or female level, while the other parameter was set at an androgynous level, as determined by an independent set of listeners. Compared to a control adaptation condition (in which both F0 and timbre were clearly male or female), aftereffects were clearly reduced in both F0 and timbre adaptation conditions. Critically, larger aftereffects were found after timbre adaptation (comprising androgynous F0) compared to F0 adaptation (comprising an androgynous timbre). Together these results suggest that timbre plays a larger role than F0 in voice gender adaptation. Finally, the authors found some evidence that individual differences among listeners reflect in part pre-experimental contact to male and female voices. PMID:26328731

  6. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  7. Tracking rhythmicity in nonstationary quasi-periodic biomedical signals using adaptive time-varying covariance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Jung, Ranu

    2002-07-01

    A time-varying covariance method for detecting and quantifying the evolution of rhythmicity (frequency) in persistently varying quasi-periodic nonstationary signals is presented. The basic method, evaluated using chirp signals, utilizes a shifting window of fixed length. A substantial reduction in estimation bias and variability are obtained by utilizing an adaptive window whose length is dependent on past frequency estimates. The adaptive window yields estimates that are comparable in accuracy to those obtained using high-resolution time-frequency representation but with lower computation requirements and the potential for on-line application. Finally, an example of the application of the method for analyzing a neural recording is also illustrated. PMID:11931864

  8. Tracking short-term auditory cortical plasticity during classical conditioning using frequency-tagged stimuli.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Nathan; Kostadinov, Branislav; Dohrmann, Katalin; Hartmann, Thomas; Schlee, Winfried

    2007-08-01

    Animal studies indicate that short-term plasticity during classical conditioning is a fast process. The temporal details of this process in humans are unknown. We employed amplitude-modulated tones in order to elicit the steady-state field (SSF). Conditioned stimulus (CS+) and CS- had a common low carrier frequency, however, differed in their high-frequency component. Low and high frequencies within one tone were modulated at 29 and 45 Hz, respectively. Mean fast Fourier transformation analysis of each single trial allowed extraction of the cortical response to these modulation frequencies, allowing to track cortical responses trial by trial. Mutilation pictures were used as unconditioned stimulus. Furthermore, heart rate and contingency awareness were assessed. Our main findings are the following: 1) A rapid (within 5 trials) enhancement of the amplitude of the high frequencies in contrast to the low frequency, while the high frequencies differentiated later (toward end of acquisition). This partially replicates rapid plasticity as shown before in animals. 2) Those participants who were less aware of the stimulus contingencies showed a relative heart rate acceleration and greater SSF increase to the CS+. This could possibly imply a stronger early amygdala activation in these participants, which then mediates the development of conditioning-related reorganization in auditory cortical areas. PMID:17053046

  9. Low-frequency vibration control of floating slab tracks using dynamic vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyang; Yang, Jizhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Longqing; Cai, Chengbiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to effectively and robustly suppress the low-frequency vibrations of floating slab tracks (FSTs) using dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). First, the optimal locations where the DVAs are attached are determined by modal analysis with a finite element model of the FST. Further, by identifying the equivalent mass of the concerned modes, the optimal stiffness and damping coefficient of each DVA are obtained to minimise the resonant vibration amplitudes based on fixed-point theory. Finally, a three-dimensional coupled dynamic model of a metro vehicle and the FST with the DVAs is developed based on the nonlinear Hertzian contact theory and the modified Kalker linear creep theory. The track irregularities are included and generated by means of a time-frequency transformation technique. The effect of the DVAs on the vibration absorption of the FST subjected to the vehicle dynamic loads is evaluated with the help of the insertion loss in one-third octave frequency bands. The sensitivities of the mass ratio of DVAs and the damping ratio of steel-springs under the floating slab are discussed as well, which provided engineers with the DVA's adjustable room for vibration mitigation. The numerical results show that the proposed DVAs could effectively suppress low-frequency vibrations of the FST when tuned correctly and attached properly. The insertion loss due to the attachment of DVAs increases as the mass ratio increases, whereas it decreases with the increase in the damping ratio of steel-springs.

  10. Spatial-frequency-contingent color aftereffects: adaptation with two-dimensional stimulus patterns.

    PubMed

    Webster, W R; Day, R H; Gillies, O; Crassini, B

    1992-01-01

    The spatial-frequency theory of vision has been supported by adaptation studies using checkerboards in which contingent color aftereffects (CAEs) were produced at fundamental frequencies oriented at 45 degrees to the edges. A replication of this study failed to produce CAEs at the orientation of either the edges or the fundamentals. Using a computer-generated display, no CAEs were produced by adaptation of a square or an oblique checkerboard. But when one type of checkerboard (4 cpd) was adapted alone, CAEs were produced on the adapted checkerboard and on sine-wave gratings aligned with the fundamental and third harmonics of the checkerboard spectrum. Adaptation of a coarser checkerboard (0.80 cpd) produced CAEs aligned with both the edges and the harmonic frequencies. With checkerboards of both frequencies, CAEs were also found on the other type of checkerboard that had not been adapted. This observation raises problems for any edge-detector theory of vision, because there was no adaptation to edges. It was concluded that spatial-frequency mechanisms are operating at both low- and high-spatial frequencies and that an edge mechanism is operative at lower frequencies. The implications of these results are assessed for other theories of spatial vision. PMID:1549426

  11. Adaptive beam tracking and steering via electrowetting-controlled liquid prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Chung-Lung

    2011-11-01

    We report an electrowetting-controlled optofluidic system for adaptive beam tracking and agile steering. With two immiscible fluids in a transparent cell, we can actively control the contact angle along the fluid-fluid-solid tri-junction line and hence the orientation of the fluid-fluid interface via electrowetting. The naturally formed meniscus between the two liquids can function as an optical prism. We have fabricated a liquid prism module with an aperture size of 10 mm × 10mm. With 1 wt. % KCl and 1 wt. % Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate added into deionized water, the orientation of the water-silicone oil interface has been modulated between -26° and 26° that can deflect and steer beam within the incidence angle of 0°-15°. The wide-range beam tracking and steering enables the liquid prism work as an electrowetting solar cell.

  12. Adaptive external torque estimation by means of tracking a Lyapunov function

    SciTech Connect

    Schaub, H.; Junkins, J.L.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    A real-time method is presented to adoptively estimate three-dimensional unmodeled external torques acting on a spacecraft. This is accomplished by forcing the tracking error dynamics to follow the Lyapunov function underlying the feedback control law. For the case where the external torque is constant, the tracking error dynamics are shown to converge asypmtotically. The methodology applies not only to the control law used in this paper, but can also be applied to most Lyapunov derived feedback control laws. The adaptive external torque estimation is very robust in the presence of measurement noise, since a numerical integration is used instead of a numerical differentiation. Spacecraft modeling errors, such as in the inertia matrix, are also compensated for by this method. Several examples illustrate the practical significance of these ideas.

  13. Adaptive beam tracking and steering via electrowetting-controlled liquid prism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, JT; Chen, CL

    2011-11-07

    We report an electrowetting-controlled optofluidic system for adaptive beam tracking and agile steering. With two immiscible fluids in a transparent cell, we can actively control the contact angle along the fluid-fluid-solid tri-junction line and hence the orientation of the fluid-fluid interface via electrowetting. The naturally formed meniscus between the two liquids can function as an optical prism. We have fabricated a liquid prism module with an aperture size of 10 mm -10mm. With 1 wt.% KCl and 1 wt.% Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate added into deionized water, the orientation of the water-silicone oil interface has been modulated between -26 degrees and 26 degrees that can deflect and steer beam within the incidence angle of 0 degrees-15 degrees. The wide-range beam tracking and steering enables the liquid prism work as an electrowetting solar cell. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi: 10.1063/1.3660578

  14. Spatial-frequency-contingent color aftereffects: adaptation with one-dimensional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Day, R H; Webster, W R; Gillies, O; Crassini, B

    1992-01-01

    The McCollough effect was shown to be spatial-frequency selective by Lovegrove and Over (1972) after adaptation with vertical colored square-wave gratings separated by 1 octave. Adaptation with slide-presented red and green vertical square-wave gratings separated by 1 octave failed to produce contingent color aftereffects (CAEs). However, when each of these gratings was adapted alone, strong CAEs were produced. Adaptation with vertical colored sine-wave gratings separated by 1 octave also failed to produce CAEs, but strong effects were produced by adaptation with each grating alone. By varying the spatial frequency of the test sine wave, CAEs were found to be tuned for spatial frequency at 2.85 octaves after adaptation of 4 cycles per degree (cpd) and at 2.30 octaves after adaptation of 8 cpd. Adaptation of both vertical and horizontal sine-wave gratings produced strong CAEs, with bandwidths ranging from 1.96 to 2.90 octaves and with lower adapting contrast producing weaker CAEs. These results indicate that the McCollough effect is more broadly tuned for spatial frequency than are simple adaptation effects. PMID:1549425

  15. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat.

    PubMed

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H T; de Boer, W Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  16. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat

    PubMed Central

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A.; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H. T.; de Boer, W. Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  17. A closed-loop system for frequency tracking of piezoresistive cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Zhang, Qing; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    A closed loop circuit capable of tracking resonant frequencies for MEMS-based piezoresistive cantilever resonators is developed in this work. The proposed closed-loop system is mainly based on a phase locked loop (PLL) circuit. In order to lock onto the resonant frequency of the resonator, an actuation signal generated from a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is locked to the phase of the input reference signal of the cantilever sensor. In addition to the PLL component, an instrumentation amplifier and an active low pass filter (LPF) are connected to the system for gaining the amplitude and reducing the noise of the cantilever output signals. The LPF can transform a rectangular signal into a sinusoidal signal with voltage amplitudes ranging from 5 to 10 V which are sufficient for a piezoactuator input (i.e., maintaining a large output signal of the cantilever sensor). To demonstrate the functionality of the system, a self-sensing silicon cantilever resonator with a built-in piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge is fabricated and integrated with the circuit. A piezoactuator is utilized for actuating the cantilever into resonance. Implementation of this closed loop system is used to track the resonant frequency of a silicon cantilever-based sensor resonating at 9.4 kHz under a cross-sensitivity test of ambient temperature. The changes of the resonant frequency are interpreted using a frequency counter connected to the system. From the experimental results, the temperature sensitivity and coefficient of the employed sensor are 0.3 Hz/°C and 32.8 ppm/°C, respectively. The frequency stability of the system can reach up to 0.08 Hz. The development of this system will enable real-time nanoparticle monitoring systems and provide a miniaturization of the instrumentation modules for cantilever-based nanoparticle detectors.

  18. Solar radiation reflectors adapted to track the incident rays of the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Sintes, J.F.

    1981-06-23

    A tracking solar radiation structure is described which includes a main support column and a plurality of secondary structures mounted on the main column with a series of reflecting surfaces on the secondary structures. The bearing column extends in an inclined plane and is rotatable about its axis. The secondary reflector structures are articulatedly connected to the bearing column and adapted to swing with respect to the bearing column around the axis of articulation. The bearing column is supported at its lower end on an appropriate base and at a section above its midpoint by a substantially flat structure perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the bearing column.

  19. Observation-driven adaptive differential evolution and its application to accurate and smooth bronchoscope three-dimensional motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Wan, Ying; He, Xiangjian; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes an observation-driven adaptive differential evolution algorithm that fuses bronchoscopic video sequences, electromagnetic sensor measurements, and computed tomography images for accurate and smooth bronchoscope three-dimensional motion tracking. Currently an electromagnetic tracker with a position sensor fixed at the bronchoscope tip is commonly used to estimate bronchoscope movements. The large tracking error from directly using sensor measurements, which may be deteriorated heavily by patient respiratory motion and the magnetic field distortion of the tracker, limits clinical applications. How to effectively use sensor measurements for precise and stable bronchoscope electromagnetic tracking remains challenging. We here exploit an observation-driven adaptive differential evolution framework to address such a challenge and boost the tracking accuracy and smoothness. In our framework, two advantageous points are distinguished from other adaptive differential evolution methods: (1) the current observation including sensor measurements and bronchoscopic video images is used in the mutation equation and the fitness computation, respectively and (2) the mutation factor and the crossover rate are determined adaptively on the basis of the current image observation. The experimental results demonstrate that our framework provides much more accurate and smooth bronchoscope tracking than the state-of-the-art methods. Our approach reduces the tracking error from 3.96 to 2.89 mm, improves the tracking smoothness from 4.08 to 1.62 mm, and increases the visual quality from 0.707 to 0.741. PMID:25660001

  20. An Adaptive Particle Filtering Approach to Tracking Modes in a Varying Shallow Ocean Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2011-03-22

    The shallow ocean environment is ever changing mostly due to temperature variations in its upper layers (< 100m) directly affecting sound propagation throughout. The need to develop processors that are capable of tracking these changes implies a stochastic as well as an 'adaptive' design. The stochastic requirement follows directly from the multitude of variations created by uncertain parameters and noise. Some work has been accomplished in this area, but the stochastic nature was constrained to Gaussian uncertainties. It has been clear for a long time that this constraint was not particularly realistic leading a Bayesian approach that enables the representation of any uncertainty distribution. Sequential Bayesian techniques enable a class of processors capable of performing in an uncertain, nonstationary (varying statistics), non-Gaussian, variable shallow ocean. In this paper adaptive processors providing enhanced signals for acoustic hydrophonemeasurements on a vertical array as well as enhanced modal function estimates are developed. Synthetic data is provided to demonstrate that this approach is viable.

  1. Frequency-specific adaptation and its underlying circuit model in the auditory midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Zhao, Lingyun; Hong, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Receptive fields of sensory neurons are considered to be dynamic and depend on the stimulus history. In the auditory system, evidence of dynamic frequency-receptive fields has been found following stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). However, the underlying mechanism and circuitry of SSA have not been fully elucidated. Here, we studied how frequency-receptive fields of neurons in rat inferior colliculus (IC) changed when exposed to a biased tone sequence. Pure tone with one specific frequency (adaptor) was presented markedly more often than others. The adapted tuning was compared with the original tuning measured with an unbiased sequence. We found inhomogeneous changes in frequency tuning in IC, exhibiting a center-surround pattern with respect to the neuron's best frequency. Central adaptors elicited strong suppressive and repulsive changes while flank adaptors induced facilitative and attractive changes. Moreover, we proposed a two-layer model of the underlying network, which not only reproduced the adaptive changes in the receptive fields but also predicted novelty responses to oddball sequences. These results suggest that frequency-specific adaptation in auditory midbrain can be accounted for by an adapted frequency channel and its lateral spreading of adaptation, which shed light on the organization of the underlying circuitry. PMID:26483641

  2. Exponential parameter and tracking error convergence guarantees for adaptive controllers without persistency of excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Girish; Mühlegg, Maximilian; Johnson, Eric

    2014-08-01

    In model reference adaptive control (MRAC) the modelling uncertainty is often assumed to be parameterised with time-invariant unknown ideal parameters. The convergence of parameters of the adaptive element to these ideal parameters is beneficial, as it guarantees exponential stability, and makes an online learned model of the system available. Most MRAC methods, however, require persistent excitation of the states to guarantee that the adaptive parameters converge to the ideal values. Enforcing PE may be resource intensive and often infeasible in practice. This paper presents theoretical analysis and illustrative examples of an adaptive control method that leverages the increasing ability to record and process data online by using specifically selected and online recorded data concurrently with instantaneous data for adaptation. It is shown that when the system uncertainty can be modelled as a combination of known nonlinear bases, simultaneous exponential tracking and parameter error convergence can be guaranteed if the system states are exciting over finite intervals such that rich data can be recorded online; PE is not required. Furthermore, the rate of convergence is directly proportional to the minimum singular value of the matrix containing online recorded data. Consequently, an online algorithm to record and forget data is presented and its effects on the resulting switched closed-loop dynamics are analysed. It is also shown that when radial basis function neural networks (NNs) are used as adaptive elements, the method guarantees exponential convergence of the NN parameters to a compact neighbourhood of their ideal values without requiring PE. Flight test results on a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Characteristics of Bayesian multiple model adaptive estimation for tracking airborne targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzer, A. S.

    1985-12-01

    Previous studies at the Air Force Institute of Technology have led to the development of a multiple model adaptive filter (MMAF) tracking algorithm which provides significant improvements in tracker performance against highly-dynamic airborne targets over the currently used correlation trackers. A forward looking infra-red (FLIR) sensor is used to provide a target shape function to the tracking algorithm in the form of an 8 x 8 array of intensities projected onto a field of view (FOV). This target image measurement is correlated with an estimate of the target image template, to produce linear offset pseudo-measurements from the center of the FOV, which are provided as measurements to a bank of linear Kalman filters, in the multiple model adaptive filtering (MMAF) structure. The output of the MMAF provides the state estimates used in pointing the FLIR sensor, and generating the new target image estimate. This study investigates the characteristics of this algorithm in order to evaluate its performance against various target scenarios.

  4. Performance Enhancement for a GPS Vector-Tracking Loop Utilizing an Adaptive Iterated Extended Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyuan; Wang, Xiying; Xu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of state estimation for the vector-tracking loop of a software-defined Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. For a nonlinear system that has the model error and white Gaussian noise, a noise statistics estimator is used to estimate the model error, and based on this, a modified iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF) named adaptive iterated Kalman filter (AIEKF) is proposed. A vector-tracking GPS receiver utilizing AIEKF is implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Through road tests, it is shown that the proposed method has an obvious accuracy advantage over the IEKF and Adaptive Extended Kalman filter (AEKF) in position determination. The results show that the proposed method is effective to reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of position (including longitude, latitude and altitude). Comparing with EKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 45.1%, 40.9% and 54.6% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Comparing with IEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 25.7%, 19.3% and 35.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. Compared with AEKF, the position RMSE values of AIEKF are reduced by about 21.6%, 15.5% and 30.7% in the east, north and up directions, respectively. PMID:25502124

  5. Modified fast frequency acquisition via adaptive least squares algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and the associated apparatus for estimating the amplitude, frequency, and phase of a signal of interest are presented. The method comprises the following steps: (1) inputting the signal of interest; (2) generating a reference signal with adjustable amplitude, frequency and phase at an output thereof; (3) mixing the signal of interest with the reference signal and a signal 90 deg out of phase with the reference signal to provide a pair of quadrature sample signals comprising respectively a difference between the signal of interest and the reference signal and a difference between the signal of interest and the signal 90 deg out of phase with the reference signal; (4) using the pair of quadrature sample signals to compute estimates of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of an error signal comprising the difference between the signal of interest and the reference signal employing a least squares estimation; (5) adjusting the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the reference signal from the numerically controlled oscillator in a manner which drives the error signal towards zero; and (6) outputting the estimates of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the error signal in combination with the reference signal to produce a best estimate of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the signal of interest. The preferred method includes the step of providing the error signal as a real time confidence measure as to the accuracy of the estimates wherein the closer the error signal is to zero, the higher the probability that the estimates are accurate. A matrix in the estimation algorithm provides an estimate of the variance of the estimation error.

  6. Adaptive track scheduling to optimize concurrency and vectorization in GeantV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; De Fine Licht, J. C.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, V. D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Sehgal, R.; Shadura, O.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-05-01

    The GeantV project is focused on the R&D of new particle transport techniques to maximize parallelism on multiple levels, profiting from the use of both SIMD instructions and co-processors for the CPU-intensive calculations specific to this type of applications. In our approach, vectors of tracks belonging to multiple events and matching different locality criteria must be gathered and dispatched to algorithms having vector signatures. While the transport propagates tracks and changes their individual states, data locality becomes harder to maintain. The scheduling policy has to be changed to maintain efficient vectors while keeping an optimal level of concurrency. The model has complex dynamics requiring tuning the thresholds to switch between the normal regime and special modes, i.e. prioritizing events to allow flushing memory, adding new events in the transport pipeline to boost locality, dynamically adjusting the particle vector size or switching between vector to single track mode when vectorization causes only overhead. This work requires a comprehensive study for optimizing these parameters to make the behaviour of the scheduler self-adapting, presenting here its initial results.

  7. Adaptive Resource Allocation for the PB/MC-CDMA System in Frequency Selective Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyujin; Lee, Kyesan

    We propose Adaptive Resource Allocation for the Partial Block MC-CDMA (ARA-PB/MC-CDMA) system. The ARA-PB/MC-CDMA system aims to improve total throughput performance and frequency efficiency across various channel conditions. It adaptively changes the number of blocks to improve the throughput performance and frequency efficiency according to the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR). Therefore, the proposed system supports various Quality of Service (QoS) requirements for various SIR values.

  8. Performance assessment of frequency plane filters applied to track association and sensor registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, Clay J.; Javidi, Bahram; Yanni, P.

    2003-09-01

    The current generation of correlation systems attempting to provide a Single Integrated Picture (SIP) have concentrated on improving quality from the situational awareness (SA) and tracking perspective with limited success, while having not addressed the combat identification (CID) issue at all. Furthermore, decision time has lengthened, not decreased, as more and more sensor data are made available to the commanders; much of which is video in origin. Many efforts are underway to build a network of sensors including the Army's Future Combat System (FCS), Air Force Multi-mission Command and Control Aircraft (MC2A), Network-Centric Collaborative Targeting (NCCT), and the follow-on to the Navy's Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC). Each of these programs has the potential to increase precision of the targeting data with successful correlation algorithms while eliminating dual track reports, but none have combined or will combine disparate sensor data into a cohesive target with a high confidence of identification. In this paper, we address an architecture that solves the track correlation problem using frequency plane pattern recognition techniques that also can provide CID capability. Also, we discuss statistical considerations and performance issues.

  9. Styles of Adaptation: The Impact of Frequency and Valence of Adaptation on Preventing Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William B.; Pankratz, Melinda M.; Dusenbury, Linda; Giles, Steven M.; Bishop, Dana C.; Albritton, Jordan; Albritton, Lauren P.; Strack, Joann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To be effective, evidence-based programs should be delivered as prescribed. This suggests that adaptations that deviate from intervention goals may limit a program's effectiveness. This study aims to examine the impact that number and quality of adaptations have on substance use outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The authors…

  10. Time accuracy of a radio frequency identification patient tracking system for recording operating room timestamps.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Riitta A; Torkki, Paulus M; Torkki, Markus I; Kirvelä, Olli A

    2006-04-01

    A patient tracking system is a promising tool for managing patient flow and improving efficiency in the operating room. Wireless location systems, using infrared or radio frequency transmitters, can automatically timestamp key events, thereby decreasing the need for manual data input. In this study, we measured the accuracy and precision of automatically documented timestamps compared with manual recording. Each patient scheduled for urgent surgery was given an active radio frequency/infrared transmitter. The prototype software tracked the patient throughout the perioperative process, automatically documenting the timestamps. Both automatic and traditional data entry were compared with the reference data. The absolute value of median error was 64% smaller (P < 0.01), and the average quartile deviation of error was 69% smaller in automatic documentation. The average delay between an activity and the documentation was 80 seconds in automatic documentation and 735 seconds in manual documentation. Both the accuracy and the precision were better in automatic documentation and the data were immediately available. Automatic documentation with the Indoor Positioning System can help in managing patient flow and in increasing transparency with faster availability and better accuracy of data. PMID:16551921

  11. A new laboratory radio frequency identification (RFID) system for behavioural tracking of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Sarriá, David; García, José Antonio; Costa, Corrado; del Río, Joaquín; Mànuel, Antoni; Menesatti, Paolo; Sardà, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) devices are currently used to quantify several traits of animal behaviour with potential applications for the study of marine organisms. To date, behavioural studies with marine organisms are rare because of the technical difficulty of propagating radio waves within the saltwater medium. We present a novel RFID tracking system to study the burrowing behaviour of a valuable fishery resource, the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus L.). The system consists of a network of six controllers, each handling a group of seven antennas. That network was placed below a microcosm tank that recreated important features typical of Nephrops' grounds, such as the presence of multiple burrows. The animals carried a passive transponder attached to their telson, operating at 13.56 MHz. The tracking system was implemented to concurrently report the behaviour of up to three individuals, in terms of their travelled distances in a specified unit of time and their preferential positioning within the antenna network. To do so, the controllers worked in parallel to send the antenna data to a computer via a USB connection. The tracking accuracy of the system was evaluated by concurrently recording the animals' behaviour with automated video imaging. During the two experiments, each lasting approximately one week, two different groups of three animals each showed a variable burrow occupancy and a nocturnal displacement under a standard photoperiod regime (12 h light:12 h dark), measured using the RFID method. Similar results were obtained with the video imaging. Our implemented RFID system was therefore capable of efficiently tracking the tested organisms and has a good potential for use on a wide variety of other marine organisms of commercial, aquaculture, and ecological interest. PMID:22163710

  12. A New Laboratory Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System for Behavioural Tracking of Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Sbragaglia, Valerio; Sarriá, David; García, José Antonio; Costa, Corrado; del Río, Joaquín; Mànuel, Antoni; Menesatti, Paolo; Sardà, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) devices are currently used to quantify several traits of animal behaviour with potential applications for the study of marine organisms. To date, behavioural studies with marine organisms are rare because of the technical difficulty of propagating radio waves within the saltwater medium. We present a novel RFID tracking system to study the burrowing behaviour of a valuable fishery resource, the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus L.). The system consists of a network of six controllers, each handling a group of seven antennas. That network was placed below a microcosm tank that recreated important features typical of Nephrops’ grounds, such as the presence of multiple burrows. The animals carried a passive transponder attached to their telson, operating at 13.56 MHz. The tracking system was implemented to concurrently report the behaviour of up to three individuals, in terms of their travelled distances in a specified unit of time and their preferential positioning within the antenna network. To do so, the controllers worked in parallel to send the antenna data to a computer via a USB connection. The tracking accuracy of the system was evaluated by concurrently recording the animals’ behaviour with automated video imaging. During the two experiments, each lasting approximately one week, two different groups of three animals each showed a variable burrow occupancy and a nocturnal displacement under a standard photoperiod regime (12 h light:12 h dark), measured using the RFID method. Similar results were obtained with the video imaging. Our implemented RFID system was therefore capable of efficiently tracking the tested organisms and has a good potential for use on a wide variety of other marine organisms of commercial, aquaculture, and ecological interest. PMID:22163710

  13. [Peculiarities of adaptive hemodynamic processes during high-frequency jet lung ventilation].

    PubMed

    Zislin, B D; Astakhov, A A; Pankov, N E; Kontorovich, M B

    2009-01-01

    This study concerns poorly known features of adaptive hemodynamic reactions of the heart pump function during traditional and high-frequency jet lung ventilation. Spectral analysis of slow-wave oscillations of stroke volume and left ventricular diastolic filling wave in 36 patients with craniocerebral injury and acute cerebral insufficiency showed that beneficial adaptive reactions were realized through a rise in the general spectrum power and entropy. High-frequency jet lung ventilation ensured better effect on the adaptive processes than the traditional technique. PMID:19642544

  14. A frequency-domain estimator for use in adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard O.; Valavani, Lena; Athans, Michael; Stein, Gunter

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a frequency-domain estimator that can identify both a parametrized nominal model of a plant as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling error associated with this nominal model. This estimator, which we call a robust estimator, can be used in conjunction with a robust control-law redesign algorithm to form a robust adaptive controller.

  15. A frequency-domain estimator for use in adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamaire, Richard O.; Valavani, Lena; Athans, Michael; Stein, Gunter

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a frequency-domain estimator which can identify both a nominal model of a plant as well as a frequency-domain bounding function on the modeling error associated with this nominal model. This estimator, which is called a robust estimator, can be used in conjunction with a robust control-law redesign algorithm to form a robust adaptive controller.

  16. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰-only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  17. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  18. Self-Oscillation-Based Frequency Tracking for the Drive and Detection of Resonance Magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zheng; Ren, Dahai; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a drive and detection method for Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based Lorentz-force resonance magnetometers. Based on the proposed MEMS magnetometer, a drive and detection method was developed by using self-oscillation to adjust the mismatch between the mechanical resonance frequency and the coil drive frequency as affected by temperature fluctuations and vibration amplitude changes. Not only was the signal-to-noise ratio enhanced by the proposed method compared to the traditional method, but the test system automatically reached resonance frequency very rapidly when powered on. Moreover, the linearity and the measurement range were improved by the magnetic feedback generated by the coil. Test results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed magnetometer is 59.6 mV/μT and its noise level is 0.25 μT. When operating in ±65 μT, its nonlinearity is 2.5‰—only one-tenth of the former prototype. Its power consumption is only about 250 mW and its size is only 28 mm × 28 mm × 10 mm, or about one-eighth of the original sensor; further, unlike the former device, it can distinguish both positive and negative magnetic fields. The proposed method can also be applied in other MEMS sensors such as gyroscopes and micromirrors to enhance their frequency tracking ability. PMID:27213401

  19. Research of adaptive threshold model and its application in iris tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qijie; Tu, Dawei; Wang, Rensan; Gao, Daming

    2005-02-01

    The relationship between gray value of pixels and macro-information in image has been analyzed with the method in statistical mechanics. After simulating and curve fitting with the experiment data by statistic and regression method, an adaptive threshold model between average gray value and image threshold has been proposed in terms of Boltzmann statistics. On the other hand, the image characteristics around the eye region and the states of eyeball also have been analyzed, and an algorithm to extract the eye feature and locate its position on the image has been proposed, furthermore, another algorithm has been proposed to find the iris characteristic line and then to coordinate the iris center. At last, considering the cases of head gesture, different head position, and the opening state of eyes, some experiments have been respectively done with the function based on the adaptive threshold model and the designed algorithms in eye-gaze input human-computer interaction (HCI) system. The experiment results show that the algorithms can widely be applied in different cases, and real-time iris tracking can be performed with the adaptive threshold model and algorithms.

  20. Adaptive mobile tracking in unknown non-line-of-sight conditions with application to digital TV networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Piché, Robert; Kuusniemi, Heidi; Chen, Ruizhi

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracking a mobile device in mixed line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. NLOS error is assumed to be Gaussian with unknown mean and variance. An adaptive Rao-Blackwellized particle filter (RBPF) is proposed for mobile tracking in such scenarios. An extended Kalman filter is used to approximately estimate the mobile state, and the particle filter is applied to estimate the posterior distribution of sight conditions and the unknown static parameters, the distribution of which is updated by sufficient statistics. To improve the efficiency of the particle filtering, we use the approximate optimal proposal distribution for particle inference. Algorithm performance is investigated in the scenario of mobile tracking using signals of opportunity from digital TV (DTV) network. Simulation results show that the adaptive RBPF method is effective to infer the unknown NLOS parameter and can achieve good tracking accuracy using a small number of particles.

  1. Tracking the Time Course of Word-Frequency Effects in Auditory Word Recognition with Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Sophie; Brunelliere, Angele; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H.

    2013-01-01

    Although the word-frequency effect is one of the most established findings in spoken-word recognition, the precise processing locus of this effect is still a topic of debate. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to track the time course of the word-frequency effect. In addition, the neighborhood density effect, which is known to…

  2. Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control of Nonlinear Systems With Asymmetric Actuator Backlash Based on a New Smooth Inverse.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guanyu; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Yun; Philip Chen, C L

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concentrated on the problem of adaptive fuzzy tracking control for an uncertain nonlinear system whose actuator is encountered by the asymmetric backlash behavior. First, we propose a new smooth inverse model which can approximate the asymmetric actuator backlash arbitrarily. By applying it, two adaptive fuzzy control scenarios, namely, the compensation-based control scheme and nonlinear decomposition-based control scheme, are then developed successively. It is worth noticing that the first fuzzy controller exhibits a better tracking control performance, although it recourses to a known slope ratio of backlash nonlinearity. The second one further removes the restriction, and also gets a desirable control performance. By the strict Lyapunov argument, both adaptive fuzzy controllers guarantee that the output tracking error is convergent to an adjustable region of zero asymptotically, while all the signals remain semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Lastly, two comparative simulations are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed fuzzy controllers. PMID:27187937

  3. Adaptive Disturbance Tracking Theory with State Estimation and State Feedback for Region II Control of Large Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Frost, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    A theory called Adaptive Disturbance Tracking Control (ADTC) is introduced and used to track the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) of 5 MW Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). Since ADTC theory requires wind speed information, a wind disturbance generator model is combined with lower order plant model to estimate the wind speed as well as partial states of the wind turbine. In this paper, we present a proof of stability and convergence of ADTC theory with lower order estimator and show that the state feedback can be adaptive.

  4. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF. PMID:27475606

  5. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  6. A real-time digital adaptive tracking controller for a dc motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this design is to implement an accurate and cost effective adaptive tracking controller for a DC motor using an 80C196kr microcontroller system. The on-chip embedded functions, optical quadrature encoder and a Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) waveform generator, are used to measure motor positions and generate DC voltages to drive a DC motor respectively. A homing routine that incorporates a photo electric sensor is used to position the motor at a reference point. Users communicate with the system through a 4x4 matrix keypad and 20x2 LCD display or through a PC. The experimental results have shown the validity of this simple microcontroller-based digital control system. This system is performed on a real-time basis, and the control law can be easily replaced by any advanced control laws without changing the hardware setup.

  7. Helicopter and aircraft detection and classification using adaptive beamforming and tracking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Koersel, Antonius C.; Beerens, S. P.

    2002-08-01

    Measurements of different types of aircraft are performed and used to obtain information on target characteristics and develop an algorithm to perform classification between jet aircraft, propeller aircraft and helicopters. To obtain a larger detection range, reduce background noise and to reduce classification errors in a multi-target environment, a real time adaptive beamformer algorithm is developed for a three microphone array. The output of the beamformer is submitted to a tracking algorithm. Acoustic signals from identified tracks are submitted to the classification algorithms. The algorithm is tested on data recorded during various field trials. The objective of the research, which is part of a research program for the Dutch Army, is to detect the passage of an aircraft with one or more mechanical wave sensors, either acoustic or seismic. After detection of a target, classification of the type of aircraft is requested (for example: helicopter-jet-propeller-rpv). If possible type identification is also requested. Earlier work showed promising results for detection and classification of helicopter targets. The projects resulted in an algorithm that can detect and classify helicopters, but it was developed to reject other targets. The chosen approach is to combine new aircraft detection and beamforming algorithms with the existing algorithms.

  8. Adaptive sensor placement for target tracking in the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2003-12-01

    Recently a general framework for sensor resource management, which has been shown to allow efficient and effective utilization of a multisensor system was introduced in5. The basis of this technique is to use the Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) to quantify and control the optimal achievable accuracy of target state estimation. In the current paper we extend this framework by addressing the issues of imperfect sensor placement and uncertain sensor movement (e.g., sensor drift). In contrast the previous work considered only the case where the sensor location is known exactly. The crucial consideration is then how these two forms of uncertainty affect the sensor management strategy. If unaccounted for, these uncertainties will render the output of the resource manager useless. We adjust the PCRLB to account for sensor location uncertainty, and we also allow for measurement origin uncertainty (missed target originated detections and false alarms). The work is motivated by the problem of tracking a submarine by adaptively deploying sonobuoys from a helicopter. Simulation results are presented to show the advantages of accounting for sensor location uncertainty within this focal domain of anti-submarine warfare. The same technique can be used for tracking using unattended ground sensors (UGS) or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

  9. Adaptive sensor placement for target tracking in the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Hernandez, Marcel L.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a general framework for sensor resource management, which has been shown to allow efficient and effective utilization of a multisensor system was introduced in5. The basis of this technique is to use the Posterior Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (PCRLB) to quantify and control the optimal achievable accuracy of target state estimation. In the current paper we extend this framework by addressing the issues of imperfect sensor placement and uncertain sensor movement (e.g., sensor drift). In contrast the previous work considered only the case where the sensor location is known exactly. The crucial consideration is then how these two forms of uncertainty affect the sensor management strategy. If unaccounted for, these uncertainties will render the output of the resource manager useless. We adjust the PCRLB to account for sensor location uncertainty, and we also allow for measurement origin uncertainty (missed target originated detections and false alarms). The work is motivated by the problem of tracking a submarine by adaptively deploying sonobuoys from a helicopter. Simulation results are presented to show the advantages of accounting for sensor location uncertainty within this focal domain of anti-submarine warfare. The same technique can be used for tracking using unattended ground sensors (UGS) or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

  10. Store-and-feedforward adaptive gaming system for hand-finger motion tracking in telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lockery, Daniel; Peters, James F; Ramanna, Sheela; Shay, Barbara L; Szturm, Tony

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a telerehabilitation system that encompasses a webcam and store-and-feedforward adaptive gaming system for tracking finger-hand movement of patients during local and remote therapy sessions. Gaming-event signals and webcam images are recorded as part of a gaming session and then forwarded to an online healthcare content management system (CMS) that separates incoming information into individual patient records. The CMS makes it possible for clinicians to log in remotely and review gathered data using online reports that are provided to help with signal and image analysis using various numerical measures and plotting functions. Signals from a 6 degree-of-freedom magnetic motion tracking system provide a basis for video-game sprite control. The MMT provides a path for motion signals between common objects manipulated by a patient and a computer game. During a therapy session, a webcam that captures images of the hand together with a number of performance metrics provides insight into the quality, efficiency, and skill of a patient. PMID:21536526

  11. The experimental results of a self tuning adaptive controller using online frequency identification. [for Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, W.-W.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A fourth-order laboratory dynamic system featuring very low structural damping and a noncolocated actuator-sensor pair has been used to test a novel real-time adaptive controller, implemented in a minicomputer, which consists of a state estimator, a set of state feedback gains, and a frequency-locked loop for real-time parameter identification. The adaptation algorithm employed can correct controller error and stabilize the system for more than 50 percent variation in the plant's natural frequency, compared with a 10 percent stability margin in frequency variation for a fixed gain controller having the same performance as the nominal plant condition. The very rapid convergence achievable by this adaptive system is demonstrated experimentally, and proven with simple, root-locus methods.

  12. High-Pass Filtering at Vestibular Frequencies by Transducer Adaptation in Mammalian Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian saccule detects head tilt and low-frequency head accelerations as well as higher-frequency bone vibrations and sounds. It has two different hair cell types, I and II, dispersed throughout two morphologically distinct regions, the striola and extrastriola. Afferents from the two zones have distinct response dynamics which may arise partly from zonal differences in hair cell properties. We find that type II hair cells in the rat saccular epithelium adapt with a time course appropriate for influencing afferent responses to head motions. Moreover, striolar type II hair cells adapted by a greater extent than extrastriolar type II hair cells and had greater phase leads in the mid-frequency range (5-50 Hz). These differences suggest that hair cell transduction may contribute to zonal differences in the adaptation of vestibular afferents to head motions.

  13. Frequency domain synthesis of optimal inputs for adaptive identification and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Li-Chen; Sastry, Shankar

    1987-01-01

    The input design problem of selecting appropriate inputs for use in SISO adaptive identification and model reference adaptive control algorithms is considered. Averaging theory is used to characterize the optimal inputs in the frequency domain. The design problem is formulated as an optimization problem which maximizes the smallest eigenvalue of the average information matrix over power constrained signals, and the global optimal solution is obtained using a convergent numerical algorithm. A bound on the frequency search range required in the design algorithm has been determined in terms of the desired performance.

  14. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2013-09-15

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  15. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm2 at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  16. An adaptive approach to computing the spectrum and mean frequency of Doppler signals.

    PubMed

    Herment, A; Giovannelli, J F

    1995-01-01

    Modern ultrasound Doppler systems are facing the problem of processing increasingly shorter data sets. Spectral analysis of the strongly nonstationary Doppler signal needs to shorten the analysis window while maintaining a low variance and high resolution spectrum. Color flow imaging requires estimation of the Doppler mean frequency from even shorter Doppler data sets to obtain both a high frame rate and high spatial resolution. We reconsider these two estimation problems in light of adaptive methods. A regularized parametric method for spectral analysis as well as an adapted mean frequency estimator are developed. The choice of the adaptive criterion is then addressed and adaptive spectral and mean frequency estimators are developed to minimize the mean square error on estimation in the presence of noise. Two suboptimal spectral and mean-frequency estimators are then derived for real-time applications. Finally, their performance is compared to that of both the FFT based periodogram and the AR parametric spectral analysis for the spectral estimator, and, to both the correlation angle and the Kristoffersen's [8] estimators for the mean frequency estimator using Doppler data recorded in vitro. PMID:7638930

  17. Left ventricular adaptation to high altitude: speckle tracking echocardiography in lowlanders, healthy highlanders and highlanders with chronic mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Dedobbeleer, Chantal; Hadefi, Alia; Pichon, Aurelien; Villafuerte, Francisco; Naeije, Robert; Unger, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic exposure depresses myocardial contractility in vitro, but has been associated with indices of increased cardiac performance in intact animals and in humans, possibly related to sympathetic nervous system activation. We explored left ventricular (LV) function using speckle tracking echocardiography and sympathetic tone by spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) in recently acclimatized lowlanders versus adapted or maladapted highlanders at high altitude. Twenty-six recently acclimatized lowlanders, 14 healthy highlanders and 12 highlanders with chronic mountain sickness (CMS) were studied. Control measurements at sea level were also obtained in the lowlanders. Altitude exposure in the lowlanders was associated with slightly increased blood pressure, decreased LV volumes and decreased longitudinal strain with a trend to increased prevalence of post-systolic shortening (p = 0.06), whereas the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio increased (1.62 ± 0.81 vs. 5.08 ± 4.13, p < 0.05) indicating sympathetic activation. Highlanders had a similarly raised LF/HF ratio, but no alteration in LV deformation. Highlanders with CMS had no change in LV deformation, no significant increase in LF/HF, but decreased global HRV still suggestive of increased sympathetic tone, and lower mitral E/A ratio compared to healthy highlanders. Short-term altitude exposure in lowlanders alters indices of LV systolic function and increases sympathetic nervous system tone. Life-long altitude exposure in highlanders is associated with similar sympathetic hyperactivity, but preserved parameters of LV function, whereas diastolic function may be altered in those with CMS. Altered LV systolic function in recently acclimatized lowlanders may be explained by combined effects of hypoxia and changes in loading conditions. PMID:25665685

  18. Roll-to-Roll Screen Printed Radio Frequency Identification Transponder Antennas for Vehicle Tracking Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichner, Ralf; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2013-05-01

    Vehicle tracking systems based on ultra high frequency (UHF) radio frequency identification (RFID) technology are already introduced to control the access to car parks and corporate premises. For this field of application so-called Windshield RFID transponder labels are used, which are applied to the inside of the windshield. State of the art for manufacturing these transponder antennas is the traditional lithography/etching approach. Furthermore the performance of these transponders is limited to a reading distance of approximately 5 m which results in car speed limit of 5 km/h for identification. However, to achieve improved performance compared to existing all-purpose transponders and a dramatic cost reduction, an optimized antenna design is needed which takes into account the special dielectric and in particular metallic car environment of the tag and an roll-to-roll (R2R) printing manufacturing process. In this paper we focus on the development of a customized UHF RFID transponder antenna design, which is adopted for vehicle geometry as well as R2R screen printing manufacturing processes.

  19. High-frequency acoustic tracking of odontocetes at the Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hursky, Paul; Abawi, Ahmad T.; Porter, Michael B.; Hildebrand, John A.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Soldevilla, Melissa; Sauter, Allan W.

    2005-09-01

    The SCORE site, located near San Clemente Island, is known to be abundant in marine mammals, and is the site of frequent naval operations, making it an ideal site to study what impact man-made activities may have upon these creatures. In August 2004, an experiment was performed to collect both visual and acoustic observations of odontocetes at the SCORE site. Odontocete vocalizations consist of clicks and whistles. The clicks are very wideband (often 100 kHz), so times of arrival can be measured with extremely high resolution, which makes clicks attractive waveforms for multipath ranging and depth estimation. Although the whistles are narrowband, their fundamental frequency often ranges over tens of kilohertz, so these too can be processed as if they were wideband. We will present results of processing excerpts from several weeks of data recorded on a high-frequency horizontal line array deployed from the FLIP research vessel. Bearing tracks of individuals and groups from a number of different species will be correlated and compared with visual observations. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities for range and depth estimates derived from the multipath arrivals observed in the clicks and whistles.

  20. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  1. Adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter for noise removal in wrapped phase patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Dongxue; Peng, Yanhua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    In order to avoid the detrimental effects of excessive noise in the phase fringe patterns of a laser digital interferometer over the accuracy of phase unwrapping and the successful detection of mechanical fatigue defects, an effective method of adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filtering is introduced based on the characteristics of the energy spectrum of localized wrapped phase patterns. Not only can this method automatically set the cutoff frequency, but it can also effectively filter out noise while preserving the image edge information. Compared with the sine and cosine transform filtering and the multidirectional frequency domain filtering, the experimental results demonstrate that the image filtered by our method has the fewest number of residues and is the closest to the noise-free image, compared to the two aforementioned methods, demonstrating the effectiveness of this adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter. PMID:27505376

  2. Adaptive frequency-separation-based energy management system for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Adrian; Bacha, Seddik; Munteanu, Iulian; Bratcu, Antoneta Iuliana; Rumeau, Axel

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with an adaptive frequency-based power sharing method between batteries and ultracapacitors (UC) as power sources within an electric vehicle. An adaptive frequency splitter is used for routing the low-frequency content of power demand into the battery and its high-frequency content into the UC system, taking profit from the UC as a peak power unit. Autonomy may thus be increased while preserving battery state of health and ensuring that UC voltage variations remain confined within certain desired range. Results obtained by real-time experiments on a dedicated test rig validate the proposed energy management approach and recommend it to be applied as power source coordination method to microgrids in general.

  3. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  4. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S. Bijl, Hester

    2009-10-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  5. A self-adaptive oriented particles Level-Set method for tracking interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianniello, S.; Di Mascio, A.

    2010-02-01

    A new method for tracking evolving interfaces by lagrangian particles in conjunction with a Level-Set approach is introduced. This numerical technique is based on the use of time evolution equations for fundamental vector and tensor quantities defined on the front and represents a new and convenient way to couple the advantages of the Eulerian description given by a Level-Set function ϕ to the use of Lagrangian massless particles. The term oriented points out that the information advected by the particles not only concern the spatial location, but also the local (outward) normal vector n to the interface Γ and the second fundamental tensor (the shape operator) ∇n. The particles are exactly located upon Γ and provide all the requested information for tracking the interface on their own. In addition, a self-adaptive mechanism suitably modifies, at each time step, the markers distribution in the numerical domain: each particle behaves both as a potential seeder of new markers on Γ (so as to guarantee an accurate reconstruction of the interface) and a de-seeder (to avoid any useless gathering of markers and to limit the computational effort). The algorithm is conceived to avoid any transport equation for ϕ and to confine the Level-Set function to the role of a mere post-processing tool; thus, all the numerical diffusion problems usually affecting the Level-Set methodology are removed. The method has been tested both on 2D and 3D configurations; it carries out a fast reconstruction of the interface and its accuracy is only limited by the spatial resolution of the mesh.

  6. Self-adaptive road tracking in hyperspectral data for C-IED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Hendrik; Gross, Wolfgang; Middelmann, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    For Counter Improvised Explosive Devices purposes, main routes including their vicinity are surveyed. In future military operations, small hyperspectral sensors will be used for ground covering reconnaissance, complementing images from infrared and high resolution sensors. They will be mounted on unmanned airborne vehicles and are used for on-line monitoring of convoy routes. Depending of the proximity to the road, different regions can be defined for threat assessment. Automatic road tracking can help choosing the correct areas of interest. Often, the exact discrimination between road and surroundings fails in conventional methods due to low contrast in pan-chromatic images at the road boundaries or occlusions. In this contribution, a novel real-time lock-on road tracking algorithm is introduced. It uses hyperspectral data and is specifically designed to address the afore- mentioned deficiencies of conventional methods. Local features are calculated from the high-resolution spectral signatures. They describe the similarity to the actual road cover and to either roadside. Classification is per- formed to discriminate the signatures. To improve robustness against variations in road cover, the classification results are used to progressively adapt the road and roadside classes. Occlusions are treated by predicting the course of the road and comparing the signatures in the target area to previously determined road cover signa- tures. The algorithm can be easily extended to show regions of varying threat, depending on the distance to the road. Thus, complex anomaly detectors and classification algorithms can be applied to a reduced data set. First experiments were performed for AISA Eagle II (400nm - 970nm) and AISA Hawk (970nm - 2450nm) data

  7. Automated Performance Characterization of DSN System Frequency Stability Using Spacecraft Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Timothy T.; Machuzak, Richard J.; Bedrossian, Alina; Kelly, Richard M.; Liao, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    This software provides an automated capability to measure and qualify the frequency stability performance of the Deep Space Network (DSN) ground system, using daily spacecraft tracking data. The results help to verify if the DSN performance is meeting its specification, therefore ensuring commitments to flight missions; in particular, the radio science investigations. The rich set of data also helps the DSN Operations and Maintenance team to identify the trends and patterns, allowing them to identify the antennas of lower performance and implement corrective action in a timely manner. Unlike the traditional approach where the performance can only be obtained from special calibration sessions that are both time-consuming and require manual setup, the new method taps into the daily spacecraft tracking data. This new approach significantly increases the amount of data available for analysis, roughly by two orders of magnitude, making it possible to conduct trend analysis with good confidence. The software is built with automation in mind for end-to-end processing. From the inputs gathering to computation analysis and later data visualization of the results, all steps are done automatically, making the data production at near zero cost. This allows the limited engineering resource to focus on high-level assessment and to follow up with the exceptions/deviations. To make it possible to process the continual stream of daily incoming data without much effort, and to understand the results quickly, the processing needs to be automated and the data summarized at a high level. Special attention needs to be given to data gathering, input validation, handling anomalous conditions, computation, and presenting the results in a visual form that makes it easy to spot items of exception/deviation so that further analysis can be directed and corrective actions followed.

  8. Seasonal prediction of typhoon genesis frequency and track patterns in the North West Pacific area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyoun, Yoosun; Kang, Kiryong; Shin, Do-Shick

    2014-05-01

    This study is to investigate the performance of the typhoon seasonal predictability using a dynamical model. The check items are the monthly statistics for total number of typhoon genesis in Western North Pacific (WNP) area and possible threat to Korean peninsula among them, and the probability of each categorized track pattern. As the dynamical model the Florida State University/Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (FSU/COAPS) was used, and it uses five ensemble members including control run are generated using time-lagged methods and the resolution of T126L27 (a Gaussian grid spacing of 0.94º). The model initial conditions are obtained from the National Center for Enviromental Prediction Global Forecast System (NCEP GFS) and the SST from Climate Forecast System with bias correction was used for ocean surface boundary condition. The summer (Jun-Jul-Aug) season prediction is made one month prior to target season. The detection of tropical cyclone used in this system is based on six criteria. First, the isolated vortex type minimum sea level pressure should be below 1008hPa. Second, the maximum wind speed is larger than 17m s-1. Third, the magnitude of the maximum relative vorticity at 850hPa exceeds 3.5x10-5s-1. Fourth, the average temperature difference from the area mean of surrounding region at 300hPa, 500hPa, 700hPa exceeds 2.5K. Fifth, the maximum wind speed at 850hPa is larger than that at 300hPa. Sixth, this identified vortex should last more than two days. These criteria were chosen after close examination from model-observation comparison. In this study, we will focus on performance of the system typhoon frequency and track pattern in the WNP area during 2004-2013.

  9. Automated Performance Characterization of DSN System Frequency Stability Using Spacecraft Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Timothy T.; Machuzak, Richard J.; Bedrossian, Alina; Kelly, Richard M.; Liao, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    This software provides an automated capability to measure and qualify the frequency stability performance of the Deep Space Network (DSN) ground system, using daily spacecraft tracking data. The results help to verify if the DSN performance is meeting its specification, therefore ensuring commitments to flight missions; in particular, the radio science investigations. The rich set of data also helps the DSN Operations and Maintenance team to identify the trends and patterns, allowing them to identify the antennas of lower performance and implement corrective action in a timely manner. Unlike the traditional approach where the performance can only be obtained from special calibration sessions that are both time-consuming and require manual setup, the new method taps into the daily spacecraft tracking data. This new approach significantly increases the amount of data available for analysis, roughly by two orders of magnitude, making it possible to conduct trend analysis with good confidence. The software is built with automation in mind for end-to-end processing. From the inputs gathering to computation analysis and later data visualization of the results, all steps are done automatically, making the data production at near zero cost. This allows the limited engineering resource to focus on high-level assessment and to follow up with the exceptions/deviations. To make it possible to process the continual stream of daily incoming data without much effort, and to understand the results quickly, the processing needs to be automated and the data summarized at a high level. Special attention needs to be given to data gathering, input validation, handling anomalous conditions, computation, and presenting the results in a visual form that makes it easy to spot items of exception/ deviation so that further analysis can be directed and corrective actions followed.

  10. Detecting phase-amplitude coupling with high frequency resolution using adaptive decompositions

    PubMed Central

    Pittman-Polletta, Benjamin; Hsieh, Wan-Hsin; Kaur, Satvinder; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hu, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) – the dependence of the amplitude of one rhythm on the phase of another, lower-frequency rhythm – has recently been used to illuminate cross-frequency coordination in neurophysiological activity. An essential step in measuring PAC is decomposing data to obtain rhythmic components of interest. Current methods of PAC assessment employ narrowband Fourier-based filters, which assume that biological rhythms are stationary, harmonic oscillations. However, biological signals frequently contain irregular and nonstationary features, which may contaminate rhythms of interest and complicate comodulogram interpretation, especially when frequency resolution is limited by short data segments. New method To better account for nonstationarities while maintaining sharp frequency resolution in PAC measurement, even for short data segments, we introduce a new method of PAC assessment which utilizes adaptive and more generally broadband decomposition techniques – such as the empirical mode decomposition (EMD). To obtain high frequency resolution PAC measurements, our method distributes the PAC associated with pairs of broadband oscillations over frequency space according to the time-local frequencies of these oscillations. Comparison with existing methods We compare our novel adaptive approach to a narrowband comodulogram approach on a variety of simulated signals of short duration, studying systematically how different types of nonstationarities affect these methods, as well as on EEG data. Conclusions Our results show: (1) narrowband filtering can lead to poor PAC frequency resolution, and inaccuracy and false negatives in PAC assessment; (2) our adaptive approach attains better PAC frequency resolution and is more resistant to nonstationarities and artifacts than traditional comodulograms. PMID:24452055

  11. Egalisation adaptative et non invasive de la reponse temps-frequence d'une petite salle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tristan

    is rather seen as a "black box" including inputs and outputs. The problem studied is the characterization of an electro-acoustic system as having a single input signal transmitted through a speaker in a room, and a single output signal picked up by a microphone at the listening position. The originality of this work lies not only in the technique developed to arrive at this characterization, but especially in the constraints imposed in order to get there. The majority of technics documented to this date involve using excitation signals dedicated the measure; signals with favorable characteristics to simplify the calculation of the impulse response of the audio chain. Known signals are played through a loudspeaker and the room's response to excitation is captured with a microphone at the listening position. The measurement exercise itself poses problem, especially when there is an audience in the room. Also, the response of the room may change between the time of the measurement and time of listening. If the room is reconfigured for example, a curtain is pulled or the stage moved. In the case of a theater, the speaker used may vary depending on the context. A survey of work in which solutions to this problem are suggested was made. The main objective is to develop an innovative method to capture the impulse response of an audio chain without the knowledge of the audience. To do this, no signal dedicated to the measurement should be used. The developed method allows the capture of the electro-acoustic impulse response exploiting only the music signals when it comes to a concert hall or using a movie sound track when a movie is a movie theater. As a result, an algorithm for modeling dynamicly and continuously the response of a room. A finite impulse response filter acting as a digital equalizer must be designed and also able to dynamically adapt the behavior of the room, even when it varies over time. A multi spectral resolution method is used to build, for diffrent

  12. A Framework for Sediment Particle Tracking via Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiris, Achilleas; Papanicolaou, Thanos; Abban, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The study of sedimentary and morphodynamic processes in riverine environments has recently been shifting from the traditional Eulerian, static perspective to a Lagrangian perspective, which considers the movement characteristics of the individual transported particles, such as their travel and resting distance and time. The Lagrangian framework, in turn allows to better study processes such as bedload particle diffusion, erosion and deposition within a river reach, to more accurately predict bedload fluxes especially through the use of stochastic Discrete Particle models. A technology that goes hand-in-hand with this Lagrangian perspective is Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID), which has been recently applied for tracking the movement of tagged sediment particles within the river continuum. RFID allows the wireless, bidirectional exchange of information between a base station, known as the reader, with a typically large number of transponders (or tags) via an (excitation) antenna. RFID allows essentially the unique, wireless detection and identification of a transponder over a distance. The goal of this study is to further enhance the utility of RFID in riverine applications by developing a framework that allows extracting the 3D location of RFID tagged sediment particles in nearly real-time. To address the goal of this coupled theoretical and experimental study, a semi-theoretical approach based on antenna inductive coupling was combined with experimental measurements for developing a relationship that provides an estimate of the distance between a tagged particle and the antenna using the Return Signal Strength Indication (RSSI). The RSSI quantifies the magnetic energy transmitted from the transponder to the antenna. The RFID system used in this study was a passive, Low-Frequency (LF) system, which ensured that the LF radio waves could penetrate through the river bed material. The RSSI of the signal transmitted from each transponder was measured with an

  13. A dosimetric comparison of real-time adaptive and non-adaptive radiotherapy: A multi-institutional study encompassing robotic, gimbaled, multileaf collimator and couch tracking

    PubMed Central

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy; Nill, Simeon; Fast, Martin; Bedford, James; Oelfke, Uwe; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Poulsen, Per; Worm, Esben; Hansen, Rune; Ravkilde, Thomas; Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Lang, Stephanie; Guckenberger, Matthias; Groh, Christian; Herrmann, Christian; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Wang, Lei; Hadsell, Michael; Sothmann, Thilo; Blanck, Oliver; Keall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A study of real-time adaptive radiotherapy systems was performed to test the hypothesis that, across delivery systems and institutions, the dosimetric accuracy is improved with adaptive treatments over non-adaptive radiotherapy in the presence of patient-measured tumor motion. Methods and materials Ten institutions with robotic(2), gimbaled(2), MLC(4) or couch tracking(2) used common materials including CT and structure sets, motion traces and planning protocols to create a lung and a prostate plan. For each motion trace, the plan was delivered twice to a moving dosimeter; with and without real-time adaptation. Each measurement was compared to a static measurement and the percentage of failed points for γ-tests recorded. Results For all lung traces all measurement sets show improved dose accuracy with a mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of 1.6% with adaptation and 15.2% without adaptation (p < 0.001). For all prostate the mean 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate was 1.4% with adaptation and 17.3% without adaptation (p < 0.001). The difference between the four systems was small with an average 2%/2 mm γ-fail rate of <3% for all systems with adaptation for lung and prostate. Conclusions The investigated systems all accounted for realistic tumor motion accurately and performed to a similar high standard, with real-time adaptation significantly outperforming non-adaptive delivery methods. PMID:27016171

  14. Spatial and Temporal Analysis on the Distribution of Active Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) Tracking Accuracy with the Kriging Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Shannon, Jeremy; Voun, Howard; Truijens, Martijn; Chi, Hung-Lin; Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been applied in a number of areas to facilitate the tracking process. However, the insufficient tracking accuracy of RFID is one of the problems that impedes its wider application. Previous studies focus on examining the accuracy of discrete points RFID, thereby leaving the tracking accuracy of the areas between the observed points unpredictable. In this study, spatial and temporal analysis is applied to interpolate the continuous distribution of RFID tracking accuracy based on the Kriging method. An implementation trial has been conducted in the loading and docking area in front of a warehouse to validate this approach. The results show that the weak signal area can be easily identified by the approach developed in the study. The optimum distance between two RFID readers and the effect of the sudden removal of readers are also presented by analysing the spatial and temporal variation of RFID tracking accuracy. This study reveals the correlation between the testing time and the stability of RFID tracking accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can be used to assist the RFID system setup process to increase tracking accuracy. PMID:25356648

  15. Spatial and temporal analysis on the distribution of active radio-frequency identification (RFID) tracking accuracy with the Kriging method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Shannon, Jeremy; Voun, Howard; Truijens, Martijn; Chi, Hung-Lin; Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been applied in a number of areas to facilitate the tracking process. However, the insufficient tracking accuracy of RFID is one of the problems that impedes its wider application. Previous studies focus on examining the accuracy of discrete points RFID, thereby leaving the tracking accuracy of the areas between the observed points unpredictable. In this study, spatial and temporal analysis is applied to interpolate the continuous distribution of RFID tracking accuracy based on the Kriging method. An implementation trial has been conducted in the loading and docking area in front of a warehouse to validate this approach. The results show that the weak signal area can be easily identified by the approach developed in the study. The optimum distance between two RFID readers and the effect of the sudden removal of readers are also presented by analysing the spatial and temporal variation of RFID tracking accuracy. This study reveals the correlation between the testing time and the stability of RFID tracking accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can be used to assist the RFID system setup process to increase tracking accuracy. PMID:25356648

  16. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  17. Speed quantification and tracking of moving objects in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Johnny; Roorda, Austin

    2011-03-01

    Microscopic features of the human retina can be resolved noninvasively using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). We describe an improved method to track and quantify the speed of moving objects in AOSLO videos, which is necessary for characterizing the hemodynamics of retinal capillaries. During video acquisition, the objects of interest are in constant motion relative to the background tissue (object motion). The background tissue is in constant motion relative to the AOSLO, due to continuous eye motion during video recordings (eye motion). The location at which AOSLO acquires data is also in continuous motion, since the imaging source is swept in a raster scan across the retina (raster scanning). We show that it is important to take into consideration the combination of object motion, eye motion, and raster scanning for accurate quantification of object speeds. The proposed methods performed well on both experimental AOSLO videos as well as synthetic videos generated by a virtual AOSLO. These methods improve the accuracy of methods to investigate hemodynamics using AOSLO imaging.

  18. Effects of spike-frequency adaptation on neural models, with applications to biologically inspired robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, David Ross

    Animals are impressive biological machines, and their ability to handle unstructured environments is something roboticists wish to emulate. The behavioural competence of animals derives largely from the functioning of their nervous systems. Mathematical modelling of the functioning of neurons may enable us to extract useful principles from biology to be applied in robotics. Here, several systems with relevance to biologically inspired robotics are analyzed. The qualitative dynamics of a biological property called spike-frequency adaptation are added to existing analog neural models, and analysis shows the conditions under which the augmented model can generate oscillatory solutions. A network of these augmented analog neurons is then used to generate a walking gait for a six-legged robot in such a way that the system recovers rapidly from perturbations to the legs. The dynamics of oscillations arising in two coupled populations of integrate-and-fire neurons are studied; an analysis of the system provides good predictions of the oscillatory period and the range of coupling strengths for which oscillations will occur. A signal-processing phenomenon known as noise-shaping, wherein noise in a system is shifted out of the low frequencies up into higher frequency ranges, is demonstrated in networks of integrate-and-fire and conductance-based neurons; it is shown that spike-frequency adaptation provides certain signal-processing advantages in such networks. The effect of spike-frequency adaptation on the variability in integrate-and-fire neurons' firing records is analyzed.

  19. From wavelets to adaptive approximations: time-frequency parametrization of EEG.

    PubMed

    Durka, Piotr J

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of time-frequency analysis of the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). It covers in details two major steps: introduction of wavelets and adaptive approximations. Presented studies include time-frequency solutions to several standard research and clinical problems, encountered in analysis of evoked potentials, sleep EEG, epileptic activities, ERD/ERS and pharmaco-EEG. Based upon these results we conclude that the matching pursuit algorithm provides a unified parametrization of EEG, applicable in a variety of experimental and clinical setups. This conclusion is followed by a brief discussion of the current state of the mathematical and algorithmical aspects of adaptive time-frequency approximations of signals. PMID:12605721

  20. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  1. Wireless Displacement Sensing of Micromachined Spiral-Coil Actuator Using Resonant Frequency Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; AbuZaiter, Alaa; Schlosser, Colin; Bycraft, Brad; Takahata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a method that enables real-time displacement monitoring and control of micromachined resonant-type actuators using wireless radiofrequency (RF). The method is applied to an out-of-plane, spiral-coil microactuator based on shape-memory-alloy (SMA). The SMA spiral coil forms an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit that is excited using external RF magnetic fields to thermally actuate the coil. The actuation causes a shift in the circuit's resonance as the coil is displaced vertically, which is wirelessly monitored through an external antenna to track the displacements. Controlled actuation and displacement monitoring using the developed method is demonstrated with the microfabricated device. The device exhibits a frequency sensitivity to displacement of 10 kHz/μm or more for a full out-of-plane travel range of 466 μm and an average actuation velocity of up to 155 μm/s. The method described permits the actuator to have a self-sensing function that is passively operated, thereby eliminating the need for separate sensors and batteries on the device, thus realizing precise control while attaining a high level of miniaturization in the device. PMID:25014100

  2. Adaptive spatial carrier frequency method for fast monitoring optical properties of fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Agour, M.; Hamza, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an extension of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method which is proposed for fast measuring optical properties of fibrous materials. The method can be considered as a two complementary steps. In the first step, the support of the adaptive filter shall be defined. In the second step, the angle between the sample under test and the interference fringe system generated by the utilized interferometer has to be determined. Thus, the support of the optical filter associated with the implementation of the adaptive spatial carrier frequency method is accordingly rotated. This method is experimentally verified by measuring optical properties of polypropylene (PP) fibre with the help of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The results show that errors resulting from rotating the fibre with respect to the interference fringes of the interferometer are reduced compared with the traditional band pass filter method. This conclusion was driven by comparing results of the mean refractive index of drown PP fibre at parallel polarization direction obtained from the new and adaptive spatial carrier frequency method.

  3. Adaptive ILC algorithms of nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties for non-repetitive trajectory tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lv, Mang-Mang; Ho, John K. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, two adaptive iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms are presented for nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties. Unlike general ILC techniques, the proposed adaptive ILC algorithms allow that both the initial error at each iteration and the reference trajectory are iteration-varying in the ILC process, and can achieve non-repetitive trajectory tracking beyond a small initial time interval. Compared to the neural network or fuzzy system-based adaptive ILC schemes and the classical ILC methods, in which the number of iterative variables is generally larger than or equal to the number of control inputs, the first adaptive ILC algorithm proposed in this paper uses just two iterative variables, while the second even uses a single iterative variable provided that some bound information on system dynamics is known. As a result, the memory space in real-time ILC implementations is greatly reduced.

  4. Segregation of tracked and wheeled ground vehicle mobility mechanisms through in-situ adaptation of seismic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Christopher G.; Fitzgerald, James; Power, Dennis

    2008-04-01

    The ability to perform generalized ground vehicle classification by unattended ground sensors (UGS) is an important facet of data analysis performed by modern unattended sensor systems. Large variation in seismic signature propagation from one location to another renders exploiting seismic measurements to classify vehicles a significant challenge. This paper presents the results of using an adaptive methodology to distinguish between tracked and wheeled ground vehicle mobility mechanisms. The methodology is a passive in-situ learning process that does not rely upon an explicit calibration process but does require an estimated range to the target. Furthermore, the benefits of the seismic feature adaptation are realized with a sparse information set. There exist scenarios in which the adaptation fails to provide information when implemented as an independent process. These situations, however, may be mitigated by sharing information with other classification algorithms. Once properly initialized, the in-situ adaptation process correctly categorizes over 95% of ground vehicles.

  5. A quantitative study of 3D-scanning frequency and Δd of tracking points on the tooth surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Micro-movement of human jaws in the resting state might influence the accuracy of direct three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Providing a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems to overcome this influence is important. In this study, we measured micro-movement, or change in distance (∆d), as the change in position of a single tracking point from one sampling time point to another in five human subjects. ∆d of tracking points on incisors at 7 sampling frequencies was judged against the clinical accuracy requirement to select proper sampling frequency settings. The curve equation was then fit quantitatively between ∆d median and the sampling frequency to predict the trend of ∆d with increasing f. The difference of ∆d among the subjects and the difference between upper and lower incisor feature points of the same subject were analyzed by a non-parametric test (α = 0.05). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted among different subjects and between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P < 0.01). Overall, ∆d decreased with increasing frequency. When the frequency was 60 Hz, ∆d nearly reached the clinical accuracy requirement. Frequencies higher than 60 Hz did not significantly decrease Δd further. PMID:26400112

  6. Tracking features in retinal images of adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope using KLT-SIFT algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Lu, Jing; Shi, Guohua; Zhang, Yudong

    2010-01-01

    With the use of adaptive optics (AO), high-resolution microscopic imaging of living human retina in the single cell level has been achieved. In an adaptive optics confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system, with a small field size (about 1 degree, 280 μm), the motion of the eye severely affects the stabilization of the real-time video images and results in significant distortions of the retina images. In this paper, Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) is used to abstract stable point features from the retina images. Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi(KLT) algorithm is applied to track the features. With the tracked features, the image distortion in each frame is removed by the second-order polynomial transformation, and 10 successive frames are co-added to enhance the image quality. Features of special interest in an image can also be selected manually and tracked by KLT. A point on a cone is selected manually, and the cone is tracked from frame to frame. PMID:21258443

  7. Model parameter adaption-based multi-model algorithm for extended object tracking using a random matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Borui; Mu, Chundi; Han, Shuli; Bai, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Traditional object tracking technology usually regards the target as a point source object. However, this approximation is no longer appropriate for tracking extended objects such as large targets and closely spaced group objects. Bayesian extended object tracking (EOT) using a random symmetrical positive definite (SPD) matrix is a very effective method to jointly estimate the kinematic state and physical extension of the target. The key issue in the application of this random matrix-based EOT approach is to model the physical extension and measurement noise accurately. Model parameter adaptive approaches for both extension dynamic and measurement noise are proposed in this study based on the properties of the SPD matrix to improve the performance of extension estimation. An interacting multi-model algorithm based on model parameter adaptive filter using random matrix is also presented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive approaches and multi-model algorithm. The estimation performance of physical extension is better than the other algorithms, especially when the target maneuvers. The kinematic state estimation error is lower than the others as well. PMID:24763252

  8. A frequency response analysis approach for quantitative assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tong; Chen, Cheng; Xu, WeiJie; Sanchez, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation is a viable and economical technique that allows researchers to observe the behavior of critical elements at full scale when an entire structure is subjected to dynamic loading. To ensure reliable experimental results, it is necessary to evaluate the actuator tracking after the test, even when sophisticated compensation methods are used to negate the detrimental effect of servo-hydraulic dynamics. Existing methods for assessment of actuator tracking are often based on time-domain analysis. This paper proposes a frequency-domain-based approach to the assessment of actuator tracking for real-time hybrid simulations. To ensure the accuracy of the proposed frequency response approach, the effects of spectrum leakage are investigated as well as the length and sampling frequency requirements of the signals. Two signal pre-processing techniques (data segmentation and window transform) are also discussed and compared to improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed frequency-domain-based approach is demonstrated through both computational analyses and laboratory tests, including real-time tests with predefined displacement and real-time hybrid simulation.

  9. Adaptive Yaw Rate Aware Sensor Wakeup Schemes Protocol (A-YAP) for Target Prediction and Tracking in Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Mir, Zeeshan Hameed; Akbar, Ali Hammad; Yoo, Seung-Wha; Kim, Ki-Hyung

    Target tracking is one of the key applications of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) that forms basis for numerous other applications. The overall procedures of target tracking involve target detection, localization, and tracking. Because of the WSNs' resource constraints (especially energy), it is highly desired that target tracking should be done by involving as less number of sensor nodes as possible. Due to the uncertain behavior of the target and resulting mobility patterns, this goal becomes harder to achieve without predicting the future locations of the target. The presence of a prediction mechanism may allow the activation of only the relevant sensors along the future course, before actually the target reaches the future location. This prior activation contributes to increasing the overall sensor networks lifetime by letting non-relevant nodes sleep. In this paper, first, we introduce a Yaw rate aware sensor wAkeup Protocol (YAP) for the prediction of future target locations. Second, we present improvements on the YAP design through the incorporation of adaptability. The proposed schemes are distributive in nature, and select relevant sensors to determine the target track. The performance of YAP and A-YAP is also discussed on different mobility patterns, which confirms the efficacy of the algorithm.

  10. Modeling and simulation of adaptive multimodal optical sensors for target tracking in the visible to near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presnar, Michael D.

    This work investigates an integrated aerial remote sensor design approach to address moving target detection and tracking problems within highly cluttered, dynamic ground-based scenes. Sophisticated simulation methodologies and scene phenomenology validations have resulted in advancements in artificial multimodal truth video synthesis. Complex modeling of novel micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) devices, optical systems, and detector arrays has resulted in a proof of concept for a state-of-the-art imaging spectropolarimeter sensor model that does not suffer from typical multimodal image registration problems. Test methodology developed for this work provides the ability to quantify performance of a target tracking application with varying ground scenery, flight characteristics, or sensor specifications. The culmination of this research is an end-to-end simulated demonstration of multimodal aerial remote sensing and target tracking. Deeply hidden target recognition is shown to be enhanced through the fusing of panchromatic, hyperspectral, and polarimetric image modalities. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation model was leveraged to synthesize truth spectropolarimetric sensor-reaching radiance image cubes comprised of coregistered Stokes vector bands in the visible to near-infrared. An intricate synthetic urban scene containing numerous moving vehicular targets was imaged from a virtual sensor aboard an aerial platform encircling a stare point. An adaptive sensor model was designed with a superpixel array of MOEMS devices fabricated atop a division of focal plane detector. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) imagery is acquired by combining three adjacent micropolarizer outputs within each 2x2 superpixel whose respective transmissions vary with wavelength, relative angle of polarization, and wire-grid spacing. A novel micromirror within each superpixel adaptively relays light between a panchromatic imaging channel and a hyperspectral

  11. Semi-decentralized adaptive fuzzy control for cooperative multirobot systems with H(infinity) motion/internal force tracking performance.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kuang-Yow; Chiu, Chian-Song; Liu, P

    2002-01-01

    We present a semi-decentralized adaptive fuzzy control scheme for cooperative multirobot systems to achieve H(infinity) performance in motion and internal force tracking. First, we reformulate the overall system dynamics into a fully actuated system with constraints. To cope with both parametric and nonparametric uncertainties, the controller for each robot consists of two parts: 1) model-based adaptive controller; and 2) adaptive fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The model-based adaptive controller handles the nominal dynamics which results in both zero motion and internal force errors for a pure parametric uncertain system. The FLC part handles the unstructured dynamics and external disturbances. An H(infinity) tracking problem defined by a novel performance criterion is given and solved in the sequel. Hence, a robust controller satisfying the disturbance attenuation is derived being simple and singularity-free. Asymptotic convergence is obtained when the fuzzy approximation error is bounded with finite energy. Maintaining the same results, the proposed controller is further simplified for easier implementation. Finally, the numerical simulation results for two cooperative planar robots transporting an object illustrate the expected performance. PMID:18238126

  12. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  13. Optimal coordination method of opportunistic array radars for multi-target-tracking-based radio frequency stealth in clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenkai; Salous, Sana; Li, Hailin; Tian, Yubo

    2015-11-01

    Opportunistic array radar is a new radar system that can improve the modern radar performance effectively. In order to improve its radio frequency stealth ability, a novel coordination method of opportunistic array radars in the network for target tracking in clutter is presented. First, the database of radar cross section for targets is built, then the signal-to-noise ratio for netted radars is computed according to the radar cross section and range of target. Then the joint probabilistic data association algorithm of tracking is improved with consideration of emitted power of the opportunistic array radar, which has a main impact on detection probability for tracking in clutter. Finally, with the help of grey relational grade and covariance control, the opportunistic array radar with the minimum radiated power will be selected for better radio frequency stealth performance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm not only has excellent tracking accuracy in clutter but also saves much more radiated power comparing with other methods.

  14. A Dual Track Treadmill in a Virtual Reality Environment as a Countermeasure for Neurovestibular Adaptations in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAndrea, Susan E.; Kahelin, Michael W.; Horowitz, Jay G.; OConnor, Philip A.

    2004-01-01

    While the neurovestibular system is capable of adapting to altered environments such as microgravity, the adaptive state achieved in space in inadequate for 1G. This leads to gait and postural instabilities when returning to a gravity environment and may create serious problems in future missions to Mars. New methods are needed to improve the understanding of the adaptive capabilities of the human neurovestibular system and to develop more effective countermeasures. The concept behind the current study is that by challenging the neurovestibular system while walking or running, a treadmill can help to readjust the relationship between the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive signals that are altered in a microgravity environment. As a countermeasure, this device could also benefit the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems and at the same time decrease the overall time spent exercising. The overall goal of this research is to design, develop, build and test a dual track treadmill, which utilizes virtual reality,

  15. Adaptive sliding mode dynamic controller with integrator in the loop for nonholonomic wheeled mobile robot trajectory tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Muhammad; Junaid Khan, Muhammad; Cai, Ning

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, novel adaptive sliding mode dynamic controller with integrator in the loop is proposed for nonholonomic wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The modified kinematics controller is used to generate kinematics velocities of WMR which are subsequently used as the input to adaptive dynamic controller. Actuator dynamics are also derived to generate actuator voltage of WMR through torque and velocity vectors. Stability of both kinematics and dynamic controller is presented using Lyapunov stability analysis. The proposed scheme is verified and validated using computer simulations for tracking the desired trajectory of WMR. The performance of proposed scheme is compared with standard backstepping kinematics controller and classical sliding mode control. In addition, the performance is further compared with standard backstepping kinematics controller with adaptive sliding mode controller without integrator. It is shown that the proposed scheme exhibits zero steady state error, fast error convergence and robustness in the presence of continuous disturbances and uncertainties.

  16. A Dual Track Treadmill in a Virtual Reality Environment as a Countermeasure for Neurovestibular Adaptations in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAndrea, Susan E.; Kahelin, Michael W.; Horowitz, Jay G.; OConnor, Philip A.

    2004-01-01

    While the neurovestibular system is capable of adapting to altered environments such as microgravity, the adaptive state achieved in space in inadequate for 1G. This leads to giant and postural instabilities when returning to a gravity environment and may create serious problems in future mission to Mars. New methods are needed to improve the understanding of the adaptive capabilities of the human neurovestibular system and to develop more effective countermeasures. The concept behind the current study is that by challenging the neurovestibular system while walking or running a treadmill can help to read just the relationship between the visual, vestibular and proprioceptive signals that are altered in a microgravity environment. As a countermeasure, this device could also benefit the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems and at the same time decrease the overall time spent exercising. The overall goal of this research is to design, develop, build and test a dual track treadmill, which utilizes virtual reality, VR, displays.

  17. High Frequency Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls in a Liquid-Fueled Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2003-01-01

    This effort extends into high frequency (>500 Hz), an earlier developed adaptive control algorithm for the suppression of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquidfueled combustor. The earlier work covered the development of a controls algorithm for the suppression of a low frequency (280 Hz) combustion instability based on simulations, with no hardware testing involved. The work described here includes changes to the simulation and controller design necessary to control the high frequency instability, augmentations to the control algorithm to improve its performance, and finally hardware testing and results with an experimental combustor rig developed for the high frequency case. The Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control (ASPAC) algorithm modulates the fuel flow in the combustor with a control phase that continuously slides back and forth within the phase region that reduces the amplitude of the instability. The results demonstrate the power of the method - that it can identify and suppress the instability even when the instability amplitude is buried in the noise of the combustor pressure. The successful testing of the ASPAC approach helped complete an important NASA milestone to demonstrate advanced technologies for low-emission combustors.

  18. Electron content near the lunar surface using dual-frequency VLBI tracking data in a single lunar orbiter mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Na; Ping, Jin-Song

    2015-05-01

    In VLBI observations of Vstar, a subsatellite of the Japanese lunar mission SELENE, there were opportunities for lunar grazing occultation when Vstar was very close to the limb of the Moon. This kind of chance made it possible to probe the thin plasma layer above the Moon's surface as a meaningful by-product of VLBI, by using the radio occultation method with coherent radio waves from the S/X bands. The dual-frequency measurements were carried out at Earth-based VLBI stations. In the line-of-sight direction between the satellite and the ground-based tracking station where VLBI measurements were made, the effects of the terrestrial ionosphere, interplanetary plasma and the thin lunar ionosphere mixed together in the combined observables of dual-frequency Doppler shift and phase shift. To separate the variation of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) near the surface of the Moon from the mixed signal, the influences of the terrestrial ionosphere and interplanetary plasma have been removed by using an extrapolation method based on a short-term trend. The lunar TEC is estimated from the dual-frequency observation for Vstar from UT 22:18 to UT 22:20 on 2008 June 28 at several tracking stations. The TEC results obtained from VLBI sites are identical, however, they are not as remarkable as the result obtained at the Usuda deep space tracking station.

  19. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  20. Egalisation adaptative et non invasive de la reponse temps-frequence d'une petite salle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Tristan

    is rather seen as a "black box" including inputs and outputs. The problem studied is the characterization of an electro-acoustic system as having a single input signal transmitted through a speaker in a room, and a single output signal picked up by a microphone at the listening position. The originality of this work lies not only in the technique developed to arrive at this characterization, but especially in the constraints imposed in order to get there. The majority of technics documented to this date involve using excitation signals dedicated the measure; signals with favorable characteristics to simplify the calculation of the impulse response of the audio chain. Known signals are played through a loudspeaker and the room's response to excitation is captured with a microphone at the listening position. The measurement exercise itself poses problem, especially when there is an audience in the room. Also, the response of the room may change between the time of the measurement and time of listening. If the room is reconfigured for example, a curtain is pulled or the stage moved. In the case of a theater, the speaker used may vary depending on the context. A survey of work in which solutions to this problem are suggested was made. The main objective is to develop an innovative method to capture the impulse response of an audio chain without the knowledge of the audience. To do this, no signal dedicated to the measurement should be used. The developed method allows the capture of the electro-acoustic impulse response exploiting only the music signals when it comes to a concert hall or using a movie sound track when a movie is a movie theater. As a result, an algorithm for modeling dynamicly and continuously the response of a room. A finite impulse response filter acting as a digital equalizer must be designed and also able to dynamically adapt the behavior of the room, even when it varies over time. A multi spectral resolution method is used to build, for diffrent

  1. Adaptive low-bandwidth tracking of Galileo and Pioneer 10 carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watola, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    In the Deep Space Network, tracking of residual carrier phase typically occurs with a fixed-bandwidth phase-locked loop using a bandwidth sufficiently wide to prevent loss of lock under worst-case conditions of signal dynamics, received signal phase noise, and receiver phase noise. Much of the time, however, such a high bandwidth is not required and may inflict unnecessarily heavy penalties on loop signal-to-noise ratios. This article describes a technique for improving tracking performance by permitting initial tracking at narrow bandwidths and gradually widening the loop as needed. The cost is a requirement for signal buffering, which is relatively inexpensive for low data rate applications. Results based on off-line processing of recorded carrier data from Galileo and Pioneer 10 are presented, and show potential 10-16 dB gains in loop SNR over worst-case fixed-bandwidth tracking.

  2. Investigation of the robustness of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for tracking moving tumors in external radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili

    2014-12-01

    In external radiotherapy of dynamic targets such as lung and breast cancers, accurate correlation models are utilized to extract real time tumor position by means of external surrogates in correlation with the internal motion of tumors. In this study, a correlation method based on the neuro-fuzzy model is proposed to correlate the input external motion data with internal tumor motion estimation in real-time mode, due to its robustness in motion tracking. An initial test of the performance of this model was reported in our previous studies. In this work by implementing some modifications it is resulted that ANFIS is still robust to track tumor motion more reliably by reducing the motion estimation error remarkably. After configuring new version of our ANFIS model, its performance was retrospectively tested over ten patients treated with Synchrony Cyberknife system. In order to assess the performance of our model, the predicted tumor motion as model output was compared with respect to the state of the art model. Final analyzed results show that our adaptive neuro-fuzzy model can reduce tumor tracking errors more significantly, as compared with ground truth database and even tumor tracking methods presented in our previous works. PMID:25412886

  3. A parallel adaptive finite element simplified spherical harmonics approximation solver for frequency domain fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yujie; Zhu, Banghe; Shen, Haiou; Rasmussen, John C; Wang, Ge; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2010-08-21

    Fluorescence molecular imaging/tomography may play an important future role in preclinical research and clinical diagnostics. Time- and frequency-domain fluorescence imaging can acquire more measurement information than the continuous wave (CW) counterpart, improving the image quality of fluorescence molecular tomography. Although diffusion approximation (DA) theory has been extensively applied in optical molecular imaging, high-order photon migration models need to be further investigated to match quantitation provided by nuclear imaging. In this paper, a frequency-domain parallel adaptive finite element solver is developed with simplified spherical harmonics (SP(N)) approximations. To fully evaluate the performance of the SP(N) approximations, a fast time-resolved tetrahedron-based Monte Carlo fluorescence simulator suitable for complex heterogeneous geometries is developed using a convolution strategy to realize the simulation of the fluorescence excitation and emission. The validation results show that high-order SP(N) can effectively correct the modeling errors of the diffusion equation, especially when the tissues have high absorption characteristics or when high modulation frequency measurements are used. Furthermore, the parallel adaptive mesh evolution strategy improves the modeling precision and the simulation speed significantly on a realistic digital mouse phantom. This solver is a promising platform for fluorescence molecular tomography using high-order approximations to the radiative transfer equation. PMID:20671350

  4. Mount for continuously orienting a collector dish in a system adapted to perform both diurnal and seasonal solar tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.; Lawson, B. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A collector dish is continuously oriented toward the sun in a system adapted to perform both diurnal and seasonal solar tracking. The mount is characterized by a rigid, angulated axle having a linear midportion supporting a collector dish, and oppositely extended end portions normally related to the midportion of the axle and received in spaced journals. The longitudinal axis of symmetry for the midportion of the axle is coincident with a seasonal axis while the axes of the journals are coincident with a diurnal axis paralleling the earth's polar axis. Drive means are provided for periodically displacing the axle about the diurnal axis at a substantially constant rate, while other drive means are provided for periodically indexing the dish through 1 deg about the seasonal axis whereby the position of the dish relative to the axle is varied for accommodating seasonal tracking as changes in the angle of inclination of the polar axis occurs.

  5. Reversal of the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in cat spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion.

    PubMed

    Brownstone, Robert M; Krawitz, Sherry; Jordan, Larry M

    2011-03-01

    In spinal motoneurons, late spike frequency adaptation (SFA) is defined as the slowing of the firing rate over tens of seconds and can be seen during sustained or intermittent current injection. Although the function of late SFA is not known, it may result in a decrease in force production over time, or muscle fatigue. Because locomotion can persist for long periods of time without fatigue, late SFA was studied using intracellular recordings from adult cat motoneurons during fictive locomotion. Of eight lumbar motoneurons studied, all showed late adaptation during control conditions, but none demonstrated late adaptation during locomotor activity. The most consistent properties that correlated with the presence or absence of late SFA were those related to availability of fast, inactivating sodium channels, particularly action potential rate of rise. Evidence of the reversal of late SFA during locomotion was present for several minutes following locomotor trials, consistent with the suggestion that SFA is modulated through slow metabotropic pathways. The abolition of late adaptation in spinal motoneurons during fictive locomotion is an example of a state-dependent change in the "intrinsic" properties of mammalian motoneurons. This change contributes to increased excitability of motoneurons during locomotion and results in robust firing during sustained locomotion. PMID:21177992

  6. Adaptive Zero-Padding OFDM over Frequency-Selective Multipath Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Neng; Blostein, Steven D.

    2004-12-01

    We present a novel bandwidth (BW) efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme with adaptive zero-padding (AZP-OFDM) for wireless transmission. Redundancy issues in OFDM based on cyclic prefix (CP), zero-padding (ZP), as well as no guard interval (NGI) systems are analyzed. A novel system design criterion based on the channel matrix condition is studied and applied to the design of an AZP-OFDM system. Simulation results have shown that the proposed AZP-OFDM offers performance similar to that of CP-OFDM, complexity similar to that of ZP-OFDM, with BW efficiency higher than that of both CP- and ZP-OFDM in channels with small to moderate delay spread. In channels with large delay spread, AZP scheme adaptively maintains high performance at the expense of BW efficiency. Essentially, AZP-OFDM offers a more flexible tradeoff between symbol recovery, BW efficiency, and complexity.

  7. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, Martin J. Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  8. Application of adaptive optics to scintillation correction in phased array high-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theurer, Timothy E.; Bristow, William A.

    2015-06-01

    At high frequency, diffraction during ionospheric propagation can yield wavefronts whose amplitude and phase fluctuate over the physical dimensions of phased array radars such as those of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Distortion in the wavefront introduces amplitude and phase scintillation into the geometric beamformed signal while reducing radar performance in terms of angular resolution and achieved array gain. A scintillation correction algorithm based on adaptive optics techniques is presented. An experiment conducted using two SuperDARN radars is presented that quantifies the effect of wavefront distortion and demonstrates a reduction in observed scintillation and improvement in radar performance post scintillation correction.

  9. Adaptive PD Tracking Control of Gimbal on Satellite Based on Parameter Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Min; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Bai, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hao-Yu

    As key component of pointing and tracking mission of satellite, gimbal with two or more degree of freedom is usually mounted on the satellite in order to fulfill certain space mission, such as optical communication between satellites, target recognition, antenna with certain pointing direction and so on. In these missions, gimbal is mostly used to point to and track a space target or a given track. However, for most control method, because of their constant feedback parameter, the gimbal still track target with constant speed when the target is in high-speed or the satellite mounted with gimbal is suddenly undertaken shock. In fact, the gimbal could track target with different speed to improve pointing accuracy under particular circumstance. In order to solve the problem, an algorithm to revise feedback parameter is designed to be different functions of pointing angle error of gimbal. At last a simulation is carried out to verify the improvement of joint angle error using this algorithm under particular circumstance. The results proved that the joint angle error is efficiently decreased with feedback parameter revision.

  10. Adaptive frequency comb illumination for interferometry in the case of nested two-beam cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, Irina; Leuchs, Gerd; Mantel, Klaus; Schwider, Johannes

    2011-09-01

    The homogeneity test of glass plates in a Fizeau interferometer is hampered by the superposition of multiple interference signals coming from the surfaces of the glass plate as well as the empty Fizeau cavity. To evaluate interferograms resulting from such nested cavities, various approaches such as the use of broadband light sources have been applied. In this paper, we propose an adaptive frequency comb interferometer to accomplish the cavity selection. An adjustable Fabry-Perot resonator is used to generate a variable frequency comb that can be matched to the length of the desired cavity. Owing to its flexibility, the number of measurements needed for the homogeneity test can be reduced to four. Furthermore, compared to approaches using a two-beam interferometer as a filter for the broadband light source, the visibility of the fringe system is considerably higher if a Fabry-Perot filter is applied.

  11. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N₀) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N₀. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N₀. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  12. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-01-01

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N0) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N0. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N0. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area. PMID:26343683

  13. Neural network-based adaptive consensus tracking control for multi-agent systems under actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Jia, Yingmin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a distributed output feedback consensus tracking control scheme is proposed for second-order multi-agent systems in the presence of uncertain nonlinear dynamics, external disturbances, input constraints, and partial loss of control effectiveness. The proposed controllers incorporate reduced-order filters to account for the unmeasured states, and the neural networks technique is implemented to approximate the uncertain nonlinear dynamics in the synthesis of control algorithms. In order to compensate the partial loss of actuator effectiveness faults, fault-tolerant parts are included in controllers. Using the Lyapunov approach and graph theory, it is proved that the controllers guarantee a group of agents that simultaneously track a common time-varying state of leader, even when the state of leader is available only to a subset of the members of a group. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed consensus tracking method.

  14. DSP-based adaptive backstepping using the tracking errors for high-performance sensorless speed control of induction motor drive.

    PubMed

    Zaafouri, Abderrahmen; Ben Regaya, Chiheb; Ben Azza, Hechmi; Châari, Abdelkader

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a modified structure of the backstepping nonlinear control of the induction motor (IM) fitted with an adaptive backstepping speed observer. The control design is based on the backstepping technique complemented by the introduction of integral tracking errors action to improve its robustness. Unlike other research performed on backstepping control with integral action, the control law developed in this paper does not propose the increase of the number of system state so as not increase the complexity of differential equations resolution. The digital simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed control compared to the conventional PI control. The results analysis shows the characteristic robustness of the adaptive control to disturbances of the load, the speed variation and low speed. PMID:26653141

  15. Spike-frequency adaptation of a two-compartment neuron modulated by extracellular electric fields.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xile; Deng, Bin; Han, Chunxiao

    2015-06-01

    Spike-frequency adaptation has been shown to play an important role in neural coding. Based on a reduced two-compartment model, here we investigate how two common adaptation currents, i.e., voltage-sensitive potassium current (I(M)) and calcium-sensitive potassium current (I(AHP)), modulate neuronal responses to extracellular electric fields. It is shown that two adaptation mechanisms lead to distinct effects on the dynamical behavior of the neuron to electric fields. These effects depend on a neuronal morphological parameter that characterizes the ratio of soma area to total membrane area and internal coupling conductance. In the case of I(AHP) current, changing the morphological parameter switches spike initiation dynamics between saddle-node on invariant cycle bifurcation and supercritical Hopf bifurcation, whereas it only switches between subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations for I(M) current. Unlike the morphological parameter, internal coupling conductance is unable to alter the bifurcation scenario for both adaptation currents. We also find that the electric field threshold for triggering neuronal steady-state firing is determined by two parameters, especially by the morphological parameter. Furthermore, the neuron with I(AHP) current generates mixed-mode oscillations through the canard phenomenon for some small values of the morphological parameter. All these results suggest that morphological properties play a critical role in field-induced effects on neuronal dynamics, which could qualitatively alter the outcome of adaptation by modulating internal current between soma and dendrite. The findings are readily testable in experiments, which could help to reveal the mechanisms underlying how the neuron responds to electric field stimulus. PMID:25652337

  16. BK potassium channels facilitate high-frequency firing and cause early spike frequency adaptation in rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ning; Vervaeke, Koen; Storm, Johan F

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal potassium (K+) channels are usually regarded as largely inhibitory, i.e. reducing excitability. Here we show that BK-type calcium-activated K+ channels enhance high-frequency firing and cause early spike frequency adaptation in neurons. By combining slice electrophysiology and computational modelling, we investigated functions of BK channels in regulation of high-frequency firing in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. Blockade of BK channels by iberiotoxin (IbTX) selectively reduced the initial discharge frequency in response to strong depolarizing current injections, thus reducing the early spike frequency adaptation. IbTX also blocked the fast afterhyperpolarization (fAHP), slowed spike rise and decay, and elevated the spike threshold. Simulations with a computational model of a CA1 pyramidal cell confirmed that the BK channel-mediated rapid spike repolarization and fAHP limits activation of slower K+ channels (in particular the delayed rectifier potassium current (IDR)) and Na+ channel inactivation, whereas M-, sAHP- or SK-channels seem not to be important for the early facilitating effect. Since the BK current rapidly inactivates, its facilitating effect diminishes during the initial discharge, thus producing early spike frequency adaptation by an unconventional mechanism. This mechanism is highly frequency dependent. Thus, IbTX had virtually no effect at spike frequencies < 40 Hz. Furthermore, extracellular field recordings demonstrated (and model simulations supported) that BK channels contribute importantly to high-frequency burst firing in response to excitatory synaptic input to distal dendrites. These results strongly support the idea that BK channels play an important role for early high-frequency, rapidly adapting firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, thus promoting the type of bursting that is characteristic of these cells in vivo, during behaviour. PMID:17303637

  17. A characterization of a single-trial adaptive filter and its implementation in the frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, J P; Isenhart, R; Sandman, C A

    1989-10-01

    A single-trial adaptive filter (SAF) was implemented in the frequency domain (FDAF) by using the Fast Fourier Transform. The FDAF is significantly more efficient than the SAF. In the data presented the FDAF ran approximately 2 times faster than the SAF. For time series containing larger numbers of data points (n) the efficiency of the calculation will increase on the order of N/Ln(N). The FDAF was tested under a variety of conditions to determine the limits of its usefulness. Pre-filtering the data was found to be necessary to prevent the FDAF from lining up on high frequency activity not related to the signal. The importance of minimizing the amount of low frequency noise was emphasized since it adversely affected the performance of the FDAF and was difficult to filter. The single-trial latencies predicted by the FDAF were much more sensitive to increasing noise than the final wave form. In the absence of excessive low frequency noise a negative exponential relationship was found between the mean error in latency prediction and the SNR estimate. Since the SAF technique is also used to determine signal latency in single sweep data the SNR estimate can be a useful test to determine if the FDAF is locating the signal correctly or merely amplifying chance regularities in noisy data. PMID:2477222

  18. Multi-frequency Phase Unwrap from Noisy Data: Adaptive Least Squares Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkovnik, Vladimir; Bioucas-Dias, José

    2010-04-01

    Multiple frequency interferometry is, basically, a phase acquisition strategy aimed at reducing or eliminating the ambiguity of the wrapped phase observations or, equivalently, reducing or eliminating the fringe ambiguity order. In multiple frequency interferometry, the phase measurements are acquired at different frequencies (or wavelengths) and recorded using the corresponding sensors (measurement channels). Assuming that the absolute phase to be reconstructed is piece-wise smooth, we use a nonparametric regression technique for the phase reconstruction. The nonparametric estimates are derived from a local least squares criterion, which, when applied to the multifrequency data, yields denoised (filtered) phase estimates with extended ambiguity (periodized), compared with the phase ambiguities inherent to each measurement frequency. The filtering algorithm is based on local polynomial (LPA) approximation for design of nonlinear filters (estimators) and adaptation of these filters to unknown smoothness of the spatially varying absolute phase [9]. For phase unwrapping, from filtered periodized data, we apply the recently introduced robust (in the sense of discontinuity preserving) PUMA unwrapping algorithm [1]. Simulations give evidence that the proposed algorithm yields state-of-the-art performance for continuous as well as for discontinues phase surfaces, enabling phase unwrapping in extraordinary difficult situations when all other algorithms fail.

  19. Frequency-shift low-pass filtering and least mean square adaptive filtering for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Li, Chunyu; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound image quality enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in medical imaging modality and an ongoing challenge to date. This paper investigates a method based on frequency-shift low-pass filtering (FSLF) and least mean square adaptive filtering (LMSAF) for ultrasound image quality enhancement. FSLF is used for processing the ultrasound signal in the frequency domain, while LMSAPF in the time domain. Firstly, FSLF shifts the center frequency of the focused signal to zero. Then the real and imaginary part of the complex data are filtered respectively by finite impulse response (FIR) low-pass filter. Thus the information around the center frequency are retained while the undesired ones, especially background noises are filtered. Secondly, LMSAF multiplies the signals with an automatically adjusted weight vector to further eliminate the noises and artifacts. Through the combination of the two filters, the ultrasound image is expected to have less noises and artifacts and higher resolution, and contrast. The proposed method was verified with the RF data of the CIRS phantom 055A captured by SonixTouch DAQ system. Experimental results show that the background noises and artifacts can be efficiently restrained, the wire object has a higher resolution and the contrast ratio (CR) can be enhanced for about 12dB to 15dB at different image depth comparing to delay-and-sum (DAS).

  20. Orbit-based analysis of nonlinear energetic ion dynamics in tokamaks. I. Effective mode number profile and resonant frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, Andreas; Shinohara, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear interactions between shear Alfvén modes and tangentially injected beam ions in the 150-400 keV range are studied numerically in a JT-60U tokamak scenario with realistic geometry, large magnetic drifts, and strong beam drive. For this purpose, the recently developed orbit-based resonance analysis (ORA) method for circulating particles is extended, so that it can be applied to the nonlinear regime, where the spectrum of orbit-based poloidal mode numbers m orb varies in time as the fast ions undergo wave-particle trapping and radial transport. In particular, the extended ORA method captures the effect of nonlinear overlaps between resonances associated with neighboring harmonics ( m orb , n ) and ( m orb + 1 , n ) that cause long-distance ballistic transport. Two cases with low toroidal mode numbers n ≳ 1 are studied: an n = 1 mode without resonance overlap and a strongly driven n = 3 mode with resonance overlap. For both cases, an effective radial profile of the resonant poloidal mode number m res = M eff ( r ) is computed and used to track the effective resonant frequency ω res ( t ) of individual particles during their radial motion r(t). In Paper II, this frequency tracking technique will be applied to study the nonlinear frequency chirping and convective amplification of the modes.

  1. Multivariable output feedback robust adaptive tracking control design for a class of delayed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Gutman, Per-Olof

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a model reference adaptive control scheme for a class of multi-input multi-output nonlinearly perturbed dynamic systems with unknown time-varying state delays which is also robust with respect to an external disturbance with unknown bounds. The output feedback adaptive control scheme uses feedback actions only, and thus does not require a direct measurement of the command or disturbance signals. A suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii type functional is introduced to design the adaptation algorithms and to prove stability.

  2. Adaptive NN tracking control of uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems with nonaffine dead-zone input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Tong, Shaocheng

    2015-03-01

    In the paper, an adaptive tracking control design is studied for a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems with dead-zone input. The considered systems are of the nonaffine pure-feedback form and the dead-zone input appears nonlinearly in the systems. The contributions of the paper are that: 1) it is for the first time to investigate the control problem for this class of discrete-time systems with dead-zone; 2) there are major difficulties for stabilizing such systems and in order to overcome the difficulties, the systems are transformed into an n-step-ahead predictor but nonaffine function is still existent; and 3) an adaptive compensative term is constructed to compensate for the parameters of the dead-zone. The neural networks are used to approximate the unknown functions in the transformed systems. Based on the Lyapunov theory, it is proven that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of zero. Two simulation examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of the control approach in the paper. PMID:24968366

  3. Tracking lexical access in speech production: electrophysiological correlates of word frequency and cognate effects.

    PubMed

    Strijkers, Kristof; Costa, Albert; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-04-01

    The present study establishes an electrophysiological index of lexical access in speech production by exploring the locus of the frequency and cognate effects during overt naming. We conducted 2 event-related potential (ERP) studies with 16 Spanish-Catalan bilinguals performing a picture naming task in Spanish (L1) and 16 Catalan-Spanish bilinguals performing a picture naming task in Spanish (L2). Behavioral results showed a clear frequency effect and an interaction between frequency and cognate status. The ERP elicited during the production of high-frequency words diverged from the low-frequency ERP between 150 and 200 ms post-target presentation and kept diverging until voice onset. The same results were obtained when comparing cognate and noncognate conditions. Positive correlations were observed between naming latencies and mean amplitude of the P2 component following the divergence, for both the lexical frequency and the cognate effects. We conclude that lexical access during picture naming begins approximately 180 ms after picture presentation. Furthermore, these results offer direct electrophysiological evidence for an early influence of frequency and cognate status in speech production. The theoretical implications of these findings for models of speech production are discussed. PMID:19679542

  4. Adaptive tracking and compensation of laser spot based on ant colony optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihong; Ke, Xizheng; Bai, Runbing; Hu, Qidi

    2009-05-01

    Because the effect of atmospheric scattering and atmospheric turbulence on laser signal of atmospheric absorption,laser spot twinkling, beam drift and spot split-up occur ,when laser signal transmits in the atmospheric channel. The phenomenon will be seriously affects the stability and the reliability of laser spot receiving system. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric turbulence, we adopt optimum control thoughts in the field of artificial intelligence, propose a novel adaptive optical control technology-- model-free optimized adaptive control technology, analyze low-order pattern wave-front error theory, in which an -adaptive optical system is employed to adjust errors, and design its adaptive structure system. Ant colony algorithm is the control core algorithm, which is characteristic of positive feedback, distributed computing and greedy heuristic search. . The ant colony algorithm optimization of adaptive optical phase compensation is simulated. Simulation result shows that, the algorithm can effectively control laser energy distribution, improve laser light beam quality, and enhance signal-to-noise ratio of received signal.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Jin, Li

    2008-08-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (Tf) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials.

  6. Adaptive Kalman filter implementation by a neural network scheme for tracking maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoozegar, Farid; Sundareshan, Malur K.

    1995-07-01

    Conventional target tracking algorithms based on linear estimation techniques perform quite efficiently when the target motion does not involve maneuvers. Target maneuvers involving short term accelerations, however, cause a bias (e.g. jump) in the measurement sequence, which unless compensated, results in divergence of the Kalman filter that provides estimates of target position and velocity, in turn leading to a loss of track. Accurate compensation for the bias requires processing more samples of the input signals which adds to the computational complexity. The waiting time for more samples can also result in a total loss of track since the target can begin a new maneuver and if the target begins a new maneuver before the first one is compensated for, the filter would never converge. Most of the proposed algorithms in the current literature hence have the disadvantage of losing the target in short term accelerations, i.e., when the duration of acceleration is comparable to the time period between the measurements. The time lag for maneuver modelings, which have been based on Bayesian probability calculations and linear estimation shall propose a neural network scheme for the modeling of target maneuvers. The primary motivation for employing compensation. The parallel processing capability of a properly trained neural network can permit fast processing of features to yield correct acceleration estimates and hence can take the burden off the primary Kalman filter which still provides the target position and velocity estimates.

  7. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  8. Technical specifications of low-frequency radio identification bedload tracking from field experiments: Differences in antennas, tags and operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, F.; Piégay, H.; Vaudor, L.; Bultingaire, L.; Fantino, G.

    2015-06-01

    Low-frequency passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) have been increasingly used for tracking bedload transport in gravel-bed rivers. Prior studies have reported high recovery rates in small streams, while recovery rates remained much lower in large systems, in large part because of the limited reading distance of the tags (< 1 m). Some laboratory tests have identified controlling factors for detection ranges (tag and antenna size, tag orientation, burial, submergence, etc.). Beyond these tests, improving our understanding of PIT tag functioning, using different equipment within different environments, is still needed in order to select the most suitable device for each geomorphic context. We address this knowledge gap with technical specifications for a low-frequency radio identification (RFID) device by working for the first time with real fluvial constraints, i.e., the gravel deposits and the aquatic channel. The three-dimensional detection envelopes of two types of tags and three types of antennas are quantified as well as the effect of practices (interoperator bias, battery power) on the detection. The interoperator variability and the intertag variability can be considered as negligible. The influence of burial in dry and water-saturated sediment and the influence of water immersion are shown to be minor. Finally, we summarize practical implications for RFID bedload tracking through these experiments.

  9. Demonstration (DEMO) of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system for tracking and monitoring of nuclear materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H. C.; Chen, K.; Liu, Y. Y.; Shuler, J.

    2010-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) [Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-45)] Packaging Certification Program (PCP) has developed a radiofrequency identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system for the management of nuclear materials packages during storage and transportation. The system, developed by the PCP team at Argonne National Laboratory, involves hardware modification, application software development, secured database and web server development, and irradiation experiments. In April 2008, Argonne tested key features of the RFID tracking and monitoring system in a weeklong, 1700 mile (2736 km) demonstration employing 14 empty type B fissile material drums of three designs (models 9975, 9977 and ES-3100) that have been certified for shipment by the DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The demonstration successfully integrated global positioning system (GPS) technology for vehicle tracking, satellite/cellular (general packet radio service, or GPRS) technologies for wireless communication, and active RFID tags with multiple sensors (seal integrity, shock, temperature, humidity and battery status) on drums. In addition, the demonstration integrated geographic information system (GIS) technology with automatic alarm notifications of incidents and generated buffer zone reports for emergency response and management of staged incidents. The demonstration was sponsored by EM and the US National Nuclear Security Administration, with the participation of Argonne, Savannah River and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. Over 50 authorised stakeholders across the country observed the demonstration via secured Internet access. The DOE PCP and national laboratories are working on several RFID system implementation projects at selected DOE sites, as well as continuing device and systems development and widening applications beyond DOE sites and possibly beyond nuclear materials to include other radioactive materials.

  10. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P < 0.001), with minimal phase changes, such that mean retinal image slip was held below 5 degrees/s. However, no corresponding modulation in vestibuloocular reflex gain occurred with increasing peak head velocity during a control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Vehicle-track interaction at high frequencies - Modelling of a flexible rotating wheelset in non-inertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiral, A.; Alonso, A.; Giménez, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle-track interaction in the mid- and high-frequency range has become an important issue for rolling-stock manufacturers, railway operators and administrations. Previous modelling approaches have been focused on the development of flexible wheelset-track systems based on the assumption that the unsprung masses are decoupled from the high-frequency dynamic behaviour of carbody and bogies. In this respect, the available flexible wheelset models account for gyroscopic and inertial effects due to the main rotation but are, in general, developed from the viewpoint of inertial spaces and consequently restricted to the study of tangent layouts. The aim of this paper is to present the formulation of a flexible rotating wheelset derived within the framework of a non-inertial vehicle moving reference frame. This brings a double advantage; on the one hand, the formulation is not restricted to tangent tracks, but is also suitable for the study of transition curves and curve negotiation. On the other hand, the use of a vehicle moving reference frame allows the introduction of the hypothesis of small displacement for the degrees of freedom of the wheelset. This hypothesis is not applied to the pitch angle, as it is associated with the main axis of rotation. In addition, unlike previous flexible wheelset models that only consider the rotation around the main axis, all the degrees of freedom will be considered when developing the dynamic equations of motion. Results for the proposed model will be presented and the influence of the inertial and gyroscopic terms not taken into account in previous derived formulations will be evaluated.

  12. The Use of a Shelter Software a to Track Frequency and Selected Risk Factors for Feline Upper Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kommedal, Ann Therese; Wagner, Denae; Hurley, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Feline upper respiratory infection is a common disease in animal shelters. Without monitoring, effective control and prevention is difficult. We looked at a software system a used in shelters across the United States to determine if it can be used to track URI frequency and risk factors in a population. Reports from the software system a were compared to data collected manually. This showed that data currently collected were not useful for tracking URI frequency and risk factors. However, potential exists to increase the practicality and usefulness of this shelter software system to monitor URI and other diseases. Abstract Objective—Feline upper respiratory infection (URI) is a common, multi-factorial infectious disease syndrome endemic to many animal shelters. Although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in shelter cats, URI is seldom formally monitored in shelter cat populations. Without monitoring, effective control and prevention of this often endemic disease is difficult. We looked at an integrated case management software system a for animal care organizations, widely used in shelters across the United States. Shelter staff routinely enter information regarding individual animals and disease status, but do not commonly use the software system to track frequency of disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if the software system a can be used to track URI frequency and selected risk factors in a population, and to evaluate the quality and completeness of the data as currently collected in a shelter. Design (type of study)—Descriptive Survey. Animals (or Sample)—317 cats in an animal shelter. Procedures—Reports from the software system a containing data regarding daily inventory, daily intake, animal identification, location, age, vaccination status, URI diagnosis and URI duration were evaluated. The reports were compared to data collected manually by an observer (Ann Therese Kommedal) to assess discrepancies

  13. An adaptive compensation algorithm for temperature drift of micro-electro-mechanical systems gyroscopes using a strong tracking Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to -2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation. PMID:25985165

  14. An Adaptive Compensation Algorithm for Temperature Drift of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Gyroscopes Using a Strong Tracking Kalman Filter

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yibo; Li, Xisheng; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for a system integrated with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) gyroscopes and a compass to eliminate the influence from the environment, compensate the temperature drift precisely, and improve the accuracy of the MEMS gyroscope. We use a simplified drift model and changing but appropriate model parameters to implement this algorithm. The model of MEMS gyroscope temperature drift is constructed mostly on the basis of the temperature sensitivity of the gyroscope. As the state variables of a strong tracking Kalman filter (STKF), the parameters of the temperature drift model can be calculated to adapt to the environment under the support of the compass. These parameters change intelligently with the environment to maintain the precision of the MEMS gyroscope in the changing temperature. The heading error is less than 0.6° in the static temperature experiment, and also is kept in the range from 5° to −2° in the dynamic outdoor experiment. This demonstrates that the proposed algorithm exhibits strong adaptability to a changing temperature, and performs significantly better than KF and MLR to compensate the temperature drift of a gyroscope and eliminate the influence of temperature variation. PMID:25985165

  15. Adaptive grid artifact reduction in the frequency domain with spatial properties for x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2012-03-01

    By applying band-rejection filters (BRFs) in the frequency domain, we can efficiently reduce the grid artifacts, which are caused by using the antiscatter grid in obtaining x-ray digital images. However, if the frequency component of the grid artifact is relatively close to that of the object, then simply applying a BRF may seriously distort the object and cause the ringing artifacts. Since the ringing artifacts are quite dependent on the shape of the object to be recovered in the spatial domain, the spatial property of the x-ray image should be considered in applying BRFs. In this paper, we propose an adaptive filtering scheme, which can cooperate such different properties in the spatial domain. In the spatial domain, we compare several approaches, such as the mangnitude, edge, and frequency-modulation (FM) model-based algorithms, to detect the ringing artifact or the grid artifact component. In order to perform a robust detection whether the ringing artifact is strong or not, we employ the FM model for the extracted signal, which corresponds to a specific grid artifact. A detection of the position for the ringing artifact is then conducted based on the slope detection algorithm, which is commonly used as an FM discriminator in the communication area. However, the detected position of the ringing artifact is not accurate. Hence, in order to obtain an accurate detection result, we combine the edge-based approach with the FM model approach. Numerical result for real x-ray images shows that applying BRFs in the frequency domain in conjunction with the spatial property of the ringing artifact can successfully remove the grid artifact, distorting the object less.

  16. Understanding Attention to Adaptive Hints in Educational Games: An Eye-Tracking Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conati, Cristina; Jaques, Natasha; Muir, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a user study that investigates the factors affecting student attention to user-adaptive hints during interaction with an educational computer game. The study focuses on Prime Climb, an educational game designed to provide individualized support for learning number factorization skills in the form of textual hints based on a…

  17. Maximum power tracking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, G.

    1983-03-01

    By definition, a maximum power tracking device causes the photovoltaic array to operate on the locus of maximum power points within a specified accuracy. There are limitations to the application of maximum power tracking. A prerequisite is that the load be capable of absorbing all of the power availble at all times. Battery chargers, electrical heaters, water pumps, and most significantly, returning power to the utility grid, are prime examples of applications that are adaptable to maximum power tracking. Maximum power tracking is available to either dc or ac loads. An inverter equipped with a means of changing input voltage by controlling its input impedance can deliver maximum power to ac loads. The inverter can be fixed or variable frequency and fixed or variable voltage, but must be compatible with the ac load. The discussion includes applications, techniques, and cost factors.

  18. Visualizing and Tracking Evolving Features in 3D Unstructured and Adaptive Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, D.; Zabusky, N.

    2002-08-01

    The massive amounts of time-varying datasets being generated demand new visualization and quantification techniques. Visualization alone is not sufficient. Without proper measurement information/computations real science cannot be done. Our focus is this work was to combine visualization with quantification of the data to allow for advanced querying and searching. As part of this proposal, we have developed a feature extraction adn tracking methodology which allows researcher to identify features of interest and follow their evolution over time. The implementation is distributed and operates over data In-situ: where it is stored and when it was computed.

  19. Adaptive Region of Interest (ROI) detection and tracking for respiration measurement in thermal video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Nelson, Jill K.; Williams, Timothy; O'Kane, Barbara L.

    2012-06-01

    Respiration rate is a key guide for evaluating the physiological state of an individual during triage. Recent work has shown that high resolution thermal cameras can passively and remotely obtain respiration signals under controlled environmental conditions. This paper introduces an automatic end-to-end respiration signal measurement (through signal detection) approach based on statistical computation of the image intensities around the human nostril area in a thermal video. A method is presented to detect and track the nostril area and to calculate statistical values of the pixel intensity around the nostril area and correlate the statistical values with respiration signals from a contact sensor such as transducer belt. Results are based upon data collected from 200 subjects across two different experiments. This work provides not only a new image processing tool for tracking facial ROIs in thermal imagery, but also enhances our capability to provide non-contact, remote, passive, and real-time methods for measuring respiration for security and medical applications.

  20. Suppression Measured from Chinchilla Auditory-Nerve-Fiber Responses Following Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Adaptive-Tracking and Systems-Identification Approaches.

    PubMed

    Sayles, Mark; Walls, Michael K; Heinz, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The compressive nonlinearity of cochlear signal transduction, reflecting outer-hair-cell function, manifests as suppressive spectral interactions; e.g., two-tone suppression. Moreover, for broadband sounds, there are multiple interactions between frequency components. These frequency-dependent nonlinearities are important for neural coding of complex sounds, such as speech. Acoustic-trauma-induced outer-hair-cell damage is associated with loss of nonlinearity, which auditory prostheses attempt to restore with, e.g., "multi-channel dynamic compression" algorithms.Neurophysiological data on suppression in hearing-impaired (HI) mammals are limited. We present data on firing-rate suppression measured in auditory-nerve-fiber responses in a chinchilla model of noise-induced hearing loss, and in normal-hearing (NH) controls at equal sensation level. Hearing-impaired (HI) animals had elevated single-fiber excitatory thresholds (by ~ 20-40 dB), broadened frequency tuning, and reduced-magnitude distortion-product otoacoustic emissions; consistent with mixed inner- and outer-hair-cell pathology. We characterized suppression using two approaches: adaptive tracking of two-tone-suppression threshold (62 NH, and 35 HI fibers), and Wiener-kernel analyses of responses to broadband noise (91 NH, and 148 HI fibers). Suppression-threshold tuning curves showed sensitive low-side suppression for NH and HI animals. High-side suppression thresholds were elevated in HI animals, to the same extent as excitatory thresholds. We factored second-order Wiener-kernels into excitatory and suppressive sub-kernels to quantify the relative strength of suppression. We found a small decrease in suppression in HI fibers, which correlated with broadened tuning. These data will help guide novel amplification strategies, particularly for complex listening situations (e.g., speech in noise), in which current hearing aids struggle to restore intelligibility. PMID:27080669

  1. Adaptive output voltage tracking controller for uncertain DC/DC boost converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Seoup; Kim, Seok-Kyoon; Park, Jin-Hyuk; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a cascade output voltage control strategy for an uncertain DC/DC boost converter adopting an adaptive current controller in its inner loop. Considering the non-linearity, load uncertainties and parameter uncertainties of the converter, the proposed controller is designed following the conventional cascade voltage controller design method. The proposed method makes the following three contributions. First, a coordinate transformation is introduced for the inner loop, enabling avoidance of the singularity problem caused by the estimates of uncertain parameters. Second, a slight modification to the adaptation law is performed to guarantee closed-loop stability in the presence of the time-varying component of the load current. Third, the outer-loop controller is devised such that its performance can be adjusted without any parameter information. The closed-loop performance is demonstrated through simulations and experiments using the DSP28335 with a 3 kW DC/DC boost converter.

  2. Time synchronization over the Internet using an adaptive frequency-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Levine, J

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of an algorithm for synchronizing the time of computers using messages transmitted over packet-switched networks such as the Internet. The algorithm configures itself to realize any specified performance level at minimum cost (measured in computer cycles or network bandwidth). If the highest possible accuracy is requested, the performance will be limited by the larger of the instability of the local clock oscillator or the noise in the measurement process between the client and the server; uncertainties of about 8 ms RMS have been obtained using standard workstations and average network connections. Lower accuracy can be realized at substantially lower cost because the cost varies approximately as the inverse of the accuracy squared over a wide range of these parameters. The algorithm makes better use of scarce network bandwidth than previous methods. This improvement is realized by using a pure frequency-locked loop (rather than mixed frequency/phase locking algorithms currently proposed for the NTP) with unequal spacing between calibration cycles. The result is a cleaner separation between network noise and clock noise, which is especially important when the highest possible accuracy is desired. In addition, the algorithm is an improvement over the pure-FLL "Interlock" algorithm described previously because it is self configuring. In addition to supporting an explicit trade-off between cost and accuracy, the algorithm provides better performance than previous methods because it is better able to adapt itself to fluctuations in the asymmetry of the network delay. PMID:18238493

  3. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A.; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  4. Dual-Track Clearance of Circulating Bacteria Balances Rapid Restoration of Blood Sterility with Induction of Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Steven P; Plaumann, Ann; Coletti, Raffaele; Lehmann, Christin; Wanisch, Andreas; Seidlmeier, Amelie; Esser, Knud; Luo, Shanshan; Rämer, Patrick C; Massberg, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Verschoor, Admar

    2016-07-13

    Efficient clearance of bacteremia prevents life-threatening disease. Platelet binding to intravascular bacteria, a process involving platelet glycoprotein GPIb and bacterial opsonization with activated complement C3, influences blood clearance and anti-infective immunity. Using intravital microscopy of the bloodstream of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes, we show that bacterial clearance is not a uniform process but a "dual-track" mechanism consisting of parallel "fast" and "slow" pathways. "Slow clearance" is regulated by time-dependent bacterial opsonization, stochastic platelet binding, and capture of bacteria-platelet-complexes via the complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, CRIg. The mechanism spares some bacteria from "fast clearance" and rapid destruction in the liver via Kupffer cell scavenger receptors, keeping them available for adaptive immunity induction by splenic CD8α(+) dendritic cells. We consistently find "fast" and "slow" clearance patterns for a broad panel of other Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Thus, dual-track clearance balances rapid restoration of blood sterility with induction of specific antibacterial immunity. PMID:27345696

  5. Optimum filters and smoothers design for carrier phase and frequency tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the application of fixed lag smoothing algorithms to the problem of estimation of the phase and frequency of a sinusoidal carrier received in the presence of process noise and additive observation noise. A suboptimal structure consists of a phase-locked loop (PLL) followed by post-loop correction to the phase and frequency estimates. When the PLL is operating under high signal-to-noise ratio, the phase detector is approximately linear, and the smoother equations then correspond to the optimal linear equations for an equivalent linear signal model. The performance of such a smoother can be predicted by linear filtering theory. However, if the PLL is operating near the threshold region of the signal-to-noise ratio, the phase detector cannot be assumed to be linear. Then the actual performance of the smoother can significantly differ from that predicted by linear theory. In this report we present both the theoretical and simulated performance of such smoothers derived on the basis of various models for the phase and frequency processes.

  6. SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, P; Guo, K; Alayoubi, N; Kehler, K; Pistorius, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accounting for tumor motion during radiation therapy is important to ensure that the tumor receives the prescribed dose. Increasing the field size to account for this motion exposes the surrounding healthy tissues to unnecessary radiation. In contrast to using motion-encompassing techniques to treat moving tumors, conformal radiation therapy (RT) uses a smaller field to track the tumor and adapts the beam aperture according to the motion detected. This work investigates and compares the performance of three markerless, EPID based, optical flow methods to track tumor motion with conformal RT. Methods: Three techniques were used to track the motions of a 3D printed lung tumor programmed to move according to the tumor of seven lung cancer patients. These techniques utilized a multi-resolution optical flow algorithm as the core computation for image registration. The first method (DIR) registers the incoming images with an initial reference frame, while the second method (RFSF) uses an adaptive reference frame and the third method (CU) uses preceding image frames for registration. The patient traces and errors were evaluated for the seven patients. Results: The average position errors for all patient traces were 0.12 ± 0.33 mm, −0.05 ± 0.04 mm and −0.28 ± 0.44 mm for CU, DIR and RFSF method respectively. The position errors distributed within 1 standard deviation are 0.74 mm, 0.37 mm and 0.96 mm respectively. The CU and RFSF algorithms are sensitive to the characteristics of the patient trace and produce a wider distribution of errors amongst patients. Although the mean error for the DIR method is negatively biased (−0.05 mm) for all patients, it has the narrowest distribution of position error, which can be corrected using an offset calibration. Conclusion: Three techniques of image registration and position update were studied. Using direct comparison with an initial frame yields the best performance. The authors would like to thank Dr.YeLin Suh for

  7. Ionospheric electron density irregularities observed by satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, low-low Doppler tracking link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A low-low, satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, Doppler tracking experiment was performed. The data are analyzed here for irregularities in electron density at the altitude of 212 km. The differential Doppler data with the relative motion term removed are integrated to obtain a representation of the electron density variation along the satellite path. Well-known large-scale features such as the equatorial geomagnetic anomaly and day/night ionization level differences are clearly observed in the integrated data. The larger crest of the morning geomagnetic anomaly is seen to occur in the southern (winter) hemisphere in agreement with previous observations. In addition, a sharp peak in the electron density at the day-to-night transition point is observed in two consecutive revolutions. This effect may be due to the previously postulated atmospheric shock wave generated by supersonic motion of the terminator.

  8. Ionospheric corrections for single-frequency tracking of GNSS satellites by VLBI based on co-located GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männel, Benjamin; Rothacher, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Tracking L-band signals of GNSS satellites by radio telescopes became a new observation type in recent years and will be used to improve reference system realizations and links between Earth- and space-fixed frames. First successful test observations were done, with the drawback of being single-frequency only. In order to correct the ionospheric delay by using GNSS phase observations from co-located receivers, the L4R approach was developed. Based on residuals derived by a least-squares processing of the GNSS geometry-free linear combination corresponding corrections could be derived. As a first validation step L4R corrections were applied to GNSS L_1 data analysis. Station coordinate repeatibilities at the 1-cm level were obtained for baselines of a few thousand kilometers. Comparing the derived delay corrections to VLBI ionospheric delays for quasars located in same directions, differences with a standard deviation of 2.2 TECU could be achieved.

  9. A real-time algorithm for the harmonic estimation and frequency tracking of dominant components in fusion plasma magnetic diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R. [Associação Euratom Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-15

    The real-time tracking of instantaneous quantities such as frequency, amplitude, and phase of components immerse in noisy signals has been a common problem in many scientific and engineering fields such as power systems and delivery, telecommunications, and acoustics for the past decades. In magnetically confined fusion research, extracting this sort of information from magnetic signals can be of valuable assistance in, for instance, feedback control of detrimental magnetohydrodynamic modes and disruption avoidance mechanisms by monitoring instability growth or anticipating mode-locking events. This work is focused on nonlinear Kalman filter based methods for tackling this problem. Similar methods have already proven their merits and have been successfully employed in this scientific domain in applications such as amplitude demodulation for the motional Stark effect diagnostic. In the course of this work, three approaches are described, compared, and discussed using magnetic signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak plasma discharges for benchmarking purposes.

  10. Small Infrared Target Detection by Region-Adaptive Clutter Rejection for Sea-Based Infrared Search and Track

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho; Lee, Joohyoung

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a region-adaptive clutter rejection method for small target detection in sea-based infrared search and track. In the real world, clutter normally generates many false detections that impede the deployment of such detection systems. Incoming targets (missiles, boats, etc.) can be located in the sky, horizon and sea regions, which have different types of clutters, such as clouds, a horizontal line and sea-glint. The characteristics of regional clutter were analyzed after the geometrical analysis-based region segmentation. The false detections caused by cloud clutter were removed by the spatial attribute-based classification. Those by the horizontal line were removed using the heterogeneous background removal filter. False alarms by sun-glint were rejected using the temporal consistency filter, which is the most difficult part. The experimental results of the various cluttered background sequences show that the proposed region adaptive clutter rejection method produces fewer false alarms than that of the mean subtraction filter (MSF) with an acceptable degradation detection rate. PMID:25054633

  11. Small infrared target detection by region-adaptive clutter rejection for sea-based infrared search and track.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Lee, Joohyoung

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a region-adaptive clutter rejection method for small target detection in sea-based infrared search and track. In the real world, clutter normally generates many false detections that impede the deployment of such detection systems. Incoming targets (missiles, boats, etc.) can be located in the sky, horizon and sea regions, which have different types of clutters, such as clouds, a horizontal line and sea-glint. The characteristics of regional clutter were analyzed after the geometrical analysis-based region segmentation. The false detections caused by cloud clutter were removed by the spatial attribute-based classification. Those by the horizontal line were removed using the heterogeneous background removal filter. False alarms by sun-glint were rejected using the temporal consistency filter, which is the most difficult part. The experimental results of the various cluttered background sequences show that the proposed region adaptive clutter rejection method produces fewer false alarms than that of the mean subtraction filter (MSF) with an acceptable degradation detection rate. PMID:25054633

  12. A proposed adaptive step size perturbation and observation maximum power point tracking algorithm based on photovoltaic system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu

    Solar energy becomes one of the major alternative renewable energy options for its huge abundance and accessibility. Due to the intermittent nature, the high demand of Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) techniques exists when a Photovoltaic (PV) system is used to extract energy from the sunlight. This thesis proposed an advanced Perturbation and Observation (P&O) algorithm aiming for relatively practical circumstances. Firstly, a practical PV system model is studied with determining the series and shunt resistances which are neglected in some research. Moreover, in this proposed algorithm, the duty ratio of a boost DC-DC converter is the object of the perturbation deploying input impedance conversion to achieve working voltage adjustment. Based on the control strategy, the adaptive duty ratio step size P&O algorithm is proposed with major modifications made for sharp insolation change as well as low insolation scenarios. Matlab/Simulink simulation for PV model, boost converter control strategy and various MPPT process is conducted step by step. The proposed adaptive P&O algorithm is validated by the simulation results and detail analysis of sharp insolation changes, low insolation condition and continuous insolation variation.

  13. Adaptive detection of microvascular edge in microcirculatory images for auto-tracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Bao, Yongjian; Xiu, Rui-juan; Karras, Matti

    1994-05-01

    We developed a dynamic microvascular edge detection method which is based on an adaptive thresholding and multijudgmental criteria. To realize the on-line measurement with video rate, we first set changeable measuring lines which are perpendicular to a microvessel axis and cover the possible edge location at a cross- section of the microvessel as a sampling window. A dynamic threshold, which can frame-by-frame automatically adapt to the change of light intensity in the sampling window, will be generated based on the on-line analysis of light intensity distribution along the measuring lines. The judgment of microvascular edges is based on the pattern characteristics of the light intensity distribution curve in the microvascular edge areas and the possible range of the microvascular diameters. Multiple criteria for the edge detection were set for accurately detecting the edges and skipping the non-edge zones to speed the edge recognizing procedure. To further improve reliability of this edge detection, a dynamic graphic indicator can be generated according to the detected vessel edge location, and simultaneously displayed with the original image. This algorithm has been successfully applied for autotracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion in microcirculation, even when the microcirculatory image had complex background and low contrast.

  14. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling in the human nucleus accumbens tracks action monitoring during cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Zaehle, Tino; Kopitzki, Klaus; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T.; Hinrichs, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The Nucleus Accumbens (NAcc) is an important structure for the transfer of information between cortical and subcortical structures, especially the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. However, the mechanism that allows the NAcc to achieve this integration is not well understood. Phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling (PAC) of oscillations in different frequency bands has been proposed as an effective mechanism to form functional networks to optimize transfer and integration of information. Here we assess PAC between theta and high gamma oscillations as a potential mechanism that facilitates motor adaptation. To address this issue we recorded intracranial field potentials directly from the bilateral human NAcc in three patients while they performed a motor learning task that varied in the level of cognitive control needed to perform the task. As in rodents, PAC was observable in the human NAcc, transiently occurring contralateral to a movement following the motor response. Importantly, PAC correlated with the level of cognitive control needed to monitor the action performed. This functional relation indicates that the NAcc is engaged in action monitoring and supports the evaluation of motor programs during adaptive behavior by means of PAC. PMID:24109448

  15. Water-cooled, high-intensity ultrasound surgical applicators with frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roy W; Vaezy, Shahram; Proctor, Andrew; Myntti, Terrence; Lee, Janelle B J; Crum, Lawrence A

    2003-10-01

    High-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) applicators have been developed for arresting bleeding with the ultimate intent of use in surgery. The design uses a tapered titanium component for transmission coupling of the ultrasound energy from a spherically curved transducer to biological tissues. The nominal operating frequency is 5.5 MHz, in a highly resonant mode (quality factor of 327 with water load). Liquid cooling is used to remove energy loss important at net applied power greater than 18 W/cm2 at the surface of the piezoelectric element. A downward resonance frequency shift (>20 kHz) occurs, even with cooling, as the applicator warms with normal operation. A feedback technique is used for maintaining the excitation near optimum resonance. Standing wave ratios of the applied power of 1.6 or less are thus sustained. The system and applicators have been found to be highly robust, effective in achieving hemostasis in the hemorrhaging liver, spleen, lung, or blood vessels in rabbit and pig experiments. One unit has been operated for over 1.7 hours in treating organ hemorrhage in blunt trauma experiments with nine swine with electrical net power of up to 158 W (31 W/cm2 across the transducer) and intensity of 2560 W/cm2 at focus. PMID:14609070

  16. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Robert A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2010-01-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large angular measurement range and allows the use of a probe that is small in comparison with the measurement volume. We review PSD characteristics and quantitative resolution limits, consider the lock-in amplifier measurement system as a communication link, discuss the application of FDM to PSDs, and make comparisons with time-domain techniques. We consider the phase-sensitive detector as a multirate DSP problem, explore parallels with Fourier spectral estimation and filter banks, discuss how to choose the modulation frequencies and sample rates that maximize channel isolation under design constraints, and describe efficient digital implementation. We also discuss hardware design considerations, sensor calibration, probe construction and calibration, and 3-D measurement by triangulation using two sensors. As an example, we characterize the resolution, speed, and accuracy of an instrument that measures the position and orientation of a 10 mm × 5 mm probe in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 30-mm cube with 4-μm peak-to-peak resolution at 1-kHz sampling. PMID:20428484

  17. High-Speed Microscale Optical Tracking Using Digital Frequency-Domain Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSDs), or lateral-effect photodiodes, are commonly used for high-speed, high-resolution optical position measurement. This paper describes the instrument design for multidimensional position and orientation measurement based on the simultaneous position measurement of multiple modulated sources using frequency-domain-multiplexed (FDM) PSDs. The important advantages of this optical configuration in comparison with laser/mirror combinations are that it has a large angular measurement range and allows the use of a probe that is small in comparison with the measurement volume. We review PSD characteristics and quantitative resolution limits, consider the lock-in amplifier measurement system as a communication link, discuss the application of FDM to PSDs, and make comparisons with time-domain techniques. We consider the phase-sensitive detector as a multirate DSP problem, explore parallels with Fourier spectral estimation and filter banks, discuss how to choose the modulation frequencies and sample rates that maximize channel isolation under design constraints, and describe efficient digital implementation. We also discuss hardware design considerations, sensor calibration, probe construction and calibration, and 3-D measurement by triangulation using two sensors. As an example, we characterize the resolution, speed, and accuracy of an instrument that measures the position and orientation of a 10 mm × 5 mm probe in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 30-mm cube with 4-μm peak-to-peak resolution at 1-kHz sampling. PMID:20428484

  18. Experimental verification of adaptive and robust trajectory tracking controllers for switched reluctance motors

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.J.; Dawson, D.M.; Vedagarbha, P.

    1994-12-31

    Integrator backstepping design techniques have recently been used to develop voltage level control algorithms for various classes of electric machines. The resulting control algorithms yield rigorous stability results that are attractive for motor drive applications for several reasons: (1) they can compensate for typically neglected electrical dynamics associated with the motor drive system, (2) they can compensate for a variety of uncertainties throughout the entire drive system (i.e., both modeled and unmodelled electromechanical dynamics), and (3) they can be designed to operate with only partial state measurements (i.e., sensorless control). Despite this promising outlook, few backstepping based algorithms have been experimentally verified, primarily due to their recent theoretical emergence. This paper examines two backstepping based algorithms for switched reluctance (SR) machines which use full-state measurements (i.e., motor position, velocity, and per phase winding currents), to yield rigorous theoretical stability results on the rotor trajectory tracking error despite uncertainty in the SR motor drive system. The controllers incorporate a smooth commutation strategy for the shared specification of the individual SR phase currents. The proposed controllers are experimentally verified using a digital signal processor based data acquisition and control system, and the performance results compared to a backstepping based, exact model knowledge control algorithm.

  19. Tracking and data acquisition system for the 1990's. Volume 8: TDAS frequency planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppe, S. B.; Elrod, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Current planning calls for the TDAS to support new user and crosslink services, in addition to TDRSS-compatible services. TDRSS-compatible services would operate in current S-band and K-band channels used by TDRSS. New services, however, can take advantage of technology advances at microwave and optical frequencies. For augmented space-to-space services, 60 GHz and GaAs laser systems offer technical advantages, relative freedom from RFI, and a benign regulatory environment (i.e., minimal congestion and, in the case of 60 GHz, maximum regulatory support for TDAS-type services). For TDAS Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth services, the 30/20 GHz band offers the best mix of technical and regulatory advantages. But use of these bands would have to be coordinated with the U.S. military.

  20. An adaptive recurrent neural-network controller using a stabilization matrix and predictive inputs to solve a tracking problem under disturbances.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Michael; Li, Shuhui; Fu, Xingang; Alonso, Eduardo; Wunsch, Donald

    2014-01-01

    We present a recurrent neural-network (RNN) controller designed to solve the tracking problem for control systems. We demonstrate that a major difficulty in training any RNN is the problem of exploding gradients, and we propose a solution to this in the case of tracking problems, by introducing a stabilization matrix and by using carefully constrained context units. This solution allows us to achieve consistently lower training errors, and hence allows us to more easily introduce adaptive capabilities. The resulting RNN is one that has been trained off-line to be rapidly adaptive to changing plant conditions and changing tracking targets. The case study we use is a renewable-energy generator application; that of producing an efficient controller for a three-phase grid-connected converter. The controller we produce can cope with the random variation of system parameters and fluctuating grid voltages. It produces tracking control with almost instantaneous response to changing reference states, and virtually zero oscillation. This compares very favorably to the classical proportional integrator (PI) controllers, which we show produce a much slower response and settling time. In addition, the RNN we propose exhibits better learning stability and convergence properties, and can exhibit faster adaptation, than has been achieved with adaptive critic designs. PMID:24161455

  1. Robust model reference adaptive output feedback tracking for uncertain linear systems with actuator fault based on reinforced dead-zone modification.

    PubMed

    Bagherpoor, H M; Salmasi, Farzad R

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, robust model reference adaptive tracking controllers are considered for Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) and Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) linear systems containing modeling uncertainties, unknown additive disturbances and actuator fault. Two new lemmas are proposed for both SISO and MIMO, under which dead-zone modification rule is improved such that the tracking error for any reference signal tends to zero in such systems. In the conventional approach, adaption of the controller parameters is ceased inside the dead-zone region which results tracking error, while preserving the system stability. In the proposed scheme, control signal is reinforced with an additive term based on tracking error inside the dead-zone which results in full reference tracking. In addition, no Fault Detection and Diagnosis (FDD) unit is needed in the proposed approach. Closed loop system stability and zero tracking error are proved by considering a suitable Lyapunov functions candidate. It is shown that the proposed control approach can assure that all the signals of the close loop system are bounded in faulty conditions. Finally, validity and performance of the new schemes have been illustrated through numerical simulations of SISO and MIMO systems in the presence of actuator faults, modeling uncertainty and output disturbance. PMID:25744053

  2. Removal of spike frequency adaptation via neuromodulation intrinsic to the Tritonia escape swim central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Katz, P S; Frost, W N

    1997-10-15

    For the mollusc Tritonia diomedea to generate its escape swim motor pattern, interneuron C2, a crucial member of the central pattern generator (CPG) for this rhythmic behavior, must fire repetitive bursts of action potentials. Yet, before swimming, repeated depolarizing current pulses injected into C2 at periods similar those in the swim motor program are incapable of mimicking the firing rate attained by C2 on each cycle of a swim motor program. This resting level of C2 inexcitability is attributable to its own inherent spike frequency adaptation (SFA). Clearly, this property must be altered for the swim behavior to occur. The pathway for initiation of the swimming behavior involves activation of the serotonergic dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs), which are also intrinsic members of the swim CPG. Physiologically appropriate DSI stimulation transiently decreases C2 SFA, allowing C2 to fire at higher rates even when repeatedly depolarized at short intervals. The increased C2 excitability caused by DSI stimulation is mimicked and occluded by serotonin application. Furthermore, the change in excitability is not caused by the depolarization associated with DSI stimulation or serotonin application but is correlated with a decrease in C2 spike afterhyperpolarization. This suggests that the DSIs use serotonin to evoke a neuromodulatory action on a conductance in C2 that regulates its firing rate. This modulatory action of one CPG neuron on another is likely to play a role in configuring the swim circuit into its rhythmic pattern-generating mode and maintaining it in that state. PMID:9315892

  3. Frequency of antibiotic application drives rapid evolutionary adaptation of Escherichia coli persistence.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Bram; Michiels, Joran E; Wenseleers, Tom; Windels, Etthel M; Boer, Pieterjan Vanden; Kestemont, Donaat; De Meester, Luc; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance is a major threat to society and has been predicted to lead to 10 million casualties annually by 2050(1). Further aggravating the problem, multidrug tolerance in bacteria not only relies on the build-up of resistance mutations, but also on some cells epigenetically switching to a non-growing antibiotic-tolerant 'persister' state(2-6). Yet, despite its importance, we know little of how persistence evolves in the face of antibiotic treatment(7). Our evolution experiments in Escherichia coli demonstrate that extremely high levels of multidrug tolerance (20-100%) are achieved by single point mutations in one of several genes and readily emerge under conditions approximating clinical, once-daily dosing schemes. In contrast, reversion to low persistence in the absence of antibiotic treatment is relatively slow and only partially effective. Moreover, and in support of previous mathematical models(8-10), we show that bacterial persistence quickly adapts to drug treatment frequency and that the observed rates of switching to the persister state can be understood in the context of 'bet-hedging' theory. We conclude that persistence is a major component of the evolutionary response to antibiotics that urgently needs to be considered in both diagnostic testing and treatment design in the battle against multidrug tolerance. PMID:27572640

  4. Seismic random noise attenuation based on adaptive time-frequency peak filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinhuan; Ma, Haitao; Li, Yue; Zeng, Qian

    2015-02-01

    Time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF) method uses a specific window with fixed length to recover band-limited signal in stationary random noise. However, the derivatives of signal such as seismic wavelets may change rapidly in some short time intervals. In this case, TFPF equipped with fixed window length will not provide an optimal solution. In this letter, we present an adaptive version of TFPF for seismic random noise attenuation. In our version, the improved intersection of confidence intervals combined with short-time energy criterion is used to preprocess the noisy signal. And then, we choose an appropriate threshold to divide the noisy signal into signal, buffer and noise. Different optimal window lengths are used in each type of segments. We test the proposed method on both synthetic and field seismic data. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed method makes the degree of amplitude preservation raise more than 10% and signal-to-noise (SNR) improve 2-4 dB compared with the original algorithm.

  5. High-fidelity interface tracking in compressible flows: Unlimited anchored adaptive level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourgaliev, R. R.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2007-06-01

    The interface-capturing-fidelity issue of the level set method is addressed wholly within the Eulerian framework. Our aim is for a practical and efficient way to realize the expected benefits of grid resolution and high order schemes. Based on a combination of structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR), rather than quad/octrees, and on high-order spatial discretization, rather than the use of Lagrangian particles, our method is tailored to compressible flows, while it provides a potentially useful alternative to the particle level set (PLS) for incompressible flows. Interesting salient features of our method include (a) avoidance of limiting (in treating the Hamiltonian of the level set equation), (b) anchoring the level set in a manner that ensures no drift and no spurious oscillations of the zero level during PDE-reinitialization, and (c) a non-linear tagging procedure for defining the neighborhood of the interface subject to mesh refinement. Numerous computational results on a set of benchmark problems (strongly deforming, stretching and tearing interfaces) demonstrate that with this approach, implemented up to 11th order accuracy, the level set method becomes essentially free of mass conservation errors and also free of parasitic interfacial oscillations, while it is still highly efficient, and convenient for 3D parallel implementation. In addition, demonstration of performance in fully-coupled simulations is presented for multimode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (low-Mach number regime) and shock-induced, bubble-collapse (highly compressible regime).

  6. Tracking postfire successional trajectories in a plant community adapted to high-severity fire.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Johanna E; Kobziar, Leda N

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop management strategies that maintain native biodiversity in plant communities adapted to high-severity fire, an understanding of natural postfire succession in the target ecosystem is essential. Detailed information on fire effects is lacking for the sand pine (Pinus clausa [Chapm. ex Engelm.] Vasey ex Sarg.) scrub of the southeastern United States, limiting our ability to decide how and when to apply prescribed fire in this ecosystem. We studied the effects of fire-severity heterogeneity on sand pine scrub following a 4700-ha wildfire in Florida's Juniper Prairie Wilderness Area (USA). We identified four levels of fire severity (unburned, low, moderate, and high) and three pre-burn stand conditions (sapling, mature, and senescent). Study plots were established in each severity-stand-class combination, and were sampled at one and two years following fire. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) ordination was applied in order to identify differences in community composition and successional trajectories in each of the stand-class-fire-severity combinations. NMS analyses indicated a shift in dominance between the dominant understory oak species, from Quercus myrtifolia Willd. to Quercus geminata Small, as sand pine basal area increases. Our ordination and regression results showed that Q. myrtifolia was the most aggressive colonizer of postfire open space, which is an important structural and habitat component of a sand pine scrub. Successional trajectories were heavily influenced by Quercus myrtifolia Willd. and were more uniform in the mature class than in the senescent class, probably due to more consistent overstory basal area. In both mature and sapling stands, herbaceous species cover was highest in moderate-severity plots. Woody-debris load varied significantly with stand age, fire severity level, and time. Sand pine seedling recruitment was highest in mature stands burned at high severity, while sapling and senescent stands exhibited much

  7. Adaptive modulation and intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging scheme for multiband OFDM UWB over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Li, Teng; Wen, Xuejie; Deng, Rui; Chen, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the unbalanced error bit distribution among subcarriers caused by inter-subcarriers mixing interference (ISMI) and frequency selective fading (FSF), an adaptive modulation scheme based on 64/16/4QAM modulation is proposed and experimentally investigated in the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM/DD) multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) over fiber system. After 50 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) transmission, at the bit error ratio (BER) of 1×10-3, the experimental results show that the power penalty of the IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system with 64/16/4QAM adaptive modulation scheme is about 3.6 dB, compared to that with the 64QAM modulation scheme. Moreover, the receiver sensitivity has been improved about 0.52 dB when the intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA) algorithm is employed in the IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system based on the 64/16/4QAM adaptive modulation scheme. Meanwhile, after 50 km SSMF transmission, there is a negligible power penalty in the adaptively modulated IM/DD MB-OFDM UWBoF system, compared to the optical back-to-back case.

  8. Seam tracking with adaptive image capture for fine-tuning of a high power laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahdenoja, Olli; Säntti, Tero; Laiho, Mika; Paasio, Ari; Poikonen, Jonne K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the development of methods for real-time fine-tuning of a high power laser welding process of thick steel by using a compact smart camera system. When performing welding in butt-joint configuration, the laser beam's location needs to be adjusted exactly according to the seam line in order to allow the injected energy to be absorbed uniformly into both steel sheets. In this paper, on-line extraction of seam parameters is targeted by taking advantage of a combination of dynamic image intensity compression, image segmentation with a focal-plane processor ASIC, and Hough transform on an associated FPGA. Additional filtering of Hough line candidates based on temporal windowing is further applied to reduce unrealistic frame-to-frame tracking variations. The proposed methods are implemented in Matlab by using image data captured with adaptive integration time. The simulations are performed in a hardware oriented way to allow real-time implementation of the algorithms on the smart camera system.

  9. Backstepping-based cooperative and adaptive tracking control design for a group of underactuated AUVs in horizontal plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghommam, Jawhar; Saad, Maarouf

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate new implementable cooperative adaptive backstepping controllers for a group of underactuated autonomous vehicles that are communicating with their local neighbours to track a time-varying virtual leader of which the relative position may only be available to a portion of the team members. At the kinematic cooperative control level of the autonomous underwater vehicle, the virtual cooperative controller is basically designed on a proportional and derivative consensus algorithm presented in Ren (2010), which involves velocity information from local neighbours. In this paper, we propose a new design algorithm based on singular perturbation theory that precludes the use of the neighbours' velocity information in the cooperative design. At the dynamic cooperative control level, calculation of the partial derivatives of some stabilising functions which in turn will contain velocity information from the local neighbours is required. To facilitate the implementation of the cooperative controllers, we propose a command filter approach technique to avoid analytic differentiation of the virtual cooperative control laws. We show how Lyapunov-based techniques and graph theory can be combined together to yield a robust cooperative controller where the uncertain dynamics of the cooperating vehicles and the constraints on the communication topology which contains a directed spanning tree are explicitly taken into account. Simulation results with a dynamic model of underactuated autonomous underwater vehicles moving on the horizontal plane are presented and discussed.

  10. Multi-dimensional LADAR tracking and adaptive grasping for spaceborne assembly of SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Randy W.; Bohlin, John A.

    1990-02-01

    The most successful approaches to both machine target recognition and robot arm manipulation have been those where tasks are completely pre-specified. In such systems there is little room for deviations in robot path motion or target location and orientation. A novel approach to robotic implementation such as spaceborne assembly of SDI platforms are too difficult for existing robots because random occurrences and large numbers of external variables preclude the complete specification of tasks off-line. The proposed system has strong adaptability due to the following innovations: Registered video and range laser radar sensing (i.e., a one-to-one correspondence between visual and range data). This allows fast, accurate 3D target recognition as part of an autonomous CAD model based recognition system for Phase 2, or as input to teleoperator control in Phase 1. Closed loop range and video feedback for grasper guidance using the pose matching concept where target and grasper are both in the field of view, and CAD derived track points are used for position and orientation error signals.

  11. Adaptation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in cystic fibrosis: molecular diversity, mutation frequency and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, P G; Dittmer, S; Steinmann, E; Buer, J; Rath, P-M; Steinmann, J

    2014-07-01

    Due to the continuous exposure to a challenging environment and repeated antibiotic treatment courses, bacterial populations in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients experience selective pressure causing the emergence of mutator phenotypes. In this study we investigated the genotypic diversity, mutation frequency and antibiotic resistance of S. maltophilia isolates chronically colonizing CF patients. S. maltophilia was isolated from a total of 90 sputum samples, collected sequentially from 19 CF patients admitted between January 2008 and March 2012 at the University Hospital Essen, Germany. DNA fingerprinting by repetitive-sequence-based PCR revealed that 68.4% (n=13) of CF patients harbored different S. maltophilia genotypes during the 4-year study course. Out of 90 S. maltophilia isolates obtained from chronically colonized CF patients, 17.8% (n=16) were hypomutators, 27.7% (n=25), normomutators, 23.3% (n=21), weak hypermutators and 31.2% (n=28) strong hypermutators. We also found that mutation rates of the most clonally related genotypes varied over time with the tendency to become less mutable. Mutator isolates were found to have no significant increase in resistance against eight different antibiotics versus nonmutators. Sequencing of the mismatch repair genes mutL, mutS and uvrD revealed alterations that resulted in amino acid changes in their corresponding proteins. Here, we could demonstrate that several different S. maltophilia genotypes are present in CF patients and as a sign of adaption their mutation status switches over time to a less mutator phenotype without increasing resistance. These results suggest that S. maltophilia attempts to sustain its biological fitness as mechanism for long-term persistence in the CF lung. PMID:24836944

  12. Adaptive signal processing of on-orbit radio frequency lightning recordings using overcomplete chirplet dictionaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, D. I.; Smith, D. A.; Light, T. E.; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Heavner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing research at Los Alamos National Laboratory studies the Earth's radio frequency (RF) transient background utilizing satellite-based RF observations of terrestrial lightning. Such impulsive signals are dispersed as they travel through the ionosphere and appear as nonlinear chirps at a receiver on-orbit. Signals of interest are typically observed in the presence of additive noise and structured clutter, including gated and continuous-wave (CW) sources. Detection and classification of such non-stationary signals against a complex, non-stationary background can present challenges for standard physics-based approaches. The FORTE satellite provided a rich satellite lightning database that has been previously used for some event classification. We now develop and implement new event classification capability on the FORTE database using state-of-the-art adaptive signal processing combined with compressive sensing and machine learning techniques. The focus of our work is improved feature extraction using representations in overcomplete analytical dictionaries. We choose a dictionary based on Gabor chirplets, which is designed to represent both pulses (chirping or non-chirping) and CW signals in very few representative elements from the dictionary. One feature extraction approach is based on obtaining sparse representations of our data using a matching pursuit search of the dictionary. A second approach is based on using a frame operator on the dictionary to obtain a dense representation of our data. We explore robustness of extracted features to changes in background clutter and noise levels. Both feature extraction algorithms will be used in conjunction with statistical classifiers to explore classification performance of major lightning types. Performance will be evaluated both qualitatively, as well as quantitatively using a small validated test set. We present preliminary results of our work and discuss future areas of development.

  13. Development of a Synthetic Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Prediction Model for Tumor Motion Tracking in External Radiotherapy by Evaluating Various Data Clustering Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanzadeh, Leila; Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili; Nabipour, Jamshid Soltani; Arbatan, Moslem Ahmadi

    2016-04-01

    In image guided radiotherapy, in order to reach a prescribed uniform dose in dynamic tumors at thorax region while minimizing the amount of additional dose received by the surrounding healthy tissues, tumor motion must be tracked in real-time. Several correlation models have been proposed in recent years to provide tumor position information as a function of time in radiotherapy with external surrogates. However, developing an accurate correlation model is still a challenge. In this study, we proposed an adaptive neuro-fuzzy based correlation model that employs several data clustering algorithms for antecedent parameters construction to avoid over-fitting and to achieve an appropriate performance in tumor motion tracking compared with the conventional models. To begin, a comparative assessment is done between seven nuero-fuzzy correlation models each constructed using a unique data clustering algorithm. Then, each of the constructed models are combined within an adaptive sevenfold synthetic model since our tumor motion database has high degrees of variability and that each model has its intrinsic properties at motion tracking. In the proposed sevenfold synthetic model, best model is selected adaptively at pre-treatment. The model also updates the steps for each patient using an automatic model selectivity subroutine. We tested the efficacy of the proposed synthetic model on twenty patients (divided equally into two control and worst groups) treated with CyberKnife synchrony system. Compared to Cyberknife model, the proposed synthetic model resulted in 61.2% and 49.3% reduction in tumor tracking error in worst and control group, respectively. These results suggest that the proposed model selection program in our synthetic neuro-fuzzy model can significantly reduce tumor tracking errors. Numerical assessments confirmed that the proposed synthetic model is able to track tumor motion in real time with high accuracy during treatment. PMID:25765021

  14. An Adaptive-Duration Version of the PVT Accurately Tracks Changes in Psychomotor Vigilance Induced by Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F.

    2012-01-01

    96.8% (range 91.6%-99.9%). Test duration averaged 6.4 minutes (SD 1.7 min), with a minimum of 27 seconds. Conclusions: We developed and validated a highly accurate, sensitive, and specific adaptive-duration version of the 10-minute PVT. Test duration of the adaptive PVT averaged less than 6.5 minutes, with 60 tests (4.3%) terminating after less than 2 minutes, increasing the practicability of the test in operational and clinical settings. The adaptive-duration strategy may be superior to a simple reduction of PVT duration in which the fixed test duration may be too short to identify subjects with moderate impairment (showing deficits only later during the test) but unnecessarily long for those who are either fully alert or severely impaired. Citation: Basner M; Dinges DF. An adaptive-duration version of the PVT accurately tracks changes in psychomotor vigilance induced by sleep restriction. SLEEP 2012;35(2):193-202. PMID:22294809

  15. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaohua, Pan; Niansong, Mei; Hu, Chen; Yumei, Huang; Zhiliang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A low-phase-noise Σ—Δ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise. A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity. A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30 μs, which covers all five required frequency bands. The measured in-band phase noise are -89, -95.5 and -101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz, 2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers, respectively, and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are -121, -123 and -132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards.

  16. Early auditory experience induces frequency-specific, adaptive plasticity in the forebrain gaze fields of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Miller, G L; Knudsen, E I

    2001-05-01

    Binaural acoustic cues such as interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs) are used by many species to determine the locations of sound sources. The relationship between cue values and locations in space is frequency dependent and varies from individual to individual. In the current study, we tested the capacity of neurons in the forebrain localization pathway of the barn owl to adjust their tuning for binaural cues in a frequency-dependent manner in response to auditory experience. Auditory experience was altered by raising young owls with a passive acoustic filtering device that caused frequency-dependent changes in ITD and ILD. Extracellular recordings were made in normal and device-reared owls to characterize frequency-specific ITD and ILD tuning in the auditory archistriatum (AAr), an output structure of the forebrain localization pathway. In device-reared owls, individual sites in the AAr exhibited highly abnormal, frequency-dependent variations in ITD tuning, and across the population of sampled sites, there were frequency-dependent shifts in the representation of ITD. These changes were in a direction that compensated for the acoustic effects of the device on ITD and therefore tended to restore a normal representation of auditory space. Although ILD tuning was degraded relative to normal at many sites in the AAr of device-reared owls, the representation of frequency-specific ILDs across the population of sampled sites was shifted in the adaptive direction. These results demonstrate that early auditory experience shapes the representation of binaural cues in the forebrain localization pathway in an adaptive, frequency-dependent manner. PMID:11353033

  17. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  18. The generalized frequency-domain adaptive filtering algorithm as an approximation of the block recursive least-squares algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Martin; Kellermann, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic echo cancellation (AEC) is a well-known application of adaptive filters in communication acoustics. To implement AEC for multichannel reproduction systems, powerful adaptation algorithms like the generalized frequency-domain adaptive filtering (GFDAF) algorithm are required for satisfactory convergence behavior. In this paper, the GFDAF algorithm is rigorously derived as an approximation of the block recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm. Thereby, the original formulation of the GFDAF algorithm is generalized while avoiding an error that has been in the original derivation. The presented algorithm formulation is applied to pruned transform-domain loudspeaker-enclosure-microphone models in a mathematically consistent manner. Such pruned models have recently been proposed to cope with the tremendous computational demands of massive multichannel AEC. Beyond its generalization, a regularization of the GFDAF is shown to have a close relation to the well-known block least-mean-squares algorithm.

  19. Self-adaptive method for high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface wave method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When the high frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is conducted to explore soil properties in the vadose zone, existing rules for selecting the near offset and spread lengths cannot satisfy the requirements of planar dominant Rayleigh waves for all frequencies of interest ...

  20. Self-adaptive method for high-frequency dispersion curve determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When high-frequency (from 50 to 500 Hz) MASW is conducted to explore soil profile in the vadose zone, existing rules for selecting near offset and receiver spread length cannot satisfy the requirements of planar and dominant Rayleigh waves for all frequencies and will inevitably introduce near and f...

  1. Neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rat show stimulus-specific adaptation for frequency, but not for intensity

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Daniel; Wang, Xin; Nieto-Diego, Javier; Krumbholz, Katrin; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological and psychophysical responses to a low-intensity probe sound tend to be suppressed by a preceding high-intensity adaptor sound. Nevertheless, rare low-intensity deviant sounds presented among frequent high-intensity standard sounds in an intensity oddball paradigm can elicit an electroencephalographic mismatch negativity (MMN) response. This has been taken to suggest that the MMN is a correlate of true change or “deviance” detection. A key question is where in the ascending auditory pathway true deviance sensitivity first emerges. Here, we addressed this question by measuring low-intensity deviant responses from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized rats. If the IC exhibits true deviance sensitivity to intensity, IC neurons should show enhanced responses to low-intensity deviant sounds presented among high-intensity standards. Contrary to this prediction, deviant responses were only enhanced when the standards and deviants differed in frequency. The results could be explained with a model assuming that IC neurons integrate over multiple frequency-tuned channels and that adaptation occurs within each channel independently. We used an adaptation paradigm with multiple repeated adaptors to measure the tuning widths of these adaption channels in relation to the neurons’ overall tuning widths. PMID:27066835

  2. Adaptive categorization of sound frequency does not require the auditory cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Tyler L; Lorenc, Maja; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    A defining feature of adaptive behavior is our ability to change the way we interpret sensory stimuli depending on context. Rapid adaptation in behavior has been attributed to frontal cortical circuits, but it is not clear if sensory cortexes also play an essential role in such tasks. In this study we tested whether the auditory cortex was necessary for rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. We used a two-alternative choice sound-categorization task for rats in which the boundary that separated two acoustic categories changed several times within a behavioral session. These shifts in the boundary resulted in changes in the rewarded action for a subset of stimuli. We found that extensive lesions of the auditory cortex did not impair the ability of rats to switch between categorization contingencies and sound discrimination performance was minimally impaired. Similar results were obtained after reversible inactivation of the auditory cortex with muscimol. In contrast, lesions of the auditory thalamus largely impaired discrimination performance and, as a result, the ability to modify behavior across contingencies. Thalamic lesions did not impair performance of a visual discrimination task, indicating that the effects were specific to audition and not to motor preparation or execution. These results suggest that subcortical outputs of the auditory thalamus can mediate rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. PMID:26156379

  3. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  4. A double-inverted pendulum model for studying the adaptability of postural control to frequency during human stepping in place.

    PubMed

    Breniere, Y; Ribreau, C

    1998-10-01

    In order to analyze the influence of gravity and body characteristics on the control of center of mass (CM) oscillations in stepping in place, equations of motion in oscillating systems were developed using a double-inverted pendulum model which accounts for both the head-arms-trunk (HAT) segment and the two-legged system. The principal goal of this work is to propose an equivalent model which makes use of the usual anthropometric data for the human body, in order to study the ability of postural control to adapt to the step frequency in this particular paradigm of human gait. This model allows the computation of CM-to-CP amplitude ratios, when the center of foot pressure (CP) oscillates, as a parametric function of the stepping in place frequency, whose parameters are gravity and major body characteristics. Motion analysis from a force plate was used to test the model by comparing experimental and simulated values of variations of the CM-to-CP amplitude ratio in the frontal plane versus the frequency. With data from the literature, the model is used to calculate the intersegmental torque which stabilizes the HAT when the Leg segment is subjected to a harmonic torque with an imposed frequency. PMID:9830708

  5. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  6. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  7. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  8. Wastewater microalgal production, nutrient removal and physiological adaptation in response to changes in mixing frequency.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2014-09-15

    Laminar flows are a common problem in high rate algal ponds (HRAP) due to their long channels and gentle mixing by a single paddlewheel. Sustained laminar flows may modify the amount of light microalgal cells are exposed to, increase the boundary layer between the cell and the environment and increase settling out of cells onto the pond bottom. To date, there has been little focus on the effects of the time between mixing events (frequency of mixing) on the performance of microalgae in wastewater treatment HRAPs. This paper investigates the performance of three morphologically distinct microalgae in wastewater treatment high rate algal mesocosms operated at four different mixing frequencies (continuous, mixed every 45 min, mixed every 90 min and no mixing). Microalgal performance was measured in terms of biomass concentration, nutrient removal efficiency, light utilisation and photosynthetic performance. Microalgal biomass increased significantly with increasing mixing frequency for the two colonial species but did not differ for the single celled species. All three species were more efficient at NH4-N uptake as the frequency of mixing increased. Increased frequency of mixing supported larger colonies with improved harvest-ability by gravity but at the expense of efficient light absorption and maximum rate of photosynthesis. However, maximum quantum yield was highest in the continuously mixed cultures due to higher efficiency of photosynthesis under light limited conditions. Based on these results, higher microalgal productivity, improved wastewater treatment and better gravity based harvest-ability can be achieved with the inclusion of more mixing points and reduced laminar flows in full-scale HRAP. PMID:24911561

  9. Multiple Model Adaptive Two-Step Filter and Motion Tracking Sliding-Mode Guidance for Missiles with Time Lag in Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Zhang, Yong-An; Duan, Guang-Ren

    The two-step filter has been combined with a modified Sage-Husa time-varying measurement noise statistical estimator, which is able to estimate the covariance of measurement noise on line, to generate an adaptive two-step filter. In many practical applications such as the bearings-only guidance, some model parameters and the process noise covariance are also unknown a priori. Based on the adaptive two-step filter, we utilize multiple models in the first-step filtering as well as in the time update of the second-step filtering to handle the uncertainties of model parameters and process noise covariance. In each timestep of the multiple model filtering, probabilistic weights punishing the estimates of first-step state from different models, and their associated covariance matrices are acquired according to Bayes’ rule. The weighted sum of the estimates of first-step state and that of the associated covariance matrices are extracted as the ultimate estimate and covariance of the first-step state, and are used as measurement information for the measurement update of the second-step state. Thus there is still only one iteration process and no apparent enhancement of computation burden. A motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law is presented for missiles with non-negligible delays in actual acceleration. This guidance law guarantees guidance accuracy and is able to enhance observability in bearings-only tracking. In bearings-only cases, the multiple model adaptive two-step filter is applied to the motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law, supplying relative range, relative velocity, and target acceleration information. In simulation experiments satisfactory filtering and guidance results are obtained, even if the filter runs into unknown target maneuvers and unknown time-varying measurement noise covariance, and the guidance law has to deal with a large time lag in acceleration.

  10. Multidimensional evaluation of a radio frequency identification wi-fi location tracking system in an acute-care hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Graham, Alecia; Gavrilova, Marina; Wah, Dannel; Gilgen, Jonathan; Coke, Jason; Burden, Jack; Nayyar, Shikha; Kaunda, Joseph; Yergens, Dean; Baylis, Barry; Ghali, William A

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS) have the potential to enhance healthcare systems through the live tracking of assets, patients and staff. This study evaluated a commercially available RTLS system deployed in a clinical setting, with three objectives: (1) assessment of the location accuracy of the technology in a clinical setting; (2) assessment of the value of asset tracking to staff; and (3) assessment of threshold monitoring applications developed for patient tracking and inventory control. Simulated daily activities were monitored by RTLS and compared with direct research team observations. Staff surveys and interviews concerning the system's effectiveness and accuracy were also conducted and analyzed. The study showed only modest location accuracy, and mixed reactions in staff interviews. These findings reveal that the technology needs to be refined further for better specific location accuracy before full-scale implementation can be recommended. PMID:22298566

  11. Multidimensional evaluation of a radio frequency identification wi-fi location tracking system in an acute-care hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Graham, Alecia; Gavrilova, Marina; Wah, Dannel; Gilgen, Jonathan; Coke, Jason; Burden, Jack; Nayyar, Shikha; Kaunda, Joseph; Yergens, Dean; Baylis, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS) have the potential to enhance healthcare systems through the live tracking of assets, patients and staff. This study evaluated a commercially available RTLS system deployed in a clinical setting, with three objectives: (1) assessment of the location accuracy of the technology in a clinical setting; (2) assessment of the value of asset tracking to staff; and (3) assessment of threshold monitoring applications developed for patient tracking and inventory control. Simulated daily activities were monitored by RTLS and compared with direct research team observations. Staff surveys and interviews concerning the system's effectiveness and accuracy were also conducted and analyzed. The study showed only modest location accuracy, and mixed reactions in staff interviews. These findings reveal that the technology needs to be refined further for better specific location accuracy before full-scale implementation can be recommended. PMID:22298566

  12. Adaptive re-tracking algorithm for retrieval of water level variations and wave heights from satellite altimetry data for middle-sized inland water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Lebedev, Sergey; Soustova, Irina; Rybushkina, Galina; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Panyutin, Andrey

    One of the recent applications of satellite altimetry originally designed for measurements of the sea level [1] is associated with remote investigation of the water level of inland waters: lakes, rivers, reservoirs [2-7]. The altimetry data re-tracking algorithms developed for open ocean conditions (e.g. Ocean-1,2) [1] often cannot be used in these cases, since the radar return is significantly contaminated by reflection from the land. The problem of minimization of errors in the water level retrieval for inland waters from altimetry measurements can be resolved by re-tracking satellite altimetry data. Recently, special re-tracking algorithms have been actively developed for re-processing altimetry data in the coastal zone when reflection from land strongly affects echo shapes: threshold re-tracking, The other methods of re-tracking (threshold re-tracking, beta-re-tracking, improved threshold re-tracking) were developed in [9-11]. The latest development in this field is PISTACH product [12], in which retracking bases on the classification of typical forms of telemetric waveforms in the coastal zones and inland water bodies. In this paper a novel method of regional adaptive re-tracking based on constructing a theoretical model describing the formation of telemetric waveforms by reflection from the piecewise constant model surface corresponding to the geography of the region is considered. It was proposed in [13, 14], where the algorithm for assessing water level in inland water bodies and in the coastal zone of the ocean with an error of about 10-15 cm was constructed. The algorithm includes four consecutive steps: - constructing a local piecewise model of a reflecting surface in the neighbourhood of the reservoir; - solving a direct problem by calculating the reflected waveforms within the framework of the model; - imposing restrictions and validity criteria for the algorithm based on waveform modelling; - solving the inverse problem by retrieving a tracking point

  13. An adaptive subspace trust-region method for frequency-domain seismic full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Li, Xiaofan; Song, Hanjie; Liu, Shaolin

    2015-05-01

    Full waveform inversion is currently considered as a promising seismic imaging method to obtain high-resolution and quantitative images of the subsurface. It is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, the main difficulty of which that prevents the full waveform inversion from widespread applying to real data is the sensitivity to incorrect initial models and noisy data. Local optimization theories including Newton's method and gradient method always lead the convergence to local minima, while global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing are computationally costly. To confront this issue, in this paper we investigate the possibility of applying the trust-region method to the full waveform inversion problem. Different from line search methods, trust-region methods force the new trial step within a certain neighborhood of the current iterate point. Theoretically, the trust-region methods are reliable and robust, and they have very strong convergence properties. The capability of this inversion technique is tested with the synthetic Marmousi velocity model and the SEG/EAGE Salt model. Numerical examples demonstrate that the adaptive subspace trust-region method can provide solutions closer to the global minima compared to the conventional Approximate Hessian approach and the L-BFGS method with a higher convergence rate. In addition, the match between the inverted model and the true model is still excellent even when the initial model deviates far from the true model. Inversion results with noisy data also exhibit the remarkable capability of the adaptive subspace trust-region method for low signal-to-noise data inversions. Promising numerical results suggest this adaptive subspace trust-region method is suitable for full waveform inversion, as it has stronger convergence and higher convergence rate.

  14. The frequency of actions and thoughts scale: development and psychometric validation of a measure of adaptive behaviours and cognitions.

    PubMed

    Terides, Matthew D; Dear, Blake F; Karin, Eyal; Jones, Michael P; Gandy, Milena; Fogliati, Vincent J; Kayrouz, Rony; Staples, Lauren G; Titov, Nickolai

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an instrument that measures the frequency of adaptive behaviours and cognitions related to therapeutic change during cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Two studies were conducted. In study one, 661 participants completed an online survey with 28 items targeting adaptive behaviours and cognitions. Exploratory factor analysis performed on part of the sample (n = 451) revealed that a four-factor solution 'characterised' the data. This led to the development of a 12-item instrument, the Frequency of Actions and Thoughts Scale (FATS). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the factor structure of the FATS using the remaining sample (n = 210), which revealed an acceptable model fit. In study two, 125 participants with clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, depression, or both were recruited to an Internet-delivered CBT (iCBT) treatment course. Participants completed the FATS and other measures throughout treatment, after treatment, and at three-month follow-up. Correlations and residual change scores of the FATS and its subscales with measures of anxiety, depression, behavioural activation, and CBT-related skills usage supported the construct validity of the FATS. A significant increase in FATS scores over treatment was also observed. The findings provide preliminary support for the psychometric properties of the FATS, which appears to have utility in research investigating mechanisms of change in CBT. PMID:26926484

  15. Colloquium paper: human adaptations to diet, subsistence, and ecoregion are due to subtle shifts in allele frequency.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Angela M; Witonsky, David B; Ehler, Edvard; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Beall, Cynthia; Gebremedhin, Amha; Sukernik, Rem; Utermann, Gerd; Pritchard, Jonathan; Coop, Graham; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2010-05-11

    Human populations use a variety of subsistence strategies to exploit an exceptionally broad range of ecoregions and dietary components. These aspects of human environments have changed dramatically during human evolution, giving rise to new selective pressures. To understand the genetic basis of human adaptations, we combine population genetics data with ecological information to detect variants that increased in frequency in response to new selective pressures. Our approach detects SNPs that show concordant differences in allele frequencies across populations with respect to specific aspects of the environment. Genic and especially nonsynonymous SNPs are overrepresented among those most strongly correlated with environmental variables. This provides genome-wide evidence for selection due to changes in ecoregion, diet, and subsistence. We find particularly strong signals associated with polar ecoregions, with foraging, and with a diet rich in roots and tubers. Interestingly, several of the strongest signals overlap with those implicated in energy metabolism phenotypes from genome-wide association studies, including SNPs influencing glucose levels and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, several pathways, including those of starch and sucrose metabolism, are enriched for strong signals of adaptations to a diet rich in roots and tubers, whereas signals associated with polar ecoregions are overrepresented in genes associated with energy metabolism pathways. PMID:20445095

  16. KRLMM: an adaptive genotype calling method for common and low frequency variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SNP genotyping microarrays have revolutionized the study of complex disease. The current range of commercially available genotyping products contain extensive catalogues of low frequency and rare variants. Existing SNP calling algorithms have difficulty dealing with these low frequency variants, as the underlying models rely on each genotype having a reasonable number of observations to ensure accurate clustering. Results Here we develop KRLMM, a new method for converting raw intensities into genotype calls that aims to overcome this issue. Our method is unique in that it applies careful between sample normalization and allows a variable number of clusters k (1, 2 or 3) for each SNP, where k is predicted using the available data. We compare our method to four genotyping algorithms (GenCall, GenoSNP, Illuminus and OptiCall) on several Illumina data sets that include samples from the HapMap project where the true genotypes are known in advance. All methods were found to have high overall accuracy (> 98%), with KRLMM consistently amongst the best. At low minor allele frequency, the KRLMM, OptiCall and GenoSNP algorithms were observed to be consistently more accurate than GenCall and Illuminus on our test data. Conclusions Methods that tailor their approach to calling low frequency variants by either varying the number of clusters (KRLMM) or using information from other SNPs (OptiCall and GenoSNP) offer improved accuracy over methods that do not (GenCall and Illuminus). The KRLMM algorithm is implemented in the open-source crlmm package distributed via the Bioconductor project (http://www.bioconductor.org). PMID:24886250

  17. Environmental-adaptability analysis of an all polarization-maintaining fiber-based optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Xu, Xin; Hu, Xiaohong; Liu, Yuanshan; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zhi; Duan, Lina; Zhao, Wei; Cheng, Zhao

    2015-06-29

    We demonstrate an all polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-based optical frequency comb and provide the detailed environmental stability analysis results. The frequency comb has been built by commercial available PM fiber completely, and its static uncertainty in optical domain is 350 Hz in 1 s when referenced to a low noise oven controlled crystal oscillator. The acoustic resonant frequencies of the system have been measured. It is proved that acoustic-vibration induced phase noise could be eliminated by low pass vibration-isolation structure. Further, the existence of the optimum working temperature is illustrated. At this temperature (289.6 K), the out-loop integrated phase noise of f(r) and the temperature-drift induced instability of f(CEO) reach the lowest level 31.6 μrad and 0 kHz/(mW∙K) respectively. Finally, the system is proved to be stable under different humidity (18% ~80%) by a 240-day-long record of the f(CEO). PMID:26191762

  18. Results from a Field Trial of the Radio Frequency Based Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Laughter, Mark D; Martyn, Rose; Pickett, Chris A; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Shephard, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) is a tool designed for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to improve overall inspector efficiency through real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, site specific rules-based event detection, and the capability to integrate many types of monitoring technologies. The system is based on the tracking of cylinder movements using (radio frequency) RF tags, and the collection of data, such as accountability weights, that can be associated with the cylinders. This presentation will cover the installation and evaluation of the CATS at the Global Nuclear Fuels (GNF) fuel fabrication facility in Wilmington, NC. This system was installed to evaluate its safeguards applicability, operational durability under operating conditions, and overall performance. An overview of the system design and elements specific to the GNF deployment will be presented along with lessons learned from the installation process and results from the field trial.

  19. Real-time multi-signal frequency tracking with a bank of notch filters to estimate the respiratory rate from the ECG.

    PubMed

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Leila; Vesin, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-01

    Measuring the instantaneous frequency of a signal rapidly and accurately is essential in many applications. However, the instantaneous frequency by definition is a parameter difficult to determine. Fourier-based methods introduce estimation delays as computations are performed in a time-window. Instantaneous methods based on the Hilbert transform lack robustness. State-of-the-art adaptive filters yield accurate estimates, however, with an adaptation delay. In this study we propose an algorithm based on short length-3 FIR notch filters to estimate the instantaneous frequency of a signal at each sample, in a real-time manner and with very low delay. The output powers of a bank of the above-mentioned filters are used in a recursive weighting scheme to estimate the dominant frequency of the input. This scheme has been extended to process multiple inputs containing a common frequency by introducing an additional weighting scheme upon the inputs. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data and then evaluated on real biomedical data, i.e. the estimation of the respiratory rate from the electrocardiogram. It was shown that the proposed method provided more accurate estimates with less delay than those of state-of-the-art methods. By virtue of its simplicity and good performance, the proposed method is a worthy candidate to be used in biomedical applications, for example in health monitoring developments based on portable and automatic devices. PMID:27510318

  20. Trabecular Bone Adaptation to Low-Magnitude High-Frequency Loading in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Torcasio, Antonia; Jähn, Katharina; Van Guyse, Maarten; Spaepen, Pieter; Tami, Andrea E.; Vander Sloten, Jos; Stoddart, Martin J.; van Lenthe, G. Harry

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes loss of lower body bone mass in some astronauts. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading can stimulate bone formation on earth. Here we hypothesized that low-magnitude high-frequency loading will also stimulate bone formation under microgravity conditions. Two groups of six bovine cancellous bone explants were cultured at microgravity on a Russian Foton-M3 spacecraft and were either loaded dynamically using a sinusoidal curve or experienced only a static load. Comparable reference groups were investigated at normal gravity. Bone structure was assessed by histology, and mechanical competence was quantified using μCT and FE modelling; bone remodelling was assessed by fluorescent labelling and secreted bone turnover markers. Statistical analyses on morphometric parameters and apparent stiffness did not reveal significant differences between the treatment groups. The release of bone formation marker from the groups cultured at normal gravity increased significantly from the first to the second week of the experiment by 90.4% and 82.5% in response to static and dynamic loading, respectively. Bone resorption markers decreased significantly for the groups cultured at microgravity by 7.5% and 8.0% in response to static and dynamic loading, respectively. We found low strain magnitudes to drive bone turnover when applied at high frequency, and this to be valid at normal as well as at microgravity. In conclusion, we found the effect of mechanical loading on trabecular bone to be regulated mainly by an increase of bone formation at normal gravity and by a decrease in bone resorption at microgravity. Additional studies with extended experimental time and increased samples number appear necessary for a further understanding of the anabolic potential of dynamic loading on bone quality and mechanical competence. PMID:24787094

  1. Preceding vehicle detection and tracking adaptive to illumination variation in night traffic scenes based on relevance analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junbin; Wang, Jianqiang; Guo, Xiaosong; Yu, Chuanqiang; Sun, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Preceding vehicle detection and tracking at nighttime are challenging problems due to the disturbance of other extraneous illuminant sources coexisting with the vehicle lights. To improve the detection accuracy and robustness of vehicle detection, a novel method for vehicle detection and tracking at nighttime is proposed in this paper. The characteristics of taillights in the gray level are applied to determine the lower boundary of the threshold for taillights segmentation, and the optimal threshold for taillight segmentation is calculated using the OTSU algorithm between the lower boundary and the highest grayscale of the region of interest. The candidate taillight pairs are extracted based on the similarity between left and right taillights, and the non-vehicle taillight pairs are removed based on the relevance analysis of vehicle location between frames. To reduce the false negative rate of vehicle detection, a vehicle tracking method based on taillights estimation is applied. The taillight spot candidate is sought in the region predicted by Kalman filtering, and the disturbed taillight is estimated based on the symmetry and location of the other taillight of the same vehicle. Vehicle tracking is completed after estimating its location according to the two taillight spots. The results of experiments on a vehicle platform indicate that the proposed method could detect vehicles quickly, correctly and robustly in the actual traffic environments with illumination variation. PMID:25195855

  2. Preceding Vehicle Detection and Tracking Adaptive to Illumination Variation in Night Traffic Scenes Based on Relevance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junbin; Wang, Jianqiang; Guo, Xiaosong; Yu, Chuanqiang; Sun, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Preceding vehicle detection and tracking at nighttime are challenging problems due to the disturbance of other extraneous illuminant sources coexisting with the vehicle lights. To improve the detection accuracy and robustness of vehicle detection, a novel method for vehicle detection and tracking at nighttime is proposed in this paper. The characteristics of taillights in the gray level are applied to determine the lower boundary of the threshold for taillights segmentation, and the optimal threshold for taillight segmentation is calculated using the OTSU algorithm between the lower boundary and the highest grayscale of the region of interest. The candidate taillight pairs are extracted based on the similarity between left and right taillights, and the non-vehicle taillight pairs are removed based on the relevance analysis of vehicle location between frames. To reduce the false negative rate of vehicle detection, a vehicle tracking method based on taillights estimation is applied. The taillight spot candidate is sought in the region predicted by Kalman filtering, and the disturbed taillight is estimated based on the symmetry and location of the other taillight of the same vehicle. Vehicle tracking is completed after estimating its location according to the two taillight spots. The results of experiments on a vehicle platform indicate that the proposed method could detect vehicles quickly, correctly and robustly in the actual traffic environments with illumination variation. PMID:25195855

  3. Tracking adaptive evolution in the structure, function and molecular phylogeny of haemoglobin in non-Antarctic notothenioid fish species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, Cinzia; Parisi, Elio; di Prisco, Guido

    2006-04-01

    With the notable exception of Antarctic icefishes, haemoglobin (Hb) is present in all vertebrates. In polar fish, Hb evolution has included adaptations with implications at the biochemical, physiological and molecular levels. Cold adaptation has been shown to be also linked to small changes in primary structure and post-translational modifications in proteins, including hydrophobic remodelling and increased flexibility. A wealth of knowledge is available on the oxygen-transport system of fish inhabiting Antarctic waters, but very little is known on the structure and function of Hb of non-Antarctic notothenioid fishes. The comparison of the biochemical and physiological adaptations between cold-adapted and non-cold-adapted species is a powerful tool to understand whether (and to what extent) extreme environments require specific adaptations or simply select for phenotypically different life styles. This study focuses on structure, function and molecular phylogeny of Hb in Antarctic and non-Antarctic notothenioid fishes. The rationale is to use the primary structure of Hb as tool of choice to gain insight into the pathways of the evolution history of α and β globins of notothenioids and also as a basis for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships among Antarctic and non-Antarctic species.

  4. Doppler tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher Jacob

    This study addresses the development of a methodology using the Doppler Effect for high-resolution, short-range tracking of small projectiles and vehicles. Minimal impact on the design of the moving object is achieved by incorporating only a transmitter in it and using ground stations for all other components. This is particularly useful for tracking objects such as sports balls that have configurations and materials that are not conducive to housing onboard instrumentation. The methodology developed here uses four or more receivers to monitor a constant frequency signal emitted by the object. Efficient and accurate schemes for filtering the raw signals, determining the instantaneous frequencies, time synching the frequencies from each receiver, smoothing the synced frequencies, determining the relative velocity and radius of the object and solving the nonlinear system of equations for object position in three dimensions as a function of time are developed and described here.

  5. Robust rate-adaptive hybrid ARQ scheme for frequency-hopped spread-spectrum multiple-access communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigloo, Amir M. Y.; Gulliver, T. Aaron; Wang, Q.; Bhargava, Vijay K.

    1994-06-01

    This paper considers the application of rate-adaptive coding (RAC) to a spread spectrum multiple access (SSMA) communication system. Specifically, RAC using a variable rate Reed-Solomon (RS) code with a single decoder is applied to frequency-hopped SSMA. We show that this combination can accommodate a larger number of users compared to that with conventional fixed-rate coding. This increase is a result of a reduction in the channel interference from other users. The penalty for this improvement in most cases is a slight increase in the delay (composed of propagation and decoding delay). The throughput and the undetected error probability for a Q-ary symmetric channel are analyzed, and performance results are presented.

  6. Comparative study on the intracavity frequency-doubling 532 nm laser based on gray-tracking-resistant KTP and conventional KTP.

    PubMed

    Huang, H-T; Qiu, G; Zhang, B-T; He, J-L; Yang, J-F; Xu, J-L

    2009-11-10

    A comparative study of a frequency-doubling 532 nm laser based on gray-tracking-resistant KTP (GTR-KTP) and conventional KTP is presented. The intracavity GTR-KTP was proved to have better temperature characteristics than that of conventional KTP. Within the normalized output power variation range of 0.8-1.0, GTR-KTP has a temperature tolerance of 35 degrees C, broader than the 21 degrees C obtained with conventional KTP. Under the laser diode (LD) pump power of 180 W, the maximum average output power at 532 nm was 40.6 W for GTR-KTP at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. In the case of conventional KTP, the maximum available LD pump power was limited to 150 W, with the corresponding maximum green average output power of 27.2 W. PMID:19904338

  7. Decentralized Output Feedback Adaptive NN Tracking Control for Time-Delay Stochastic Nonlinear Systems With Prescribed Performance.

    PubMed

    Hua, Changchun; Zhang, Liuliu; Guan, Xinping

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the dynamic output feedback tracking control problem for stochastic interconnected time-delay systems with the prescribed performance. The subsystems are in the form of triangular structure. First, we design a reduced-order observer independent of time delay to estimate the unmeasured state variables online instead of the traditional full-order observer. Then, a new state transformation is proposed in consideration of the prescribed performance requirement. Using neural network to approximate the composite unknown nonlinear function, the corresponding decentralized output tracking controller is designed. It is strictly proved that the resulting closed-loop system is stable in probability in the sense of uniformly ultimately boundedness and that both transient-state and steady-state performances are preserved. Finally, a simulation example is given, and the result shows the effectiveness of the proposed control design method. PMID:25794398

  8. Forskolin Suppresses Delayed-Rectifier K+ Currents and Enhances Spike Frequency-Dependent Adaptation of Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Elena; Cruzblanca, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV). Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels. PMID:25962132

  9. T wave alternans evaluation using adaptive time-frequency signal analysis and non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Ghoraani, Behnaz; Krishnan, Sridhar; Selvaraj, Raja J; Chauhan, Vijay S

    2011-07-01

    Each year 400,000 North Americans die from sudden cardiac death (SCD). Identifying those patients at risk of SCD remains a formidable challenge. T wave alternans (TWA) evaluation is emerging as an important tool to risk stratify patients with heart diseases. TWA is a heart rate dependent phenomenon that manifests on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) as a change in the shape or amplitude of the T wave every second heart beat. The presence of large magnitude TWA often presages lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Because the TWA signal is typically in the microvolt range, accurate detection algorithms are required to control for confounding noise and changing physiological conditions (i.e. data nonstationarity). In this study, we address the limitations of two common TWA estimation methods, spectral method (SM) and modified moving average (MMA). To overcome their limitations, we propose a modified TWA quantification framework, called Adaptive SM, that uses non-linear time-frequency distribution (TFD). In order to increase the robustness of TWA detection in ambulatory ECGs, we also propose a new technique, called non-negative matrix factorization (NMF)-Adaptive SM. We present the analytical background of these methods, and evaluate their accuracy in detecting synthetic TWA signal in simulated and real-world ambulatory ECG recordings under conditions of noise and data non-stationarity. The results of the numerical simulations support the effectiveness of the proposed approaches for TWA analysis, which may ultimately improve SCD risk assessment. PMID:21333581

  10. Robust fundamental frequency estimation in sustained vowels: Detailed algorithmic comparisons and information fusion with adaptive Kalman filtering

    PubMed Central

    Tsanas, Athanasios; Zañartu, Matías; Little, Max A.; Fox, Cynthia; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Clifford, Gari D.

    2014-01-01

    There has been consistent interest among speech signal processing researchers in the accurate estimation of the fundamental frequency (F0) of speech signals. This study examines ten F0 estimation algorithms (some well-established and some proposed more recently) to determine which of these algorithms is, on average, better able to estimate F0 in the sustained vowel /a/. Moreover, a robust method for adaptively weighting the estimates of individual F0 estimation algorithms based on quality and performance measures is proposed, using an adaptive Kalman filter (KF) framework. The accuracy of the algorithms is validated using (a) a database of 117 synthetic realistic phonations obtained using a sophisticated physiological model of speech production and (b) a database of 65 recordings of human phonations where the glottal cycles are calculated from electroglottograph signals. On average, the sawtooth waveform inspired pitch estimator and the nearly defect-free algorithms provided the best individual F0 estimates, and the proposed KF approach resulted in a ∼16% improvement in accuracy over the best single F0 estimation algorithm. These findings may be useful in speech signal processing applications where sustained vowels are used to assess vocal quality, when very accurate F0 estimation is required. PMID:24815269

  11. Robust fundamental frequency estimation in sustained vowels: detailed algorithmic comparisons and information fusion with adaptive Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Tsanas, Athanasios; Zañartu, Matías; Little, Max A; Fox, Cynthia; Ramig, Lorraine O; Clifford, Gari D

    2014-05-01

    There has been consistent interest among speech signal processing researchers in the accurate estimation of the fundamental frequency (F(0)) of speech signals. This study examines ten F(0) estimation algorithms (some well-established and some proposed more recently) to determine which of these algorithms is, on average, better able to estimate F(0) in the sustained vowel /a/. Moreover, a robust method for adaptively weighting the estimates of individual F(0) estimation algorithms based on quality and performance measures is proposed, using an adaptive Kalman filter (KF) framework. The accuracy of the algorithms is validated using (a) a database of 117 synthetic realistic phonations obtained using a sophisticated physiological model of speech production and (b) a database of 65 recordings of human phonations where the glottal cycles are calculated from electroglottograph signals. On average, the sawtooth waveform inspired pitch estimator and the nearly defect-free algorithms provided the best individual F(0) estimates, and the proposed KF approach resulted in a ∼16% improvement in accuracy over the best single F(0) estimation algorithm. These findings may be useful in speech signal processing applications where sustained vowels are used to assess vocal quality, when very accurate F(0) estimation is required. PMID:24815269

  12. An adaptation method to improve secret key rates of time-frequency QKD in atmospheric turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaole; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) channels can be characterized by random power fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, which is known as scintillation. Weak coherent source based FSO quantum key distribution (QKD) systems suffer from the scintillation effect because during the deep channel fading the expected detection rate drops, which then gives an eavesdropper opportunity to get additional information about protocol by performing photon number splitting (PNS) attack and blocking single-photon pulses without changing QBER. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we study a large-alphabet QKD protocol, which is achieved by using pulse-position modulation (PPM)-like approach that utilizes the time-frequency uncertainty relation of the weak coherent photon state, called here TF-PPM-QKD protocol. We first complete finite size analysis for TF-PPM-QKD protocol to give practical bounds against non-negligible statistical fluctuation due to finite resources in practical implementations. The impact of scintillation under strong atmospheric turbulence regime is studied then. To overcome the secure key rate performance degradation of TF-PPM-QKD caused by scintillation, we propose an adaptation method for compensating the scintillation impact. By changing source intensity according to the channel state information (CSI), obtained by classical channel, the adaptation method improves the performance of QKD system with respect to the secret key rate. The CSI of a time-varying channel can be predicted using stochastic models, such as autoregressive (AR) models. Based on the channel state predictions, we change the source intensity to the optimal value to achieve a higher secret key rate. We demonstrate that the improvement of the adaptation method is dependent on the prediction accuracy.

  13. Bandwidth reduction of high-frequency sonar imagery in shallow water using content-adaptive hybrid image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Frances B.; Kil, David H.

    1998-09-01

    One of the biggest challenges in distributed underwater mine warfare for area sanitization and safe power projection during regional conflicts is transmission of compressed raw imagery data to a central processing station via a limited bandwidth channel while preserving crucial target information for further detection and automatic target recognition processing. Moreover, operating in an extremely shallow water with fluctuating channels and numerous interfering sources makes it imperative that image compression algorithms effectively deal with background nonstationarity within an image as well as content variation between images. In this paper, we present a novel approach to lossy image compression that combines image- content classification, content-adaptive bit allocation, and hybrid wavelet tree-based coding for over 100:1 bandwidth reduction with little sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Our algorithm comprises (1) content-adaptive coding that takes advantage of a classify-before-coding strategy to reduce data mismatch, (2) subimage transformation for energy compaction, and (3) a wavelet tree-based coding for efficient encoding of significant wavelet coefficients. Furthermore, instead of using the embedded zerotree coding with scalar quantization (SQ), we investigate the use of a hybrid coding strategy that combines SQ for high-magnitude outlier transform coefficients and classified vector quantization (CVQ) for compactly clustered coefficients. This approach helps us achieve reduced distortion error and robustness while achieving high compression ratio. Our analysis based on the high-frequency sonar real data that exhibit severe content variability and contain both mines and mine-like clutter indicates that we can achieve over 100:1 compression ratio without losing crucial signal attributes. In comparison, benchmarking of the same data set with the best still-picture compression algorithm called the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) reveals

  14. Adaptive sparse signal processing of satellite-based radio frequency (RF) recordings of lightning events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Daniela I.; Smith, David A.

    2014-05-01

    Ongoing research at Los Alamos National Laboratory studies the Earth's radio frequency (RF) background utilizing satellite-based RF observations of terrestrial lightning. Such impulsive events are dispersed through the ionosphere and appear as broadband nonlinear chirps at a receiver on-orbit. They occur in the presence of additive noise and structured clutter, making their classification challenging. The Fast On-orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite provided a rich RF lightning database. Application of modern pattern recognition techniques to this database may further lightning research in the scientific community, and potentially improve on-orbit processing and event discrimination capabilities for future satellite payloads. Conventional feature extraction techniques using analytical dictionaries, such as a short-time Fourier basis or wavelets, are not comprehensively suitable for analyzing the broadband RF pulses under consideration here. We explore an alternative approach based on non-analytical dictionaries learned directly from data, and extend two dictionary learning algorithms, K-SVD and Hebbian, for use with satellite RF data. Both algorithms allow us to learn features without relying on analytical constraints or additional knowledge about the expected signal characteristics. We then use a pursuit search over the learned dictionaries to generate sparse classification features, and discuss their performance in terms of event classification. We also use principal component analysis to analyze and compare the respective learned dictionary spaces to the real data space.

  15. Radiation-hardened fast acquisition/weak signal tracking system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke (Inventor); Boegner, Gregory J. (Inventor); Sirotzky, Steve (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A global positioning system (GPS) receiver and method of acquiring and tracking GPS signals comprises an antenna adapted to receive GPS signals; an analog radio frequency device operatively connected to the antenna and adapted to convert the GPS signals from an analog format to a digital format; a plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators operatively connected to the analog RF device; a GPS signal acquisition component operatively connected to the analog RF device and the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators, wherein the GPS signal acquisition component is adapted to calculate a maximum vector on a databit correlation grid; and a microprocessor operatively connected to the plurality of GPS signal tracking correlators and the GPS signal acquisition component, wherein the microprocessor is adapted to compare the maximum vector with a predetermined correlation threshold to allow the GPS signal to be fully acquired and tracked.

  16. High-order tracking differentiator based adaptive neural control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subject to actuators constraints.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Mingyan; Huang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural controller is exploited for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV) based on high-order tracking differentiator (HTD). By utilizing functional decomposition methodology, the dynamic model is reasonably decomposed into the respective velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem. For the velocity subsystem, a dynamic inversion based neural controller is constructed. By introducing the HTD to adaptively estimate the newly defined states generated in the process of model transformation, a novel neural based altitude controller that is quite simpler than the ones derived from back-stepping is addressed based on the normal output-feedback form instead of the strict-feedback formulation. Based on minimal-learning parameter scheme, only two neural networks with two adaptive parameters are needed for neural approximation. Especially, a novel auxiliary system is explored to deal with the problem of control inputs constraints. Finally, simulation results are presented to test the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy in the presence of system uncertainties and actuators constraints. PMID:26142218

  17. Inferring the Frequency Spectrum of Derived Variants to Quantify Adaptive Molecular Evolution in Protein-Coding Genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Peter D; Campos, José L; Booker, Tom R; Charlesworth, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Many approaches for inferring adaptive molecular evolution analyze the unfolded site frequency spectrum (SFS), a vector of counts of sites with different numbers of copies of derived alleles in a sample of alleles from a population. Accurate inference of the high-copy-number elements of the SFS is difficult, however, because of misassignment of alleles as derived vs. ancestral. This is a known problem with parsimony using outgroup species. Here we show that the problem is particularly serious if there is variation in the substitution rate among sites brought about by variation in selective constraint levels. We present a new method for inferring the SFS using one or two outgroups that attempts to overcome the problem of misassignment. We show that two outgroups are required for accurate estimation of the SFS if there is substantial variation in selective constraints, which is expected to be the case for nonsynonymous sites in protein-coding genes. We apply the method to estimate unfolded SFSs for synonymous and nonsynonymous sites in a population of Drosophila melanogaster from phase 2 of the Drosophila Population Genomics Project. We use the unfolded spectra to estimate the frequency and strength of advantageous and deleterious mutations and estimate that ∼50% of amino acid substitutions are positively selected but that <0.5% of new amino acid mutations are beneficial, with a scaled selection strength of Nes ≈ 12. PMID:27098912

  18. Organization in audition by similarity in rate of change: evidence from tracking individual frequency glides in mixtures.

    PubMed

    McPherson, L M; Ciocca, V; Bregman, A S

    1994-03-01

    In audition, sound energy is assigned to separate auditory "streams" following principles of organization that closely parallel the visual gestalt principles that guide the perception of distinct forms or objects. Metzger (1934) provided evidence for organization in vision based on similarity in the velocity of moving forms. If two dots approach one another along one spatial dimension, they may appear to cross and continue beyond their meeting point if their velocities differ; otherwise, they usually appear to change direction abruptly and retrace their movements. If an analogous auditory principle exists, with rate of change in frequency substituted for velocity of movement, two frequency glides that sweep through the same frequency range in opposite directions should be able to perceptually cross if their rates of change differ; otherwise, they should usually appear to change direction and retrace the same frequency region. Four experiments provided data in support of this hypothesis, and the results were consistent across experiments with varying stimuli and methods of presentation. When properties of the stimuli favored organization according to a principle of frequency proximity, the effect of a principle of rate similarity was attenuated but still evident. PMID:8036108

  19. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    PubMed Central

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca; Jónsson, Hákon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Fumagalli, Matteo; Yang, Melinda A.; Gamba, Cristina; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie D.; Petersen, Bent; Hoover, Cindi A.; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Boulygina, Eugenia; Tsygankova, Svetlana; Neuditschko, Markus; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Thèves, Catherine; Alfarhan, Ahmed H.; Alquraishi, Saleh A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Popov, Ruslan; Grigoriev, Semyon; Alekseev, Anatoly N.; Rubin, Edward M.; McCue, Molly; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso; Tikhonov, Alexei; Crubézy, Eric; Slatkin, Montgomery; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Kantanen, Juha; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below −70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens dating from the early 19th century and ∼5,200 y ago. By comparing these genomes with the genomes of two Late Pleistocene, 27 domesticated, and three wild Przewalski’s horses, we find that contemporary Yakutian horses do not descend from the native horses that populated the region until the mid-Holocene, but were most likely introduced following the migration of the Yakut people a few centuries ago. Thus, they represent one of the fastest cases of adaptation to the extreme temperatures of the Arctic. We find cis-regulatory mutations to have contributed more than nonsynonymous changes to their adaptation, likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments. PMID:26598656

  20. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments.

    PubMed

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca; Schubert, Mikkel; Jónsson, Hákon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Fumagalli, Matteo; Yang, Melinda A; Gamba, Cristina; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie D; Petersen, Bent; Hoover, Cindi A; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Boulygina, Eugenia; Tsygankova, Svetlana; Neuditschko, Markus; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Thèves, Catherine; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Popov, Ruslan; Grigoriev, Semyon; Alekseev, Anatoly N; Rubin, Edward M; McCue, Molly; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso; Tikhonov, Alexei; Crubézy, Eric; Slatkin, Montgomery; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Kantanen, Juha; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-12-15

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below -70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens dating from the early 19th century and ∼5,200 y ago. By comparing these genomes with the genomes of two Late Pleistocene, 27 domesticated, and three wild Przewalski's horses, we find that contemporary Yakutian horses do not descend from the native horses that populated the region until the mid-Holocene, but were most likely introduced following the migration of the Yakut people a few centuries ago. Thus, they represent one of the fastest cases of adaptation to the extreme temperatures of the Arctic. We find cis-regulatory mutations to have contributed more than nonsynonymous changes to their adaptation, likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments. PMID:26598656

  1. A new class of energy based control laws for revolute robot arms - Tracking control, robustness enhancement and adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth; Bayard, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A class of joint-level control laws for all-revolute robot arms is introduced. The analysis is similar to the recently proposed energy Liapunov function approach except that the closed-loop potential function is shaped in accordance with the underlying joint space topology. By using energy Liapunov functions with the modified potential energy, a much simpler analysis can be used to show closed-loop global asymptotic stability and local exponential stability. When Coulomb and viscous friction and model parameter errors are present, a sliding-mode-like modification of the control law is proposed to add a robustness-enhancing outer loop. Adaptive control is also addressed within the same framework. A linear-in-the-parameters formulation is adopted, and globally asymptotically stable adaptive control laws are derived by replacing the model parameters in the nonadaptive control laws by their estimates.

  2. Adapting a ground-based laser ranging system at NASA-GSFC for identification and tracking of orbital debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, D. B.; Stysley, Paul R.; McGarry, Jan F.; Hull, Scott M.; Getzandanner, Kenneth M.; Young, Romae P.

    2013-05-01

    The mitigation of orbital debris was addressed in the most recent release of the National Space Policy directing space faring agencies to pursue technologies that will "mitigate and remove on-orbit debris." No matter what abatement technology is developed and deployed, still lacking is the remote sensing infrastructure to locate and track these objects with adequate precision. We propose using GSFC's ground-based laser ranging facility to provide meter-level or better ranging precision on optically passive 10-30 cm orbital debris targets with the goal of improving current predictions up to 85%. The improved location accuracy also has the immediate benefit of reducing costly false alarms in collision predictions for existing assets.

  3. Adaptive Channel-Tracking Method and Equalization for MC-CDMA Systems over Rapidly Fading Channel under Colored Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chang-Yi; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2010-12-01

    A recursive maximum-likelihood (RML) algorithm for channel estimation under rapidly fading channel and colored noise in a multicarrier code-division multiple-access (MC-CDMA) system is proposed in this paper. A moving-average model with exogenous input (MAX) is given to describe the transmission channel and colored noise. Based on the pseudoregression method, the proposed RML algorithm can simultaneously estimate the parameters of channel and colored noise. Following the estimation results, these parameters can be used to enhance the minimum mean-square error (MMSE) equalizer. Considering high-speed mobile stations, a one-step linear trend predictor is added to improve symbol detection. Simulation results indicate that the proposed RML estimator can track the channel more precisely than the conventional estimator. Meanwhile, the performance of the proposed enhanced MMSE equalizer is robust to the rapidly Rayleigh fading channel under colored noise in the MC-CDMA systems.

  4. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  5. Adaptation of multidimensional group particle tracking and particle wall-boundary condition model to the FDNS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Farmer, R. C.

    1992-04-01

    A particulate two-phase flow CFD model was developed based on the FDNS code which is a pressure based predictor plus multi-corrector Navier-Stokes flow solver. Turbulence models with compressibility correction and the wall function models were employed as submodels. A finite-rate chemistry model was used for reacting flow simulation. For particulate two-phase flow simulations, a Eulerian-Lagrangian solution method using an efficient implicit particle trajectory integration scheme was developed in this study. Effects of particle-gas reaction and particle size change to agglomeration or fragmentation were not considered in this investigation. At the onset of the present study, a two-dimensional version of FDNS which had been modified to treat Lagrangian tracking of particles (FDNS-2DEL) had already been written and was operational. The FDNS-2DEL code was too slow for practical use, mainly because it had not been written in a form amenable to vectorization on the Cray, nor was the full three-dimensional form of FDNS utilized. The specific objective of this study was to reorder to calculations into long single arrays for automatic vectorization on the Cray and to implement the full three-dimensional version of FDNS to produce the FDNS-3DEL code. Since the FDNS-2DEL code was slow, a very limited number of test cases had been run with it. This study was also intended to increase the number of cases simulated to verify and improve, as necessary, the particle tracking methodology coded in FDNS.

  6. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  7. Wearable Multi-Frequency and Multi-Segment Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Unobtrusively Tracking Body Fluid Shifts during Physical Activity in Real-Field Applications: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Federica; Magnani, Alessandro; Maggioni, Martina A.; Stahn, Alexander; Rampichini, Susanna; Merati, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy (BIS) allows assessing the composition of body districts noninvasively and quickly, potentially providing important physiological/clinical information. However, neither portable commercial instruments nor more advanced wearable prototypes simultaneously satisfy the demanding needs of unobtrusively tracking body fluid shifts in different segments simultaneously, over a broad frequency range, for long periods and with high measurements rate. These needs are often required to evaluate exercise tests in sports or rehabilitation medicine, or to assess gravitational stresses in aerospace medicine. Therefore, the aim of this work is to present a new wearable prototype for monitoring multi-segment and multi-frequency BIS unobtrusively over long periods. Our prototype guarantees low weight, small size and low power consumption. An analog board with current-injecting and voltage-sensing electrodes across three body segments interfaces a digital board that generates square-wave current stimuli and computes impedance at 10 frequencies from 1 to 796 kHz. To evaluate the information derivable from our device, we monitored the BIS of three body segments in a volunteer before, during and after physical exercise and postural shift. We show that it can describe the dynamics of exercise-induced changes and the effect of a sit-to-stand maneuver in active and inactive muscular districts separately and simultaneously. PMID:27187389

  8. On Fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  9. On fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bao; Yuan, Jian; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  10. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  12. Spike frequency adaptation is a possible mechanism for control of attractor preference in auto-associative neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, James; Sander, Leonard; Zochowski, Michal

    Auto-associative memory is the ability to retrieve a pattern from a small fraction of the pattern and is an important function of neural networks. Within this context, memories that are stored within the synaptic strengths of networks act as dynamical attractors for network firing patterns. In networks with many encoded memories, some attractors will be stronger than others. This presents the problem of how networks switch between attractors depending on the situation. We suggest that regulation of neuronal spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) provides a universal mechanism for network-wide attractor selectivity. Here we demonstrate in a Hopfield type attractor network that neurons minimal SFA will reliably activate in the pattern corresponding to a local attractor and that a moderate increase in SFA leads to the network to converge to the strongest attractor state. Furthermore, we show that on long time scales SFA allows for temporal sequences of activation to emerge. Finally, using a model of cholinergic modulation within the cortex we argue that dynamic regulation of attractor preference by SFA could be critical for the role of acetylcholine in attention or for arousal states in general. This work was supported by: NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE 1256260 (JPR), NSF CMMI 1029388 (MRZ) and NSF PoLS 1058034 (MRZ & LMS).

  13. Design of a constant-voltage and constant-current controller with dual-loop and adaptive switching frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingping, Chen; Zhiqian, Li

    2015-05-01

    A 5.0-V 2.0-A flyback power supply controller providing constant-voltage (CV) and constant-current (CC) output regulation without the use of an optical coupler is presented. Dual-close-loop control is proposed here due to its better regulation performance of tolerance over process and temperature compared with open loop control used in common. At the same time, the two modes, CC and CV, could switch to each other automatically and smoothly according to the output voltage level not sacrificing the regulation accuracy at the switching phase, which overcomes the drawback of the digital control scheme depending on a hysteresis comparator to change the mode. On-chip compensation using active capacitor multiplier technique is applied to stabilize the voltage loop, eliminate an additional package pin, and save on the die area. The system consumes as little as 100 mW at no-load condition without degrading the transient response performance by utilizing the adaptive switching frequency control mode. The proposed controller has been implemented in a commercial 0.35-μm 40-V BCD process, and the active chip area is 1.5 × 1.0 mm2. The total error of the output voltage due to line and load variations is less than ±1.7%.

  14. Single frequency adapter

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, M.F.; Grazulis, J.J.

    1989-04-04

    This patent describes a system for rapidly changing the length between the mirrors of a gas laser, consisting of: (a) at least one of the mirror mounts being hollow and made of a nominally electrically conducting material and positioned so that the lasing axis passes therethrough; (b) an induction coil surrounding the mirror mount made of a nominally electrically conductive material and outwardly spaced from the mirror mount; (c) means for applying an alternating current to the induction coil; and (d) means for modulating the current in the induction coil.

  15. Emerging tools, concepts and ideas to track the modulator genes underlying plant drought adaptive traits: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Parvathi, M S; Nataraja, Karaba N

    2016-01-01

    Crop vulnerability to multiple abiotic stresses is increasing at an alarming rate in the current global climate change scenario, especially drought. Crop improvement for adaptive adjustments to accomplish stress tolerance requires a comprehensive understanding of the key contributory processes. This requires the identification and careful analysis of the critical morpho-physiological plant attributes and their genetic control. In this review we try to discuss the crucial traits underlying drought tolerance and the various modes followed to understand their molecular level regulation. Plant stress biology is progressing into new dimensions and a conscious attempt has been made to traverse through the various approaches and checkpoints that would be relevant to tackle drought stress limitations for sustainable crop production. PMID:26618613

  16. Five-year tracking of Plasmodium falciparum allele frequencies in a holoendemic area with indistinct seasonal transitions

    PubMed Central

    Akala, Hoseah M; Achieng, Angela O; Eyase, Fredrick L; Juma, Dennis W; Ingasia, Luiser; Cheruiyot, Agnes C; Okello, Charles; Omariba, Duke; Owiti, Eunice A; Muriuki, Catherine; Yeda, Redemptah; Andagalu, Ben; Johnson, Jacob D; Kamau, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Background The renewed malaria eradication efforts require an understanding of the seasonal patterns of frequency of polymorphic variants in order to focus limited funds productively. Although cross-sectional studies in holoendemic areas spanning a single year could be useful in describing parasite genotype status at a given point, such information is inadequate in describing temporal trends in genotype polymorphisms. For Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Kisumu District Hospital, Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt-K76T) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (PfMDR1-N86Y), were analyzed for polymorphisms and parasitemia changes in the 53 months from March 2008 to August 2012. Observations were compared with prevailing climatic factors, including humidity, rainfall, and temperature. Methods Parasitemia (the percentage of infected red blood cells per total red blood cells) was established by microscopy for P. falciparum malaria-positive samples. P. falciparum DNA was extracted from whole blood using a Qiagen DNA Blood Mini Kit. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification at positions Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or sequencing. Data on climatic variables were obtained from http://www.tutiempo.net/en/. Results A total of 895 field isolates from 2008 (n=169), 2009 (n=161), 2010 (n=216), 2011 (n=223), and 2012 (n=126) showed large variations in monthly frequency of PfMDR1-N86Y and Pfcrt-K76T as the mutant genotypes decreased from 68.4%±15% and 38.1%±13% to 29.8%±18% and 13.3%±9%, respectively. The mean percentage of parasitemia was 2.61%±1.01% (coefficient of variation 115.86%; n=895). There was no correlation between genotype or parasitemia and climatic factors. Conclusion This study shows variability in the frequency of Pfcrt-K76T and PfMDR1-N86Y polymorphisms during the study period, bringing into focus the role of cross-sectional studies in describing temporal

  17. Adaptation of primate vestibuloocular reflex to altered peripheral vestibular inputs. I. Frequency-specific recovery of horizontal VOR after inactivation of the lateral semicircular canals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Hess, B. J.; Arai, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The adaptive plasticity of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) following a selective lesion of the peripheral vestibular organs was investigated in rhesus monkeys whose lateral semicircular canals were inactivated by plugging of the canal lumen in both ears. Gain and phase of horizontal, vertical, and torsional slow-phase eye velocity were determined from three-dimensional eye movement recordings obtained acutely after the plugging operation, as well as in regular intervals up to 10 mo later. 2. Acutely after plugging, horizontal VOR was minimal during yaw rotation with gains of < 0.1 at all frequencies. Horizontal VOR gain gradually increased over time, reaching gains of 0.4-0.5 for yaw oscillations at 1.1 Hz approximately 5 mo after lateral canal inactivation. This response recovery was strongly frequency dependent: horizontal VOR gains were largest at the highest frequency tested and progressively decreased for lower frequencies. Below approximately 0.1 Hz, no consistent horizontal VOR could be elicited even 10 mo after plugging. 3. The frequency-dependent changes in gain paralleled changes in horizontal VOR phase. Below approximately 0.1-0.05 Hz large phase leads were present, similarly as in semicircular canal primary afferents. Smaller phase leads were also present at higher frequencies, particularly at 1.1 Hz (the highest frequency tested). 4. Consistent with the afferent-like dynamics of the adapted horizontal VOR, per- and postrotatory horizontal responses to constant-velocity yaw rotations were short lasting. Time constants of the slow-phase eye velocity envelope of the horizontal postrotatory nystagmus were approximately 2 s. Nonetheless, a consistent horizontal optokinetic afternystagmus was evoked in plugged animals. 5. A torsional component that was absent in intact animals was consistently present during yaw rotation acutely after lateral canal inactivation and remained approximately constant thereafter. The frequency response characteristics of this

  18. The mammalian efferent vestibular system plays a crucial role in the high-frequency response and short-term adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Patrick P; Khan, Serajul I; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-12-01

    Although anatomically well described, the functional role of the mammalian efferent vestibular system (EVS) remains unclear. Unlike in fish and reptiles, the mammalian EVS does not seem to play a role in modulation of primary afferent activity in anticipation of active head movements. However, it could play a role in modulating long-term mechanisms requiring plasticity such as vestibular adaptation. We measured the efficacy of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) adaptation in α9-knockout mice. These mice carry a missense mutation of the gene encoding the α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit. The α9 nAChR subunit is expressed in the vestibular and auditory periphery, and its loss of function could compromise peripheral input from the predominantly cholinergic EVS. We measured the VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) in 26 α9-knockout mice and 27 cba129 control mice. Mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: gain-increase adaptation (1.5×), gain-decrease adaptation (0.5×), or no adaptation (baseline, 1×). After adaptation training (horizontal rotations at 0.5 Hz with peak velocity 20°/s), we measured the sinusoidal (0.2-10 Hz, 20-100°/s) and transient (1,500-6,000°/s(2)) VOR in complete darkness. α9-Knockout mice had significantly lower baseline gains compared with control mice. This difference increased with stimulus frequency (∼ 5% <1 Hz to ∼ 25% >1 Hz). Moreover, vestibular adaptation (difference in VOR gain of gain-increase and gain-decrease adaptation groups as % of gain increase) was significantly reduced in α9-knockout mice (17%) compared with control mice (53%), a reduction of ∼ 70%. Our results show that the loss of α9 nAChRs moderately affects the VOR but severely affects VOR adaptation, suggesting that the EVS plays a crucial role in vestibular plasticity. PMID:26424577

  19. System and method for tracking a signal source. [employing feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogavero, L. N.; Johnson, E. G.; Evans, J. M., Jr.; Albus, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A system for tracking moving signal sources is disclosed which is particularly adaptable for use in tracking stage performers. A miniature transmitter is attached to the person or object to be tracked and emits a detectable signal of a predetermined frequency. A plurality of detectors positioned in a preset pattern sense the signal and supply output information to a phase detector which applies signals representing the angular orientation of the transmitter to a computer. The computer provides command signals to a servo network which drives a device such as a motor driven mirror reflecting the beam of a spotlight, to track the moving transmitter.

  20. A Cross-Track Cloud-Scanning Dual-Frequency Doppler (C2D2) Radar for the Proposed ACE Mission and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Tanelli, Simone; Chamberlain, Neil; Durden, Stephen; Fung, Andy; Sanchez-Barbetty, Mauricio; Thrivikraman, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    The National Resource Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey” (NRCDS) has identified the Aerosol/Climate/Ecosystems (ACE) Mission as a priority mission for NASA Earth science. The NRC recommended the inclusion of "a cross-track scanning cloud radar with channels at 94 GHz and possibly 34 GHz for measurement of cloud droplet size, glaciation height, and cloud height". Several radar concepts have been proposed that meet some of the requirements of the proposed ACE mission but none have provided scanning capability at both 34 and 94 GHz due to the challenge of constructing scanning antennas at 94 GHz. In this paper, we will describe a radar design that leverages new developments in microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) and micro-machining to enable an electronically-scanned radar with both Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (94-GHz) channels. This system uses a dual-frequency linear active electronically-steered array (AESA) combined with a parabolic cylindrical reflector. This configuration provides a large aperture (3m x 5m) with electronic-steering but is much simpler than a two-dimension AESA of similar size. Still, the W-band frequency requires element spacing of approximately 2.5 mm, presenting significant challenges for signal routing and incorporation of MMICs. By combining (Gallium Nitride) GaN MMIC technology with micro-machined radiators and interconnects and silicon-germanium (SiGe) beamforming MMICs, we are able to meet all the performance and packaging requirements of the linear array feed and enable simultaneous scanning of Ka-band and W-band radars over swath of up to 100 km.

  1. Real-time tracking of CO₂ injected into a subsurface coal fire through high-frequency measurements of the ¹³CO₂ signature.

    PubMed

    Krevor, Samuel C M; Ide, Taku; Benson, Sally M; Orr, Franklin M

    2011-05-01

    CO₂ was injected into a coal fire burning at a depth of 15 m in the subsurface in southwestern Colorado, USA. Measurements were made of the ¹³CO₂ isotopic signature of gas exhaust from an observation well and two surface fissures. The goal of the test was to determine (1) whether CO₂ with a distinct isotopic signature could be used as a tracer to identify flow pathways and travel times in a combustion setting where CO₂ was present in significant quantities in the gases being emitted from the coalbed fire, and (2) to confirm the existence of a self-propagating system of air-intake and combustion gas exhaust that has been previously proposed. CO₂ was injected in three separate periods. The ¹³CO₂ isotopic signature was measured at high frequency (0.5 Hz) before, during, and after the injection periods for gas flowing from fissures over the fire and from gas entering an observation well drilled into the formation just above the fire but near the combustion zone. In two cases, a shift in the isotopic signature of outgassing CO₂ provided clear evidence that injected CO₂ had traveled from the injection well to the observation point, while in a third case, no response was seen and the fissure could not be assumed to have a flowpath connected with the injection well. High-frequency measurements of the ¹³CO₂ signature of gas in observation wells is identified as a viable technique for tracking CO₂ injected into subsurface formations in real-time. In addition, a chimney-like coupled air-intake and exhaust outlet system feeding the combustion of the coal seam was confirmed. This can be used to further develop strategies for extinguishing the fire. PMID:21466184

  2. Etna_NETVIS: A dedicated tool for automatically pre-processing high frequency data useful to extract geometrical parameters and track the evolution of the lava field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, Maria; Junior Valentino D'Aranno, Peppe; De Bonis, Roberto; Nardinocchi, Carla; Scifoni, Silvia; Scutti, Marianna; Sonnessa, Alberico; Wahbeh, Wissam; Biale, Emilio; Coltelli, Mauro; Pecora, Emilio; Prestifilippo, Michele; Proietti, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    In volcanic areas, where it could be difficult to gain access to the most critical zones for carrying out direct surveys, digital photogrammetry techniques are rarely experimented, although in many cases they proved to have remarkable potentialities, as the possibility to follow the evolution of volcanic (fracturing, vent positions, lava fields, lava front positions) and deformation processes (inflation/deflation and instability phenomena induced by volcanic activity). These results can be obtained, in the framework of standard surveillance activities, by acquiring multi-temporal datasets including Digital Orthophotos (DO) and Digital Elevation Models (DEM) to be used for implementing a quantitative and comparative analysis. The frequency of the surveys can be intensified during emergency phases to implement a quasi real-time monitoring for supporting civil protection actions. The high level of accuracy and the short time required for image processing make digital photogrammetry a suitable tool for controlling the evolution of volcanic processes which are usually characterized by large and rapid mass displacements. In order to optimize and extend the existing permanent ground NEtwork of Thermal and VIsible Sensors located on Mt. Etna (Etna_NETVIS) and to improve the observation of the most active areas, an approach for monitoring surface sin-eruptive processes was implemented. A dedicated tool for automatically pre-processing high frequency data, useful to extract geometrical parameters as well as to track the evolution of the lava field, was developed and tested both in simulated and real scenarios. The tool allows to extract a coherent multi-temporal dataset of orthophotos useful to evaluate active flow area and to estimate effusion rates. Furthermore, Etna_NETVIS data were used to downscale the information derived from satellite data and/or to integrate the satellite datasets in case of incomplete coverage or missing acquisitions. This work was developed in the

  3. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  4. SU-E-J-77: Dose Tracking On An MR-Linac for Online QA and Plan Adaptation in Abdominal Organs

    SciTech Connect

    Glitzner, M; Crijns, S; Kontaxis, C; Prins, F; Lagendijk, J; Raaymakers, B; Senneville, B Denis de

    2015-06-15

    Recent developments made MRI-guided radiotherapy feasible. Simultaneously performed imaging during dose delivery reveals the influence of changes in anatomy not yet known at the planning stage. When targeting highly motile abdominal organs, respiratory gating is commonly employed in MRI and investigated in external beam radiotherapy to mitigate malicious motion effects. The purpose of the presented work is to investigate anatomy-adaptive dose reconstruction in the treatment of abdominalorgans using concurrent (duplex) gating of an integrated MRlinac modality.Using navigators, 3D-MR images were sampled during exhale phase, requiring 3s per axial volume (360×260×100mm{sup 3}, waterselective T1w-FFE). Deformation vector fields (DVF) were calculated for all imaging dynamics with respect to initial anatomy, yielding an estimation of anatomy changes over the time of a fraction. A pseudo-CT was generated from the outline of a reference MR image, assuming a water-filled body. Consecutively, a treatment was planned on a fictional kidney lesion and optimized simulating a 6MV linac in a 1.5T magnetic field. After delivery, using the DVF, the pseudo-CT was deformed and dose accumulated for every individual gating interval yielding the true accumulated dose on the dynamic anatomy during beam-on.Dose-volume parameters on the PTV show only moderate changes when incorporating motion, i.e. ΔD{sub 99} (GTV)=0.3Gy with D{sub 99} (GTV)=20Gy constraints. However, local differences in the PTV region showed underdosages as high as 2.7Gy and overdosages up to 1.4Gy as compared to the optimized dose on static anatomy.A dose reconstruction toolchain was successfully implemented and proved its potential in the duplex gated treatment of abdominal organs by means of an MR-linac modality. While primary dose constraints were not violated on the fictional test data, large deviations could be found locally, which are left unaccounted for in conventional treatments. Dose-tracking of both target

  5. Measurement of LF Standard-Frequency Waves JJY along the track of Shirase, the Japanese Antarctic Research Icebreaker, during JARE53-JARE54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitauchi, H.; Nozaki, K.; Ito, H.; Tsuchiya, S.; Imamura, K.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2013-12-01

    We first obtained a strong evidence of reception of the low frequency (LF) radio waves, 40 kHz and 60 kHz, of the call sign JJY by use of a newly developed, highly sensitive receiving system on board the Japanese Antarctic research icebreaker Shirase offshore East Ongul Island, East Antarctica--about 14,000 km away from those transmitting stations in Japan. The measured data sets of the electric field intensity and phase of those signals are to be analysed to examine and/or improve numerical prediction methods of field strength for long-distance propagation of LF radio waves, contributing to the Recommendation 'Prediction of field strength at frequencies below about 150 kHz' made by International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R). The call sign JJY of standard frequency and time signals (SFTS) of LF 40 kHz and 60 kHz are emitted from the transmitting stations, respectively, Ohtakadoya-yama 37° 22‧ 21″ N, 140° 50‧ 56″ E in Fukushima Prefecture (eastern Japan) and Hagane-yama 33° 27‧ 56″ N, 130° 10‧ 32″ E in Saga/Fukuoka Prefecture (western Japan) by NICT. Those are widely used for calibrating frequency standard oscillators and radio-controlled clocks in Japan. Since low signal attenuation in LF radio band allows long distance communication, kilometre waves have been utilized for operations such as SFTS and military communications around the world. Therefore, there is a need to give guidance to engineers for the planning of radio services in LF band so as to avoid interference. ITU-R recommends the guidance 'Prediction of field strength at frequencies below about 150 kHz', in which a numerical prediction method is proposed to compute the electric field intensity, up to 16,000 km of long-distance propagation, away from the transmitting station. Since reliable data sets are limited for the long-distance propagation, in this study we tried to measure the field strength and phase of the LF SFTS JJY of 40 kHz and 60 kHz over 14

  6. Applying an On-Track Indicator for High School Graduation: Adapting the Consortium on Chicago School Research Indicator for Five Texas Districts. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jenifer; Wilkins, Chuck; Gregory, Lois; Gould, Laura Feagans; D'Souza, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This study uses a measure of the on-track or off-track status of students at the end of grade 9 as an indicator of whether students in five Texas districts would graduate from high school in four years. In all five districts, on-time graduation rates were higher for students who were on track at the end of grade 9 than for students who were off…

  7. Adaptive Control with Reference Model Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a modification of the conventional model reference adaptive control (MRAC) architecture in order to improve transient performance of the input and output signals of uncertain systems. A simple modification of the reference model is proposed by feeding back the tracking error signal. It is shown that the proposed approach guarantees tracking of the given reference command and the reference control signal (one that would be designed if the system were known) not only asymptotically but also in transient. Moreover, it prevents generation of high frequency oscillations, which are unavoidable in conventional MRAC systems for large adaptation rates. The provided design guideline makes it possible to track a reference commands of any magnitude from any initial position without re-tuning. The benefits of the method are demonstrated with a simulation example

  8. Contribution of apamin-sensitive SK channels to the firing precision but not to the slow afterhyperpolarization and spike frequency adaptation in snail neurons.

    PubMed

    Vatanparast, Jafar; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2009-02-19

    Apamin-sensitive small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)(SK) channels are generally accepted as responsible for the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) after single or train of action potentials. Here, we examined the functional involvement of these channels in the firing precision, post train AHP and spike frequency adaptation (SFA) in neurons of snail Caucasotachea atrolabiata. Apamin, a selective SK channel antagonist, reduced the duration of single-spike AHP and disrupted the spontaneous rhythmic activity. High frequency trains of evoked action potentials showed a time-dependent decrease in the action potential discharge rate (spike frequency adaptation) and followed by a prominent post stimulus inhibitory period (PSIP) as a marker of slow AHP (sAHP). Neither sAHP nor SFA was attenuated by apamin, suggesting that apamin-sensitive SK channels can strongly affect the rhythmicity, but are probably not involved in the SFA and sAHP. Nifedipine, antagonist of L-type Ca(2+) channels, decreased the firing frequency and neuronal rhythmicity. When PSIP was normalized to the background interspike interval, a suppressing effect of nifedipine on PSIP was also observed. Intracellular iontophoretic injection of BAPTA, a potent Ca(2+) chelator, dramatically suppressed PSIP that confirms the intracellular Ca(2+) dependence of the sAHP, but had no discernable effect on the SFA. During train-evoked activity a reduction in the action potential overshoot and maximum depolarization rate was also observed, along with a decrease in the firing frequency, while the action potential threshold increased, which indicated that Na(+) channels, rather than Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels, are involved in the SFA. PMID:19100724

  9. A 0.04 mm (2) Buck-Boost DC-DC Converter for Biomedical Implants Using Adaptive Gain and Discrete Frequency Scaling Control.

    PubMed

    George, Libin; Gargiulo, Gaetano Dario; Lehmann, Torsten; Hamilton, Tara Julia

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable buck-boost switched-capacitor DC-DC converter suitable for use in a wide range of biomedical implants. The proposed converter has an extremely small footprint and uses a novel control method that allows coarse and fine control of the output voltage. The converter uses adaptive gain control, discrete frequency scaling and pulse-skipping schemes to regulate the power delivered to a range of output voltages and loads. Adaptive gain control is used to implement variable switching gain ratios from a reconfigurable power stage and thereby make coarse steps in output voltage. A discrete frequency scaling controller makes discrete changes in switching frequency to vary the power delivered to the load and perform fine tuning when the output voltage is within 10% of the target output voltage. The control architecture is predominately digital and it has been implemented as part of a fully-integrated switched-capacitor converter design using a standard bulk CMOS 0.18 μm process. Measured results show that the converter has an output voltage range of 1.0 to 2.2 V, can deliver up to 7.5 mW of load power and efficiency up to 75% using an active area of only 0.04 mm (2), which is significantly smaller than that of other designs. This low-area, low-complexity reconfigurable power converter can support low-power circuits in biomedical implant applications. PMID:26600247

  10. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  11. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  12. Experimental investigations in transmission performance of real-time long-reach adaptively modulated direct-detection optical-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; He, Jing; Tang, Jin; Chen, Lin

    2014-09-01

    A real-time base-band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transceiver with symbol synchronization, channel equalization, sampling clock frequency synchronization, and adaptive modulation technique is successfully implemented by field programmable gate arrays and a 2.5-GSps digital-to-analog converter and analog-to-digital converter. The real-time optical OFDM signal at a raw bit rate of 5.156 Gbps within about 1.1-GHz bandwidth transmission over 100-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) is experimentally investigated in a simple intensity-modulation and direct-detection system. The experimental results show that the real-time system has a good bit error rate (BER) performance by using an adaptive modulation technique according to the conditions on the subchannels. After 100-km SSMF transmission, at a BER of 1×10-3, the power penalty is <1 dB. Moreover, there is a negligible penalty between the off-line and real-time digital signal processing results.

  13. Robust DTC Based on Adaptive Fuzzy Control of Double Star Synchronous Machine Drive with Fixed Switching Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudana, Djamel; Nezli, Lazhari; Tlemçani, Abdelhalim; Mahmoudi, Mohand Oulhadj; Tadjine, Mohamed

    2012-05-01

    The double star synchronous machine (DSSM) is widely used for high power traction drives. It possesses several advantages over the conventional three phase machine. To reduce the torque ripple the DSSM are supplied with source voltage inverter (VSI). The model of the system DSSM-VSI is high order, multivariable and nonlinear. Further, big harmonic currents are generated. The aim of this paper is to develop a new direct torque adaptive fuzzy logic control in order to control DSSM and minimize the harmonics currents. Simulations results are given to show the effectiveness of our approach.

  14. Linguistic tone is related to the population frequency of the adaptive haplogroups of two brain size genes, ASPM and Microcephalin

    PubMed Central

    Dediu, Dan; Ladd, D. Robert

    2007-01-01

    The correlations between interpopulation genetic and linguistic diversities are mostly noncausal (spurious), being due to historical processes and geographical factors that shape them in similar ways. Studies of such correlations usually consider allele frequencies and linguistic groupings (dialects, languages, linguistic families or phyla), sometimes controlling for geographic, topographic, or ecological factors. Here, we consider the relation between allele frequencies and linguistic typological features. Specifically, we focus on the derived haplogroups of the brain growth and development-related genes ASPM and Microcephalin, which show signs of natural selection and a marked geographic structure, and on linguistic tone, the use of voice pitch to convey lexical or grammatical distinctions. We hypothesize that there is a relationship between the population frequency of these two alleles and the presence of linguistic tone and test this hypothesis relative to a large database (983 alleles and 26 linguistic features in 49 populations), showing that it is not due to the usual explanatory factors represented by geography and history. The relationship between genetic and linguistic diversity in this case may be causal: certain alleles can bias language acquisition or processing and thereby influence the trajectory of language change through iterated cultural transmission. PMID:17537923

  15. Adaptation of frequency-domain readout for Transition Edge Sensor bolometers for the POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaori; Arnold, Kam; Barron, Darcy; Dobbs, Matt; de Haan, Tijmen; Harrington, Nicholas; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Holzapfel, William L.; Keating, Brian; Lee, Adrian T.; Morii, Hideki; Myers, Michael J.; Smecher, Graeme; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tomaru, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    The POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. For the large array's readout, we employ digital frequency-domain multiplexing and multiplex 32 bolometers through a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). An 8-bolometer frequency-domain multiplexing readout has been deployed with the POLARBEAR-1 experiment. Extending that architecture to 32 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics to 3 MHz. To achieve this increase in bandwidth, we use Digital Active Nulling (DAN) on the digital frequency multiplexing platform. In this paper, we present requirements and improvements on parasitic inductance and resistance of cryogenic wiring and capacitors used for modulating bolometers. These components are problematic above 1 MHz. We also show that our system is able to bias a bolometer in its superconducting transition at 3 MHz.

  16. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  17. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parametersmore » of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.« less

  18. Adaptation of Locally Available Portion Sizes for Food Frequency Questionnaires in Nutritional Epidemiological Studies: How Much Difference does it Make?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha; Verma, Sonika; Singh, Abhishek; Tandon, Nikhil; Puri, Seema; Arora, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is need for employing strategies to minimize measurement errors while administering semi-quantitative FFQ. The current study was planned to adapt and standardize locally available portion sizes for semi-quantitative FFQ to improve its validity and document the process of standardization of portion sizes. Methodology: The study was conducted in 9 villages of the INCLEN-SOMAARTH DDESS (Demographic, Development and Environmental Surveillance Site), Palwal district, Haryana, India. The subjects in these nine villages are part of a cohort study to assess the interaction between societal and household factors with food intake and physical activity of children. Systematic utensil survey was undertaken in 3 randomly chosen households per village i.e. 27 households and the portion sizes were derived from a total of 74 serving utensils. The derived sizes were classified as small (240 ml), medium (320 ml) and large (600 ml). The semi-quantitative FFQ with locally derived portion sizes was then administered to 63 children in 6-12 year age group. Results: The volume of food measured by the reference portion sizes generally being employed in the national surveys, would have been underestimated the food consumed by the child by 55-60% as compared to what was being consumed by the children in the study area. The correlation between food intake assessed by 24-hr recall method and FFQ using derived (local) portion sizes was better as compared to that obtained with the semi-quantitative FFQ done with reference portions. Conclusion: In conclusion, local portion size adaptation of FFQ for semi-quantification is useful to mitigate measurement errors associated with this technique. PMID:27385878

  19. A Load Frequency Control in an Off-Grid Sustainable Power System Based on a Parameter Adaptive PID-Type Fuzzy Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronilaya, Ferdian; Miyauchi, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new implementation of a parameter adaptive PID-type fuzzy controller (PAPIDfc) for a grid-supporting inverter of battery to alleviate frequency fluctuations in a wind-diesel power system. A variable speed wind turbine that drives a permanent magnet synchronous generator is assumed for demonstrations. The PAPIDfc controller is built from a set of control rules that adopts the droop method and uses only locally measurable frequency signal. The output control signal is determined from the knowledge base and the fuzzy inference. The input-derivative gain and the output-integral gain of the PAPIDfc are tuned online. To ensure safe battery operating limits, we also propose a protection scheme called intelligent battery protection (IBP). Several simulation experiments are performed by using MATLAB®/SimPowersystems™. Next, to verify the scheme's effectiveness, the simulation results are compared with the results of conventional controllers. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the PAPIDfc scheme to control a grid-supporting inverter of the battery in the reduction of frequency fluctuations.

  20. High-dynamic GPS tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, S.; Statman, J. I.

    1988-01-01

    The results of comparing four different frequency estimation schemes in the presence of high dynamics and low carrier-to-noise ratios are given. The comparison is based on measured data from a hardware demonstration. The tested algorithms include a digital phase-locked loop, a cross-product automatic frequency tracking loop, and extended Kalman filter, and finally, a fast Fourier transformation-aided cross-product frequency tracking loop. The tracking algorithms are compared on their frequency error performance and their ability to maintain lock during severe maneuvers at various carrier-to-noise ratios. The measured results are shown to agree with simulation results carried out and reported previously.

  1. Optical tracking telescope compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In order to minimize the effects of parameter variations in the dynamics of an optical tracking telescope, a model referenced parameter adaptive control system is described that - in conjunction with more traditional forms of compensation - achieves a reduction of rms pointing error by more than a factor of six. The adaptive compensation system utilizes open loop compensation, closed loop compensation, and model reference compensation to provide the precise input to force telescope axis velocity to follow the ideal velocity.

  2. Adaptation of a High Frequency Ultrasonic Transducer to the Measurement of Water Temperature in a Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaz, G.; Calzavara, Y.; Le Clézio, E.; Despaux, G.

    Most high flux reactors possess for research purposes fuel elements composed of plates. Their relative distance is a crucial parameter, particularly concerning the irradiation history. For the High Flux Reactor (RHF) of the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL), the measurement of this distance with a microscopic resolution becomes extremely challenging. To address this issue, a specific ultrasonic transducer, presented in a first paper, has been designed and manufactured to be inserted into the 1.8 mm width channel existing between curved fuel plates. It was set on a blade yielding a total device thickness of 1 mm. To achieve the expected resolution, the system is excited with frequencies up to 70 MHz and integrated into a set of high frequency acquisition instruments. Thanks to a specific signal processing, this device allows the distance measurement through the evaluation of the ultrasonic wave time of fight. One of the crucial points is then the evaluation of the local water temperature inside the water channel. To obtain a precise estimation of this parameter, the ultrasonic sensor is used as a thermometer thanks to the analysis of the spectral components of the acoustic signal propagating inside the sensor multilayered structure. The feasibility of distance measurement was proved during the December 2013 experiment in the RHF fuel element of the ILL. Some of the results will be presented as well as some experimental constraints identified to improve the accuracy of the measurement in future works.

  3. Tracking rhythm in long-term EEG recordings using empirical mode calculation.

    PubMed

    Lipping, Tarmo; Anier, Andres; Ratsep, Indrek; Kleemann, Piret; Toome, Valdo; Jantti, Ville

    2008-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the detection and tracking of rhythmic patterns in the EEG signal is presented. The algorithm includes the following steps: 1) linear filtering using symmetric impulse response, 2) calculation of the first intrinsic mode of the filter output and 3) calculation of instantaneous frequency and amplitude using the Hilbert transform. The linear filter is adapted according to the instantaneous frequency. The algorithm is shown to perform well in tracking the alpha rhythm (the alpha coma pattern) in critically ill patients sedated with midazolam. PMID:19163489

  4. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  5. Energy-efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based passive optical network based on adaptive sleep-mode control and dynamic bandwidth allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongfu; Xiao, Nengwu; Chen, Chen; Yuan, Weicheng; Qiu, Kun

    2016-02-01

    We propose an energy-efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based passive optical network (OFDM-PON) using adaptive sleep-mode control and dynamic bandwidth allocation. In this scheme, a bidirectional-centralized algorithm named the receiver and transmitter accurate sleep control and dynamic bandwidth allocation (RTASC-DBA), which has an overall bandwidth scheduling policy, is employed to enhance the energy efficiency of the OFDM-PON. The RTASC-DBA algorithm is used in an optical line terminal (OLT) to control the sleep mode of an optical network unit (ONU) sleep and guarantee the quality of service of different services of the OFDM-PON. The obtained results show that, by using the proposed scheme, the average power consumption of the ONU is reduced by ˜40% when the normalized ONU load is less than 80%, compared with the average power consumption without using the proposed scheme.

  6. A novel DVS guidance principle and robust adaptive path-following control for underactuated ships using low frequency gain-learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Zhang, Xianku

    2015-05-01

    Around the waypoint-based path-following control for marine ships, a novel dynamic virtual ship (DVS) guidance principle is developed to implement the assumption "the reference path is generated using a virtual ship", which is critical for applying the current theoretical studies in practice. Taking two steerable variables as control inputs, the robust adaptive scheme is proposed by virtue of the robust neural damping and dynamic surface control (DSC) techniques. The derived controller is with the advantages of concise structure and being easy-to-implement for its burdensome superiority. Furthermore, the low frequency learning method improves the applicability of the algorithm. Finally, the comparison experiments with the line-of-sight (LOS) based fuzzy scheme are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our results. PMID:25579375

  7. Performance evaluation of coherent free space optical communications with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror adaptive optics system depending on the Greenwood frequency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Kainan; Huang, Danian; Lin, Xudong; Wang, Liang; Lv, Yaowen

    2016-06-13

    The Greenwood frequency (GF) is influential in performance improvement for the coherent free space optical communications (CFSOC) system with a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) unit. We analyze the impact of tilt and high-order aberrations on the mixing efficiency (ME) and bit-error-rate (BER) under different GF. The root-mean-square value (RMS) of the ME related to the RMS of the tilt aberrations, and the GF is derived to estimate the volatility of the ME. Furthermore, a numerical simulation is applied to verify the theoretical analysis, and an experimental correction system is designed with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror and a 97-element continuous surface deformable mirror. The conclusions of this paper provide a reference for designing the AO system for the CFSOC system. PMID:27410346

  8. TRACKING Trounces Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of an article from School Board News, January 6, 2004 edition. The article describes the effort of de-tracking students of varying ability levels, made by officials of South Side High School, in Rockville Centre, New York, and Noble High School, in North Berwick, Maine. Officials from both schools say that the…

  9. Optimal Control Modification for Robust Adaptation of Singularly Perturbed Systems with Slow Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham; Stepanyan, Vahram; Boskovic, Jovan

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. The model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in increase in the feedback gain and modification of the adaptive law.

  10. Adaptive switching frequency buck DC—DC converter with high-accuracy on-chip current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinguang, Jiang; Fei, Huang; Zhihui, Xiong

    2015-05-01

    A current-mode PWM buck DC—DC converter is proposed. With the high-accuracy on-chip current sensor, the switching frequency can be selected automatically according to load requirements. This method improves efficiency and obtains an excellent transient response. The high accuracy of the current sensor is achieved by a simple switch technique without an amplifier. This has the direct benefit of reducing power dissipation and die size. Additionally, a novel soft-start circuit is presented to avoid the inrush current at the starting up state. Finally, this DC—DC converter is fabricated with the 0.5 μm standard CMOS process. The chip occupies 3.38 mm2. The accuracy of the proposed current sensor can achieve 99.5% @ 200 mA. Experimental results show that the peak efficiency is 91.8%. The input voltage ranges from 5 to 18 V, while a 2 A load current can be obtained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41274047), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (No. BK2012639), the Science and Technology Enterprises in Jiangsu Province Technology Innovation Fund (No. BC2012121), and the Changzhou Science and Technology Support (Industrial) Project (No. CE20120074).

  11. Intense pumping and time- and frequency-resolved CARS for driving and tracking structural deformation and recovery of liquid nitromethane molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chang; Wu, Hong-lin; Song, Yun-fei; He, Xing; Yang, Yan-qiang; Tan, Duo-wang

    2015-11-01

    A modified CARS technique with an intense nonresonant femtosecond laser is presented to drive the structural deformation of liquid nitromethane molecules and track their structural relaxation process. The CARS spectra reveal that the internal rotation of the molecule can couple with the CN symmetric stretching vibration and the molecules undergo ultrafast structural deformation of the CH3 groups from 'opened umbrella' to 'closed umbrella' shape, and then experience a structural recovery process within 720 fs.

  12. Tracking of electrochemical impedance of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piret, H.; Granjon, P.; Guillet, N.; Cattin, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary battery impedance estimation method, which can be easily embedded in vehicles or nomad devices. The proposed method not only allows an accurate frequency impedance estimation, but also a tracking of its temporal evolution contrary to classical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. Taking into account constraints of cost and complexity, we propose to use the existing electronics of current control to perform a frequency evolutionary estimation of the electrochemical impedance. The developed method uses a simple wideband input signal, and relies on a recursive local average of Fourier transforms. The averaging is controlled by a single parameter, managing a trade-off between tracking and estimation performance. This normalized parameter allows to correctly adapt the behavior of the proposed estimator to the variations of the impedance. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: the method is easy to embed into a simple electronic circuit, and the battery impedance estimator is evolutionary. The ability of the method to monitor the impedance over time is demonstrated on a simulator, and on a real Lithium ion battery, on which a repeatability study is carried out. The experiments reveal good tracking results, and estimation performance as accurate as the usual laboratory approaches.

  13. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  14. Computationally efficient Bayesian tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Jason; La Cour, Brian

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the progress we have achieved in developing a computationally efficient, grid-based Bayesian fusion tracking system. In our approach, the probability surface is represented by a collection of multidimensional polynomials, each computed adaptively on a grid of cells representing state space. Time evolution is performed using a hybrid particle/grid approach and knowledge of the grid structure, while sensor updates use a measurement-based sampling method with a Delaunay triangulation. We present an application of this system to the problem of tracking a submarine target using a field of active and passive sonar buoys.

  15. Anti-aliasing Wiener filtering for wave-front reconstruction in the spatial-frequency domain for high-order astronomical adaptive-optics systems.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Teixeira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    Computationally efficient wave-front reconstruction techniques for astronomical adaptive-optics (AO) systems have seen great development in the past decade. Algorithms developed in the spatial-frequency (Fourier) domain have gathered much attention, especially for high-contrast imaging systems. In this paper we present the Wiener filter (resulting in the maximization of the Strehl ratio) and further develop formulae for the anti-aliasing (AA) Wiener filter that optimally takes into account high-order wave-front terms folded in-band during the sensing (i.e., discrete sampling) process. We employ a continuous spatial-frequency representation for the forward measurement operators and derive the Wiener filter when aliasing is explicitly taken into account. We further investigate and compare to classical estimates using least-squares filters the reconstructed wave-front, measurement noise, and aliasing propagation coefficients as a function of the system order. Regarding high-contrast systems, we provide achievable performance results as a function of an ensemble of forward models for the Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (using sparse and nonsparse representations) and compute point-spread-function raw intensities. We find that for a 32×32 single-conjugated AOs system the aliasing propagation coefficient is roughly 60% of the least-squares filters, whereas the noise propagation is around 80%. Contrast improvements of factors of up to 2 are achievable across the field in the H band. For current and next-generation high-contrast imagers, despite better aliasing mitigation, AA Wiener filtering cannot be used as a standalone method and must therefore be used in combination with optical spatial filters deployed before image formation actually takes place. PMID:25606767

  16. Manchester transition tracking loop (MTTL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cellier, A.; Ma, L. N.; Huey, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    In new tracking loop, separate phase detection algorithm is incorporated for acquisition; programmed acquisition-to-track sequence includes automatic bandwidth switching. Additionally, system has very effective phase detection signal-to-noise ratio and can operate at any rate by changing master clock frequency. All system parameters remain constant.

  17. Adaptive sequential algorithms for detecting targets in a heavy IR clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexander G.; Kligys, Skirmantas; Petrov, Anton

    1999-10-01

    Cruise missiles over land and sea cluttered background are serious threats to search and track systems. In general, these threats are stealth in both the IR and radio frequency bands. That is, their thermal IR signature and their radar cross section can be quite small. This paper discusses adaptive sequential detection methods which exploit 'track- before-detect' technology for detection glow-SNR targets in IR search and track (IRST) systems. Despite the fact that we focus on an IRST against cruise missiles over land and sea cluttered backgrounds, the results are applicable to other sensors and other kinds of targets.

  18. Analysis of railway track vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Yamada, M.

    1989-04-01

    Analytical formulae are developed for estimating the amplitudes of the vibrations generated in railway tracks by wheels and rail discontinuities or by unevennesses on their surfaces. Rails are assumed to be supported elastically on concrete sleepers by resilient rail-pads inserted between them. The elasticities and the masses of track materials and those of the roadbed are also taken into consideration. It is shown that after an impulse is applied to the track, not only is a vibration with a comparatively low natural frequency generated, but also traveling waves with higher frequencies, and the latter propagate lengthwise along the track or downwards into the roadbed. With the assumption that the power spectral density of the unevennesses on the rail surface is in proportion to the third power of the wavelength, or to (wavenumber) -3, the amplitudes of the vibrations in railway tracks supported by rail-pads and roadbeds with various magnitudes of elastic constants are analyzed and the values for each one-third octave band are estimated. The velocity of the vibration takes on a maximum value for the band with a center frequency of 63 Hz, which corresponds to the resonant frequency of the system composed of the wheel and the track. As the frequency increases beyond this value, the velocity of the vibration takes on a second maximum value at a frequency of about 1000 Hz. These estimates are compared with the data obtained from field measurements and reasonably good correlations are found between them.

  19. Illusory motion reversals and feature tracking analyses of movement.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Derek H; Pearce, Samuel L; Marinovic, Welber

    2014-06-01

    Illusory motion reversals (IMRs) can happen when looking at a repetitive pattern of motion, such as a spinning wheel. To date these have been attributed to either a form of motion aftereffect seen while viewing a moving stimulus or to the visual system taking discrete perceptual snapshots of continuous input. Here we present evidence that we argue is inconsistent with both proposals. First, we show that IMRs are driven by the adaptation of nondirectional temporal frequency tuned cells, which is inconsistent with the motion aftereffect account. Then we establish that the optimal frequency for inducing IMRs differs for color and luminance defined movement. These data are problematic for any account based on a constant rate of discrete perceptual sampling. Instead, we suggest IMRs result from a perceptual rivalry involving discrepant signals from a feature tracking analysis of movement and motion-energy based analyses. We do not assume that feature tracking relies on a discrete sampling of input at a fixed rate, but rather that feature tracking can (mis)match features at any rate less than a stimulus driven maximal resolution. Consistent with this proposal, we show that the critical frequency for inducing IMRs is dictated by the duty cycle of salient features within a moving pattern, rather than by the temporal frequency of luminance changes. PMID:24635200

  20. Adaptive vehicle motion estimation and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Thorpe, Chuck E.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate motion estimation and reliable maneuver prediction enable an automated car to react quickly and correctly to the rapid maneuvers of the other vehicles, and so allow safe and efficient navigation. In this paper, we present a car tracking system which provides motion estimation, maneuver prediction and detection of the tracked car. The three strategies employed - adaptive motion modeling, adaptive data sampling, and adaptive model switching probabilities - result in an adaptive interacting multiple model algorithm (AIMM). The experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that our tracking system is reliable, flexible, and robust. The adaptive tracking makes the system intelligent and useful in various autonomous driving tasks.

  1. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness. PMID:26352631

  2. Derailing Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Reviews recent research on student achievement, self-concept, and curriculum and instruction showing the ineffectiveness of tracking and ability grouping. Certain court rulings show that tracking violates the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Innovative alternatives include cooperative learning, mastery learning, peer tutoring,…

  3. Beyond Tracking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Percy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    On the surface, educational tracking may seem like a useful tool for allowing students to work at their own pace, and to avoid discouraging competition, but abuses of the tracking idea have arisen through biased placement practices that have denied equal access to education for minority students. The articles in this issue explore a number of…

  4. Rover tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Tracks made by the Sojourner rover are visible in this image, taken by one of the cameras aboard Sojourner on Sol 3. The tracks represent the rover maneuvering towards the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill.' The rover, having exited the lander via the rear ramp, first traveled towards the right portion of the image, and then moved forward towards the left where Barnacle Bill sits. The fact that the rover was making defined tracks indicates that the soil is made up of particles on a micron scale.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Tracking the turbidity maximum zone in the Loire Estuary (France) based on a long-term, high-resolution and high-frequency monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón-Rojas, Isabel; Schmidt, Sabine; Sottolichio, Aldo; Bertier, Christine

    2016-04-01

    A unique dataset of turbidity from 7 years of continuous monitoring at six stations, distributed evenly along a 62-km long transect, is presented to discuss, for the first time, the present-day dynamics of the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) in the Loire Estuary. This system is considered one of the largest macrotidal, hyper-turbid estuaries of the European coast, mainly as the result of intense engineering works in the last two centuries. Besides accurate TMZ tracking, from tidal to multi-annual time scales, the high temporal and spatial resolution of measurements allows us to address TMZ aspects scarcely reported in the literature on estuarine sedimentary dynamics. In the Loire Estuary, TMZ moves upstream during periods of low discharge and its upstream boundary may reach up to 62 km from the mouth. The TMZ displacement is faster during its downstream flushing by river floods than during its upstream migration by tidal pumping (respectively 1.6 km day-1 and 0.9 km day-1 during 2011). However, the expulsion of the TMZ from the upper reaches requires higher discharge levels than its installation (respective discharge thresholds of 497-1034 m3 s-1 and 300-360 m3 s-1). This is due to the presence of mobile mud remaining after the TMZ presence, as confirmed by clockwise turbidity-discharge hysteresis patterns. While the installation threshold barely varies over years, the expulsion threshold is higher during years with a more concentrated and persistent TMZ. The interannual variability of the TMZ concentration and persistence is explained by the water volume transported during the previous high discharge period and the duration of the low discharge period, respectively, as recently shown for the Gironde Estuary, leading to a better understanding of TMZ features in macrotidal estuaries. The summer-averaged river flow is introduced as a hydrological indicator of the upstream boundary of the TMZ. In the context of global change, these three discharge-based indicators of TMZ

  6. Tracking the Emergence of Host-Specific Simian Immunodeficiency Virus env and nef Populations Reveals nef Early Adaptation and Convergent Evolution in Brain of Naturally Progressing Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Nolan, David J.; Rife, Brittany D.; Fogel, Gary B.; McGrath, Michael S.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Autissier, Patrick; Williams, Kenneth C.; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT While a clear understanding of the events leading to successful establishment of host-specific viral populations and productive infection in the central nervous system (CNS) has not yet been reached, the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque provides a powerful model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution and neuropathogenesis. The evolution of the gp120 and nef genes, which encode two key proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of infection, was assessed in macaques that were intravenously inoculated with the same viral swarm and allowed to naturally progress to simian AIDS and potential SIV-associated encephalitis (SIVE). Longitudinal plasma samples and immune markers were monitored until terminal illness. Single-genome sequencing was employed to amplify full-length env through nef transcripts from plasma over time and from brain tissues at necropsy. nef sequences diverged from the founder virus faster than gp120 diverged. Host-specific sequence populations were detected in nef (∼92 days) before they were detected in gp120 (∼182 days). At necropsy, similar brain nef sequences were found in different macaques, indicating convergent evolution, while gp120 brain sequences remained largely host specific. Molecular clock and selection analyses showed weaker clock-like behavior and stronger selection pressure in nef than in gp120, with the strongest nef selection in the macaque with SIVE. Rapid nef diversification, occurring prior to gp120 diversification, indicates that early adaptation of nef in the new host is essential for successful infection. Moreover, the convergent evolution of nef sequences in the CNS suggests a significant role for nef in establishing neurotropic strains. IMPORTANCE The SIV-infected rhesus macaque model closely resembles HIV-1 immunopathogenesis, neuropathogenesis, and disease progression in humans. Macaques were intravenously infected with identical viral

  7. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Salton, Jonathan R.; Buttz, James H.; Garretson, Justin; Hayward, David R.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K.

    2012-07-24

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  8. Adaptive line enhancers for fast acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures - namely, conventional ALE, ALE with double filtering, and ALE with coherent accumulation - are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in the time domain. The advantages of these algorithms are their simplicity, flexibility, robustness, and applicability to general situations including the Earth-to-space uplink carrier acquisition and tracking of the spacecraft. In the acquisition mode, these algorithms act as bandpass filters; hence, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) is improved for fast acquisition. In the tracking mode, these algorithms simply act as lowpass filters to improve signal-to-noise ratio; hence, better tracking performance is obtained. It is not necessary to have a priori knowledge of the received signal parameters, such as CNR, Doppler, and carrier sweeping rate. The implementation of these algorithms is in the time domain (as opposed to the frequency domain, such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT)). The carrier frequency estimation can be updated in real time at each time sample (as opposed to the batch processing of the FFT). The carrier frequency to be acquired can be time varying, and the noise can be non-Gaussian, nonstationary, and colored.

  9. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  10. Habituation of visual adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: The electrical asymmetry effect in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges - measurements of dc self bias, ion energy and ion flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, J.; Schüngel, E.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2009-05-01

    The recently theoretically predicted electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) (Heil et al 2008 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36 1404, Heil et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 165202, Czarnetzki et al 2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. at press) in capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharges and the related separate control of ion energy and flux via the EAE (Czarnetzki et al 2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. at press, Donkó et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42 025205) are tested experimentally for the first time. A geometrically symmetric CCRF discharge (equal electrode surface areas) operated at 13.56 and 27.12 MHz with variable phase angle between the harmonics is operated in argon at different pressures. The dc self bias, the energy as well as the flux of ions at the grounded electrode, and the space and phase resolved optical emission are measured. The results verify the predictions of models and simulations: via the EAE a dc self bias is generated as an almost linear function of the phase. This variable dc self bias allows separate control of ion energy and flux in an almost ideal way under various discharge conditions.

  12. Drift and proportional tracking chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    The many techniques exploited in constructing tracking chambers, particle detectors which measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles, are discussed. In high energy interactions, the final states are dominated by closely collimated jets of high multiplicity, requiring good track-pair resolution in the tracking chamber. High energy particles deflect very little in limited magnetic field volumes, necessitating good spatial resolution for accurate momentum measurements. The colliding beam technique requires a device easily adapted to full solid angle coverage, and the high event rates expected in some of these machines put a premium on good time resolution. Finally, the production and subsequent decays of the tau, charmed and beautiful mesons provide multiple vertex topologies. To reconstruct these vertices reliably requires improvements in spatial resolution and track pair resolution. The proportional counter and its descendant, the drift chamber, are considered as tracking chambers. The physics of this device are discussed in order to understand its performance limitations and promises.

  13. Adaptation to continuous perturbation of balance: progressive reduction of postural muscle activity with invariant or increasing oscillations of the center of mass depending on perturbation frequency and vision conditions.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Micaela; Bottaro, Alessandra; Sozzi, Stefania; Schieppati, Marco

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the adaptation of balancing behavior during a continuous, predictable perturbation of stance consisting of 3-min backward and forward horizontal sinusoidal oscillations of the support base. Two visual conditions (eyes-open, EO; eyes-closed, EC) and two oscillation frequencies (LF, 0.2 Hz; HF, 0.6 Hz) were used. Center of Mass (CoM) and Center of Pressure (CoP) oscillations and EMG of Soleus (Sol) and Tibialis Anterior (TA) were recorded. The time course of each variable was estimated through an exponential model. An adaptation index allowed comparison of the degree of adaptation of different variables. Muscle activity pattern was initially prominent under the more challenging conditions (HF, EC and EO; LF, EC) and diminished progressively to reach a steady state. At HF, the behavior of CoM and CoP was almost invariant. The time-constant of EMG adaptation was shorter for TA than for Sol. With EC, the adaptation index showed a larger decay in the TA than Sol activity at the end of the balancing trial, pointing to a different role of the two muscles in the adaptation process. At LF, CoM and CoP oscillations increased during the balancing trial to match the platform translations. This occurred regardless of the different EMG patterns under EO and EC. Contrary to CoM and CoP, the adaptation of the muscle activities had a similar time-course at both HF and LF, in spite of the two frequencies implying a different number of oscillation cycles. During adaptation, under critical balancing conditions (HF), postural muscle activity is tuned to that sufficient for keeping CoM within narrow limits. On the contrary, at LF, when vision permits, a similar decreasing pattern of muscle activity parallels a progressive increase in CoM oscillation amplitude, and the adaptive balancing behavior shifts from the initially reactive behavior to one of passive riding the platform. Adaptive balance control would rely on on-line computation of risk of falling and sensory inflow

  14. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  15. Dynamic tracking of tendon elongation in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Mahta; Screen, Hazel; Morrissey, Dylan

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the elongation of the Achilles tendon by looking at the changing position of Myo-Tendenious Junction (MTJ) using ultrasound during isometric contraction on an Isometric dynamometer. A sequence of ultrasound images in the form of movie, obtained from a unit operating at a frequency of 12MHz during isometric contraction, was analyzed offline using MATLAB to track the MTJ. This investigation has implemented important techniques for in vivo feature extraction of Achilles tendon. Prior to feature extraction, the images were filtered by anisotropic diffusion method and morphological enhancements. The cross correlation search algorithm with an adaptive mask was utilized to track MTJ by comparing adjacent segmented frames. The present method was studied on seventeen subjects, where it was able to measure the related movement accurately.

  16. Decentralized adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, B. J.; Jamshidi, M.; Seraji, H.

    1988-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive control is proposed to stabilize and track the nonlinear, interconnected subsystems with unknown parameters. The adaptation of the controller gain is derived by using model reference adaptive control theory based on Lyapunov's direct method. The adaptive gains consist of sigma, proportional, and integral combination of the measured and reference values of the corresponding subsystem. The proposed control is applied to the joint control of a two-link robot manipulator, and the performance in computer simulation corresponds with what is expected in theoretical development.

  17. On fractional order composite model reference adaptive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiheng; Sun, Zhenyuan; Hu, Yangsheng; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel composite model reference adaptive control approach for a class of fractional order linear systems with unknown constant parameters. The method is extended from the model reference adaptive control. The parameter estimation error of our method depends on both the tracking error and the prediction error, whereas the existing method only depends on the tracking error, which makes our method has better transient performance in the sense of generating smooth system output. By the aid of the continuous frequency distributed model, stability of the proposed approach is established in the Lyapunov sense. Furthermore, the convergence property of the model parameters estimation is presented, on the premise that the closed-loop control system is stable. Finally, numerical simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  18. An Adaptive Filter for the Removal of Drifting Sinusoidal Noise Without a Reference.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John W; Siewiorek, Daniel P; Smailagic, Asim; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for filtering sinusoidal noise with a variable bandwidth filter that is capable of tracking a sinusoid's drifting frequency. The method, which is based on the adaptive noise canceling (ANC) technique, will be referred to here as the adaptive sinusoid canceler (ASC). The ASC eliminates sinusoidal contamination by tracking its frequency and achieving a narrower bandwidth than typical notch filters. The detected frequency is used to digitally generate an internal reference instead of relying on an external one as ANC filters typically do. The filter's bandwidth adjusts to achieve faster and more accurate convergence. In this paper, the focus of the discussion and the data is physiological signals, specifically electrocorticographic (ECoG) neural data contaminated with power line noise, but the presented technique could be applicable to other recordings as well. On simulated data, the ASC was able to reliably track the noise's frequency, properly adjust its bandwidth, and outperform comparative methods including standard notch filters and an adaptive line enhancer. These results were reinforced by visual results obtained from real ECoG data. The ASC showed that it could be an effective method for increasing signal to noise ratio in the presence of drifting sinusoidal noise, which is of significant interest for biomedical applications. PMID:25474814

  19. Seismic random noise elimination according to the adaptive fractal conservation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanlei; Li, Yue; Zeng, Qian

    2016-05-01

    The fractal conservation law (FCL) is based on the Cauchy problem of the partial differential equation (PDE), which is modified by an anti-diffusive term of lower order. The analysis indicates that it can eliminate the high frequencies and preserve or amplify the low/medium frequencies. The performance of FCL depends on the threshold selected for the PDE. This threshold corresponds to the cut-off frequency of FCL in the frequency domain. Generally, the threshold is fixed. Thus, the FCL cannot track the signal beyond the cut-off frequency, and it removes the higher-frequency components of the signal. To solve this problem, an adaptive FCL filtering method is presented. The main purpose of this method is to select the optimal FCL threshold in each sample index such that it can adaptively track the rapid changes in the signal. In the adaptive FCL, we select FCL estimations with different thresholds and construct a convex hull of these estimations of each sample index. Consequently, we introduce a quadratic functional with respect to FCL estimation to ensure that we select the optimal estimation from the convex hull of each sample index. This leads to a box-constrained convex problem, which can be solved by the Viterbi algorithm.

  20. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  1. Python algorithms in particle tracking microrheology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Particle tracking passive microrheology relates recorded trajectories of microbeads, embedded in soft samples, to the local mechanical properties of the sample. The method requires intensive numerical data processing and tools allowing control of the calculation errors. Results We report the development of a software package collecting functions and scripts written in Python for automated and manual data processing, to extract viscoelastic information about the sample using recorded particle trajectories. The resulting program package analyzes the fundamental diffusion characteristics of particle trajectories and calculates the frequency dependent complex shear modulus using methods published in the literature. In order to increase conversion accuracy, segmentwise, double step, range-adaptive fitting and dynamic sampling algorithms are introduced to interpolate the data in a splinelike manner. Conclusions The presented set of algorithms allows for flexible data processing for particle tracking microrheology. The package presents improved algorithms for mean square displacement estimation, controlling effects of frame loss during recording, and a novel numerical conversion method using segmentwise interpolation, decreasing the conversion error from about 100% to the order of 1%. PMID:23186362

  2. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  3. Applying an On-Track Indicator for High School Graduation: Adapting the Consortium on Chicago School Research Indicator for Five Texas Districts. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 100

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Jenifer; Wilkins, Chuck; Gregory, Lois; Gould, Laura Feagans; D'Souza, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This study uses a measure of the on-track or off-track status of students at the end of grade 9 as an indicator of whether students in five Texas districts would graduate from high school in four years. In all five districts, on-time graduation rates were higher for students who were on track at the end of grade 9 than for students who were off…

  4. GPS Metric Tracking Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) applications become more prevalent for land- and air-based vehicles, GPS applications for space vehicles will also increase. The Applied Technology Directorate of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has developed a lightweight, low-cost GPS Metric Tracking Unit (GMTU), the first of two steps in developing a lightweight, low-cost Space-Based Tracking and Command Subsystem (STACS) designed to meet Range Safety's link margin and latency requirements for vehicle command and telemetry data. The goals of STACS are to improve Range Safety operations and expand tracking capabilities for space vehicles. STACS will track the vehicle, receive commands, and send telemetry data through the space-based asset, which will dramatically reduce dependence on ground-based assets. The other step was the Low-Cost Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Transceiver (LCT2), developed by the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF), which allows the vehicle to communicate with a geosynchronous relay satellite. Although the GMTU and LCT2 were independently implemented and tested, the design collaboration of KSC and WFF engineers allowed GMTU and LCT2 to be integrated into one enclosure, leading to the final STACS. In operation, GMTU needs only a radio frequency (RF) input from a GPS antenna and outputs position and velocity data to the vehicle through a serial or pulse code modulation (PCM) interface. GMTU includes one commercial GPS receiver board and a custom board, the Command and Telemetry Processor (CTP) developed by KSC. The CTP design is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with embedded processors to support GPS functions.

  5. Note: high frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method.

    PubMed

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot. PMID:24007125

  6. Note: High frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  7. Gravitational adaptation of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Burton, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of gravitational adaptation is studied in a group of five Leghorn cocks which had become physiologically adapted to 2 G after 162 days of centrifugation. After this period of adaptation, they are periodically exposed to a 2 G field, accompanied by five previously unexposed hatch-mates, and the degree of retained acceleration adaptation is estimated from the decrease in lymphocyte frequency after 24 hr at 2 G. Results show that the previously adapted birds exhibit an 84% greater lymphopenia than the unexposed birds, and that the lymphocyte frequency does not decrease to a level below that found at the end of 162 days at 2 G. In addition, the capacity for adaptation to chronic acceleration is found to be highly heritable. An acceleration tolerant strain of birds shows lesser mortality during chronic acceleration, particularly in intermediate fields, although the result of acceleration selection is largely quantitative (a greater number of survivors) rather than qualitative (behavioral or physiological changes).

  8. Tracking Comb Filter Suppresses Welder Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcher, Ray C.

    1992-01-01

    Tracking comb filter includes charge-coupled-device delay line and phase-locked loop. Filter removes harmonics of frequency of repetition of welding-current pulses from acoustic-emission signal. Spurious signals reduced almost to fundamental limit.

  9. Application of least mean square algorithm to suppression of maglev track-induced self-excited vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D. F.; Li, J.; Hansen, C. H.

    2011-11-01

    Track-induced self-excited vibration is commonly encountered in EMS (electromagnetic suspension) maglev systems, and a solution to this problem is important in enabling the commercial widespread implementation of maglev systems. Here, the coupled model of the steel track and the magnetic levitation system is developed, and its stability is investigated using the Nyquist criterion. The harmonic balance method is employed to investigate the stability and amplitude of the self-excited vibration, which provides an explanation of the phenomenon that track-induced self-excited vibration generally occurs at a specified amplitude and frequency. To eliminate the self-excited vibration, an improved LMS (Least Mean Square) cancellation algorithm with phase correction (C-LMS) is employed. The harmonic balance analysis shows that the C-LMS cancellation algorithm can completely suppress the self-excited vibration. To achieve adaptive cancellation, a frequency estimator similar to the tuner of a TV receiver is employed to provide the C-LMS algorithm with a roughly estimated reference frequency. Numerical simulation and experiments undertaken on the CMS-04 vehicle show that the proposed adaptive C-LMS algorithm can effectively eliminate the self-excited vibration over a wide frequency range, and that the robustness of the algorithm suggests excellent potential for application to EMS maglev systems.

  10. The Adaptive Change of HLA-DRB1 Allele Frequencies Caused by Natural Selection in a Mongolian Population That Migrated to the South of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lin, Keqin; Liu, Shuyuan; Huang, Kai; Wang, Xiuyun; Chu, Jiayou; Huang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection determines the richness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Changes in the pathogen spectrum may cause corresponding changes in HLA loci. Approximately 700 years ago, a Mongolian population moved from the north of China to the Yunnan region in the south of China. The pathogen spectrum in the south of China differs from that in the north. In this study, changes in the HLA genes in the Yunnan Mongolian population, as well as the underlying mechanism, were investigated. A sequence-based typing method (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-DRB1 in 470 individuals from two Mongolian populations and another five ethnic groups. Meanwhile, 10 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to assess the influence of genetic background on HLA-DRB1 frequencies. The frequencies of certain alleles changed significantly in the Mongolian population that migrated to Yunnan. For example, DRB1*12:02:01 increased from 6.1% to 35.4%. STR analysis excluded the possibility of a recent bottleneck and indicated that 50% of the genetic consistency between northern and southern Mongolians; Tajima's D value for HLA-DRB1 exon2 and dN/dS analysis showed that the HLA-DRB1 genes in both Mongolian populations were under balancing selection. However, the sites under natural selection changed. We proposed that the dramatically change of HLA frequencies in southern Mongolian was caused by a combination of inter-population gene flow and natural selection. Certain diseases specific to the south of China, such as malaria, may be the driving force behind the enhanced DRB1*12:02:01 frequency. PMID:26230582

  11. Preserving Structure in Model-Free Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; van der Maaten, Laurens J P

    2014-04-01

    Model-free trackers can track arbitrary objects based on a single (bounding-box) annotation of the object. Whilst the performance of model-free trackers has recently improved significantly, simultaneously tracking multiple objects with similar appearance remains very hard. In this paper, we propose a new multi-object model-free tracker (using a tracking-by-detection framework) that resolves this problem by incorporating spatial constraints between the objects. The spatial constraints are learned along with the object detectors using an online structured SVM algorithm. The experimental evaluation of our structure-preserving object tracker (SPOT) reveals substantial performance improvements in multi-object tracking. We also show that SPOT can improve the performance of single-object trackers by simultaneously tracking different parts of the object. Moreover, we show that SPOT can be used to adapt generic, model-based object detectors during tracking to tailor them towards a specific instance of that object. PMID:26353198

  12. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥ 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  13. Perceptually adapted MPEG video encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, Philippe; Guillotel, Philippe

    2000-06-01

    In picture quality assessment, the amount of distortion perceived by a human observer differs from one region to another according to its particular local content. This subjective perception can be explained/predicted by considering some simple psychovisual properties (masking) of the Human Visual System (HVS). We have implemented a HVS model based on a pyramid decomposition for extracting the spatial frequencies, associated with a multi-resolution motion representation. Then the visibility of the decoded errors is computed by exploiting the Kelly's contrast sensitivity spatio-velocity model. The resulting data is called a 'Quality-map.' Special attention has been paid to temporal/moving effects since, in the case of video sequences, motion strongly influences the subjective quality assessment. The quality of the motion information is thus preponderant. In the second part, two possible uses of these psychovisual properties for improving MPEG video encoding performances are depicted: (1) The pre-processing of the pictures to remove non-visible information using a motion adapted filtering. This process is efficient in term of bits saved and degradation is not significant especially on consumer electronic TV sets. (2) A perceptual quantizer based on a local adaptation scheme in order to obtain Quality-maps as uniform as possible (homogeneous perceived distortion), at constant bit-rate. Further improvements have been considered, especially when the viewer is tracking a moving object in the scene.

  14. Tracking in a ground-to-satellite optical link: effects due to lead-ahead and aperture mismatch, including temporal tracking response.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David

    2008-07-01

    Establishing a link between a ground station and a geosynchronous orbiting satellite can be aided greatly with the use of a beacon on the satellite. A tracker, or even an adaptive optics system, can use the beacon during communication or tracking activities to correct beam pointing for atmospheric turbulence and mount jitter effects. However, the pointing lead-ahead required to illuminate the moving object and an aperture mismatch between the tracking and the pointing apertures can limit the effectiveness of the correction, as the sensed tilt will not be the same as the tilt required for optimal transmission to the satellite. We have developed an analytical model that addresses the combined impact of these tracking issues in a ground-to-satellite optical link. We present these results for different tracker/pointer configurations. By setting the low-pass cutoff frequency of the tracking servo properly, the tracking errors can be minimized. The analysis considers geosynchronous Earth orbit satellites as well as low Earth orbit satellites. PMID:18594615

  15. Hypothesis: Low frequency heart rate variability (LF-HRV) is an input for undisclosed yet biological adaptive control, governing the cardiovascular regulations to assure optimal functioning.

    PubMed

    Gabbay, Uri; Bobrovsky, Ben Zion

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular regulation is considered today as having three levels: autoregulations, neural regulations and hormonal regulations. We hypothesize that the cardiovascular regulation has an additional (fourth) control level which is outer, hierarchical (adaptive) loop where LF-HRV amplitude serves as a reference input which the neural cardiovascular center detects and responses in order to maintain LF-HRV around some prescribed level. Supporting evidences: LF-HRV absence during artificial cardiac pacing may be associated with "pacemaker syndrome" which had not been sufficiently understood regardless of apparently unimpaired cardiovascular performance. The hypothesis may provide an essential basis for understanding several cardiovascular morbidities and insight toward diagnostic measures and treatments (including but not limited to adding variability to the pulse generator of artificial pacemakers to eliminate "pace maker syndrome"). PMID:22100632

  16. A variable-speed, constant-frequency wind power generation scheme using a slip-ring induction generator

    SciTech Connect

    Velayudhan, C.; Bundell, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This paper investigates a variable-speed, constant-frequency double output induction generator which is capable of absorbing the mechanical energy from a fixed pitch wind turbine and converting it into electrical energy at constant grid voltage and frequency. Rotor power at varying voltage and frequency is either fed to electronically controlled resistances and used as heat energy or is rectified, inverted by a controllable line-commutated inverter and returned to the grid. Optimal power tracking is by means of an adaptive controller which controls the developed torque of the generator by monitoring the shaft speed.

  17. Digital tracking loops for a programmable digital modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poklemba, John J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis and hardware emulation of the tracking loops for a very flexible programmable digital modem (PDM) will be presented. The modem is capable of being programmed for 2, 4, 8, 16-PSK, 16-QAM, MSK, and Offset-QPSK modulation schemes over a range of data rates from 2.34 to 300 Mbps with programmable spectral occupancy from 1.2 to 1.8 times the symbol rate; these operational parameters are executable in burst or continuous mode. All of the critical processing in both the modulator and demodulator is done at baseband with very high-speed digital hardware and memory. Quadrature analog front-ends are used for translation between baseband and the IF center frequency. The modulator is based on a table lookup approach, where precomputed samples are stored in memory and clocked out according to the incoming data pattern. The sample values are predistorted to counteract the effects of the other filtering functions in the link as well as any transmission impairments. The demodulator architecture was adapted from a joint estimator-detector (JED) mathematical analysis. Its structure is applicable to most signalling formats that can be represented in a two-dimensional space. The JED realization uses interdependent, mutually aiding tracking loops with post-detection data feedback. To expedite and provide for more reliable synchronization, initial estimates for these loops are computed in a parallel acquisition processor. The cornerstone of the demodulator realization is the pre-averager received data filter which allows operation over a broad range of data rates without any hardware changes and greatly simplifies the implementation complexity. The emulation results confirmed tracking loop operation over the entire range of operational parameters listed above, as well as the capability of achieving and maintaining synchronization at BER's in excess of 10(exp -1). The emulation results also showed very close agreement with the tracking loop analysis, and

  18. Manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Niehorster, Diederick C.; Siu, Wilfred W. F.; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements only when tracking a self-driven or a predictable moving target. Here, we used a control-theoretic approach to examine whether concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit of an unpredictable moving target. In the eye-hand tracking condition, participants used their eyes to track a Gaussian target that moved randomly along a horizontal axis. In the meantime, they used their dominant hand to move a mouse to control the horizontal movement of a Gaussian cursor to vertically align it with the target. In the eye-alone tracking condition, the target and cursor positions recorded in the eye-hand tracking condition were replayed, and participants only performed eye tracking of the target. Catch-up saccades were identified and removed from the recorded eye movements, allowing for a frequency-response analysis of the smooth pursuit response to unpredictable target motion. We found that the overall smooth pursuit gain was higher and the number of catch-up saccades made was less when eye tracking was accompanied by manual tracking than when not. We conclude that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit. This enhancement is a fundamental property of eye-hand coordination that occurs regardless of the predictability of the target motion. PMID:26605840

  19. Multi-area adaptive LFC developed for a comprehensive AGC simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shoults, R.R. . Energy Systems Research Center); Ibarra, J.A.J. )

    1993-05-01

    A multi-area adaptive Load Frequency Control (LFC) based on the Self-Tuning Regulator (STR) for a comprehensive Automatic Generator Control Simulator (AGCS) is investigated. A multi-area AGCS comprising the dynamic as well as the static solutions of an interconnected power system has been implemented to accommodate a control center with adaptive LFC features. Simulation results from a three-area system driven by realistic load compositions show that the STR presents better tracking properties than the integral or the combination of integral and STR controllers.

  20. Excited-state geometries and vibrational frequencies studied using the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction method. I. HAX-type molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Masahiro; Oyagi, Fumito; Abe, Yoko; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    In this series of studies, we systematically apply the analytical energy gradients of the direct symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction singles and doubles nonvariational method to calculate the equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies of excited and ionized states of molecules. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated using the second derivatives numerically computed from the analytical first derivatives and the anharmonicity was evaluated from the three-dimensional potential energy surfaces around the local minima. In this paper, the method is applied to the low-lying valence singlet and triplet excited states of HAX-type molecules, HCF, HCCl, HSiF, HSiCl, HNO, HPO, and their deuterium isotopomers. The vibrational level emission spectra of HSiF and DSiF and absorption spectra of HSiCl and DSiCl were also simulated within the Franck-Condon approximation and agree well with the experimental spectra. The results show that the present method is useful and reliable for calculating these quantities and spectra. The change in geometry in the excited states was qualitatively interpreted in the light of the electrostatic force theory. The effect of perturbation selection with the localized molecular orbitals on the geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies is also discussed.

  1. Track Construction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Ron; Di Gennaro, Guy; Ediger, Rick; Garner, Lanny; Hersom, Steve; Miller, Jack; Nemeth, Ron; Petrucelli, Jim; Sierks, Donna; Smith, Don; Swank, Kevin; West, Kevin

    This book establishes guidelines for the construction and maintenance of tracks by providing information for building new tracks or upgrading existing tracks. Subjects covered include running track planning and construction, physical layout, available surfaces, and maintenance. General track requirements and construction specifications are…

  2. On the Right Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieber, Ed

    1983-01-01

    Suggests thinking of "tracks" as clues and using them as the focus of outdoor activities in the urban environment. Provides 24 examples of possible track activities, including: seeds on the ground (track of a nearby tree), litter (track of a litterbug), and peeling paint (track of weathering forces). (JN)

  3. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b)...

  4. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b)...

  5. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b)...

  6. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b)...

  7. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b)...

  8. Track Detection in Railway Sidings Based on MEMS Gyroscope Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Broquetas, Antoni; Comerón, Adolf; Gelonch, Antoni; Fuertes, Josep M.; Castro, J. Antonio; Felip, Damià; López, Miguel A.; Pulido, José A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a two-step technique for real-time track detection in single-track railway sidings using low-cost MEMS gyroscopes. The objective is to reliably know the path the train has taken in a switch, diverted or main road, immediately after the train head leaves the switch. The signal delivered by the gyroscope is first processed by an adaptive low-pass filter that rejects noise and converts the temporal turn rate data in degree/second units into spatial turn rate data in degree/meter. The conversion is based on the travelled distance taken from odometer data. The filter is implemented to achieve a speed-dependent cut-off frequency to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Although direct comparison of the filtered turn rate signal with a predetermined threshold is possible, the paper shows that better detection performance can be achieved by processing the turn rate signal with a filter matched to the rail switch curvature parameters. Implementation aspects of the track detector have been optimized for real-time operation. The detector has been tested with both simulated data and real data acquired in railway campaigns. PMID:23443376

  9. Track detection in railway sidings based on MEMS gyroscope sensors.

    PubMed

    Broquetas, Antoni; Comerón, Adolf; Gelonch, Antoni; Fuertes, Josep M; Castro, J Antonio; Felip, Damià; López, Miguel A; Pulido, José A

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a two-step technique for real-time track detection in single-track railway sidings using low-cost MEMS gyroscopes. The objective is to reliably know the path the train has taken in a switch, diverted or main road, immediately after the train head leaves the switch. The signal delivered by the gyroscope is first processed by an adaptive low-pass filter that rejects noise and converts the temporal turn rate data in degree/second units into spatial turn rate data in degree/meter. The conversion is based on the travelled distance taken from odometer data. The filter is implemented to achieve a speed-dependent cut-off frequency to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Although direct comparison of the filtered turn rate signal with a predetermined threshold is possible, the paper shows that better detection performance can be achieved by processing the turn rate signal with a filter matched to the rail switch curvature parameters. Implementation aspects of the track detector have been optimized for real-time operation. The detector has been tested with both simulated data and real data acquired in railway campaigns. PMID:23443376

  10. Cassini Archive Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Diane; Sayfi, Elias; Tinio, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    The Cassini Archive Tracking System (CATS) is a computer program that enables tracking of scientific data transfers from originators to the Planetary Data System (PDS) archives. Without CATS, there is no systematic means of locating products in the archive process or ensuring their completeness. By keeping a database of transfer communications and status, CATS enables the Cassini Project and the PDS to efficiently and accurately report on archive status. More importantly, problem areas are easily identified through customized reports that can be generated on the fly from any Web-enabled computer. A Web-browser interface and clearly defined authorization scheme provide safe distributed access to the system, where users can perform functions such as create customized reports, record a transfer, and respond to a transfer. CATS ensures that Cassini provides complete science archives to the PDS on schedule and that those archives are available to the science community by the PDS. The three-tier architecture is loosely coupled and designed for simple adaptation to multimission use. Written in the Java programming language, it is portable and can be run on any Java-enabled Web server.

  11. Optimal Appearance Model for Visual Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuru; Jiang, Longkui; Liu, Qiaoyuan; Yin, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    Many studies argue that integrating multiple cues in an adaptive way increases tracking performance. However, what is the definition of adaptiveness and how to realize it remains an open issue. On the premise that the model with optimal discriminative ability is also optimal for tracking the target, this work realizes adaptiveness and robustness through the optimization of multi-cue integration models. Specifically, based on prior knowledge and current observation, a set of discrete samples are generated to approximate the foreground and background distribution. With the goal of optimizing the classification margin, an objective function is defined, and the appearance model is optimized by introducing optimization algorithms. The proposed optimized appearance model framework is embedded into a particle filter for a field test, and it is demonstrated to be robust against various kinds of complex tracking conditions. This model is general and can be easily extended to other parameterized multi-cue models. PMID:26789639

  12. Optimal Appearance Model for Visual Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuru; Jiang, Longkui; Liu, Qiaoyuan; Yin, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    Many studies argue that integrating multiple cues in an adaptive way increases tracking performance. However, what is the definition of adaptiveness and how to realize it remains an open issue. On the premise that the model with optimal discriminative ability is also optimal for tracking the target, this work realizes adaptiveness and robustness through the optimization of multi-cue integration models. Specifically, based on prior knowledge and current observation, a set of discrete samples are generated to approximate the foreground and background distribution. With the goal of optimizing the classification margin, an objective function is defined, and the appearance model is optimized by introducing optimization algorithms. The proposed optimized appearance model framework is embedded into a particle filter for a field test, and it is demonstrated to be robust against various kinds of complex tracking conditions. This model is general and can be easily extended to other parameterized multi-cue models. PMID:26789639

  13. Radio tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, J. C.; Komarek, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The principles and techniques of deep space radio tracking are described along with the uses of tracking data in navigation and radio science. Emphasis is placed on the measurement functions of radio tracking.

  14. Adaptive particle filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark R.; Gutchess, Dan; Checka, Neal; Snorrason, Magnús

    2006-05-01

    Image exploitation algorithms for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) and weapon systems are extremely sensitive to differences between the operating conditions (OCs) under which they are trained and the extended operating conditions (EOCs) in which the fielded algorithms are tested. As an example, terrain type is an important OC for the problem of tracking hostile vehicles from an airborne camera. A system designed to track cars driving on highways and on major city streets would probably not do well in the EOC of parking lots because of the very different dynamics. In this paper, we present a system we call ALPS for Adaptive Learning in Particle Systems. ALPS takes as input a sequence of video images and produces labeled tracks. The system detects moving targets and tracks those targets across multiple frames using a multiple hypothesis tracker (MHT) tightly coupled with a particle filter. This tracker exploits the strengths of traditional MHT based tracking algorithms by directly incorporating tree-based hypothesis considerations into the particle filter update and resampling steps. We demonstrate results in a parking lot domain tracking objects through occlusions and object interactions.

  15. Myopes experience greater contrast adaptation during reading.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, Colm; van der Linde, Ian; Pardhan, Shahina; Engel, Stephen A; Mallen, Edward A H; Allen, Peter M

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated whether reading influences contrast adaptation differently in young adult emmetropic and myopic participants at the spatial frequencies created by text rows and character strokes. Pre-adaptation contrast sensitivity was measured for test gratings with spatial frequencies of 1cdeg(-1) and 4cdeg(-1), presented horizontally and vertically. Participants then adapted to reading text corresponding to the horizontal "row frequency" of text (1cdeg(-1)), and vertical "stroke frequency" of the characters (4cdeg(-1)) for 180s. Following this, post-adaptation contrast sensitivity was measured. Twenty young adults (10 myopes, 10 emmetropes) optimally corrected for the viewing distance participated. There was a significant reduction in logCS post-text adaptation (relative to pre-adaptation logCS) at the row frequency (1cdeg(-1) horizontal) but not at the stroke frequency (4cdeg(-1) vertical). logCS changes due to adaptation at 1cdeg(-1) horizontal were significant in both emmetropes and myopes. Comparing the two refractive groups, myopic participants showed significantly greater adaptation compared to emmetropic participants. Reading text on a screen induces contrast adaptation in young adult observers. Myopic participants were found to exhibit greater contrast adaptation than emmetropes at the spatial frequency corresponding to the text row frequency. No contrast adaptation was observed at the text stroke frequency in either participant group. The greater contrast adaptation experienced by myopes after reading warrants further investigation to better understand the relationship between near work and myopia development. PMID:26804636

  16. CR-39 track etching and blow-up method

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    This invention is a method of etching tracks in CR-39 foil to obtain uniformly sized tracks. The invention comprises a step of electrochemically etching the foil at a low frequency and a "blow-up" step of electrochemically etching the foil at a high frequency.

  17. A Novel Architecture of Radio Tracking System Based on Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Bo; Jin, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a photonics-based novel architecture of radio tracking system in space applications. This system can operate in multiple frequency bands, implement various functions, and realize integrated, generalized, frequency-independent design. This new scheme can meet the needs of future space missions, and especially suitable for space tracking ship.

  18. On the rejection of vibrations in adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradore, Riccardo; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Fedrigo, Enrico; Clare, Richard

    2012-07-01

    In modern adaptive optics systems, lightly damped sinusoidal oscillations resulting from telescope structural vibrations have a significant deleterious impact on the quality of the image collected at the detector plane. Such oscillations are often at frequencies beyond the bandwidth of the wave-front controller that therefore is either incapable of rejecting them or might even amplify their detrimental impact on the overall AO performance. A technique for the rejection of periodic disturbances acting at the output of unknown plants, which has been recently presented in literature, has been adapted to the problem of rejecting vibrations in AO loops. The proposed methodology aims at estimating phase and amplitude of the harmonic disturbance together with the response of the unknown plant at the frequency of vibration. On the basis of such estimates, a control signal is generated to cancel out the periodic perturbation. Additionally, the algorithm can be easily extended to cope with unexpected time variations of the vibrations frequency by adding a frequency tracking module based either on a simple PLL architecture or on a classical extended Kalman filter. Oversampling can be also easily introduced to efficiently correct for vibrations approaching the sampling frequency. The approach presented in this contribution is compared against a different algorithm for vibration rejection available in literature, in order to identify drawbacks and advantages. Finally, the performance of the proposed vibration cancellation technique has been tested in realistic scenarios defined exploiting tip/tilt measurements from MACAO and NACO

  19. Neural network L1 adaptive control of MIMO systems with nonlinear uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hong-tao; Qi, Xiao-hui; Li, Jie; Tian, Qing-min

    2014-01-01

    An indirect adaptive controller is developed for a class of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems with unknown uncertainties. This control system is comprised of an L 1 adaptive controller and an auxiliary neural network (NN) compensation controller. The L 1 adaptive controller has guaranteed transient response in addition to stable tracking. In this architecture, a low-pass filter is adopted to guarantee fast adaptive rate without generating high-frequency oscillations in control signals. The auxiliary compensation controller is designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions by MIMO RBF neural networks to suppress the influence of uncertainties. NN weights are tuned on-line with no prior training and the project operator ensures the weights bounded. The global stability of the closed-system is derived based on the Lyapunov function. Numerical simulations of an MIMO system coupled with nonlinear uncertainties are used to illustrate the practical potential of our theoretical results. PMID:25147871

  20. Elastic tracking versus neural network tracking for very high multiplicity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Harlander, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1991-04-01

    A new Elastic Tracking (ET) algorithm is proposed for finding tracks in very high multiplicity and noisy environments. It is based on a dynamical reinterpretation and generalization of the Radon transform and is related to elastic net algorithms for geometrical optimization. ET performs an adaptive nonlinear fit to noisy data with a variable number of tracks. Its numerics is more efficient than that of the traditional Radon or Hough transform method because it avoids binning of phase space and the costly search for valid minima. Spurious local minima are avoided in ET by introducing a time-dependent effective potential. The method is shown to be very robust to noise and measurement error and extends tracking capabilities to much higher track densities than possible via local road finding or even the novel Denby-Peterson neural network tracking algorithms. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. LARP - An adaptive LDV signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Glenn D.; Murphy, R. Jay; Meyers, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Recent attempts at realization of a frequency domain signal processor exhibit practical drawbacks such as manual gain, filter and sampling adjustments, and simplistic adaptations of frequency domain techniques. This paper introduces an adaptive LDV signal processor, one which requires no operator intervention under any circumstances by adapting dynamically to burst characteristics, while surpassing all previous techniques in range and accuracy.

  2. Solar tracking system

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2016-07-12

    Solar tracking systems, as well as methods of using such solar tracking systems, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the solar tracking systems include lateral supports horizontally positioned between uprights to support photovoltaic modules. The lateral supports may be raised and lowered along the uprights or translated to cause the photovoltaic modules to track the moving sun.

  3. Storage Free Smart Energy Management for Frequency Control in a Diesel-PV-Fuel Cell-Based Hybrid AC Microgrid.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, P C; Mishra, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel, smart energy management scheme for a microgrid, consisting of a diesel generator and power electronic converter interfaced renewable energy-based generators, such as photovoltaic (PV) and fuel cell, for frequency regulation without any storage. In the proposed strategy, output of the PV is controlled in coordination with other generators using neurofuzzy controller, either only for transient frequency regulation or for both transient and steady-state frequency regulation, depending on the load demand, thereby eliminating the huge storage requirements. The option of demand response control is also explored along with the generation control. For accurate and quick tracking of maximum power point and its associated reserve power from the PV generator, this paper also proposes a novel adaptive-predictor-corrector-based tracking mechanism. PMID:26011895

  4. Radial Basis Functions for Combining Shape and Speckle Tracking in 4D Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Compas, Colin B.; Wong, Emily Y.; Huang, Xiaojie; Sampath, Smita; Lin, Ben A.; Pal, Prasanta; Papademetris, Xenophon; Thiele, Karl; Dione, Donald P.; Stacy, Mitchel; Staib, Lawrence H.; Sinusas, Albert J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Duncan, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of left ventricular deformation can provide valuable information about the extent of disease as well as the efficacy of treatment. In this work, we develop an adaptive multi-level compactly supported radial basis approach for deformation analysis in 3D+time echocardiography. Our method combines displacement information from shape tracking of myocardial boundaries (derived from B-mode data) with mid-wall displacements from radio-frequency-based ultrasound speckle tracking. We evaluate our methods on open-chest canines (N=8) and show that our combined approach is better correlated to magnetic resonance tagging-derived strains than either individual method. We also are able to identify regions of myocardial infarction (confirmed by postmortem analysis) using radial strain values obtained with our approach. PMID:24893257

  5. Communications and tracking - Light and IR will help carry high traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The space station currently under consideration by NASA must simultaneously track and communicate with the many vehicles and objects surrounding it in orbit. While the Space Shuttle has 23 antennas, more than 50 will be required by the space station. In addition to Shuttle-compatible equipment at P, L, C, S, and Ku bands, the station system will probably incorporate Ka, W, IR and optical frequency equipment for tracking and communications. A major design challenge is foreseen in the placement of separate antennas, lenses and reflectors over the station's external geometry in order to give both the overlapping fields of view required for spherical coverage and the radiation of unambiguous navigation guide beams and markers. Adaptive distributed element arrays are under consideration. Another approach to spherical coverage involves the use of omnidirectional antennas which both transmit and receive RF energy over a wide range of angles.

  6. Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivitz, Robert; Kendrick, Richard; Mason, James; Bold, Matthew; Kubo, Tracy; Bock, Kevin; Tyler, David

    2014-07-01

    Lockheed Martin has built a Space Object Tracking (SPOT) facility at our Santa Cruz test site in Northern California. SPOT consists of three 1 meter optical telescopes controlled by a common site management system to individually or cooperatively task each system to observe orbital debris and earth orbiting satellites. The telescopes are mounted in Az/El fork mounts capable of rapid repointing and arc-sec class open loop tracking. Each telescope is installed in a separate clam shell dome and has aft mounted benches to facilitate installing various instrument suites. The telescope domes are mounted on movable rail carts that can be positioned arbitrarily along tracks to provide variable baselines for sparse aperture imaging. The individual telescopes achieved first light in June 2012 and have been used since to observe satellites and orbital debris. Typical observations consist of direct photometric imaging at visible and near infrared wavelengths, and also include spectroscopic and hypertemporal measurements. Rayleigh beacon adaptive optical systems for atmospheric aberration correction and high rate J-Band trackers for each telescope will be added in 2015. Coherent combinations of the three telescopes as an interferometric imaging array using actively stabilized free space variable delay optical paths and fringe tracking sensors is also planned. The first narrow band (I band) interferometric fringes will be formed in the summer of 2014, with wide band (R, I, H) interferometric imaging occurring by early 2015.

  7. Vibration characteristics of floating slab track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chen-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yi

    2008-11-01

    Coupled equilibrium equations of suspended wheels and floating slab track system were solved with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method to obtain the deflections, vibration velocities, and wheel-rail contact forces. The program was validated through several aspects. Cases with various vehicle speed, slab mass, and stiffness of slab bearing were analyzed to reveal the effects of slab bearing on track responses. The correlation between wheel-rail resonance and train speed was also discussed. It was found that rail deflections increase significantly as train speed increases. Although large slab mass may lower tuning frequency, it could also result in higher wheel-rail contact force and rail deflections. The floating slab track is effective in isolating loading above 10 Hz, which might present in some railway sections with irregularities. Adopting floating slab track for vibration control for environment along the railway may cause concerns about ride quality and track damages.

  8. TrackEye tracking algorithm characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, Michael T.; Shields, Robert W.; Reed, Jack M.

    2004-10-01

    TrackEye is a film digitization and target tracking system that offers the potential for quantitatively measuring the dynamic state variables (e.g., absolute and relative position, orientation, linear and angular velocity/acceleration, spin rate, trajectory, angle of attack, etc.) for moving objects using captured single or dual view image sequences. At the heart of the system is a set of tracking algorithms that automatically find and quantify the location of user selected image details such as natural test article features or passive fiducials that have been applied to cooperative test articles. This image position data is converted into real world coordinates and rates with user specified information such as the image scale and frame rate. Though tracking methods such as correlation algorithms are typically robust by nature, the accuracy and suitability of each TrackEye tracking algorithm is in general unknown even under good imaging conditions. The challenges of optimal algorithm selection and algorithm performance/measurement uncertainty are even more significant for long range tracking of high-speed targets where temporally varying atmospheric effects degrade the imagery. This paper will present the preliminary results from a controlled test sequence used to characterize the performance of the TrackEye tracking algorithm suite.

  9. TrackEye tracking algorithm characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Jack W.; Shields, Rob W; Valley, Michael T.

    2004-08-01

    TrackEye is a film digitization and target tracking system that offers the potential for quantitatively measuring the dynamic state variables (e.g., absolute and relative position, orientation, linear and angular velocity/acceleration, spin rate, trajectory, angle of attack, etc.) for moving objects using captured single or dual view image sequences. At the heart of the system is a set of tracking algorithms that automatically find and quantify the location of user selected image details such as natural test article features or passive fiducials that have been applied to cooperative test articles. This image position data is converted into real world coordinates and rates with user specified information such as the image scale and frame rate. Though tracking methods such as correlation algorithms are typically robust by nature, the accuracy and suitability of each TrackEye tracking algorithm is in general unknown even under good imaging conditions. The challenges of optimal algorithm selection and algorithm performance/measurement uncertainty are even more significant for long range tracking of high-speed targets where temporally varying atmospheric effects degrade the imagery. This paper will present the preliminary results from a controlled test sequence used to characterize the performance of the TrackEye tracking algorithm suite.

  10. Tracking filter algorithm for automatic video tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEver, Mark A.; Kimbrell, James E.

    2006-05-01

    In addition to servo control and power amplification, motion control systems for optical tracking pedestals feature capabilities such as electro-optical tracking using an integrated Automatic Video Tracker (AVT) card. An electro-optical system tracking loop is comprised of sensors mounted on a pointing pedestal, an AVT that detects a target in the sensor imagery, and a tracking filter algorithm that commands the pedestal to follow the target. The tracking filter algorithm receives the target boresight error from the AVT and calculates motion demands for the pedestal servo controller. This paper presents a tracking algorithm based on target state estimation using a Kalman filter. The servo demands are based on calculating the Kalman filter state estimate from absolute line-of-sight angles to the target. Simulations are used to compare its performance to tracking loops without tracking filters, and to other tracking filter algorithms, such as rate feedback loops closed around boresight error. Issues such as data latency and sensor alignment error are discussed.

  11. Targets tracking relating method based on fuzzy reasoning and wavelet energy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Shi, Yao-wu

    2008-12-01

    Targets tracking methods based digital image are used widely. During the process of multi-targets tracking, when the targets falling in the tracking door are not only one, joint data association is used as a traditional method. But there is so much operation in this method that the need of real time can not be meet. Targets tracking relating method based on fuzzy reasoning and expending Kalman filter is adopted in this paper. Firstly, wavelet energy is adopted to detect targets in the image. The wavelet of bior1.3 is used to decompose image. It is anti-symmetric wavelet and is fit for detecting variational information in horizontal and vertical direction. Because the detected image generally have natural texture background, such as sea, sky, and so on. The targets have high frequency characteristic at horizontal and vertical direction in these images, but the background has high frequency characteristic at one of the two direction. The wavelet energy of targets at two direction go beyond that of background. Then through selecting self-adaptive threshold, targets and background can be divided. By the method of figure centers distance classifying, the figure centers of every target can be calculated. Secondly, Targets figure-center coordinate is detecting through self-adapting figure-center filter. Thirdly, fuzzy reasoning method is used in the progress of data relating. It is easy in engineering application compared with the JPDA arithmetic. In the experiment, after several frames relating, the mean square error of row coordinate reduce from 0.278 to 0.148. The errors of multi-targets figure-center coordinate gradually decrease. The forecast veracity gradually increase.

  12. Adaptive Models for Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Sayed, Ali H.; Shen, Xiling

    2012-01-01

    Biological systems are often treated as time-invariant by computational models that use fixed parameter values. In this study, we demonstrate that the behavior of the p53-MDM2 gene network in individual cells can be tracked using adaptive filtering algorithms and the resulting time-variant models can approximate experimental measurements more accurately than time-invariant models. Adaptive models with time-variant parameters can help reduce modeling complexity and can more realistically represent biological systems. PMID:22359614

  13. Adaptive-passive vibration control systems for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Pfeiffer, T.; Vrbata, J.; Melz, T.

    2015-04-01

    Tuned vibration absorbers have become common for passive vibration reduction in many industrial applications. Lightly damped absorbers (also called neutralizers) can be used to suppress narrowband disturbances by tuning them to the excitation frequency. If the resonance is adapted in-operation, the performance of those devices can be significantly enhanced, or inertial mass can be decreased. However, the integration of actuators, sensors and control electronics into the system raises new design challenges. In this work, the development of adaptive-passive systems for vibration reduction at an industrial scale is presented. As an example, vibration reduction of a ship engine was studied in a full scale test. Simulations were used to study the feasibility and evaluate the system concept at an early stage. Several ways to adjust the resonance of the neutralizer were evaluated, including piezoelectric actuation and common mechatronic drives. Prototypes were implemented and tested. Since vibration absorbers suffer from high dynamic loads, reliability tests were used to assess the long-term behavior under operational conditions and to improve the components. It was proved that the adaptive systems are capable to withstand the mechanical loads in an industrial application. Also a control strategy had to be implemented in order to track the excitation frequency. The most mature concepts were integrated into the full scale test. An imbalance exciter was used to simulate the engine vibrations at a realistic level experimentally. The neutralizers were tested at varying excitation frequencies to evaluate the tracking capabilities of the control system. It was proved that a significant vibration reduction is possible.

  14. Developments in strong shock wave position tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Glover, Brain; Perry, Lee; WX-6; WX-7 Team

    2011-06-01

    This poster will highlight several modified techniques to allow the position vs. time to be tracked in strong shock situations (such as detonation). Each is a modification or improvement of existing ideas either making use of advances in specialist materials availability or recent advances in electronics.) Shorting embedded mini-coaxial cable with a standing microwave pattern. This technique is a modified version of an old LANL method of shock position tracking making use of a traveling short imposed in an embedded coaxial cable. A high frequency standing wave (3-8GHz) is present in the cable and the moving short position can be tracked by monitoring the output voltage envelope as a function of time. A diode detector is used to allow the envelope voltage to be monitored on a regular low frequency digitizer significantly reducing the cost. The small and cheap high frequency voltage generators now available allow much greater spatial resolution than possible previously. 2) Very thin shorting resistance track gauges. Parallel tracks of constantan resistance material are etched on a thin dielectric substrate. The gauges are less than 0.2 mm thick. The ionized gas present in a detonation front sweeps up the tracks lowering the measured resistance. A potential divider circuit allows the shock position vs. time to be monitored on a regular digitizer after easy calibration. The novel feature is the thin section of the gauge producing minimal perturbation in the detonation front.

  15. Galileo probe relay receiver - Acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1983-01-01

    The probe-to-orbiter data link for the Jovian mission uses a Manchester encoded BPSK waveform which is demodulated by the Galileo probe relay receiver. Signal acquisition and tracking consists of a sequential probability ratio signal search, frequency acquisition with a least-squares estimator, wide-band phase lock acquisition, and a self-regulating mode control. A discrete Fourier transform serves as the basic mechanism to generate the algorithms that provide this orderly transition to phase tracking. Acquisition and tracking is addressed in this paper with emphasis on key algorithms, rationale, and theoretical/measured performance.

  16. Edge-following algorithm for tracking geological features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Sequential edge-tracking algorithm employs circular scanning to point permit effective real-time tracking of coastlines and rivers from earth resources satellites. Technique eliminates expensive high-resolution cameras. System might also be adaptable for application in monitoring automated assembly lines, inspecting conveyor belts, or analyzing thermographs, or x ray images.

  17. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  18. To Track or Not to Track?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesson, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Background: This paper was written for a graduate level action research course at Muskingum University, located in New Concord, OH. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine which method of instruction best serves ALL high school students. Is it more advantageous to track ("ability group") students or not to track students in high…

  19. Calculating track thrust with track functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-08-01

    In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a “calorimetric” measurement using both charged and neutral particles and a “track-based” measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe, and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on nonperturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape “track thrust” and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are nonperturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between nonperturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.

  20. Method and apparatus for receiving and tracking phase modulated signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, S.; Lenett, S. D.; Kobayashi, H. S.; Pawlowski, J. F. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and technique are described for receiving and tracking analog or digital phase modulated signals from 0 deg to 360 deg phase shift. In order to track a signal with many phases, a detector discerns the phase modulation of the incoming signal and a phase shifter generates a negative phase shift opposite in angle to the detected phase angle. This produces a converted series sideband component barrier signal. The residual carrier signal and the converted series sideband component carrier are added together to produce a tracking carrier signal. The tracking carrier signal is multiplied with the output from a voltage controlled oscillator in the tracking loop to obtain an error signal which drives the voltage controlled oscillator and tracks the incoming signal frequency. The technique is less susceptible to carrier interference which may degrade tracking and tracking may be performed at lower signal to noise ratios and for lower input signal power levels.