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Sample records for adaptive gdda-blast fast

  1. Adaptive GDDA-BLAST: fast and efficient algorithm for protein sequence embedding.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yoojin; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Dongwon; van Rossum, Damian B

    2010-10-22

    A major computational challenge in the genomic era is annotating structure/function to the vast quantities of sequence information that is now available. This problem is illustrated by the fact that most proteins lack comprehensive annotations, even when experimental evidence exists. We previously theorized that embedded-alignment profiles (simply "alignment profiles" hereafter) provide a quantitative method that is capable of relating the structural and functional properties of proteins, as well as their evolutionary relationships. A key feature of alignment profiles lies in the interoperability of data format (e.g., alignment information, physio-chemical information, genomic information, etc.). Indeed, we have demonstrated that the Position Specific Scoring Matrices (PSSMs) are an informative M-dimension that is scored by quantitatively measuring the embedded or unmodified sequence alignments. Moreover, the information obtained from these alignments is informative, and remains so even in the "twilight zone" of sequence similarity (<25% identity). Although our previous embedding strategy was powerful, it suffered from contaminating alignments (embedded AND unmodified) and high computational costs. Herein, we describe the logic and algorithmic process for a heuristic embedding strategy named "Adaptive GDDA-BLAST." Adaptive GDDA-BLAST is, on average, up to 19 times faster than, but has similar sensitivity to our previous method. Further, data are provided to demonstrate the benefits of embedded-alignment measurements in terms of detecting structural homology in highly divergent protein sequences and isolating secondary structural elements of transmembrane and ankyrin-repeat domains. Together, these advances allow further exploration of the embedded alignment data space within sufficiently large data sets to eventually induce relevant statistical inferences. We show that sequence embedding could serve as one of the vehicles for measurement of low-identity alignments

  2. Fast autodidactic adaptive equalization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilal, Katia

    Autodidactic equalization by adaptive filtering is addressed in a mobile radio communication context. A general method, using an adaptive stochastic gradient Bussgang type algorithm, to deduce two low cost computation algorithms is given: one equivalent to the initial algorithm and the other having improved convergence properties thanks to a block criteria minimization. Two start algorithms are reworked: the Godard algorithm and the decision controlled algorithm. Using a normalization procedure, and block normalization, the performances are improved, and their common points are evaluated. These common points are used to propose an algorithm retaining the advantages of the two initial algorithms. This thus inherits the robustness of the Godard algorithm and the precision and phase correction of the decision control algorithm. The work is completed by a study of the stable states of Bussgang type algorithms and of the stability of the Godard algorithms, initial and normalized. The simulation of these algorithms, carried out in a mobile radio communications context, and under severe conditions on the propagation channel, gave a 75% reduction in the number of samples required for the processing in relation with the initial algorithms. The improvement of the residual error was of a much lower return. These performances are close to making possible the use of autodidactic equalization in the mobile radio system.

  3. Fast adaptive unsharp masking with programmable mediaprocessors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Unmin; Shamdasani, Vijay; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2003-06-01

    Unsharp masking is a widely used image-enhancement method in medical imaging. Hardware-based solutions can be developed to support high computational demand for unsharp masking, but they suffer from limited flexibility. Software solutions can easily incorporate new features and modify key parameters, such as filtering kernel size, but they have not been able to meet the fast computing requirement. Modern programmable mediaprocessors can meet both fast computing and flexibility requirements, which will benefit medical image computing. In this article, we present fast adaptive unsharp masking on two leading mediaprocessors or high-end digital signal processors, Hitachi/Equator Technologies MAP-CA and Texas Instruments TMS320C64x. For a 2k x 2k 16-bit image, our adaptive unsharp masking with a 201 x 201 boxcar kernel takes 225 ms on a 300-MHz MAP-CA and 74 ms on a 600-MHz TMS320C64x. This fast unsharp masking enables technologists and/or physicians to adjust parameters interactively for optimal quality assurance and image viewing.

  4. Adaptive line enhancers for fast acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Nguyen, T. M.

    1994-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures - namely, conventional ALE, ALE with double filtering, and ALE with coherent accumulation - are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in the time domain. The advantages of these algorithms are their simplicity, flexibility, robustness, and applicability to general situations including the Earth-to-space uplink carrier acquisition and tracking of the spacecraft. In the acquisition mode, these algorithms act as bandpass filters; hence, the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) is improved for fast acquisition. In the tracking mode, these algorithms simply act as lowpass filters to improve signal-to-noise ratio; hence, better tracking performance is obtained. It is not necessary to have a priori knowledge of the received signal parameters, such as CNR, Doppler, and carrier sweeping rate. The implementation of these algorithms is in the time domain (as opposed to the frequency domain, such as the fast Fourier transform (FFT)). The carrier frequency estimation can be updated in real time at each time sample (as opposed to the batch processing of the FFT). The carrier frequency to be acquired can be time varying, and the noise can be non-Gaussian, nonstationary, and colored.

  5. Fast, compact, autonomous holographic adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Geoff; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul; Gaddipati, Ravi; Gaddipati, Phani; Ghebremichael, Fassil

    2014-04-21

    We present a closed-loop adaptive optics system based on a holographic sensing method. The system uses a multiplexed holographic recording of the response functions of each actuator in a deformable mirror. By comparing the output intensity measured in a pair of photodiodes, the absolute phase can be measured over each actuator location. From this a feedback correction signal is applied to the input beam without need for a computer. The sensing and correction is applied to each actuator in parallel, so the bandwidth is independent of the number of actuator. We demonstrate a breadboard system using a 32-actuator MEMS deformable mirror capable of operating at over 10 kHz without a computer in the loop.

  6. A Space/Fast-Time Adaptive Monopulse Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Yaron; Williams, Douglas B.; Holder, E. Jeff

    2006-12-01

    Mainbeam jamming poses a particularly difficult challenge for conventional monopulse radars. In such cases spatially adaptive processing provides some interference suppression when the target and jammer are not exactly coaligned. However, as the target angle approaches that of the jammer, mitigation performance is increasingly hampered and distortions are introduced into the resulting beam pattern. Both of these factors limit the reliability of a spatially adaptive monopulse processor. The presence of coherent multipath in the form of terrain-scattered interference (TSI), although normally considered a nuisance, can be exploited to suppress mainbeam jamming with space/fast-time processing. A method is presented offering space/fast-time monopulse processing with distortionless spatial array patterns that can achieve improved angle estimation over spatially adaptive monopulse. Performance results for the monopulse processor are obtained for mountaintop data containing a jammer and TSI, which demonstrate a dramatic improvement in performance over conventional monopulse and spatially adaptive monopulse.

  7. An Optimal Control Modification to Model-Reference Adaptive Control for Fast Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Boskovic, Jovan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method that can achieve fast adaptation for a class of model-reference adaptive control. It is well-known that standard model-reference adaptive control exhibits high-gain control behaviors when a large adaptive gain is used to achieve fast adaptation in order to reduce tracking error rapidly. High gain control creates high-frequency oscillations that can excite unmodeled dynamics and can lead to instability. The fast adaptation approach is based on the minimization of the squares of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The necessary condition of optimality is used to derive an adaptive law using the gradient method. This adaptive law is shown to result in uniform boundedness of the tracking error by means of the Lyapunov s direct method. Furthermore, this adaptive law allows a large adaptive gain to be used without causing undesired high-gain control effects. The method is shown to be more robust than standard model-reference adaptive control. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikando, Aristide C.; Kinser, Jason M.

    2006-02-01

    Imaging of signaling phenomena within the intracellular domain is a well studied field. Signaling is the process by which all living cells communicate with their environment and with each other. In the case of signaling calcium waves, numerous computational models based on solving homogeneous reaction diffusion equations have been developed. Typically, the reaction diffusion approach consists of solving systems of partial differential equations at each update step. The traditional methods used to solve these reaction diffusion equations are very computationally expensive since they must employ small time steps in order to reduce the computational error. The presented research suggests the application of fast marching methods to imaging signaling calcium waves, more specifically fertilization calcium waves, in Xenopus laevis eggs. The fast marching approach provides fast and efficient means of tracking the evolution of monotonically advancing fronts. A model that employs biophysical properties of intracellular calcium signaling, and adapts fast marching methods to tracking the propagation of signaling calcium waves is presented. The developed model is used to reproduce simulation results obtained with reaction diffusion based model. Results obtained with our model agree with both the results obtained with reaction diffusion based models, and confocal microscopy observations during in vivo experiments. The adaptation of fast marching methods to intracellular protein or macromolecule trafficking is also briefly explored.

  9. Fast complex memory polynomial-based adaptive digital predistorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Sappal, Amandeep; Singh Patterh, Manjeet; Sharma, Sanjay

    2011-07-01

    Today's 3G wireless systems require both high linearity and high power amplifier (PA) efficiency. The high peak-to-average ratios of the digital modulation schemes used in 3G wireless systems require that the RF PA maintain high linearity over a large range while maintaining this high efficiency; these two requirements are often at odds with each other with many of the traditional amplifier architectures. In this article, a fast and easy-to-implement adaptive digital predistorter has been presented for Wideband Code Division Multiplexed signals using complex memory polynomial work function. The proposed algorithm has been implemented to test a Motorola LDMOSFET PA. The proposed technique also takes care of the memory effects of the PA, which have been ignored in many proposed techniques in the literature. The results show that the new complex memory polynomial-based adaptive digital predistorter has better linearisation performance than conventional predistortion techniques.

  10. Fast animation of lightning using an adaptive mesh.

    PubMed

    Kim, Theodore; Lin, Ming C

    2007-01-01

    We present a fast method for simulating, animating, and rendering lightning using adaptive grids. The "dielectric breakdown model" is an elegant algorithm for electrical pattern formation that we extend to enable animation of lightning. The simulation can be slow, particularly in 3D, because it involves solving a large Poisson problem. Losasso et al. recently proposed an octree data structure for simulating water and smoke, and we show that this discretization can be applied to the problem of lightning simulation as well. However, implementing the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG) solver for this problem can be daunting, so we provide an extensive discussion of implementation issues. ICCG solvers can usually be accelerated using "Eisenstat's trick," but the trick cannot be directly applied to the adaptive case. Fortunately, we show that an "almost incomplete Cholesky" factorization can be computed so that Eisenstat's trick can still be used. We then present a fast rendering method based on convolution that is competitive with Monte Carlo ray tracing but orders of magnitude faster, and we also show how to further improve the visual results using jittering.

  11. Fast unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation with adaptive spatial regularisation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marcelo; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents a new Bayesian estimation technique for hidden Potts-Markov random fields with unknown regularisation parameters, with application to fast unsupervised K-class image segmentation. The technique is derived by first removing the regularisation parameter from the Bayesian model by marginalisation, followed by a small-variance-asymptotic (SVA) analysis in which the spatial regularisation and the integer-constrained terms of the Potts model are decoupled. The evaluation of this SVA Bayesian estimator is then relaxed into a problem that can be computed efficiently by iteratively solving a convex total-variation denoising problem and a least-squares clustering (K-means) problem, both of which can be solved straightforwardly, even in high-dimensions, and with parallel computing techniques. This leads to a fast fully unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation methodology in which the strength of the spatial regularisation is adapted automatically to the observed image during the inference procedure, and that can be easily applied in large 2D and 3D scenarios or in applications requiring low computing times. Experimental results on synthetic and real images, as well as extensive comparisons with state-ofthe- art algorithms, confirm that the proposed methodology offer extremely fast convergence and produces accurate segmentation results, with the important additional advantage of self-adjusting regularisation parameters.

  12. Fast and Adaptive Lossless Onboard Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kimesh, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Modern hyperspectral imaging systems are able to acquire far more data than can be downlinked from a spacecraft. Onboard data compression helps to alleviate this problem, but requires a system capable of power efficiency and high throughput. Software solutions have limited throughput performance and are power-hungry. Dedicated hardware solutions can provide both high throughput and power efficiency, while taking the load off of the main processor. Thus a hardware compression system was developed. The implementation uses a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data (NPO-42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which achieves excellent compression performance and has low complexity. This algorithm performs predictive compression using an adaptive filtering method, and uses adaptive Golomb coding. The implementation also packetizes the coded data. The FL algorithm is well suited for implementation in hardware. In the FPGA implementation, one sample is compressed every clock cycle, which makes for a fast and practical realtime solution for space applications. Benefits of this implementation are: 1) The underlying algorithm achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that exceeds that of techniques currently in use. 2) The algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. 3) Hardware acceleration provides a throughput improvement of 10 to 100 times vs. the software implementation. A prototype of the compressor is available in software, but it runs at a speed that does not meet spacecraft requirements. The hardware implementation targets the Xilinx Virtex IV FPGAs, and makes the use of this compressor practical for Earth satellites as well as beyond-Earth missions with hyperspectral instruments.

  13. The SNAP-25 Linker as an Adaptation Toward Fast Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Mohrmann, Ralf; Wiederhold, Katrin; Walter, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of four soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domains into a complex is essential for membrane fusion. In most cases, the four SNARE-domains are encoded by separate membrane-targeted proteins. However, in the exocytotic pathway, two SNARE-domains are present in one protein, connected by a flexible linker. The significance of this arrangement is unknown. We characterized the role of the linker in SNAP-25, a neuronal SNARE, by using overexpression techniques in synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) null mouse chromaffin cells and fast electrophysiological techniques. We confirm that the palmitoylated linker-cysteines are important for membrane association. A SNAP-25 mutant without cysteines supported exocytosis, but the fusion rate was slowed down and the fusion pore duration prolonged. Using chimeric proteins between SNAP-25 and its ubiquitous homologue SNAP-23, we show that the cysteine-containing part of the linkers is interchangeable. However, a stretch of 10 hydrophobic and charged amino acids in the C-terminal half of the SNAP-25 linker is required for fast exocytosis and in its absence the calcium dependence of exocytosis is shifted toward higher concentrations. The SNAP-25 linker therefore might have evolved as an adaptation toward calcium triggering and a high rate of execution of the fusion process, those features that distinguish exocytosis from other membrane fusion pathways. PMID:18579690

  14. Adaptation of H.264/AVC predictions for enabling fast transrating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, Philippe; Cherigui, Safa

    2010-01-01

    Fast video transrating algorithms for DCT-based video coding standards have proven their efficiency in many applications and are widely used in the industry. However, they cannot be re-used for H.264/AVC because they introduce an unacceptable level of drift. To settle this issue, this paper proposes to adapt the H.264/AVC predictions by separately processing the DC component from the other AC coefficients. This allows the drift to be removed from the requantization transrating algorithms. Experimental results show the amount of bits in our prediction scheme is only increased by 2.46 % for CIF and 1.87% for 720p in Intra in comparison with the H.264/AVC codec under the same PSNR. The performance of the fast transrating algorithms applied on streams generated with our method are improved dramatically, allowing to directly compete with the best in class, but computation load demanding Cascaded Pixel Domain decode and recode Transcoding (CPDT) architecture. Additionally, one potential application induced by this new prediction principle is the partial decoding of video streams to obtain reduced size images.

  15. Fast-adaptive near-lossless image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejing

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of image compression is to store or transmit image data efficiently. However, most compression methods emphasize the compression ratio rather than the throughput. We propose an encoding process and rules, and consequently a fast-adaptive near-lossless image compression method (FAIC) with good compression ratio. FAIC is a single-pass method, which removes bits from each codeword, then predicts the next pixel value through localized edge detection techniques, and finally uses Golomb-Rice codes to encode the residuals. FAIC uses only logical operations, bitwise operations, additions, and subtractions. Meanwhile, it eliminates the slow operations (e.g., multiplication, division, and logarithm) and the complex entropy coder, which can be a bottleneck in hardware implementations. Besides, FAIC does not depend on any precomputed tables or parameters. Experimental results demonstrate that FAIC achieves good balance between compression ratio and computational complexity in certain range (e.g., peak signal-to-noise ratio >35 dB, bits per pixel>2). It is suitable for applications in which the amount of data is huge or the computation power is limited.

  16. Novel fast adapting interneurons mediate cholinergic-induced fast GABAA inhibitory postsynaptic currents in striatal spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Faust, Thomas W; Assous, Maxime; Shah, Fulva; Tepper, James M; Koós, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Previous work suggests that neostriatal cholinergic interneurons control the activity of several classes of GABAergic interneurons through fast nicotinic receptor-mediated synaptic inputs. Although indirect evidence has suggested the existence of several classes of interneurons controlled by this mechanism, only one such cell type, the neuropeptide-Y-expressing neurogliaform neuron, has been identified to date. Here we tested the hypothesis that in addition to the neurogliaform neurons that elicit slow GABAergic inhibitory responses, another interneuron type exists in the striatum that receives strong nicotinic cholinergic input and elicits conventional fast GABAergic synaptic responses in projection neurons. We obtained in vitro slice recordings from double transgenic mice in which Channelrhodopsin-2 was natively expressed in cholinergic neurons and a population of serotonin receptor-3a-Cre-expressing GABAergic interneurons were visualized with tdTomato. We show that among the targeted GABAergic interneurons a novel type of interneuron, termed the fast-adapting interneuron, can be identified that is distinct from previously known interneurons based on immunocytochemical and electrophysiological criteria. We show using optogenetic activation of cholinergic inputs that fast-adapting interneurons receive a powerful supra-threshold nicotinic cholinergic input in vitro. Moreover, fast adapting neurons are densely connected to projection neurons and elicit fast, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current responses. The nicotinic receptor-mediated activation of fast-adapting interneurons may constitute an important mechanism through which cholinergic interneurons control the activity of projection neurons and perhaps the plasticity of their synaptic inputs when animals encounter reinforcing or otherwise salient stimuli.

  17. Physiological responses to food deprivation in the house sparrow, a species not adapted to prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Anton; McCue, Marshall D; Pinshow, Berry

    2012-09-01

    Many wild birds fast during reproduction, molting, migration, or because of limited food availability. Species that are adapted to fasting sequentially oxidize endogenous fuels in three discrete phases. We hypothesized that species not adapted to long fasts have truncated, but otherwise similar, phases of fasting, sequential changes in fuel oxidization, and similar changes in blood metabolites to fasting-adapted species. We tested salient predictions in house sparrows (Passer domesticus biblicus), a subspecies that is unable to tolerate more than ~32 h of fasting. Our main hypothesis was that fasting sparrows sequentially oxidize substrates in the order carbohydrates, lipids, and protein. We dosed 24 house sparrows with [(13)C]glucose, palmitic acid, or glycine and measured (13)CO(2) in their breath while they fasted for 24 h. To ascertain whether blood metabolite levels reflect fasting-induced changes in metabolic fuels, we also measured glucose, triacylglycerides, and β-hydroxybutyrate in the birds' blood. The results of both breath (13)CO(2) and plasma metabolite analyses did not support our hypothesis; i.e., that sparrows have the same metabolic responses characteristic of fasting-adapted species, but on a shorter time scale. Contrary to our main prediction, we found that recently assimilated (13)C-tracers were oxidized continuously in different patterns with no definite peaks corresponding to the three phases of fasting and also that changes in plasma metabolite levels accurately tracked the changes found by breath analysis. Notably, the rate of recently assimilated [(13)C]glycine oxidization was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than that of the other metabolic tracers at all postdosing intervals. We conclude that the inability of house sparrows to fast for longer than 32 h is likely related to their inability to accrue large lipid stores, separately oxidize different fuels, and/or spare protein during fasting.

  18. Flight Research into Simple Adaptive Control on the NASA FAST Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2011-01-01

    A series of simple adaptive controllers with varying levels of complexity were designed, implemented and flight tested on the NASA Full-Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST) aircraft. Lessons learned from the development and flight testing are presented.

  19. Performance Comparison Between Adaptive Line Enhancers and FFT for Fast Carrier Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H-G.; Nguyen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Three adaptive line enhancer (ALE) algorithms and architectures, namely conventional ALE, ALE with Double Filtering (ALEDF), and ALE with Coherent Accumulation (ALECA) are investigated for fast carrier acquisition in time-domain.

  20. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  1. Fast HDR image upscaling using locally adapted linear filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Su, Guan-Ming; Yin, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A new method for upscaling high dynamic range (HDR) images is introduced in this paper. Overshooting artifact is the common problem when using linear filters such as bicubic interpolation. This problem is visually more noticeable while working on HDR images where there exist more transitions from dark to bright. Our proposed method is capable of handling these artifacts by computing a simple gradient map which enables the filter to be locally adapted to the image content. This adaptation consists of first, clustering pixels into regions with similar edge structures and second, learning the shape and length of our symmetric linear filter for each of these pixel groups. This new filter can be implemented in a separable fashion which perfectly fits hardware implementations. Our experimental results show that training our filter with HDR images can effectively reduce the overshooting artifacts and improve upon the visual quality of the existing linear upscaling approaches.

  2. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  3. A Massively Parallel Adaptive Fast Multipole Method on Heterogeneous Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuk, Ilya; Chandramowlishwaran, Aparna; Langston, Harper; Nguyen, Tuan-Anh; Sampath, Rahul S; Shringarpure, Aashay; Vuduc, Richard; Ying, Lexing; Zorin, Denis; Biros, George

    2012-01-01

    We describe a parallel fast multipole method (FMM) for highly nonuniform distributions of particles. We employ both distributed memory parallelism (via MPI) and shared memory parallelism (via OpenMP and GPU acceleration) to rapidly evaluate two-body nonoscillatory potentials in three dimensions on heterogeneous high performance computing architectures. We have performed scalability tests with up to 30 billion particles on 196,608 cores on the AMD/CRAY-based Jaguar system at ORNL. On a GPU-enabled system (NSF's Keeneland at Georgia Tech/ORNL), we observed 30x speedup over a single core CPU and 7x speedup over a multicore CPU implementation. By combining GPUs with MPI, we achieve less than 10 ns/particle and six digits of accuracy for a run with 48 million nonuniformly distributed particles on 192 GPUs.

  4. Fast but fleeting: adaptive motor learning processes associated with aging and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Trewartha, Kevin M; Garcia, Angeles; Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2014-10-01

    Motor learning has been shown to depend on multiple interacting learning processes. For example, learning to adapt when moving grasped objects with novel dynamics involves a fast process that adapts and decays quickly-and that has been linked to explicit memory-and a slower process that adapts and decays more gradually. Each process is characterized by a learning rate that controls how strongly motor memory is updated based on experienced errors and a retention factor determining the movement-to-movement decay in motor memory. Here we examined whether fast and slow motor learning processes involved in learning novel dynamics differ between younger and older adults. In addition, we investigated how age-related decline in explicit memory performance influences learning and retention parameters. Although the groups adapted equally well, they did so with markedly different underlying processes. Whereas the groups had similar fast processes, they had different slow processes. Specifically, the older adults exhibited decreased retention in their slow process compared with younger adults. Within the older group, who exhibited considerable variation in explicit memory performance, we found that poor explicit memory was associated with reduced retention in the fast process, as well as the slow process. These findings suggest that explicit memory resources are a determining factor in impairments in the both the fast and slow processes for motor learning but that aging effects on the slow process are independent of explicit memory declines.

  5. Fast Source Camera Identification Using Content Adaptive Guided Image Filter.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Kang, Xiangui

    2016-03-01

    Source camera identification (SCI) is an important topic in image forensics. One of the most effective fingerprints for linking an image to its source camera is the sensor pattern noise, which is estimated as the difference between the content and its denoised version. It is widely believed that the performance of the sensor-based SCI heavily relies on the denoising filter used. This study proposes a novel sensor-based SCI method using content adaptive guided image filter (CAGIF). Thanks to the low complexity nature of the CAGIF, the proposed method is much faster than the state-of-the-art methods, which is a big advantage considering the potential real-time application of SCI. Despite the advantage of speed, experimental results also show that the proposed method can achieve comparable or better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy.

  6. Physiological adaptations to fasting in an actively wintering canid, the Arctic blue fox (Alopex lagopus).

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykönen, Teija; Puukka, Matti; Asikainen, Juha; Hänninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Nieminen, Petteri

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the physiological adaptations to fasting using the farmed blue fox (Alopex lagopus) as a model for the endangered wild arctic fox. Sixteen blue foxes were fed throughout the winter and 32 blue foxes were fasted for 22 d in Nov-Dec 2002. Half of the fasted blue foxes were food-deprived again for 22 d in Jan-Feb 2003. The farmed blue fox lost weight at a slower rate (0.97-1.02% body mass d(-1)) than observed previously in the arctic fox, possibly due to its higher initial body fat content. The animals experienced occasional fasting-induced hypoglycaemia, but their locomotor activity was not affected. The plasma triacylglycerol and glycerol concentrations were elevated during phase II of fasting indicating stimulated lipolysis, probably induced by the high growth hormone concentrations. The total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, urea, uric acid and total protein levels and the urea:creatinine ratio decreased during fasting. Although the plasma levels of some essential amino acids increased, the blue foxes did not enter phase III of starvation characterized by stimulated proteolysis during either of the 22-d fasting procedures. Instead of excessive protein catabolism, it is liver dysfunction, indicated by the increased plasma bilirubin levels and alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities, that may limit the duration of fasting in the species.

  7. Fast Dynamical Coupling Enhances Frequency Adaptation of Oscillators for Robotic Locomotion Control

    PubMed Central

    Nachstedt, Timo; Tetzlaff, Christian; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmic neural signals serve as basis of many brain processes, in particular of locomotion control and generation of rhythmic movements. It has been found that specific neural circuits, named central pattern generators (CPGs), are able to autonomously produce such rhythmic activities. In order to tune, shape and coordinate the produced rhythmic activity, CPGs require sensory feedback, i.e., external signals. Nonlinear oscillators are a standard model of CPGs and are used in various robotic applications. A special class of nonlinear oscillators are adaptive frequency oscillators (AFOs). AFOs are able to adapt their frequency toward the frequency of an external periodic signal and to keep this learned frequency once the external signal vanishes. AFOs have been successfully used, for instance, for resonant tuning of robotic locomotion control. However, the choice of parameters for a standard AFO is characterized by a trade-off between the speed of the adaptation and its precision and, additionally, is strongly dependent on the range of frequencies the AFO is confronted with. As a result, AFOs are typically tuned such that they require a comparably long time for their adaptation. To overcome the problem, here, we improve the standard AFO by introducing a novel adaptation mechanism based on dynamical coupling strengths. The dynamical adaptation mechanism enhances both the speed and precision of the frequency adaptation. In contrast to standard AFOs, in this system, the interplay of dynamics on short and long time scales enables fast as well as precise adaptation of the oscillator for a wide range of frequencies. Amongst others, a very natural implementation of this mechanism is in terms of neural networks. The proposed system enables robotic applications which require fast retuning of locomotion control in order to react to environmental changes or conditions. PMID:28377710

  8. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  9. Research on a Pulmonary Nodule Segmentation Method Combining Fast Self-Adaptive FCM and Classification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Cai-Ming; Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Kai; Deng, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The key problem of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of lung cancer is to segment pathologically changed tissues fast and accurately. As pulmonary nodules are potential manifestation of lung cancer, we propose a fast and self-adaptive pulmonary nodules segmentation method based on a combination of FCM clustering and classification learning. The enhanced spatial function considers contributions to fuzzy membership from both the grayscale similarity between central pixels and single neighboring pixels and the spatial similarity between central pixels and neighborhood and improves effectively the convergence rate and self-adaptivity of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve more accurate segmentation of vascular adhesion, pleural adhesion, and ground glass opacity (GGO) pulmonary nodules than other typical algorithms. PMID:25945120

  10. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  11. Fast multipole and space adaptive multiresolution methods for the solution of the Poisson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Petr; Duarte, Max; Nečas, David; Bourdon, Anne; Bonaventura, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the conjunction of the fast multipole method (FMM) with the space adaptive multiresolution (MR) technique for grid adaptation. Since both methods, MR and FMM provide a priori error estimates, both achieve O(N) computational complexity, and both operate on the same hierarchical space division, their conjunction represents a natural choice when designing a numerically efficient and robust strategy for time dependent problems. Special attention is given to the use of these methods in the simulation of streamer discharges in air. We have designed a FMM Poisson solver on multiresolution adapted grid in 2D. The accuracy and the computation complexity of the solver has been verified for a set of manufactured solutions. We confirmed that the developed solver attains desired accuracy and this accuracy is controlled only by the number of terms in the multipole expansion in combination with the multiresolution accuracy tolerance. The implementation has a linear computation complexity O(N).

  12. Global metabolic network reorganization by adaptive mutations allows fast growth of Escherichia coli on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kian-Kai; Lee, Baek-Seok; Masuda, Takeshi; Ito, Takuro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Deng, Lingli; Dong, Jiyang; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Palsson, Bernhard O; Robert, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Comparative whole-genome sequencing enables the identification of specific mutations during adaptation of bacteria to new environments and allelic replacement can establish their causality. However, the mechanisms of action are hard to decipher and little has been achieved for epistatic mutations, especially at the metabolic level. Here we show that a strain of Escherichia coli carrying mutations in the rpoC and glpK genes, derived from adaptation in glycerol, uses two distinct metabolic strategies to gain growth advantage. A 27-bp deletion in the rpoC gene first increases metabolic efficiency. Then, a point mutation in the glpK gene promotes growth by improving glycerol utilization but results in increased carbon wasting as overflow metabolism. In a strain carrying both mutations, these contrasting carbon/energy saving and wasting mechanisms work together to give an 89% increase in growth rate. This study provides insight into metabolic reprogramming during adaptive laboratory evolution for fast cellular growth.

  13. A Non-Traditional Model of the Metabolic Syndrome: The Adaptive Significance of Insulin Resistance in Fasting-Adapted Seals

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Dorian S.; Champagne, Cory D.; Crocker, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), which fasts from food and water for periods of up to 4 months. During this time, ∼90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7–3.2 mM). All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures and therapies

  14. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  15. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  16. Adaptations to fasting in a terrestrial mustelid, the sable (Martes zibellina).

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Puukka, Matti; Saarela, Seppo; Paakkonen, Tommi; Aho, Jari; Nieminen, Petteri

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the actively wintering Palearctic sable Martes zibellina has evolved physiological adaptations to tolerate nutritional scarcity. Sixteen farm-bred male sables were divided into a fed control group and an experimental group fasted for 4 days. The rate of weight loss in the sable was similar to other medium-sized mustelids. Fasting led to hypoglycaemia and to a decreased lymphocyte percentage. The sable derived metabolic energy from both subcutaneous and intraabdominal white adipose tissues and the relative decrease in fat mass was the largest for the retroperitoneal and subcutaneous depots. Metabolic energy derived partly from body proteins indicated by the increased plasma levels of urea, uric acid and total essential amino acids. Triacylglycerols accumulated in the livers of the fasted sables and the increased plasma aminotransferase activities suggested hepatic dysfunction. The decreased plasma insulin concentrations and the elevated cortisol levels probably contributed to stimulated lipolysis and protein catabolism. Moreover, fasting increased the plasma ghrelin concentrations of the sables and down-regulated the thyroid activity.

  17. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Half of the subjects trained in the fasted state (F; n = 10), while the others ingested ample carbohydrates before (∼160 g) and during (1 g·kg body wt⁻¹·h⁻¹) the training sessions (CHO; n = 10). The training similarly increased Vo(₂max) (+9%) and performance in a 60-min simulated time trial (+8%) in both groups (P < 0.01). Metabolic measurements were made during a 2-h constant-load exercise bout in the fasted state at ∼65% pretraining Vo(₂max). In F, exercise-induced intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) breakdown was enhanced in type I fibers (P < 0.05) and tended to be increased in type IIa fibers (P = 0.07). Training did not affect IMCL breakdown in CHO. In addition, F (+21%) increased the exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal rate of fat oxidation more than did CHO (+6%) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, maximal citrate synthase (+47%) and β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (+34%) activity was significantly upregulated in F (P < 0.05) but not in CHO. Also, only F prevented the development exercise-induced drop in blood glucose concentration (P < 0.05). In conclusion, F is more effective than CHO to increase muscular oxidative capacity and at the same time enhances exercise-induced net IMCL degradation. In addition, F but not CHO prevented drop of blood glucose concentration during fasting exercise.

  18. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state

    PubMed Central

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1–1.5 h cycling at ∼70% V̇o2max, 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Half of the subjects trained in the fasted state (F; n = 10), while the others ingested ample carbohydrates before (∼160 g) and during (1 g·kg body wt−1·h−1) the training sessions (CHO; n = 10). The training similarly increased V̇o2max (+9%) and performance in a 60-min simulated time trial (+8%) in both groups (P < 0.01). Metabolic measurements were made during a 2-h constant-load exercise bout in the fasted state at ∼65% pretraining V̇o2max. In F, exercise-induced intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) breakdown was enhanced in type I fibers (P < 0.05) and tended to be increased in type IIa fibers (P = 0.07). Training did not affect IMCL breakdown in CHO. In addition, F (+21%) increased the exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal rate of fat oxidation more than did CHO (+6%) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, maximal citrate synthase (+47%) and β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (+34%) activity was significantly upregulated in F (P < 0.05) but not in CHO. Also, only F prevented the development exercise-induced drop in blood glucose concentration (P < 0.05). In conclusion, F is more effective than CHO to increase muscular oxidative capacity and at the same time enhances exercise-induced net IMCL degradation. In addition, F but not CHO prevented drop of blood glucose concentration during fasting exercise. PMID:21051570

  19. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  20. p21Cip1 plays a critical role in the physiological adaptation to fasting through activation of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Guadamillas, Elena; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Pantoja, Cristina; Muñoz-Martin, Maribel; Martínez, Dolores; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Valverde, Angela M.; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fasting is a physiological stress that elicits well-known metabolic adaptations, however, little is known about the role of stress-responsive tumor suppressors in fasting. Here, we have examined the expression of several tumor suppressors upon fasting in mice. Interestingly, p21 mRNA is uniquely induced in all the tissues tested, particularly in liver and muscle (>10 fold), and this upregulation is independent of p53. Remarkably, in contrast to wild-type mice, p21-null mice become severely morbid after prolonged fasting. The defective adaptation to fasting of p21-null mice is associated to elevated energy expenditure, accelerated depletion of fat stores, and premature activation of protein catabolism in the muscle. Analysis of the liver transcriptome and cell-based assays revealed that the absence of p21 partially impairs the transcriptional program of PPARα, a key regulator of fasting metabolism. Finally, treatment of p21-null mice with a PPARα agonist substantially protects them from their accelerated loss of fat upon fasting. We conclude that p21 plays a relevant role in fasting adaptation through the positive regulation of PPARα. PMID:27721423

  1. Fast and Adaptive Lossless On-Board Hyperspectral Data Compression System for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Bakhshi, Alireza; Keymeulen, Didier; Klimesh, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Efficient on-board lossless hyperspectral data compression reduces the data volume necessary to meet NASA and DoD limited downlink capabilities. The techniques also improves signature extraction, object recognition and feature classification capabilities by providing exact reconstructed data on constrained downlink resources. At JPL a novel, adaptive and predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral data was recently developed. This technique uses an adaptive filtering method and achieves a combination of low complexity and compression effectiveness that far exceeds state-of-the-art techniques currently in use. The JPL-developed 'Fast Lossless' algorithm requires no training data or other specific information about the nature of the spectral bands for a fixed instrument dynamic range. It is of low computational complexity and thus well-suited for implementation in hardware, which makes it practical for flight implementations of pushbroom instruments. A prototype of the compressor (and decompressor) of the algorithm is available in software, but this implementation may not meet speed and real-time requirements of some space applications. Hardware acceleration provides performance improvements of 10x-100x vs. the software implementation (about 1M samples/sec on a Pentium IV machine). This paper describes a hardware implementation of the JPL-developed 'Fast Lossless' compression algorithm on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA implementation targets the current state of the art FPGAs (Xilinx Virtex IV and V families) and compresses one sample every clock cycle to provide a fast and practical real-time solution for Space applications.

  2. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    PubMed

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples.

  3. AFMPB: An Adaptive Fast Multipole Poisson-Boltzmann Solver for Calculating Electrostatics in Biomolecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole to local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. PMID:20532187

  4. Regulation of skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways during metabolic adaptation to fasting in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A; Bakker, Leontine E H; van der Zon, Gerard C; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jazet, Ingrid M; Pijl, Hanno; Guigas, Bruno

    2014-11-15

    During fasting, rapid metabolic adaptations are required to maintain energy homeostasis. This occurs by a coordinated regulation of energy/nutrient-sensing pathways leading to transcriptional activation and repression of specific sets of genes. The aim of the study was to investigate how short-term fasting affects whole body energy homeostasis and skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptome in humans. For this purpose, 12 young healthy men were studied during a 24-h fast. Whole body glucose/lipid oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry, and blood and skeletal muscle biopsies were collected and analyzed at baseline and after 10 and 24 h of fasting. As expected, fasting induced a time-dependent decrease in plasma insulin and leptin levels, whereas levels of ketone bodies and free fatty acids increased. This was associated with a metabolic shift from glucose toward lipid oxidation. At the molecular level, activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways was time-dependently reduced in skeletal muscle during fasting, whereas the AMP-activated protein kinase activity remained unaffected. Furthermore, we report some changes in the phosphorylation and/or content of forkhead protein 1, sirtuin 1, and class IIa histone deacetylase 4, suggesting that these pathways might be involved in the transcriptional adaptation to fasting. Finally, transcriptome profiling identified genes that were significantly regulated by fasting in skeletal muscle at both early and late time points. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive map of the main energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptomic changes during short-term adaptation to fasting in human skeletal muscle.

  5. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson−Boltzmann Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson−Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer. PMID:19517026

  6. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer.

  7. A Fast Variational Method for the Construction of Resolution Adaptive C-Smooth Molecular Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L; Xu, Guoliang; Zhang, Qin

    2009-05-01

    We present a variational approach to smooth molecular (proteins, nucleic acids) surface constructions, starting from atomic coordinates, as available from the protein and nucleic-acid data banks. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations traditionally used in understanding protein and nucleic-acid folding processes, are based on molecular force fields, and require smooth models of these molecular surfaces. To accelerate MD simulations, a popular methodology is to employ coarse grained molecular models, which represent clusters of atoms with similar physical properties by psuedo- atoms, resulting in coarser resolution molecular surfaces. We consider generation of these mixed-resolution or adaptive molecular surfaces. Our approach starts from deriving a general form second order geometric partial differential equation in the level-set formulation, by minimizing a first order energy functional which additionally includes a regularization term to minimize the occurrence of chemically infeasible molecular surface pockets or tunnel-like artifacts. To achieve even higher computational efficiency, a fast cubic B-spline C(2) interpolation algorithm is also utilized. A narrow band, tri-cubic B-spline level-set method is then used to provide C(2) smooth and resolution adaptive molecular surfaces.

  8. Multi-atlas registration and adaptive hexahedral voxel discretization for fast bioluminescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shenghan; Hu, Haihong; Li, Gen; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been a valuable optical molecular imaging technique to non-invasively depict the cellular and molecular processes in living animals with high sensitivity and specificity. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of BLT, a priori information of anatomical structure is usually incorporated into the reconstruction. The structural information is usually provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In order to obtain better quantitative results, BLT reconstruction with heterogeneous tissues needs to segment the internal organs and discretize them into meshes with the finite element method (FEM). It is time-consuming and difficult to handle the segmentation and discretization problems. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction method for BLT based on multi-atlas registration and adaptive voxel discretization to relieve the complicated data processing procedure involved in the hybrid BLT/CT system. A multi-atlas registration method is first adopted to estimate the internal organ distribution of the imaged animal. Then, the animal volume is adaptively discretized into hexahedral voxels, which are fed into FEM for the following BLT reconstruction. The proposed method is validated in both numerical simulation and an in vivo study. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can reconstruct the bioluminescence source efficiently with satisfactory accuracy. PMID:27446674

  9. A service-oriented medical framework for fast and adaptive information delivery in mobile environment.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjeong; Nam, Hyo Suk

    2009-11-01

    The need for fast treatment of patients in critical conditions motivates the use of mobile devices to provide prompt and consistent communication between hospitals and physicians. We propose a framework that supports ubiquitous access to medical systems using personalized mobile services and integrated medical systems. The proposed service-oriented medical framework provides dynamically composed services that are adapted to contextual variables such as the user's role, the network bandwidth, and resources available at mobile devices while supporting task allocation in distributed servers for massive resource-consuming services. It also manages accurate patient data by integrating local medical systems using medical information standards such as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and Health Level 7. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of our framework by building a prototype of context-based adaptation of computerized tomography image retrieval for acute stroke treatments, which allows images to be viewed on mobile devices with WiMax wireless network. The proposed medical framework reduces hospital delays of patients and facilitates treatments in the absence of medical specialists.

  10. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-06-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Program summaryProgram title: AFMPB: Adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver Catalogue identifier: AEGB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 453 649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8 764 754 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: Depends on the size of the discretized biomolecular system Classification: 3 External routines: Pre- and post-processing tools are required for generating the boundary elements and for visualization. Users can use MSMS ( http://www.scripps.edu/~sanner/html/msms_home.html) for pre-processing, and VMD ( http://www.ks.uiuc.edu/Research/vmd/) for visualization. Sub-programs included: An iterative Krylov subspace solvers package from SPARSKIT by Yousef Saad ( http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~saad/software/SPARSKIT/sparskit.html), and the fast multipole methods subroutines from FMMSuite ( http

  11. Adaptive Control of Fast-Scale Bifurcation in Peak Current Controlled Buck-Boost Inverter via One-Cycle Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Dong, Shuai; Guan, Weimin; Yi, Chuanzhi; He, Bo

    In this paper, one-cycle compensation (OCC) method is proposed to realize adaptive control of fast-scale bifurcation in the peak current controlled buck-boost inverter because the proposed control method can adjust the slope of the integrator’s output voltage automatically through extracting a sinusoidal signal from the absolute value of the reference voltage. In order to reveal their underlying mechanisms of fast-scale bifurcations, a modified averaged model which can capture the sample-and-hold effect is derived in detail to describe the fast-scale dynamics of the buck-boost inverter. Based on the proposed model, a theoretical analysis is performed to identify both the fast-scale period-doubling bifurcation and the fast-scale Hopf one by judging in what way the poles loci move. It has been shown that the OCC method can be used not only to discover the unknown dynamical behaviors (i.e. fast-scale Hopf bifurcation), but also to enlarge the stable region in peak current controlled buck-boost inverter. In addition, the critical bifurcation angles and the parameter behavior boundary are given to verify the effectiveness of the adaptive bifurcation control method. Finally, PSpice circuit experiments are performed to verify the above theoretical and numerical results.

  12. Control of metabolic adaptation to fasting by dILP6-induced insulin signaling in Drosophila oenocytes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debamita; Katewa, Subhash D; Qi, Yanyan; Jackson, Susan A; Kapahi, Pankaj; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-12-16

    Metabolic adaptation to changing dietary conditions is critical to maintain homeostasis of the internal milieu. In metazoans, this adaptation is achieved by a combination of tissue-autonomous metabolic adjustments and endocrine signals that coordinate the mobilization, turnover, and storage of nutrients across tissues. To understand metabolic adaptation comprehensively, detailed insight into these tissue interactions is necessary. Here we characterize the tissue-specific response to fasting in adult flies and identify an endocrine interaction between the fat body and liver-like oenocytes that regulates the mobilization of lipid stores. Using tissue-specific expression profiling, we confirm that oenocytes in adult flies play a central role in the metabolic adaptation to fasting. Furthermore, we find that fat body-derived Drosophila insulin-like peptide 6 (dILP6) induces lipid uptake in oenocytes, promoting lipid turnover during fasting and increasing starvation tolerance of the animal. Selective activation of insulin/IGF signaling in oenocytes by a fat body-derived peptide represents a previously unidentified regulatory principle in the control of metabolic adaptation and starvation tolerance.

  13. Adaptive optics system for fast automatic control of laser beam jitters in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Salvatore; Acernese, Fausto; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems can operate fast automatic control of laser beam jitters for several applications of basic research as well as for the improvement of industrial and medical devices. We here present our theoretical and experimental research showing the opportunity of suppressing laser beam geometrical fluctuations of higher order Hermite Gauss modes in interferometric Gravitational Waves (GW) antennas. This in turn allows to significantly reduce the noise that originates from the coupling of the laser source oscillations with the interferometer asymmetries and introduces the concrete possibility of overcoming the sensitivity limit of the GW antennas actually set at 10-23 1 Hz value. We have carried out the feasibility study of a novel AO System which performs effective laser jitters suppression in the 200 Hz bandwidth. It extracts the wavefront error signals in terms of Hermite Gauss (HG) coefficients and performs the wavefront correction using the Zernike polynomials. An experimental Prototype of the AO System has been implemented and tested in our laboratory at the University of Salerno and the results we have achieved fully confirm effectiveness and robustness of the control upon first and second order laser beam geometrical fluctuations, in good accordance with GW antennas requirements. Above all, we have measured 60 dB reduction of astigmatism and defocus modes at low frequency below 1 Hz and 20 dB reduction in the 200 Hz bandwidth.

  14. AFMPB: An adaptive fast multipole Poisson-Boltzmann solver for calculating electrostatics in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A Fortran program package is introduced for rapid evaluation of the electrostatic potentials and forces in biomolecular systems modeled by the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The numerical solver utilizes a well-conditioned boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation, a node-patch discretization scheme, a Krylov subspace iterative solver package with reverse communication protocols, and an adaptive new version of the fast multipole method in which the exponential expansions are used to diagonalize the multipole-to-local translations. The program and its full description, as well as several closely related libraries and utility tools are available at http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/~lubz/afmpb.html and a mirror site at http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/. This paper is a brief summary of the program: the algorithms, the implementation and the usage. Restrictions: Only three or six significant digits options are provided in this version. Unusual features: Most of the codes are in Fortran77 style. Memory allocation functions from Fortran90 and above are used in a few subroutines. Additional comments: The current version of the codes is designed and written for single core/processor desktop machines. Check http://lsec.cc.ac.cn/lubz/afmpb.html for updates and changes. Running time: The running time varies with the number of discretized elements (N) in the system and their distributions. In most cases, it scales linearly as a function of N.

  15. Adaptation of a Fast Optimal Interpolation Algorithm to the Mapping of Oceangraphic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris; Fieguth, Paul; Wunsch, Carl; Willsky, Alan

    1997-01-01

    A fast, recently developed, multiscale optimal interpolation algorithm has been adapted to the mapping of hydrographic and other oceanographic data. This algorithm produces solution and error estimates which are consistent with those obtained from exact least squares methods, but at a small fraction of the computational cost. Problems whose solution would be completely impractical using exact least squares, that is, problems with tens or hundreds of thousands of measurements and estimation grid points, can easily be solved on a small workstation using the multiscale algorithm. In contrast to methods previously proposed for solving large least squares problems, our approach provides estimation error statistics while permitting long-range correlations, using all measurements, and permitting arbitrary measurement locations. The multiscale algorithm itself, published elsewhere, is not the focus of this paper. However, the algorithm requires statistical models having a very particular multiscale structure; it is the development of a class of multiscale statistical models, appropriate for oceanographic mapping problems, with which we concern ourselves in this paper. The approach is illustrated by mapping temperature in the northeastern Pacific. The number of hydrographic stations is kept deliberately small to show that multiscale and exact least squares results are comparable. A portion of the data were not used in the analysis; these data serve to test the multiscale estimates. A major advantage of the present approach is the ability to repeat the estimation procedure a large number of times for sensitivity studies, parameter estimation, and model testing. We have made available by anonymous Ftp a set of MATLAB-callable routines which implement the multiscale algorithm and the statistical models developed in this paper.

  16. Fasting in the American marten (Martes americana): a physiological model of the adaptations of a lean-bodied animal.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Saarela, Seppo; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2007-10-01

    The American marten (Martes americana) is a boreal forest marten with low body adiposity throughout the year. The aim of this study was to investigate the adaptations of this lean-bodied species to fasting for an ecologically relevant duration (48 h) by exposing eight farm-bred animals to total food deprivation with seven control animals. Selected morphological and hematological parameters, plasma and serum biochemistry, endocrinological variables and liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) enzyme activities were determined. After 48 h without food, the marten were within phase II of fasting with depleted liver and muscle glycogen stores, but with active lipid mobilization indicated by the high lipase activities in several WAT depots. The plasma ghrelin concentrations were higher due to food deprivation, possibly increasing appetite and enhancing foraging behavior. The lower plasma insulin and higher cortisol concentrations could mediate augmented lipolysis and the lower triiodothyronine levels could suppress the metabolic rate. Fasting did not affect the plasma levels of stress-associated catecholamines or variables indicating tissue damage. In general, the adaptations to short-term fasting exhibited some differences compared to the related farm-bred American mink (Mustela vison), an example of which was the better ability of the marten to hydrolyze lipids despite its significantly lower initial fat mass.

  17. A Fast, Locally Adaptive, Interactive Retrieval Algorithm for the Analysis of DIAL Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarov, D. V.; Rogers, R.; Hair, J. W.; Douglass, K. O.; Plusquellic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Differential absorption light detection and ranging (DIAL) is a laser-based tool which is used for remote, range-resolved measurement of particular gases in the atmosphere, such as carbon-dioxide and methane. In many instances it is of interest to study how these gases are distributed over a region such as a landfill, factory, or farm. While a single DIAL measurement only tells us about the distribution of a gas along a single path, a sequence of consecutive measurements provides us with information on how that gas is distributed over a region, making DIAL a natural choice for such studies. DIAL measurements present a number of interesting challenges; first, in order to convert the raw data to concentration it is necessary to estimate the derivative along the path of the measurement. Second, as the distribution of gases across a region can be highly heterogeneous it is important that the spatial nature of the measurements be taken into account. Finally, since it is common for the set of collected measurements to be quite large it is important for the method to be computationally efficient. Existing work based on Local Polynomial Regression (LPR) has been developed which addresses the first two issues, but the issue of computational speed remains an open problem. In addition to the latter, another desirable property is to allow user input into the algorithm. In this talk we present a novel method based on LPR which utilizes a variant of the RODEO algorithm to provide a fast, locally adaptive and interactive approach to the analysis of DIAL measurements. This methodology is motivated by and applied to several simulated examples and a study out of NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) looking at the estimation of aerosol extinction in the atmosphere. A comparison study of our method against several other algorithms is also presented. References Chaudhuri, P., Marron, J.S., Scale-space view of curve estimation, Annals of Statistics 28 (2000) 408-428. Duong, T., Cowling

  18. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  19. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  20. Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R

    2009-10-17

    High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

  1. Fasting adaptation in idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia: a mismatch between glucose production and demand.

    PubMed

    Huidekoper, Hidde H; Duran, Marinus; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Sauerwein, Hans P; Wijburg, Frits A

    2008-08-01

    In order to study the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia in idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia (KH), glucose kinetics during fasting in patients with KH were determined. A fasting test was performed in 12 children with previously documented KH. Besides determination of glucoregulatory hormones, plasma ketones, FFA and alanine, the rates of endogenous glucose production (EGP), glucose uptake, gluconeogenesis (GNG) and glycogenolysis (GGL) were quantified using the [6,6-(2)H(2)] glucose isotope dilution method and the deuterated water method. The five youngest subjects (age 2.5-3.9 years) became hypoglycemic (glucose <3.0 mmol/l) during the test. Mean differences in glucose kinetics between overnight fasting and the end of the test in the hypoglycemic vs. the normoglycemic subjects were: EGP: -31.9% vs. -17.9% (p = 0.007), GGL: -66.2% vs. -50.8% (p = 0.465) and GNG 6.8% vs. 19.5% (p = 0.465). Plasma alanine levels were significantly lower (p = 0.028) at the end of the test in the hypoglycemic subjects. Plasma ketones and FFA levels were in the normal range for fasting duration in all subjects. We conclude that hypoglycemia in KH is caused by the inability to sustain an adequate EGP during fasting in view of the higher glucose requirement in young children. The decrease in GGL is not accompanied by a significant increase in GNG, possibly because of a limitation in the supply of alanine. Our results support the hypothesis that KH represents the lower tail of the Gaussian distribution of fasting tolerance in children.

  2. Physiological adaptive indicators in fasted neonate broiler chicks in response to calcium gluconate injection.

    PubMed

    Khosravinia, H

    2016-06-01

    Four hundred and eighty mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 3 h after hatching were allotted according to a completely random design in a 6 × 2 × 2 factorial schedule into two groups of 12 replications of 20 chicks each. The main experimental factors were fasting for 0, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after chick placement and calcium gluconate (Ca-glu) injection (0 and 0.6 ml). Live body weight (BW) of chicks decreased linearly (Y = 43.36-0.109BW0 h , r(2)  = 0.876) as neonatal fasting extended. Injection of 0.6 ml Ca-glu at 3 h post-hatching did not affect weight loss of chicks. Yolk residuals (YR) utilized linearly (Y = 5.75-0.062YR, r(2)  = 0.956) by 0.062 g/h in neonate fasted chicks up to 48 h, showing no effect of Ca-glu injection. Neonatal fasting periods longer than 12 h increased liver weight (p < 0.05). The mean absolute and proportional (% of BW0 h ) breast and leg weight were reduced linearly as neonatal fasting extended (p < 0.05). Serum glucose concentration increased up to 6 h and then reduced linearly to 150 mg/dl after 48-h fasting. The Ca-glu treatment influenced serum glucose level for a short period up to 6 h of fasting. Serum Ca concentration sharply increased up to threefolds in the birds received Ca-glu injection resulting in acute hypercalcemia, then decreased to the initial level after 24-h feed withdrawal (p < 0.05). The mean serum level for creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, HDL, albumins and total proteins significantly increased during the fasting periods of 6 to 48 h and significantly elevated in the birds receiving 0.6-ml Ca-glu injection compared with the non-treated chicks (p < 0.05). It was concluded that subcutaneous administration of 0.6 ml Ca-glu in the chick's neck did not suitably support the increased metabolic demands for glucose and calcium in feed-deprived neonate chicks.

  3. Fast characterization of two ultrasound longitudinal waves in cancellous bone using an adaptive beamforming technique.

    PubMed

    Taki, Hirofumi; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Sato, Toru

    2015-04-01

    The received signal in through-transmission ultrasound measurements of cancellous bone consists of two longitudinal waves, called the fast and slow waves. Analysis of these fast and slow waves may reveal characteristics of the cancellous bone that would be good indicators of osteoporosis. Because the two waves often overlap, decomposition of the received signal is an important problem in the characterization of bone quality. This study proposes a fast and accurate decomposition method based on the frequency domain interferometry imaging method with a modified wave transfer function that uses a phase rotation parameter. The proposed method accurately characterized the fast and slow waves in the experimental study, and the residual intensity, which was normalized with respect to the received signal intensity, was less than -20 dB over the bone specimen thickness range from 6 to 15 mm. In the simulation study, the residual intensity was less than -20 dB over the specimen thickness range from 3 to 8 mm. Decomposition of a single received signal takes only 5 s using a laptop personal computer with a single central processing unit. The proposed method has great potential to provide accurate and rapid measurements of indicators of osteoporosis in cancellous bone.

  4. The Fast Adaptive Composite Grid Method and Algebraic Multigrid in Large Scale Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-03

    in the context of oil reservoir simulation [5], the basic ideas are useful in many areas of interest. Finally, Lagrangian and semi-Lagrangian... reservoir simulation ," Proceeding of the SPE Svmposium on Reservoir imuation, February, 1989, Houston, Texas. 6. S. McCormick and J. Thomas, "The fast

  5. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  6. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  7. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  8. Hepatic IRE1α regulates fasting-induced metabolic adaptive programs through the XBP1s-PPARα axis signalling.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mengle; Shan, Bo; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yiping; Yan, Cheng; Wu, Ying; Mao, Ting; Qiu, Yifu; Zhou, Yubo; Jiang, Shan; Jia, Weiping; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Rui, Liangyou; Yang, Liu; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-27

    Although the mammalian IRE1α-XBP1 branch of the cellular unfolded protein response has been implicated in glucose and lipid metabolism, the exact metabolic role of IRE1α signalling in vivo remains poorly understood. Here we show that hepatic IRE1α functions as a nutrient sensor that regulates the metabolic adaptation to fasting. We find that prolonged deprivation of food or consumption of a ketogenic diet activates the IRE1α-XBP1 pathway in mouse livers. Hepatocyte-specific abrogation of Ire1α results in impairment of fatty acid β-oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver under chronic fasting or ketogenic conditions, leading to hepatosteatosis; liver-specific restoration of XBP1s reverses the defects in IRE1α null mice. XBP1s directly binds to and activates the promoter of PPARα, the master regulator of starvation responses. Hence, our results demonstrate that hepatic IRE1α promotes the adaptive shift of fuel utilization during starvation by stimulating mitochondrial β-oxidation and ketogenesis through the XBP1s-PPARα axis.

  9. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  10. Physiological adaptations to prolonged fasting in the overwintering striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Bowman, Jeff; Sadowski, Carrie; Nituch, Larissa A; Bruce, Laura; Halonen, Toivo; Puukka, Katri; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Aho, Jari; Nieminen, Petteri

    2013-12-01

    Wintertime physiology of captive striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) in response to cold ambient temperature (Ta) and fasting was investigated with body temperature (Tb) and activity recordings and analyses of hematology, plasma biochemistry and tissue fatty acids (FA). After 105 days of food deprivation, the skunks were in phase II of fasting indicated by the elevated plasma nonesterified FA and glycerol but no accumulation of nitrogen end products. Shorter-chain saturated and monounsaturated FA together with C18-20 n-3 polyunsaturated FA were preferentially mobilized. Individual amino acids responded to fasting in a complex manner, while essential and nonessential amino acid sums remained stable. Increases in hemoglobin and hematocrit suggested dehydration. The activity levels were lower in mid-January-early March, and the activity bouts were mostly displayed between 17:00-23:00 h. Daily torpor was observed in two females with 29 and 46 bouts. The deepest torpor (Tb<31 °C) occurred between dawn and early afternoon and lasted for 3.3 ± 0.18 h. The average minimum Tb was 29.2 ± 0.15 °C and the lowest recorded Tb was 25.8 °C. There was significant relation between the average 24-h Tb and Ta. Increases in wintertime Ta, as predicted by climate change scenarios, could influence torpor patterns in the species.

  11. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-12-17

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback-Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria.

  12. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback–Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria. PMID:24297927

  13. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  14. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  15. Ear Deformations Give Bats a Physical Mechanism for Fast Adaptation of Ultrasonic Beam Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats’ ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  16. Wavelet multiresolution analyses adapted for the fast solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jawerth, Bjoern; Sweldens, Wim

    1993-01-01

    We present ideas on how to use wavelets in the solution of boundary value ordinary differential equations. Rather than using classical wavelets, we adapt their construction so that they become (bi)orthogonal with respect to the inner product defined by the operator. The stiffness matrix in a Galerkin method then becomes diagonal and can thus be trivially inverted. We show how one can construct an O(N) algorithm for various constant and variable coefficient operators.

  17. Synthetic physiology strategies for adapting tools from nature for genetically targeted control of fast biological processes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian Y; Chuong, Amy S; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Boyden, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The life and operation of cells involve many physiological processes that take place over fast timescales of milliseconds to minutes. Genetically encoded technologies for driving or suppressing specific fast physiological processes in intact cells, perhaps embedded within intact tissues in living organisms, are critical for the ability to understand how these physiological processes contribute to emergent cellular and organismal functions and behaviors. Such "synthetic physiology" tools are often incredibly complex molecular machines, in part because they must operate at high speeds, without causing side effects. We here explore how synthetic physiology molecules can be identified and deployed in cells, and how the physiology of these molecules in cellular contexts can be assessed and optimized. For concreteness, we discuss these methods in the context of the "optogenetic" light-gated ion channels and pumps that we have developed over the past few years as synthetic physiology tools and widely disseminated for use in neuroscience for probing the role of specific brain cell types in neural computations, behaviors, and pathologies. We anticipate that some of the insights revealed here may be of general value for the field of synthetic physiology, as they raise issues that will be of importance for the development and use of high-performance, high-speed, side-effect free physiological control tools in heterologous expression systems.

  18. A fast image super-resolution algorithm using an adaptive Wiener filter.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Russell

    2007-12-01

    A computationally simple super-resolution algorithm using a type of adaptive Wiener filter is proposed. The algorithm produces an improved resolution image from a sequence of low-resolution (LR) video frames with overlapping field of view. The algorithm uses subpixel registration to position each LR pixel value on a common spatial grid that is referenced to the average position of the input frames. The positions of the LR pixels are not quantized to a finite grid as with some previous techniques. The output high-resolution (HR) pixels are obtained using a weighted sum of LR pixels in a local moving window. Using a statistical model, the weights for each HR pixel are designed to minimize the mean squared error and they depend on the relative positions of the surrounding LR pixels. Thus, these weights adapt spatially and temporally to changing distributions of LR pixels due to varying motion. Both a global and spatially varying statistical model are considered here. Since the weights adapt with distribution of LR pixels, it is quite robust and will not become unstable when an unfavorable distribution of LR pixels is observed. For translational motion, the algorithm has a low computational complexity and may be readily suitable for real-time and/or near real-time processing applications. With other motion models, the computational complexity goes up significantly. However, regardless of the motion model, the algorithm lends itself to parallel implementation. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated here in a number of experimental results using simulated and real video sequences. A computational analysis is also presented.

  19. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  20. A fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on two-dimensional processor arrays with a reconfigurable BUS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olariu, S.; Schwing, J.; Zhang, J.

    1991-01-01

    A bus system that can change dynamically to suit computational needs is referred to as reconfigurable. We present a fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on a two-dimensional processor array with a reconfigurable bus system (2-D PARBS, for short). Specifically, we show that computing the convex hull of a planar set of n points taken O(log n/log m) time on a 2-D PARBS of size mn x n with 3 less than or equal to m less than or equal to n. Our result implies that the convex hull of n points in the plane can be computed in O(1) time in a 2-D PARBS of size n(exp 1.5) x n.

  1. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  2. Differential adaptive responses to 1- or 2-day fasting in various mouse tissues revealed by quantitative PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junya; Kamata, Shotaro; Miura, Asumi; Nagata, Tomoko; Kainuma, Ryo; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Dietary or caloric restriction confers various clinical benefits. Short-term fasting of mice is a common experimental procedure that may involve systemic metabolic remodeling, which may significantly affect experimental outputs. This study evaluated adaptive cellular responses after 1- or 2-day fasting in 13 mouse tissues by quantitative PCR using 15 marker primer sets for the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome (Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), autophagy–lysosome (LC3b, p62 and Lamp2), amino acid response (Asns, Trib3, Herpud1, xCT, and Chop), Nrf2-mediated antioxidant (HO-1 and Gsta1), and amino acid transport (Slc38a2, Slc7a5, and Slc7a1) systems. Differential activation profiles obtained in seven highly (thymus, liver, spleen, and small intestine) or mildly (stomach, kidney, and colon) atrophied tissues as well as in six non-atrophied tissues (brain, eye, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, and testis) suggested tissue-specific active metabolic remodeling. PMID:25973363

  3. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  4. A fast partitioning algorithm using adaptive Mahalanobis clustering with application to seismic zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Esteban, Antonio; Martínez-Álvarez, Francisco; Scitovski, Sanja; Scitovski, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we construct an efficient adaptive Mahalanobis k-means algorithm. In addition, we propose a new efficient algorithm to search for a globally optimal partition obtained by using the adoptive Mahalanobis distance-like function. The algorithm is a generalization of the previously proposed incremental algorithm (Scitovski and Scitovski, 2013). It successively finds optimal partitions with k = 2 , 3 , … clusters. Therefore, it can also be used for the estimation of the most appropriate number of clusters in a partition by using various validity indexes. The algorithm has been applied to the seismic catalogues of Croatia and the Iberian Peninsula. Both regions are characterized by a moderate seismic activity. One of the main advantages of the algorithm is its ability to discover not only circular but also elliptical shapes, whose geometry fits the faults better. Three seismogenic zonings are proposed for Croatia and two for the Iberian Peninsula and adjacent areas, according to the clusters discovered by the algorithm.

  5. Adaptive, fast walking in a biped robot under neuronal control and learning.

    PubMed

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Geng, Tao; Kulvicius, Tomas; Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-07-01

    Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical) arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori-motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s), self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks.

  6. Adaptive, Fast Walking in a Biped Robot under Neuronal Control and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-01-01

    Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely autonomous, and where higher level control (e.g., cortical) arises only pointwise, as needed. This requires an architecture of several nested, sensori–motor loops where the walking process provides feedback signals to the walker's sensory systems, which can be used to coordinate its movements. To complicate the situation, at a maximal walking speed of more than four leg-lengths per second, the cycle period available to coordinate all these loops is rather short. In this study we present a planar biped robot, which uses the design principle of nested loops to combine the self-stabilizing properties of its biomechanical design with several levels of neuronal control. Specifically, we show how to adapt control by including online learning mechanisms based on simulated synaptic plasticity. This robot can walk with a high speed (>3.0 leg length/s), self-adapting to minor disturbances, and reacting in a robust way to abruptly induced gait changes. At the same time, it can learn walking on different terrains, requiring only few learning experiences. This study shows that the tight coupling of physical with neuronal control, guided by sensory feedback from the walking pattern itself, combined with synaptic learning may be a way forward to better understand and solve coordination problems in other complex motor tasks. PMID:17630828

  7. Real-time fast inverse dose optimization for image guided adaptive radiation therapy-Enhancements to fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, S. P.; Turnbull, D.; Johnson, C.; Chen, J. Z.; Battista, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose

  8. Fast parallel MR image reconstruction via B1-based, adaptive restart, iterative soft thresholding algorithms (BARISTA).

    PubMed

    Muckley, Matthew J; Noll, Douglas C; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Sparsity-promoting regularization is useful for combining compressed sensing assumptions with parallel MRI for reducing scan time while preserving image quality. Variable splitting algorithms are the current state-of-the-art algorithms for SENSE-type MR image reconstruction with sparsity-promoting regularization. These methods are very general and have been observed to work with almost any regularizer; however, the tuning of associated convergence parameters is a commonly-cited hindrance in their adoption. Conversely, majorize-minimize algorithms based on a single Lipschitz constant have been observed to be slow in shift-variant applications such as SENSE-type MR image reconstruction since the associated Lipschitz constants are loose bounds for the shift-variant behavior. This paper bridges the gap between the Lipschitz constant and the shift-variant aspects of SENSE-type MR imaging by introducing majorizing matrices in the range of the regularizer matrix. The proposed majorize-minimize methods (called BARISTA) converge faster than state-of-the-art variable splitting algorithms when combined with momentum acceleration and adaptive momentum restarting. Furthermore, the tuning parameters associated with the proposed methods are unitless convergence tolerances that are easier to choose than the constraint penalty parameters required by variable splitting algorithms.

  9. Adaptive search range adjustment scheme for fast motion estimation in AVC/H.264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunyoung; Choi, Kiho; Jang, Euee S.

    2011-06-01

    AVC/H.264 supports the use of multiple reference frames (e.g., 5 frames in AVC/H.264) for motion estimation (ME), which demands a huge computational complexity in ME. We propose an adaptive search range adjustment scheme to reduce the computational complexity of ME by reducing the search range of each reference frame--from the (t-1)'th frame to the (t-5)'th frame--for each macroblock. Based on the statistical analysis that the 16×16 mode type is dominantly selected rather than the other block partition mode types, the proposed method reduces the search range of the remaining ME process in the given reference frame according to the motion vector (MV) position of the 16×16 block ME. In the case of the (t-1)'th frame, the MV position of the 8×8 block ME--in addition to that of 16×16 block ME--is also used for the search range reduction to sub-block partition mode types of the 8×8 block. The experimental results show that the proposed method reduces about 50% and 65% of the total encoding time over CIF/SIF and full HD test sequences, respectively, without any noticeable visual degradation, compared to the full search method of the AVC/H.264 encoder.

  10. Fast Adaptive Thermal Camouflage Based on Flexible VO₂/Graphene/CNT Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Ma, He; Liu, Junku; Zhao, Wei; Jia, Yi; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Kai; Wu, Yang; Wei, Yang; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2015-12-09

    Adaptive camouflage in thermal imaging, a form of cloaking technology capable of blending naturally into the surrounding environment, has been a great challenge in the past decades. Emissivity engineering for thermal camouflage is regarded as a more promising way compared to merely temperature controlling that has to dissipate a large amount of excessive heat. However, practical devices with an active modulation of emissivity have yet to be well explored. In this letter we demonstrate an active cloaking device capable of efficient thermal radiance control, which consists of a vanadium dioxide (VO2) layer, with a negative differential thermal emissivity, coated on a graphene/carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film. A slight joule heating drastically changes the emissivity of the device, achieving rapid switchable thermal camouflage with a low power consumption and excellent reliability. It is believed that this device will find wide applications not only in artificial systems for infrared camouflage or cloaking but also in energy-saving smart windows and thermo-optical modulators.

  11. Evidence of fast serotonin transmission in frog slowly adapting type 1 responses.

    PubMed

    Press, Daniel; Mutlu, Sevinç; Güçlü, Burak

    2010-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite (MCN) complex generates slowly adapting type 1 (SA1) response when mechanically stimulated. Both serotonin (5-HT) and glutamate have been implicated in the generation of normal SA1 responses, but previous studies have been inconclusive as to what their roles are or how synaptic transmission occurs. In this study, excised dorsal skin patches from common water frogs (Rana ridibunda) were stimulated by von Frey hairs during perfusion in a tissue bath, and single-unit spike activity was recorded from SA1 fibres. Serotonin had no significant effect on the SA1 response at low (10 µM) concentration, significantly increased activity in a force-independent manner at 100 µM, but decreased activity with reduced responsiveness to force at 1 mM. Glutamate showed no effect on the responsiveness to force at 100 µM. MDL 72222 (100 µM), an ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, completely abolished the responsiveness to force, suggesting that serotonin is released from Merkel cells as a result of mechanical stimulation, and activated 5-HT3 receptors on the neurite. The metabotropic 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, greatly reduced the SA1 fibre's responsiveness to force, as did the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid. This supports a role for serotonin and glutamate as neuromodulators in the MCN complex, possibly by activation and/or inhibition of signalling cascades in the Merkel cell associated with vesicle release. Additionally, it was observed that SA1 responses contained a force-independent component, similar to a dynamic response observed during mechanical vibrations.

  12. Real-time MRI-guided hyperthermia treatment using a fast adaptive algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stakhursky, Vadim L.; Arabe, Omar; Cheng, Kung-Shan; MacFall, James; Maccarini, Paolo; Craciunescu, Oana; Dewhirst, Mark; Stauffer, Paul; Das, Shiva K.

    2009-04-01

    temperature in the tumor to integral temperature in normal tissue) by up to six-fold, compared to the first iteration. The integrated MR-HT treatment algorithm successfully steered the focus of heating into the desired target volume for both the simple homogeneous and the more challenging muscle equivalent phantom with tumor insert models of human extremity sarcomas after 16 and 2 iterations, correspondingly. The adaptive method for MR thermal image guided focal steering shows promise when tested in phantom experiments on a four-antenna phased array applicator.

  13. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  14. An Approximation to the Adaptive Exponential Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Model Allows Fast and Predictive Fitting to Physiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Hertäg, Loreen; Hass, Joachim; Golovko, Tatiana; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    For large-scale network simulations, it is often desirable to have computationally tractable, yet in a defined sense still physiologically valid neuron models. In particular, these models should be able to reproduce physiological measurements, ideally in a predictive sense, and under different input regimes in which neurons may operate in vivo. Here we present an approach to parameter estimation for a simple spiking neuron model mainly based on standard f–I curves obtained from in vitro recordings. Such recordings are routinely obtained in standard protocols and assess a neuron’s response under a wide range of mean-input currents. Our fitting procedure makes use of closed-form expressions for the firing rate derived from an approximation to the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire (AdEx) model. The resulting fitting process is simple and about two orders of magnitude faster compared to methods based on numerical integration of the differential equations. We probe this method on different cell types recorded from rodent prefrontal cortex. After fitting to the f–I current-clamp data, the model cells are tested on completely different sets of recordings obtained by fluctuating (“in vivo-like”) input currents. For a wide range of different input regimes, cell types, and cortical layers, the model could predict spike times on these test traces quite accurately within the bounds of physiological reliability, although no information from these distinct test sets was used for model fitting. Further analyses delineated some of the empirical factors constraining model fitting and the model’s generalization performance. An even simpler adaptive LIF neuron was also examined in this context. Hence, we have developed a “high-throughput” model fitting procedure which is simple and fast, with good prediction performance, and which relies only on firing rate information and standard physiological data widely and easily available. PMID:22973220

  15. Constraints on adaptive evolution: the functional trade-off between reproduction and fast-start swimming performance in the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    Ghalambor, Cameron K; Reznick, David N; Walker, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The empirical study of natural selection reveals that adaptations often involve trade-offs between competing functions. Because natural selection acts on whole organisms rather than isolated traits, adaptive evolution may be constrained by the interaction between traits that are functionally integrated. Yet, few attempts have been made to characterize how and when such constraints are manifested or whether they limit the adaptive divergence of populations. Here we examine the consequences of adaptive life-history evolution on locomotor performance in the live-bearing guppy. In response to increased predation from piscivorous fish, Trinidadian guppies evolve an increased allocation of resources toward reproduction. These populations are also under strong selection for rapid fast-start swimming performance to evade predators. Because embryo development increases a female's wet mass as she approaches parturition, an increased investment in reproductive allocation should impede fast-start performance. We find evidence for adaptive but constrained evolution of fast-start swimming performance in laboratory trials conducted on second-generation lab-reared fish. Female guppies from high-predation localities attain a faster acceleration and velocity and travel a greater distance during fast-start swimming trials. However, velocity and distance traveled decline more rapidly over the course of pregnancy in these same females, thus reducing the magnitude of divergence in swimming performance between high- and low-predation populations. This functional trade-off between reproduction and swimming performance reveals how different aspects of the phenotype are integrated and highlights the complexity of adaptation at the whole-organism level.

  16. Fast and Adaptive Detection of Pulmonary Nodules in Thoracic CT Images Using a Hierarchical Vector Quantization Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Han, Fangfang; Song, Bowen; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Computer-aided detection (CADe) of pulmonary nodules is critical to assisting radiologists in early identification of lung cancer from computed tomography (CT) scans. This paper proposes a novel CADe system based on a hierarchical vector quantization (VQ) scheme. Compared with the commonly-used simple thresholding approach, high-level VQ yields a more accurate segmentation of the lungs from the chest volume. In identifying initial nodule candidates (INCs) within the lungs, low-level VQ proves to be effective for INCs detection and segmentation, as well as computationally efficient compared to existing approaches. False-positive (FP) reduction is conducted via rule-based filtering operations in combination with a feature-based support vector machine classifier. The proposed system was validated on 205 patient cases from the publically available on-line LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium) database, with each case having at least one juxta-pleural nodule annotation. Experimental results demonstrated that our CADe system obtained an overall sensitivity of 82.7% at a specificity of 4 FPs/scan, and 89.2% sensitivity at 4.14 FPs/scan for the classification of juxta-pleural INCs only. With respect to comparable CADe systems, the proposed system shows outperformance and demonstrates its potential for fast and adaptive detection of pulmonary nodules via CT imaging. PMID:25486657

  17. Content-adaptive thresholding early termination scheme on directional gradient descent searches for fast block motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Chen, Po-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Tso; Liu, Ching-Chung

    2012-11-01

    An efficient algorithm named modified directional gradient descent searches to enhance the directional gradient descent search (DGDS) algorithm is presented to reduce computations. A modified search pattern with an adaptive threshold for early termination is applied to DGDS to avoid meaningless calculation after the searching point is good enough. A statistical analysis of best motion vector distribution is analyzed to decide the modified search pattern. Then a statistical model based on the characteristics of the block distortion information of the previous coded frame helps the early termination parameters selection, and a trade-off between the video quality and the computational complexity can be obtained. The simulation results show the proposed algorithm provides significant improvement in reducing the motion estimation (ME) by 17.81% of the average search points and 20% of ME time saving compared to the fast DGDS algorithm implemented in H.264/AVC JM 18.2 reference software according to different types of sequences, while maintaining a similar bit rate without losing picture quality.

  18. On application of fast and adaptive periodic Battle-Lemarie wavelets to modeling of multiple lossy transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Lei, Guangtsai; Pan, Guangwen

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, the continuous operator is discretized into matrix forms by Galerkin`s procedure, using periodic Battle-Lemarie wavelets as basis/testing functions. The polynomial decomposition of wavelets is applied to the evaluation of matrix elements, which makes the computational effort of the matrix elements no more expensive than that of method of moments (MoM) with conventional piecewise basis/testing functions. A new algorithm is developed employing the fast wavelet transform (FWT). Owing to localization, cancellation, and orthogonal properties of wavelets, very sparse matrices have been obtained, which are then solved by the LSQR iterative method. This algorithm is also adaptive in that one can add at will finer wavelet bases in the regions where fields vary rapidly, without any damage to the system orthogonality of the wavelet basis functions. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the new algorithm, we applied it to the evaluation of frequency-dependent resistance and inductance matrices of multiple lossy transmission lines. Numerical results agree with previously published data and laboratory measurements. The valid frequency range of the boundary integral equation results has been extended two to three decades in comparison with the traditional MoM approach. The new algorithm has been integrated into the computer aided design tool, MagiCAD, which is used for the design and simulation of high-speed digital systems and multichip modules Pan et al. 29 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle.

  20. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  1. SU-E-J-208: Fast and Accurate Auto-Segmentation of Abdominal Organs at Risk for Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V; Wang, Y; Romero, A; Heijmen, B; Hoogeman, M; Myronenko, A; Jordan, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Various studies have demonstrated that online adaptive radiotherapy by real-time re-optimization of the treatment plan can improve organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing in the abdominal region. Its clinical implementation, however, requires fast and accurate auto-segmentation of OARs in CT scans acquired just before each treatment fraction. Autosegmentation is particularly challenging in the abdominal region due to the frequently observed large deformations. We present a clinical validation of a new auto-segmentation method that uses fully automated non-rigid registration for propagating abdominal OAR contours from planning to daily treatment CT scans. Methods: OARs were manually contoured by an expert panel to obtain ground truth contours for repeat CT scans (3 per patient) of 10 patients. For the non-rigid alignment, we used a new non-rigid registration method that estimates the deformation field by optimizing local normalized correlation coefficient with smoothness regularization. This field was used to propagate planning contours to repeat CTs. To quantify the performance of the auto-segmentation, we compared the propagated and ground truth contours using two widely used metrics- Dice coefficient (Dc) and Hausdorff distance (Hd). The proposed method was benchmarked against translation and rigid alignment based auto-segmentation. Results: For all organs, the auto-segmentation performed better than the baseline (translation) with an average processing time of 15 s per fraction CT. The overall improvements ranged from 2% (heart) to 32% (pancreas) in Dc, and 27% (heart) to 62% (spinal cord) in Hd. For liver, kidneys, gall bladder, stomach, spinal cord and heart, Dc above 0.85 was achieved. Duodenum and pancreas were the most challenging organs with both showing relatively larger spreads and medians of 0.79 and 2.1 mm for Dc and Hd, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the achieved accuracy and computational time we conclude that the investigated auto

  2. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  3. A fast algorithm for adaptive clutter rejection in ultrasound color flow imaging based on the first-order perturbation: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    You, Wei; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2010-08-01

    A fast clutter rejection method for ultrasound color flow imaging is proposed based on the first-order perturbation as an efficient implementation of eigen-decomposition. The proposed method is verified by simulated data. Results show that the proposed method can be adaptive to non-stationary clutter movements and its computational complexity is lower than that of the conventional eigen-based clutter rejection methods.

  4. Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to-Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ARL-TR-7315 ● JUNE 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Analysis and Implementation of Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor ...Particle-to- Particle (P2P) Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) Kernel for Black-Box Adaptive Fast Multipole Method by Richard H Haney and Dale Shires...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection information

  5. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Characterization of the Two-Speed Subgenomes of Fusarium graminearum Reveals the Fast-Speed Subgenome Specialized for Adaption and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinhu; Jiang, Cong; Wang, Chenfang; Chen, Changjun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most severe diseases on wheat and barley worldwide. Although the genomic data of several strains were published, the intragenomic variation of F. graminearum was not well characterized. Here, we sequenced three Chinese strains and conducted genome-wide comparisons. Our data revealed that all the sequenced strains were distinct from each other and over 350 genes were functionally lost in each of them. Variants of each strain were unevenly distributed in a highly conserved pattern along the chromosomes, resulting in a conserved two-speed genome. The fast subgenome has a lower GC content, shorter gene length, and higher variation of exon numbers than the slow subgenome. Genes related to interaction and pathogenicity, under positive selection, and up-regulated in planta were all significantly enriched in the fast subgenome. Furthermore, we found that the fast subgenome coincided with facultative heterochromatin regions that were repressed in vegetative stage but activated during infection as measured by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data, suggesting that the fast subgenome is epigenetically regulated. Taken together, our data demonstrated that F. graminearum has a highly conserved two-speed genome and the fast subgenome responsible for adaption and infection is under the control of heterochromatin. PMID:28261228

  7. Effects of wintertime fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK and ACC in hypothalamus, adipose tissue and liver of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Sanni; Mänttäri, Satu; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Saarela, Seppo

    2016-02-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is a canid with autumnal fattening and passive wintering strategy. We examined the effects of wintertime fasting and seasonality on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of metabolism, and its target, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) on the species. Twelve farmed raccoon dogs (eleven females/one male) were divided into two groups: half were fasted for ten weeks in December-March (winter fasted) and the others were fed ad libitum (winter fed). A third group (autumn fed, eight females) was fed ad libitum and sampled in December. Total AMPK, ACC and their phosphorylated forms (pAMPK, pACC) were measured from hypothalamus, liver, intra-abdominal (iWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues (sWAT). The fasted animals lost 32% and the fed 20% of their body mass. Hypothalamic AMPK expression was lower and pACC levels higher in the winter groups compared to the autumn fed group. Liver pAMPK was lower in the winter fasted group, with consistently decreased ACC and pACC. AMPK and pAMPK were down-regulated in sWAT and iWAT of both winter groups, with a parallel decline in pACC in sWAT. The responses of AMPK and ACC to fasting were dissimilar to the effects observed previously in non-seasonal mammals and hibernators. Differences between the winter fed and autumn fed groups indicate that the functions of AMPK and ACC could be regulated in a season-dependent manner. Furthermore, the distinctive effects of prolonged fasting and seasonal adaptation on AMPK-ACC pathway could contribute to the wintering strategy of the raccoon dog.

  8. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  9. Whole transcriptome analysis of the fasting and fed Burmese python heart: insights into extreme physiological cardiac adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher E; Cozza, Steven; Riquelme, Cecilia A; McCombie, W Richard; Heimiller, Joseph K; Marr, Thomas G; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The infrequently feeding Burmese python (Python molurus) experiences significant and rapid postprandial cardiac hypertrophy followed by regression as digestion is completed. To begin to explore the molecular mechanisms of this response, we have sequenced and assembled the fasted and postfed Burmese python heart transcriptomes with Illumina technology using the chicken (Gallus gallus) genome as a reference. In addition, we have used RNA-seq analysis to identify differences in the expression of biological processes and signaling pathways between fasted, 1 day postfed (DPF), and 3 DPF hearts. Out of a combined transcriptome of ∼2,800 mRNAs, 464 genes were differentially expressed. Genes showing differential expression at 1 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for biological processes involved in metabolism and energetics, while genes showing differential expression at 3 DPF compared with fasted were enriched for processes involved in biogenesis, structural remodeling, and organization. Moreover, we present evidence for the activation of physiological and not pathological signaling pathways in this rapid, novel model of cardiac growth in pythons. Together, our data provide the first comprehensive gene expression profile for a reptile heart.

  10. The population genomics of a fast evolver: high levels of diversity, functional constraint, and molecular adaptation in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cahais, Vincent; Galtier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenomics has revealed the existence of fast-evolving animal phyla in which the amino acid substitution rate, averaged across many proteins, is consistently higher than in other lineages. The reasons for such differences in proteome-wide evolutionary rates are still unknown, largely because only a handful of species offer within-species genomic data from which molecular evolutionary processes can be deduced. In this study, we use next-generation sequencing technologies and individual whole-transcriptome sequencing to gather extensive polymorphism sequence data sets from Ciona intestinalis. Ciona is probably the best-characterized member of the fast-evolving Urochordata group (tunicates), which was recently identified as the sister group of the slow-evolving vertebrates. We introduce and validate a maximum-likelihood framework for single-nucleotide polymorphism and genotype calling, based on high-throughput short-read typing. We report that the C. intestinalis proteome is characterized by a high level of within-species diversity, efficient purifying selection, and a substantial percentage of adaptive amino acid substitutions. We conclude that the increased rate of amino acid sequence evolution in tunicates, when compared with vertebrates, is the consequence of both a 2-6 times higher per-year mutation rate and prevalent adaptive evolution.

  11. High glucose uptake in growing rats adapted to a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet determines low fasting glycemia even with high hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mayara P; Buzelle, Samyra L; Batistela, Emanuele; Doneda, Diego L; França, Suélem A de; Santos, Maísa P dos; Andrade, Cláudia M B; Garófalo, Maria A R; Kettelhut, Isis do C; Navegantes, Luiz C C; Chaves, Valéria E; Bertolini, Gisele L; Kawashita, Nair H

    2014-06-01

    The our objective was to investigate the adaptations induced by a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet in growing rats, which by comparison with the rats fed a control (C) diet at displayed lower fasting glycemia and similar fasting insulinemia, despite impairment in insulin signaling in adipose tissues. In the insulin tolerance test the LPHC rats showed higher rates of glucose disappearance (30%) and higher tolerance to overload of glucose than C rats. The glucose uptake by the soleus muscle, evaluated in vivo by administration of 2-deoxy-[(14)C]glucose, increased by 81%. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase content and the incorporation of [1-(14)C]pyruvate into glucose was also higher in the slices of liver from the LPHC rats than in those from C rats. The LPHC rats showed increases in l-lactate as well as in other gluconeogenic precursors in the blood. These rats also had a higher hepatic production of glucose, evaluated by in situ perfusion. The data obtained indicate that the main substrates for gluconeogenesis in the LPHC rats are l-lactate and glycerol. Thus, we concluded that the fasting glycemia in the LPHC animals was maintained mainly by increases in the hepatic gluconeogenesis from glycerol and l-lactate, compensating, at least in part, for the higher glucose uptake by the tissues.

  12. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments

    PubMed Central

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca; Jónsson, Hákon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Fumagalli, Matteo; Yang, Melinda A.; Gamba, Cristina; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie D.; Petersen, Bent; Hoover, Cindi A.; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Boulygina, Eugenia; Tsygankova, Svetlana; Neuditschko, Markus; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Thèves, Catherine; Alfarhan, Ahmed H.; Alquraishi, Saleh A.; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Popov, Ruslan; Grigoriev, Semyon; Alekseev, Anatoly N.; Rubin, Edward M.; McCue, Molly; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso; Tikhonov, Alexei; Crubézy, Eric; Slatkin, Montgomery; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Kantanen, Juha; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below −70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens dating from the early 19th century and ∼5,200 y ago. By comparing these genomes with the genomes of two Late Pleistocene, 27 domesticated, and three wild Przewalski’s horses, we find that contemporary Yakutian horses do not descend from the native horses that populated the region until the mid-Holocene, but were most likely introduced following the migration of the Yakut people a few centuries ago. Thus, they represent one of the fastest cases of adaptation to the extreme temperatures of the Arctic. We find cis-regulatory mutations to have contributed more than nonsynonymous changes to their adaptation, likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments. PMID:26598656

  13. Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments.

    PubMed

    Librado, Pablo; Der Sarkissian, Clio; Ermini, Luca; Schubert, Mikkel; Jónsson, Hákon; Albrechtsen, Anders; Fumagalli, Matteo; Yang, Melinda A; Gamba, Cristina; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie D; Petersen, Bent; Hoover, Cindi A; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Nedoluzhko, Artem; Boulygina, Eugenia; Tsygankova, Svetlana; Neuditschko, Markus; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Thèves, Catherine; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Popov, Ruslan; Grigoriev, Semyon; Alekseev, Anatoly N; Rubin, Edward M; McCue, Molly; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso; Tikhonov, Alexei; Crubézy, Eric; Slatkin, Montgomery; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske; Kantanen, Juha; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-12-15

    Yakutia, Sakha Republic, in the Siberian Far East, represents one of the coldest places on Earth, with winter record temperatures dropping below -70 °C. Nevertheless, Yakutian horses survive all year round in the open air due to striking phenotypic adaptations, including compact body conformations, extremely hairy winter coats, and acute seasonal differences in metabolic activities. The evolutionary origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis of their adaptations remain, however, contentious. Here, we present the complete genomes of nine present-day Yakutian horses and two ancient specimens dating from the early 19th century and ∼5,200 y ago. By comparing these genomes with the genomes of two Late Pleistocene, 27 domesticated, and three wild Przewalski's horses, we find that contemporary Yakutian horses do not descend from the native horses that populated the region until the mid-Holocene, but were most likely introduced following the migration of the Yakut people a few centuries ago. Thus, they represent one of the fastest cases of adaptation to the extreme temperatures of the Arctic. We find cis-regulatory mutations to have contributed more than nonsynonymous changes to their adaptation, likely due to the comparatively limited standing variation within gene bodies at the time the population was founded. Genes involved in hair development, body size, and metabolic and hormone signaling pathways represent an essential part of the Yakutian horse adaptive genetic toolkit. Finally, we find evidence for convergent evolution with native human populations and woolly mammoths, suggesting that only a few evolutionary strategies are compatible with survival in extremely cold environments.

  14. Simplex Free Adaptive Tree Fast Sweeping and Evolution Methods for Solving Level Set Equations in Arbitrary Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-06

    and node counts for a codimension-n problem of solving the eikonal equation |∇φ| = 1, (8) with a boundary point at xb = (0.5, 0.5, . . . , 0.5) with...unorganized points using variational level set method. Comp. Vis. and Image Under., 80:295–319, 2000. [40] Hongkai Zhao. A fast sweeping method for eikonal equations. Math. Comp., 74(250):603–627 (electronic), 2005. 21 ...nature. Secondly, they re- quire a backtracking along characteristics and an interpolation at an arbitrary point within the domain. This

  15. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  16. Fast response and high sensitivity to microsaccades in a cascading-adaptation neural network with short-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Jian-Fang; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-04-01

    Microsaccades are very small eye movements during fixation. Experimentally, they have been found to play an important role in visual information processing. However, neural responses induced by microsaccades are not yet well understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Here we propose a network model with a cascading adaptation including both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. In the neural network model, we compare the microsaccade-induced neural responses in the presence of STD and those without STD. It is found that the cascading with STD can give rise to faster and sharper responses to microsaccades. Moreover, STD can enhance response effectiveness and sensitivity to microsaccadic spatiotemporal changes, suggesting improved detection of small eye movements (or moving visual objects). We also explore the mechanism of the response properties in the model. Our studies strongly indicate that STD plays an important role in neural responses to microsaccades. Our model considers simultaneously retinal adaptation and STD at thalamocortical synapses in the study of microsaccade-induced neural activity, and may be useful for further investigation of the functional roles of microsaccades in visual information processing.

  17. Performance evaluation of coherent free space optical communications with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror adaptive optics system depending on the Greenwood frequency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Kainan; Huang, Danian; Lin, Xudong; Wang, Liang; Lv, Yaowen

    2016-06-13

    The Greenwood frequency (GF) is influential in performance improvement for the coherent free space optical communications (CFSOC) system with a closed-loop adaptive optics (AO) unit. We analyze the impact of tilt and high-order aberrations on the mixing efficiency (ME) and bit-error-rate (BER) under different GF. The root-mean-square value (RMS) of the ME related to the RMS of the tilt aberrations, and the GF is derived to estimate the volatility of the ME. Furthermore, a numerical simulation is applied to verify the theoretical analysis, and an experimental correction system is designed with a double-stage fast-steering-mirror and a 97-element continuous surface deformable mirror. The conclusions of this paper provide a reference for designing the AO system for the CFSOC system.

  18. Blubber transcriptome response to acute stress axis activation involves transient changes in adipogenesis and lipolysis in a fasting-adapted marine mammal

    PubMed Central

    Khudyakov, J. I.; Champagne, C. D.; Meneghetti, L. M.; Crocker, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Stress can compromise an animal’s ability to conserve metabolic stores and participate in energy-demanding activities that are critical for fitness. Understanding how wild animals, especially those already experiencing physiological extremes (e.g. fasting), regulate stress responses is critical for evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on physiology and fitness, key challenges for conservation. However, studies of stress in wildlife are often limited to baseline endocrine measurements and few have investigated stress effects in fasting-adapted species. We examined downstream molecular consequences of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation by exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in blubber of northern elephant seals due to the ease of blubber sampling and its key role in metabolic regulation in marine mammals. We report the first phocid blubber transcriptome produced by RNAseq, containing over 140,000 annotated transcripts, including metabolic and adipocytokine genes of interest. The acute response of blubber to stress axis activation, measured 2 hours after ACTH administration, involved highly specific, transient (lasting <24 hours) induction of gene networks that promote lipolysis and adipogenesis in mammalian adipocytes. Differentially expressed genes included key adipogenesis factors which can be used as blubber-specific markers of acute stress in marine mammals of concern for which sampling of other tissues is not possible. PMID:28186107

  19. Fast coeff_token decoding method and new memory architecture design for an efficient H.264/AVC context-based adaptive variable length coding decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Yong Ho; Yoon, Kun Su; Ha, Seok Wun

    2009-12-01

    A fast coeff_token decoding method based on new memory architecture is proposed to implement an efficient context-based adaptive variable length-coding (CAVLC) decoder. The heavy memory access needed in CAVLC decoding is a significant issue in designing a real system, such as digital multimedia broadcasting players, portable media players, and mobile phones with video, because it results in high power consumption and delay in operations. Recently, a new coeff_token variable-length decoding method has been suggested to achieve memory access reduction. However, it still requires a large portion of the total memory access in CAVLC decoding. In this work, an effective memory architecture is designed through careful examination of codewords in variable-length code tables. In addition, a novel fast decoding method is proposed to further reduce the memory accesses required for reconstructing the coeff_token element. Only one memory access is used for reconstructing each coeff_token element in the proposed method.

  20. Adapted to change: The rapid development of symbiosis in newly settled, fast-maturing chemosymbiotic mussels in the deep sea.

    PubMed

    Laming, Sven R; Duperron, Sébastien; Gaudron, Sylvie M; Hilário, Ana; Cunha, Marina R

    2015-12-01

    Symbioses between microbiota and marine metazoa occur globally at chemosynthetic habitats facing imminent threat from anthropogenic disturbance, yet little is known concerning the role of symbiosis during early development in chemosymbiotic metazoans: a critical period in any benthic species' lifecycle. The emerging symbiosis of Idas (sensu lato) simpsoni mussels undergoing development is assessed over a post-larval-to-adult size spectrum using histology and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Post-larval development shows similarities to that of both heterotrophic and chemosymbiotic mussels. Data from newly settled specimens confirm aposymbiotic, planktotrophic larval development. Sulphur-oxidising (SOX) symbionts subsequently colonise multiple exposed, non-ciliated epithelia shortly after metamorphosis, but only become abundant on gills as these expand with greater host size. This wide-spread bathymodiolin recorded from sulphidic wood, bone and cold-seep habitats, displays a suite of adaptive traits that could buffer against anthropogenic disturbance.

  1. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Bradley M.; de Waal, Parker W.; Ramjan, Zachary H.; Xu, H. Eric; Rothbart, Scott B.

    2016-10-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  2. "Adapted Linear Interaction Energy": A Structure-Based LIE Parametrization for Fast Prediction of Protein-Ligand Affinities.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Ranganathan, Anirudh; Brinck, Tore

    2013-02-12

    We present a structure-based parametrization of the Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method and show that it allows for the prediction of absolute protein-ligand binding energies. We call the new model "Adapted" LIE (ALIE) because the α and β coefficients are defined by system-dependent descriptors and do therefore not require any empirical γ term. The best formulation attains a mean average deviation of 1.8 kcal/mol for a diverse test set and depends on only one fitted parameter. It is robust with respect to additional fitting and cross-validation. We compare this new approach with standard LIE by Åqvist and co-workers and the LIE + γSASA model (initially suggested by Jorgensen and co-workers) against in-house and external data sets and discuss their applicabilities.

  3. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Bradley M; de Waal, Parker W; Ramjan, Zachary H; Xu, H Eric; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-10-21

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  4. RTTOV-gb - Adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is the single most important under-sampled part of the atmosphere. According to the WMO Statement Of Guidance For Global Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), temperature and humidity profiles (in cloudy areas) are among the four critical atmospheric variables not adequately measured in the PBL. Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) provide temperature and humidity profiles in both clear- and cloudy-sky conditions with high temporal resolution and low-to-moderate vertical resolution, with information mostly residing in the PBL. Ground-based MWR offer to bridge this observational gap by providing continuous temperature and humidity information in the PBL. The MWR data assimilation into NWP models may be particularly important in nowcasting and severe weather initiation. The assimilation of thermodynamic profiles retrieved from MWR data has been recently experimented, but a way to possibly increase the impact is to directly assimilate measured radiances instead of retrieved profiles. The assimilation of observed radiances in a variational scheme requires the following tools: (i) a fast radiative transfer (RT) model to compute the simulated radiances at MWR channels from the NWP model fields (ii) the partial derivatives (Jacobians) of the fast radiative transfer model with respect to control variables to optimize the distances of the atmospheric state from both the first guess and the observations. Such a RT model is available from the EUMETSAT NWPSAF (Numerical Weather Prediction Satellite Application Facility) and well accepted in the NWP community: RTTOV. This model was developed for nadir-viewing passive visible, infrared, and microwave satellite radiometers, spectrometers and interferometers. It has been modified to handle ground-based microwave radiometer observations. This version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, provides the tools needed to exploit ground-based upward looking MWR brightness temperatures into NWP variational data

  5. PUEO NUI: feasible and fast upgrade of the CFHT adaptive optics system for high-dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Olivier; Ménard, François; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles

    2003-02-01

    Rethinking the efficient use of 4m-class telescopes in the dawning era of larger facilities is a timely but challenging debate. The extensive use of PUEO for imaging (and now spectroscopy) has kept CFHT at the forefront of scientific research with adaptive optics since its commissioning in 1996. Even though larger facilities are now starting to think about ways of implementing high order AO systems, we believe the medium size of the CFHT and the excellent quality of our site on Mauna Kea is a perfect combination to reach the highest performances with a high order AO system. The fields of application of high order adaptive optics are exciting: They include extremely high contrast imaging and coronography in the near-infrared and diffraction-limited imaging in the optical, with the corresponding gain in angular resolution. Specific science examples are described in and adjacent paper (Menard et al, these proceedings (4839-133)), and planned instrumentation in the form of four quadrant coronograph or existing dual (or triple) wavelength imagers (such as TRIDENT) would benefit tremendously from >90% Strehl ratios in the K band. Simulations of a high order (104 electrodes) curvature system have been performed and produce the required performance and are presented in an adjacent paper (Lai & Craven-Bartle, (4860-28)). Technologically, the system is quite simple and re-uses most of the opto-mechanics of the existing PUEO. Deformable mirrors and real time computers are well within existing (and commercially available) specifications. An innovative solution of using a dedicated low read noise CCD camera (specifically for curvature systems) overcomes the potential cost drawbacks of using avalanche photo-diodes (APDs). This detector is described in detail in an adjacent paper (Cuillandre et al, these proceedings (4839-31)).

  6. Adaptive-weighted cubic B-spline using lookup tables for fast and efficient axial resampling of 3D confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Indhumathi, C; Cai, Y Y; Guan, Y Q; Opas, M; Zheng, J

    2012-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has become a most powerful tool to visualize and analyze the dynamic behavior of cellular molecules. Photobleaching of fluorochromes is a major problem with confocal image acquisition that will lead to intensity attenuation. Photobleaching effect can be reduced by optimizing the collection efficiency of the confocal image by fast z-scanning. However, such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the z dimension, which causes disparities in the x, y, and z directions of the voxels with the original image stacks. As a result, reliable segmentation and feature extraction of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Image interpolation is especially needed for the correction of undersampling artifact in the axial plane of three-dimensional images generated by a confocal microscope to obtain cubic voxels. In this work, we present an adaptive cubic B-spline-based interpolation with the aid of lookup tables by deriving adaptive weights based on local gradients for the sampling nodes in the interpolation formulae. Thus, the proposed method enhances the axial resolution of confocal images by improving the accuracy of the interpolated value simultaneously with great reduction in computational cost. Numerical experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed interpolation approach and demonstrate its superiority both in terms of accuracy and speed compared to other interpolation algorithms.

  7. Fast protocol for extraction of DNA from Prosopis spp leaves (plant adapted to arid environment) without liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Michel-López, C Y; González-Mendoza, D; Grimaldo-Juarez, O

    2013-09-27

    The extraction of high-quality genomic DNA from Prosopis spp for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification is complicated, owing to the presence of a high percentage of secondary metabolites that bind to or co-precipitate with nucleic acids. In the present study, we report a modified sodium dodecyl sulfate/phenol protocol that eliminates the use of liquid nitrogen in the maceration process, β-mercaptoethanol in the buffer extraction, and the ethanol precipitation step. The A₂₆₀/A₂₈₀ absorbance ratios of the isolated DNA were approximately 2.0 to 1.9, suggesting that the DNA fraction was pure and can be used for further PCR analysis. The DNA isolated by this protocol is of sufficient quality for molecular applications; this technique could be applied to other organisms that have similar substances that hinder DNA extraction. Finally, this proposal represents an alternative fast, cheap, and effective method for the isolation of genomic DNA from fresh leaves of Prosopis spp, even in low-technology laboratories.

  8. Adaptive fusion method of visible light and infrared images based on non-subsampled shearlet transform and fast non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weiwei; Lei, Yang; Zhao, Huaixun

    2014-11-01

    The issue of visible light and infrared images fusion has been an active topic in both military and civilian areas, and a great many relevant algorithms and techniques have been developed accordingly. This paper addresses a novel adaptive approach to the above two patterns of images fusion problem, employing multi-scale geometry analysis (MGA) of non-subsampled shearlet transform (NSST) and fast non-negative matrix factorization (FNMF) together. Compared with other existing conventional MGA tools, NSST owns not only better feature-capturing capabilities, but also much lower computational complexities. As a modification version of the classic NMF model, FNMF overcomes the local optimum property inherent in NMF to a large extent. Furthermore, use of the FNMF with a less complex structure and much fewer iteration numbers required leads to the enhancement of the overall computational efficiency, which is undoubtedly meaningful and promising in so many real-time applications especially the military and medical technologies. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is superior to other current popular ones in both aspects of subjective visual and objective performance.

  9. Fast simulated annealing and adaptive Monte Carlo sampling based parameter optimization for dense optical-flow deformable image registration of 4DCT lung anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Tai H.; Min, Yugang; Neylon, John; Thomas, David; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important step in radiotherapy treatment planning. An optimal input registration parameter set is critical to achieve the best registration performance with the specific algorithm. Methods In this paper, we investigated a parameter optimization strategy for Optical-flow based DIR of the 4DCT lung anatomy. A novel fast simulated annealing with adaptive Monte Carlo sampling algorithm (FSA-AMC) was investigated for solving the complex non-convex parameter optimization problem. The metric for registration error for a given parameter set was computed using landmark-based mean target registration error (mTRE) between a given volumetric image pair. To reduce the computational time in the parameter optimization process, a GPU based 3D dense optical-flow algorithm was employed for registering the lung volumes. Numerical analyses on the parameter optimization for the DIR were performed using 4DCT datasets generated with breathing motion models and open-source 4DCT datasets. Results showed that the proposed method efficiently estimated the optimum parameters for optical-flow and closely matched the best registration parameters obtained using an exhaustive parameter search method.

  10. Adaptation of acyl-enzyme kinetic theory and an experimental method for evaluating the kinetics of fast-acting, irreversible protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leytus, S P; Peltz, S W; Mangel, W F

    1983-01-26

    The theory of acyl-enzyme kinetics (Bender, M.L., Kézdy, F.J. and Wedler, F.C. (1967) J. Chem. Educ. 44, 84-88) has been adapted for use in evaluating the kinetics of inhibition of serine proteases by both natural and synthetic irreversible inhibitors. The new theory is based upon formal analysis of the case of an irreversible, active-site-directed inhibitor competing with an irreversible, active-site-directed substrate for the active site of a serine protease. From this theory, an experimentally simple and accurate method is described to obtain a second-order rate constant that is characteristic of the efficiency with which an irreversible inhibitor reacts. The experimental method is particularly useful for characterizing fast-acting, irreversible inhibitors. The theory and method which are applicable to a wide variety of enzymes are verified by analysis of the inhibition of bovine trypsin by three model inhibitors, p-nitrophenyl p'-guanidinobenzoate, soybean trypsin inhibitor and alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor as well as by human antithrombin III in the presence of heparin and by bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

  11. Boundary element solutions for broad-band 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems accelerated by an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a generalized and stable surface integral formula for 3-D uniform inducing field and plane wave electromagnetic induction problems, which works reliably over a wide frequency range. Vector surface electric currents and magnetic currents, scalar surface electric charges and magnetic charges are treated as the variables. This surface integral formula is successfully applied to compute the electromagnetic responses of 3-D topography to low frequency magnetotelluric and high frequency radio-magnetotelluric fields. The standard boundary element method which is used to solve this surface integral formula quickly exceeds the memory capacity of modern computers for problems involving hundreds of thousands of unknowns. To make the surface integral formulation applicable and capable of dealing with large-scale 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems, we have developed a matrix-free adaptive multilevel fast multipole boundary element solver. By means of the fast multipole approach, the time-complexity of solving the final system of linear equations is reduced to O(m log m) and the memory cost is reduced to O(m), where m is the number of unknowns. The analytical solutions for a half-space model were used to verify our numerical solutions over the frequency range 0.001-300 kHz. In addition, our numerical solution shows excellent agreement with a published numerical solution for an edge-based finite-element method on a trapezoidal hill model at a frequency of 2 Hz. Then, a high frequency simulation for a similar trapezoidal hill model was used to study the effects of displacement currents in the radio-magnetotelluric frequency range. Finally, the newly developed algorithm was applied to study the effect of moderate topography and to evaluate the applicability of a 2-D RMT inversion code that assumes a flat air-Earth interface, on RMT field data collected at Smørgrav, southern Norway. This paper constitutes the first part of a hybrid boundary element-finite element

  12. How Fast Is Fast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, Abe

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to answer for themselves the question of how fast a body must travel before the nonrelativistic expression must be replaced with the correct relativistic expression by deciding on the accuracy required in describing the kinetic energy of a body. (ZWH)

  13. Local ensemble transform Kalman filter, a fast non-stationary control law for adaptive optics on ELTs: theoretical aspects and first simulation results.

    PubMed

    Gray, Morgan; Petit, Cyril; Rodionov, Sergey; Bocquet, Marc; Bertino, Laurent; Ferrari, Marc; Fusco, Thierry

    2014-08-25

    We propose a new algorithm for an adaptive optics system control law, based on the Linear Quadratic Gaussian approach and a Kalman Filter adaptation with localizations. It allows to handle non-stationary behaviors, to obtain performance close to the optimality defined with the residual phase variance minimization criterion, and to reduce the computational burden with an intrinsically parallel implementation on the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs).

  14. A fast Adaptive-Gain Orientation Filter of inertial/magnetic data for human motion tracking in free-living environments.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ya; Tan, Jindong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution, real-time data obtained by human motion tracking systems can be used for gait analysis, which helps better understanding the cause of many diseases for more effective treatments, such as rehabilitation for outpatients or recovery from lost motor functions after a stroke. This paper presents an analytically derived method for an adaptive-gain complementary filter based on the convergence rate from the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm (GNA) and the divergence rate from the gyroscope, which is referred as Adaptive-Gain Orientation Filter (AGOF) in this paper. The AGOF has the advantages of one iteration calculation to reduce the computing load and accurate estimation of gyroscope measurement error. Moreover, for handling magnetic distortions especially in indoor environments and movements with excessive acceleration, adaptive measurement vectors and a reference vector for Earth's magnetic field selection schemes are introduced to help the GNA find more accurate direction of gyroscope error. Experimental results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed method, which shows better accuracy of orientation estimation than several well-known methods.

  15. Fasting and sport: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J

    2010-06-01

    Most humans observe an overnight fast on a daily basis, and the human body copes well with short duration fasting. Periodic fasting is widely practised for cultural, religious or health reasons. Fasting may take many different forms. Prolonged restriction of food and fluid is harmful to health and performance, and it is often automatically assumed that intermittent fasting will lead to decrements in exercise performance. Athletes who choose to fast during training or competitions may therefore be at a disadvantage. The available evidence does not entirely support this view, but there is little or no information on the effects on elite athletes competing in challenging environments. Prolonged periods of training in the fasted state may not allow optimum adaptation of muscles and other tissues. Further research on a wide range of athletes with special nutrition needs is urgently required. In events where performance might be affected, other strategies to eliminate or minimise any effects must be sought.

  16. WE-EF-BRD-03: I Want It Now!: Advances in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction and the Use of Priors to Enable Fast Anatomic and Physiologic Imaging to Inform Guidance and Adaptation Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  17. Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; Pisanti, O.

    The following sections are included: * Elementary Considerations * The Integral Equation to the Neutron Distribution * The Critical Size for a Fast Reactor * Supercritical Reactors * Problems and Exercises

  18. Creatine loading elevates the intracellular phosphorylation potential and alters adaptive responses of rat fast-twitch muscle to chronic low-frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Putman, Charles T; Gallo, Maria; Martins, Karen J B; MacLean, Ian M; Jendral, Michelle J; Gordon, Tessa; Syrotuik, Daniel G; Dixon, Walter T

    2015-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevating the intracellular phosphorylation potential (IPP = [ATP]/[ADP]free) within rat fast-twitch tibialis anterior muscles by creatine (Cr) loading would prevent fast-to-slow fibre transitions induced by chronic low-frequency electrical stimulation (CLFS, 10 Hz, 12 h/day). Creatine-control and creatine-CLFS groups drank a solution of 1% Cr + 5% dextrose, ad libitum, for 10 days before and during 10 days of CLFS; dextrose-control and dextrose-CLFS groups drank 5% dextrose. Cr loading increased total Cr (P < 0.025), phosphocreatine (PCr) (P < 0.003), and the IPP (P < 0.0008) by 34%, 45%, and 64%, respectively. PCr and IPP were 46% (P < 0.002) and 76% (P < 0.02) greater in creatine-CLFS than in dextrose-CLFS. Higher IPP was confirmed by a 58% reduction in phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase α (Thr172) (P < 0.006). In dextrose-CLFS, myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I and IIa transcripts increased 32- and 38-fold (P < 0.006), respectively, whereas MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P < 0.03); the corresponding MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa protein contents increased by 2.0- (P < 0.03) and 2.7-fold (P < 0.05), respectively, and MyHC-IIb decreased by 30% (P < 0.03). In contrast, within creatine-CLFS, MyHC-I and MyHC-IIa mRNA were unchanged and MyHC-IIb mRNA decreased by 75% (P < 0.003); the corresponding MyHC isoform contents were not altered. Oxidative reference enzymes were similarly elevated (P < 0.01) in dextrose-CLFS and creatine-CLFS, but reciprocal reductions in glycolytic reference enzymes occurred only in dextrose-CLFS (P < 0.02). Preservation of the glycolytic potential and greater SERCA2 and parvalbumin contents in creatine-CLFS coincided with prolonged time to peak tension and half-rise time (P < 0.01). These results highlight the IPP as an important physiological regulator of muscle fibre plasticity and demonstrate that training-induced changes typically associated with improvements in muscular endurance or increased power output are

  19. Genetic changes during a laboratory adaptive evolution process that allowed fast growth in glucose to an Escherichia coli strain lacking the major glucose transport system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS), which is the major bacterial component involved in glucose transport and its phosphorylation, accumulate high amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate that can be diverted to the synthesis of commercially relevant products. However, these strains grow slowly in glucose as sole carbon source due to its inefficient transport and metabolism. Strain PB12, with 400% increased growth rate, was isolated after a 120 hours adaptive laboratory evolution process for the selection of faster growing derivatives in glucose. Analysis of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain that lacks PTS will allow a better understanding of the basis of its growth adaptation and, therefore, in the design of improved metabolic engineering strategies for enhancing carbon diversion into the aromatic pathways. Results Whole genome analyses using two different sequencing methodologies: the Roche NimbleGen Inc. comparative genome sequencing technique, and high throughput sequencing with Illumina Inc. GAIIx, allowed the identification of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain. Both methods detected 23 non-synonymous and 22 synonymous point mutations. Several non-synonymous mutations mapped in regulatory genes (arcB, barA, rpoD, rna) and in other putative regulatory loci (yjjU, rssA and ypdA). In addition, a chromosomal deletion of 10,328 bp was detected that removed 12 genes, among them, the rppH, mutH and galR genes. Characterization of some of these mutated and deleted genes with their functions and possible functions, are presented. Conclusions The deletion of the contiguous rppH, mutH and galR genes that occurred simultaneously, is apparently the main reason for the faster growth of the evolved PB12 strain. In support of this interpretation is the fact that inactivation of the rppH gene in the parental PB11 strain substantially increased its growth rate, very

  20. Fast CRCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Detecting Codes: General Theory and Their Application in Feedback Communication Systems. Kluwer Academic, 1995. [8] D.E. Knuth , The Art of Computer ... computation . Index Terms—Fast CRC, low-complexity CRC, checksum, error-detection code, Hamming code, period of polynomial, fast software implementation...simulations, and performance analysis of systems and networks. CRC implementation in software is desirable, because many computers do not have hardware

  1. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  2. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  3. Project FAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essexville-Hampton Public Schools, MI.

    Described are components of Project FAST (Functional Analysis Systems Training) a nationally validated project to provide more effective educational and support services to learning disordered children and their regular elementary classroom teachers. The program is seen to be based on a series of modules of delivery systems ranging from mainstream…

  4. Resilience through adaptation

    PubMed Central

    van Voorn, George A. K.; Ligtenberg, Arend; Molenaar, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of agents through learning or evolution is an important component of the resilience of Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). Without adaptation, the flexibility of such systems to cope with outside pressures would be much lower. To study the capabilities of CAS to adapt, social simulations with agent-based models (ABMs) provide a helpful tool. However, the value of ABMs for studying adaptation depends on the availability of methodologies for sensitivity analysis that can quantify resilience and adaptation in ABMs. In this paper we propose a sensitivity analysis methodology that is based on comparing time-dependent probability density functions of output of ABMs with and without agent adaptation. The differences between the probability density functions are quantified by the so-called earth-mover’s distance. We use this sensitivity analysis methodology to quantify the probability of occurrence of critical transitions and other long-term effects of agent adaptation. To test the potential of this new approach, it is used to analyse the resilience of an ABM of adaptive agents competing for a common-pool resource. Adaptation is shown to contribute positively to the resilience of this ABM. If adaptation proceeds sufficiently fast, it may delay or avert the collapse of this system. PMID:28196372

  5. Fasting - the ultimate diet?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, A M

    2007-05-01

    Adult humans often undertake acute fasts for cosmetic, religious or medical reasons. For example, an estimated 14% of US adults have reported using fasting as a means to control body weight and this approach has long been advocated as an intermittent treatment for gross refractory obesity. There are unique historical data sets on extreme forms of food restriction that give insight into the consequences of starvation or semi-starvation in previously healthy, but usually non-obese subjects. These include documented medical reports on victims of hunger strike, famine and prisoners of war. Such data provide a detailed account on how the body adapts to prolonged starvation. It has previously been shown that fasting for the biblical period of 40 days and 40 nights is well within the overall physiological capabilities of a healthy adult. However, the specific effects on the human body and mind are less clearly documented, either in the short term (hours) or in the longer term (days). This review asks the following three questions, pertinent to any weight-loss therapy, (i) how effective is the regime in achieving weight loss, (ii) what impact does it have on psychology? and finally, (iii) does it work long-term?

  6. Fasting: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Valter D.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity in part by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions. PMID:24440038

  7. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  8. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    PubMed

    Angeler, David G; Allen, Craig R; Garmestani, Ahjond S; Gunderson, Lance H; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  9. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  10. Adaptation and irreversibility in microevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Stefano; Mazzolini, Andrea; Celani, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Within the framework of population genetics we consider the evolution of an asexual haploid population under the effect of a rapidly varying natural selection (microevolution). We focus on the case in which the environment exerting selection changes stochastically. We derive the effective genotype and fitness dynamics on the slower timescales at which the relevant genetic modifications take place. We find that, despite the fast environmental switches, the population manages to adapt on the fast timescales yielding a finite positive contribution to the fitness. However, such contribution is balanced by the continuous loss in fitness due to the varying selection so that the statistics of the global fitness can be described neglecting the details of the fast environmental process. The occurrence of adaptation on fast timescales would be undetectable if one were to consider only the effective genotype and fitness dynamics on the slow timescales. We therefore propose an experimental observable to detect it.

  11. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  12. Fast and flexible: the cephalopod repertoire.

    PubMed

    Boyle, P

    2000-09-01

    The cephalopods differ remarkably from their molluscan cousins such as snails and bivalves. Fast moving, active predators, they have behavioural and physiological capabilities that stimulate and fascinate marine zoologists. Research on their methods of prey capture and handling, in particular, demonstrates the adaptability of the cephalopod format.

  13. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S; Sundar, Hari; Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  14. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  15. Fast ForWord[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Fast ForWord"[R] is a family of computer-based products. According to the developer's web site, the programs help students develop and strengthen the cognitive skills necessary for successful reading and learning. Participants spend 30 to 100 minutes a day, five days a week, for four to 16 weeks with these adaptive exercises. "Fast ForWord[R]…

  16. Fast food (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Fast foods are quick, reasonably priced, and readily available alternatives to home cooking. While convenient and economical for a busy lifestyle, fast foods are typically high in calories, fat, saturated ...

  17. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  18. Speed adaptation as Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Jose F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2008-10-01

    If the purpose of adaptation is to fit sensory systems to different environments, it may implement an optimization of the system. What the optimum is depends on the statistics of these environments. Therefore, the system should update its parameters as the environment changes. A Kalman-filtering strategy performs such an update optimally by combining current estimations of the environment with those from the past. We investigate whether the visual system uses such a strategy for speed adaptation. We performed a matching-speed experiment to evaluate the time course of adaptation to an abrupt velocity change. Experimental results are in agreement with Kalman-modeling predictions for speed adaptation. When subjects adapt to a low speed and it suddenly increases, the time course of adaptation presents two phases, namely, a rapid decrease of perceived speed followed by a slower phase. In contrast, when speed changes from fast to slow, adaptation presents a single phase. In the Kalman-model simulations, this asymmetry is due to the prevalence of low speeds in natural images. However, this asymmetry disappears both experimentally and in simulations when the adapting stimulus is noisy. In both transitions, adaptation now occurs in a single phase. Finally, the model also predicts the change in sensitivity to speed discrimination produced by the adaptation.

  19. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    PubMed

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting.

  20. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  1. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  2. Three timescales in prism adaptation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masato; Uchimura, Motoaki; Karibe, Ayaka; O'Shea, Jacinta; Rossetti, Yves; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that motor adaptation depends on at least two learning systems, one that learns fast but with poor retention and another that learns slowly but with better retention (Smith MA, Ghazizadeh A, Shadmehr R. PLoS Biol 4: e179, 2006). This two-state model has been shown to account for a range of behavior in the force field adaptation task. In the present study, we examined whether such a two-state model could also account for behavior arising from adaptation to a prismatic displacement of the visual field. We first confirmed that an "adaptation rebound," a critical prediction of the two-state model, occurred when visual feedback was deprived after an adaptation-extinction episode. We then examined the speed of decay of the prism aftereffect (without any visual feedback) after repetitions of 30, 150, and 500 trials of prism exposure. The speed of decay decreased with the number of exposure trials, a phenomenon that was best explained by assuming an "ultraslow" system, in addition to the fast and slow systems. Finally, we compared retention of aftereffects 24 h after 150 or 500 trials of exposure: retention was significantly greater after 500 than 150 trials. This difference in retention could not be explained by the two-state model but was well explained by the three-state model as arising from the difference in the amount of adaptation of the "ultraslow process." These results suggest that there are not only fast and slow systems but also an ultraslow learning system in prism adaptation that is activated by prolonged prism exposure of 150-500 trials.

  3. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  4. fast-matmul

    SciTech Connect

    Grey Ballard, Austin Benson

    2014-11-26

    This software provides implementations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms. These algorithms perform fewer floating point operations than the classical cubic algorithm. The software uses code generation to automatically implement the fast algorithms based on high-level descriptions. The code serves two general purposes. The first is to demonstrate that these fast algorithms can out-perform vendor matrix multiplication algorithms for modest problem sizes on a single machine. The second is to rapidly prototype many variations of fast matrix multiplication algorithms to encourage future research in this area. The implementations target sequential and shared memory parallel execution.

  5. Fast and stable electrical discharge machining (EDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianyang; Zhou, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Jianwei; Zeng, Xiangwei; Xu, Donghui

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve EDM performances, the most important issue is to develop a highly stable control system. As a serious defect in EDM adaptive control system by minimum-variance control law, the occasional instability deterred its full applications in industries. This paper focuses on stabilizing EDM process by establishing a new minimum-variance and pole-placement coupled control law. Based on real-time estimation of EDM process model parameters, this adaptive control system directly controls electrode discharging cycle not only to follow a specified gap state for fast machining but also to track the dynamical response of a reference model for stabilizing EDM process. Confirmation experiment demonstrates that this control system can timely adjust electrode discharging cycle in terms of different machining situations quantified as a series of varied gap states to maintain a stable and fast fabrication. The adaptive control system by this newly developed control law exhibits its superior machining ability and capability of stabilizing sparking process to those of the adaptive control system by minimum-variance control law. The adaptive system has actually theoretically and technically solved the stability issue puzzled EDM circle for decades.

  6. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  7. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  8. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting.

  9. fastKDE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Travis A.; Kashinath, Karthik

    2015-05-22

    This software implements the fast, self-consistent probability density estimation described by O'Brien et al. (2014, doi: ). It uses a non-uniform fast Fourier transform technique to reduce the computational cost of an objective and self-consistent kernel density estimation method.

  10. Fast optical pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cezairliyan, Ared

    1988-01-01

    Design and operation of accurate millisecond and microsecond resolution optical pyrometers developed at the National Bureau of Standards during the last two decades are described. Results of tests are presented and estimates of uncertainties in temperature measurements are given. Calibration methods are discussed and examples of applications of fast pyrometry are given. Ongoing research in developing fast multiwavelength and spatial scanning pyrometers are summarized.

  11. Adaptive hybrid control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecuture is presented. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and it achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal, and it accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  12. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  13. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  14. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  15. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  16. FAST Construction Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, R. D.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, L.; Cai, W. J.; Liu, N.; Xie, J. T.; Zhang, S. X.

    2016-11-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese mega-science project to build the largest single dish radio telescope in the world. A unique karst depression in Guizhou province has been selected as the site to build an active reflector radio telescope with a diameter of 500 m and three outstanding aspects, which enables FAST to have a large sky coverage and the ability of observing astronomical targets with a high precision. Chinese Academy of Sciences and Guizhou province are in charge of FAST construction. The first light of the telescope was expected on September 25, 2016.

  17. FAST joins Breakthrough programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The 180m Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) - the world's largest single-aperture radio receiver - has become part of the Breakthrough Listen programme, which launched in July 2015 to look for intelligent life beyond Earth.

  18. Pneumococcal Disease Fast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About Pneumococcal Types of Infection Risk Factors & Transmission Symptoms & Complications Diagnosis & Treatment Prevention Photos Fast Facts Pneumococcal Vaccination For Clinicians Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Clinical Features Risk Factors Diagnosis & Management Prevention For ...

  19. Calorie count - Fast food

    MedlinePlus

    ... count - fast food FOOD ITEM SERVING SIZE CALORIES Breakfast Foods Dunkin Donuts Egg White Veggie Wrap 1 ... Cheese Biscuit Sandwich 1 sandwich 510 BK Ultimate Breakfast Platter 1 platter 1190 McDonalds Fruit 'n Yogurt ...

  20. FATRAS - the ATLAS Fast Track Simulation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechnich, Jörg; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response is an integral component of any analysis performed with data from the LHC experiments. As these simulated data sets must be both large and precise, their production is a CPU-intensive task. ATLAS has developed full and fast detector simulation techniques to achieve this goal within the computing limits of the collaboration. At the current early stages of data-taking, it is necessary to reprocess the Monte Carlo event samples continuously, while integrating adaptations to the simulation modules in order to improve the agreement with data taken by means of the detector itself. FATRAS is a fast track simulation engine which produces a Monte Carlo simulation based on modules and the geometry of the standard ATLAS track reconstruction algorithm. It can be combined with a fast parametrized-response simulation of the calorimeters. This approach shows a high level of agreement with the full simulation, while achieving a relative timing gain of two orders of magnitude. FATRAS was designed to provide a fast feedback cycle for tuning the MC simulation with real data: this includes the material distribution inside the detector, the integration of misalignment and current conditions, as well as calibration at the hit level. We present the updated and calibrated version of FATRAS based on the first LHC data. Extensive comparisons of the fast track simulation with the full simulation and data at 900 GeV are shown.

  1. Discovery with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P.

    2016-02-01

    FAST offers "transformational" performance well-suited to finding new phenomena - one of which might be polarised spectral transients. But discoveries will only be made if "the system" provides its users with the necessary opportunities. In addition to designing in as much observational flexibility as possible, FAST should be operated with a philosophy which maximises its "human bandwidth". This band includes the astronomers of tomorrow - many of whom not have yet started school or even been born.

  2. Adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  3. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  4. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  5. Intermittent fasting during Ramadan: does it affect sleep?

    PubMed

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Almushailhi, Khalid; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M

    2014-02-01

    Islamic intermittent fasting is distinct from regular voluntary or experimental fasting. We hypothesised that if a regimen of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake is followed during intermittent fasting, the effects of fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness will be minimal. Therefore, we designed this study to objectively assess the effects of Islamic intermittent fasting on sleep architecture and daytime sleepiness. Eight healthy volunteers reported to the Sleep Disorders Centre on five occasions for polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests: (1) during adaptation; (2) 3 weeks before Ramadan, after having performed Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting); (3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline); (4) 2 weeks into Ramadan (Ramadan); and (5) 2 weeks after Ramadan (non-fasting; Recovery). Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the multiple sleep latency test. The participants had a mean age of 26.6 ± 4.9 years, a body mass index of 23.7 ± 3.5 kg m(-2) and an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 7.3 ± 2.7. There was no change in weight or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in the four study periods. The rapid eye movement sleep percentage was significantly lower during fasting. There was no difference in sleep latency, non-rapid eye movement sleep percentage, arousal index and sleep efficiency. The multiple sleep latency test analysis revealed no difference in the sleep latency between the 'non-fasting baseline', 'baseline fasting', 'Ramadan' and 'Recovery' time points. Under conditions of a fixed sleep-wake schedule and a fixed caloric intake, Islamic intermittent fasting results in decreased rapid eye movement sleep with no impact on other sleep stages, the arousal index or daytime sleepiness.

  6. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  7. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  8. ADAPTIVE SMALL-ANIMAL SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, L.R.; Moore, J.W.; Freed, M.; Kupinski, M.A.; Clarkson, E.; Liu, Z.; Wilson, D.W.; Woolfenden, J.M.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    We are exploring the concept of adaptive multimodality imaging, a form of non-linear optimization where the imaging configuration is automatically adjusted in response to the object. Preliminary studies suggest that substantial improvement in objective, task-based measures of image quality can result. We describe here our work to add motorized adjustment capabilities and a matching CT to our existing FastSPECT II system to form an adaptive small-animal SPECT/CT. PMID:26617457

  9. A fast multipole transformation for global climate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.A.; Wang, Z.; Drake, J.B.; Lyon, B.F.; Chen, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    A fast multipole transformation is adapted to the evaluation of summations that occur in global climate calculations when transforming between spatial and spherical harmonic representations. For each summation, the timing of the fast multipole transformation scales linearly with the number of latitude gridpoints, but the timing for direct evaluations scales quadratically. In spite of a larger computational overhead, this scaling advantage renders the fast multipole method faster than direct evaluation for transformations involving greater than approximately 300 to 500 gridpoints. Convergence of the fast multipole transformation is accurate to machine precision. As the resolution in global climate calculations continues to increase, an increasingly large fraction of the computational work involves the transformation between spatial and spherical harmonic representations. The fast multipole transformation offers a significant reduction in computational time for these high-resolution cases.

  10. Cumulative Reconstructor: fast wavefront reconstruction algorithm for Extremely Large Telescopes.

    PubMed

    Rosensteiner, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    The Cumulative Reconstructor (CuRe) is a new direct reconstructor for an optical wavefront from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor measurements. In this paper, the algorithm is adapted to realistic telescope geometries and the transition from modified Hudgin to Fried geometry is discussed. After a discussion of the noise propagation, we analyze the complexity of the algorithm. Our numerical tests confirm that the algorithm is very fast and accurate and can therefore be used for adaptive optics systems of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  11. Organizational Adaptive Capacity: How Much, How Fast, and How Often

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-25

    trained specialty, they are rarely diverted to performing the primary BCT task. A low level example of this would be a personnel clerk in an infantry...entitled “A Discourse on Winning and Losing.” Maxwell AFB, AL: Air University Library, Document no. M-U 43947; U.S. Department of the Army, Operations...31 Eliot A.Cohen and John Gooch, Military Misfortunes: The Anatomy of Failure in War (New York: The Free Press 1990. 32 James G. March and

  12. Fast adaptive uniformisation of the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Mateescu, M; Wolf, V; Didier, F; Henzinger, T A

    2010-11-01

    Within systems biology there is an increasing interest in the stochastic behaviour of biochemical reaction networks. An appropriate stochastic description is provided by the chemical master equation, which represents a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC). The uniformisation technique is an efficient method to compute probability distributions of a CTMC if the number of states is manageable. However, the size of a CTMC that represents a biochemical reaction network is usually far beyond what is feasible. In this study, the authors present an on-the-fly variant of uniformisation, where they improve the original algorithm at the cost of a small approximation error. By means of several examples, the authors show that their approach is particularly well-suited for biochemical reaction networks.

  13. Modified fast frequency acquisition via adaptive least squares algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and the associated apparatus for estimating the amplitude, frequency, and phase of a signal of interest are presented. The method comprises the following steps: (1) inputting the signal of interest; (2) generating a reference signal with adjustable amplitude, frequency and phase at an output thereof; (3) mixing the signal of interest with the reference signal and a signal 90 deg out of phase with the reference signal to provide a pair of quadrature sample signals comprising respectively a difference between the signal of interest and the reference signal and a difference between the signal of interest and the signal 90 deg out of phase with the reference signal; (4) using the pair of quadrature sample signals to compute estimates of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of an error signal comprising the difference between the signal of interest and the reference signal employing a least squares estimation; (5) adjusting the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the reference signal from the numerically controlled oscillator in a manner which drives the error signal towards zero; and (6) outputting the estimates of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the error signal in combination with the reference signal to produce a best estimate of the amplitude, frequency, and phase of the signal of interest. The preferred method includes the step of providing the error signal as a real time confidence measure as to the accuracy of the estimates wherein the closer the error signal is to zero, the higher the probability that the estimates are accurate. A matrix in the estimation algorithm provides an estimate of the variance of the estimation error.

  14. Adaptive equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, S. U. H.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical work which has been effective in improving data transmission by telephone and radio links using adaptive equalization (AE) techniques is reviewed. AE has been applied to reducing the temporal dispersion effects, such as intersymbol interference, caused by the channel accessed. Attention is given to the Nyquist telegraph transmission theory, least mean square error adaptive filtering and the theory and structure of linear receive and transmit filters for reducing error. Optimum nonlinear receiver structures are discussed in terms of optimality criteria as a function of error probability. A suboptimum receiver structure is explored in the form of a decision-feedback equalizer. Consideration is also given to quadrature amplitude modulation and transversal equalization for receivers.

  15. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  16. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  17. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  18. A Fast Hermite Transform.

    PubMed

    Leibon, Gregory; Rockmore, Daniel N; Park, Wooram; Taintor, Robert; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2008-12-17

    We present algorithms for fast and stable approximation of the Hermite transform of a compactly supported function on the real line, attainable via an application of a fast algebraic algorithm for computing sums associated with a three-term relation. Trade-offs between approximation in bandlimit (in the Hermite sense) and size of the support region are addressed. Numerical experiments are presented that show the feasibility and utility of our approach. Generalizations to any family of orthogonal polynomials are outlined. Applications to various problems in tomographic reconstruction, including the determination of protein structure, are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of Fast-Forward Video Visualization.

    PubMed

    Hoferlin, M; Kurzhals, K; Hoferlin, B; Heidemann, G; Weiskopf, D

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate and compare video visualization techniques based on fast-forward. A controlled laboratory user study (n = 24) was conducted to determine the trade-off between support of object identification and motion perception, two properties that have to be considered when choosing a particular fast-forward visualization. We compare four different visualizations: two representing the state-of-the-art and two new variants of visualization introduced in this paper. The two state-of-the-art methods we consider are frame-skipping and temporal blending of successive frames. Our object trail visualization leverages a combination of frame-skipping and temporal blending, whereas predictive trajectory visualization supports motion perception by augmenting the video frames with an arrow that indicates the future object trajectory. Our hypothesis was that each of the state-of-the-art methods satisfies just one of the goals: support of object identification or motion perception. Thus, they represent both ends of the visualization design. The key findings of the evaluation are that object trail visualization supports object identification, whereas predictive trajectory visualization is most useful for motion perception. However, frame-skipping surprisingly exhibits reasonable performance for both tasks. Furthermore, we evaluate the subjective performance of three different playback speed visualizations for adaptive fast-forward, a subdomain of video fast-forward.

  20. Fast ForWord.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Fast ForWord, a CD-ROM and Internet-based training program for children (pre-K to grade 8) with language and reading problems that helps children rapidly build oral language comprehension and other critical skills necessary for learning to read or becoming a better reader. With the help of computers, speech…

  1. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Integral Fast Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative LMR concept, being developed at Argonne National Laboratory, that fully exploits the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel to achieve breakthroughs in economics and inherent safety. This paper describes key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, technology development status, fuel cycle economics potential, and future development path.

  3. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  4. Fifth-wheel fork truck adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1969-01-01

    Standard fifth wheel mounted on a rectangular steel structure adapted for use with a fork lift truck provides a fast, safe, and economical way of maneuvering semitrailers in close quarters at plants and warehouses. One operator can move and locate a semitrailer without dismounting from a fork lift truck.

  5. FAST Science: Teaching Science to Adolescents with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Joyce; Serna, Loretta A.

    1995-01-01

    FAST I (Foundational Approach to Science Teaching I) is an inquiry and inductive-reasoning approach to learning physical science, ecology, and relational study. The program was successfully adapted for middle school students with mild disabilities. Teacher preparation, classroom groupings, behavior management procedures, evaluation, and…

  6. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  7. "Fast" Capitalism and "Fast" Schools: New Realities and New Truths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Susan L.

    This paper locates the phenomenon of self-managing schools within the framework of "fast capitalism" and identifies themes of organization central to fast capitalism, which are argued to also underpin the self-managing schools. "Fast capitalism" refers to the rapidly intensified integration of regionalized productive activities into the global…

  8. PHENIX Fast TOF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Chiu, Mickey; Mannel, Eric; Stoll, Sean; Lynch, Don; Boose, Steve; Northacker, Dave; Alfred, Marcus; Lindesay, James; Chujo, Tatsuya; Inaba, Motoi; Nonaka, Toshihiro; Sato, Wataru; Sakatani, Ikumi; Hirano, Masahiro; Choi, Ihnjea

    2014-01-15

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of PHENIX Fast TOF group who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The goals for this test beam experiment are to verify the timing performance of the two types of time-of-flight detector prototypes.

  9. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  11. Lipid metabolism during fasting.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ekberg, K; Landau, B R

    2001-10-01

    These studies were conducted to understand the relationship between measures of systemic free fatty acid (FFA) reesterification and regional FFA, glycerol, and triglyceride metabolism during fasting. Indirect calorimetry was used to measure fatty acid oxidation in six men after a 60-h fast. Systemic and regional (splanchnic, renal, and leg) FFA ([(3)H]palmitate) and glycerol ([(3)H]glycerol) kinetics, as well as splanchnic triglyceride release, were measured. The rate of systemic FFA reesterification was 366 +/- 93 micromol/min, which was greater (P < 0.05) than splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output (64 +/- 6 micromol/min), a measure of VLDL triglyceride fatty acid export. The majority of glycerol uptake occurred in the splanchnic and renal beds, although some leg glycerol uptake was detected. Systemic FFA release was approximately double that usually present in overnight postabsorptive men, yet the regional FFA release rates were of the same proportions previously observed in overnight postabsorptive men. In conclusion, FFA reesterification at rest during fasting far exceeds splanchnic triglyceride fatty acid output. This indicates that nonhepatic sites of FFA reesterification are important, and that peripheral reesterification of FFA exceeds the rate of simultaneous intracellular triglyceride fatty acid oxidation.

  12. Fast Track Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Fast Track Study supports the efforts of a Special Study Group (SSG) made up of members of the Advanced Project Management Class number 23 (APM-23) that met at the Wallops Island Management Education Center from April 28 - May 8, 1996. Members of the Class expressed interest to Mr. Vem Weyers in having an input to the NASA Policy Document (NPD) 7120.4, that will replace NASA Management Institute (NMI) 7120.4, and the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. The APM-23 SSG was tasked with assisting in development of NASA policy on managing Fast Track Projects, defined as small projects under $150 million and completed within three years. 'Me approach of the APM-23 SSG was to gather data on successful projects working in a 'Better, Faster, Cheaper' environment, within and outside of NASA and develop the Fast Track Project section of the NASA Program/Project Management Guide. Fourteen interviews and four other data gathering efforts were conducted by the SSG, and 16 were conducted by Strategic Resources, Inc. (SRI), including five interviews at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and one at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The interviews were compiled and analyzed for techniques and approaches commonly used to meet severe cost and schedule constraints.

  13. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption

    PubMed Central

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-01-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person’s immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person’s perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence—Geographic Information Systems (GIS)—within that person’s neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant’s neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely

  14. Neighborhood fast food availability and fast food consumption.

    PubMed

    Oexle, Nathalie; Barnes, Timothy L; Blake, Christine E; Bell, Bethany A; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Recent nutritional and public health research has focused on how the availability of various types of food in a person's immediate area or neighborhood influences his or her food choices and eating habits. It has been theorized that people living in areas with a wealth of unhealthy fast-food options may show higher levels of fast-food consumption, a factor that often coincides with being overweight or obese. However, measuring food availability in a particular area is difficult to achieve consistently: there may be differences in the strict physical locations of food options as compared to how individuals perceive their personal food availability, and various studies may use either one or both of these measures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between weekly fast-food consumption and both a person's perceived availability of fast-food and an objective measure of fast-food presence - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - within that person's neighborhood. A randomly selected population-based sample of eight counties in South Carolina was used to conduct a cross-sectional telephone survey assessing self-report fast-food consumption and perceived availability of fast food. GIS was used to determine the actual number of fast-food outlets within each participant's neighborhood. Using multinomial logistic regression analyses, we found that neither perceived availability nor GIS-based presence of fast-food was significantly associated with weekly fast-food consumption. Our findings indicate that availability might not be the dominant factor influencing fast-food consumption. We recommend using subjective availability measures and considering individual characteristics that could influence both perceived availability of fast food and its impact on fast-food consumption. If replicated, our findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing fast-food consumption by limiting neighborhood fast-food availability might not be completely effective.

  15. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to <10 kHz due to large computing overhead and limited photon efficiencies. Moreover most use zonal wavefront sensors which cannot easily handle extreme scintillation or unexpected obscuration of a pre-set aperture. Here we present a compact, lightweight adaptive optics system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be

  16. Adaptive Control for Uncertain Nonlinear Multi-Input Multi-Output Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chengyu (Inventor); Hovakimyan, Naira (Inventor); Xargay, Enric (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods of adaptive control for uncertain nonlinear multi-input multi-output systems in the presence of significant unmatched uncertainty with assured performance are provided. The need for gain-scheduling is eliminated through the use of bandwidth-limited (low-pass) filtering in the control channel, which appropriately attenuates the high frequencies typically appearing in fast adaptation situations and preserves the robustness margins in the presence of fast adaptation.

  17. Fast quench reactor method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.; Berry, Ray A.

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  18. Simplified fast neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    1979-01-01

    Direct fast-neutron-induced recoil and alpha particle tracks in polycarbonate films may be enlarged for direct visual observation and automated counting procedures employing electrochemical etching techniques. Electrochemical etching is, for example, carried out in a 28% KOH solution at room temperature by applying a 2000 V peak-to-peak voltage at 1 kHz frequency. Such recoil particle amplification can be used for the detection of wide neutron dose ranges from 1 mrad. to 1000 rads. or higher, if desired.

  19. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  20. The fast encryption package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Matt

    1988-01-01

    The organization of some tools to help improve passwork security at a UNIX-based site is described along with how to install and use them. These tools and their associated library enable a site to force users to pick reasonably safe passwords (safe being site configurable) and to enable site management to try to crack existing passworks. The library contains various versions of a very fast implementation of the Data Encryption Standard and of the one-way encryption functions used to encryp the password.

  1. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  2. FAST NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Snell, A.H.

    1957-12-01

    This patent relates to a reactor and process for carrying out a controlled fast neutron chain reaction. A cubical reactive mass, weighing at least 920 metric tons, of uranium metal containing predominantly U/sup 238/ and having a U/sup 235/ content of at least 7.63% is assembled and the maximum neutron reproduction ratio is limited to not substantially over 1.01 by insertion and removal of a varying amount of boron, the reactive mass being substantially freed of moderator.

  3. Fast quench reactor method

    SciTech Connect

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  4. Post-fasting olfactory, transcriptional, and feeding responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Farhadian, Shelli F; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cho, Christine E; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2012-01-18

    The sensation of hunger after a period of fasting and of satiety after eating is crucial to behavioral regulation of food intake, but the biological mechanisms regulating these sensations are incompletely understood. We studied the behavioral and physiological adaptations to fasting in the vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster). Here we show that both male and female flies increased their rate of food intake transiently in the post-fasted state. Although the basal feeding rate was higher in females than males, the magnitude of the post-fasting feeding response was the same in both sexes. Flies returned to a stable baseline feeding rate within 12 h after return to food for males and 24 h for females. This modulation in feeding was accompanied by a significant increase in the size of the crop organ of the digestive system, suggesting that fasted flies responded both by increasing their food intake and storing reserve food in their crop. Flies demonstrated increased behavioral attraction to an attractive odor when food-deprived. Expression profiling of head, body, and chemosensory tissues by microarray analysis revealed 415 genes regulated by fasting after 24 h and 723 genes after 48 h, with downregulated genes outnumbering upregulated genes in each tissue and fasting time point. These transcriptional changes showed rich temporal dynamics and affected genes across multiple functional gene ontology categories. These observations suggest that a coordinated transcriptional response to internal physiological state may regulate both ingestive behaviors and chemosensory perception of food.

  5. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  6. Effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start swimming performance of southern catfish Silurus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Yan, G J; He, X K; Cao, Z D; Fu, S J

    2015-01-21

    This study investigated the effects of fasting and feeding on the fast-start escape swimming performance of juvenile southern catfish Silurus meridionalis, a sit-and-wait forager that encounters extreme fasting and famine frequently during its lifespan. Ten to 30 days of fasting resulted in no significant change in most of the variables measured in the fast-start response except a 20-30% decrease in the escape distance during the first 120 ms (D120ms ) relative to the control group (48 h after feeding). The ratio of the single-bend (SB) response (lower energetic expenditure) to the double-bend (DB) response increased significantly from 0% in the control group to 75 and 82·5% in the 20 and 30 day fasting groups, respectively. Satiated feeding (25% of body mass) resulted in a significantly lower (36·6%) maximum linear velocity (Vmax ) and a significantly lower (43·3%) D120ms than in non-fed fish (control group, 48 h after feeding). Half-satiated feeding (12·5% of body mass), however, showed no significant effects on any of the measured variables of the fast-start response relative to control fish. It is suggested that the increase in the ratio of SB:DB responses with fasting in S. meridionalis may reflect a trade-off between energy conservation and maintaining high Vmax , while variables of fast-start performance were more sensitive to feeding than fasting might be an adaptive strategy to their foraging mode and food availability in their habitat.

  7. Fast-Acting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, Bogdan V. (Inventor); Pegg, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fast-acting valve includes an annular valve seat that defines an annular valve orifice between the edges of the annular valve seat, an annular valve plug sized to cover the valve orifice when the valve is closed, and a valve-plug holder for moving the annular valve plug on and off the annular valve seat. The use of an annular orifice reduces the characteristic distance between the edges of the valve seat. Rather than this distance being equal to the diameter of the orifice, as it is for a conventional circular orifice, the characteristic distance equals the distance between the inner and outer radii (for a circular annulus). The reduced characteristic distance greatly reduces the gap required between the annular valve plug and the annular valve seat for the valve to be fully open, thereby greatly reducing the required stroke and corresponding speed and acceleration of the annular valve plug. The use of a valve-plug holder that is under independent control to move the annular valve plug between its open and closed positions is important for achieving controllable fast operation of the valve.

  8. Fast SCR Thyratron Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

  9. Islamic fasting and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Month-long daytime Ramadan fasting pose s major challenges to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Muslim countries. Physicians should have practical knowledge on the implications of fasting on MS. We present a summary of database searches (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed) and a mini-symposium on Ramadan fasting and MS. In this symposium, we aimed to review the effect of fasting on MS and suggest practical guidelines on management. Discussion In general, fasting is possible for most stable patients. Appropriate amendment of drug regimens, careful monitoring of symptoms, as well as providing patients with available evidence on fasting and MS are important parts of management. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that calorie restriction before disease induction reduces inflammation and subsequent demyelination and attenuates disease severity. Fasting does not appear to have unfavorable effects on disease course in patients with mild disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score ≤3). Most experts believed that during fasting (especially in summer), some MS symptoms (fatigue, fatigue perception, dizziness, spasticity, cognitive problems, weakness, vision, balance, gait) might worsen but return to normal levels during feasting. There was a general consensus that fasting is not safe for patients: on high doses of anti-convulsants, anti-spastics, and corticosteroids; with coagulopathy or active disease; during attacks; with EDSS score ≥7. Summary These data suggest that MS patients should have tailored care. Fasting in MS patients is a challenge that is directly associated with the spiritual belief of the patient. PMID:24655543

  10. Fast Food Jobs. National Study of Fast Food Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined employment in the fast-food industry. The national survey collected data from employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies. Female employees outnumbered males by two to one. The ages of those fast-food employees in the survey sample ranged from 14 to 71, with fully 70 percent being in the 16- to 20-year-old age…

  11. Mass Loss Rates of Fasting Polar Bears.

    PubMed

    Pilfold, Nicholas W; Hedman, Daryll; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Lunn, Nicholas J; Richardson, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have adapted to an annual cyclic regime of feeding and fasting, which is extreme in seasonal sea ice regions of the Arctic. As a consequence of climate change, sea ice breakup has become earlier and the duration of the open-water period through which polar bears must rely on fat reserves has increased. To date, there is limited empirical data with which to evaluate the potential energetic capacity of polar bears to withstand longer fasts. We measured the incoming and outgoing mass of inactive polar bears (n = 142) that were temporarily detained by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship during the open-water period near the town of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, in 2009-2014. Polar bears were given access to water but not food and held for a median length of 17 d. Median mass loss rates were 1.0 kg/d, while median mass-specific loss rates were 0.5%/d, similar to other species with high adiposity and prolonged fasting capacities. Mass loss by unfed captive adult males was identical to that lost by free-ranging individuals, suggesting that terrestrial feeding contributes little to offset mass loss. The inferred metabolic rate was comparable to a basal mammalian rate, suggesting that while on land, polar bears can maintain a depressed metabolic rate to conserve energy. Finally, we estimated time to starvation for subadults and adult males for the on-land period. Results suggest that at 180 d of fasting, 56%-63% of subadults and 18%-24% of adult males in this study would die of starvation. Results corroborate previous assessments on the limits of polar bear capacity to withstand lengthening ice-free seasons and emphasize the greater sensitivity of subadults to changes in sea ice phenology.

  12. Adaptive refinement tools for tetrahedral unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul (Inventor); Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment providing one or more improvements includes software which is robust, efficient, and has a very fast run time for user directed grid enrichment and flow solution adaptive grid refinement. All user selectable options (e.g., the choice of functions, the choice of thresholds, etc.), other than a pre-marked cell list, can be entered on the command line. The ease of application is an asset for flow physics research and preliminary design CFD analysis where fast grid modification is often needed to deal with unanticipated development of flow details.

  13. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  14. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  15. Fast thyratron driver

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Cassel, R.L.

    1991-04-01

    A fast solid-state pulse generator used as a thyratron grid driver for kicker pulsers, has been developed and built with power MOSFETs and a transmission line transformer. The MOSFET, pulsed on and off by a pair of P-N channel HEXFETs, switches charged capacitors into the transformer connected in parallel on one end and in series on the other end to step up the voltage. The resulting output pulse parameters are 2 kilovolts peak (into 50 Ohms), 13 nanoseconds risetime (10--90%), 250 nanoseconds duration, and less than 50 picoseconds pulse-to-pulse jitter. Various methods are employed to protect the MOSFETs from thyratron arc back, including the use of TransZorbs and a magnetic diode. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  16. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  17. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological origin. Current best estimates for the rate of FRBs is several thousand per sky per day at radio frequencies near 1.4 GHz. Even with so high a rate, to date, fewer than 20 FRBs have been reported, with one source showing repeated bursts. In this talk I will describe known FRB properties including what is known about the lone repeating source, as well as models for the origin of these mysterious events. I will also describe the CHIME radio telescope, currently under construction in Canada. Thanks to its great sensitivity and unprecedented field-of-view, CHIME promises major progress on FRBs.

  18. A fast feedback controlled magnetic drive for the ASDEX Upgrade fast-ion loss detectors.

    PubMed

    Ayllon-Guerola, J; Gonzalez-Martin, J; Garcia-Munoz, M; Rivero-Rodriguez, J; Herrmann, A; Vorbrugg, S; Leitenstern, P; Zoletnik, S; Galdon, J; Garcia Lopez, J; Rodriguez-Ramos, M; Sanchis-Sanchez, L; Dominguez, A D; Kocan, M; Gunn, J P; Garcia-Vallejo, D; Dominguez, J

    2016-11-01

    A magnetically driven fast-ion loss detector system for the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has been designed and will be presented here. The device is feedback controlled to adapt the detector head position to the heat load and physics requirements. Dynamic simulations have been performed taking into account effects such as friction, coil self-induction, and eddy currents. A real time positioning control algorithm to maximize the detector operational window has been developed. This algorithm considers dynamical behavior and mechanical resistance as well as measured and predicted thermal loads. The mechanical design and real time predictive algorithm presented here may be used for other reciprocating systems.

  19. A fast feedback controlled magnetic drive for the ASDEX Upgrade fast-ion loss detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayllon-Guerola, J.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Rivero-Rodriguez, J.; Herrmann, A.; Vorbrugg, S.; Leitenstern, P.; Zoletnik, S.; Galdon, J.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Dominguez, A. D.; Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Garcia-Vallejo, D.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-11-01

    A magnetically driven fast-ion loss detector system for the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak has been designed and will be presented here. The device is feedback controlled to adapt the detector head position to the heat load and physics requirements. Dynamic simulations have been performed taking into account effects such as friction, coil self-induction, and eddy currents. A real time positioning control algorithm to maximize the detector operational window has been developed. This algorithm considers dynamical behavior and mechanical resistance as well as measured and predicted thermal loads. The mechanical design and real time predictive algorithm presented here may be used for other reciprocating systems.

  20. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion.

    PubMed

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C

    2016-03-22

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing.

  1. Molecular Adaptation during Adaptive Radiation in the Hawaiian Endemic Genus Schiedea

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Maxim V.; Filatov, Dmitry A.

    2006-01-01

    Background “Explosive” adaptive radiations on islands remain one of the most puzzling evolutionary phenomena. The rate of phenotypic and ecological adaptations is extremely fast during such events, suggesting that many genes may be under fairly strong selection. However, no evidence for adaptation at the level of protein coding genes was found, so it has been suggested that selection may work mainly on regulatory elements. Here we report the first evidence that positive selection does operate at the level of protein coding genes during rapid adaptive radiations. We studied molecular adaptation in Hawaiian endemic plant genus Schiedea (Caryophyllaceae), which includes closely related species with a striking range of morphological and ecological forms, varying from rainforest vines to woody shrubs growing in desert-like conditions on cliffs. Given the remarkable difference in photosynthetic performance between Schiedea species from different habitats, we focused on the “photosynthetic” Rubisco enzyme, the efficiency of which is known to be a limiting step in plant photosynthesis. Results We demonstrate that the chloroplast rbcL gene, encoding the large subunit of Rubisco enzyme, evolved under strong positive selection in Schiedea. Adaptive amino acid changes occurred in functionally important regions of Rubisco that interact with Rubisco activase, a chaperone which promotes and maintains the catalytic activity of Rubisco. Interestingly, positive selection acting on the rbcL might have caused favorable cytotypes to spread across several Schiedea species. Significance We report the first evidence for adaptive changes at the DNA and protein sequence level that may have been associated with the evolution of photosynthetic performance and colonization of new habitats during a recent adaptive radiation in an island plant genus. This illustrates how small changes at the molecular level may change ecological species performance and helps us to understand the

  2. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  3. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  4. Savings in locomotor adaptation explained by changes in learning parameters following initial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mawase, Firas; Shmuelof, Lior; Bar-Haim, Simona; Karniel, Amir

    2014-04-01

    Faster relearning of an external perturbation, savings, offers a behavioral linkage between motor learning and memory. To explain savings effects in reaching adaptation experiments, recent models suggested the existence of multiple learning components, each shows different learning and forgetting properties that may change following initial learning. Nevertheless, the existence of these components in rhythmic movements with other effectors, such as during locomotor adaptation, has not yet been studied. Here, we study savings in locomotor adaptation in two experiments; in the first, subjects adapted to speed perturbations during walking on a split-belt treadmill, briefly adapted to a counter-perturbation and then readapted. In a second experiment, subjects readapted after a prolonged period of washout of initial adaptation. In both experiments we find clear evidence for increased learning rates (savings) during readaptation. We show that the basic error-based multiple timescales linear state space model is not sufficient to explain savings during locomotor adaptation. Instead, we show that locomotor adaptation leads to changes in learning parameters, so that learning rates are faster during readaptation. Interestingly, we find an intersubject correlation between the slow learning component in initial adaptation and the fast learning component in the readaptation phase, suggesting an underlying mechanism for savings. Together, these findings suggest that savings in locomotion and in reaching may share common computational and neuronal mechanisms; both are driven by the slow learning component and are likely to depend on cortical plasticity.

  5. Fast word reading in pure alexia: "fast, yet serial".

    PubMed

    Bormann, Tobias; Wolfer, Sascha; Hachmann, Wibke; Neubauer, Claudia; Konieczny, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Pure alexia is a severe impairment of word reading in which individuals process letters serially with a pronounced length effect. Yet, there is considerable variation in the performance of alexic readers with generally very slow, but also occasionally fast responses, an observation addressed rarely in previous reports. It has been suggested that "fast" responses in pure alexia reflect residual parallel letter processing or that they may even be subserved by an independent reading system. Four experiments assessed fast and slow reading in a participant (DN) with pure alexia. Two behavioral experiments investigated frequency, neighborhood, and length effects in forced fast reading. Two further experiments measured eye movements when DN was forced to read quickly, or could respond faster because words were easier to process. Taken together, there was little support for the proposal that "qualitatively different" mechanisms or reading strategies underlie both types of responses in DN. Instead, fast responses are argued to be generated by the same serial-reading strategy.

  6. An enhanced fast scanning algorithm for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Ahmed Naser; Yusof, Yuhanis binti

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is an essential and important process that separates an image into regions that have similar characteristics or features. This will transform the image for a better image analysis and evaluation. An important benefit of segmentation is the identification of region of interest in a particular image. Various algorithms have been proposed for image segmentation and this includes the Fast Scanning algorithm which has been employed on food, sport and medical images. It scans all pixels in the image and cluster each pixel according to the upper and left neighbor pixels. The clustering process in Fast Scanning algorithm is performed by merging pixels with similar neighbor based on an identified threshold. Such an approach will lead to a weak reliability and shape matching of the produced segments. This paper proposes an adaptive threshold function to be used in the clustering process of the Fast Scanning algorithm. This function used the gray'value in the image's pixels and variance Also, the level of the image that is more the threshold are converted into intensity values between 0 and 1, and other values are converted into intensity values zero. The proposed enhanced Fast Scanning algorithm is realized on images of the public and private transportation in Iraq. Evaluation is later made by comparing the produced images of proposed algorithm and the standard Fast Scanning algorithm. The results showed that proposed algorithm is faster in terms the time from standard fast scanning.

  7. Fast pitch softball injuries.

    PubMed

    Meyers, M C; Brown, B R; Bloom, J A

    2001-01-01

    The popularity of fast pitch softball in the US and throughout the world is well documented. Along with this popularity, there has been a concomitant increase in the number of injuries. Nearly 52% of cases qualify as major disabling injuries requiring 3 weeks or more of treatment and 2% require surgery. Interestingly, 75% of injuries occur during away games and approximately 31% of traumas occur during nonpositional and conditioning drills. Injuries range from contusions and tendinitis to ligamentous disorders and fractures. Although head and neck traumas account for 4 to 12% of cases, upper extremity traumas account for 23 to 47% of all injuries and up to 19% of cases involve the knee. Approximately 34 to 42% of injuries occur when the athlete collides with another individual or object. Other factors involved include the quality of playing surface, athlete's age and experience level, and the excessive physical demands associated with the sport. Nearly 24% of injuries involve base running and are due to poor judgement, sliding technique, current stationary base design, unorthodox joint and extremity position during ground impact and catching of cleats. The increasing prevalence of overtraining syndrome among athletes has been attributed to an unclear definition of an optimal training zone, poor communication between player and coach, and the limited ability of bone and connective tissue to quickly respond to match the demands of the sport. This has led routinely to arm, shoulder and lumbar instability, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and time loss injuries in 45% of pitching staff during a single season. Specific attention to a safer playing environment, coaching and player education, and sport-specific training and conditioning would reduce the risk, rate and severity of fast pitch traumas. Padding of walls, backstops, rails and dugout areas, as well as minimising use of indoor facilities, is suggested to decrease the number of collision

  8. Fasting activates the gene expression of UCP3 independent of genes necessary for lipid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tunstall, Rebecca J; Mehan, Kate A; Hargreaves, Mark; Spriet, Lawrence L; Cameron-Smith, David

    2002-06-07

    Fasting triggers a complex array of adaptive metabolic and hormonal responses including an augmentation in the capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) oxidation in skeletal muscle. This study hypothesized that this adaptive response is mediated by increased mRNA of key genes central to the regulation of fat oxidation in human skeletal muscle. Fasting dramatically increased UCP3 gene expression, by 5-fold at 15 h and 10-fold at 40 h. However the expression of key genes responsible for the uptake, transport, oxidation, and re-esterification of FA remained unchanged following 15 and 40 h of fasting. Likewise there was no change in the mRNA abundance of transcription factors. This suggests a unique role for UCP3 in the regulation of FA homeostasis during fasting as adaptation to 40 h of fasting does not require alterations in the expression of other genes necessary for lipid metabolism.

  9. Fast dual tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion, Philip M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects “bad data” which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model.In this paper, I will derive basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  10. Fast foldable tent domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägers, Aswin P. L.; Sliepen, Guus; Bettonvil, Felix C. M.; Hammerschlag, Robert H.

    2008-07-01

    In the near future ELTs (Extreme Large Telescopes) will be built. Preferably these telescopes should operate without obstructions in the near surrounding to reach optimal seeing conditions and avoid large turbulences with wind-gust accelerations around large obstacles. This applies also to future large solar telescopes. At present two foldable dome prototypes have been built on the Canary Islands: the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT, La Palma) and the GREGOR Telescope (Tenerife), having a diameter of 7 and 9 meter, respectively. The domes are usually fully retracted during observations. The research consists of measurements on the two domes. New camera systems are developed and placed inside the domes for precise dome deformation measurements within 0.1 mm over the whole dome size. Simultaneously, a variety of wind-speed and -direction sensors measure the wind field around the dome. In addition, fast sensitive air-pressure sensors placed on the supporting bows measure the wind pressure. The aim is to predict accurately the expected forces and deformations on up-scaled, fully retractable domes to make their construction more economically. The dimensions of 7 and 9 meter are large enough for realistic on-site tests in gusty wind and will give much more information than wind tunnel experiments.

  11. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  12. Glycemic management during Jain fasts

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep; Sachan, Alok; Bajaj, Sarita; Sahay, Rakesh; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet; Saboo, Banshi; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Baruah, Manash P.; Parmar, Girish; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    This review describes the various fasts observed by adherents of the Jain religion. It attempts to classify them according to their suitability for people with diabetes and suggests appropriate regime and dose modification for those observing these fasts. The review is an endeavor to encourage rational and evidence-based management in this field of diabetology. PMID:28217525

  13. Adaptive Algorithms for HF Antenna Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    SUBJECT TERMS (Contnue on reverse dfnoceaq and identiy by bkICk numnber) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP HP Adaptive Arrays HrF Comunications Systems 4 HP...Although their heavy computational load renders them impractical *1 for many applications, the advancements in cheap, fast digital hardware have...or digital form. For many applications, the LMS algorithm represents a good trade off between speed of convergence* and implementational The speed of

  14. Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm that effects fast lossless compression of multispectral-image data is based on low-complexity, proven adaptive-filtering algorithms. This algorithm is intended for use in compressing multispectral-image data aboard spacecraft for transmission to Earth stations. Variants of this algorithm could be useful for lossless compression of three-dimensional medical imagery and, perhaps, for compressing image data in general.

  15. Fast Color Change with Photochromic Fused Naphthopyrans.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Céu M; Berthet, Jerome; Delbaere, Stephanie; Polónia, André; Coelho, Paulo J

    2015-12-18

    Photochromic molecules can reversibly develop color upon irradiation with UV light. These smart molecules, mainly in the naphthopyran family, have been applied with success to ophthalmic lenses that darken quickly under sunlight and revert to the uncolored state after several minutes in the dark. This slow adaptation to the absence of light is one of the limitations and is due to the formation of an unwanted photoisomer. We have designed a new naphthopyran with a bridged structure which prohibits the formation of the undesirable, persistent photoisomer and thus shows a very fast switching between the uncolored and colored states. UV irradiation of a hybrid siloxane matrix doped with the new fused naphthopyran leads to the formation of a pink coloration bleaching in a few milliseconds, in the absence of light, at room temperature. This new fused naphthopyran is easily prepared in three steps from readily accessible precursors and is amenable to structural modifications to tailor color and lifetime of the colored photoisomer.

  16. Metabolic and hormonal response to chronic maternal fasting in the ewe.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, R L; Lemons, J A; Gresham, E L

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolic adaptations of the fetus during maternal starvation and to determine the changes of plasma insulin and glucagon concentrations in the fed state and during severe maternal fasting in the chronic fetal sheep preparation. Maternal fasting resulted in a decrease in maternal and fetal plasma glucose as well as a decrease in fetal plasma fructose. Fetal-maternal arterial urea concentration differences increased with maternal fasting, suggesting increased fetal amino acid catabolism. Both maternal anf fetal plasma insulin decreased parallel to the decrease in plasma glucose concentration. Maternal glucagon did not change significantly during fasting and with a short-term fast there was no change in fetal glucagon concentration. However, by 6 days of fasting, the fetal glucagon concentration tended to increase.

  17. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  18. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  19. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  20. Fast optical measurement of intraocular straylight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Harilaos; Sahin, Onurcan; Artal, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Light scattering in the human eye can deteriorate image quality and limit visual performance especially at the presence of a glare source. Optical measurement of straylight in the human eye is a challenging task where issues related to various inherent artifacts must be addressed. We report on a novel instrument based on the principle of double-pass optical integration that has been adapted for fast measurements suitable for a clinical setting. The instrument utilizes a light source formed by an array of green light emitting diodes that is projected onto the ocular fundus. The source has two concentric parts, a disk (field angle 0-3 degrees) and an annulus (3 - 8 degrees) that are modulated at different frequencies. A silicon photomultiplier receives the light reflected from the central part of the fundus and the Fourier transform of the signal reveals the contribution of each part of the source. Their relative amplitude is used to quantify light scattering by means of the straylight parameter. The instrument was initially validated using known diffusers. Straylight in a cohort of cataract patients (N=39) was measured. The optically measured straylight parameter was correlated to the clinical cataract grade as well to the psychophysically estimated value. The measurement method, utilizing rotational symmetry and coding filed angles with different frequencies eliminates the need for a highperformance camera and allows fast measurements. This approach can be further advanced with multiple wavelengths and field angles to perform other measurements such as that of the macular pigment density.

  1. Fast compression implementation for hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihara, Hiroki; Yoshida, Jun; Ishida, Juro; Takada, Jun; Senda, Yuzo; Suzuki, Makoto; Seki, Taeko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Ohgi, Nagamitsu

    2010-11-01

    Fast and small foot print lossless image compressors aiming at hyper-spectral sensor for the earth observation satellite have been developed. Since more than one hundred channels are required for hyper-spectral sensors on optical observation satellites, fast compression algorithm with small foot print implementation is essential for reducing encoder size and weight resulting in realizing light-weight and small-size sensor system. The image compression method should have low complexity in order to reduce size and weight of the sensor signal processing unit, power consumption and fabrication cost. Coding efficiency and compression speed enables enlargement of the capacity of signal compression channels, which resulted in reducing signal compression channels onboard by multiplexing sensor signal channels into reduced number of compression channels. The employed method is based on FELICS1, which is hierarchical predictive coding method with resolution scaling. To improve FELICS's performance of image decorrelation and entropy coding, we applied two-dimensional interpolation prediction and adaptive Golomb-Rice coding, which enables small footprint. It supports progressive decompression using resolution scaling, whilst still delivering superior performance as measured by speed and complexity. The small footprint circuitry is embedded into the hyper-spectral sensor data formatter. In consequence, lossless compression function has been added without additional size and weight.

  2. Glucagon receptors: effect of exercise and fasting.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Carole

    2005-06-01

    One paradox of hormonal regulation during exercise is the maintenance of glucose homeostasis after endurance training despite a lower increase in plasma glucagon. One explanation could be that liver sensitivity to glucagon is increased by endurance training. Glucagon exerts its effect through a 62 KDa glycoprotein receptor, member of the G protein-coupled receptor. To determine whether changes with exercise in glucagon sensitivity occurred at the level of the glucagon receptor (GR), binding characteristics of hepatic glucagon receptors were ascertained in rat purified plasma membranes. Saturation kinetics indicated no difference in the dissociation constant or affinity of glucagon receptor, but a significantly higher glucagon receptor binding density in liver in endurance trained compared to untrained animals. Along with endurance training, it appears that fasting also changes GR binding characteristics. In animals fasting 24 hrs, a significant increase in glucagon receptor density was also reported. Although the exact mechanism remains unknown, there is no doubt that the liver can adapt to physiological stress through modulation of GR binding characteristics to enhance the hepatic glucose production responsiveness to glucagon.

  3. VLSI Implementation Of The Fast Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Paul M.; Ku, Walter H.

    1986-03-01

    A VLSI implementation of a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processor consisting of a mesh interconnection of complex floating-point butterfly units is presented. The Cooley-Tukey radix-2 Decimation-In-Frequency (DIF) formulation of the FFT was chosen since it offered the best overall compromise between the need for fast and efficient algorithmic computation and the need for a structure amenable to VLSI layout. Thus the VLSI implementation is modular, regular, expandable to various problem sizes and has a simple systolic flow of data and control. To evaluate the FFT architecture, VLSI area-time complexity concepts are used, but are now adapted to a complex floating-point number system rather than the usual integer ring representation. We show by our construction that the Thompson area-time optimum bound for the VLSI computation of an N-point FFT, area-time2oc = ORNlogN)1+a] can be attained by an alternative number representation, and hence the theoretical bound is a tight bound regardless of number system representation.

  4. A Method to Teach Age-Specific Demography with Field Grown Rapid Cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Martin G.; Terrana, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that rapid cycling "Brassica rapa" (Wisconsin Fast Plants) can be used in inquiry-based, student ecological fieldwork. We are the first to describe age-specific survival for field-grown Fast Plants and identify life history traits associated with individual survival. This experiment can be adapted by educators as a…

  5. Long Range Fast Tool Servo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-31

    AD-A271 614 r, FINAL REPORT w to I OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH [I on * LONG RANGE FAST TOOL SERVO I ONR CONTRACT NO. N00014-92-J-4082-PII Covering the...n I I 1 INTRODUCTION The PEC’s MAC 100 Fast Tool Servo (FTS) System has demonstrated the efficacy of fabricating off-axis parabolic segments on axis...by utilizing a fast tool motion to machine non-rotationally symmetric surfaces [1]. The key to this technique was a servo for the tool motion that had

  6. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  7. A Parallel Implementation of Multilevel Recursive Spectral Bisection for Application to Adaptive Unstructured Meshes. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Stephen T.; Simon, Horst; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The design of a parallel implementation of multilevel recursive spectral bisection is described. The goal is to implement a code that is fast enough to enable dynamic repartitioning of adaptive meshes.

  8. Adaptive filter design using recurrent cerebellar model articulation controller.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Chen, Li-Yang; Yeung, Daniel S

    2010-07-01

    A novel adaptive filter is proposed using a recurrent cerebellar-model-articulation-controller (CMAC). The proposed locally recurrent globally feedforward recurrent CMAC (RCMAC) has favorable properties of small size, good generalization, rapid learning, and dynamic response, thus it is more suitable for high-speed signal processing. To provide fast training, an efficient parameter learning algorithm based on the normalized gradient descent method is presented, in which the learning rates are on-line adapted. Then the Lyapunov function is utilized to derive the conditions of the adaptive learning rates, so the stability of the filtering error can be guaranteed. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed adaptive RCMAC filter, it is applied to a nonlinear channel equalization system and an adaptive noise cancelation system. The advantages of the proposed filter over other adaptive filters are verified through simulations.

  9. Serum corticosteroid binding globulin expression is modulated by fasting in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Obbard, Martyn E; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from several subpopulations undergo extended fasting during the ice-free season. However, the animals appear to conserve protein despite the prolonged fasting, though the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We hypothesized that elevated concentrations of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary cortisol binding protein in circulation, lead to cortisol resistance and provide a mechanism for protein conservation during extended fasting. The metabolic state (feeding vs. fasting) of 16 field sampled male polar bears was determined based on their serum urea to creatinine ratio (>25 for feeding vs. <5 for fasting). There were no significant differences in serum cortisol levels between all male and female polar bears sampled. Serum CBG expression was greater in lactating females relative to non-lactating females and males. CBG expression was significantly higher in fasting males when compared to non-fasting males. This leads us to suggest that CBG expression may serve as a mechanism to conserve protein during extended fasting in polar bears by reducing systemic free cortisol concentrations. This was further supported by a lower serum glucose concentration in the fasting bears. As well, a lack of an enhanced adrenocortical response to acute capture stress supports our hypothesis that chronic hunger is not a stressor in this species. Overall, our results suggest that elevated serum CBG expression may be an important adaptation to spare proteins by limiting cortisol bioavailability during extended fasting in polar bears.

  10. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health ... Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile Application Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  11. FastStats: Sinus Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . FastStats Homepage Diseases and Conditions Anemia or Iron Deficiency Arthritis ... Statistics Tables for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2014, Table A-2 [PDF - 219 KB] Physician ...

  12. Fast Food: Tips for Choosing Healthier Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... make wise meal choices when going to a fast-food restaurant. By Mayo Clinic Staff Does following ... or healthy diet mean you must swear off fast food? Not necessarily. An occasional stop for fast ...

  13. Fasting in paediatric ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, Seija; Suominen, Tarja

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine how preoperative fasting and postoperative termination of the fast was experienced in ambulatory surgery by child patients and their mothers. The target group consisted of children (n = 12, age 2-10 years) who had undergone tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, and their mothers. In the interviews, the mothers were asked to describe the problems connected with their child's preoperative fast and postoperative termination of the fast, as well as the things that went well in the process. Content analysis was carried out inductively. Preoperatively, the children were thirsty and anxious, but understood the fasting situation well. In some cases, there were conflicts between the child and his/her parent if fasting was prolonged. Parents also had doubts about their ability to implement the child's fast. Postoperatively, children had pains in their throats and stomachs, suffered from nausea, and had difficulty taking in nutrition and medication. Parents had worries about their child's home care, such as food intake and administration of pain medication. The possibility of postoperative bleeding and exacerbation of the child's condition was also worrying for the parents. The most evident result of the study was that parents need more information before their child's operation. Preparing the child for the operation by giving him/her nutrition as long as permitted enhances postoperative recovery and improves parents' control over the ambulatory surgical experience. Nurses should take a more active part in children's perioperative fasting and preoperative preparation of children and their parents. In further research, experimental studies should be designed in order to receive more evidence-based information for clinical practice.

  14. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    PubMed

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  15. Fast-Tracking Colostomy Closures.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2015-12-01

    There have been very few studies on applying fast-track principles to colostomy closures. We believe that outcome may be significantly improved with multimodal interventions in the peri-operative care of patients undergoing this procedure. A retrospective study was carried out comparing patients who had undergone colostomy closures by the fast-track and traditional care protocols at our centre. We intended to analyse peri-operative period and recovery in colostomy closures to confirm that fast-track surgery principles improved outcomes. Twenty-six patients in the fast-track arm and 24 patients in the traditional care arm had undergone colostomy closures. Both groups were comparable in terms of their baseline parameters. Patients in the fast-track group were ambulatory and accepted oral feeding earlier. There was a significant reduction in the duration of stay (4.73 ± 1.43 days vs. 7.21 ± 1.38 days, p = 0.0000). We did not observe a rise in complications or 30-day re-admissions. Fast-track surgery can safely be applied to colostomy closures. It shows earlier ambulation and reduction in length of hospital stay.

  16. Volumetric imaging of fast biological dynamics in deep tissue via wavefront engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    To reveal fast biological dynamics in deep tissue, we combine two wavefront engineering methods that were developed in our laboratory, namely optical phase-locked ultrasound lens (OPLUL) based volumetric imaging and iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique (IMPACT). OPLUL is used to generate oscillating defocusing wavefront for fast axial scanning, and IMPACT is used to compensate the wavefront distortions for deep tissue imaging. We show its promising applications in neuroscience and immunology.

  17. Educational Multimedia Profiling Recommendations for Device-Aware Adaptive Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moldovan, Arghir-Nicolae; Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is seeing a fast adoption with the increasing availability and affordability of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. As the creation and consumption of educational multimedia content on mobile devices is also increasing fast, educators and mobile learning providers are faced with the challenge to adapt multimedia type…

  18. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  19. [Diabetic patients in the Yom Kippur fast--who can fast and how to treat the fasting patients].

    PubMed

    Katz, Yisrael; Zangen, David; Leibowitz, Gil; Szalalt, Auryan

    2009-09-01

    Jews all over the world fast on Yom Kippur, a fast lasting 25 hours. For diabetic patients and their physicians the fast is a significant challenge. The Jewish law exempts patients from fasting if the fast endangers the patient's health. In order to know if they can fast safely, many diabetic patients consult their physicians. In this review, the authors summarize the potential risk for fasting in diabetic patients and propose treatment protocols for patients who intend to fast. The principle recommendations are based on data related to fasting diabetic patients during the Ramadan fast, which is shorter than Yom Kippur. Furthermore, practical suggestions are based on a recent Israeli study on type 1 diabetic patients fasting for 25 hours, taking into account the Jewish law. Every diabetic patient who intends to fast should consult his physician for assurance that fasting is safe. The physician should pay special attention to patients on intensive insulin treatment or on sulfonylureas. Some, but not all these patients, should avoid fasting. In case these patients decide to fast, intensive monitoring of blood glucose is required during the fast to prevent severe hypoglycemia.

  20. A novel bit-wise adaptable entropy coding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel entropy coding technique which is adaptable in that each bit to be encoded may have an associated probability esitmate which depends on previously encoded bits. The technique may have advantages over arithmetic coding. The technique can achieve arbitrarily small redundancy and admits a simple and fast decoder.

  1. Hormone and metabolite changes associated with extended breeding fasts in male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M; Houser, Dorian S; Webb, Paul M; Costa, Daniel P

    2012-04-01

    We measured metabolic hormones and several key metabolites in breeding adult male northern elephant seals to examine the regulation of fuel metabolism during extended natural fasts of over 3 months associated with high levels of energy expenditure. Males were sampled twice, early and late in the fast, losing an average of 23% of body mass and 47% of adipose stores between measurements. Males exhibited metabolic homeostasis over the breeding fast with no changes in glucose, non-esterified fatty acids, or blood urea nitrogen. Ketoacids increased over the fast but were very low when compared to other fasting species. Changes within individuals in total triiodothyronine (tT(3)) were positively related to daily energy expenditure (DEE) and protein catabolism. Differences in levels of thyroid hormones relative to that observed in weaned pups and females suggest a greater deiodination of T(4) to support the high DEE of breeding males. Relative levels of leptin and ghrelin were consistent with the suppression of appetite but a significant reduction in growth hormone across the fast was contrary to expectation in fasting mammals. The lack of the increase in cortisol during fasting found in conspecific weaned pups and lactating females may contribute to the ability of breeding males to spare protein despite high levels of energy expenditure. Together these findings reveal significant differences with conspecifics under varying nutrient demands, suggesting metabolic adaptation to extended high energy fasts.

  2. Fasting in king penguin. II. Hormonal and metabolic changes during molt.

    PubMed

    Cherel, Y; Leloup, J; Le Maho, Y

    1988-02-01

    The coincidence of fast and molt in penguins is an interesting condition for investigating the factors controlling protein metabolism; avian molt involves the utilization of amino acids for synthesis of new feathers, whereas a major factor for adaptation to fasting in birds, as for mammals, is reduction in net protein breakdown. Hormonal and biochemical changes were studied in seven molting king penguins. Their initial body mass was 18 kg. It decreased by 58% over 41 days of fasting. Feather synthesis lasted for the first 3 wk of the fast. It was marked by plasma concentrations of alanine and uric acid 1.5 to 2 times those for nonmolting fast, and plasma thyroxine was increased five times. At the completion of molt all these values returned to levels comparable to those in nonmolting fast. As indicated by high plasma levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate, lipid stores were mobilized readily during molting. The fast ended by a phase of enhancement in protein utilization that was characterized by a fivefold increase in uricacidemia and coincided with an 80% drop in plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate and a fourfold increase in plasma corticosterone. These data suggest that two different hormones control the two successive periods marked by an increased protein mobilization during the molting fast, i.e., thyroxine during feather growth and corticosterone toward the end of the fast, when the molt is completed.

  3. HI Intensity Mapping with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Chen, T.; Dickinson, C.; Harper, S.; Maffei, B.; Olivari, L. C.; Wilkinsondagger, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the detectability of large-scale HI intensity fluctuations using the FAST telescope. We present forecasts for the accuracy of measuring the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and constraining the properties of dark energy. The FAST 19-beam L-band receivers (1.05-1.45 GHz) can provide constraints on the matter power spectrum and dark energy equation of state parameters (w0,wa) that are comparable to the BINGO and CHIME experiments. For one year of integration time we find that the optimal survey area is 6000 deg2. However, observing with larger frequency coverage at higher redshift (0.95-1.35 GHz) improves the projected errorbars on the HI power spectrum by more than 2 σ confidence level. The combined constraints from FAST, CHIME, BINGO and Planck CMB observations can provide reliable, stringent constraints on the dark energy equation of state.

  4. Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Future Assets, Student Talent (FAST) motivates and prepares talented students with disabilities to further their education and achieve High Tech and professional employment. The FAST program is managed by local professionals, business, and industry leaders; it is modeled after High School High Tech project TAKE CHARGE started in Los Angeles in 1983. Through cooperative efforts of Alabama Department of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Adult and Children Services, and the President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, north central Alabama was chosen as the second site for a High School High Tech project. In 1986 local business, industry, education, government agencies, and rehabilitation representatives started FAST. The program objectives and goals, results and accomplishments, and survey results are included.

  5. Fast reactors and nuclear nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Avrorin, E.N.; Rachkov, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2013-07-01

    Problems are discussed with regard to nuclear fuel cycle resistance in fast reactors to nuclear proliferation risk due to the potential for use in military programs of the knowledge, technologies and materials gained from peaceful nuclear power applications. Advantages are addressed for fast reactors in the creation of a more reliable mode of nonproliferation in the closed nuclear fuel cycle in comparison with the existing fully open and partially closed fuel cycles of thermal reactors. Advantages and shortcomings are also discussed from the point of view of nonproliferation from the start with fast reactors using plutonium of thermal reactor spent fuel and enriched uranium fuel to the gradual transition using their own plutonium as fuel. (authors)

  6. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Anthony W; Effertz, Thomas; Ricci, Anthony J

    2013-11-20

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca(2+) entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence of adaptation in the mammalian auditory system. Recordings from rat cochlear hair cells demonstrate that altering Ca(2+) entry or internal Ca(2+) buffering has little effect on either adaptation kinetics or steady-state adaptation responses. Two additional findings include a voltage-dependent process and an extracellular Ca(2+) binding site, both modulating the resting open probability independent of adaptation. These data suggest that slow motor adaptation is negligible in mammalian auditory cells and that the remaining adaptation process is independent of calcium entry.

  7. Optimal Control Modification for Robust Adaptation of Singularly Perturbed Systems with Slow Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham; Stepanyan, Vahram; Boskovic, Jovan

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. The model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in increase in the feedback gain and modification of the adaptive law.

  8. Organizational Adaptation and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    1984-01-01

    Organizational adaptation and types of adaptation needed in academe in the future are reviewed and major conceptual approaches to organizational adaptation are presented. The probable environment that institutions will face in the future that will require adaptation is discussed. (MLW)

  9. Fast Setting Cement - Literature Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    materials does produce early set times and high strengths . It is re- ported, also, that the addition of 1.5 percent Ca"l 2 to clinkers contain- Ing more than...produce high strength concrete. They include addition of iron asggregate, physical treatment of clinker , ’ addition of highly reactive SiO2 or Ca0, and...Fast-Fix. The Western Co. has developed materials designated as Fast-Fix with rapid setting and high strength properties. Published data show i .1

  10. [Preoperative fasting guidelines: an update].

    PubMed

    López Muñoz, A C; Busto Aguirreurreta, N; Tomás Braulio, J

    2015-03-01

    Anesthesiology societies have issued various guidelines on preoperative fasting since 1990, not only to decrease the incidence of lung aspiration and anesthetic morbidity, but also to increase patient comfort prior to anesthesia. Some of these societies have been updating their guidelines, as such that, since 2010, we now have 2 evidence-based preoperative fasting guidelines available. In this article, an attempt is made to review these updated guidelines, as well as the current instructions for more controversial patients such as infants, the obese, and a particular type of ophthalmic surgery.

  11. Human heat adaptation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-01-01

    In this overview, human morphological and functional adaptations during naturally and artificially induced heat adaptation are explored. Through discussions of adaptation theory and practice, a theoretical basis is constructed for evaluating heat adaptation. It will be argued that some adaptations are specific to the treatment used, while others are generalized. Regarding ethnic differences in heat tolerance, the case is put that reported differences in heat tolerance are not due to natural selection, but can be explained on the basis of variations in adaptation opportunity. These concepts are expanded to illustrate how traditional heat adaptation and acclimatization represent forms of habituation, and thermal clamping (controlled hyperthermia) is proposed as a superior model for mechanistic research. Indeed, this technique has led to questioning the perceived wisdom of body-fluid changes, such as the expansion and subsequent decay of plasma volume, and sudomotor function, including sweat habituation and redistribution. Throughout, this contribution was aimed at taking another step toward understanding the phenomenon of heat adaptation and stimulating future research. In this regard, research questions are posed concerning the influence that variations in morphological configuration may exert upon adaptation, the determinants of postexercise plasma volume recovery, and the physiological mechanisms that modify the cholinergic sensitivity of sweat glands, and changes in basal metabolic rate and body core temperature following adaptation.

  12. Gravitational adaptation of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Burton, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of gravitational adaptation is studied in a group of five Leghorn cocks which had become physiologically adapted to 2 G after 162 days of centrifugation. After this period of adaptation, they are periodically exposed to a 2 G field, accompanied by five previously unexposed hatch-mates, and the degree of retained acceleration adaptation is estimated from the decrease in lymphocyte frequency after 24 hr at 2 G. Results show that the previously adapted birds exhibit an 84% greater lymphopenia than the unexposed birds, and that the lymphocyte frequency does not decrease to a level below that found at the end of 162 days at 2 G. In addition, the capacity for adaptation to chronic acceleration is found to be highly heritable. An acceleration tolerant strain of birds shows lesser mortality during chronic acceleration, particularly in intermediate fields, although the result of acceleration selection is largely quantitative (a greater number of survivors) rather than qualitative (behavioral or physiological changes).

  13. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  14. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  15. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  16. Adaptive corrector operating in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radikaynen, Y. M.

    1984-11-01

    An interference-immune corrector for a signal converter with automatic regulation of adaptation speed is described which operates in the frequency domain with fast convergence and high signal-to-noise ratio. It contains an analog-to-digital converter, a demodulator, and a filter array with equidistant spacing of center frequencies, three multipliers and two summators, as well as a reference signal generator, a frequency divider, a counter, and a noise meter. Filtering is done by a n-point Fourier transformation or bunching with a memory at the filter input followed by inverse Fourier transformation or debunching, respectively. The algorithm of corrector operation in the frequency domain can be constructed heuristically by an analog to the complex algorithm of minimizing the mean-square error in the time domain. Each weight factor can be processed independently and only once per Fourier transformation cycle, which ensures fast convergence without preliminary phase correction even with large distortions in the communication channel.

  17. Adaptive regularization network based neural modeling paradigm for nonlinear adaptive estimation of cerebral evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Böhme, Johann F

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we report an adaptive regularization network (ARN) approach to realizing fast blind separation of cerebral evoked potentials (EPs) from background electroencephalogram (EEG) activity with no need to make any explicit assumption on the statistical (or deterministic) signal model. The ARNs are proposed to construct nonlinear EEG and EP signal models. A novel adaptive regularization training (ART) algorithm is proposed to improve the generalization performance of the ARN. Two adaptive neural modeling methods based on the ARN are developed and their implementation and performance analysis are also presented. The computer experiments using simulated and measured visual evoked potential (VEP) data have shown that the proposed ARN modeling paradigm yields computationally efficient and more accurate VEP signal estimation owing to its intrinsic model-free and nonlinear processing characteristics.

  18. Fast, Massively Parallel Data Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Robert A.; Blevins, Donald W.; Davis, ED

    1994-01-01

    Proposed fast, massively parallel data processor contains 8x16 array of processing elements with efficient interconnection scheme and options for flexible local control. Processing elements communicate with each other on "X" interconnection grid with external memory via high-capacity input/output bus. This approach to conditional operation nearly doubles speed of various arithmetic operations.

  19. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced field reflectors,'' is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  20. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-12-31

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced ``field reflectors,`` is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  1. Enhanced Model for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Rodney J.

    2010-10-12

    Laser Fusion is a prime candidate for alternate energy production, capable of serving a major portion of the nation's energy needs, once fusion fuel can be readily ignited. Fast Ignition may well speed achievement of this goal, by reducing net demands on laser pulse energy and timing precision. However, Fast Ignition has presented a major challenge to modeling. This project has enhanced the computer code ePLAS for the simulation of the many specialized phenomena, which arise with Fast Ignition. The improved code has helped researchers to understand better the consequences of laser absorption, energy transport, and laser target hydrodynamics. ePLAS uses efficient implicit methods to acquire solutions for the electromagnetic fields that govern the accelerations of electrons and ions in targets. In many cases, the code implements fluid modeling for these components. These combined features, "implicitness and fluid modeling," can greatly facilitate calculations, permitting the rapid scoping and evaluation of experiments. ePLAS can be used on PCs, Macs and Linux machines, providing researchers and students with rapid results. This project has improved the treatment of electromagnetics, hydrodynamics, and atomic physics in the code. It has simplified output graphics, and provided new input that avoids the need for source code access by users. The improved code can now aid university, business and national laboratory users in pursuit of an early path to success with Fast Ignition.

  2. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  3. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  4. Fast swept-volume distance for robust collision detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.

    1997-04-01

    The need for collision detection arises in several robotics areas, including motion-planning, online collision avoidance, and simulation. At the heart of most current methods are algorithms for interference detection and/or distance computation. A few recent algorithms and implementations are very fast, but to use them for accurate collision detection, very small step sizes can be necessary, reducing their effective efficiency. We present a fast, implemented technique for doing exact distance computation and interference detection for translationally-swept bodies. For rotationally swept bodies, we adapt this technique to improve accuracy, for any given step size, in distance computation and interference detection. We present preliminary experiments that show that the combination of basic and swept-body calculations holds much promise for faster accurate collision detection.

  5. Fast control latency uncertainty elimination for the BESIII ETOF upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Cao, Ping; Liu, Shu-bin; An, Qi

    2016-09-01

    A new fanning topology is proposed to precisely fan out fast control signals in the Beijing Spectrometer (BESIII) end-cap time-of-flight (ETOF) electronics. However, uncertainty in transfer latency is introduced by the new fanning channel, which will degrade the precision of fast control. In this paper, latency uncertainty elimination for the BESIII ETOF upgrade is introduced. The latency uncertainty is determined by a Time-Digital-Converter (TDC) embedded in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and is eliminated by re-capturing at synchronous and determinate time. Compared with the existing method of Barrel-cap TOF (BTOF), it has advantages of flexible structure, easy calibration and good adaptability. Field tests on the BESIII ETOF system show that this method effectively eliminates transfer latency uncertainty. Supported by CAS Maintenance Project for Major Scientific and Technological Infrastructure (IHEP-SW-953/2013)

  6. A Fast Technology Infusion Model for Aerospace Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Andrew A.; Schone, Harald; Brinza, David E.; Garrett, Henry B.; Feather, Martin S.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-year Fast Technology Infusion initiative proposes a model for aerospace organizations to improve the cost-effectiveness by which they mature new, in-house developed software and hardware technologies for space mission use. The first year task under the umbrella of this initiative will provide the framework to demonstrate and document the fast infusion process. The viability of this approach will be demonstrated on two technologies developed in prior years with internal Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funding. One hardware technology and one software technology were selected for maturation within one calendar year or less. The overall objective is to achieve cost and time savings in the qualification of technologies. At the end of the recommended three-year effort, we will have demonstrated for six or more in-house developed technologies a clear path to insertion using a documented process that permits adaptation to a broad range of hardware and software projects.

  7. Human adaptation to smog

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.W. Jacobs, S.V.; Frager, N.B.

    1982-10-01

    This study examined the health effects of human adaptation to photochemical smog. A group of recent arrivals to the Los Angeles air basin were compared to long-term residents of the basin. Evidence for adaptation included greater irritation and respiratory problems among the recent arrivals and desensitization among the long-term residents in their judgments of the severity of the smog problem to their health. There was no evidence for biochemical adaptation as measured by hemoglobin response to oxidant challenge. The results were discussed in terms of psychological adaption to chronic environmental stressors.

  8. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  9. Peripheral adaptation codes for high odor concentration in glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Jérôme; Tiret, Pascale; Charpak, Serge

    2009-03-11

    Adaptation is a general property of sensory receptor neurons and has been extensively studied in isolated cell preparation of olfactory receptor neurons. In contrast, little is known about the conditions under which peripheral adaptation occurs in the CNS during odorant stimulation. Here, we used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy and targeted extracellular recording in freely breathing anesthetized rats to investigate the correlate of peripheral adaptation at the first synapse of the olfactory pathway in olfactory bulb glomeruli. We find that during sustained stimulation at high concentration, odorants can evoke local field potential (LFP) postsynaptic responses that rapidly adapt with time, some within two inhalations. Simultaneous measurements of LFP and calcium influx at olfactory receptor neuron terminals reveal that postsynaptic adaptation is associated with a decrease in odorant-evoked calcium response, suggesting that it results from a decrease in glutamate release. This glomerular adaptation was concentration-dependent and did not change the glomerular input-output curve. In addition, in situ application of antagonists of either ionotropic glutamate receptors or metabotropic GABA(B) receptors did not affect this adaptation, thus discarding the involvement of local presynaptic inhibition. Glomerular adaptation, therefore, reflects the response decline of olfactory receptor neurons to sustained odorant. We postulate that peripheral fast adaptation is a means by which glomerular output codes for high concentration of odor.

  10. Application of washed rumen technique for rapid determination of fasting heat production in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a washed rumen technique as an alternative approach for determining fasting HP in cattle. In Exp. 1, 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) were adapted to a cubed alfalfa-based diet (1.5xNEm) for 10 d. After which steers were placed into individual hea...

  11. Fast-flowering mini-maize: seed to seed in 60 days

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two lines of Zea mays were developed as a short-generation model for maize. The Fast-Flowering Mini-Maize (FFMM) lines A and B are robust inbred lines with a significantly shorter generation time, much smaller stature, and better greenhouse adaptation than traditional maize varieties. Five generatio...

  12. Fast method for verifying Chernikov rules in Fourier-Motzkin elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrakov, S. I.; Zolotykh, N. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of eliminating unknowns from a system of linear inequalities is considered. A new fast technique for verifying Chernikov rules in Fourier-Motzkin elimination is proposed, which is an adaptation of the "graph" test for adjacency in the double description method. Numerical results are presented that confirm the effectiveness of this technique.

  13. LSHPlace: fast phylogenetic placement using locality-sensitive hashing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel G; Truszkowski, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of phylogenetic placement, in which large numbers of sequences (often next-generation sequencing reads) are placed onto an existing phylogenetic tree. We adapt our recent work on phylogenetic tree inference, which uses ancestral sequence reconstruction and locality-sensitive hashing, to this domain. With these ideas, new sequences can be placed onto trees with high fidelity in strikingly fast runtimes. Our results are two orders of magnitude faster than existing programs for this domain, and show a modest accuracy tradeoff. Our results offer the possibility of analyzing many more reads in a next-generation sequencing project than is currently possible.

  14. Physiologic adaptation to space - Space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The adaptive changes of the neurovestibular system to microgravity, which result in space motion sickness (SMS), are studied. A list of symptoms, which range from vomiting to drowsiness, is provided. The two patterns of symptom development, rapid and gradual, and the duration of the symptoms are described. The concept of sensory conflict and rearrangements to explain SMS is being investigated.

  15. Fast notification architecture for wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hahk

    2013-03-01

    In an emergency, since it is vital to transmit the message to the users immediately after analysing the data to prevent disaster, this article presents the deployment of a fast notification architecture for a wireless sensor network. The sensor nodes of the proposed architecture can monitor an emergency situation periodically and transmit the sensing data, immediately to the sink node. We decide on the grade of fire situation according to the decision rule using the sensing values of temperature, CO, smoke density and temperature increasing rate. On the other hand, to estimate the grade of air pollution, the sensing data, such as dust, formaldehyde, NO2, CO2, is applied to the given knowledge model. Since the sink node in the architecture has a ZigBee interface, it can transmit the alert messages in real time according to analysed results received from the host server to the terminals equipped with a SIM card-type ZigBee module. Also, the host server notifies the situation to the registered users who have cellular phone through short message service server of the cellular network. Thus, the proposed architecture can adapt an emergency situation dynamically compared to the conventional architecture using video processing. In the testbed, after generating air pollution and fire data, the terminal receives the message in less than 3 s. In the test results, this system can also be applied to buildings and public areas where many people gather together, to prevent unexpected disasters in urban settings.

  16. Fast dissolving films made of maltodextrins.

    PubMed

    Cilurzo, Francesco; Cupone, Irma E; Minghetti, Paola; Selmin, Francesca; Montanari, Luisa

    2008-11-01

    This work aimed to study maltodextrins (MDX) with a low dextrose equivalent as film forming material and their application in the design of oral fast-dissolving films. The suitable plasticizer and its concentration were selected on the basis of flexibility, tensile strength and stickiness of MDX films, and the MDX/plasticizer interactions were investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Flexible films were obtained by using 16-20% w/w glycerin (GLY). This basic formulation was adapted to the main production technologies, casting and solvent evaporation (Series C) or hot-melt extrusion (Series E), by adding sorbitan monoleate (SO) or cellulose microcrystalline (MCC), respectively. MCC decreased the film ductility and significantly affected the film disintegration time both in vitro and in vivo (Series C<10s; Series E approximately 1min). To assess the film loading capacity, piroxicam (PRX), a water insoluble drug, was selected. The loading of a drug as a powder decreased the film ductility, but the formulation maintained satisfactory flexibility and resistance to elongation for production and packaging procedures. The films present a high loading capacity, up to 25mg for a surface of 6cm(2). The PRX dissolution rate significantly improved in Series C films independently of the PRX/MDX ratio.

  17. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  18. Fast Image Texture Classification Using Decision Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Texture analysis would permit improved autonomous, onboard science data interpretation for adaptive navigation, sampling, and downlink decisions. These analyses would assist with terrain analysis and instrument placement in both macroscopic and microscopic image data products. Unfortunately, most state-of-the-art texture analysis demands computationally expensive convolutions of filters involving many floating-point operations. This makes them infeasible for radiation- hardened computers and spaceflight hardware. A new method approximates traditional texture classification of each image pixel with a fast decision-tree classifier. The classifier uses image features derived from simple filtering operations involving integer arithmetic. The texture analysis method is therefore amenable to implementation on FPGA (field-programmable gate array) hardware. Image features based on the "integral image" transform produce descriptive and efficient texture descriptors. Training the decision tree on a set of training data yields a classification scheme that produces reasonable approximations of optimal "texton" analysis at a fraction of the computational cost. A decision-tree learning algorithm employing the traditional k-means criterion of inter-cluster variance is used to learn tree structure from training data. The result is an efficient and accurate summary of surface morphology in images. This work is an evolutionary advance that unites several previous algorithms (k-means clustering, integral images, decision trees) and applies them to a new problem domain (morphology analysis for autonomous science during remote exploration). Advantages include order-of-magnitude improvements in runtime, feasibility for FPGA hardware, and significant improvements in texture classification accuracy.

  19. Object localization using adaptive feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S. Youngkyoo; Kim, Jungbae; Lee, Seongdeok

    2009-01-01

    'Fast and robust' are the most beautiful keywords in computer vision. Unfortunately they are in trade-off relationship. We present a method to have one's cake and eat it using adaptive feature selections. Our chief insight is that it compares reference patterns to query patterns, so that it selects smartly more important and useful features to find target. The probabilities of pixels in the query to belong to the target are calculated from importancy of features. Our framework has three distinct advantages: 1 - It saves computational cost dramatically to the conventional approach. This framework makes it possible to find location of an object in real-time. 2 - It can smartly select robust features of a reference pattern as adapting to a query pattern. 3- It has high flexibility on any feature. It doesn't matter which feature you may use. Lots of color space, texture, motion features and other features can fit perfectly only if the features meet histogram criteria.

  20. Adaptive path planning for flexible manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1994-08-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for automating flexible manufacturing in incrementally-changing environments. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

  1. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  2. On Teaching Adaptively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corno, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    New theory on adaptive teaching reflects the social dynamics of classrooms to explain what practicing teachers do to address student differences related to learning. In teaching adaptively, teachers respond to learners as they work. Teachers read student signals to diagnose needs on the fly and tap previous experience with similar learners to…

  3. Computerized Adaptive Ability Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    The general objective of a research program on adaptive testing was to identify several sources of potential error in test scores, and to study adaptive testing as a means for reducing these errors. Errors can result from the mismatch of item difficulty to the individual's ability; the psychological effects of testing and the test environment; the…

  4. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  5. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  6. Research, Adaptation, & Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lee A., Ed.; And Others

    Research adaptation is an endeavor that implies solid collaboration among school practitioners and university and college researchers. This volume addresses the broad issues of research as an educational endeavor, adaptation as a necessary function associated with applying research findings to school situations, and change as an inevitable…

  7. Adaptive Wavelet Transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Szu, H.; Hsu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Human sensors systems (HSS) may be approximately described as an adaptive or self-learning version of the Wavelet Transforms (WT) that are capable to learn from several input-output associative pairs of suitable transform mother wavelets. Such an Adaptive WT (AWT) is a redundant combination of mother wavelets to either represent or classify inputs.

  8. Metabolic response to a glucagon challenge varies with adiposity and life-history stage in fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Daniel E; Fowler, Melinda A; Champagne, Cory D; Vanderlugt, Anna L; Houser, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic adaptations for extended fasting in wildlife prioritize beta-oxidation of lipids and reduced glucose utilization to support energy metabolism. The pancreatic hormone glucagon plays key roles in regulating glycemia and lipid metabolism during fasting in model species but its function in wildlife species adapted for extended fasting is not well understood. Northern elephant seals (NES) undergo natural fasts of 1-3months while under constraints of high nutrient demands including lactation and development. We performed a glucagon challenge on lactating, molting and developing NES, early and late in their natural fasts, to examine the impact of this important regulatory hormone on metabolism. Glucagon caused increases in plasma glucose, insulin, fatty acids, ketones and urea, but the magnitude of these effects varied widely with adiposity and life-history stage. The strong impact of adiposity on glucose and insulin responses suggest a potential role for adipose derived factors in regulating hepatic metabolism and pancreatic sensitivity. Elevations in plasma glucose in response to glucagon were strongly associated with increases in protein catabolism, suggesting negative impacts of elevated glucagon on protein sparing. Glucagon promoted rapid ketone accumulation suggesting that low ketoacid levels in NES reflect low rates of production. These results demonstrate strong metabolic impacts of glucagon and support the idea that glucagon levels are downregulated in the context of metabolic adaptation to extended fasting. These results suggest that the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in NES changes with adiposity, fasting duration and under various constraints of nutrient demands.

  9. 75 FR 57859 - Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN21 Specially Adapted Housing and Special Home Adaptation AGENCY... housing and special home adaptation grants. This final rule incorporates certain provisions from the... adapted housing (SAH) grants and special home adaptation (SHA) grants. The public comment period ended...

  10. Financing climate change adaptation.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Laurens M; Aerts, Jeroen C J H

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the topic of financing adaptation in future climate change policies. A major question is whether adaptation in developing countries should be financed under the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), or whether funding should come from other sources. We present an overview of financial resources and propose the employment of a two-track approach: one track that attempts to secure climate change adaptation funding under the UNFCCC; and a second track that improves mainstreaming of climate risk management in development efforts. Developed countries would need to demonstrate much greater commitment to the funding of adaptation measures if the UNFCCC were to cover a substantial part of the costs. The mainstreaming of climate change adaptation could follow a risk management path, particularly in relation to disaster risk reduction. 'Climate-proofing' of development projects that currently do not consider climate and weather risks could improve their sustainability.

  11. Optimal Control Modification Adaptive Law for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  12. Techniques for Fast Stereoscopic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  13. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  14. Causes of Extremely Fast CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We study CMEs observed by LASCO to have plane of the sky velocities exceeding 1500 km/sec. We find that these extremely fast CMEs are typically associated with flares accompanied by erupting prominences. Our results are consistent with a single CME initiation process that consists of three stages. The initial stage is brought about by the emergence of new magnetic flux, which interacts with the pre-existing magnetic configuration and results in a slow rise of the magnetic structure. The second stage is a fast reconnection phase with flaring, filament eruption and a sudden increase of the rise velocity of the magnetic structure (CME). The third stage consists of propagation in the corona. We discuss the sources of these CMEs and the need for improved understanding of the first and third stages.

  15. Why are idioms recognized fast?

    PubMed

    Tabossi, Patrizia; Fanari, Rachele; Wolf, Kinou

    2009-06-01

    It is an established fact that idiomatic expressions are fast to process. However, the explanation of the phenomenon is controversial. Using a semantic judgment paradigm, where people decide whether a string is meaningful or not, the present experiment tested the predictions deriving from the three main theories of idiom recognition-the lexical representation hypothesis, the idiom decomposition hypothesis, and the configuration hypothesis. Participants were faster at judging decomposable idioms, nondecomposable idioms, and clichés than at judging their matched controls. The effect was comparable for all conventional expressions. The results were interpreted as suggesting that, as posited by the configuration hypothesis, the fact that they are known expressions, rather than idiomaticity, explains their fast recognition.

  16. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  17. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  18. Selective adaptation in networks of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Eytan, Danny; Brenner, Naama; Marom, Shimon

    2003-10-15

    A key property of neural systems is their ability to adapt selectively to stimuli with different features. Using multisite electrical recordings from networks of cortical neurons developing ex vivo, we show that neurons adapt selectively to different stimuli invading the network. We focus on selective adaptation to frequent and rare stimuli; networks were stimulated at two sites with two different stimulus frequencies. When both stimuli were presented within the same period, neurons in the network attenuated their responsiveness to the more frequent input, whereas their responsiveness to the rarely delivered stimuli showed a marked average increase. The amplification of the response to rare stimuli required the presence of the other, more frequent stimulation source. By contrast, the decreased response to the frequent stimuli occurred regardless of the presence of the rare stimuli. Analysis of the response of single units suggests that both of these effects are caused by changes in synaptic transmission. By using synaptic blockers, we find that the increased responsiveness to the rarely stimulated site depends specifically on fast GABAergic transmission. Thus, excitatory synaptic depression, the inhibitory sub-network, and their balance play an active role in generating selective gain control. The observation that selective adaptation arises naturally in a network of cortical neurons developing ex vivo indicates that this is an inherent feature of spontaneously organizing cortical networks.

  19. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-09-24

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  20. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  1. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  2. Fast Anomaly Discovery Given Duplicates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    skipping the computations for duplicate points in SN(ui) that have ci larger than k, the runtime complexity is enhanced significantly. That is, in...Fast anomaly discovery given duplicates Jay-Yoon Lee, U Kang, Danai Koutra, Christos Faloutsos Dec 2012 CMU-CS-12-146 School of Computer Science...ES) Carnegie Mellon University,School of Computer Science,Pittsburgh,PA,15213 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  3. Fast track to 340B.

    PubMed

    Gricius, Robert F; Wong, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals that are newly qualified for the 340B Drug Pricing Program may have an opportunity for fast-track approval to participate in the program. Three steps are required to seize this opportunity: Use data analytics to assess current and future percentages of Medicaid utilization and eligibility for federal SSI cash benefits. Determine the feasibility of early cost report filing. Prepare appropriate documentation and undertake the initial enrollment process.

  4. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOEpatents

    Detering, Brent A.; Donaldson, Alan D.; Fincke, James R.; Kong, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage.

  5. Sputtering of fast meteoroids' surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, O. P.; Strelkov, A. S.; Sidneva, S. N.

    Entering meteoroids are subjected by direct impacts of molecules of the individual constituents of the air, when the body approaching the Earth at heights of about 300-100 km. At meteor velocities about 72 km/s the energy of air molecules is about 800 eV and oxygen atoms have energy about 400 eV. Particles with such energies don't penetrate into deep layers of entering body and are concentrated in narrow surface layer of about hundreds angstroms. Action of air particles on meteoroid leads to both heating of meteoroid and sputtering of meteoroid surface. Sputtering effect was supposed as explanation of this high altitude ionization and luminosity (Brosch et al, 2001), which aren't explained by classical ablation theory. Sputtering results in appearance of fast particles, which also may be exited and/or ionized. Flux of these particles causes formation of ionized meteor trails recording by radars. For bigger bodies fast particles may create luminous area at the altitudes above altitude of intensive evaporation. We demonstrate physical model, which allows us to describe sputtering of meteoroid surface under impacts of incoming air particles. We consider sputtering of meteoroid with composition close to hondritic one at the altitude 150 km. Fast particles are really sputtered from meteoroid surface. They carry out about 10% of incoming flux energy. There are also reflected particles, but the most part of total particle outcome is formed by particles of meteor substance. Presence of fast particles possibly explains a large size of meteors in diffuse stage at high altitudes (above 130 km). The sputtering is neglectable in the case of meteor velocities below 30 km/s. Sputtered and reflected particles have enough high ionization degree (˜ (1-5) 10-2, that is larger than ionization degree of surrounding atmosphere (˜ 10-5div 10-6)).

  6. Diagnostics for Fast Ignition Science

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A; Akli, K; Beg, F; Chen, C; Chen, H; Clarke, R; Hey, D; Freeman, R; Kemp, A; Key, M; King, J; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; Nakamura, N; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Phillips, T; Stephens, R; Town, R; Wei, M; VanWoerkom, L; Mackinnon, A

    2008-05-06

    The concept for Electron Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion demands sufficient laser energy be transferred from the ignitor pulse to the assembled fuel core via {approx}MeV electrons. We have assembled a suite of diagnostics to characterize such transfer. Recent experiments have simultaneously fielded absolutely calibrated extreme ultraviolet multilayer imagers at 68 and 256eV; spherically bent crystal imagers at 4 and 8keV; multi-keV crystal spectrometers; MeV x-ray bremmstrahlung and electron and proton spectrometers (along the same line of sight); nuclear activation samples and a picosecond optical probe based interferometer. These diagnostics allow careful measurement of energy transport and deposition during and following laser-plasma interactions at extremely high intensities in both planar and conical targets. Augmented with accurate on-shot laser focal spot and pre-pulse characterization, these measurements are yielding new insight into energy coupling and are providing critical data for validating numerical PIC and hybrid PIC simulation codes in an area that is crucial for many applications, particularly fast ignition. Novel aspects of these diagnostics and how they are combined to extract quantitative data on ultra high intensity laser plasma interactions are discussed, together with implications for full-scale fast ignition experiments.

  7. [Fasting and physical endurance capacity].

    PubMed

    Schürch, P M

    1993-03-01

    Fasting, or zero calorie diets are used not only by overweight people as a means of losing weight, but by athletes too. Their use is then explained on philosophical grounds, with the aim of even enhancing sports performance. The purpose of this investigation consisted of quantifying the effects of a 10-day fast on maximum performance capacity and endurance (as measured on a bicycle ergometer) of 12 female students of physical education of normal weight. The measurements included resting and exercise metabolism determinants, as well as weight and lean body mass. The main results show that after the diet period the maximum ergometric performance was lower in absolute terms as well as in relation to weight or lean body mass. Performance capacity for submaximal exercise was also reduced. Fat combustion was enhanced both at rest and during exercise. The reduction of maximum performance and endurance capacity may be explained by an enhanced muscle breakdown, an efficiency drop of muscular work, and an inadequate glycogen content of the acting muscles. Shorter fasting periods of 24-36 hours also lead to a lower performance level for exercise bouts extending from several minutes to 1-3 hours. An enhancement of fat combustion was always conspicuous. One may conclude that optimal physical performance is dependent on full hepatic and muscle glycogen stores. Glycogen concentration in the liver decreases sharply as a matter of fact after merely one day of carbohydrate shortage. Zero calorie or low carbohydrate diets are thus at variance with an optimal physical work capacity.

  8. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  9. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  10. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  11. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  12. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  13. Online adaptation and verification of VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Crijns, Wouter; Defraene, Gilles; Depuydt, Tom; Haustermans, Karin; Van Herck, Hans; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method for fast volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) adaptation in response to interfraction anatomical variations. Additionally, plan parameters extracted from the adapted plans are used to verify the quality of these plans. The methods were tested as a prostate class solution and compared to replanning and to their current clinical practice. Methods: The proposed VMAT adaptation is an extension of their previous intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adaptation. It follows a direct (forward) planning approach: the multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures are corrected in the beam’s eye view (BEV) and the monitor units (MUs) are corrected using point dose calculations. All MLC and MU corrections are driven by the positions of four fiducial points only, without need for a full contour set. Quality assurance (QA) of the adapted plans is performed using plan parameters that can be calculated online and that have a relation to the delivered dose or the plan quality. Five potential parameters are studied for this purpose: the number of MU, the equivalent field size (EqFS), the modulation complexity score (MCS), and the components of the MCS: the aperture area variability (AAV) and the leaf sequence variability (LSV). The full adaptation and its separate steps were evaluated in simulation experiments involving a prostate phantom subjected to various interfraction transformations. The efficacy of the current VMAT adaptation was scored by target mean dose (CTV{sub mean}), conformity (CI{sub 95%}), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The impact of the adaptation on the plan parameters (QA) was assessed by comparison with prediction intervals (PI) derived from a statistical model of the typical variation of these parameters in a population of VMAT prostate plans (n = 63). These prediction intervals are the adaptation equivalent of the tolerance tables for couch shifts in the current clinical

  14. Migrant Students with Limited English Proficiency: Can Fast ForWord Language? Make a Difference in Their Language Skills and Academic Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the computer-assisted intervention program known as Fast ForWord Language? in a sample of migrant students in Grades 1 through 6 who were native Spanish speakers. Fast ForWord Language? combines intensive training in multiple receptive English language skills with adaptive acoustic waveform lengthening and…

  15. Adaptation to blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Webster, Shernaaz M.; MacDonald, Jennifer; Bahradwadj, Shrikant R.

    2001-06-01

    Blur is an intrinsic property of the retinal image that can vary substantially in natural viewing. We examined how processes of contrast adaptation might adjust the visual system to regulate the perception of blur. Observers viewed a blurred or sharpened image for 2-5 minutes, and then judged the apparent focus of a series of 0.5-sec test images interleaved with 6-sec of readaptation. A 2AFC staircase procedure was used to vary the amplitude spectrum of successive test to find the image that appeared in focus. Adapting to a blurred image causes a physically focused image to appear too sharp. Opposite after-effects occur for sharpened adapting images. Pronounced biases were observed over a wide range of magnitudes of adapting blur, and were similar for different types of blur. After-effects were also similar for different classes of images but were generally weaker when the adapting and test stimuli were different images, showing that the adaptation is not adjusting simply to blur per se. These adaptive adjustments may strongly influence the perception of blur in normal vision and how it changes with refractive errors.

  16. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy.

  17. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  18. Adaptive optics ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, A

    2000-01-01

    Retinal images in the human eye are normally degraded because we are forced to use the optical system of the human eye--which is fraught with aberrations--as the objective lens. The recent application of adaptive optics technology to measure and compensate for these aberrations has produced retinal images in human eyes with unprecedented resolution. The adaptive optics ophthalmoscope is used to take pictures of photoreceptors and capillaries and to study spectral and angular tuning properties of individual photoreceptors. Application of adaptive optics technology for ophthalmoscopy promises continued progress toward understanding the basic properties of the living human retina and also for clinical applications.

  19. Adaptive Telemetry Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, R. L.; Salazar, G. A.; Haddick, C. M., Jr.; Spahn, C. J.; Venkatesh, C. N.

    1989-01-01

    Telemetry-data-acquisition unit adjusted remotely to produce changes in sampling rate, sampling channels, measurement scale, and output-bias level. Functional configuration adapted to changing conditions or new requirements by distant operator over telemetry link. Reconfiguration done in real time, without removing equipment from service. Bus-interface unit accepts reprogramming commands and translates them for low-rate adaptive multiplexer. Reprogrammable equipment reduces need for spare parts, since not necessary to stock variety of hardware with fixed characteristics. Adaptive multiplexer performs well in tests, amplitude errors less than 0.5 percent, distortion less than 0.25 percent, and crosstalk and common-mode rejection indiscernible.

  20. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  1. Fast Foods, Organic Foods, Fad Diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is no standard definition of fast food. Generally, fast food is eaten without cutlery, and fast-food restaurants have no wait staff. Failure to have a standardized definition makes it difficult to compare studies. Foods available outside the home tend to be high in energy and fat compared w...

  2. Nutritional and behavioral effects of gorge and fast feeding in captive lions.

    PubMed

    Altman, Joanne D; Gross, Kathy L; Lowry, Stephen R

    2005-01-01

    Nonhuman animals in captivity manifest behaviors and physiological conditions that are not common in the wild. Lions in captivity face problems of obesity, inactivity, and stereotypy. To mediate common problems of captive lions, this study implemented a gorge and fast feeding schedule that better models naturalistic patterns: African lions (Panthera leo) gradually adapted from a conventional feeding program to a random gorge and fast feeding schedule. Digestibility increased significantly and food intake and metabolizable energy intake correspondingly decreased. Lions also showed an increase in appetitive active behaviors, no increase in agonistic behavior, and paced half as frequently on fast days as on feeding days. Thus, switching captive lions to a gorge and fast feeding schedule resulted in improved nutritional status and increased activity.

  3. Experiment K-7-33: Functional Neuromuscular Adaptation to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Bodine-Fowler, S.; Hodgson, J. A.; Roy, R. R.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    1994-01-01

    The following data were collected from two Rhesus monkeys (782 and 2483) that were flown aboard a 14-day biosatellite mission (COSMOS 2044). The proposed study was designed to determine the effects of the absence of weight support on flexor and extensor muscles of the hindlimb. These effects were assessed morphologically and biochemically from muscle biopsies taken from a slow extensor, the soleus; a fast extensor, the medial gastrocnemius; and a fast flexor, the tibialis anterior. A second objective of this study was to determine the relative importance of activity (as determined by intramuscular electromyography, and force (as determined by joint torque) on the adaptation of muscle.

  4. Performance of adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1994-03-01

    A prototype adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use at Lick Observatory. This system is based on an ITEX 69-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Kodak fast-framing intensified CCD camera, and a Mercury VME board containing four Intel i860 processors. The system has been tested using natural reference stars on the 40-inch Nickel telescope at Lick Observatory yielding up to a factor of 10 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). These results are consistent with theoretical expectations. In order to improve performance, the intensified CCD camera will be replaced by a high-quantum-efficiency low-noise fast CCD camera built for LLNL by Adaptive Optics Associates using a chip developed by Lincoln Laboratory, and the 69-actuator deformable mirror will be replaced by a 127-actuator deformable mirror developed at LLNL. With these upgrades, the system should perform well in median seeing conditions on the 120-inch Shane telescope for observing wavelengths longer than {approximately}1 {mu}m and using natural reference stars brighter than m{sub R} {approximately} 10 or using the laser currently being developed at LLNL for use at Lick Observatory to generate a sodium-layer reference star.

  5. Elliptic Solvers with Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Complex Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip, B.

    2000-07-24

    Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is a numerical technique for locally tailoring the resolution computational grids. Multilevel algorithms for solving elliptic problems on adaptive grids include the Fast Adaptive Composite grid method (FAC) and its parallel variants (AFAC and AFACx). Theory that confirms the independence of the convergence rates of FAC and AFAC on the number of refinement levels exists under certain ellipticity and approximation property conditions. Similar theory needs to be developed for AFACx. The effectiveness of multigrid-based elliptic solvers such as FAC, AFAC, and AFACx on adaptively refined overlapping grids is not clearly understood. Finally, a non-trivial eye model problem will be solved by combining the power of using overlapping grids for complex moving geometries, AMR, and multilevel elliptic solvers.

  6. Fast Offset Laser Phase-Locking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a simplified block diagram of an improved optoelectronic system for locking the phase of one laser to that of another laser with an adjustable offset frequency specified by the user. In comparison with prior systems, this system exhibits higher performance (including higher stability) and is much easier to use. The system is based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and operates almost entirely digitally; hence, it is easily adaptable to many different systems. The system achieves phase stability of less than a microcycle. It was developed to satisfy the phase-stability requirement for a planned spaceborne gravitational-wave-detecting heterodyne laser interferometer (LISA). The system has potential terrestrial utility in communications, lidar, and other applications. The present system includes a fast phasemeter that is a companion to the microcycle-accurate one described in High-Accuracy, High-Dynamic-Range Phase-Measurement System (NPO-41927), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 22. In the present system (as in the previously reported one), beams from the two lasers (here denoted the master and slave lasers) interfere on a photodiode. The heterodyne photodiode output is digitized and fed to the fast phasemeter, which produces suitably conditioned, low-latency analog control signals which lock the phase of the slave laser to that of the master laser. These control signals are used to drive a thermal and a piezoelectric transducer that adjust the frequency and phase of the slave-laser output. The output of the photodiode is a heterodyne signal at the difference between the frequencies of the two lasers. (The difference is currently required to be less than 20 MHz due to the Nyquist limit of the current sampling rate. We foresee few problems in doubling this limit using current equipment.) Within the phasemeter, the photodiode-output signal is digitized to 15 bits at a sampling frequency of 40 MHz by use of the same analog

  7. F2Dock: Fast Fourier Protein-Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Chowdhury, Rezaul; Siddavanahalli, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    The functions of proteins is often realized through their mutual interactions. Determining a relative transformation for a pair of proteins and their conformations which form a stable complex, reproducible in nature, is known as docking. It is an important step in drug design, structure determination and understanding function and structure relationships. In this paper we extend our non-uniform fast Fourier transform docking algorithm to include an adaptive search phase (both translational and rotational) and thereby speed up its execution. We have also implemented a multithreaded version of the adaptive docking algorithm for even faster execution on multicore machines. We call this protein-protein docking code F2Dock (F2 = Fast Fourier). We have calibrated F2Dock based on an extensive experimental study on a list of benchmark complexes and conclude that F2Dock works very well in practice. Though all docking results reported in this paper use shape complementarity and Coulombic potential based scores only, F2Dock is structured to incorporate Lennard-Jones potential and re-ranking docking solutions based on desolvation energy. PMID:21071796

  8. Telescope Adaptive Optics Code

    SciTech Connect

    Phillion, D.

    2005-07-28

    The Telescope AO Code has general adaptive optics capabilities plus specialized models for three telescopes with either adaptive optics or active optics systems. It has the capability to generate either single-layer or distributed Kolmogorov turbulence phase screens using the FFT. Missing low order spatial frequencies are added using the Karhunen-Loeve expansion. The phase structure curve is extremely dose to the theoreUcal. Secondly, it has the capability to simulate an adaptive optics control systems. The default parameters are those of the Keck II adaptive optics system. Thirdly, it has a general wave optics capability to model the science camera halo due to scintillation from atmospheric turbulence and the telescope optics. Although this capability was implemented for the Gemini telescopes, the only default parameter specific to the Gemini telescopes is the primary mirror diameter. Finally, it has a model for the LSST active optics alignment strategy. This last model is highly specific to the LSST

  9. Adaptive Heat Engine.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Babajanyan, S G; Martirosyan, N H; Melkikh, A V

    2016-07-15

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where-due to feedback from the functional part-the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  10. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  11. Adaptive Management of Ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management. As such, management may be treated as experiment, with replication, or management may be conducted in an iterative manner. Although the concept has resonated with many...

  12. Transcriptome screen for fast evolving genes by Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fast evolving genes are targets of an increasing panel of biological studies, from cancer research to population genetics and species specific adaptations. Yet, their identification and isolation are still laborious, particularly for non-model organisms. We developed a method, named the Inter-Specific Selective Hybridization (ISSH) method, for generating cDNA libraries enriched in fast evolving genes. It utilizes transcripts of homologous tissues of distinct yet related species. Experimental hybridization conditions are monitored in order to discard transcripts that do not find their homologous counterparts in the two species sets as well as transcripts that display a strong complementarity between the two species. Only heteroduplexes that disanneal at low stringency are used for constructing the resulting cDNA library. Results We demonstrate the efficiency of the ISSH method by generating a brain cDNA library enriched in fast evolving transcripts of a non-model catfish species as well as a control, non-enriched library. Our results indicate that the enriched library contains effectively more fast evolving sequences than the control library. Gene annotation analyses also indicate enrichment in genes with low expression levels and non-ubiquitously expressed genes, both categories encompassing the majority of fast evolving genes. Furthermore, most of the identified transcripts show higher sequence divergence between two closely related catfish species as compared to recognized fast evolving DNA markers. Conclusions The ISSH method offers a simple, inexpensive and efficient way to screen the transcriptome for isolating fast evolving genes. This method opens new opportunities in the investigation of biological mechanisms that include fast evolving genes, such as the evolution of lineage specific processes and traits responsible for species adaptation to their environment. PMID:20175901

  13. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  14. Comparison of Fast-Food and Non-Fast-Food Children's Menu Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Elena L.; Jedda, Virginia B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare the macronutrient content of children's meals sold by fast-food restaurants (FFR) and non-fast-food restaurants (NFF). Design: All restaurants within the designated city limits were surveyed. Non-fast-food children's meals were purchased, weighed, and analyzed using nutrition software. All fast-food children's meals were…

  15. Robust Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  16. Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    redundant model of the data to be used in classification . There are two classes of learning, or adaptation schemes. The first, unsupervised learning...37, No. 3, pp. 242-247, 1983. [2] E. F. Codd, Cellular Automata , Academic Press, 1968. [31 H. Everett, G. Gilbreath, S. Alderson, D. J. Marchette...Na al Oca aytm aete !JTI FL E COPY AD-A 199 030 Technical Document 1335 August 1988 Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classif ication C. E. Priebe D. J

  17. Driver Adaptive Warning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    this threshold, an alarm is triggered. Since TLC based systems can have user defined thresholds, a warning can be given as early as desired. However, the...Driver Adaptive Warning Systems Thesis Proposal Parag H. Batavia CMU-RI-TR-98-07 The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh...control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAR 1998 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1998 to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Driver Adaptive Warning

  18. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  19. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  20. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  1. Adaptation through proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liyang; Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation is a ubiquitous feature in biological sensory and signaling networks. It has been suggested that adaptive systems may follow certain simple design principles across diverse organisms, cells and pathways. One class of networks that can achieve adaptation utilizes an incoherent feedforward control, in which two parallel signaling branches exert opposite but proportional effects on the output at steady state. In this paper, we generalize this adaptation mechanism by establishing a steady-state proportionality relationship among a subset of nodes in a network. Adaptation can be achieved by using any two nodes in the sub-network to respectively regulate the output node positively and negatively. We focus on enzyme networks and first identify basic regulation motifs consisting of two and three nodes that can be used to build small networks with proportional relationships. Larger proportional networks can then be constructed modularly similar to LEGOs. Our method provides a general framework to construct and analyze a class of proportional and/or adaptation networks with arbitrary size, flexibility and versatile functional features.

  2. The Climate Adaptation Frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2013-01-01

    Climate adaptation has emerged as a mainstream risk management strategy for assisting in maintaining socio-ecological systems within the boundaries of a safe operating space. Yet, there are limits to the ability of systems to adapt. Here, we introduce the concept of an adaptation frontier , which is defined as a socio-ecological system s transitional adaptive operating space between safe and unsafe domains. A number of driving forces are responsible for determining the sustainability of systems on the frontier. These include path dependence, adaptation/development deficits, values conflicts and discounting of future loss and damage. The cumulative implications of these driving forces are highly uncertain. Nevertheless, the fact that a broad range of systems already persist at the edge of their frontiers suggests a high likelihood that some limits will eventually be exceeded. The resulting system transformation is likely to manifest as anticipatory modification of management objectives or loss and damage. These outcomes vary significantly with respect to their ethical implications. Successful navigation of the adaptation frontier will necessitate new paradigms of risk governance to elicit knowledge that encourages reflexive reevaluation of societal values that enable or constrain sustainability.

  3. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  4. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  5. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  6. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  7. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  8. Searches for Fast Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.

    2003-10-01

    We discuss optimal detection of fast radio transients from astrophysical objects while taking into account the effects of propagation through intervening ionized media, including dispersion, scattering, and scintillation. Our analysis applies to the giant-pulse phenomenon exhibited by some pulsars, for which we show examples, and to radio pulses from other astrophysical sources, such as prompt radio emission from gamma-ray burst sources and modulated signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We estimate scintillation parameters for extragalactic sources that take into account scattering both in the host galaxy and in foreground Galactic plasma.

  9. Fast, efficient lossless data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents lossless data compression and decompression algorithms which can be easily implemented in software. The algorithms can be partitioned into their fundamental parts which can be implemented at various stages within a data acquisition system. This allows for efficient integration of these functions into systems at the stage where they are most applicable. The algorithms were coded in Forth to run on a Silicon Composers Single Board Computer (SBC) using the Harris RTX2000 Forth processor. The algorithms require very few system resources and operate very fast. The performance of the algorithms with the RTX enables real time data compression and decompression to be implemented for a wide range of applications.

  10. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F.; Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A.

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R&D topics are discussed.

  11. Aging influences adaptations of the neuromuscular junction to endurance training.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, M R; Roby, M A; Glass, E K

    2011-09-08

    This investigation sought to determine if aging affected adaptations of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) to exercise training. Twenty young adult (8 months) and 20 aged (24 months) rats were assigned to either a program of treadmill exercise, or sedentary conditions. Following the 10-week experimental period, rats were euthanized, and soleus and plantaris muscles were removed and frozen. Longitudinal sections of the muscles were fluorescently stained to visualize pre-synaptic nerve terminals and post-synaptic endplates on both slow- and fast-twitch fibers. Images were collected with confocal microscopy and quantified. Muscle cross-sections were histochemically stained to assess muscle fiber profiles (size and fiber type). Our analysis of NMJs revealed a high degree of specificity and sensitivity to aging, exercise training, and their interaction. In the soleus, slow-twitch NMJs demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.05) training-induced adaptations in young adult, but not aged rats. In the fast-twitch NMJs of the soleus, aging, but not training, was associated with remodeling. In the plantaris, aging, but not training, remodeled the predominant fast-twitch NMJs, but only pre-synaptically. In contrast, the slow-twitch NMJs of the plantaris displayed morphologic adaptations to both aging and exercise in pre- and post-synaptic components. Muscle fiber profiles indicated that changes in NMJ size were unrelated to adaptations of their fibers. Our data show that aging interferes with the ability of NMJs to adapt to exercise training. Results also reveal complexity in the coordination of synaptic responses among different muscles, and different fiber types within muscles, in their adaptation to aging and exercise training.

  12. Fast Covariance Estimation for High-dimensional Functional Data.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Luo; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Ruppert, David; Crainiceanu, Ciprian

    2016-01-01

    We propose two fast covariance smoothing methods and associated software that scale up linearly with the number of observations per function. Most available methods and software cannot smooth covariance matrices of dimension J > 500; a recently introduced sandwich smoother is an exception but is not adapted to smooth covariance matrices of large dimensions, such as J = 10, 000. We introduce two new methods that circumvent those problems: 1) a fast implementation of the sandwich smoother for covariance smoothing; and 2) a two-step procedure that first obtains the singular value decomposition of the data matrix and then smoothes the eigenvectors. These new approaches are at least an order of magnitude faster in high dimensions and drastically reduce computer memory requirements. The new approaches provide instantaneous (a few seconds) smoothing for matrices of dimension J = 10,000 and very fast (< 10 minutes) smoothing for J = 100, 000. R functions, simulations, and data analysis provide ready to use, reproducible, and scalable tools for practical data analysis of noisy high-dimensional functional data.

  13. Spectrally resolved fast transient brain states in electrophysiological data

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Diego; Quinn, Andrew J.; Baker, Adam P.; Dupret, David; Tejero-Cantero, Alvaro; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of producing coordinated fast changing neural dynamics across multiple brain regions in order to adapt to rapidly changing environments. However, it is non-trivial to identify multiregion dynamics at fast sub-second time-scales in electrophysiological data. We propose a method that, with no knowledge of any task timings, can simultaneously identify and describe fast transient multiregion dynamics in terms of their temporal, spectral and spatial properties. The approach models brain activity using a discrete set of sequential states, with each state distinguished by its own multiregion spectral properties. This can identify potentially very short-lived visits to a brain state, at the same time as inferring the state's properties, by pooling over many repeated visits to that state. We show how this can be used to compute state-specific measures such as power spectra and coherence. We demonstrate that this can be used to identify short-lived transient brain states with distinct power and functional connectivity (e.g., coherence) properties in an MEG data set collected during a volitional motor task. PMID:26631815

  14. Split-belt walking: adaptation differences between young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Van Impe, Annouchka; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2012-08-01

    Human walking is highly adaptable, which allows us to walk under different circumstances. With aging, the probability of falling increases, which may partially be due to a decreased ability of older adults to adapt the gait pattern to the needs of the environment. The literature on visuomotor adaptations during reaching suggests, however, that older adults have little problems in adapting their motor behavior. Nevertheless, it may be that adaptation during a more complex task like gait is compromised by aging. In this study, we investigated the ability of young (n = 8) and older (n = 12) adults to adapt their gait pattern to novel constraints with a split-belt paradigm. Findings revealed that older adults adapted less and more slowly to split-belt walking and showed fewer aftereffects than young adults. While young adults showed a fast adjustment of the relative time spent in swing for each leg older adults failed to do so, but instead they were very fast in manipulating swing speed differences between the two legs. We suggest that these changes in adaptability of gait due to aging stem from a mild degradation of cortico-cerebellar pathways (reduced adaptability) and cerebral structures (decreased ability to change gait cycle timing). However, an alternative interpretation may be that the observed reduced adaptation is a compensatory strategy in view of the instability induced by the split-belt paradigm.

  15. Impact of intermittent fasting on health and disease processes.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P; Longo, Valter D; Harvie, Michelle

    2016-10-31

    Humans in modern societies typically consume food at least three times daily, while laboratory animals are fed ad libitum. Overconsumption of food with such eating patterns often leads to metabolic morbidities (insulin resistance, excessive accumulation of visceral fat, etc.), particularly when associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Because animals, including humans, evolved in environments where food was relatively scarce, they developed numerous adaptations that enabled them to function at a high level, both physically and cognitively, when in a food-deprived/fasted state. Intermittent fasting (IF) encompasses eating patterns in which individuals go extended time periods (e.g., 16-48h) with little or no energy intake, with intervening periods of normal food intake, on a recurring basis. We use the term periodic fasting (PF) to refer to IF with periods of fasting or fasting mimicking diets lasting from 2 to as many as 21 or more days. In laboratory rats and mice IF and PF have profound beneficial effects on many different indices of health and, importantly, can counteract disease processes and improve functional outcome in experimental models of a wide range of age-related disorders including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's disease and stroke. Studies of IF (e.g., 60% energy restriction on 2days per week or every other day), PF (e.g., a 5day diet providing 750-1100kcal) and time-restricted feeding (TRF; limiting the daily period of food intake to 8h or less) in normal and overweight human subjects have demonstrated efficacy for weight loss and improvements in multiple health indicators including insulin resistance and reductions in risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which IF improves health and counteracts disease processes involve activation of adaptive cellular stress response signaling pathways that enhance mitochondrial health, DNA repair

  16. Rapid adaptation to microgravity in mammalian macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cora S; de Zélicourt, Diane; Tauber, Svantje; Adrian, Astrid; Franz, Markus; Simmet, Dana M; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Hauschild, Swantje; Krammer, Sonja; Christen, Miriam; Bradacs, Gesine; Paulsen, Katrin; Wolf, Susanne A; Braun, Markus; Hatton, Jason; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Franke, Stefanie; Tanner, Samuel; Cristoforetti, Samantha; Sick, Beate; Hock, Bertold; Ullrich, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Despite the observed severe effects of microgravity on mammalian cells, many astronauts have completed long term stays in space without suffering from severe health problems. This raises questions about the cellular capacity for adaptation to a new gravitational environment. The International Space Station (ISS) experiment TRIPLE LUX A, performed in the BIOLAB laboratory of the ISS COLUMBUS module, allowed for the first time the direct measurement of a cellular function in real time and on orbit. We measured the oxidative burst reaction in mammalian macrophages (NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages) exposed to a centrifuge regime of internal 0 g and 1 g controls and step-wise increase or decrease of the gravitational force in four independent experiments. Surprisingly, we found that these macrophages adapted to microgravity in an ultra-fast manner within seconds, after an immediate inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst reaction. For the first time, we provided direct evidence of cellular sensitivity to gravity, through real-time on orbit measurements and by using an experimental system, in which all factors except gravity were constant. The surprisingly ultra-fast adaptation to microgravity indicates that mammalian macrophages are equipped with a highly efficient adaptation potential to a low gravity environment. This opens new avenues for the exploration of adaptation of mammalian cells to gravitational changes.

  17. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; Calvin, Justus A.; Fann, George I.; Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Galindo, Diego; Hammond, Jeff R.; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca; Hill, Judith C.; Jia, Jun; Kottmann, Jakob S.; Yvonne Ou, M-J.; Pei, Junchen; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Reuter, Matthew G.; Richie-Halford, Adam C.; Romero, Nichols A.; Sekino, Hideo; Shelton, William A.; Sundahl, Bryan E.; Thornton, W. Scott; Valeev, Edward F.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Vence, Nicholas; Yanai, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yukina

    2016-01-01

    MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  18. MADNESS: A Multiresolution, Adaptive Numerical Environment for Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Beylkin, Gregory; Bischoff, Florian A.; Calvin, Justus A.; Fann, George I.; Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Galindo, Diego; Hammond, Jeff R.; Hartman-Baker, Rebecca; Hill, Judith C.; Jia, Jun; Kottmann, Jakob S.; Yvonne Ou, M-J.; Pei, Junchen; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Reuter, Matthew G.; Richie-Halford, Adam C.; Romero, Nichols A.; Sekino, Hideo; Shelton, William A.; Sundahl, Bryan E.; Thornton, W. Scott; Valeev, Edward F.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Vence, Nicholas; Yanai, Takeshi; Yokoi, Yukina

    2016-01-01

    We present MADNESS (multiresolution adaptive numerical environment for scientific simulation) that is a high-level software environment for solving integral and differential equations in many dimensions that uses adaptive and fast harmonic analysis methods with guaranteed precision that are based on multiresolution analysis and separated representations. Underpinning the numerical capabilities is a powerful petascale parallel programming environment that aims to increase both programmer productivity and code scalability. This paper describes the features and capabilities of MADNESS and briefly discusses some current applications in chemistry and several areas of physics.

  19. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  20. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  1. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  2. Cortical Specializations Underlying Fast Computations.

    PubMed

    Volgushev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The time course of behaviorally relevant environmental events sets temporal constraints on neuronal processing. How does the mammalian brain make use of the increasingly complex networks of the neocortex, while making decisions and executing behavioral reactions within a reasonable time? The key parameter determining the speed of computations in neuronal networks is a time interval that neuronal ensembles need to process changes at their input and communicate results of this processing to downstream neurons. Theoretical analysis identified basic requirements for fast processing: use of neuronal populations for encoding, background activity, and fast onset dynamics of action potentials in neurons. Experimental evidence shows that populations of neocortical neurons fulfil these requirements. Indeed, they can change firing rate in response to input perturbations very quickly, within 1 to 3 ms, and encode high-frequency components of the input by phase-locking their spiking to frequencies up to 300 to 1000 Hz. This implies that time unit of computations by cortical ensembles is only few, 1 to 3 ms, which is considerably faster than the membrane time constant of individual neurons. The ability of cortical neuronal ensembles to communicate on a millisecond time scale allows for complex, multiple-step processing and precise coordination of neuronal activity in parallel processing streams, while keeping the speed of behavioral reactions within environmentally set temporal constraints.

  3. Fast generic polar harmonic transforms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai V; Tabbone, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    Generic polar harmonic transforms have recently been proposed to extract rotation-invariant features from images and their usefulness has been demonstrated in a number of pattern recognition problems. However, direct computation of these transforms from their definition is inefficient and is usually slower than some efficient computation strategies that have been proposed for other methods. This paper presents a number of novel computation strategies to compute these transforms rapidly. The proposed methods are based on the inherent recurrence relations among complex exponential and trigonometric functions used in the definition of the radial and angular kernels of these transforms. The employment of these relations leads to recursive and addition chain-based strategies for fast computation of harmonic function-based kernels. Experimental results show that the proposed method is about 10× faster than direct computation and 5× faster than fast computation of Zernike moments using the q-recursive strategy. Thus, among all existing rotation-invariant feature extraction methods, polar harmonic transforms are the fastest.

  4. Manybeam velocimeter for fast surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.; Avara, G.; Steinmetz, L.; Lai, C.; Perry, S.

    1996-09-01

    For the past 5 years, we have conceived, built and successfully used a new 10 beam laser velocimeter for monitoring velocity vs time histories of fast moving surfaces, and will have a 20 beam capability soon. We conceived a method to multiplex 5 to 10 beams through a single Fabry-Perot interferometer, without losing any light that our equivalently-performing single beam system could use, and with negligible cross- talk. This saves the cost of 16 interferometers, simplifies operation and takes less space than without multiplexing. We devised special efficient light collecting probes, streak cameras that change sweep speed during the course of the record, and a new double cavity interferometer which is better, cheaper and more flexible than our previous versions. With the 10 recorders, we conceived and employ a method of using both a fast and a slow streak camera on each of 5 beams without reducing the light that is available to either camera separately. Five new galvanometrically-driven triggerable CCD streak cameras will be installed soon.

  5. Face Adaptation Effects Show Strong and Long-Lasting Transfer from Lab to More Ecological Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Ditye, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A review on recent experiments on figural face aftereffects reveals that adaptation effects in famous faces can last for hours up to days. Such adaptations seem to be highly reliable regarding test–retest designs as well as regarding the generalizability of adaptation across different adaptation routines and adaptations toward different kinds of facial properties. However, in the studies conducted so far, adaptation and the subsequent test phase were carried out in typical laboratory environments. Under these circumstances, it cannot be ruled out that the observed effects are, in fact, episodic learn–test compatibility effects. To test for ecological validity in adaptation effects we used an adaptation paradigm including environmental and social properties that differed between adaptation and test phase. With matched samples (n1 = n2 = 54) we found no main effects of experimental setting compatibility resulting from varying where the tests where conducted (environmental condition) nor any interaction with effects of stimulus compatibility resulting from varying stimulus similarity between adaptation and test phase using the same picture, different pictures of the same person, or different persons (transfer). This indicates that these adaptation effects are not artificial or merely lab-biased effects. Adaptation to face stimuli may document representational adaptations and tuning mechanisms that integrate new visual input in a very fast, reliable, and sustainable way. PMID:22291676

  6. Catch Me if You Can: Adaptation from Standing Genetic Variation to a Moving Phenotypic Optimum.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Sebastian; Hermisson, Joachim; Kopp, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Adaptation lies at the heart of Darwinian evolution. Accordingly, numerous studies have tried to provide a formal framework for the description of the adaptive process. Of these, two complementary modeling approaches have emerged: While so-called adaptive-walk models consider adaptation from the successive fixation of de novo mutations only, quantitative genetic models assume that adaptation proceeds exclusively from preexisting standing genetic variation. The latter approach, however, has focused on short-term evolution of population means and variances rather than on the statistical properties of adaptive substitutions. Our aim is to combine these two approaches by describing the ecological and genetic factors that determine the genetic basis of adaptation from standing genetic variation in terms of the effect-size distribution of individual alleles. Specifically, we consider the evolution of a quantitative trait to a gradually changing environment. By means of analytical approximations, we derive the distribution of adaptive substitutions from standing genetic variation, that is, the distribution of the phenotypic effects of those alleles from the standing variation that become fixed during adaptation. Our results are checked against individual-based simulations. We find that, compared to adaptation from de novo mutations, (i) adaptation from standing variation proceeds by the fixation of more alleles of small effect and (ii) populations that adapt from standing genetic variation can traverse larger distances in phenotype space and, thus, have a higher potential for adaptation if the rate of environmental change is fast rather than slow.

  7. Adaptive Flight Control Design with Optimal Control Modification on an F-18 Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Griffin, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to as the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly; however, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect the robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient robustness. A damping term (v) is added in the modification to increase damping as needed. Simulations were conducted on a damaged F-18 aircraft (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) with both the standard baseline dynamic inversion controller and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model.

  8. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing. PMID:27003445

  9. Passification based simple adaptive control of quadrotor attitude: Algorithms and testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomashevich, Stanislav; Belyavskyi, Andrey; Andrievsky, Boris

    2017-01-01

    In the paper, the results of the Passification Method with the Implicit Reference Model (IRM) approach are applied for designing the simple adaptive controller for quadrotor attitude. The IRM design technique makes it possible to relax the matching condition, known for habitual MRAC systems, and leads to simple adaptive controllers, ensuring fast tuning the controller gains, high robustness with respect to nonlinearities in the control loop, to the external disturbances and the unmodeled plant dynamics. For experimental evaluation of the adaptive systems performance, the 2DOF laboratory setup has been created. The testbed allows to safely test new control algorithms in the laboratory area with a small space and promptly make changes in cases of failure. The testing results of simple adaptive control of quadrotor attitude are presented, demonstrating efficacy of the applied simple adaptive control method. The experiments demonstrate good performance quality and high adaptation rate of the simple adaptive control system.

  10. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  11. Optimal and adaptive methods of processing hydroacoustic signals (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, G. S.; Sidel'nikov, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    Different methods of optimal and adaptive processing of hydroacoustic signals for multipath propagation and scattering are considered. Advantages and drawbacks of the classical adaptive (Capon, MUSIC, and Johnson) algorithms and "fast" projection algorithms are analyzed for the case of multipath propagation and scattering of strong signals. The classical optimal approaches to detecting multipath signals are presented. A mechanism of controlled normalization of strong signals is proposed to automatically detect weak signals. The results of simulating the operation of different detection algorithms for a linear equidistant array under multipath propagation and scattering are presented. An automatic detector is analyzed, which is based on classical or fast projection algorithms, which estimates the background proceeding from median filtering or the method of bilateral spatial contrast.

  12. Satellite cell ablation attenuates short-term fast-to-slow fibre type transformations in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen J B; Murdoch, Gordon K; Shu, Yang; Harris, R Luke W; Gallo, Maria; Dixon, Walter T; Foxcroft, George R; Gordon, Tessa; Putman, Charles T

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this time-course study was to determine whether satellite cell ablation within rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscles exposed to short-term chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) would limit fast-to-slow fibre type transformations. Satellite cells of the left TA were ablated by exposure to gamma-irradiation before 1, 2, 5 or 10 days of CLFS and 1 week later where required. Control groups received only CLFS or a sham operation. Continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine revealed that CLFS first induced an increase in satellite cell proliferation at 1 day, up to a maximum at 10 days over control (mean +/- SEM, 5.7 +/- 0.7 and 20.4 +/- 1.0 versus 1.5 +/- 0.2 mm(-2), respectively, P < 0.007) that was abolished by gamma-irradiation. Myosin heavy chain mRNA, immunohistochemical and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses revealed CLFS-induced fast-to-slow fibre type transformation began at 5 days and continued at 10 days; in those muscles that were also exposed to gamma-irradiation, attenuation occurred within the fast fibre population, and the final fast-twitch to slow-twitch adaptation did not occur. These findings indicate satellite cells play active and obligatory roles early on in the time course during skeletal muscle fibre type adaptations to CLFS.

  13. A Novel Adaptive Frequency Estimation Algorithm Based on Interpolation FFT and Improved Adaptive Notch Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ting-ao; Li, Hua-nan; Zhang, Qi-xin; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    The convergence rate and the continuous tracking precision are two main problems of the existing adaptive notch filter (ANF) for frequency tracking. To solve the problems, the frequency is detected by interpolation FFT at first, which aims to overcome the convergence rate of the ANF. Then, referring to the idea of negative feedback, an evaluation factor is designed to monitor the ANF parameters and realize continuously high frequency tracking accuracy. According to the principle, a novel adaptive frequency estimation algorithm based on interpolation FFT and improved ANF is put forward. Its basic idea, specific measures and implementation steps are described in detail. The proposed algorithm obtains a fast estimation of the signal frequency, higher accuracy and better universality qualities. Simulation results verified the superiority and validity of the proposed algorithm when compared with original algorithms.

  14. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  15. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  16. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  17. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  18. Adaptation and risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation assessment methods are compatible with the international risk management standard ISO:31000. Risk management approaches are increasingly being recommended for adaptation assessments at both national and local levels. Two orientations to assessments can commonly be identified: top-down and bottom-up, and prescriptive and diagnostic. Combinations of these orientations favor different types of assessments. The choice of orientation can be related to uncertainties in prediction and taking action, in the type of adaptation and in the degree of system stress. Adopting multiple viewpoints is to be encouraged, especially in complex situations. The bulk of current guidance material is consistent with top-down and predictive approaches, thus is most suitable for risk scoping and identification. Abroad range ofmaterial fromwithin and beyond the climate change literature can be used to select methods to be used in assessing and implementing adaptation. The framing of risk, correct formulation of the questions being investigated and assessment methodology are critical aspects of the scoping phase. Only when these issues have been addressed should be issue of specific methods and tools be addressed. The reorientation of adaptation from an assessment focused solely on anthropogenic climate change to broader issues of vulnerability/resilience, sustainable development and disaster risk, especially through a risk management framework, can draw from existing policy and management understanding in communities, professions and agencies, incorporating existing agendas, knowledge, risks, and issues they already face.

  19. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  20. Solar Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Thomas R; Marino, Jose

    Adaptive optics (AO) has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO) will be given.

  1. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  2. Real Time & Power Efficient Adaptive - Robust Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan Gliga, Lavinius; Constantin Mihai, Cosmin; Lupu, Ciprian; Popescu, Dumitru

    2017-01-01

    A design procedure for a control system suited for dynamic variable processes is presented in this paper. The proposed adaptive - robust control strategy considers both adaptive control advantages and robust control benefits. It estimates the degradation of the system’s performances due to the dynamic variation in the process and it then utilizes it to determine when the system must be adapted with a redesign of the robust controller. A single integral criterion is used for the identification of the process, and for the design of the control algorithm, which is expressed in direct form, through a cost function defined in the space of the parameters of both the process and the controller. For the minimization of this nonlinear function, an adequate mathematical programming minimization method is used. The theoretical approach presented in this paper was validated for a closed loop control system, simulated in an application developed in C. Because of the reduced number of operations, this method is suitable for implementation on fast processes. Due to its effectiveness, it increases the idle time of the CPU, thereby saving electrical energy.

  3. Advances in Adaptive Control Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This poster presentation describes recent advances in adaptive control technology developed by NASA. Optimal Control Modification is a novel adaptive law that can improve performance and robustness of adaptive control systems. A new technique has been developed to provide an analytical method for computing time delay stability margin for adaptive control systems.

  4. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  5. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  6. Adaptive modulations of martensites.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Rössler, U K; Heczko, O; Wuttig, M; Buschbeck, J; Schultz, L; Fähler, S

    2010-04-09

    Modulated phases occur in numerous functional materials like giant ferroelectrics and magnetic shape-memory alloys. To understand the origin of these phases, we employ and generalize the concept of adaptive martensite. As a starting point, we investigate the coexistence of austenite, adaptive 14M phase, and tetragonal martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape-memory alloy epitaxial films. We show that the modulated martensite can be constructed from nanotwinned variants of the tetragonal martensite phase. By combining the concept of adaptive martensite with branching of twin variants, we can explain key features of modulated phases from a microscopic view. This includes metastability, the sequence of 6M-10M-14M-NM intermartensitic transitions, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  7. Adaptive Epibiochemistry and Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Buryanov, Ya I

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reactions of post-synthetic modification of macromolecules occur in the cells of all organisms. These reactions, which can be designated as epibiochemical, are of a special type and, as discriminated from reactions with low molecular weight substrates, occur on the level of biopolymers, causing their covalent modification. The majority of epibiochemical modifications of proteins, DNA, and RNA are reversible and are carried out by modification transferases and de-modification enzymes, respectively. Epibiochemical, i.e. those located above the low molecular weight metabolites, modifications of proteins and nucleic acids perform various functions, including participation in molecular mechanisms of adaptive epigenetic heredity. This paper presents an overview of some adaptive epibiochemical modifications of macromolecules and the adaptive epigenetic processes on their basis. The features of epigenetic inheritance of acquired characteristics and the limits of biological evolution are discussed.

  8. Fast breeder reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    van Erp, J.B.

    1973-10-01

    Reactor protection is provided for a liquid-metal-fast breeder reactor core by measuring the coolant outflow temperature from each of the subassemblies of the core. The outputs of the temperature sensors from a subassembly region of the core containing a plurality of subassemblies are combined in a logic circuit which develops a scram alarm if a predetermined number of the sensors indicate an over temperature condition. The coolant outflow from a single subassembly can be mixed with the coolant outflow from adjacent subassemblies prior to the temperature sensing to increase the sensitivity of the protection system to a single subassembly failure. Coherence between the sensors can be required to discriminate against noise signals. (Official Gazette)

  9. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A uv-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  10. Rotor for centrifugal fast analyzers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an improved photometric analyzer of the rotary cuvette type, the analyzer incorporating a multicuvette rotor of novel design. The rotor (a) is leaktight, (b) permits operation in the 90.degree. and 180.degree. excitation modes, (c) is compatible with extensively used Centrifugal Fast Analyzers, and (d) can be used thousands of times. The rotor includes an assembly comprising a top plate, a bottom plate, and a central plate, the rim of the central plate being formed with circumferentially spaced indentations. A UV-transmitting ring is sealably affixed to the indented rim to define with the indentations an array of cuvettes. The ring serves both as a sealing means and an end window for the cuvettes.

  11. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL3 + L4), while existing algorithms take O(nL4). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier–Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA. PMID:27570801

  12. Integral fast reactor safety features

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J.E.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Mueller, C.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Wade, D.C.; Wei, T.Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The two major goals of the IFR development effort are improved economics and enhanced safety. In addition to liquid metal cooling, the principal design features that distinguish the IFR are: (1) a pool-type primary system, (2) an advanced ternary alloy metallic fuel, and (3) an integral fuel cycle with on-site fuel reprocessing and fabrication. This paper focuses on the technical aspects of the improved safety margins available in the IFR concept. This increased level of safety is made possible by (1) the liquid metal (sodium) coolant and pool-type primary system layout, which together facilitate passive decay heat removal, and (2) a sodium-bonded metallic fuel pin design with thermal and neutronic properties that provide passive core responses which control and mitigate the consequences of reactor accidents.

  13. Fast Steerable Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhizhen; Shkolnisky, Yoel; Singer, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy nowadays often requires the analysis of hundreds of thousands of 2-D images as large as a few hundred pixels in each direction. Here, we introduce an algorithm that efficiently and accurately performs principal component analysis (PCA) for a large set of 2-D images, and, for each image, the set of its uniform rotations in the plane and their reflections. For a dataset consisting of n images of size L × L pixels, the computational complexity of our algorithm is O(nL(3) + L(4)), while existing algorithms take O(nL(4)). The new algorithm computes the expansion coefficients of the images in a Fourier-Bessel basis efficiently using the nonuniform fast Fourier transform. We compare the accuracy and efficiency of the new algorithm with traditional PCA and existing algorithms for steerable PCA.

  14. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  15. Adaptive response modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Esposito, Giuseppe; Belli, Mauro

    Cellular response to radiation is often modified by a previous delivery of a small "priming" dose: a smaller amount of damage, defined by the end point being investigated, is observed, and for this reason the effect is called adaptive response. An improved understanding of this effect is essential (as much as for the case of the bystander effect) for a reliable radiation risk assessment when low dose irradiations are involved. Experiments on adaptive response have shown that there are a number of factors that strongly influence the occurrence (and the level) of the adaptation. In particular, priming doses and dose rates have to fall in defined ranges; the same is true for the time interval between the delivery of the small priming dose and the irradiation with the main, larger, dose (called in this case challenging dose). Different hypotheses can be formulated on the main mechanism(s) determining the adaptive response: an increased efficiency of DNA repair, an increased level of antioxidant enzymes, an alteration of cell cycle progression, a chromatin conformation change. An experimental clearcut evidence going definitely in the direction of one of these explanations is not yet available. Modelling can be done at different levels. Simple models, relating the amount of damage, through elementary differential equations, to the dose and dose rate experienced by the cell, are relatively easy to handle, and they can be modified to account for the priming irradiation. However, this can hardly be of decisive help in the explanation of the mechanisms, since each parameter of these models often incorporates in an effective way several cellular processes related to the response to radiation. In this presentation we show our attempts to describe adaptive response with models that explicitly contain, as a dynamical variable, the inducible adaptive agent. At a price of a more difficult treatment, this approach is probably more prone to give support to the experimental studies

  16. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, Benoit; Pope, Michael; Piet, Steven J.; Driscoll, Michael

    2012-07-30

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  17. FastBit Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng

    2007-08-02

    An index in a database system is a data structure that utilizes redundant information about the base data to speed up common searching and retrieval operations. Most commonly used indexes are variants of B-trees, such as B+-tree and B*-tree. FastBit implements a set of alternative indexes call compressed bitmap indexes. Compared with B-tree variants, these indexes provide very efficient searching and retrieval operations by sacrificing the efficiency of updating the indexes after the modification of an individual record. In addition to the well-known strengths of bitmap indexes, FastBit has a special strength stemming from the bitmap compression scheme used. The compression method is called the Word-Aligned Hybrid (WAH) code. It reduces the bitmap indexes to reasonable sizes and at the same time allows very efficient bitwise logical operations directly on the compressed bitmaps. Compared with the well-known compression methods such as LZ77 and Byte-aligned Bitmap code (BBC), WAH sacrifices some space efficiency for a significant improvement in operational efficiency. Since the bitwise logical operations are the most important operations needed to answer queries, using WAH compression has been shown to answer queries significantly faster than using other compression schemes. Theoretical analyses showed that WAH compressed bitmap indexes are optimal for one-dimensional range queries. Only the most efficient indexing schemes such as B+-tree and B*-tree have this optimality property. However, bitmap indexes are superior because they can efficiently answer multi-dimensional range queries by combining the answers to one-dimensional queries.

  18. New Adaptive Optics Technique Demonstrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    Enrico Marchetti, the MAD Project Manager. "The system behaviour was very stable and the acquisition and closed loop operations were fast and smooth." ESO PR Photo 19d/07 ESO PR Photo 19d/07 AO Strehl Maps After routine checks on the closed loop stability and preliminary scans of the system parameters, the telescope was pointed to Omega Centauri, a very crowded area in the sky, and an optimal test case for extracting accurate measurements on AO correction performance with good spatial resolution on the FoV. Three 11 magnitude stars within a circle of ~1.5 arcmin diameter were selected as the baseline for wavefront sensing and the MCAO loop was closed successfully. Omega Centauri will be observed for several nights more, in order to test the AO correction in different seeing conditions. "This is a tremendous achievement that opens new perspectives in the era of extremely large telescopes," said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. " "I am very proud of the ESO staff and wish to congratulate all involved for their prowess," she added. The MAD images perfectly show the validity of the concept. The image quality was almost uniform over the whole field of view and beautifully corrected for some of the atmospheric turbulence. More Information The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) Demonstrator MAD was built by ESO in collaboration with the Astronomical Observatories of Arcetri and Padova (Italy) and the Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal), as a pathfinder for 2nd generation VLT instrumentation and the European Extremely Large Telescope project. The MCAO technique is based on probing the atmospheric turbulence on a large volume of atmosphere by means of several wavefront sensors (WFS), which point at different locations in the observed field of view, and by means of several deformable mirrors - optically conjugated at different altitudes on the atmosphere above the telescope - which correct for the atmospheric disturbance. The signals provided

  19. Structured adaptive grid generation using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, Bharat K.; Roger, R. P.; Chan, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical algorithm depends not only on the formal order of approximation but also on the distribution of grid points in the computational domain. Grid adaptation is a procedure which allows optimal grid redistribution as the solution progresses. It offers the prospect of accurate flow field simulations without the use of an excessively timely, computationally expensive, grid. Grid adaptive schemes are divided into two basic categories: differential and algebraic. The differential method is based on a variational approach where a function which contains a measure of grid smoothness, orthogonality and volume variation is minimized by using a variational principle. This approach provided a solid mathematical basis for the adaptive method, but the Euler-Lagrange equations must be solved in addition to the original governing equations. On the other hand, the algebraic method requires much less computational effort, but the grid may not be smooth. The algebraic techniques are based on devising an algorithm where the grid movement is governed by estimates of the local error in the numerical solution. This is achieved by requiring the points in the large error regions to attract other points and points in the low error region to repel other points. The development of a fast, efficient, and robust algebraic adaptive algorithm for structured flow simulation applications is presented. This development is accomplished in a three step process. The first step is to define an adaptive weighting mesh (distribution mesh) on the basis of the equidistribution law applied to the flow field solution. The second, and probably the most crucial step, is to redistribute grid points in the computational domain according to the aforementioned weighting mesh. The third and the last step is to reevaluate the flow property by an appropriate search/interpolate scheme at the new grid locations. The adaptive weighting mesh provides the information on the desired concentration

  20. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Die adaptive Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung (ACC, Adaptive Cruise Control) ist eine Weiterentwicklung der konventionellen Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung, die eine konstante Fahrgeschwindigkeit einstellt. ACC überwacht mittels eines Radarsensors den Bereich vor dem Fahrzeug und passt die Geschwindigkeit den Gegebenheiten an. ACC reagiert auf langsamer vorausfahrende oder einscherende Fahrzeuge mit einer Reduzierung der Geschwindigkeit, sodass der vorgeschriebene Mindestabstand zum vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug nicht unterschritten wird. Hierzu greift ACC in Antrieb und Bremse ein. Sobald das vorausfahrende Fahrzeug beschleunigt oder die Spur verlässt, regelt ACC die Geschwindigkeit wieder auf die vorgegebene Sollgeschwindigkeit ein (Bild 1). ACC steht somit für eine Geschwindigkeitsregelung, die sich dem vorausfahrenden Verkehr anpasst.

  1. Adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jr., Robert L. (Inventor); Vipperman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cole, Daniel G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm implemented in digital or analog form is used in conjunction with a voltage controlled amplifier to compensate for the feedthrough capacitance of piezoelectric sensoriactuator. The mechanical response of the piezoelectric sensoriactuator is resolved from the electrical response by adaptively altering the gain imposed on the electrical circuit used for compensation. For wideband, stochastic input disturbances, the feedthrough capacitance of the sensoriactuator can be identified on-line, providing a means of implementing direct-rate-feedback control in analog hardware. The device is capable of on-line system health monitoring since a quasi-stable dynamic capacitance is indicative of sustained health of the piezoelectric element.

  2. Adaptive management: Chapter 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  3. Fast Transient Behavior of Thyristor Switches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    FAST TRANSIENT BEHAVIOR OF THYRISTOR SWITCHES(U) TEXAS i/tl TECH UNIV LUBBOCK DEPT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROTNOV FEB 85 RADC-TR-85-20...8217 , " , - ." .- ., .-, ..., .., . ., , ." ’ ’ , ’ , ., " " , ’ ., ., .., ..’ ..’ , .’ .. ., [ ." -.-.-, . ’ .J ,Z . ’ .’ , , . ,. C ; RADC-TR85-20 4 Final Technical Report February 1965 Lf) FAST TRANSIENT BEHAVIOR OF 4 ~THYRISTOR SWITCHES Texas Tech...Ctawaficaitonp FAST TRANSIENT BEHAVIOR OF THYRISTOR SWITCHES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S)

  4. Hybrid Adaptive Flight Control with Model Inversion Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates a hybrid adaptive flight control method as a design possibility for a flight control system that can enable an effective adaptation strategy to deal with off-nominal flight conditions. The hybrid adaptive control blends both direct and indirect adaptive control in a model inversion flight control architecture. The blending of both direct and indirect adaptive control provides a much more flexible and effective adaptive flight control architecture than that with either direct or indirect adaptive control alone. The indirect adaptive control is used to update the model inversion controller by an on-line parameter estimation of uncertain plant dynamics based on two methods. The first parameter estimation method is an indirect adaptive law based on the Lyapunov theory, and the second method is a recursive least-squares indirect adaptive law. The model inversion controller is therefore made to adapt to changes in the plant dynamics due to uncertainty. As a result, the modeling error is reduced that directly leads to a decrease in the tracking error. In conjunction with the indirect adaptive control that updates the model inversion controller, a direct adaptive control is implemented as an augmented command to further reduce any residual tracking error that is not entirely eliminated by the indirect adaptive control.

  5. Pro-TRH and pro-CRF expression in paraventricular nucleus of small litter-reared fasted adult rats.

    PubMed

    Aréchiga-Ceballos, F; Alvarez-Salas, E; Matamoros-Trejo, G; Amaya, M I; García-Luna, C; de Gortari, P

    2014-04-01

    Neuroendocrine axes adapt to nutrient availability. During fasting, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT) is reduced, whereas that of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) is increased. Overfeeding-induced hyperleptinemia during lactation may alter the regulatory set point of neuroendocrine axes and their adaptability to fasting in adulthood. Hyperleptinemia is developed in rodents by litter size reduction during lactation; adult rats from small litters become overweight, but their paraventricular nucleus (PVN) TRH synthesis is unchanged. It is unclear whether peptide expression still responds to nutrient availability. PVN corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression has not been evaluated in this model. We analyzed adaptability of HPT and HPA axes to fasting-induced low leptin levels of reduced-litter adult rats. Offspring litters were reduced to 2-3/dam (early-overfed) or maintained at 8/dam (controls, C). At 10 weeks old, a subset of animals from each group was fasted for 48 h and leptin, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones serum levels were analyzed. In brain, expressions of leptin receptor, NPY and SOCS3, were evaluated in arcuate nucleus, and those of proTRH and proCRF in PVN by real-time PCR. ProTRH expression in anterior and medial PVN subcompartments was assayed by in situ hybridization. Early-overfed adults developed hyperphagia and excessive weight, together with decreased proTRH expression in anterior PVN, supporting the anorexigenic effects of TRH. Early-overfed rats presented low PVN proTRH synthesis, whereas fasting did not induce a further reduction. Fasting-induced stress was unable to increase corticosterone levels, contributing to reduced body weight loss in early-overfed rats. We concluded that early overfeeding impaired the adaptability of HPT and HPA axes to excess weight and fasting in adults.

  6. Stimulus change detection in phasic auditory units in the frog midbrain: frequency and ear specific adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ponnath, Abhilash; Hoke, Kim L.

    2013-01-01

    Neural adaptation, a reduction in the response to a maintained stimulus, is an important mechanism for detecting stimulus change. Contributing to change detection is the fact that adaptation is often stimulus specific: adaptation to a particular stimulus reduces excitability to a specific subset of stimuli, while the ability to respond to other stimuli is unaffected. Phasic cells (e.g., cells responding to stimulus onset) are good candidates for detecting the most rapid changes in natural auditory scenes, as they exhibit fast and complete adaptation to an initial stimulus presentation. We made recordings of single phasic auditory units in the frog midbrain to determine if adaptation was specific to stimulus frequency and ear of input. In response to an instantaneous frequency step in a tone, 28 % of phasic cells exhibited frequency specific adaptation based on a relative frequency change (delta-f = ±16 %). Frequency specific adaptation was not limited to frequency steps, however, as adaptation was also overcome during continuous frequency modulated stimuli and in response to spectral transients interrupting tones. The results suggest that adaptation is separated for peripheral (e.g., frequency) channels. This was tested directly using dichotic stimuli. In 45 % of binaural phasic units, adaptation was ear specific: adaptation to stimulation of one ear did not affect responses to stimulation of the other ear. Thus, adaptation exhibited specificity for stimulus frequency and lateralization at the level of the midbrain. This mechanism could be employed to detect rapid stimulus change within and between sound sources in complex acoustic environments. PMID:23344947

  7. The fast escaping set for quasiregular mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergweiler, Walter; Drasin, David; Fletcher, Alastair

    2014-06-01

    The fast escaping set of a transcendental entire function is the set of all points which tend to infinity under iteration as fast as possible compatible with the growth of the function. We study the analogous set for quasiregular mappings in higher dimensions and show, among other things, that various equivalent definitions of the fast escaping set for transcendental entire functions in the plane also coincide for quasiregular mappings. We also exhibit a class of quasiregular mappings for which the fast escaping set has the structure of a spider's web.

  8. Practical management of diabetes during Ramadan fasting.

    PubMed

    Fariduddin, M; Mahtab, H; Latif, Z A; Siddiqui, N I

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a global epidemic including Bangladesh. It is a chronic, costly and deadly disease. Recent advancement gives us the opportunity to control diabetes and offer the patient to have a normal or near normal life. Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. Recent studies show that most of the type-2 diabetic patients can fast during the holy month of Ramadan safely. But they need pre-Ramadan counseling for assessment, education, motivation, dietary and drug adjustment. Ramadan is beneficial for health. Fasting improves metabolic control, reduces weight and helps to control hypertension. Fasting also associated with some risks like-hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyper osmolar non ketotic coma and dehydration. All of these risks can be significantly reduced by pre-Ramadan counseling. Those who are at very high risks of hypoglycemia and acute diabetic or other complications they should not fast. After recovery they should complete their fast with the consultation of Islamic scholars. If there is hypoglycemia while fasting, fast must be broken. Islam allows us to have a regular blood sugar test during fast. Patient should follow a highly individualized management plan. Close monitoring is essential to prevent complications for safe Ramadan.

  9. The block adaptive multigrid method applied to the solution of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantelelis, Nikos

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, a scheme capable of solving very fast and robust complex nonlinear systems of equations is presented. The Block Adaptive Multigrid (BAM) solution method offers multigrid acceleration and adaptive grid refinement based on the prediction of the solution error. The proposed solution method was used with an implicit upwind Euler solver for the solution of complex transonic flows around airfoils. Very fast results were obtained (18-fold acceleration of the solution) using one fourth of the volumes of a global grid with the same solution accuracy for two test cases.

  10. Using ultra fast analog memories for fast photodetector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Dominique; Delagnes, Eric; Maalmi, Jihane

    2012-12-01

    The recent progresses in the field of photodetection have pushed the performances of the detectors toward the picosecond scale. Necessary precise charge and time measurement are mainly based on high-end oscilloscopes or commercial modules, but these solutions are expensive and house very few channels. The USB-WaveCatcher board provides high performances over a short time window. It houses two 12-bit 500-MHz-bandwidth digitizers sampling up to 3.2 GS/s. Its low consumption allows it to be USB-powered and it offers a lot of functionalities. The board has been used in different test benches dedicated to fast MCP-PMTs or SiPMs, and a reproducible time precision better than 10 ps rms has been demonstrated. Implementations with up to 16 channels have been designed and exhibit the same time precision. The USB-WaveCatcher thus seems to be a wonderful tool for photodetector characterization. Our next step is to widely expand the number of channels while keeping the 10 ps time precision.

  11. Accelerated Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Raymond K.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Green, Joseph J.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.; Shi, Fang

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm is an image-based wavefront-sensing method that can turn any science instrument focal plane into a wavefront sensor. MGS characterizes optical systems by estimating the wavefront errors in the exit pupil using only intensity images of a star or other point source of light. This innovative implementation of MGS significantly accelerates the MGS phase retrieval algorithm by using stream-processing hardware on conventional graphics cards. Stream processing is a relatively new, yet powerful, paradigm to allow parallel processing of certain applications that apply single instructions to multiple data (SIMD). These stream processors are designed specifically to support large-scale parallel computing on a single graphics chip. Computationally intensive algorithms, such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), are particularly well suited for this computing environment. This high-speed version of MGS exploits commercially available hardware to accomplish the same objective in a fraction of the original time. The exploit involves performing matrix calculations in nVidia graphic cards. The graphical processor unit (GPU) is hardware that is specialized for computationally intensive, highly parallel computation. From the software perspective, a parallel programming model is used, called CUDA, to transparently scale multicore parallelism in hardware. This technology gives computationally intensive applications access to the processing power of the nVidia GPUs through a C/C++ programming interface. The AAMGS (Accelerated Adaptive MGS) software takes advantage of these advanced technologies, to accelerate the optical phase error characterization. With a single PC that contains four nVidia GTX-280 graphic cards, the new implementation can process four images simultaneously to produce a JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) wavefront measurement 60 times faster than the previous code.

  12. Adaptive Cruise Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winner, Hermann; Danner, Bernd; Steinle, Joachim

    Mit Adaptive Cruise Control, abgekürzt ACC, wird eine Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung bezeichnet, die sich an die Verkehrssituation anpasst. Synonyme Bezeichnungen sind Aktive Geschwindigkeitsregelung, Automatische Distanzregelung oder Abstandsregeltempomat. Im englischen Sprachraum fnden sich die weiteren Bezeichnungen Active Cruise Control, Automatic Cruise Control oder Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control. Als markengeschützte Bezeichnungen sind Distronic und Automatische Distanz-Regelung (ADR) eingetragen.

  13. Multiple Docking Adapter Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This cutaway drawing details the major characteristics of the Skylab Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA). The MDA, built under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, housed the control units for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP), and Zero-Gravity Materials Processing Facility, and provided a docking port for the Apollo Command Module (CM).

  14. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  15. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  16. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  17. Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinger, Scott A.; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Cohen, David; Green, Joseph J.; Lou, John; Ohara, Catherine; Redding, David; Shi, Fang

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive MGS Phase Retrieval software uses the Modified Gerchberg-Saxton (MGS) algorithm, an image-based sensing method that can turn any focal plane science instrument into a wavefront sensor, avoiding the need to use external metrology equipment. Knowledge of the wavefront enables intelligent control of active optical systems.

  18. Adapting Environmental Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This publication provides Peace Corps volunteers and others who conduct environmental education activities in schools, environmental education centers, parks, and communities with the tools to adapt existing environmental education resources to local environmental issues, cultures, and audiences. Sections include: (1) the process of adapting…

  19. Parallel multilevel adaptive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, B.; Govett, M.; Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The progress of a project for the design and analysis of a multilevel adaptive algorithm (AFAC/HM/) targeted for the Navier Stokes Computer is discussed. The results of initial timing tests of AFAC, coupled with multigrid and an efficient load balancer, on a 16-node Intel iPSC/2 hypercube are included. The results of timing tests are presented.

  20. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  1. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative...

  2. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5’UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments. PMID:27812193

  3. Narrative, Adaptation, and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateson, Mary Catherine

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores how individuals and communities orient themselves to the future by the way they story the past. There is a persistent tendency to think of such narratives as factual and therefore stable. The mutability of such narratives is actually a key adaptive characteristic, ranging from complete repression of individual traumas to public…

  4. The Modular Adaptive Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Panda, Anshuman; Singh, Amartya; Sinha, Himanshu; Bhanot, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is an ancient machine, performing the same function across organisms. Although functionally unitary, recent experiments suggest specialized roles for some ribosomal proteins. Our central thesis is that ribosomal proteins function in a modular fashion to decode genetic information in a context dependent manner. We show through large data analyses that although many ribosomal proteins are essential with consistent effect on growth in different conditions in yeast and similar expression across cell and tissue types in mice and humans, some ribosomal proteins are used in an environment specific manner. The latter set of variable ribosomal proteins further function in a coordinated manner forming modules, which are adapted to different environmental cues in different organisms. We show that these environment specific modules of ribosomal proteins in yeast have differential genetic interactions with other pathways and their 5'UTRs show differential signatures of selection in yeast strains, presumably to facilitate adaptation. Similarly, we show that in higher metazoans such as mice and humans, different modules of ribosomal proteins are expressed in different cell types and tissues. A clear example is nervous tissue that uses a ribosomal protein module distinct from the rest of the tissues in both mice and humans. Our results suggest a novel stratification of ribosomal proteins that could have played a role in adaptation, presumably to optimize translation for adaptation to diverse ecological niches and tissue microenvironments.

  5. Career Adaptability in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Porfeli, Erik J.; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood marks the dawn of vocational development, involving developmental tasks, transitions, and change. Children must acquire the rudiments of career adaptability to envision a future, make educational and vocational decisions, explore self and occupations, and problem solve. The authors situate child vocational development within human life…

  6. Flexibility: Ensuring Adaptability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slyke, Paul; Goode, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to collaborate with administrators, physical plant representatives, department heads, lawmakers, and design professionals to create flexible school facilities that adapt to changing needs, noting the importance of utilizing a programming process that determines the true needs of a facility, based on the potential activities that will…

  7. Adaptive Recreational Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed for teachers interested in therapeutic recreation, the document lists sources of adaptive recreational equipment and their homemade counterparts. Brief descriptions for ordering or constructing recreational equipment for the visually impaired, poorly coordinated, physically impaired, and mentally retarded are given. Specific adaptations…

  8. Adapting to the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Amy L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity on natural selection and how the peppered moth's adaptive values for their colors changed during the Industrial Revolution in Manchester, England, influencing their survival and ultimately affecting the survival of their offspring. Includes activity objectives. (Author/KHR)

  9. Adapted Aquatics and Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.; Conatser, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Presents strategies and techniques to help instructors and directors promote successful inclusive aquatics programs for students with disabilities, discussing the importance of considering issues related to: teaching style, collaborative planning, goal determination, appropriate inclusive placement, personnel preparation, curriculum adaptation,…

  10. Influence of fasting during moult on the faecal microbiota of penguins.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Meagan L; Arnould, John P Y; Krause, Lutz; Trathan, Phil; Dann, Peter; Smith, Stuart C

    2014-01-01

    Many seabirds including penguins are adapted to long periods of fasting, particularly during parts of the reproductive cycle and during moult. However, the influence of fasting on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota has not been investigated in seabirds. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the microbial composition and diversity of the GI microbiota of fasting little (Eudyptula minor) and king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) penguins during early and late moult. The results from this study indicated that there was little change in the abundance of the major phyla during moult, except for a significant increase in the level of Proteobacteria in king penguins. In king penguins the abundance of Fusobacteria increases from 1.73% during early moult to 33.6% by late moult, whilst the abundance of Proteobacteria (35.7% to 17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (19.5% to 11%) decrease from early to late moult. In little penguins, a decrease in the abundances of Firmicutes (44% to 29%) and an increase in the abundance of Bacteroidetes (11% to 20%) were observed from early to late moult respectively. The results from this study indicate that the microbial composition of both king and little penguins alters during fasting. However, it appears that the microbial composition of king penguins is more affected by fasting than little penguins with the length of fast the most probable cause for this difference.

  11. Visual saliency-based fast intracoding algorithm for high efficiency video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Shi, Guangming; Zhou, Wei; Duan, Zhemin

    2017-01-01

    Intraprediction has been significantly improved in high efficiency video coding over H.264/AVC with quad-tree-based coding unit (CU) structure from size 64×64 to 8×8 and more prediction modes. However, these techniques cause a dramatic increase in computational complexity. An intracoding algorithm is proposed that consists of perceptual fast CU size decision algorithm and fast intraprediction mode decision algorithm. First, based on the visual saliency detection, an adaptive and fast CU size decision method is proposed to alleviate intraencoding complexity. Furthermore, a fast intraprediction mode decision algorithm with step halving rough mode decision method and early modes pruning algorithm is presented to selectively check the potential modes and effectively reduce the complexity of computation. Experimental results show that our proposed fast method reduces the computational complexity of the current HM to about 57% in encoding time with only 0.37% increases in BD rate. Meanwhile, the proposed fast algorithm has reasonable peak signal-to-noise ratio losses and nearly the same subjective perceptual quality.

  12. Protein catabolism in suckling and fasting northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga anglstirostris).

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Costa, D P

    2001-11-01

    Nursing elephant seal pups are hypothesized to be preadapted to the postweaning fast, yet no comparison of lipid or protein use for meeting metabolic costs has been made between these contrasting nutritional periods. To address this, protein catabolism was estimated in five elephant seal pups from measurements of urea turnover made twice during nursing and twice during the postweaning fast. Changes in body composition were measured in ten separate weaned pups via tritiated water dilution and matched to fasting urea turnover measurements in order to assess errors in protein catabolism derived from urea turnover rates. Estimates of lean mass loss based upon urea turnover and tritiated water dilution were in general agreement, supporting estimates of protein catabolism derived from urea turnover measurements. Protein catabolism was estimated to contribute less than 4% to the average metabolic rate of suckling and fasting pups implying strict protein conservation during both periods and supporting the shypothesis that suckling pups are pre-adapted to fasting. It is proposed that strict protein conservation across suckling and fasting compensates for relative reductions in maternal investment associated with the abbreviated lactation period of the elephant seal.

  13. Energy metabolism and fasting in male and female insectivorous bats Molossus molossus (Chiroptera: Molossidae).

    PubMed

    Freitas, M B; Goulart, L S; Barros, M S; Morais, D B; Amaral, T S; Matta, S L P

    2010-08-01

    Metabolic adaptations induced by 24 and 48 hours of fasting were investigated in male and female insectivorous bats (Molossus molossus Pallas, 1766). For this purpose, plasma glucose, non esterified fatty acids (NEFA), glycogen, protein and lipids concentrations in liver and muscles were obtained. Data presented here demonstrate that fed bats showed plasma glucose levels similar to those reported for other mammal species. In response to fasting, glycemia was decreased only in 48 hours fasted females. Plasma NEFA levels were similar in both sexes, and did not exhibit any changes during fasting. Considering the data from energy reserve variations, fed females presented an increased content of liver glycogen as well as higher breast muscle protein and limbs lipids concentrations, compared to fed males. In response to fasting, liver and muscle glycogen levels remained unchanged. Considering protein and lipid reserves, only females showed decreased values following fasting, as seen in breast, limbs and carcass lipids and breast muscle protein reserves, but still fail to keep glucose homeostasis after 48 hours without food. Taken together, our data suggest that the energy metabolism of insectivorous bats may vary according to sexual differences, a pattern that might be associated to different reproduction investments and costs between genders.

  14. Motor Adaptation Deficits in Ideomotor Apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Mutha, Pratik K.; Stapp, Lee H.; Sainburg, Robert L.; Haaland, Kathleen Y.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The cardinal motor deficits seen in ideomotor limb apraxia are thought to arise from damage to internal representations for actions developed through learning and experience. However, whether apraxic patients learn to develop new representations with training is not well understood. We studied the capacity of apraxic patients for motor adaptation, a process associated with the development of a new internal representation of the relationship between movements and their sensory effects. Methods Thirteen healthy adults and 23 patients with left hemisphere stroke (12 apraxic, 11 nonapraxic) adapted to a 30-degree visuomotor rotation. Results While healthy and nonapraxic participants successfully adapted, apraxics did not. Rather, they showed a rapid decrease in error early but no further improvement thereafter, suggesting a deficit in the slow, but not the fast component of a dual-process model of adaptation. The magnitude of this late learning deficit was predicted by the degree of apraxia, and was correlated with the volume of damage in parietal cortex. Apraxics also demonstrated an initial after-effect similar to the other groups likely reflecting the early learning, but this after-effect was not sustained and performance returned to baseline levels more rapidly, consistent with a disrupted slow learning process. Conclusions These findings suggest that the early phase of learning may be intact in apraxia, but this leads to the development of a fragile representation that is rapidly forgotten. The association between this deficit and left parietal damage points to a key role for this region in learning to form stable internal representations. PMID:28205499

  15. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient.

    PubMed

    Kates, Robert W; Travis, William R; Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2012-05-08

    All human-environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations.

  16. Transformational adaptation when incremental adaptations to climate change are insufficient

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Robert W.; Travis, William R.; Wilbanks, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    All human–environment systems adapt to climate and its natural variation. Adaptation to human-induced change in climate has largely been envisioned as increments of these adaptations intended to avoid disruptions of systems at their current locations. In some places, for some systems, however, vulnerabilities and risks may be so sizeable that they require transformational rather than incremental adaptations. Three classes of transformational adaptations are those that are adopted at a much larger scale, that are truly new to a particular region or resource system, and that transform places and shift locations. We illustrate these with examples drawn from Africa, Europe, and North America. Two conditions set the stage for transformational adaptation to climate change: large vulnerability in certain regions, populations, or resource systems; and severe climate change that overwhelms even robust human use systems. However, anticipatory transformational adaptation may be difficult to implement because of uncertainties about climate change risks and adaptation benefits, the high costs of transformational actions, and institutional and behavioral actions that tend to maintain existing resource systems and policies. Implementing transformational adaptation requires effort to initiate it and then to sustain the effort over time. In initiating transformational adaptation focusing events and multiple stresses are important, combined with local leadership. In sustaining transformational adaptation, it seems likely that supportive social contexts and the availability of acceptable options and resources for actions are key enabling factors. Early steps would include incorporating transformation adaptation into risk management and initiating research to expand the menu of innovative transformational adaptations. PMID:22509036

  17. Fast Numerically Based Modeling for Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, D. S.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-05-01

    There is a need for computationally fast GPR numerical modeling. This includes circumstances where real time performance is needed, for example discrimination of landmines or UXO's, and in circumstances that require a high number of successive forward problems, for example inversion or imaging. Traditional numerical techniques such as finite difference or finite element are too slow for these applications, but they provide results from general scenarios such as scattering from very complicated shapes with high contrast. Neural networks may fit in the niche between analytical techniques and traditional numerical techniques. Our concept is training a neural network to associate the model inputs of electromagnetic properties of the background and targets, and the size and shape of the targets, with the output generated by a 3-D finite difference model. Successive examples from various electromagnetic properties and targets are displayed to the neural network, until the neural network has adapted itself though optimization. The trained neural network is now used as the forward model by displaying new input parameters and the neural network then generates the appropriate output. The results from the neural network are then compared to results from finite difference models to see how well the neural networks is performing and at what point it breaks down. Areas of poor fit can be addressed through further training. The neural network GPR model can be adapted by displaying additional finite difference results to the neural network, and can also be adapted to a specific field area by actual field data examples. Because of this adaptation ability the neural network GPR model can be optimized for specific environments and applications.

  18. Sparse Gamma Rhythms Arising through Clustering in Adapting Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Ermentrout, Bard

    2011-01-01

    Gamma rhythms (30–100 Hz) are an extensively studied synchronous brain state responsible for a number of sensory, memory, and motor processes. Experimental evidence suggests that fast-spiking interneurons are responsible for carrying the high frequency components of the rhythm, while regular-spiking pyramidal neurons fire sparsely. We propose that a combination of spike frequency adaptation and global inhibition may be responsible for this behavior. Excitatory neurons form several clusters that fire every few cycles of the fast oscillation. This is first shown in a detailed biophysical network model and then analyzed thoroughly in an idealized model. We exploit the fact that the timescale of adaptation is much slower than that of the other variables. Singular perturbation theory is used to derive an approximate periodic solution for a single spiking unit. This is then used to predict the relationship between the number of clusters arising spontaneously in the network as it relates to the adaptation time constant. We compare this to a complementary analysis that employs a weak coupling assumption to predict the first Fourier mode to destabilize from the incoherent state of an associated phase model as the external noise is reduced. Both approaches predict the same scaling of cluster number with respect to the adaptation time constant, which is corroborated in numerical simulations of the full system. Thus, we develop several testable predictions regarding the formation and characteristics of gamma rhythms with sparsely firing excitatory neurons. PMID:22125486

  19. Fast Image Restoration for Spatially Varying Defocus Blur of Imaging Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hejin; Chae, Eunjung; Lee, Eunsung; Jo, Gwanghyun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast adaptive image restoration method for removing spatially varying out-of-focus blur of a general imaging sensor. After estimating the parameters of space-variant point-spread-function (PSF) using the derivative in each uniformly blurred region, the proposed method performs spatially adaptive image restoration by selecting the optimal restoration filter according to the estimated blur parameters. Each restoration filter is implemented in the form of a combination of multiple FIR filters, which guarantees the fast image restoration without the need of iterative or recursive processing. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms existing space-invariant restoration methods in the sense of both objective and subjective performance measures. The proposed algorithm can be employed to a wide area of image restoration applications, such as mobile imaging devices, robot vision, and satellite image processing. PMID:25569760

  20. A synaptic mechanism for retinal adaptation to luminance and contrast

    PubMed Central

    Jarsky, Tim; Cembrowski, Mark; Logan, Stephen M.; Kath, William L.; Riecke, Hermann; Demb, Jonathan B.; Singer, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    The gain of signaling in primary sensory circuits is matched to the stimulus intensity by the process of adaptation. Retinal neural circuits adapt to visual scene statistics, including the mean (background adaptation) and the temporal variance (contrast adaptation) of the light stimulus. The intrinsic properties of retinal bipolar cells and synapses contribute to background and contrast adaptation, but it is unclear whether both forms of adaptation depend on the same cellular mechanisms. Studies of bipolar cell synapses identified synaptic mechanisms of gain control, but the relevance of these mechanisms to visual processing is uncertain owing to the historical focus on fast, phasic transmission rather than the tonic transmission evoked by ambient light. Here, we studied use-dependent regulation of bipolar cell synaptic transmission evoked by small, ongoing modulations of membrane potential (VM) in the physiological range. We made paired whole-cell recordings from rod bipolar (RB) and AII amacrine cells in a mouse retinal slice preparation. Quasi-white noise voltage commands modulated RB VM and evoked EPSCs in the AII. We mimicked changes in background luminance or contrast, respectively, by depolarizing the VM or increasing its variance. A linear systems analysis of synaptic transmission showed that increasing either the mean or the variance of the presynaptic VM reduced gain. Further electrophysiological and computational analyses demonstrated that adaptation to mean potential resulted from both Ca channel inactivation and vesicle depletion, whereas adaptation to variance resulted from vesicle depletion alone. Thus, background and contrast adaptation apparently depend in part on a common synaptic mechanism. PMID:21795549

  1. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  2. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  3. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  4. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  5. Fast evaluation of polarizable forces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Skeel, Robert D

    2005-10-22

    Polarizability is considered to be the single most significant development in the next generation of force fields for biomolecular simulations. However, the self-consistent computation of induced atomic dipoles in a polarizable force field is expensive due to the cost of solving a large dense linear system at each step of a simulation. This article introduces methods that reduce the cost of computing the electrostatic energy and force of a polarizable model from about 7.5 times the cost of computing those of a nonpolarizable model to less than twice the cost. This is probably sufficient for the routine use of polarizable forces in biomolecular simulations. The reduction in computing time is achieved by an efficient implementation of the particle-mesh Ewald method, an accurate and robust predictor based on least-squares fitting, and non-stationary iterative methods whose fast convergence is accelerated by a simple preconditioner. Furthermore, with these methods, the self-consistent approach with a larger timestep is shown to be faster than the extended Lagrangian approach. The use of dipole moments from previous timesteps to calculate an accurate initial guess for iterative methods leads to an energy drift, which can be made acceptably small. The use of a zero initial guess does not lead to perceptible energy drift if a reasonably strict convergence criterion for the iteration is imposed.

  6. GROMACS: fast, flexible, and free.

    PubMed

    Van Der Spoel, David; Lindahl, Erik; Hess, Berk; Groenhof, Gerrit; Mark, Alan E; Berendsen, Herman J C

    2005-12-01

    This article describes the software suite GROMACS (Groningen MAchine for Chemical Simulation) that was developed at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in the early 1990s. The software, written in ANSI C, originates from a parallel hardware project, and is well suited for parallelization on processor clusters. By careful optimization of neighbor searching and of inner loop performance, GROMACS is a very fast program for molecular dynamics simulation. It does not have a force field of its own, but is compatible with GROMOS, OPLS, AMBER, and ENCAD force fields. In addition, it can handle polarizable shell models and flexible constraints. The program is versatile, as force routines can be added by the user, tabulated functions can be specified, and analyses can be easily customized. Nonequilibrium dynamics and free energy determinations are incorporated. Interfaces with popular quantum-chemical packages (MOPAC, GAMES-UK, GAUSSIAN) are provided to perform mixed MM/QM simulations. The package includes about 100 utility and analysis programs. GROMACS is in the public domain and distributed (with source code and documentation) under the GNU General Public License. It is maintained by a group of developers from the Universities of Groningen, Uppsala, and Stockholm, and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz. Its Web site is http://www.gromacs.org.

  7. Fast Robust PCA on Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Nauman; Perraudin, Nathanael; Kalofolias, Vassilis; Puy, Gilles; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Mining useful clusters from high dimensional data has received significant attention of the computer vision and pattern recognition community in the recent years. Linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction has played an important role to overcome the curse of dimensionality. However, often such methods are accompanied with three different problems: high computational complexity (usually associated with the nuclear norm minimization), non-convexity (for matrix factorization methods) and susceptibility to gross corruptions in the data. In this paper we propose a principal component analysis (PCA) based solution that overcomes these three issues and approximates a low-rank recovery method for high dimensional datasets. We target the low-rank recovery by enforcing two types of graph smoothness assumptions, one on the data samples and the other on the features by designing a convex optimization problem. The resulting algorithm is fast, efficient and scalable for huge datasets with O(nlog(n)) computational complexity in the number of data samples. It is also robust to gross corruptions in the dataset as well as to the model parameters. Clustering experiments on 7 benchmark datasets with different types of corruptions and background separation experiments on 3 video datasets show that our proposed model outperforms 10 state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction models. Our theoretical analysis proves that the proposed model is able to recover approximate low-rank representations with a bounded error for clusterable data.

  8. Fast approach for toner saving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Ilia V.; Kurilin, Ilya V.; Rychagov, Michael N.; Lee, Hokeun; Kim, Sangho; Choi, Donchul

    2011-01-01

    Reducing toner consumption is an important task in modern printing devices and has a significant positive ecological impact. Existing toner saving approaches have two main drawbacks: appearance of hardcopy in toner saving mode is worse in comparison with normal mode; processing of whole rendered page bitmap requires significant computational costs. We propose to add small holes of various shapes and sizes to random places inside a character bitmap stored in font cache. Such random perforation scheme is based on processing pipeline in RIP of standard printer languages Postscript and PCL. Processing of text characters only, and moreover, processing of each character for given font and size alone, is an extremely fast procedure. The approach does not deteriorate halftoned bitmap and business graphics and provide toner saving for typical office documents up to 15-20%. Rate of toner saving is adjustable. Alteration of resulted characters' appearance is almost indistinguishable in comparison with solid black text due to random placement of small holes inside the character regions. The suggested method automatically skips small fonts to preserve its quality. Readability of text processed by proposed method is fine. OCR programs process that scanned hardcopy successfully too.

  9. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  10. Generalized Backprojection Operator: Fast Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miqueles, Eduardo X.; Helou, Elias S.; De Pierro, Alvaro R.

    2014-03-01

    The inverse Radon transform and his straightforward implementation, known as filtered backprojection (also known as FBP), has become a powerful algorithm for solving a tomographic inverse problem. It has a wide range of applications, including geophysics, medicine and synchrotrons, and from kilo to centi to micro scale respectively. Such a classical inversion has a major computational disadvantage: increasing slowness proportionally to the data size. An ordinary implementation of this algorithm relies on a simple integral that has to be done pixelwise. Many accelerating techniques were proposed in the literature so as to make this part of the inversion as fast as possible. One the most promising strategies is converting the backprojection as a convolution operator (at log-polar coordinates). The generalized backprojector has many applications, for instance in the analytical inversion of single-photon emission tomography or x-ray fluorescence tomography. Our aim in this paper is to show how these ideas can be used for other inversion methods, the iterative ones; which deal much better with noise.

  11. Wavelet methods in multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helin, T.; Yudytskiy, M.

    2013-08-01

    The next generation ground-based telescopes rely heavily on adaptive optics for overcoming the limitation of atmospheric turbulence. In the future adaptive optics modalities, like multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO), atmospheric tomography is the major mathematical and computational challenge. In this severely ill-posed problem, a fast and stable reconstruction algorithm is needed that can take into account many real-life phenomena of telescope imaging. We introduce a novel reconstruction method for the atmospheric tomography problem and demonstrate its performance and flexibility in the context of MCAO. Our method is based on using locality properties of compactly supported wavelets, both in the spatial and frequency domains. The reconstruction in the atmospheric tomography problem is obtained by solving the Bayesian MAP estimator with a conjugate-gradient-based algorithm. An accelerated algorithm with preconditioning is also introduced. Numerical performance is demonstrated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of European Southern Observatory.

  12. Fast Mapping Verb Meaning from Argument Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Valerie E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine lexical knowledge in children through a fast mapping task. Method: This study compared the performance of 60 African American English-speaking and general American English-speaking children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. They were presented with a comprehension task involving the fast mapping of novel verbs in 4 different…

  13. Fast Mapping in Late-Talking Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Susan Ellis; Venker, Courtney E.; Evans, Julia L.; Moyle, Maura Jones

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated fast mapping in late-talking (LT) toddlers and toddlers with normal language (NL) development matched on age, nonverbal cognition, and maternal education. The fast-mapping task included novel object labels and familiar words. The LT group scored significantly lower than the NL group on novel word comprehension and…

  14. Fast Mapping by Bilingual Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kana, Pui Fong; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies show that young monolingual children's ability to "fast map" new word forms is closely associated with both their age and existing vocabulary knowledge. In this study we investigate potential relationships between age, fast mapping skills and existing vocabulary knowledge in both languages of developing bilingual preschool…

  15. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  16. FAST User's Guide - Updated August 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L. Jr.

    2005-10-01

    The FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence) Code is a comprehensive aeroelastic simulator capable of predicting both the extreme and fatigue loads of two- and three-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). This document covers the features of FAST and outlines its operating procedures.

  17. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  18. The fast diffusion of Au IN Pb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Ko, C.; Brotzen, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    A treatment of the phenomenon of fast diffusion in lead is presented. The model used is based upon the fast diffusion of free solute interstitials. The very large negative enhancement coefficients found in the Pb-(Au, Ag) systems is explained by the formation of first and second order clusters of vacancies and substitutional solute atoms.

  19. Research Program of a Super Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Liu, Jie; Terai, Takayuki; Nagasaki, Shinya; Muroya, Yusa; Abe, Hiroaki; Akiba, Masato; Akimoto, Hajime; Okumura, Keisuke; Akasaka, Naoaki; GOTO, Shoji

    2006-07-01

    Research program of a supercritical-pressure light water cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) is funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) in December 2005 as one of the research programs of Japanese NERI (Nuclear Energy Research Initiative). It consists of three programs. (1) development of Super Fast Reactor concept; (2) thermal-hydraulic experiments; (3) material developments. The purpose of the concept development is to pursue the advantage of high power density of fast reactor over thermal reactors to achieve economic competitiveness of fast reactor for its deployment without waiting for exhausting uranium resources. Design goal is not breeding, but maximizing reactor power by using plutonium from spent LWR fuel. MOX will be the fuel of the Super Fast Reactor. Thermal-hydraulic experiments will be conducted with HCFC22 (Hydro chlorofluorocarbons) heat transfer loop of Kyushu University and supercritical water loop at JAEA. Heat transfer data including effect of grid spacers will be taken. The critical flow and condensation of supercritical fluid will be studied. The materials research includes the development and testing of austenitic stainless steel cladding from the experience of PNC1520 for LMFBR. Material for thermal insulation will be tested. SCWR (Supercritical-Water Cooled Reactor) of GIF (Generation-4 International Forum) includes both thermal and fast reactors. The research of the Super Fast Reactor will enhance SCWR research and the data base. The research period will be until March 2010. (authors)

  20. Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kerndt, Peter R.; Naughton, James L.; Driscoll, Charles E.; Loxterkamp, David A.

    1982-01-01

    An appreciation of the physiology of fasting is essential to the understanding of therapeutic dietary interventions and the effect of food deprivation in various diseases. The practice of prolonged fasting for political or religious purposes is increasing, and a physician is likely to encounter such circumstances. Early in fasting weight loss is rapid, averaging 0.9 kg per day during the first week and slowing to 0.3 kg per day by the third week; early rapid weight loss is primarily due to negative sodium balance. Metabolically, early fasting is characterized by a high rate of gluconeogenesis with amino acids as the primary substrates. As fasting continues, progressive ketosis develops due to the mobilization and oxidation of fatty acids. As ketone levels rise they replace glucose as the primary energy source in the central nervous system, thereby decreasing the need for gluconeogenesis and sparing protein catabolism. Several hormonal changes occur during fasting, including a fall in insulin and T3 levels and a rise in glucagon and reverse T3 levels. Most studies of fasting have used obese persons and results may not always apply to lean persons. Medical complications seen in fasting include gout and urate nephrolithiasis, postural hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:6758355