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Sample records for adaptive genetic diversity

  1. Defining the landscape of adaptive genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Andrew J; Dyer, Rodney J

    2012-06-01

    Whether they are used to describe fitness, genome architecture or the spatial distribution of environmental variables, the concept of a landscape has figured prominently in our collective reasoning. The tradition of landscapes in evolutionary biology is one of fitness mapped onto axes defined by phenotypes or molecular sequence states. The characteristics of these landscapes depend on natural selection, which is structured across both genomic and environmental landscapes, and thus, the bridge among differing uses of the landscape concept (i.e. metaphorically or literally) is that of an adaptive phenotype and its distribution across geographical landscapes in relation to selective pressures. One of the ultimate goals of evolutionary biology should thus be to construct fitness landscapes in geographical space. Natural plant populations are ideal systems with which to explore the feasibility of attaining this goal, because much is known about the quantitative genetic architecture of complex traits for many different plant species. What is less known are the molecular components of this architecture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Parchman et al. (2012) pioneer one of the first truly genome-wide association studies in a tree that moves us closer to this form of mechanistic understanding for an adaptive phenotype in natural populations of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.). PMID:22676074

  2. Adapting populations in space: clonal interference and genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Daniel; Barton, Nick

    Most species inhabit ranges much larger than the scales over which individuals interact. How does this spatial structure interact with adaptive evolution? We consider a simple model of a spatially-extended, adapting population and show that, while clonal interference severely limits the adaptation of purely asexual populations, even rare recombination is enough to allow adaptation at rates approaching those of well-mixed populations. We also find that the genetic hitchhiking produced by the adaptive alleles sweeping through the population has strange effects on the patterns of genetic diversity. In large spatial ranges, even low rates of adaptation cause all individuals in the population to rapidly trace their ancestry back to individuals living in a small region in the center of the range. The probability of fixation of an allele is thus strongly dependent on the allele's spatial location, with alleles from the center favored. Surprisingly, these effects are seen genome-wide (instead of being localized to the regions of the genome undergoing the sweeps). The spatial concentration of ancestry produces a power-law dependence of relatedness on distance, so that even individuals sampled far apart are likely to be fairly closely related, masking the underlying spatial structure.

  3. Adaptability of non-genetic diversity in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Nicholas W; Pontius, William; Dufour, Yann S; Long, Junjiajia; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

    2014-10-03

    Bacterial chemotaxis systems are as diverse as the environments that bacteria inhabit, but how much environmental variation can cells tolerate with a single system? Diversification of a single chemotaxis system could serve as an alternative, or even evolutionary stepping-stone, to switching between multiple systems. We hypothesized that mutations in gene regulation could lead to heritable control of chemotactic diversity. By simulating foraging and colonization of E. coli using a single-cell chemotaxis model, we found that different environments selected for different behaviors. The resulting trade-offs show that populations facing diverse environments would ideally diversify behaviors when time for navigation is limited. We show that advantageous diversity can arise from changes in the distribution of protein levels among individuals, which could occur through mutations in gene regulation. We propose experiments to test our prediction that chemotactic diversity in a clonal population could be a selectable trait that enables adaptation to environmental variability.

  4. Adaptability of non-genetic diversity in bacterial chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Nicholas W; Pontius, William; Dufour, Yann S; Long, Junjiajia; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis systems are as diverse as the environments that bacteria inhabit, but how much environmental variation can cells tolerate with a single system? Diversification of a single chemotaxis system could serve as an alternative, or even evolutionary stepping-stone, to switching between multiple systems. We hypothesized that mutations in gene regulation could lead to heritable control of chemotactic diversity. By simulating foraging and colonization of E. coli using a single-cell chemotaxis model, we found that different environments selected for different behaviors. The resulting trade-offs show that populations facing diverse environments would ideally diversify behaviors when time for navigation is limited. We show that advantageous diversity can arise from changes in the distribution of protein levels among individuals, which could occur through mutations in gene regulation. We propose experiments to test our prediction that chemotactic diversity in a clonal population could be a selectable trait that enables adaptation to environmental variability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03526.001 PMID:25279698

  5. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  6. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  7. Evolution of adaptive diversity and genetic connectivity in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Kapralova, K H; Morrissey, M B; Kristjánsson, B K; Ólafsdóttir, G Á; Snorrason, S S; Ferguson, M M

    2011-01-01

    The ecological theory of adaptive radiation predicts that the evolution of phenotypic diversity within species is generated by divergent natural selection arising from different environments and competition between species. Genetic connectivity among populations is likely also to have an important role in both the origin and maintenance of adaptive genetic diversity. Our goal was to evaluate the potential roles of genetic connectivity and natural selection in the maintenance of adaptive phenotypic differences among morphs of Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus, in Iceland. At a large spatial scale, we tested the predictive power of geographic structure and phenotypic variation for patterns of neutral genetic variation among populations throughout Iceland. At a smaller scale, we evaluated the genetic differentiation between two morphs in Lake Thingvallavatn relative to historically explicit, coalescent-based null models of the evolutionary history of these lineages. At the large spatial scale, populations are highly differentiated, but weakly structured, both geographically and with respect to patterns of phenotypic variation. At the intralacustrine scale, we observe modest genetic differentiation between two morphs, but this level of differentiation is nonetheless consistent with strong reproductive isolation throughout the Holocene. Rather than a result of the homogenizing effect of gene flow in a system at migration-drift equilibrium, the modest level of genetic differentiation could equally be a result of slow neutral divergence by drift in large populations. We conclude that contemporary and recent patterns of restricted gene flow have been highly conducive to the evolution and maintenance of adaptive genetic variation in Icelandic Arctic charr. PMID:21224880

  8. Exploiting genetic diversity from landraces in wheat breeding for adaptation to climate change.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marta S; El-Basyoni, Ibrahim; Baenziger, Peter S; Singh, Sukhwinder; Royo, Conxita; Ozbek, Kursad; Aktas, Husnu; Ozer, Emel; Ozdemir, Fatih; Manickavelu, Alagu; Ban, Tomohiro; Vikram, Prashant

    2015-06-01

    Climate change has generated unpredictability in the timing and amount of rain, as well as extreme heat and cold spells that have affected grain yields worldwide and threaten food security. Sources of specific adaptation related to drought and heat, as well as associated breeding of genetic traits, will contribute to maintaining grain yields in dry and warm years. Increased crop photosynthesis and biomass have been achieved particularly through disease resistance and healthy leaves. Similarly, sources of drought and heat adaptation through extended photosynthesis and increased biomass would also greatly benefit crop improvement. Wheat landraces have been cultivated for thousands of years under the most extreme environmental conditions. They have also been cultivated in lower input farming systems for which adaptation traits, particularly those that increase the duration of photosynthesis, have been conserved. Landraces are a valuable source of genetic diversity and specific adaptation to local environmental conditions according to their place of origin. Evidence supports the hypothesis that landraces can provide sources of increased biomass and thousand kernel weight, both important traits for adaptation to tolerate drought and heat. Evaluation of wheat landraces stored in gene banks with highly beneficial untapped diversity and sources of stress adaptation, once characterized, should also be used for wheat improvement. Unified development of databases and promotion of data sharing among physiologists, pathologists, wheat quality scientists, national programmes, and breeders will greatly benefit wheat improvement for adaptation to climate change worldwide.

  9. Conifer genomics and adaptation: at the crossroads of genetic diversity and genome function.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Verta, Jukka-Pekka; MacKay, John J

    2016-01-01

    Conifers have been understudied at the genomic level despite their worldwide ecological and economic importance but the situation is rapidly changing with the development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. With NGS, genomics research has simultaneously gained in speed, magnitude and scope. In just a few years, genomes of 20-24 gigabases have been sequenced for several conifers, with several others expected in the near future. Biological insights have resulted from recent sequencing initiatives as well as genetic mapping, gene expression profiling and gene discovery research over nearly two decades. We review the knowledge arising from conifer genomics research emphasizing genome evolution and the genomic basis of adaptation, and outline emerging questions and knowledge gaps. We discuss future directions in three areas with potential inputs from NGS technologies: the evolutionary impacts of adaptation in conifers based on the adaptation-by-speciation model; the contributions of genetic variability of gene expression in adaptation; and the development of a broader understanding of genetic diversity and its impacts on genome function. These research directions promise to sustain research aimed at addressing the emerging challenges of adaptation that face conifer trees.

  10. Comparison of genetic diversity between Canadian adapted genotypes and exotic germplasm of soybean.

    PubMed

    Iquira, Elmer; Gagnon, Eric; Belzile, François

    2010-05-01

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) was domesticated in China and the greatest genetic diversity for this species is found in Asia. In contrast, in North America, soybean cultivars trace back to a small number of plant introductions from Asia and genetic diversity is typically quite limited. The purpose of this work was to measure and compare the genetic diversity in two sets of soybean lines. The first set (termed "local") was composed of 100 lines used in a private breeding program in Quebec. The second set (termed "exotic") was composed of 200 lines from elsewhere in the world (but mostly from Asia) and included a few lines of Glycine soja, the wild progenitor of cultivated soybean. Almost all the genotypes belonged to maturity groups between 000 and II. A total of 39 microsatellites (SSRs) were used to genotype the two collections. The number of alleles per locus was almost twice as great in the exotic set compared with the local set. Also, the number of "unique" alleles, i.e., those uniquely present in one set and absent in the other, was almost fivefold greater (191 vs. 37) in a subset of 108 exotic lines with good adaptation than among the local set. A genetic distance matrix, a UPGMA cluster analysis, and a principal coordinate analysis were conducted based on the SSR data. These analyses all indicated that the exotic set was much more diverse and formed a clearly distinct group from the local set. Interestingly, some of the lines showing the best adaptation to local conditions were quite distinctive in terms of their genotype and could potentially contribute useful novel genetic variation within the breeding program. PMID:20616865

  11. Population Genomics Reveals Low Genetic Diversity and Adaptation to Hypoxia in Snub-Nosed Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuming; Meng, Xuehong; Liu, Zhijin; Chang, Jiang; Wang, Boshi; Li, Mingzhou; Wengel, Pablo Orozco-Ter; Tian, Shilin; Wen, Changlong; Wang, Ziming; Garber, Paul A; Pan, Huijuan; Ye, Xinping; Xiang, Zuofu; Bruford, Michael W; Edwards, Scott V; Cao, Yinchuan; Yu, Shuancang; Gao, Lianju; Cao, Zhisheng; Liu, Guangjian; Ren, Baoping; Shi, Fanglei; Peterfi, Zalan; Li, Dayong; Li, Baoguo; Jiang, Zhi; Li, Junsheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Snub-nosed monkeys (genus Rhinopithecus) are a group of endangered colobines endemic to South Asia. Here, we re-sequenced the whole genomes of 38 snub-nosed monkeys representing four species within this genus. By conducting population genomic analyses, we observed a similar load of deleterious variation in snub-nosed monkeys living in both smaller and larger populations and found that genomic diversity was lower than that reported in other primates. Reconstruction of Rhinopithecus evolutionary history suggested that episodes of climatic variation over the past 2 million years, associated with glacial advances and retreats and population isolation, have shaped snub-nosed monkey demography and evolution. We further identified several hypoxia-related genes under selection in R. bieti (black snub-nosed monkey), a species that exploits habitats higher than any other nonhuman primate. These results provide the first detailed and comprehensive genomic insights into genetic diversity, demography, genetic burden, and adaptation in this radiation of endangered primates. PMID:27555581

  12. Loss and Recovery of Genetic Diversity in Adapting Populations of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Pennings, Pleuni S.; Kryazhimskiy, Sergey; Wakeley, John

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance in HIV occurs by the fixation of specific, well-known, drug-resistance mutations, but the underlying population genetic processes are not well understood. By analyzing within-patient longitudinal sequence data, we make four observations that shed a light on the underlying processes and allow us to infer the short-term effective population size of the viral population in a patient. Our first observation is that the evolution of drug resistance usually occurs by the fixation of one drug-resistance mutation at a time, as opposed to several changes simultaneously. Second, we find that these fixation events are accompanied by a reduction in genetic diversity in the region surrounding the fixed drug-resistance mutation, due to the hitchhiking effect. Third, we observe that the fixation of drug-resistance mutations involves both hard and soft selective sweeps. In a hard sweep, a resistance mutation arises in a single viral particle and drives all linked mutations with it when it spreads in the viral population, which dramatically reduces genetic diversity. On the other hand, in a soft sweep, a resistance mutation occurs multiple times on different genetic backgrounds, and the reduction of diversity is weak. Using the frequency of occurrence of hard and soft sweeps we estimate the effective population size of HIV to be ( confidence interval ). This number is much lower than the actual number of infected cells, but much larger than previous population size estimates based on synonymous diversity. We propose several explanations for the observed discrepancies. Finally, our fourth observation is that genetic diversity at non-synonymous sites recovers to its pre-fixation value within 18 months, whereas diversity at synonymous sites remains depressed after this time period. These results improve our understanding of HIV evolution and have potential implications for treatment strategies. PMID:24465214

  13. Genetic Diversity and the Structure of Genealogies in Rapidly Adapting Populations

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Michael M.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Fisher, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Positive selection distorts the structure of genealogies and hence alters patterns of genetic variation within a population. Most analyses of these distortions focus on the signatures of hitchhiking due to hard or soft selective sweeps at a single genetic locus. However, in linked regions of rapidly adapting genomes, multiple beneficial mutations at different loci can segregate simultaneously within the population, an effect known as clonal interference. This leads to a subtle interplay between hitchhiking and interference effects, which leads to a unique signature of rapid adaptation on genetic variation both at the selected sites and at linked neutral loci. Here, we introduce an effective coalescent theory (a “fitness-class coalescent”) that describes how positive selection at many perfectly linked sites alters the structure of genealogies. We use this theory to calculate several simple statistics describing genetic variation within a rapidly adapting population and to implement efficient backward-time coalescent simulations, which can be used to predict how clonal interference alters the expected patterns of molecular evolution. PMID:23222656

  14. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in a Legacy Collection of Spring Barley Landraces Adapted to a Wide Range of Climates

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Alexander; Özkan, Hakan; Graner, Andreas; Kilian, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Global environmental change and increasing human population emphasize the urgent need for higher yielding and better adapted crop plants. One strategy to achieve this aim is to exploit the wealth of so called landraces of crop species, representing diverse traditional domesticated populations of locally adapted genotypes. In this study, we investigated a comprehensive set of 1485 spring barley landraces (Lrc1485) adapted to a wide range of climates, which were selected from one of the largest genebanks worldwide. The landraces originated from 5° to 62.5° N and 16° to 71° E. The whole collection was genotyped using 42 SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure. With an average allelic richness of 5.74 and 372 alleles, Lrc1485 harbours considerably more genetic diversity than the most polymorphic current GWAS panel for barley. Ten major clusters defined most of the population structure based on geographical origin, row type of the ear and caryopsis type – and were assigned to specific climate zones. The legacy core reference set Lrc648 established in this study will provide a long-lasting resource and a very valuable tool for the scientific community. Lrc648 is best suited for multi-environmental field testing to identify candidate genes underlying quantitative traits but also for allele mining approaches. PMID:25541702

  15. Genetic diversity and population structure in a legacy collection of spring barley landraces adapted to a wide range of climates.

    PubMed

    Pasam, Raj K; Sharma, Rajiv; Walther, Alexander; Özkan, Hakan; Graner, Andreas; Kilian, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Global environmental change and increasing human population emphasize the urgent need for higher yielding and better adapted crop plants. One strategy to achieve this aim is to exploit the wealth of so called landraces of crop species, representing diverse traditional domesticated populations of locally adapted genotypes. In this study, we investigated a comprehensive set of 1485 spring barley landraces (Lrc1485) adapted to a wide range of climates, which were selected from one of the largest genebanks worldwide. The landraces originated from 5° to 62.5° N and 16° to 71° E. The whole collection was genotyped using 42 SSR markers to assess the genetic diversity and population structure. With an average allelic richness of 5.74 and 372 alleles, Lrc1485 harbours considerably more genetic diversity than the most polymorphic current GWAS panel for barley. Ten major clusters defined most of the population structure based on geographical origin, row type of the ear and caryopsis type - and were assigned to specific climate zones. The legacy core reference set Lrc648 established in this study will provide a long-lasting resource and a very valuable tool for the scientific community. Lrc648 is best suited for multi-environmental field testing to identify candidate genes underlying quantitative traits but also for allele mining approaches. PMID:25541702

  16. Genetic Adaptation to Climate in White Spruce Involves Small to Moderate Allele Frequency Shifts in Functionally Diverse Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hornoy, Benjamin; Pavy, Nathalie; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to climate is of paramount importance for preserving and managing genetic diversity in plants in a context of climate change. Yet, this objective has been addressed mainly in short-lived model species. Thus, expanding knowledge to nonmodel species with contrasting life histories, such as forest trees, appears necessary. To uncover the genetic basis of adaptation to climate in the widely distributed boreal conifer white spruce (Picea glauca), an environmental association study was conducted using 11,085 single nucleotide polymorphisms representing 7,819 genes, that is, approximately a quarter of the transcriptome. Linear and quadratic regressions controlling for isolation-by-distance, and the Random Forest algorithm, identified several dozen genes putatively under selection, among which 43 showed strongest signals along temperature and precipitation gradients. Most of them were related to temperature. Small to moderate shifts in allele frequencies were observed. Genes involved encompassed a wide variety of functions and processes, some of them being likely important for plant survival under biotic and abiotic environmental stresses according to expression data. Literature mining and sequence comparison also highlighted conserved sequences and functions with angiosperm homologs. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions that local adaptation involves genes with small frequency shifts when selection is recent and gene flow among populations is high. Accordingly, genetic adaptation to climate in P. glauca appears to be complex, involving many independent and interacting gene functions, biochemical pathways, and processes. From an applied perspective, these results shall lead to specific functional/association studies in conifers and to the development of markers useful for the conservation of genetic resources. PMID:26560341

  17. Genetic diversity at neutral and adaptive loci determines individual fitness in a long-lived territorial bird

    PubMed Central

    Agudo, Rosa; Carrete, Martina; Alcaide, Miguel; Rico, Ciro; Hiraldo, Fernando; Donázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    There is compelling evidence about the manifest effects of inbreeding depression on individual fitness and populations' risk of extinction. The majority of studies addressing inbreeding depression on wild populations are generally based on indirect measures of inbreeding using neutral markers. However, the study of functional loci, such as genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), is highly recommended. MHC genes constitute an essential component of the immune system of individuals, which is directly related to individual fitness and survival. In this study, we analyse heterozygosity fitness correlations of neutral and adaptive genetic variation (22 microsatellite loci and two loci of the MHC class II, respectively) with the age of recruitment and breeding success of a decimated and geographically isolated population of a long-lived territorial vulture. Our results indicate a negative correlation between neutral genetic diversity and age of recruitment, suggesting that inbreeding may be delaying reproduction. We also found a positive correlation between functional (MHC) genetic diversity and breeding success, together with a specific positive effect of the most frequent pair of cosegregating MHC alleles in the population. Globally, our findings demonstrate that genetic depauperation in small populations has a negative impact on the individual fitness, thus increasing the populations' extinction risk. PMID:22553093

  18. Invasive Chloroplast Population Genetics of Mikania micrantha in China: No Local Adaptation and Negative Correlation between Diversity and Geographic Distance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Guopei; Wang, Chunbo; Su, Yingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Two fundamental questions on how invasive species are able to rapidly colonize novel habitat have emerged. One asks whether a negative correlation exists between the genetic diversity of invasive populations and their geographic distance from the origin of introduction. The other is whether selection on the chloroplast genome is important driver of adaptation to novel soil environments. Here, we addressed these questions in a study of the noxious invasive weed, Mikania micrantha, which has rapidly expanded in to southern China after being introduced to Hong Kong in 1884. Seven chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) were used to investigate population genetics in 28 populations of M. micrantha, which produced 39 loci. The soil compositions for these populations, including Mg abundance, were measured. The results showed that M. micrantha possessed relatively high cpSSR variation and differentiation among populations. Multiple diversity indices were quantified, and none was significantly correlated with distance from the origin of introduction. No evidence for “isolation by distance,” significant spatial structure, bottlenecks, nor linkage disequilibrium was detected. We also were unable to identify loci on the chloroplast genome that exhibited patterns of differentiation that would suggest adaptive evolution in response to soil attributes. Soil Mg had only a genome-wide effect instead of being a selective factor, which highlighted the association between Mg and the successful invasion. This study characterizes the role of the chloroplast genome of M. micrantha during its recent invasion of southern China. PMID:27708663

  19. High Genetic Diversity and Adaptive Potential of Two Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in a Wild Primate Population

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D.; Dinis, Jorge M.; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W.; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H.; Hughes, Austin L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Goldberg, Tony L.; O'Connor, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 106–107 RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses. PMID:24651479

  20. High genetic diversity and adaptive potential of two simian hemorrhagic fever viruses in a wild primate population.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Adam L; Lauck, Michael; Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D; Dinis, Jorge M; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H; Hughes, Austin L; Friedrich, Thomas C; Goldberg, Tony L; O'Connor, David H

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 10(6)-10(7) RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses.

  1. A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam; Wilson, Ariana; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting that populations of this species sampled from agricultural fields have experienced genetic bottleneck events that have led to lower neutral genetic diversity. Heterozygosity excess tests indicate that these bottlenecks may have occurred prior to 2003. A greenhouse assay of individuals sampled from the field as seed found that populations of this species, on average, exhibited modest increases in herbicide resistance over time. However, populations differed significantly between sampling years for resistance: some populations maintained high resistance between the sampling years whereas others exhibited increased or decreased resistance. Our results show that populations of this noxious weed, capable of adapting to strong selection imparted by herbicide application, may lose genetic variation as a result of this or other environmental factors. We probably uncovered only modest increases in resistance on average between sampling cohorts due to a strong and previously identified fitness cost of resistance in this species, along with the potential that nonresistant migrants germinate from the seed bank.

  2. A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kuester, Adam; Wilson, Ariana; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S

    2016-09-01

    Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting that populations of this species sampled from agricultural fields have experienced genetic bottleneck events that have led to lower neutral genetic diversity. Heterozygosity excess tests indicate that these bottlenecks may have occurred prior to 2003. A greenhouse assay of individuals sampled from the field as seed found that populations of this species, on average, exhibited modest increases in herbicide resistance over time. However, populations differed significantly between sampling years for resistance: some populations maintained high resistance between the sampling years whereas others exhibited increased or decreased resistance. Our results show that populations of this noxious weed, capable of adapting to strong selection imparted by herbicide application, may lose genetic variation as a result of this or other environmental factors. We probably uncovered only modest increases in resistance on average between sampling cohorts due to a strong and previously identified fitness cost of resistance in this species, along with the potential that nonresistant migrants germinate from the seed bank. PMID:27357067

  3. NO REDUCTION IN GENETIC DIVERSITY DESPITE RAPID ADAPTATION IN PCB POLLUTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION OF LARGE ESTUARINE POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic stressors can have negative fitness impacts on populations by reducing population size through direct mortality or reduced reproduction. Evolutionary consequences of pollutants are inevitable if genetic diversity and structure are changed as a result of these impac...

  4. NO REDUCTION IN GENETIC DIVERSITY DESPITE RAPID ADAPTATION TO PCB POLLUTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION OF LARGE ESTUARINE POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic stressors can have negative fitness impacts on populations by reducing population size through direct mortality or reduced reproduction. Evolutionary consequences of pollutants are inevitable if genetic diversity and structure is changed as a result of these impact...

  5. The grain Hardness locus characterized in a diverse wheat panel (Triticum aestivum L.) adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent: genetic diversity, haplotype structure, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shaaf, Salar; Sharma, Rajiv; Baloch, Faheem Shehzad; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Knüpffer, Helmut; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Wheat belongs to the most important crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. In this region, fortunately, locally adapted wheat landraces are still present in farmers' fields. This material might be of immense value for future breeding programs. However, especially wheat germplasm adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent has been poorly characterized for allelic variation at key loci of agricultural importance. Grain hardness is an important trait influencing milling and baking quality of wheat. This trait is mainly determined by three tightly linked genes, namely, Puroindoline a (Pina), Puroindoline b (Pinb), and Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1), at the Hardness (Ha-D) locus on chromosome 5DS. To investigate genetic diversity and haplotype structure, we resequenced 96 diverse wheat lines at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, Gsp-A1, Gsp-B1, and Gsp-D1. Three types of null alleles were identified using diagnostic primers: the first type was a multiple deletion of Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-D1 (Pina-D1k), the second was a Pina-D1 deletion (Pina-D1b); and the third type was a deletion of Gsp-D1, representing a novel null allele designated here as Gsp-D1k. Sequence analysis resulted in four allelic variants at Pinb-D1 and five at Gsp-A1, among them Gsp-A1-V was novel. Pina-D1, Gsp-B1 and Gsp-D1 sequences were monomorphic. Haplotype and phylogenetic analysis suggested that (1) bread wheat inherited its 5DS telomeric region probably from wild diploid Ae. tauschii subsp. tauschii found within an area from Transcaucasia to Caspian Iran; and that (2) the Ha-A and Ha-B homoeoloci were most closely related to sequences of wild tetraploid T. dicocco ides. This study provides a good overview of available genetic diversity at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-1, which can be exploited to extend the range of grain texture traits in wheat. PMID:26898967

  6. Pseudomonas genomes: diverse and adaptable.

    PubMed

    Silby, Mark W; Winstanley, Craig; Godfrey, Scott A C; Levy, Stuart B; Jackson, Robert W

    2011-07-01

    Members of the genus Pseudomonas inhabit a wide variety of environments, which is reflected in their versatile metabolic capacity and broad potential for adaptation to fluctuating environmental conditions. Here, we examine and compare the genomes of a range of Pseudomonas spp. encompassing plant, insect and human pathogens, and environmental saprophytes. In addition to a large number of allelic differences of common genes that confer regulatory and metabolic flexibility, genome analysis suggests that many other factors contribute to the diversity and adaptability of Pseudomonas spp. Horizontal gene transfer has impacted the capability of pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. in terms of disease severity (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and specificity (Pseudomonas syringae). Genome rearrangements likely contribute to adaptation, and a considerable complement of unique genes undoubtedly contributes to strain- and species-specific activities by as yet unknown mechanisms. Because of the lack of conserved phenotypic differences, the classification of the genus has long been contentious. DNA hybridization and genome-based analyses show close relationships among members of P. aeruginosa, but that isolates within the Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. syringae species are less closely related and may constitute different species. Collectively, genome sequences of Pseudomonas spp. have provided insights into pathogenesis and the genetic basis for diversity and adaptation.

  7. Imposing genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The idea that a world in which everyone was born "perfect" would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This thought plays an important role in the "disability critique" of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in the bioethics literature, including some who are notoriously hostile to the idea that we should not select against disability. By developing a number of thought experiments wherein we are to contemplate increasing genetic diversity from a lower baseline in order to secure this value, I argue that this powerful intuition is more problematic than is generally recognized, especially where the price of diversity is the well-being of particular individuals. PMID:26030484

  8. Spatial pattern of adaptive and neutral genetic diversity across different biomes in the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla).

    PubMed

    Clozato, Camila L; Mazzoni, Camila J; Moraes-Barros, Nadia; Morgante, João S; Sommer, Simone

    2015-11-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for proteins involved in antigen recognition and activation of the adaptive immune response and are thought to be regulated by natural selection, especially due to pathogen-driven selective pressure. In this study, we investigated the spatial distribution of MHC class II DRB exon 2 gene diversity of the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla) across five Brazilian biomes using next-generation sequencing and compared the MHC pattern with that of neutral markers (microsatellites). We found a noticeable high level of diversity in DRB (60 amino acid alleles in 65 individuals) and clear signatures of historical positive selection acting on this gene. Higher allelic richness and proportion of private alleles were found in rain forest biomes, especially Amazon forest, a megadiverse biome, possibly harboring greater pathogen richness as well. Neutral markers, however, showed a similar pattern to DRB, demonstrating the strength of demography as an additional force to pathogen-driven selection in shaping MHC diversity and structure. This is the first characterization and description of diversity of a MHC gene for any member of the magna-order Xenarthra, one of the basal lineages of placental mammals. PMID:26640672

  9. Spatial pattern of adaptive and neutral genetic diversity across different biomes in the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla).

    PubMed

    Clozato, Camila L; Mazzoni, Camila J; Moraes-Barros, Nadia; Morgante, João S; Sommer, Simone

    2015-11-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for proteins involved in antigen recognition and activation of the adaptive immune response and are thought to be regulated by natural selection, especially due to pathogen-driven selective pressure. In this study, we investigated the spatial distribution of MHC class II DRB exon 2 gene diversity of the lesser anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla) across five Brazilian biomes using next-generation sequencing and compared the MHC pattern with that of neutral markers (microsatellites). We found a noticeable high level of diversity in DRB (60 amino acid alleles in 65 individuals) and clear signatures of historical positive selection acting on this gene. Higher allelic richness and proportion of private alleles were found in rain forest biomes, especially Amazon forest, a megadiverse biome, possibly harboring greater pathogen richness as well. Neutral markers, however, showed a similar pattern to DRB, demonstrating the strength of demography as an additional force to pathogen-driven selection in shaping MHC diversity and structure. This is the first characterization and description of diversity of a MHC gene for any member of the magna-order Xenarthra, one of the basal lineages of placental mammals.

  10. Adaptive color polymorphism and unusually high local genetic diversity in the side-blotched lizard, Uta stansburiana.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Steven; Parra, Eliseo; Routman, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, studies of adaptive color variation have become popular as models for examining the genetics of natural selection. We examined color pattern polymorphism and genetic variation in a population of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) that is found in habitats with both dark (lava) and light colored (granite) substrates. We conducted a limited experiment for adult phenotypic plasticity in laboratory conditions. We recorded both substrate and lizard color patterns in the field to determine whether lizards tended to match their substrate. Finally we examined genetic variation in a gene (melanocortin 1 receptor) that has been shown to affect lizard color in other species and in a presumably neutral gene (mitochondrial cytochrome b). Populations were sampled in the immediate area of the lava flows as well as from a more distant site to examine the role of population structure. Our captive Uta did not change color to match their background. We show that side-blotched lizards tend to match the substrate on which it was caught in the field and that variation in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene does not correlate well with color pattern in this population. Perhaps the most remarkable result is that this population of side-blotched lizards shows extremely high levels of variation at both genetic markers, in the sense of allele numbers, with relatively low levels of between-allele sequence variation. Genetic variation across this small region was as great or greater than that seen in samples of pelagic fish species collected worldwide. Statistical analysis of genetic variation suggests rapid population expansion may be responsible for the high levels of variation.

  11. Adaptive Color Polymorphism and Unusually High Local Genetic Diversity in the Side-Blotched Lizard, Uta stansburiana

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Steven; Parra, Eliseo; Routman, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, studies of adaptive color variation have become popular as models for examining the genetics of natural selection. We examined color pattern polymorphism and genetic variation in a population of side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) that is found in habitats with both dark (lava) and light colored (granite) substrates. We conducted a limited experiment for adult phenotypic plasticity in laboratory conditions. We recorded both substrate and lizard color patterns in the field to determine whether lizards tended to match their substrate. Finally we examined genetic variation in a gene (melanocortin 1 receptor) that has been shown to affect lizard color in other species and in a presumably neutral gene (mitochondrial cytochrome b). Populations were sampled in the immediate area of the lava flows as well as from a more distant site to examine the role of population structure. Our captive Uta did not change color to match their background. We show that side-blotched lizards tend to match the substrate on which it was caught in the field and that variation in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene does not correlate well with color pattern in this population. Perhaps the most remarkable result is that this population of side-blotched lizards shows extremely high levels of variation at both genetic markers, in the sense of allele numbers, with relatively low levels of between-allele sequence variation. Genetic variation across this small region was as great or greater than that seen in samples of pelagic fish species collected worldwide. Statistical analysis of genetic variation suggests rapid population expansion may be responsible for the high levels of variation. PMID:23133520

  12. Genetic Diversity among Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Shonna M.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; LeBlanc, Donald J.; Moellering, Robert C.; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis, a ubiquitous member of mammalian gastrointestinal flora, is a leading cause of nosocomial infections and a growing public health concern. The enterococci responsible for these infections are often resistant to multiple antibiotics and have become notorious for their ability to acquire and disseminate antibiotic resistances. In the current study, we examined genetic relationships among 106 strains of E. faecalis isolated over the past 100 years, including strains identified for their diversity and used historically for serotyping, strains that have been adapted for laboratory use, and isolates from previously described E. faecalis infection outbreaks. This collection also includes isolates first characterized as having novel plasmids, virulence traits, antibiotic resistances, and pathogenicity island (PAI) components. We evaluated variation in factors contributing to pathogenicity, including toxin production, antibiotic resistance, polymorphism in the capsule (cps) operon, pathogenicity island (PAI) gene content, and other accessory factors. This information was correlated with multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) data, which was used to define genetic lineages. Our findings show that virulence and antibiotic resistance traits can be found within many diverse lineages of E. faecalis. However, lineages have emerged that have caused infection outbreaks globally, in which several new antibiotic resistances have entered the species, and in which virulence traits have converged. Comparing genomic hybridization profiles, using a microarray, of strains identified by MLST as spanning the diversity of the species, allowed us to identify the core E. faecalis genome as consisting of an estimated 2057 unique genes. PMID:17611618

  13. Low genetic diversity and local adaptive divergence of Dracaena cambodiana (Liliaceae) populations associated with historical population bottlenecks and natural selection: an endangered long-lived tree endemic to Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, D-J; Xie, L-S; Zhu, J-H; Zhang, Z-L

    2012-09-01

    Historical population bottlenecks and natural selection have important effects on the current genetic diversity and structure of long-lived trees. Dracaena cambodiana is an endangered, long-lived tree endemic to Hainan Island, China. Our field investigations showed that only 10 populations remain on Hainan Island and that almost all have been seriously isolated and grow in distinct habitats. A considerable amount of genetic variation at the species level, but little variation at the population level, and a high level of genetic differentiation among the populations with limited gene flow in D. cambodiana were detected using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. No significant correlation was found between genetic diversity and actual population size, as the genetic diversities were similar regardless of population size. The Mantel test revealed that there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances among the 10 populations. The UPGMA, PCoA and Bayesian analyses showed that local adaptive divergence has occurred among the D. cambodiana populations, which was further supported by habitat-private fragments. We suggest that the current genetic diversity and population differentiation of D. cambodiana resulted from historical population bottlenecks and natural selection followed by historical isolation. However, the lack of natural regeneration of D. cambodiana indicates that former local adaptations with low genetic diversity may have been genetically weak and are unable to adapt to the current ecological environments.

  14. Microbial diversity--insights from population genetics.

    PubMed

    Mes, Ted H M

    2008-01-01

    Although many environmental microbial populations are large and genetically diverse, both the level of diversity and the extent to which it is ecologically relevant remain enigmatic. Because the effective (or long-term) population size, N(e), is one of the parameters that determines population genetic diversity, tests and simulations that assume selectively neutral mutations may help to identify the processes that have shaped microbial diversity. Using ecologically important genes, tests of selective neutrality suggest that adaptive as well as non-adaptive types of selection act and that departure from neutrality may be widespread or restricted to small groups of genotypes. Population genetic simulations using population sizes between 10(3) and 10(7) suggest extremely high levels of microbial diversity in environments that sustain large populations. However, census and effective population sizes may differ considerably, and because we know nothing of the evolutionary history of environmental microbial populations, we also have no idea what N(e) of environmental populations is. On the one hand, this reflects our ignorance of the microbial world. On the other hand, the tests and simulations illustrate interactions between microbial diversity and microbial population genetics that should inform our thinking in microbial ecology. Because of the different views on microbial diversity across these disciplines, such interactions are crucial if we are to understand the role of genes in microbial communities.

  15. Assessment of Genetic Diversity among Barley Cultivars and Breeding Lines Adapted to the US Pacific Northwest, and Its Implications in Breeding Barley for Imidazolinone-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, Jaime H.; Gemini, Richa; Brew-Appiah, Rhoda A. T.; Wen, Nuan; Osorio, Claudia; Ankrah, Nii; Murphy, Kevin M.; von Wettstein, Diter

    2014-01-01

    Extensive application of imidazolinone (IMI) herbicides had a significant impact on barley productivity contributing to a continuous decline in its acreage over the last two decades. A possible solution to this problem is to transfer IMI-resistance from a recently characterized mutation in the ‘Bob’ barley AHAS (acetohydroxy acid synthase) gene to other food, feed and malting barley cultivars. We focused our efforts on transferring IMI-resistance to barley varieties adapted to the US Pacific Northwest (PNW), since it comprises ∼23% (335,000 ha) of the US agricultural land under barley production. To effectively breed for IMI-resistance, we studied the genetic diversity among 13 two-rowed spring barley cultivars/breeding-lines from the PNW using 61 microsatellite markers, and selected six barley genotypes that showed medium to high genetic dissimilarity with the ‘Bob’ AHAS mutant. The six selected genotypes were used to make 29–53 crosses with the AHAS mutant and a range of 358–471 F1 seeds were obtained. To make informed selection for the recovery of the recipient parent genome, the genetic location of the AHAS gene was determined and its genetic nature assessed. Large F2 populations ranging in size from 2158–2846 individuals were evaluated for herbicide resistance and seedling vigor. Based on the results, F3 lines from the six most vigorous F2 genotypes per cross combination were evaluated for their genetic background. A range of 20%–90% recovery of the recipient parent genome for the carrier chromosome was observed. An effort was made to determine the critical dose of herbicide to distinguish between heterozygotes and homozygotes for the mutant allele. Results suggested that the mutant can survive up to the 10× field recommended dose of herbicide, and the 8× and 10× herbicide doses can distinguish between the two AHAS mutant genotypes. Finally, implications of this research in sustaining barley productivity in the PNW are discussed. PMID

  16. Genetic Diversity and Human Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    The idea of equality often, if not frequently, bogs down in confusion and apparent contradictions; equality is confused with identity, and diversity with inequality. It would seem that the easiest way to discredit the idea of equality is to show that people are innately, genetically, and, therefore, irremediably diverse and unlike. The snare is,…

  17. High genetic diversity is not essential for successful introduction

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Lee A; Moles, Angela T; Lam, Serena; Buitenwerf, Robert; Buswell, Joanna M; Brandenburger, Claire R; Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Nielsen, Knud B; Couchman, Ellen; Brown, Gordon S; Thomson, Fiona J; Hemmings, Frank; Frankham, Richard; Sherwin, William B

    2013-01-01

    Some introduced populations thrive and evolve despite the presumed loss of diversity at introduction. We aimed to quantify the amount of genetic diversity retained at introduction in species that have shown evidence of adaptation to their introduced environments. Samples were taken from native and introduced ranges of Arctotheca populifolia and Petrorhagia nanteuilii. Using microsatellite data, we identified the source for each introduction, estimated genetic diversity in native and introduced populations, and calculated the amount of diversity retained in introduced populations. These values were compared to those from a literature review of diversity in native, confamilial populations and to estimates of genetic diversity retained at introduction. Gene diversity in the native range of both species was significantly lower than for confamilials. We found that, on average, introduced populations showing evidence of adaptation to their new environments retained 81% of the genetic diversity from the native range. Introduced populations of P. nanteuilii had higher genetic diversity than found in the native source populations, whereas introduced populations of A. populifolia retained only 14% of its native diversity in one introduction and 1% in another. Our literature review has shown that most introductions demonstrating adaptive ability have lost diversity upon introduction. The two species studied here had exceptionally low native range genetic diversity. Further, the two introductions of A. populifolia represent the largest percentage loss of genetic diversity in a species showing evidence of substantial morphological change in the introduced range. While high genetic diversity may increase the likelihood of invasion success, the species examined here adapted to their new environments with very little neutral genetic diversity. This finding suggests that even introductions founded by small numbers of individuals have the potential to become invasive. PMID:24340190

  18. Genetic diversity in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Meade, John C; Carlton, Jane M

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in genetic characterisation of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates show that the extensive clinical variability in trichomoniasis and its disease sequelae are matched by significant genetic diversity in the organism itself, suggesting a connection between the genetic identity of isolates and their clinical manifestations. Indeed, a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in T vaginalis isolates has been observed using multiple genotyping techniques. A unique two-type population structure that is both local and global in distribution has been identified, and there is evidence of recombination within each group, although sexual recombination between the groups appears to be constrained. There is conflicting evidence in these studies for correlations between T vaginalis genetic identity and clinical presentation, metronidazole susceptibility, and the presence of T vaginalis virus, underscoring the need for adoption of a common standard for genotyping the parasite. Moving forward, microsatellite genotyping and multilocus sequence typing are the most robust techniques for future investigations of T vaginalis genotype-phenotype associations.

  19. Genetic diversity in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Meade, John C; Carlton, Jane M

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in genetic characterisation of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates show that the extensive clinical variability in trichomoniasis and its disease sequelae are matched by significant genetic diversity in the organism itself, suggesting a connection between the genetic identity of isolates and their clinical manifestations. Indeed, a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in T vaginalis isolates has been observed using multiple genotyping techniques. A unique two-type population structure that is both local and global in distribution has been identified, and there is evidence of recombination within each group, although sexual recombination between the groups appears to be constrained. There is conflicting evidence in these studies for correlations between T vaginalis genetic identity and clinical presentation, metronidazole susceptibility, and the presence of T vaginalis virus, underscoring the need for adoption of a common standard for genotyping the parasite. Moving forward, microsatellite genotyping and multilocus sequence typing are the most robust techniques for future investigations of T vaginalis genotype-phenotype associations. PMID:23702460

  20. Genetic selection and conservation of genetic diversity*.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D

    2012-08-01

    For 100s of years, livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different, except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have been in and out of favour over time. These resources are the raw materials used to manipulate populations, and therefore, they are critical to the past and future success of the livestock sector. With increasing ability to rapidly change genetic composition of livestock populations, the conservation of these genetic resources becomes more critical. Globally, awareness of the need to steward genetic resources has increased. A growing number of countries have embarked on large scale conservation efforts by using in situ, ex situ (gene banking), or both approaches. Gene banking efforts have substantially increased and data suggest that gene banks are successfully capturing genetic diversity for research or industry use. It is also noteworthy that both industry and the research community are utilizing gene bank holdings. As pressures grow to meet consumer demands and potential changes in production systems, the linkage between selection goals and genetic conservation will increase as a mechanism to facilitate continued livestock sector development. PMID:22827378

  1. Genetic selection and conservation of genetic diversity*.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, H D

    2012-08-01

    For 100s of years, livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different, except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have been in and out of favour over time. These resources are the raw materials used to manipulate populations, and therefore, they are critical to the past and future success of the livestock sector. With increasing ability to rapidly change genetic composition of livestock populations, the conservation of these genetic resources becomes more critical. Globally, awareness of the need to steward genetic resources has increased. A growing number of countries have embarked on large scale conservation efforts by using in situ, ex situ (gene banking), or both approaches. Gene banking efforts have substantially increased and data suggest that gene banks are successfully capturing genetic diversity for research or industry use. It is also noteworthy that both industry and the research community are utilizing gene bank holdings. As pressures grow to meet consumer demands and potential changes in production systems, the linkage between selection goals and genetic conservation will increase as a mechanism to facilitate continued livestock sector development.

  2. Does Genetic Diversity Predict Health in Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Hanne C.; Simmons, Leigh W.; Rhodes, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    Genetic diversity, especially at genes important for immune functioning within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), has been associated with fitness-related traits, including disease resistance, in many species. Recently, genetic diversity has been associated with mate preferences in humans. Here we asked whether these preferences are adaptive in terms of obtaining healthier mates. We investigated whether genetic diversity (heterozygosity and standardized mean d2) at MHC and nonMHC microsatellite loci, predicted health in 153 individuals. Individuals with greater allelic diversity (d2) at nonMHC loci and at one MHC locus, linked to HLA-DRB1, reported fewer symptoms over a four-month period than individuals with lower d2. In contrast, there were no associations between MHC or nonMHC heterozygosity and health. NonMHC-d2 has previously been found to predict male preferences for female faces. Thus, the current findings suggest that nonMHC diversity may play a role in both natural and sexual selection acting on human populations. PMID:19633717

  3. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCE IN MIDWESTERN STREAM-DWELLING MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic disturbances may leave imprints on patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity through their effects on population size, adaptation, migration, and mutation. We examined patterns of genetic diversity for a stream-dwelling minnow (the central stoneroller, Campostoma...

  4. Genetic Diversity Increases Insect Herbivory on Oak Saplings

    PubMed Central

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur) half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect) rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect). Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores. PMID:22937168

  5. Genetic diversity increases insect herbivory on oak saplings.

    PubMed

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur) half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect) rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect). Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores.

  6. Diversity Maintenance in Genetic Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, Tatsuya; Numaguchi, Yasushi

    This paper is motivated by an experimental result that better performing genetic programming runs tend to have higher phenotypic diversity. To maintain phenotypic diversity, we apply implicit fitness sharing and its variant, called unfitness multiplying. To apply these methods to problems in which individuals have infinite kinds of possible behaviours, we classify posible behaviours into 50 achievement levels, and assign a reward or a penalty to each level. In implicit fitness sharing a reward is shared out among individuals with the same achievement level, and in unfitness multiplying a penalty is multiplied by the number of individuals with the same level and is distributed to related individuals. Five benchmark problems (11-multiplexer, sextic polynomial, four-sine, intertwined spiral, and artificial ant problems) are used to illustrate the effect of the methods. The results show that our methods clearly promote diversity and lead population to a smooth frequency distribution of achievement levels, and that our methods usually perform better than the original implicit fitness sharing on success rate and the best (raw) fitness. We also observe that the unfitness multiplying makes a quite different ranking over individuals than the one by the implicit fitness sharing.

  7. Allelic Diversity and Its Implications for the Rate of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Armando; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation is usually estimated empirically from statistics based on population gene frequencies, but alternative statistics based on allelic diversity (number of allelic types) can provide complementary information. There is a lack of knowledge, however, on the evolutionary implications attached to allelic-diversity measures, particularly in structured populations. In this article we simulated multiple scenarios of single and structured populations in which a quantitative trait subject to stabilizing selection is adapted to different fitness optima. By forcing a global change in the optima we evaluated which diversity variables are more strongly correlated with both short- and long-term adaptation to the new optima. We found that quantitative genetic variance components for the trait and gene-frequency-diversity measures are generally more strongly correlated with short-term response to selection, whereas allelic-diversity measures are more correlated with long-term and total response to selection. Thus, allelic-diversity variables are better predictors of long-term adaptation than gene-frequency variables. This observation is also extended to unlinked neutral markers as a result of the information they convey on the demographic population history. Diffusion approximations for the allelic-diversity measures in a finite island model under the infinite-allele neutral mutation model are also provided. PMID:24121776

  8. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  9. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-01

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process. PMID:25789509

  10. A population genetic signal of polygenic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jeremy J; Coop, Graham

    2014-08-01

    Adaptation in response to selection on polygenic phenotypes may occur via subtle allele frequencies shifts at many loci. Current population genomic techniques are not well posed to identify such signals. In the past decade, detailed knowledge about the specific loci underlying polygenic traits has begun to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we combine this knowledge from GWAS with robust population genetic modeling to identify traits that may have been influenced by local adaptation. We exploit the fact that GWAS provide an estimate of the additive effect size of many loci to estimate the mean additive genetic value for a given phenotype across many populations as simple weighted sums of allele frequencies. We use a general model of neutral genetic value drift for an arbitrary number of populations with an arbitrary relatedness structure. Based on this model, we develop methods for detecting unusually strong correlations between genetic values and specific environmental variables, as well as a generalization of [Q(ST)/F(ST)] comparisons to test for over-dispersion of genetic values among populations. Finally we lay out a framework to identify the individual populations or groups of populations that contribute to the signal of overdispersion. These tests have considerably greater power than their single locus equivalents due to the fact that they look for positive covariance between like effect alleles, and also significantly outperform methods that do not account for population structure. We apply our tests to the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP) dataset using GWAS data for height, skin pigmentation, type 2 diabetes, body mass index, and two inflammatory bowel disease datasets. This analysis uncovers a number of putative signals of local adaptation, and we discuss the biological interpretation and caveats of these results. PMID:25102153

  11. Ploidy Variation and Genetic Diversity in Dichroa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent evidence suggests a close genetic relationship between Hydrangea macrophylla and D. febrifuga, which supports previous morphological and DNA sequence data. This relationship was confirmed by the production of fertile intergeneric hybrids. Here we characterize the genetic diversity of availab...

  12. Genetic diversity among Bolivian arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Cajimat, Maria N B; Milazzo, Mary Louise; Rollin, Pierre E; Nichol, Stuart T; Bowen, Michael D; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2009-03-01

    Machupo virus and Chapare virus are members of the Tacaribe serocomplex (virus family Arenaviridae) and etiological agents of hemorrhagic fever in humans in Bolivia. The nucleotide sequences of the complete Z genes, a large fragment of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes, the complete glycoprotein precursor genes, and the complete nucleocapsid protein genes of 8 strains of Machupo virus were determined to increase our knowledge of the genetic diversity among the Bolivian arenaviruses. The results of analyses of the predicted amino acid sequences of the glycoproteins of the Machupo virus strains and Chapare virus strain 200001071 indicated that immune plasma from hemorrhagic fever cases caused by Machupo virus may prove beneficial in the treatment of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever but not hemorrhagic fever caused by Chapare virus.

  13. Genetic Diversity and Societally Important Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Noah A.; Kang, Jonathan T. L.

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude of genetic diversity within human populations varies in a way that reflects the sequence of migrations by which people spread throughout the world. Beyond its use in human evolutionary genetics, worldwide variation in genetic diversity sometimes can interact with social processes to produce differences among populations in their relationship to modern societal problems. We review the consequences of genetic diversity differences in the settings of familial identification in forensic genetic testing, match probabilities in bone marrow transplantation, and representation in genome-wide association studies of disease. In each of these three cases, the contribution of genetic diversity to social differences follows from population-genetic principles. For a fourth setting that is not similarly grounded, we reanalyze with expanded genetic data a report that genetic diversity differences influence global patterns of human economic development, finding no support for the claim. The four examples describe a limit to the importance of genetic diversity for explaining societal differences while illustrating a distinction that certain biologically based scenarios do require consideration of genetic diversity for solving problems to which populations have been differentially predisposed by the unique history of human migrations. PMID:26354973

  14. Genetic Diversity and Societally Important Disparities.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Kang, Jonathan T L

    2015-09-01

    The magnitude of genetic diversity within human populations varies in a way that reflects the sequence of migrations by which people spread throughout the world. Beyond its use in human evolutionary genetics, worldwide variation in genetic diversity sometimes can interact with social processes to produce differences among populations in their relationship to modern societal problems. We review the consequences of genetic diversity differences in the settings of familial identification in forensic genetic testing, match probabilities in bone marrow transplantation, and representation in genome-wide association studies of disease. In each of these three cases, the contribution of genetic diversity to social differences follows from population-genetic principles. For a fourth setting that is not similarly grounded, we reanalyze with expanded genetic data a report that genetic diversity differences influence global patterns of human economic development, finding no support for the claim. The four examples describe a limit to the importance of genetic diversity for explaining societal differences while illustrating a distinction that certain biologically based scenarios do require consideration of genetic diversity for solving problems to which populations have been differentially predisposed by the unique history of human migrations.

  15. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-09-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. PMID:25059740

  16. Demographic Events and Evolutionary Forces Shaping European Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Veeramah, Krishna R.; Novembre, John

    2014-01-01

    Europeans have been the focus of some of the largest studies of genetic diversity in any species to date. Recent genome-wide data have reinforced the hypothesis that present-day European genetic diversity is strongly correlated with geography. The remaining challenge now is to understand more precisely how patterns of diversity in Europe reflect ancient demographic events such as postglacial expansions or the spread of farming. It is likely that recent advances in paleogenetics will give us some of these answers. There has also been progress in identifying specific segments of European genomes that reflect adaptations to selective pressures from the physical environment, disease, and dietary shifts. A growing understanding of how modern European genetic diversity has been shaped by demographic and evolutionary forces is not only of basic historical and anthropological interest but also aids genetic studies of disease. PMID:25059709

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AQUATIC MODELS FOR TESTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION EXTINCTION RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between population adaptive potential and extinction risk in a changing environment is not well understood. Although the expectation is that genetic diversity is directly related to the capacity of populations to adapt, the statistical and predictive aspects of ...

  18. Macrophage adaptation leads to parallel evolution of genetically diverse Escherichia coli small-colony variants with increased fitness in vivo and antibiotic collateral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Ricardo S; Costa, Henrique; Gordo, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Small-colony variants (SCVs) are commonly observed in evolution experiments and clinical isolates, being associated with antibiotic resistance and persistent infections. We recently observed the repeated emergence of Escherichia coli SCVs during adaptation to the interaction with macrophages. To identify the genetic targets underlying the emergence of this clinically relevant morphotype, we performed whole-genome sequencing of independently evolved SCV clones. We uncovered novel mutational targets, not previously associated with SCVs (e.g. cydA, pepP) and observed widespread functional parallelism. All SCV clones had mutations in genes related to the electron-transport chain. As SCVs emerged during adaptation to macrophages, and often show increased antibiotic resistance, we measured SCV fitness inside macrophages and measured their antibiotic resistance profiles. SCVs had a fitness advantage inside macrophages and showed increased aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, but had collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics (e.g. tetracycline). Importantly, we observed similar results in vivo. SCVs had a fitness advantage upon colonization of the mouse gut, which could be tuned by antibiotic treatment: kanamycin (aminoglycoside) increased SCV fitness, but tetracycline strongly reduced it. Our results highlight the power of using experimental evolution as the basis for identifying the causes and consequences of adaptation during host-microbe interactions. PMID:27606007

  19. Diversity of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphological similarity among species. Recent researchers using molecular tools have contributed to the identification of genes controlling several types of resistance as well as to the revision of taxonomical relationships among potato species. Historically, primitive forms of cultivated potato and its wild relatives have been used in breeding programs and there is still an enormous and unimaginable potential for discovering desirable characteristics, particularly in wild species Different methods have been developed to incorporate useful alleles from these wild species into the improved cultivars. Potato germplasm comprising of useful alleles for different breeding objectives is preserved in various gene banks worldwide. These materials, with their invaluable information, are accessible for research and breeding purposes. Precise identification of species base on the new taxonomy is essential for effective use of the germplasm collection. PMID:25931978

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand ...

  1. Genetic Diversity of A-Genome Cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is known to have relatively low levels of genetic diversity or variation in genetic makeup among individuals, a better understanding of this variation and relationships among possible sources of novel genes would be valuable. Therefore, analysis of genetic...

  2. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  3. AFRICAN GENETIC DIVERSITY: Implications for Human Demographic History, Modern Human Origins, and Complex Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Michael C.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies of ethnically diverse human populations, particularly in Africa, are important for reconstructing human evolutionary history and for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic adaptation and complex disease. African populations are characterized by greater levels of genetic diversity, extensive population substructure, and less linkage disequilibrium (LD) among loci compared to non-African populations. Africans also possess a number of genetic adaptations that have evolved in response to diverse climates and diets, as well as exposure to infectious disease. This review summarizes patterns and the evolutionary origins of genetic diversity present in African populations, as well as their implications for the mapping of complex traits, including disease susceptibility. PMID:18593304

  4. Stress-mediated adaptive response leading to genetic diversity and instability in metabolite contents of high medicinal value: an overview on Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manju Lata; Dutta, Ajaswrata

    2011-12-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum, known for its diversified clinical importance particularly for antineoplastic activity and valuable source for biological protection against high doses of radiation, has its unique position in the plant kingdom. Detailed understanding of mechanism and opportunity of chemical manipulations has amplified the scope of its bioactivity. Podophyllotoxin, the major active principle of this plant, has passed through various structural deviations with the basic aim of making the end product clinically more effective with minimal toxicity. However, over exploitation and limited growth has categorized this plant under endangered species. Depending upon the geographical variations, different species and subspecies of this plant have been explored. Morphological variations and quantitative differences in active principles are the major concern of its unstable medicinal value in whole and semifractionated preparations. The current review has addressed the issues related to the genetic diversity of P. hexandrum, extrinsic and intrinsic stresses responsible for its diversified nature, chemical modifications to enhance its multitasking bioactivity, and efforts for its cultivation and production of important metabolites to avoid collection of wild species due to its critically endangered nature.

  5. Genetic depletion at adaptive but not neutral loci in an endangered bird species.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefanie A; Schaefer, H Martin; Segelbacher, Gernot

    2014-12-01

    Many endangered species suffer from the loss of genetic diversity, but some populations may be able to thrive even if genetically depleted. To investigate the underlying genetic processes of population bottlenecks, we apply an innovative approach for assessing genetic diversity in the last known population of the endangered Pale-headed Brushfinch (Atlapetes pallidiceps) in Ecuador. First, we measure genetic diversity at eleven neutral microsatellite loci and adaptive SNP variation in five Toll-like receptor (TLR) immune system genes. Bottleneck tests confirm genetic drift as the main force shaping genetic diversity in this species and indicate a 99 % reduction in population size dating back several hundred years. Second, we compare contemporary microsatellite diversity with historic museum samples of A. pallidiceps, finding no change in genetic diversity. Third, we compare genetic diversity in the Pale-headed Brushfinch with two co-occurring-related brushfinch species (Atlapetes latinuchus, Buarremon torquatus), finding a reduction of up to 91% diversity in the immune system genes but not in microsatellites. High TLR diversity is linked to decreased survival probabilities in A. pallidiceps. Low TLR diversity is thus probably an adaptation to the specific selection regime within its currently very restricted distribution (approximately 200 ha), but could severely restrict the adaptive potential of the species in the long run. Our study illustrates the importance of investigating both neutral and adaptive markers to assess the effect of population bottlenecks and for recommending specific management plans in endangered species.

  6. Diversity and Adaptation in Large Population Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. Y. Michael; Lim, S. W.; Luo, Peixun

    We consider a version of large population games whose players compete for resources using strategies with adaptable preferences. The system efficiency is measured by the variance of the decisions. In the regime where the system can be plagued by the maladaptive behavior of the players, we find that diversity among the players improves the system efficiency, though it slows the convergence to the steady state. Diversity causes a mild spread of resources at the transient state, but reduces the uneven distribution of resources in the steady state.

  7. Evolution and genetic diversity of Theileria.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Hayashida, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-10-01

    Theileria parasites infect a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide, causing diseases with varying degrees of severity. A broad classification, based on the parasite's ability to transform the leukocytes of host animals, divides Theileria into two groups, consisting of transforming and non-transforming species. The evolution of transforming Theileria has been accompanied by drastic changes in its genetic makeup, such as acquisition or expansion of gene families, which are thought to play critical roles in the transformation of host cells. Genetic variation among Theileria parasites is sometimes linked with host specificity and virulence in the parasites. Immunity against Theileria parasites primarily involves cell-mediated immune responses in the host. Immunodominance and major histocompatibility complex class I phenotype-specificity result in a host immunity that is tightly focused and strain-specific. Immune escape in Theileria is facilitated by genetic diversity in its antigenic determinants, which potentially results in a loss of T cell receptor recognition in its host. In the recent past, several reviews have focused on genetic diversity in the transforming species, Theileriaparva and Theileriaannulata. In contrast, genetic diversity in Theileriaorientalis, a benign non-transforming parasite, which occasionally causes disease outbreaks in cattle, has not been extensively examined. In this review, therefore, we provide an outline of the evolution of Theileria, which includes T. orientalis, and discuss the possible mechanisms generating genetic diversity among parasite populations. Additionally, we discuss the potential implications of a genetically diverse parasite population in the context of Theileria vaccine development.

  8. Genetic diversity in farm animals--a review.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, L F; Lenstra, J A; Eding, H; Toro, M A; Scherf, B; Pilling, D; Negrini, R; Finlay, E K; Jianlin, H; Groeneveld, E; Weigend, S

    2010-05-01

    Domestication of livestock species and a long history of migrations, selection and adaptation have created an enormous variety of breeds. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization, recording of production environments and effective data management. In addition, molecular genetic studies allow a comparison of genetic diversity within and across breeds and a reconstruction of the history of breeds and ancestral populations. This has been summarized for cattle, yak, water buffalo, sheep, goats, camelids, pigs, horses, and chickens. Further progress is expected to benefit from advances in molecular technology.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Gilleard, J S; Redman, E

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is one of the most successful and problematic livestock parasites worldwide. From its apparent evolutionary origins in sub-Saharan Africa, it is now found in small ruminants in almost all regions of the globe, and can infect a range of different domestic and wildlife artiodactyl hosts. It has a remarkably high propensity to develop resistance to anthelmintic drugs, making control increasingly difficult. The success of this parasite is, at least in part, due to its extremely high levels of genetic diversity that, in turn, provide a high adaptive capacity. Understanding this genetic diversity is important for many areas of research including anthelmintic resistance, epidemiology, control, drug/vaccine development and molecular diagnostics. In this article, we review the current knowledge of H. contortus genetic diversity and population structure for both field isolates and laboratory strains. We highlight the practical relevance of this knowledge with a particular emphasis on anthelmintic resistance research. PMID:27238002

  10. Adaptation of Maize to Temperate Climates: Mid-Density Genome-Wide Association Genetics and Diversity Patterns Reveal Key Genomic Regions, with a Major Contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Bertin, Pascal; Madur, Delphine; Combes, Valérie; Dumas, Fabrice; Brunel, Dominique; Laborde, Jacques; Charcosset, Alain; Nicolas, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT) gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide range of

  11. Network analyses structure genetic diversity in independent genetic worlds.

    PubMed

    Halary, Sébastien; Leigh, Jessica W; Cheaib, Bachar; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2010-01-01

    DNA flows between chromosomes and mobile elements, following rules that are poorly understood. This limited knowledge is partly explained by the limits of current approaches to study the structure and evolution of genetic diversity. Network analyses of 119,381 homologous DNA families, sampled from 111 cellular genomes and from 165,529 phage, plasmid, and environmental virome sequences, offer challenging insights. Our results support a disconnected yet highly structured network of genetic diversity, revealing the existence of multiple "genetic worlds." These divides define multiple isolated groups of DNA vehicles drawing on distinct gene pools. Mathematical studies of the centralities of these worlds' subnetworks demonstrate that plasmids, not viruses, were key vectors of genetic exchange between bacterial chromosomes, both recently and in the past. Furthermore, network methodology introduces new ways of quantifying current sampling of genetic diversity.

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied.

  14. Adaptive sensor fusion using genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, D.S.; Adams, D.G.

    1994-08-01

    Past attempts at sensor fusion have used some form of Boolean logic to combine the sensor information. As an alteniative, an adaptive ``fuzzy`` sensor fusion technique is described in this paper. This technique exploits the robust capabilities of fuzzy logic in the decision process as well as the optimization features of the genetic algorithm. This paper presents a brief background on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms and how they are used in an online implementation of adaptive sensor fusion.

  15. High altitude living: genetic and environmental adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, G; Bittle, P A; Rosen, R; Rabb, H; Pineda, D

    1999-01-01

    High altitude (HA) living produces physiological changes for adaptation to chronic hypobaric-hypoxemic conditions. Although much is known about these physiologic adaptations, no clear separation has been made regarding what is "native" or "genetic" adaptation and what is "acquired." In this review, we describe the genetic vs. acquired adaptation and only include studies performed in a population native to HA and not in an acclimatized population or trekkers. The changes encountered in animals and humans living at HA in terms of hematology, muscular, respiratory, cerebral, cardiovascular, hormonal, fluid and electrolytes and reproduction, strongly suggest that genetics play a very important role in HA adaptation. Unfortunately, the characteristic physiology of HA natives has not been systematically defined to established specific measurable parameters of adaptation in comparison to the acquired ambient adaptation of the non-native population. Once the parameters are established, we can compare non-native populations exposed to HA that must emulate the HA physiology for a definite adaptation to be present. With measurable parameters, especially in the management of fluids and electrolytes, we can define how long it will take for a sea level native to adapt to an HA altitude. Until these studies are performed, speculation will continue and no rational medical intervention can be offered to HA newcomers who may experience HA difficulties.

  16. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation.

    PubMed

    van Heerwaarden, J; van Eeuwijk, F A; Ross-Ibarra, J

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that can adequately describe the genetic effects of seed management. We present a metapopulation model that accounts for several features unique to managed crop populations. Using traditional maize agriculture as an example, we develop a coalescence-based model of a crop metapopulation undergoing pollen and seed flow as well as seed replacement. In contrast to metapopulation work on natural systems, we model seed migration as episodic and originating from a single source per population rather than as a constant immigration from the entire metapopulation. We find that the correlated origin of migrants leads to surprising results, including a loss of invariance of within-deme diversity and a parabolic relationship between F(ST) and migration quantity. In contrast, the effects of migration frequency on diversity and structure are more similar to classical predictions, suggesting that seed migration in managed crop populations cannot be described by a single parameter. In addition to migration, we investigate the effects of deme size and extinction rates on genetic structure, and show that high levels of pollen migration may mask the effects of seed management on structure. Our results highlight the importance of analytically evaluating the effects of deviations from classical metapopulation models, especially in systems for which data are available to estimate specific model parameters.

  17. Genetic diversity of Rhodopirellula strains.

    PubMed

    Frank, Carsten S; Klockow, Christine; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Harder, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T) is a marine planctomycete with 7,325 genes in its genome. Ten strains of the genus Rhodopirellula were studied in whole genome microarray experiments to assess the extent of their genetic relatedness to R. baltica SH1(T). DNA of strains which were previously affiliated with the species R. baltica (OTU A) hybridized with 3,645-5,728 genes of the type strain on the microarray. Strains SH398 and 6C (OTU B), representing a closely related species with an average nucleotide identity of 88 %, showed less hybridization signals: 1,816 and 3,302 genes gave a hybridization signal, respectively. Comparative genomics of eight permanent draft genomes revealed the presence of over 4,000 proteins common in R. baltica SH1(T) and strains of OTU A or B. The genus Rhodopirellula is characterized by large genomes, with over 7,000 genes per genome and a core genome of around 3000 genes. Individual Rhodopirellula strains have a large portion of strain-specific genes. PMID:23975513

  18. Genetic Diversity of Natural Crossing in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have shown previously genetic diversity in mature cotton pollen sensitivity to low humidity. This study investigated the impact of pollen sensitivity to low humidity on the amount of outcrossing to neighboring plants. We utilized “red” and “green” pigmented cotton, in addition to gossypol glan...

  19. Genetic diversity of Lycoris endemic to Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive taxonomic relationships among Lycoris Herb. (Amaryllidaceae) taxa native to Korea have not been analyzed previously. This study was carried out to investigate the hybrid origin, genetic diversity, and relationships of Lycoris taxa (L. flavescens, L. uydoensis, L. chejuensis, L. chinensis ...

  20. Cryptic Genetic Diversity in Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeanette A.; Clark, C. Graham

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the role of Dientamoeba fragilis in human disease could be due in part to the existence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic variants. Evidence for two genetically distinct forms was obtained using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of ribosomal genes. Future studies in humans will need to take D. fragilis diversity into account. PMID:11101615

  1. Unlocking the genetic diversity of Creole wheats

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Prashant; Franco, Jorge; Burgueño-Ferreira, Juan; Li, Huihui; Sehgal, Deepmala; Saint Pierre, Carolina; Ortiz, Cynthia; Sneller, Clay; Tattaris, Maria; Guzman, Carlos; Sansaloni, Carolina Paola; Fuentes-Davila, Guillermo; Reynolds, Matthew; Sonders, Kai; Singh, Pawan; Payne, Thomas; Wenzl, Peter; Sharma, Achla; Bains, Navtej Singh; Singh, Gyanendra Pratap; Crossa, José; Singh, Sukhwinder

    2016-01-01

    Climate change and slow yield gains pose a major threat to global wheat production. Underutilized genetic resources including landraces and wild relatives are key elements for developing high-yielding and climate-resilient wheat varieties. Landraces introduced into Mexico from Europe, also known as Creole wheats, are adapted to a wide range of climatic regimes and represent a unique genetic resource. Eight thousand four hundred and sixteen wheat landraces representing all dimensions of Mexico were characterized through genotyping-by-sequencing technology. Results revealed sub-groups adapted to specific environments of Mexico. Broadly, accessions from north and south of Mexico showed considerable genetic differentiation. However, a large percentage of landrace accessions were genetically very close, although belonged to different regions most likely due to the recent (nearly five centuries before) introduction of wheat in Mexico. Some of the groups adapted to extreme environments and accumulated high number of rare alleles. Core reference sets were assembled simultaneously using multiple variables, capturing 89% of the rare alleles present in the complete set. Genetic information about Mexican wheat landraces and core reference set can be effectively utilized in next generation wheat varietal improvement. PMID:26976656

  2. Unlocking the genetic diversity of Creole wheats.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Prashant; Franco, Jorge; Burgueño-Ferreira, Juan; Li, Huihui; Sehgal, Deepmala; Saint Pierre, Carolina; Ortiz, Cynthia; Sneller, Clay; Tattaris, Maria; Guzman, Carlos; Sansaloni, Carolina Paola; Fuentes-Davila, Guillermo; Reynolds, Matthew; Sonders, Kai; Singh, Pawan; Payne, Thomas; Wenzl, Peter; Sharma, Achla; Bains, Navtej Singh; Singh, Gyanendra Pratap; Crossa, José; Singh, Sukhwinder

    2016-01-01

    Climate change and slow yield gains pose a major threat to global wheat production. Underutilized genetic resources including landraces and wild relatives are key elements for developing high-yielding and climate-resilient wheat varieties. Landraces introduced into Mexico from Europe, also known as Creole wheats, are adapted to a wide range of climatic regimes and represent a unique genetic resource. Eight thousand four hundred and sixteen wheat landraces representing all dimensions of Mexico were characterized through genotyping-by-sequencing technology. Results revealed sub-groups adapted to specific environments of Mexico. Broadly, accessions from north and south of Mexico showed considerable genetic differentiation. However, a large percentage of landrace accessions were genetically very close, although belonged to different regions most likely due to the recent (nearly five centuries before) introduction of wheat in Mexico. Some of the groups adapted to extreme environments and accumulated high number of rare alleles. Core reference sets were assembled simultaneously using multiple variables, capturing 89% of the rare alleles present in the complete set. Genetic information about Mexican wheat landraces and core reference set can be effectively utilized in next generation wheat varietal improvement. PMID:26976656

  3. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains.

  4. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains. PMID:26205244

  5. Adaptation by Plasticity of Genetic Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Naama

    2007-03-01

    Genetic regulatory networks have an essential role in adaptation and evolution of cell populations. This role is strongly related to their dynamic properties over intermediate-to-long time scales. We have used the budding yeast as a model Eukaryote to study the long-term dynamics of the genetic regulatory system and its significance in evolution. A continuous cell growth technique (chemostat) allows us to monitor these systems over long times under controlled condition, enabling a quantitative characterization of dynamics: steady states and their stability, transients and relaxation. First, we have demonstrated adaptive dynamics in the GAL system, a classic model for a Eukaryotic genetic switch, induced and repressed by different carbon sources in the environment. We found that both induction and repression are only transient responses; over several generations, the system converges to a single robust steady state, independent of external conditions. Second, we explored the functional significance of such plasticity of the genetic regulatory network in evolution. We used genetic engineering to mimic the natural process of gene recruitment, placing the gene HIS3 under the regulation of the GAL system. Such genetic rewiring events are important in the evolution of gene regulation, but little is known about the physiological processes supporting them and the dynamics of their assimilation in a cell population. We have shown that cells carrying the rewired genome adapted to a demanding change of environment and stabilized a population, maintaining the adaptive state for hundreds of generations. Using genome-wide expression arrays we showed that underlying the observed adaptation is a global transcriptional programming that allowed tuning expression of the recruited gene to demands. Our results suggest that non-specific properties reflecting the natural plasticity of the regulatory network support adaptation of cells to novel challenges and enhance their evolvability.

  6. Low genetic diversity in a marine nature reserve: re-evaluating diversity criteria in reserve design

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J.J; Okamura, B

    2005-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the genetic composition of populations associated with marine reserves, as reserve designation is generally to protect specific species, communities or habitats. Nevertheless, it is important to conserve genetic diversity since it provides the raw material for the maintenance of species diversity over longer, evolutionary time-scales and may also confer the basis for adaptation to environmental change. Many current marine reserves are small in size and isolated to some degree (e.g. sea loughs and offshore islands). While such features enable easier management, they may have important implications for the genetic structure of protected populations, the ability of populations to recover from local catastrophes and the potential for marine reserves to act as sources of propagules for surrounding areas. Here, we present a case study demonstrating genetic differentiation, isolation, inbreeding and reduced genetic diversity in populations of the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus in Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve (an isolated sea lough in southern Ireland), compared with populations on the local adjacent open coast and populations in England, Wales and France. Our study demonstrates that this sea lough is isolated from open coast populations, and highlights that there may be long-term genetic consequences of selecting reserves on the basis of isolation and ease of protection. PMID:16024366

  7. Natural Selection and Genetic Diversity in the Butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Simon H.; Möst, Markus; Palmer, William J.; Salazar, Camilo; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of selective and neutral evolutionary forces shape patterns of genetic diversity in nature. Among the insects, most previous analyses of the roles of drift and selection in shaping variation across the genome have focused on the genus Drosophila. A more complete understanding of these forces will come from analyzing other taxa that differ in population demography and other aspects of biology. We have analyzed diversity and signatures of selection in the neotropical Heliconius butterflies using resequenced genomes from 58 wild-caught individuals of Heliconius melpomene and another 21 resequenced genomes representing 11 related species. By comparing intraspecific diversity and interspecific divergence, we estimate that 31% of amino acid substitutions between Heliconius species are adaptive. Diversity at putatively neutral sites is negatively correlated with the local density of coding sites as well as nonsynonymous substitutions and positively correlated with recombination rate, indicating widespread linked selection. This process also manifests in significantly reduced diversity on longer chromosomes, consistent with lower recombination rates. Although hitchhiking around beneficial nonsynonymous mutations has significantly shaped genetic variation in H. melpomene, evidence for strong selective sweeps is limited overall. We did however identify two regions where distinct haplotypes have swept in different populations, leading to increased population differentiation. On the whole, our study suggests that positive selection is less pervasive in these butterflies as compared to fruit flies, a fact that curiously results in very similar levels of neutral diversity in these very different insects. PMID:27017626

  8. Natural Selection and Genetic Diversity in the Butterfly Heliconius melpomene.

    PubMed

    Martin, Simon H; Möst, Markus; Palmer, William J; Salazar, Camilo; McMillan, W Owen; Jiggins, Francis M; Jiggins, Chris D

    2016-05-01

    A combination of selective and neutral evolutionary forces shape patterns of genetic diversity in nature. Among the insects, most previous analyses of the roles of drift and selection in shaping variation across the genome have focused on the genus Drosophila A more complete understanding of these forces will come from analyzing other taxa that differ in population demography and other aspects of biology. We have analyzed diversity and signatures of selection in the neotropical Heliconius butterflies using resequenced genomes from 58 wild-caught individuals of Heliconius melpomene and another 21 resequenced genomes representing 11 related species. By comparing intraspecific diversity and interspecific divergence, we estimate that 31% of amino acid substitutions between Heliconius species are adaptive. Diversity at putatively neutral sites is negatively correlated with the local density of coding sites as well as nonsynonymous substitutions and positively correlated with recombination rate, indicating widespread linked selection. This process also manifests in significantly reduced diversity on longer chromosomes, consistent with lower recombination rates. Although hitchhiking around beneficial nonsynonymous mutations has significantly shaped genetic variation in H. melpomene, evidence for strong selective sweeps is limited overall. We did however identify two regions where distinct haplotypes have swept in different populations, leading to increased population differentiation. On the whole, our study suggests that positive selection is less pervasive in these butterflies as compared to fruit flies, a fact that curiously results in very similar levels of neutral diversity in these very different insects. PMID:27017626

  9. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Stallknecht, David E.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America. PMID:25463613

  10. Evolutionary genetics and vector adaptation of recombinant viruses of the western equine encephalitis antigenic complex provides new insights into alphavirus diversity and host switching.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Stallknecht, David E; Holmes, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), Highlands J virus (HJV), and Fort Morgan virus (FMV) are the sole representatives of the WEE antigenic complex of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, that are endemic to North America. All three viruses have their ancestry in a recombination event involving eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and a Sindbis (SIN)-like virus that gave rise to a chimeric alphavirus that subsequently diversified into the present-day WEEV, HJV, and FMV. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the genetic, ecological, and evolutionary relationships among these recombinant-origin viruses, including the description of a nsP4 polymerase mutation in FMV that allows it to circumvent the host range barrier to Asian tiger mosquito cells, a vector species that is normally refractory to infection. Notably, we also provide evidence that the recombination event that gave rise to these three WEEV antigenic complex viruses may have occurred in North America.

  11. Genetic algorithms in adaptive fuzzy control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. Lucas; Harper, Tony R.

    1992-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust fuzzy membership functions in response to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific computer-simulated chemical system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  12. EPA'S GENETIC DIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAM: ECOLOGICAL INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental component of biodiversity that is affected by environmental stressors in predictable ways and limits potential responses of a population to future stressors. Understanding patterns of genetic diversity enhances the value and interpretation of o...

  13. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael M; Olivieri, Isabelle; Waller, Donald M; Nielsen, Einar E

    2012-03-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how to use genetic monitoring to study adaptive responses via repeated analysis of the same populations over time, distinguishing between phenotypic and molecular genetics approaches. After describing monitoring designs, we develop explicit criteria for demonstrating adaptive responses, which include testing for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We further review a broader set of 44 studies to assess how well they meet the proposed criteria, and conclude that only 23% fulfill all criteria. Approximately half (43%) of these studies failed to rule out the alternative hypothesis of replacement by a different, better-adapted population. Likewise, 34% of the studies based on phenotypic variation did not test for selection as opposed to drift. These shortcomings can be addressed via improved experimental designs and statistical testing. We foresee monitoring of adaptive responses as a future valuable tool in conservation biology, for identifying populations unable to evolve at sufficiently high rates and for identifying possible donor populations for genetic rescue. Technological advances will further augment the realization of this potential, especially next-generation sequencing technologies that allow for monitoring at the level of whole genomes.

  14. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  15. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, David R; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency (m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e  ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e  > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated. PMID:23728203

  16. An Adaptive Immune Genetic Algorithm for Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Bai, Bendu; Zhang, Yanning

    An adaptive immune genetic algorithm (AIGA) based on cost minimization technique method for edge detection is proposed. The proposed AIGA recommends the use of adaptive probabilities of crossover, mutation and immune operation, and a geometric annealing schedule in immune operator to realize the twin goals of maintaining diversity in the population and sustaining the fast convergence rate in solving the complex problems such as edge detection. Furthermore, AIGA can effectively exploit some prior knowledge and information of the local edge structure in the edge image to make vaccines, which results in much better local search ability of AIGA than that of the canonical genetic algorithm. Experimental results on gray-scale images show the proposed algorithm perform well in terms of quality of the final edge image, rate of convergence and robustness to noise.

  17. [Molecular genetic bases of adaptation processes and approaches to their analysis].

    PubMed

    Salmenkova, E A

    2013-01-01

    Great interest in studying the molecular genetic bases of the adaptation processes is explained by their importance in understanding evolutionary changes, in the development ofintraspecific and interspecific genetic diversity, and in the creation of approaches and programs for maintaining and restoring the population. The article examines the sources and conditions for generating adaptive genetic variability and contribution of neutral and adaptive genetic variability to the population structure of the species; methods for identifying the adaptive genetic variability on the genome level are also described. Considerable attention is paid to the potential of new technologies of genome analysis, including next-generation sequencing and some accompanying methods. In conclusion, the important role of the joint use of genomics and proteomics approaches in understanding the molecular genetic bases of adaptation is emphasized.

  18. Quantitative genetic study of the adaptive process.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R G; Shaw, F H

    2014-01-01

    The additive genetic variance with respect to absolute fitness, VA(W), divided by mean absolute fitness, , sets the rate of ongoing adaptation. Fisher's key insight yielding this quantitative prediction of adaptive evolution, known as the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, is well appreciated by evolutionists. Nevertheless, extremely scant information about VA(W) is available for natural populations. Consequently, the capacity for fitness increase via natural selection is unknown. Particularly in the current context of rapid environmental change, which is likely to reduce fitness directly and, consequently, the size and persistence of populations, the urgency of advancing understanding of immediate adaptive capacity is extreme. We here explore reasons for the dearth of empirical information about VA(W), despite its theoretical renown and critical evolutionary role. Of these reasons, we suggest that expectations that VA(W) is negligible, in general, together with severe statistical challenges of estimating it, may largely account for the limited empirical emphasis on it. To develop insight into the dynamics of VA(W) in a changing environment, we have conducted individual-based genetically explicit simulations. We show that, as optimizing selection on a trait changes steadily over generations, VA(W) can grow considerably, supporting more rapid adaptation than would the VA(W) of the base population. We call for direct evaluation of VA(W) and in support of prediction of rates adaptive evolution, and we advocate for the use of aster modeling as a rigorous basis for achieving this goal.

  19. Parallel Adaptive Divergence among Geographically Diverse Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Few genetic differences between human populations conform to the classic model of positive selection, in which a newly arisen mutation rapidly approaches fixation in one lineage, suggesting that adaptation more commonly occurs via moderate changes in standing variation at many loci. Detecting and characterizing this type of complex selection requires integrating individually ambiguous signatures across genomically and geographically extensive data. Here, we develop a novel approach to test the hypothesis that selection has favored modest divergence at particular loci multiple times in independent human populations. We find an excess of SNPs showing non-neutral parallel divergence, enriched for genic and nonsynonymous polymorphisms in genes encompassing diverse and often disease related functions. Repeated parallel evolution in the same direction suggests common selective pressures in disparate habitats. We test our method with extensive coalescent simulations and show that it is robust to a wide range of demographic events. Our results demonstrate phylogenetically orthogonal patterns of local adaptation caused by subtle shifts at many widespread polymorphisms that likely underlie substantial phenotypic diversity. PMID:21698142

  20. Exploring Genetic Diversity in Plants Using High-Throughput Sequencing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Onda, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Food security has emerged as an urgent concern because of the rising world population. To meet the food demands of the near future, it is required to improve the productivity of various crops, not just of staple food crops. The genetic diversity among plant populations in a given species allows the plants to adapt to various environmental conditions. Such diversity could therefore yield valuable traits that could overcome the food-security challenges. To explore genetic diversity comprehensively and to rapidly identify useful genes and/or allele, advanced high-throughput sequencing techniques, also called next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, have been developed. These provide practical solutions to the challenges in crop genomics. Here, we review various sources of genetic diversity in plants, newly developed genetic diversity-mining tools synergized with NGS techniques, and related genetic approaches such as quantitative trait locus analysis and genome-wide association study. PMID:27499684

  1. Does population size affect genetic diversity? A test with sympatric lizard species.

    PubMed

    Hague, M T J; Routman, E J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental requirement for evolution and adaptation. Nonetheless, the forces that maintain patterns of genetic variation in wild populations are not completely understood. Neutral theory posits that genetic diversity will increase with a larger effective population size and the decreasing effects of drift. However, the lack of compelling evidence for a relationship between genetic diversity and population size in comparative studies has generated some skepticism over the degree that neutral sequence evolution drives overall patterns of diversity. The goal of this study was to measure genetic diversity among sympatric populations of related lizard species that differ in population size and other ecological factors. By sampling related species from a single geographic location, we aimed to reduce nuisance variance in genetic diversity owing to species differences, for example, in mutation rates or historical biogeography. We compared populations of zebra-tailed lizards and western banded geckos, which are abundant and short-lived, to chuckwallas and desert iguanas, which are less common and long-lived. We assessed population genetic diversity at three protein-coding loci for each species. Our results were consistent with the predictions of neutral theory, as the abundant species almost always had higher levels of haplotype diversity than the less common species. Higher population genetic diversity in the abundant species is likely due to a combination of demographic factors, including larger local population sizes (and presumably effective population sizes), faster generation times and high rates of gene flow with other populations.

  2. Whole genome snp discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in turkey (meleagris gallopavo)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of genetic diversity in domestic livestock species is of great importance for sustained genetic improvement of selected breeds in various environments, as well as to facilitate rapid adaptation to potential changes in breeding goals. The goal of this project was to investigate turkey g...

  3. Effects of founding genetic variation on adaptation to a novel resource.

    PubMed

    Agashe, Deepa; Falk, Jay J; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2011-09-01

    Population genetic theory predicts that adaptation in novel environments is enhanced by genetic variation for fitness. However, theory also predicts that under strong selection, demographic stochasticity can drive populations to extinction before they can adapt. We exposed wheat-adapted populations of the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) to a novel suboptimal corn resource, to test the effects of founding genetic variation on population decline and subsequent extinction or adaptation. As previously reported, genetically diverse populations were less likely to go extinct. Here, we show that among surviving populations, genetically diverse groups recovered faster after the initial population decline. Within two years, surviving populations significantly increased their fitness on corn via increased fecundity, increased egg survival, faster larval development, and higher rate of egg cannibalism. However, founding genetic variation only enhanced the increase in fecundity, despite existing genetic variation-and apparent lack of trade-offs-for egg survival and larval development time. Thus, during adaptation to novel habitats the positive impact of genetic variation may be restricted to only a few traits, although change in many life-history traits may be necessary to avoid extinction. Despite severe initial maladaptation and low population size, genetic diversity can thus overcome the predicted high extinction risk in new habitats. PMID:21884051

  4. Genetic diversity in aspen and its relation to arthropod abundance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunxia; Vornam, Barbara; Volmer, Katharina; Prinz, Kathleen; Kleemann, Frauke; Köhler, Lars; Polle, Andrea; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The ecological consequences of biodiversity have become a prominent public issue. Little is known on the effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem services. Here, a diversity experiment was established with European and North American aspen (Populus tremula, P. tremuloides) planted in plots representing either a single deme only or combinations of two, four and eight demes. The goals of this study were to explore the complex inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of aspen and to then relate three measures for diversity (deme diversity, genetic diversity determined as Shannon index or as expected heterozygosity) to arthropod abundance. Microsatellite and AFLP markers were used to analyze the genetic variation patterns within and between the aspen demes and deme mixtures. Large differences were observed regarding the genetic diversity within demes. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the total genetic diversity was found within demes, but the genetic differentiation among demes was also high. The complex patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation resulted in large differences of the genetic variation within plots. The average diversity increased from plots with only one deme to plots with two, four, and eight demes, respectively and separated plots with and without American aspen. To test whether intra- and interspecific diversity impacts on ecosystem services, arthropod abundance was determined. Increasing genetic diversity of aspen was related to increasing abundance of arthropods. However, the relationship was mainly driven by the presence of American aspen suggesting that species identity overrode the effect of intraspecific variation of European aspen.

  5. Genetic diversity in aspen and its relation to arthropod abundance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Vornam, Barbara; Volmer, Katharina; Prinz, Kathleen; Kleemann, Frauke; Köhler, Lars; Polle, Andrea; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    The ecological consequences of biodiversity have become a prominent public issue. Little is known on the effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem services. Here, a diversity experiment was established with European and North American aspen (Populus tremula, P. tremuloides) planted in plots representing either a single deme only or combinations of two, four and eight demes. The goals of this study were to explore the complex inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of aspen and to then relate three measures for diversity (deme diversity, genetic diversity determined as Shannon index or as expected heterozygosity) to arthropod abundance. Microsatellite and AFLP markers were used to analyze the genetic variation patterns within and between the aspen demes and deme mixtures. Large differences were observed regarding the genetic diversity within demes. An analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the total genetic diversity was found within demes, but the genetic differentiation among demes was also high. The complex patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation resulted in large differences of the genetic variation within plots. The average diversity increased from plots with only one deme to plots with two, four, and eight demes, respectively and separated plots with and without American aspen. To test whether intra- and interspecific diversity impacts on ecosystem services, arthropod abundance was determined. Increasing genetic diversity of aspen was related to increasing abundance of arthropods. However, the relationship was mainly driven by the presence of American aspen suggesting that species identity overrode the effect of intraspecific variation of European aspen. PMID:25674097

  6. Genetic Variation and Adaptation in Africa: Implications for Human Evolution and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Felicia; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Because modern humans originated in Africa and have adapted to diverse environments, African populations have high levels of genetic and phenotypic diversity. Thus, genomic studies of diverse African ethnic groups are essential for understanding human evolutionary history and how this leads to differential disease risk in all humans. Comparative studies of genetic diversity within and between African ethnic groups creates an opportunity to reconstruct some of the earliest events in human population history and are useful for identifying patterns of genetic variation that have been influenced by recent natural selection. Here we describe what is currently known about genetic variation and evolutionary history of diverse African ethnic groups. We also describe examples of recent natural selection in African genomes and how these data are informative for understanding the frequency of many genetic traits, including those that cause disease susceptibility in African populations and populations of recent African descent. PMID:24984772

  7. Genetic diversity and maternal origin of Bangladeshi chicken.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M S A; Chen, Shanyuan; Faruque, S; Bhuiyan, A K F H; Beja-Pereira, Albano

    2013-06-01

    Local domestic chicken populations are of paramount importance as a source of protein in developing countries. Bangladesh possesses a large number of native chicken populations which display a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme wet and hot environments of this region. This and the fact that wild jungle fowls (JFs) are still available in some regions of the country, it urges to study the present genetic diversity and relationships between Bangladeshi autochthonous chicken populations. Here, we report the results of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence polymorphisms analyses to assess the genetic diversity and possible maternal origin of Bangladeshi indigenous chickens. A 648-bp fragment of mtDNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed in 96 samples from four different chicken populations and one red JF population. Sequence analysis revealed 39 variable sites that defined 25 haplotypes. Estimates of haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.745 to 0.901 and from 0.011 to 0.016, respectively. The pairwise differences between populations ranged from 0.091 to 1.459 while most of the PhiST (ΦST) values were significant. Furthermore, AMOVA analysis revealed 89.16 % of the total genetic diversity was accounted for within population variation, indicating little genetic differentiation among the studied populations. The median network analysis from haplotypes of Bangladeshi chickens illustrated five distinct mitochondrial haplogroups (A, D, E, F and I). Individuals from all Bangladeshi chicken populations were represented in the major clades D and E; those maternal origins are presumed to be from Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asian countries, more particularly from South China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand. Further, phylogenetic analysis between indigenous chicken populations and sub-species of red JFs showed G. g. gallus and G. g. spadiceus shared with almost all haplogroups and had major influence than G. g. murghi in the origin of

  8. Genetic diversity and maternal origin of Bangladeshi chicken.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M S A; Chen, Shanyuan; Faruque, S; Bhuiyan, A K F H; Beja-Pereira, Albano

    2013-06-01

    Local domestic chicken populations are of paramount importance as a source of protein in developing countries. Bangladesh possesses a large number of native chicken populations which display a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme wet and hot environments of this region. This and the fact that wild jungle fowls (JFs) are still available in some regions of the country, it urges to study the present genetic diversity and relationships between Bangladeshi autochthonous chicken populations. Here, we report the results of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence polymorphisms analyses to assess the genetic diversity and possible maternal origin of Bangladeshi indigenous chickens. A 648-bp fragment of mtDNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed in 96 samples from four different chicken populations and one red JF population. Sequence analysis revealed 39 variable sites that defined 25 haplotypes. Estimates of haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.745 to 0.901 and from 0.011 to 0.016, respectively. The pairwise differences between populations ranged from 0.091 to 1.459 while most of the PhiST (ΦST) values were significant. Furthermore, AMOVA analysis revealed 89.16 % of the total genetic diversity was accounted for within population variation, indicating little genetic differentiation among the studied populations. The median network analysis from haplotypes of Bangladeshi chickens illustrated five distinct mitochondrial haplogroups (A, D, E, F and I). Individuals from all Bangladeshi chicken populations were represented in the major clades D and E; those maternal origins are presumed to be from Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asian countries, more particularly from South China, Vietnam, Myanmar and Thailand. Further, phylogenetic analysis between indigenous chicken populations and sub-species of red JFs showed G. g. gallus and G. g. spadiceus shared with almost all haplogroups and had major influence than G. g. murghi in the origin of

  9. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  10. A candidate multimodal functional genetic network for thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Pathak, Rachana; Prajapati, Indira; Bankston, Shannon; Thompson, Aprylle; Usher, Jaytriece; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate ectotherms such as reptiles provide ideal organisms for the study of adaptation to environmental thermal change. Comparative genomic and exomic studies can recover markers that diverge between warm and cold adapted lineages, but the genes that are functionally related to thermal adaptation may be difficult to identify. We here used a bioinformatics genome-mining approach to predict and identify functions for suitable candidate markers for thermal adaptation in the chicken. We first established a framework of candidate functions for such markers, and then compiled the literature on genes known to adapt to the thermal environment in different lineages of vertebrates. We then identified them in the genomes of human, chicken, and the lizard Anolis carolinensis, and established a functional genetic interaction network in the chicken. Surprisingly, markers initially identified from diverse lineages of vertebrates such as human and fish were all in close functional relationship with each other and more associated than expected by chance. This indicates that the general genetic functional network for thermoregulation and/or thermal adaptation to the environment might be regulated via similar evolutionarily conserved pathways in different vertebrate lineages. We were able to identify seven functions that were statistically overrepresented in this network, corresponding to four of our originally predicted functions plus three unpredicted functions. We describe this network as multimodal: central regulator genes with the function of relaying thermal signal (1), affect genes with different cellular functions, namely (2) lipoprotein metabolism, (3) membrane channels, (4) stress response, (5) response to oxidative stress, (6) muscle contraction and relaxation, and (7) vasodilation, vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. This network constitutes a novel resource for the study of thermal adaptation in the closely related nonavian reptiles and other

  11. Genetic basis of transcriptome diversity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Magwire, Michael M; Peiffer, Jason A; Lyman, Richard F; Stone, Eric A; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how DNA sequence variation is translated into variation for complex phenotypes has remained elusive but is essential for predicting adaptive evolution, for selecting agriculturally important animals and crops, and for personalized medicine. Gene expression may provide a link between variation in DNA sequence and organismal phenotypes, and its abundance can be measured efficiently and accurately. Here we quantified genome-wide variation in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs). We found that 42% of the Drosophila transcriptome is genetically variable in males and females, including the NTRs, and is organized into modules of genetically correlated transcripts. We found that NTRs often were negatively correlated with the expression of protein-coding genes, which we exploited to annotate NTRs functionally. We identified regulatory variants for the mean and variance of gene expression, which have largely independent genetic control. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the mean, but not for the variance, of gene expression were concentrated near genes. Notably, the variance eQTLs often interacted epistatically with local variants in these genes to regulate gene expression. This comprehensive characterization of population-scale diversity of transcriptomes and its genetic basis in the DGRP is critically important for a systems understanding of quantitative trait variation. PMID:26483487

  12. Genetic basis of transcriptome diversity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Magwire, Michael M.; Peiffer, Jason A.; Lyman, Richard F.; Stone, Eric A.; Anholt, Robert R. H.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how DNA sequence variation is translated into variation for complex phenotypes has remained elusive but is essential for predicting adaptive evolution, for selecting agriculturally important animals and crops, and for personalized medicine. Gene expression may provide a link between variation in DNA sequence and organismal phenotypes, and its abundance can be measured efficiently and accurately. Here we quantified genome-wide variation in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs). We found that 42% of the Drosophila transcriptome is genetically variable in males and females, including the NTRs, and is organized into modules of genetically correlated transcripts. We found that NTRs often were negatively correlated with the expression of protein-coding genes, which we exploited to annotate NTRs functionally. We identified regulatory variants for the mean and variance of gene expression, which have largely independent genetic control. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the mean, but not for the variance, of gene expression were concentrated near genes. Notably, the variance eQTLs often interacted epistatically with local variants in these genes to regulate gene expression. This comprehensive characterization of population-scale diversity of transcriptomes and its genetic basis in the DGRP is critically important for a systems understanding of quantitative trait variation. PMID:26483487

  13. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  14. Molecular diversity and genetic relationships in Secale.

    PubMed

    Santos, E; Matos, M; Silva, P; Figueiras, A M; Benito, C; Pinto-Carnide, O

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the molecular diversity and to determine the genetic relationships among Secale spp. and among cultivars of Secale cereale using RAPDs, ISSRs and sequence analysis of six exons of ScMATE1 gene. Thirteen ryes (cultivated and wild) were genotyped using 21 RAPD and 16 ISSR primers. A total of 435 markers (242 RAPDs and 193 ISSRs) were obtained, with 293 being polymorphic (146 RAPDs and 147 ISSRs). Two RAPD and nine ISSR primers generated more than 80% of polymorphism. The ISSR markers were more polymorphic and informative than RAPDs. Further, 69% of the ISSR primers selected achieved at least 70% of DNA polymorphism. The study of six exons of the ScMATE1 gene also demonstrated a high genetic variability that subsists in Secale genus. One difference observed in exon 1 sequences from S. vavilovii seems to be correlated with Al sensitivity in this species. The genetic relationships obtained using RAPDs, ISSRs and exons of ScMATE1 gene were similar. S. ancestrale, S. kuprijanovii and S. cereale were grouped in the same cluster and S. segetale was in another cluster. S. vavilovii showed evidences of not being clearly an isolate species and having great intraspecific differences. PMID:27350669

  15. The silent threat of low genetic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Across the Caribbean, protected coastal waters have served as primary feeding and breeding grounds for the endangered Antillean manatee. Unfortunately, these same coastal waters are also a popular “habitat” for humans. In the past, the overlap between human and manatee habitat allowed for manatee hunting and threatened the survival of these gentle marine mammals. Today, however, threats are much more inadvertent and are often related to coastal development, degraded habitats and boat strikes. In the state of Florida, decades of research on the species’ biological needs have helped conservationists address threats to its survival. For example, low wake zones and boater education have protected manatees from boat strikes, and many of their critical winter refuges are now protected. The Florida population has grown steadily, thus increasing from approximately 1,200 in 1991 to more than 5,000 in 2010. It is conceivable that in Florida manatees may one day be reclassified as “threatened” rather than “endangered.” Yet, in other parts of the Caribbean, threats still loom. This includes small, isolated manatee populations found on islands that can be more susceptible to extinction and lack of genetic diversity. To ensure the species’ long-term viability, scientists have turned their sights to the overall population dynamics of manatees throughout the Caribbean. Molecular genetics has provided new insights into long-term threats the species faces. Fortunately, the emerging field of conservation genetics provides managers with tools and strategies for protecting the species’ long-term viability.

  16. Genetic Adaptive Control for PZT Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeongwook; Stover, Shelley K.; Madisetti, Vijay K.

    1995-01-01

    A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) is capable of providing linear motion if controlled correctly and could provide a replacement for traditional heavy and large servo systems using motors. This paper focuses on a genetic model reference adaptive control technique (GMRAC) for a PZT which is moving a mirror where the goal is to keep the mirror velocity constant. Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are an integral part of the GMRAC technique acting as the search engine for an optimal PID controller. Two methods are suggested to control the actuator in this research. The first one is to change the PID parameters and the other is to add an additional reference input in the system. The simulation results of these two methods are compared. Simulated Annealing (SA) is also used to solve the problem. Simulation results of GAs and SA are compared after simulation. GAs show the best result according to the simulation results. The entire model is designed using the Mathworks' Simulink tool.

  17. Transposable elements as agents of rapid adaptation may explain the genetic paradox of invasive species.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Jessica; Santure, Anna W; Dennis, Stuart R

    2015-05-01

    Rapid adaptation of invasive species to novel habitats has puzzled evolutionary biologists for decades, especially as this often occurs in the face of limited genetic variability. Although some ecological traits common to invasive species have been identified, little is known about the possible genomic/genetic mechanisms that may underlie their success. A common scenario in many introductions is that small founder population sizes will often lead to reduced genetic diversity, but that invading populations experience large environmental perturbations, such as changes in habitat and environmental stress. Although sudden and intense stress is usually considered in a negative context, these perturbations may actually facilitate rapid adaptation by affecting genome structure, organization and function via interactions with transposable elements (TEs), especially in populations with low genetic diversity. Stress-induced changes in TE activity can alter gene action and can promote structural variation that may facilitate the rapid adaptation observed in new environments. We focus here on the adaptive potential of TEs in relation to invasive species and highlight their role as powerful mutational forces that can rapidly create genetic diversity. We hypothesize that activity of transposable elements can explain rapid adaptation despite low genetic variation (the genetic paradox of invasive species), and provide a framework under which this hypothesis can be tested using recently developed and emerging genomic technologies.

  18. Rarity and genetic diversity in Indo–Pacific Acropora corals

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Zoe T; Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2012-01-01

    Among various potential consequences of rarity is genetic erosion. Neutral genetic theory predicts that rare species will have lower genetic diversity than common species. To examine the association between genetic diversity and rarity, variation at eight DNA microsatellite markers was documented for 14 Acropora species that display different patterns of distribution and abundance in the Indo–Pacific Ocean. Our results show that the relationship between rarity and genetic diversity is not a positive linear association because, contrary to expectations, some rare species are genetically diverse and some populations of common species are genetically depleted. Our data suggest that inbreeding is the most likely mechanism of genetic depletion in both rare and common corals, and that hybridization is the most likely explanation for higher than expected levels of genetic diversity in rare species. A significant hypothesis generated from our study with direct conservation implications is that as a group, Acropora corals have lower genetic diversity at neutral microsatellite loci than may be expected from their taxonomic diversity, and this may suggest a heightened susceptibility to environmental change. This hypothesis requires validation based on genetic diversity estimates derived from a large portion of the genome. PMID:22957189

  19. Limited Genetic Diversity of Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gándara, Benjamín; Merino, Ahidé López; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici. The Brucella strains tested that were representatives of the six electrophoretic types had the same rRNA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns and identical ribotypes. All 99 isolates had similar chromosome profiles as revealed by the Eckhardt procedure. PMID:11136777

  20. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  1. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, M.J.; Bagley, M.J.; Walters, D.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Daniel, F.B.; Chaloud, D.J.; Cade, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Restoration of coral populations in light of genetic diversity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Porto, I.; Zubillaga, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the importance of preserving the genetic integrity of populations, strategies to restore damaged coral reefs should attempt to retain the allelic diversity of the disturbed population; however, genetic diversity estimates are not available for most coral populations. To provide a generalized estimate of genetic diversity (in terms of allelic richness) of scleractinian coral populations, the literature was surveyed for studies describing the genetic structure of coral populations using microsatellites. The mean number of alleles per locus across 72 surveyed scleractinian coral populations was 8.27 (±0.75 SE). In addition, population genetic datasets from four species (Acropora palmata, Montastraea cavernosa, Montastraea faveolata and Pocillopora damicornis) were analyzed to assess the minimum number of donor colonies required to retain specific proportions of the genetic diversity of the population. Rarefaction analysis of the population genetic datasets indicated that using 10 donor colonies randomly sampled from the original population would retain >50% of the allelic diversity, while 35 colonies would retain >90% of the original diversity. In general, scleractinian coral populations are genetically diverse and restoration methods utilizing few clonal genotypes to re-populate a reef will diminish the genetic integrity of the population. Coral restoration strategies using 10–35 randomly selected local donor colonies will retain at least 50–90% of the genetic diversity of the original population. PMID:22833700

  3. Restoration of coral populations in light of genetic diversity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, T. L.; Porto, I.; Zubillaga, A. L.

    2009-09-01

    Due to the importance of preserving the genetic integrity of populations, strategies to restore damaged coral reefs should attempt to retain the allelic diversity of the disturbed population; however, genetic diversity estimates are not available for most coral populations. To provide a generalized estimate of genetic diversity (in terms of allelic richness) of scleractinian coral populations, the literature was surveyed for studies describing the genetic structure of coral populations using microsatellites. The mean number of alleles per locus across 72 surveyed scleractinian coral populations was 8.27 (±0.75 SE). In addition, population genetic datasets from four species ( Acropora palmata, Montastraea cavernosa, Montastraea faveolata and Pocillopora damicornis) were analyzed to assess the minimum number of donor colonies required to retain specific proportions of the genetic diversity of the population. Rarefaction analysis of the population genetic datasets indicated that using 10 donor colonies randomly sampled from the original population would retain >50% of the allelic diversity, while 35 colonies would retain >90% of the original diversity. In general, scleractinian coral populations are genetically diverse and restoration methods utilizing few clonal genotypes to re-populate a reef will diminish the genetic integrity of the population. Coral restoration strategies using 10-35 randomly selected local donor colonies will retain at least 50-90% of the genetic diversity of the original population.

  4. Genetic diversity within a dominant plant outweighs plant species diversity in structuring an arthropod community.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kerri M; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2013-05-01

    Plant biodiversity is being lost at a rapid rate. This has spurred much interest in elucidating the consequences of this loss for higher trophic levels. Experimental tests have shown that both plant species diversity and genetic diversity within a plant species can influence arthropod community structure. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted in separate systems, so their relative importance is currently unresolved. Furthermore, potential interactions between the two levels of diversity, which likely occur in natural systems, have not been investigated. To clarify these issues, we conducted three experiments in a freshwater sand dune ecosystem. We (1) independently manipulated plant species diversity, (2) independently manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, and (3) jointly manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant and species diversity. We found that genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, more strongly influenced arthropod communities than plant species diversity, but this effect was dependent on the presence of other species. In species mixtures, A. breviligulata genetic diversity altered overall arthropod community composition, and arthropod richness and abundance peaked at the highest level of genetic diversity. Positive nonadditive effects of diversity were detected, suggesting that arthropods respond to emergent properties of diverse plant communities. However, in the independent manipulations where A. breviligulata was alone, effects of genetic diversity were weaker, with only arthropod richness responding. In contrast, plant species diversity only influenced arthropods when A. breviligulata was absent, and then only influenced herbivore abundance. In addition to showing that genetic diversity within a dominant plant species can have large effects on arthropod community composition, these results suggest that understanding how species

  5. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE OF AN ESTUARINE FISH (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITIS) INDIGENOUS TO SITES ASSOCIATED WITH A HIGHLY CONTAMINATED URBAN HARBOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intense directional selection on isolated populations can result in loss of genetic diversity, which if persistent, reduces adaptive potential and increases extinction probability. Phenotypic evidence of inherited tolerance suggests that toxic pollutants, specifically, polychlor...

  6. GENETIC DIVERSITY AND STRUCTURE OF AN ESTUARINE FISH (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) INDIGENOUS TO A HIGHLY CONTAMINATED URBAN HARBOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intense directional selection on isolated populations can result in loss of genetic diversity, which if persistent, reduces adaptive potential and increases extinction probability. Phenotypic evidence of inherited tolerance suggests that toxic pollutants, specifically, polychlor...

  7. [Research Progress on Genetic Diversity in Animal Parasitic Nematodes].

    PubMed

    YIN, Fang-yuan; LI, Fa-cai; ZHAO, Jun-long; HU, Min

    2015-10-01

    The development of molecular genetic markers for parasitic nematodes has significant implications in fundamental and applied research in Veterinary Parasitology. Knowledge on genetic diversity of nematodes would not only provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spread of drug-resistance alleles, but also have implications in the development of nematode control strategies. This review discusses the applications of molecular genetic markers (RFLP, RAPD, PCR-SSCP, AFLP, SSR and mitochondrial DNA) in research on the genetic diversity of parasitic nematodes.

  8. [Research Progress on Genetic Diversity in Animal Parasitic Nematodes].

    PubMed

    YIN, Fang-yuan; LI, Fa-cai; ZHAO, Jun-long; HU, Min

    2015-10-01

    The development of molecular genetic markers for parasitic nematodes has significant implications in fundamental and applied research in Veterinary Parasitology. Knowledge on genetic diversity of nematodes would not only provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spread of drug-resistance alleles, but also have implications in the development of nematode control strategies. This review discusses the applications of molecular genetic markers (RFLP, RAPD, PCR-SSCP, AFLP, SSR and mitochondrial DNA) in research on the genetic diversity of parasitic nematodes. PMID:26931047

  9. Genetic diversity in honey bee colonies enhances productivity and fitness.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Heather R; Seeley, Thomas D

    2007-07-20

    Honey bee queens mate with many males, creating numerous patrilines within colonies that are genetically distinct. The effects of genetic diversity on colony productivity and long-term fitness are unknown. We show that swarms from genetically diverse colonies (15 patrilines per colony) founded new colonies faster than swarms from genetically uniform colonies (1 patriline per colony). Accumulated differences in foraging rates, food storage, and population growth led to impressive boosts in the fitness (i.e., drone production and winter survival) of genetically diverse colonies. These results further our understanding of the origins of polyandry in honey bees and its benefits for colony performance.

  10. Genetic diversity in Sargasso Sea bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, S J; Britschgi, T B; Moyer, C L; Field, K G

    1990-05-01

    Bacterioplankton are recognized as important agents of biogeochemical change in marine ecosystems, yet relatively little is known about the species that make up these communities. Uncertainties about the genetic structure and diversity of natural bacterioplankton populations stem from the traditional difficulties associated with microbial cultivation techniques. Discrepancies between direct counts and plate counts are typically several orders of magnitude, raising doubts as to whether cultivated marine bacteria are actually representative of dominant planktonic species. We have phylogenetically analysed clone libraries of eubacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes amplified from natural populations of Sargasso Sea picoplankton by the polymerase chain reaction. The analysis indicates the presence of a novel microbial group, the SAR11 cluster, which appears to be a significant component of this oligotrophic bacterioplankton community. A second cluster of lineages related to the oxygenic phototrophs--cyanobacteria, prochlorophytes and chloroplasts--was also observed. However, none of the genes matched the small subunit rRNA sequences of cultivated marine cyanobacteria from similar habitats. The diversity of 16S rRNA genes observed within the clusters suggests that these bacterioplankton may be consortia of independent lineages sharing surprisingly distant common ancestors.

  11. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences between adapted and non-adapted individuals. By contrast, stress through interspecific competition or predation reduces intraspecific competition and thereby delays microevolution. This was demonstrated in mosquito populations (Culex quinquefasciatus) that were exposed to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Non-selective predation through harvesting and interspecific competition with Daphnia magna delayed the selection for individuals carrying the ace-1(R) resistance allele. Under non-toxic conditions, susceptible individuals without ace-1(R) prevailed. Likewise, predation delayed the reverse adaptation of the populations to a non-toxic environment, while the effect of interspecific competition was not significant. Applying a simulation model, we further identified how microevolution is generally determined by the type and degree of competition and predation. We infer that interactions with other species-especially strong in ecosystems with high biodiversity-can delay the development of pesticide resistance.

  12. A Genetic Incompatibility Accelerates Adaptation in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duyen T; Dine, Elliot; Anderson, James B; Aquadro, Charles F; Alani, Eric E

    2015-07-01

    During mismatch repair (MMR) MSH proteins bind to mismatches that form as the result of DNA replication errors and recruit MLH factors such as Mlh1-Pms1 to initiate excision and repair steps. Previously, we identified a negative epistatic interaction involving naturally occurring polymorphisms in the MLH1 and PMS1 genes of baker's yeast. Here we hypothesize that a mutagenic state resulting from this negative epistatic interaction increases the likelihood of obtaining beneficial mutations that can promote adaptation to stress conditions. We tested this by stressing yeast strains bearing mutagenic (incompatible) and non-mutagenic (compatible) mismatch repair genotypes. Our data show that incompatible populations adapted more rapidly and without an apparent fitness cost to high salt stress. The fitness advantage of incompatible populations was rapid but disappeared over time. The fitness gains in both compatible and incompatible strains were due primarily to mutations in PMR1 that appeared earlier in incompatible evolving populations. These data demonstrate a rapid and reversible role (by mating) for genetic incompatibilities in accelerating adaptation in eukaryotes. They also provide an approach to link experimental studies to observational population genomics. PMID:26230253

  13. Adapting to Diversity: Organizational Influences on Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Richard C., Jr.; Skinner, Elizabeth Fisk

    1990-01-01

    A model of institutional adaptation to diversity emerged from case studies of 10 public universities. The model depicts state policy influencing the priorities and practices of work groups within a university. The resulting adaptation of organizational culture leads to improvements in participation and graduation for minorities. (Author/MSE)

  14. Ordering microbial diversity into ecologically and genetically cohesive units.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse; Polz, Martin F

    2014-05-01

    We propose that microbial diversity must be viewed in light of gene flow and selection, which define units of genetic similarity, and of phenotype and ecological function, respectively. We discuss to what extent ecological and genetic units overlap to form cohesive populations in the wild, based on recent evolutionary modeling and on evidence from some of the first microbial populations studied with genomics. These show that if recombination is frequent and selection moderate, ecologically adaptive mutations or genes can spread within populations independently of their original genomic background (gene-specific sweeps). Alternatively, if the effect of recombination is smaller than selection, genome-wide selective sweeps should occur. In both cases, however, distinct units of overlapping ecological and genotypic similarity will form if microgeographic separation, likely involving ecological tradeoffs, induces barriers to gene flow. These predictions are supported by (meta)genomic data, which suggest that a 'reverse ecology' approach, in which genomic and gene flow information is used to make predictions about the nature of ecological units, is a powerful approach to ordering microbial diversity.

  15. Genetic landscapes GIS Toolbox: tools to map patterns of genetic divergence and diversity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Perry, William M.; Lugo, Roberto V.; Hathaway, Stacie A.

    2011-01-01

    The Landscape Genetics GIS Toolbox contains tools that run in the Geographic Information System software, ArcGIS, to map genetic landscapes and to summarize multiple genetic landscapes as average and variance surfaces. These tools can be used to visualize the distribution of genetic diversity across geographic space and to study associations between patterns of genetic diversity and geographic features or other geo-referenced environmental data sets. Together, these tools create genetic landscape surfaces directly from tables containing genetic distance or diversity data and sample location coordinates, greatly reducing the complexity of building and analyzing these raster surfaces in a Geographic Information System.

  16. Small population size and extremely low levels of genetic diversity in island populations of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Elise; Stoklosa, J; Griffiths, J; Gust, N; Ellis, R; Huggins, R M; Weeks, A R

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity generally underpins population resilience and persistence. Reductions in population size and absence of gene flow can lead to reductions in genetic diversity, reproductive fitness, and a limited ability to adapt to environmental change increasing the risk of extinction. Island populations are typically small and isolated, and as a result, inbreeding and reduced genetic diversity elevate their extinction risk. Two island populations of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, exist; a naturally occurring population on King Island in Bass Strait and a recently introduced population on Kangaroo Island off the coast of South Australia. Here we assessed the genetic diversity within these two island populations and contrasted these patterns with genetic diversity estimates in areas from which the populations are likely to have been founded. On Kangaroo Island, we also modeled live capture data to determine estimates of population size. Levels of genetic diversity in King Island platypuses are perilously low, with eight of 13 microsatellite loci fixed, likely reflecting their small population size and prolonged isolation. Estimates of heterozygosity detected by microsatellites (HE= 0.032) are among the lowest level of genetic diversity recorded by this method in a naturally outbreeding vertebrate population. In contrast, estimates of genetic diversity on Kangaroo Island are somewhat higher. However, estimates of small population size and the limited founders combined with genetic isolation are likely to lead to further losses of genetic diversity through time for the Kangaroo Island platypus population. Implications for the future of these and similarly isolated or genetically depauperate populations are discussed. PMID:22837830

  17. Genetic Drift, Purifying Selection and Vector Genotype Shape Dengue Virus Intra-host Genetic Diversity in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Albin; Ar Gouilh, Meriadeg; Moltini-Conclois, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Due to their error-prone replication, RNA viruses typically exist as a diverse population of closely related genomes, which is considered critical for their fitness and adaptive potential. Intra-host demographic fluctuations that stochastically reduce the effective size of viral populations are a challenge to maintaining genetic diversity during systemic host infection. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) traverse several anatomical barriers during infection of their arthropod vectors that are believed to impose population bottlenecks. These anatomical barriers have been associated with both maintenance of arboviral genetic diversity and alteration of the variant repertoire. Whether these patterns result from stochastic sampling (genetic drift) rather than natural selection, and/or from the influence of vector genetic heterogeneity has not been elucidated. Here, we used deep sequencing of full-length viral genomes to monitor the intra-host evolution of a wild-type dengue virus isolate during infection of several mosquito genetic backgrounds. We estimated a bottleneck size ranging from 5 to 42 founding viral genomes at initial midgut infection, irrespective of mosquito genotype, resulting in stochastic reshuffling of the variant repertoire. The observed level of genetic diversity increased following initial midgut infection but significantly differed between mosquito genetic backgrounds despite a similar initial bottleneck size. Natural selection was predominantly negative (purifying) during viral population expansion. Taken together, our results indicate that dengue virus intra-host genetic diversity in the mosquito vector is shaped by genetic drift and purifying selection, and point to a novel role for vector genetic factors in the genetic breadth of virus populations during infection. Identifying the evolutionary forces acting on arboviral populations within their arthropod vector provides novel insights into arbovirus evolution. PMID:27304978

  18. Genetic Drift, Purifying Selection and Vector Genotype Shape Dengue Virus Intra-host Genetic Diversity in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lequime, Sebastian; Fontaine, Albin; Ar Gouilh, Meriadeg; Moltini-Conclois, Isabelle; Lambrechts, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Due to their error-prone replication, RNA viruses typically exist as a diverse population of closely related genomes, which is considered critical for their fitness and adaptive potential. Intra-host demographic fluctuations that stochastically reduce the effective size of viral populations are a challenge to maintaining genetic diversity during systemic host infection. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) traverse several anatomical barriers during infection of their arthropod vectors that are believed to impose population bottlenecks. These anatomical barriers have been associated with both maintenance of arboviral genetic diversity and alteration of the variant repertoire. Whether these patterns result from stochastic sampling (genetic drift) rather than natural selection, and/or from the influence of vector genetic heterogeneity has not been elucidated. Here, we used deep sequencing of full-length viral genomes to monitor the intra-host evolution of a wild-type dengue virus isolate during infection of several mosquito genetic backgrounds. We estimated a bottleneck size ranging from 5 to 42 founding viral genomes at initial midgut infection, irrespective of mosquito genotype, resulting in stochastic reshuffling of the variant repertoire. The observed level of genetic diversity increased following initial midgut infection but significantly differed between mosquito genetic backgrounds despite a similar initial bottleneck size. Natural selection was predominantly negative (purifying) during viral population expansion. Taken together, our results indicate that dengue virus intra-host genetic diversity in the mosquito vector is shaped by genetic drift and purifying selection, and point to a novel role for vector genetic factors in the genetic breadth of virus populations during infection. Identifying the evolutionary forces acting on arboviral populations within their arthropod vector provides novel insights into arbovirus evolution.

  19. Status of genetic diversity of U. S. dairy goat breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity underpins the livestock breeders’ ability to improve the production potential of their livestock. Therefore, it is important to periodically assess genetic diversity within a breed. Such an analysis was conducted on U.S. dairy goat breeds: Alpine, LaMancha, Nigerian Dwarf, Nubian, ...

  20. Status of genetic diversity of U. S. dairy goat breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity underpins the livestock breeders’ ability to improve the production potential of their livestock. Therefore, it is important to periodically assess genetic diversity within a breed. Such an analysis was conducted on U.S. dairy goat breeds and this article is an overview of that wo...

  1. Peak and Persistent Excess of Genetic Diversity Following an Abrupt Migration Increase

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Nicolas; Streit, Daniela; Goudet, Jérôme; Vuilleumier, Séverine

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is essential for population survival and adaptation to changing environments. Demographic processes (e.g., bottleneck and expansion) and spatial structure (e.g., migration, number, and size of populations) are known to shape the patterns of the genetic diversity of populations. However, the impact of temporal changes in migration on genetic diversity has seldom been considered, although such events might be the norm. Indeed, during the millions of years of a species’ lifetime, repeated isolation and reconnection of populations occur. Geological and climatic events alternately isolate and reconnect habitats. We analytically document the dynamics of genetic diversity after an abrupt change in migration given the mutation rate and the number and sizes of the populations. We demonstrate that during transient dynamics, genetic diversity can reach unexpectedly high values that can be maintained over thousands of generations. We discuss the consequences of such processes for the evolution of species based on standing genetic variation and how they can affect the reconstruction of a population’s demographic and evolutionary history from genetic data. Our results also provide guidelines for the use of genetic data for the conservation of natural populations. PMID:23307901

  2. Endemic insular and coastal Tunisian date palm genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Zehdi-Azouzi, Salwa; Cherif, Emira; Guenni, Karim; Abdelkrim, Ahmed Ben; Bermil, Aymen; Rhouma, Soumaya; Salah, Mohamed Ben; Santoni, Sylvain; Pintaud, Jean Christophe; Aberlenc-Bertossi, Frédérique; Hannachi, Amel Salhi

    2016-04-01

    The breeding of crop species relies on the valorisation of ancestral or wild varieties to enrich the cultivated germplasm. The Tunisian date palm genetic patrimony is being threatened by diversity loss and global climate change. We have conducted a genetic study to evaluate the potential of spontaneous coastal resources to improve the currently exploited Tunisian date palm genetic pool. Eighteen microsatellite loci of Phoenix dactylifera L. were used to compare the genetic diversity of coastal accessions from Kerkennah, Djerba, Gabès and continental date palm accessions from Tozeur. A collection of 105 date palms from the four regions was analysed. This study has provided us with an extensive understanding of the local genetic diversity and its distribution. The coastal date palm genotypes exhibit a high and specific genetic diversity. These genotypes are certainly an untapped reservoir of agronomically important genes to improve cultivated germplasm in continental date palm.

  3. Flooding stress: acclimations and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Serres, J; Voesenek, L A C J

    2008-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress for many natural and man-made ecosystems worldwide. Genetic diversity in the plant response to flooding includes alterations in architecture, metabolism, and elongation growth associated with a low O(2) escape strategy and an antithetical quiescence scheme that allows endurance of prolonged submergence. Flooding is frequently accompanied with a reduction of cellular O(2) content that is particularly severe when photosynthesis is limited or absent. This necessitates the production of ATP and regeneration of NAD(+) through anaerobic respiration. The examination of gene regulation and function in model systems provides insight into low-O(2)-sensing mechanisms and metabolic adjustments associated with controlled use of carbohydrate and ATP. At the developmental level, plants can escape the low-O(2) stress caused by flooding through multifaceted alterations in cellular and organ structure that promote access to and diffusion of O(2). These processes are driven by phytohormones, including ethylene, gibberellin, and abscisic acid. This exploration of natural variation in strategies that improve O(2) and carbohydrate status during flooding provides valuable resources for the improvement of crop endurance of an environmental adversity that is enhanced by global warming.

  4. Comparative riverscape genetics reveals reservoirs of genetic diversity for conservation and restoration of Great Plains fishes

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Megan J; Perkin, Joshuah S.; Gido, Keith B.; Turner, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    We used comparative landscape genetics to examine the relative roles of historical events, intrinsic traits, and landscape factors in determining the distribution of genetic diversity of river fishes across the North American Great Plains. Spatial patterns of diversity were overlaid on a patch-based graphical model, and then compared within and among three species that co-occurred across five Great Plains watersheds. Species differing in reproductive strategy (benthic vs. pelagic spawning) were hypothesized to have different patterns of genetic diversity, but the overriding factor shaping contemporary patterns of diversity was the signature of past climates and geological history. Allelic diversity was significantly higher at southern latitudes for Cyprinella lutrensis and Hybognathus placitus, consistent with northward expansion from southern Pleistocene refugia. Within the historical context, all species exhibited lowered occupancy and abundance in heavily fragmented and drier upstream reaches, particularly H. placitus; a pelagic-spawning species, suggesting rates of extirpation have outpaced losses of genetic diversity in this species. Within most basins, genetically diverse populations of each species persisted. Hence, reconnecting genetically diverse populations with those characterized by reduced diversity (regardless of their position within the riverine network) would provide populations with greater genetic and demographic resilience. We discuss cases where cross-basin transfer may be appropriate to enhance genetic diversity and mitigate negative effects of climate change. Overall, striking similarities in genetic patterns and response to fragmentation and dewatering suggest a common strategy for genetic resource management in this unique riverine fish assemblage. PMID:25327780

  5. Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One aspect that influences colony-level disease resistance is polyandry, or multiple mating of the queen. Honeybee queens mate with 12 drones (males) on average (but up to 40þ), which creates a high level of intracolony genetic diversity [3]. The adaptive benefit of polyandry has several non-mutuall...

  6. The population genetics of mimetic diversity in Heliconius butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Kronforst, Marcus R; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2007-01-01

    Theory predicts strong stabilizing selection on warning patterns within species and convergent evolution among species in Müllerian mimicry systems yet Heliconius butterflies exhibit extreme wing pattern diversity. One potential explanation for the evolution of this diversity is that genetic drift occasionally allows novel warning patterns to reach the frequency threshold at which they gain protection. This idea is controversial, however, because Heliconius butterflies are unlikely to experience pronounced population subdivision and local genetic drift. To examine the fine-scale population genetic structure of Heliconius butterflies we genotyped 316 individuals from eight Costa Rican Heliconius species with 1428 AFLP markers. Six species exhibited evidence of population subdivision and/or isolation by distance indicating genetic differentiation among populations. Across species, variation in the extent of local genetic drift correlated with the roles different species have played in generating pattern diversity: species that originally generated the diversity of warning patterns exhibited striking population subdivision while species that later radiated onto these patterns had intermediate levels of genetic diversity and less genetic differentiation among populations. These data reveal that Heliconius butterflies possess the coarse population genetic structure necessary for local populations to experience pronounced genetic drift which, in turn, could explain the origin of mimetic diversity. PMID:18077248

  7. Multiple paternity does not depend on male genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Thonhauser, Kerstin E; Raveh, Shirley; Penn, Dustin J

    2014-07-01

    Polyandry is common in many species and it has been suggested that females engage in multiple mating to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring (genetic diversity hypothesis). Multiple paternity occurs in 30% of litters in wild populations of house mice, Mus musculus musculus, and multiple-sired litters are genetically more diverse than single-sired ones. Here, we aimed to test whether female house mice produce multiple-sired litters when they have the opportunity to produce genetically diverse litters. We assessed the rates of multiple paternity when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically dissimilar to each other (i.e. nonsiblings and MHC dissimilar) compared with when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically similar to each other (i.e. siblings and shared MHC alleles). Multiple mating may depend upon a female's own condition, and, therefore, we also tested whether inbred (from full-sibling matings) females were more likely to produce multiple-sired progeny than outbred controls. Overall we found that 29% of litters had multiple sires, but we found no evidence that females were more likely to produce multiple-sired litters when they had the opportunity to mate with genetically dissimilar males compared with controls, regardless of whether females were inbred or outbred. Thus, our findings do not support the idea that female mice increase multiple paternity when they have the opportunity to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring, as expected from the genetic diversity hypothesis.

  8. Multiple paternity does not depend on male genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Thonhauser, Kerstin E.; Raveh, Shirley; Penn, Dustin J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyandry is common in many species and it has been suggested that females engage in multiple mating to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring (genetic diversity hypothesis). Multiple paternity occurs in 30% of litters in wild populations of house mice, Mus musculus musculus, and multiple-sired litters are genetically more diverse than single-sired ones. Here, we aimed to test whether female house mice produce multiple-sired litters when they have the opportunity to produce genetically diverse litters. We assessed the rates of multiple paternity when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically dissimilar to each other (i.e. nonsiblings and MHC dissimilar) compared with when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically similar to each other (i.e. siblings and shared MHC alleles). Multiple mating may depend upon a female's own condition, and, therefore, we also tested whether inbred (from full-sibling matings) females were more likely to produce multiple-sired progeny than outbred controls. Overall we found that 29% of litters had multiple sires, but we found no evidence that females were more likely to produce multiple-sired litters when they had the opportunity to mate with genetically dissimilar males compared with controls, regardless of whether females were inbred or outbred. Thus, our findings do not support the idea that female mice increase multiple paternity when they have the opportunity to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring, as expected from the genetic diversity hypothesis. PMID:25018559

  9. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  10. Lack of genetic variation prevents adaptation at the geographic range margin in a damselfly.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuma; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Matsuki, Yu; Funayama, Ryo; Nakayama, Keiko; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-09-01

    What limits a species' distribution in the absence of physical barriers? Genetic load due to asymmetric gene flow and the absence of genetic variation due to lack of gene flow are hypothesized to constrain adaptation to novel environments in marginal populations, preventing range expansion. Here, we examined the genetic structure and geographic variation in morphological traits in two damselflies (Ischnura asiatica and I. senegalensis) along a latitudinal gradient in Japan, which is the distribution centre of I. asiatica and the northern limit of I. senegalensis. Genomewide genetic analyses found a loss of genetic diversity at the edge of distribution in I. senegalensis but consistently high diversity in I. asiatica. Gene flow was asymmetric in a south-north direction in both species. Although body size and wing loading showed decreasing latitudinal clines (smaller in north) in I. asiatica in Japan, increasing latitudinal clines (larger in north) in these phenotypic markers were observed in I. senegalensis, particularly near the northern boundary, which coincided well with the location where genetic diversity began a sharp decline. In ectothermic animals, increasing latitudinal cline in these traits was suggested to be established when they failed to adapt to thermal gradient. Therefore, our findings support the possibility that a lack of genetic variation rather than geneflow swamping is responsible for the constraint of adaptation at the margin of geographic distribution.

  11. Periodic Pattern of Genetic and Fitness Diversity during Evolution of an Artificial Cell-Like System.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Aita, Takuyo; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and phenotypic diversity are the basis of evolution. Despite their importance, however, little is known about how they change over the course of evolution. In this study, we analyzed the dynamics of the adaptive evolution of a simple evolvable artificial cell-like system using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology that reads an entire single artificial genome. We found that the genomic RNA population increases in fitness intermittently, correlating with a periodic pattern of genetic and fitness diversity produced by repeated diversification and domination. In the diversification phase, a genomic RNA population spreads within a genetic space by accumulating mutations until mutants with higher fitness are generated, resulting in an increase in fitness diversity. In the domination phase, the mutants with higher fitness dominate, decreasing both the fitness and genetic diversity. This study reveals the dynamic nature of genetic and fitness diversity during adaptive evolution and demonstrates the utility of a simplified artificial cell-like system to study evolution at an unprecedented resolution.

  12. Extreme genetic diversity in asexual grass thrips populations.

    PubMed

    Fontcuberta García-Cuenca, A; Dumas, Z; Schwander, T

    2016-05-01

    The continuous generation of genetic variation has been proposed as one of the main factors explaining the maintenance of sexual reproduction in nature. However, populations of asexual individuals may attain high levels of genetic diversity through within-lineage diversification, replicate transitions to asexuality from sexual ancestors and migration. How these mechanisms affect genetic variation in populations of closely related sexual and asexual taxa can therefore provide insights into the role of genetic diversity for the maintenance of sexual reproduction. Here, we evaluate patterns of intra- and interpopulation genetic diversity in sexual and asexual populations of Aptinothrips rufus grass thrips. Asexual A. rufus populations are found throughout the world, whereas sexual populations appear to be confined to few locations in the Mediterranean region. We found that asexual A. rufus populations are characterized by extremely high levels of genetic diversity, both in comparison with their sexual relatives and in comparison with other asexual species. Migration is extensive among asexual populations over large geographic distances, whereas close sexual populations are strongly isolated from each other. The combination of extensive migration with replicate evolution of asexual lineages, and a past demographic expansion in at least one of them, generated high local clone diversities in A. rufus. These high clone diversities in asexual populations may mimic certain benefits conferred by sex via genetic diversity and could help explain the extreme success of asexual A. rufus populations. PMID:26864612

  13. Extreme genetic diversity in asexual grass thrips populations.

    PubMed

    Fontcuberta García-Cuenca, A; Dumas, Z; Schwander, T

    2016-05-01

    The continuous generation of genetic variation has been proposed as one of the main factors explaining the maintenance of sexual reproduction in nature. However, populations of asexual individuals may attain high levels of genetic diversity through within-lineage diversification, replicate transitions to asexuality from sexual ancestors and migration. How these mechanisms affect genetic variation in populations of closely related sexual and asexual taxa can therefore provide insights into the role of genetic diversity for the maintenance of sexual reproduction. Here, we evaluate patterns of intra- and interpopulation genetic diversity in sexual and asexual populations of Aptinothrips rufus grass thrips. Asexual A. rufus populations are found throughout the world, whereas sexual populations appear to be confined to few locations in the Mediterranean region. We found that asexual A. rufus populations are characterized by extremely high levels of genetic diversity, both in comparison with their sexual relatives and in comparison with other asexual species. Migration is extensive among asexual populations over large geographic distances, whereas close sexual populations are strongly isolated from each other. The combination of extensive migration with replicate evolution of asexual lineages, and a past demographic expansion in at least one of them, generated high local clone diversities in A. rufus. These high clone diversities in asexual populations may mimic certain benefits conferred by sex via genetic diversity and could help explain the extreme success of asexual A. rufus populations.

  14. High genetic diversity in the endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species Leptobrachium leishanense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Zhenhua; Zhao, Mian; Wu, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Threatened species typically have a small or declining population size, which make them highly susceptible to loss of genetic diversity through genetic drift and inbreeding. Genetic diversity determines the evolutionary potential of a species; therefore, maintaining the genetic diversity of threatened species is essential for their conservation. In this study, we assessed the genetic diversity of the adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in an endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species, Leptobrachium leishanense in Southwest China. We compared the genetic variation of MHC class I genes with that observed in neutral markers (5 microsatellite loci and cytochrome b gene) to elucidate the relative roles of genetic drift and natural selection in shaping the current MHC polymorphism in this species. We found a high level of genetic diversity in this population at both MHC and neutral markers compared with other threatened amphibian species. Historical positive selection was evident in the MHC class I genes. The higher allelic richness in MHC markers compared with that of microsatellite loci suggests that selection rather than genetic drift plays a prominent role in shaping the MHC variation pattern, as drift can affect all the genome in a similar way but selection directly targets MHC genes. Although demographic analysis revealed no recent bottleneck events in L. leishanense, additional population decline will accelerate the dangerous status for this species. We suggest that the conservation management of L. leishanense should concentrate on maximizing the retention of genetic diversity through preventing their continuous population decline. Protecting their living habitats and forbidding illegal hunting are the most important measures for conservation of L. leishanense.

  15. High genetic diversity in the endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species Leptobrachium leishanense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Zhenhua; Zhao, Mian; Wu, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Threatened species typically have a small or declining population size, which make them highly susceptible to loss of genetic diversity through genetic drift and inbreeding. Genetic diversity determines the evolutionary potential of a species; therefore, maintaining the genetic diversity of threatened species is essential for their conservation. In this study, we assessed the genetic diversity of the adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in an endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species, Leptobrachium leishanense in Southwest China. We compared the genetic variation of MHC class I genes with that observed in neutral markers (5 microsatellite loci and cytochrome b gene) to elucidate the relative roles of genetic drift and natural selection in shaping the current MHC polymorphism in this species. We found a high level of genetic diversity in this population at both MHC and neutral markers compared with other threatened amphibian species. Historical positive selection was evident in the MHC class I genes. The higher allelic richness in MHC markers compared with that of microsatellite loci suggests that selection rather than genetic drift plays a prominent role in shaping the MHC variation pattern, as drift can affect all the genome in a similar way but selection directly targets MHC genes. Although demographic analysis revealed no recent bottleneck events in L. leishanense, additional population decline will accelerate the dangerous status for this species. We suggest that the conservation management of L. leishanense should concentrate on maximizing the retention of genetic diversity through preventing their continuous population decline. Protecting their living habitats and forbidding illegal hunting are the most important measures for conservation of L. leishanense. PMID:26037662

  16. Lack of genetic diversity across diverse immune genes in an endangered mammal, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Morris, Katrina M; Wright, Belinda; Grueber, Catherine E; Hogg, Carolyn; Belov, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction due to the spread of devil facial tumour disease. Polymorphisms in immune genes can provide adaptive potential to resist diseases. Previous studies in diversity at immune loci in wild species have almost exclusively focused on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, these genes only account for a fraction of immune gene diversity. Devils lack diversity at functionally important immunity loci, including MHC and Toll-like receptor genes. Whether there are polymorphisms at devil immune genes outside these two families is unknown. Here, we identify polymorphisms in a wide range of key immune genes, and develop assays to type single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a subset of these genes. A total of 167 immune genes were examined, including cytokines, chemokines and natural killer cell receptors. Using genome-level data from ten devils, SNPs within coding regions, introns and 10 kb flanking genes of interest were identified. We found low polymorphism across 167 immune genes examined bioinformatically using whole-genome data. From this data, we developed long amplicon assays to target nine genes. These amplicons were sequenced in 29-220 devils and found to contain 78 SNPs, including eight SNPS within exons. Despite the extreme paucity of genetic diversity within these genes, signatures of balancing selection were exhibited by one chemokine gene, suggesting that remaining diversity may hold adaptive potential. The low functional diversity may leave devils highly vulnerable to infectious disease, and therefore, monitoring and preserving remaining diversity will be critical for the long-term management of this species. Examining genetic variation in diverse immune genes should be a priority for threatened wildlife species. This study can act as a model for broad-scale immunogenetic diversity analysis in threatened species. PMID:26119928

  17. Population Genetic Diversity in the Australian 'Seascape': A Bioregion Approach.

    PubMed

    Pope, Lisa C; Riginos, Cynthia; Ovenden, Jennifer; Keyse, Jude; Blomberg, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity within species may promote resilience to environmental change, yet little is known about how such variation is distributed at broad geographic scales. Here we develop a novel Bayesian methodology to analyse multi-species genetic diversity data in order to identify regions of high or low genetic diversity. We apply this method to co-distributed taxa from Australian marine waters. We extracted published summary statistics of population genetic diversity from 118 studies of 101 species and > 1000 populations from the Australian marine economic zone. We analysed these data using two approaches: a linear mixed model for standardised data, and a mixed beta-regression for unstandardised data, within a Bayesian framework. Our beta-regression approach performed better than models using standardised data, based on posterior predictive tests. The best model included region (Integrated Marine and Coastal Regionalisation of Australia (IMCRA) bioregions), latitude and latitude squared. Removing region as an explanatory variable greatly reduced model performance (delta DIC 23.4). Several bioregions were identified as possessing notably high genetic diversity. Genetic diversity increased towards the equator with a 'hump' in diversity across the range studied (-9.4 to -43.7°S). Our results suggest that factors correlated with both region and latitude play a role in shaping intra-specific genetic diversity, and that bioregion can be a useful management unit for intra-specific as well as species biodiversity. Our novel statistical model should prove useful for future analyses of within species genetic diversity at broad taxonomic and geographic scales.

  18. Natural diversity and adaptation in plant secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kroymann, Juergen

    2011-06-01

    Technological advances in metabolomics, transcriptomics and genomics have facilitated the detection of genes that contribute to diversification in plant secondary metabolism. Statistical tools from molecular population genetics may help in evaluating whether the corresponding genes or genomic regions carry a signature of selection and answering the question of whether novel compounds are 'adaptive'. Gene duplication fuels diversification in plant secondary metabolism and the evolutionary mechanism for adaptation may follow a path of neofunctionalization subsequent to gene duplication, or gene duplication may occur subsequent to--and resolve--an adaptive conflict present in a single ancestral gene sequence.

  19. Genetic mapping of adaptation reveals fitness tradeoffs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ågrena, Jon; Oakley, Christopher G; McKay, John K; Lovell, John T; Schemske, Douglas W

    2013-12-24

    Organisms inhabiting different environments are often locally adapted, and yet despite a considerable body of theory, the genetic basis of local adaptation is poorly understood. Unanswered questions include the number and effect sizes of adaptive loci, whether locally favored loci reduce fitness elsewhere (i.e., fitness tradeoffs), and whether a lack of genetic variation limits adaptation. To address these questions, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for total fitness in 398 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between locally adapted populations of the highly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana from Sweden and Italy and grown for 3 consecutive years at the parental sites (>40,000 plants monitored). We show that local adaptation is controlled by relatively few genomic regions of small to modest effect. A third of the 15 fitness QTL we detected showed evidence of tradeoffs, which contrasts with the minimal evidence for fitness tradeoffs found in previous studies. This difference may reflect the power of our multiyear study to distinguish conditionally neutral QTL from those that reflect fitness tradeoffs. In Sweden, but not in Italy, the local genotype underlying fitness QTL was often maladaptive, suggesting that adaptation there is constrained by a lack of adaptive genetic variation, attributable perhaps to genetic bottlenecks during postglacial colonization of Scandinavia or to recent changes in selection regime caused by climate change. Our results suggest that adaptation to markedly different environments can be achieved through changes in relatively few genomic regions, that fitness tradeoffs are common, and that lack of genetic variation can limit adaptation.

  20. Genetic diversity patterns in five protist species occurring in lakes.

    PubMed

    Logares, Ramiro; Boltovskoy, Andrés; Bensch, Staffan; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Rengefors, Karin

    2009-05-01

    Little is known about the extent of the genetic diversity and its structuring patterns in protist species living in lakes. Here, we have investigated the genetic diversity patterns within five dinoflagellate species (Peridinium aciculiferum, Peridinium cinctum, Peridiniopsis borgei, Polarella glacialis, Scrippsiella aff. hangoei) that are present in lakes and sometimes, in marine habitats located in polar and temperate regions. A total of 68 clonal strains were investigated using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), a sensitive genetic fingerprinting technique. All used strains within each species had identical ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences, a characteristic that indicates that they likely belong to the same species. We found a wide variability in the genetic diversity among species (between 20% and 90% of polymorphic loci; Nei's gene diversity between 0.08 and 0.37). In some cases, our analyses suggested the presence of different genetically homogeneous subgroups (genetic populations) within the same water body. Thus, it appears that different genetic populations can coexist within the same lake despite the likely occurrence of recombination that tends to homogenize the gene pool. Overall, our results indicated that a large number of dinoflagellate genotypes are present in lake populations, instead of a few dominating ones. In addition, our study shows that protists with identical ITS sequences can harbor considerable amounts of genetic diversity.

  1. Species and genetic diversity in the genus Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bashisth N

    2015-06-01

    Biodiversity is the sum total of all living things on the earth with particular reference to the profound variety in structure,function and genetic constitution. It includes both number and frequency of species or genes in a given assemblage and the variety of resulting ecosystems in a region. It is usually considered at three different levels: genetic, species and ecological diversities. Genus Drosophila belongs to the family Drosophilidae (class Insecta, order Diptera), characterized by rich species diversity at global level and also in India, which is a megadiverse country. At global level, more than 1500 species have been described and several thousands estimated. Hawaiian Islands are particularly rich in species diversity with more than 500 species which provides a unique opportunity to study evolution in genus Drosophila. About 150 species of Drosophila have been reported from India. Certain species of Drosophila found in India have been investigated for genetic diversity within the species. In this regard, Drosophila ananassae is noteworthy. It is a cosmopolitan and domestic species with common occurrence in India and is endowed with many genetic peculiarities. Population genetics and evolutionary studies in this species have revealed as to how genetic diversity within a species play an important role in adaptation of populations to varying environments. In addition, the work carried on D. melanogaster, D. nasuta, D. bipectinata and certain other species in India has shown that these species vary in degree and pattern of genetic diversity, and have evolved different mechanisms for adjusting to their environments. The ecological adaptations to various kinds of stress studied in certain species of Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent are also discussed. PMID:26174688

  2. Genetic diversity among Angus, American Brahman, Senepol and Romosinuano cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, R A; Chase, C C; Olson, T A; Riley, D G; Coleman, S W

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the genetic diversity among breeds under evaluation for tropical adaptability traits that affect the performance of beef cattle at the USDA/ARS SubTropical Agricultural Research Station (STARS) near Brooksville, FL, USA. Twenty-six microsatellite loci were used to estimate parameters of genetic diversity among the breeds American Brahman, Angus, Senepol and Romosinuano; the latter was comprised of two distinct bloodlines (Costa Rican and Venezuelan). Genotypes of 47 animals from each of these STARS herds were analysed for genetic diversity and genetic distance. Using two methods, the greatest genetic distance was detected between the Costa Rican line of Romosinuano and the Senepol. Gene diversity ranged between 0.64 (Costa Rican line of Romosinuano) and 0.75 (American Brahman). The breed relationship inferences, which are based on genetic distance, provide additional tools for consideration in future crossbreeding studies and for testing the relationship between quantified breed diversity and observed heterosis. PMID:17257188

  3. T Cell Adaptive Immunity Proceeds through Environment-Induced Adaptation from the Exposure of Cryptic Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Whitacre, James M.; Lin, Joseph; Harding, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Evolution is often characterized as a process involving incremental genetic changes that are slowly discovered and fixed in a population through genetic drift and selection. However, a growing body of evidence is finding that changes in the environment frequently induce adaptations that are much too rapid to occur by an incremental genetic search process. Rapid evolution is hypothesized to be facilitated by mutations present within the population that are silent or “cryptic” within the first environment but are co-opted or “exapted” to the new environment, providing a selective advantage once revealed. Although cryptic mutations have recently been shown to facilitate evolution in RNA enzymes, their role in the evolution of complex phenotypes has not been proven. In support of this wider role, this paper describes an unambiguous relationship between cryptic genetic variation and complex phenotypic responses within the immune system. By reviewing the biology of the adaptive immune system through the lens of evolution, we show that T cell adaptive immunity constitutes an exemplary model system where cryptic alleles drive rapid adaptation of complex traits. In naive T cells, normally cryptic differences in T cell receptor reveal diversity in activation responses when the cellular population is presented with a novel environment during infection. We summarize how the adaptive immune response presents a well studied and appropriate experimental system that can be used to confirm and expand upon theoretical evolutionary models describing how seemingly small and innocuous mutations can drive rapid cellular evolution. PMID:22363338

  4. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  5. High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Jorge; Castilho Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe; Valero, Myriam; Raimondi, Pete; Reed, Dan; Alvares Serrão, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The genetic consequences of living on the edge of distributional ranges have been the subject of a largely unresolved debate. Populations occurring along persistent low latitude ranges (rear-edge) are expected to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions limiting population size at such range-edges may have caused genetic erosion that prevails over past historical effects, with potential consequences on reducing future adaptive capacity. The present study provides an empirical test of whether population declines towards a peripheral range might be reflected on decreasing diversity and increasing population isolation and differentiation. We compare population genetic differentiation and diversity with trends in abundance along a latitudinal gradient towards the peripheral distribution range of Saccorhizapolyschides, a large brown seaweed that is the main structural species of kelp forests in SW Europe. Signatures of recent bottleneck events were also evaluated to determine whether the recently recorded distributional shifts had a negative influence on effective population size. Our findings show decreasing population density and increasing spatial fragmentation and local extinctions towards the southern edge. Genetic data revealed two well supported groups with a central contact zone. As predicted, higher differentiation and signs of bottlenecks were found at the southern edge region. However, a decrease in genetic diversity associated with this pattern was not verified. Surprisingly, genetic diversity increased towards the edge despite bottlenecks and much lower densities, suggesting that extinctions and recolonizations have not strongly reduced diversity or that diversity might have been even higher there in the past, a process of shifting genetic baselines. PMID:23967038

  6. Effect of fluoride pollution on genetic diversity of a medicinal tree, Syzygium cumini.

    PubMed

    Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Kumari, Alka; Sharma, Vinay

    2012-07-01

    Syzygium cumini Linn. (Myrtaceae) is a medicinal tree (Jamun) used worldwide in treatment of diabetes. However, no molecular data is available on genetic polymorphism and its relationship, if any with fluoride pollution. In the present study, the genetic variability of two populations of S. cumini growing in fluoride rich soils and normal soils located in Rajasthan and Haryana regions of India, respectively was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Different measures of diversity in Rajasthan populations: Shannon's index of phenotypic diversity (I) = 0.440; Nei's genetic diversity (h) = 0.292; effective number of alleles per locus (Ne) = 1.497; total species diversity (Hsp) = 0.307 and within population diversity (Hpop) = 0.158 showed high diversity in comparison to Haryana populations. Thus, it seems that Rajasthan population responds with increased genetic variation resulting possibly from new mutation that affect allele frequencies as a consequence of adaptation to contaminated environment. This may imply that the increased diversity levels may act as a buffer to combat fluoride stress. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) results showed mixing between the populations. PMID:23360002

  7. Genetic diversity and structure in two protected Posidonia oceanica meadows.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Carla; D'Esposito, Daniela; Belmonte, Alessandro; Peirano, Andrea; Valiante, Luigi Maria; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadows growing along the west Mediterranean coastline are under continuous anthropogenic pressure. The way meadow health correlates with genetic and genotypic diversity in P. oceanica, is still under debate. Here we report a microsatellite analysis of two P. oceanica meadows living in protected areas of the Ligurian (Monterosso al Mare, MPA of "Cinque Terre") and central Tyrrhenian Sea (Santa Marinella, regional Site of Community Importance). Both meadows were recently classified as "disturbed", according to shoot density and other phenological parameters. Between the two meadows, Santa Marinella showed higher genetic diversity, while clear genetic substructure was present in both sites, reflecting high spatial heterogeneity. The present study suggests that genetic diversity does not match unequivocally with shoot density and leaf morphology and that small scale intra-meadow heterogeneity is an important factor to consider for establishing the relation between genetic/genotypic variability and health of natural seagrass meadows. PMID:26164681

  8. Low genetic diversity and minimal population substructure in the endangered Florida manatee: implications for conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Hunter, Margaret E.; Bonde, Robert K.; Austin, James D.; Clark, Ann Marie; Beck, Cathy A.; McGuire, Peter M.; Oli, Madan K.

    2012-01-01

    Species of management concern that have been affected by human activities typically are characterized by low genetic diversity, which can adversely affect their ability to adapt to environmental changes. We used 18 microsatellite markers to genotype 362 Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), and investigated genetic diversity, population structure, and estimated genetically effective population size (Ne). The observed and expected heterozygosity and average number of alleles were 0.455 ± 0.04, 0.479 ± 0.04, and 4.77 ± 0.51, respectively. All measures of Florida manatee genetic diversity were less than averages reported for placental mammals, including fragmented or nonideal populations. Overall estimates of differentiation were low, though significantly greater than zero, and analysis of molecular variance revealed that over 95% of the total variance was among individuals within predefined management units or among individuals along the coastal subpopulations, with only minor portions of variance explained by between group variance. Although genetic issues, as inferred by neutral genetic markers, appear not to be critical at present, the Florida manatee continues to face demographic challenges due to anthropogenic activities and stochastic factors such as red tides, oil spills, and disease outbreaks; these can further reduce genetic diversity of the manatee population.

  9. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods.

  10. Inference of genetic diversity in popcorn S3 progenies.

    PubMed

    Pena, G F; do Amaral, A T; Ribeiro, R M; Ramos, H C C; Boechat, M S B; Santos, J S; Mafra, G S; Kamphorst, S H; de Lima, V J; Vivas, M; de Souza Filho, G A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers are a useful tool for identification of complementary heterotic groups in breeding programs aimed at the production of superior hybrids, particularly for crops such as popcorn in which heterotic groups are not well-defined. The objective of the present study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 47 genotypes of tropical popcorn to identify possible heterotic groups for the development of superior hybrids. Four genotypes of high genetic value were studied: hybrid IAC 125, strain P2, and varieties UENF 14 and BRS Angela. In addition, 43 endogamous S3 progenies obtained from variety UENF 14 were used. Twenty-five polymorphic SSR-EST markers were analyzed. A genetic distance matrix was obtained and the following molecular diversity parameters were estimated: number of alleles, number of effective alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), observed and expected heterozygosities, Shannon diversity index, and coefficient of inbreeding. We found a moderate PIC and high diversity index, indicating that the studied population presents both good discriminatory ability and high informativeness for the utilized markers. The dendrogram built based on the dissimilarity matrix indicated six distinct groups. Our findings demonstrate the genetic diversity among the evaluated genotypes and provide evidence for heterotic groups in popcorn. Furthermore, the functional genetic diversity indicates that there are informative genetic markers for popcorn. PMID:27173336

  11. Inference of genetic diversity in popcorn S3 progenies.

    PubMed

    Pena, G F; do Amaral, A T; Ribeiro, R M; Ramos, H C C; Boechat, M S B; Santos, J S; Mafra, G S; Kamphorst, S H; de Lima, V J; Vivas, M; de Souza Filho, G A

    2016-05-09

    Molecular markers are a useful tool for identification of complementary heterotic groups in breeding programs aimed at the production of superior hybrids, particularly for crops such as popcorn in which heterotic groups are not well-defined. The objective of the present study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 47 genotypes of tropical popcorn to identify possible heterotic groups for the development of superior hybrids. Four genotypes of high genetic value were studied: hybrid IAC 125, strain P2, and varieties UENF 14 and BRS Angela. In addition, 43 endogamous S3 progenies obtained from variety UENF 14 were used. Twenty-five polymorphic SSR-EST markers were analyzed. A genetic distance matrix was obtained and the following molecular diversity parameters were estimated: number of alleles, number of effective alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), observed and expected heterozygosities, Shannon diversity index, and coefficient of inbreeding. We found a moderate PIC and high diversity index, indicating that the studied population presents both good discriminatory ability and high informativeness for the utilized markers. The dendrogram built based on the dissimilarity matrix indicated six distinct groups. Our findings demonstrate the genetic diversity among the evaluated genotypes and provide evidence for heterotic groups in popcorn. Furthermore, the functional genetic diversity indicates that there are informative genetic markers for popcorn.

  12. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods. PMID:24336928

  13. Assessing and broadening genetic diversity of a rapeseed germplasm collection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinfeng; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Gao, Guizhen; Chen, Biyun; Yan, Guixin; Wang, Nian; Qiao, Jiangwei; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tianyao; Song, Weiling; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-12-01

    Assessing the level of genetic diversity within a germplasm collection contributes to evaluating the potential for its utilization as a gene pool to improve the performance of cultivars. In this study, 45 high-quality simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened and used to estimate the genetic base of a world-wide collection of 248 rapeseed (Brassica napus) inbred lines. For the whole collection, the genetic diversity of A genome was higher than that of C genome. The genetic diversity of C genome for the semi-winter type was the lowest among the different germplasm types. Because B. oleracea is usually used to broaden the genetic diversity of C genome in rapeseed, we evaluated the potential of 25 wild B. oleracea lines. More allelic variations and a higher genetic diversity were observed in B. oleracea than in rapeseed. One B. oleracea line and one oilseed B. rapa line were used to generate a resynthesized Brassica napus line, which was then crossed with six semi-winter rapeseed cultivars to produce 7 F1 hybrids. Not only the allele introgression but also mutations were observed in the hybrids, resulting in significant improvement of the genetic base.

  14. Management increases genetic diversity of honey bees via admixture.

    PubMed

    Harpur, Brock A; Minaei, Shermineh; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro

    2012-09-01

    The process of domestication often brings about profound changes in levels of genetic variation in animals and plants. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, has been managed by humans for centuries for both honey and wax production and crop pollination. Human management and selective breeding are believed to have caused reductions in genetic diversity in honey bee populations, thereby contributing to the global declines threatening this ecologically and economically important insect. However, previous studies supporting this claim mostly relied on population genetic comparisons of European and African (or Africanized) honey bee races; such conclusions require reassessment given recent evidence demonstrating that the honey bee originated in Africa and colonized Europe via two independent expansions. We sampled honey bee workers from two managed populations in North America and Europe as well as several old-world progenitor populations in Africa, East and West Europe. Managed bees had highly introgressed genomes representing admixture between East and West European progenitor populations. We found that managed honey bees actually have higher levels of genetic diversity compared with their progenitors in East and West Europe, providing an unusual example whereby human management increases genetic diversity by promoting admixture. The relationship between genetic diversity and honey bee declines is tenuous given that managed bees have more genetic diversity than their progenitors and many viable domesticated animals.

  15. Understanding Genetic Diversity of Sorghum Using Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sweta; Kumaravadivel, N.

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum is the important cereal crop around the world and hence understanding and utilizing the genetic variation in sorghum accessions are essential for improving the crop. A good understanding of genetic variability among the accessions will enable precision breeding. So profiling the genetic diversity of sorghum is imminent. In the present investigation, forty sorghum accessions consisting of sweet sorghum, grain sorghum, forage sorghum, mutant lines, maintainer lines, and restorer lines were screened for genetic diversity using quantitative traits. Observations were recorded on 14 quantitative traits, out of which 9 diverse traits contributing to maximum variability were selected for genetic diversity analysis. The principle component analysis revealed that the panicle width, stem girth, and leaf breadth contributed maximum towards divergence. By using hierarchical cluster analysis, the 40 accessions were grouped under 6 clusters. Cluster I contained maximum number of accessions and cluster VI contained the minimum. The maximum intercluster distance was observed between cluster VI and cluster IV. Cluster III had the highest mean value for hundred-seed weight and yield. Hence the selection of parents must be based on the wider intercluster distance and superior mean performance for yield and yield components. Thus in the present investigation quantitative data were able to reveal the existence of a wide genetic diversity among the sorghum accessions used providing scope for further genetic improvement. PMID:27382499

  16. Accumulation of genetic diversity in the US Potato Genebank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient management of ex-situ collections includes understanding how conservation technologies impact the genetic diversity and integrity of these collections. For over 60 years, research at the US Potato Genebank has produced helpful scientific insights on diverse aspects of potato conservation. ...

  17. Genetic diversity of Toxoplama gondii isolates from Ethiopian feral cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies indicate greater genetic variability among isolates of Toxoplasma gondii worldwide than previously thought. However, there is no information on genetic diversity of T. gondii from any host in Ethiopia. In the present study, genotyping was performed on viable T. gondii isolates by bioa...

  18. Unusual, High Genetic Diversity of Aleutian Mink Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Anders; Mittelholzer, Christian; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Lind, Lars; Mejerland, Torbjörn; Belák, Sándor

    1999-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) was examined. Sequences obtained from 35 clinical samples were compared with five published sequences. An unusual, high genetic variability was revealed. Three phylogenetic subgroups of AMDV were identified, and the presence of more than one genotype at some farms was detected. PMID:10565948

  19. Unusual, high genetic diversity of Aleutian mink disease virus.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, A; Mittelholzer, C; Treiberg Berndtsson, L; Lind, L; Mejerland, T; Belák, S

    1999-12-01

    The genetic diversity of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) was examined. Sequences obtained from 35 clinical samples were compared with five published sequences. An unusual, high genetic variability was revealed. Three phylogenetic subgroups of AMDV were identified, and the presence of more than one genotype at some farms was detected. PMID:10565948

  20. Mapping Genetic Diversity of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.): Application of Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Use of Plant Genetic Resources

    PubMed Central

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Scheldeman, Xavier; Escribano, Pilar; Viruel, María A.; Van Damme, Patrick; Garcia, Willman; Tapia, César; Romero, José; Sigueñas, Manuel; Hormaza, José I.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing call for inventories that evaluate geographic patterns in diversity of plant genetic resources maintained on farm and in species' natural populations in order to enhance their use and conservation. Such evaluations are relevant for useful tropical and subtropical tree species, as many of these species are still undomesticated, or in incipient stages of domestication and local populations can offer yet-unknown traits of high value to further domestication. For many outcrossing species, such as most trees, inbreeding depression can be an issue, and genetic diversity is important to sustain local production. Diversity is also crucial for species to adapt to environmental changes. This paper explores the possibilities of incorporating molecular marker data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to allow visualization and better understanding of spatial patterns of genetic diversity as a key input to optimize conservation and use of plant genetic resources, based on a case study of cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.), a Neotropical fruit tree species. We present spatial analyses to (1) improve the understanding of spatial distribution of genetic diversity of cherimoya natural stands and cultivated trees in Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru based on microsatellite molecular markers (SSRs); and (2) formulate optimal conservation strategies by revealing priority areas for in situ conservation, and identifying existing diversity gaps in ex situ collections. We found high levels of allelic richness, locally common alleles and expected heterozygosity in cherimoya's putative centre of origin, southern Ecuador and northern Peru, whereas levels of diversity in southern Peru and especially in Bolivia were significantly lower. The application of GIS on a large microsatellite dataset allows a more detailed prioritization of areas for in situ conservation and targeted collection across the Andean distribution range of cherimoya than previous studies could do, i.e. at

  1. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Sitodiplosis mosellana in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yun; Wu, Yu-qing; Luo, Li-zhi; Miao, Jin; Gong, Zhong-jun; Jiang, Yue-li; Li, Tong

    2013-01-01

    The wheat midge, Sitodiplosis mosellana, is an important pest in Northern China. We tested the hypothesis that the population structure of this species arises during a range expansion over the past 30 years. This study used microsatellite and mitochondrial loci to conduct population genetic analysis of S. mosellana across its distribution range in China. We found strong genetic structure among the 16 studied populations, including two genetically distinct groups (the eastern and western groups), broadly consistent with the geography and habitat fragmentation. These results underline the importance of natural barriers in impeding dispersal and gene flow of S. mosellana populations. Low to moderate genetic diversity among the populations and moderate genetic differentiation (FST = 0.117) between the two groups were also found. The populations in the western group had lower genetic diversity, higher genetic differentiation and lower gene flow (FST = 0.116, Nm = 1.89) than those in the eastern group (FST = 0.049, Nm = 4.91). Genetic distance between populations was positively and significantly correlated with geographic distance (r = 0.56, P<0.001). The population history of this species provided no evidence for population expansion or bottlenecks in any of these populations. Our data suggest that the distribution of genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and population structure of S. mosellana have resulted from a historical event, reflecting its adaptation to diverse habitats and forming two different gene pools. These results may be the outcome of a combination of restricted gene flow due to geographical and environmental factors, population history, random processes of genetic drift and individual dispersal patterns. Given the current risk status of this species in China, this study can offer useful information for forecasting outbreaks and designing effective pest management programs. PMID:24265688

  2. Loss of genetic diversity as a signature of apricot domestication and diffusion into the Mediterranean Basin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestication generally implies a loss of diversity in crop species relative to their wild ancestors because of genetic drift through bottleneck effects. Compared to native Mediterranean fruit species like olive and grape, the loss of genetic diversity is expected to be more substantial for fruit species introduced into Mediterranean areas such as apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.), which was probably primarily domesticated in China. By comparing genetic diversity among regional apricot gene pools in several Mediterranean areas, we investigated the loss of genetic diversity associated with apricot selection and diffusion into the Mediterranean Basin. Results According to the geographic origin of apricots and using Bayesian clustering of genotypes, Mediterranean apricot (207 genotypes) was structured into three main gene pools: ‘Irano-Caucasian’, ‘North Mediterranean Basin’ and ‘South Mediterranean Basin’. Among the 25 microsatellite markers used, only one displayed deviations from the frequencies expected under neutrality. Similar genetic diversity parameters were obtained within each of the three main clusters using both all SSR loci and only 24 SSR loci based on the assumption of neutrality. A significant loss of genetic diversity, as assessed by the allelic richness and private allelic richness, was revealed from the ‘Irano-Caucasian’ gene pool, considered as a secondary centre of diversification, to the northern and southwestern Mediterranean Basin. A substantial proportion of shared alleles was specifically detected when comparing gene pools from the ‘North Mediterranean Basin’ and ‘South Mediterranean Basin’ to the secondary centre of diversification. Conclusions A marked domestication bottleneck was detected with microsatellite markers in the Mediterranean apricot material, depicting a global image of two diffusion routes from the ‘Irano-Caucasian’ gene pool: North Mediterranean and Southwest Mediterranean. This study

  3. Genome-wide genetic diversity of rove beetle populations along a metal pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Giska, Iwona; Babik, Wiesław; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; van Straalen, Nico M; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2015-09-01

    To what extent chemical contamination affects genetic diversity of wild populations remains an open question in ecotoxicology. Here we used a genome-wide approach (615 nuclear RADseq loci containing 3017 SNPs) and a mtDNA fragment (ATP6) to analyze the effect of long-term exposure to elevated concentrations of metals (Cd, Pb, Zn) on genetic diversity in rove beetle (Staphylinus erythropterus) populations living along a pollution gradient in Poland. In total, 96 individuals collected from six sites at increasing distance from the source of pollution were analyzed. We found weak differentiation between populations suggesting extensive gene flow. The highest genetic diversity was observed in a population inhabiting the polluted site with the highest metal availability. This may suggest increased mutation rates, possibly in relation to elevated oxidative stress levels. The polluted site could also act as an ecological sink receiving numerous migrants from neighboring populations. Despite higher genetic diversity at the most polluted site, there was no correlation between the genetic diversity and metal pollution or other soil properties. We did not find a clear genomic signature of local adaptation to metal pollution. Like in some other cases of metal tolerance in soil invertebrates, high mobility may counteract possible effects of local selective forces associated with soil pollution. PMID:25988435

  4. Genetic Diversity of Sitobion avenae (Homoptera: Aphididae) Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Juan-Juan; Shang, Qing-Li; Desneux, Nicolas; Gao, Xi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Sitobion avenae is a major agricultural pest of wheat in China. Using microsatellite markers, we studied the potential gene flow, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, and genetic structure of seven S. avenae populations from different regions of China (Beijing, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Shandong, and Shanxi provinces). The populations from Henan, Shandong, and Jiangsu showed high levels of genic and genotypic diversity. By contrast, the genic diversity in the Beijing and Hebei populations was much lower. Despite this low genic diversity, the genotypic diversity of the Beijing population was higher than that of all of the other populations, except those from Jiangsu and Shandong. Overall, the genetic divergence among the seven S. avenae populations tested was high, though there was almost no differentiation between the Shandong and Henan populations. We observed significant negative correlation between the strength of gene flow and the geographic distances among populations. Based on genetic analysis, the seven S. avenae populations studied can be divided into four distinct clusters; (i) Hubei, (ii) Shanxi, (iii) Beijing and Hebei, and (iv) Shandong, Henan, and Jiangsu. The present results provide a basis for potentially optimizing integrated pest management (IPM) programs in China, through adapting control methods that target biological traits shared by various populations of the same genotype. PMID:25356548

  5. Rapid increase in southern elephant seal genetic diversity after a founder event.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Mark; Pinsky, Malin L; Hall, Brenda; Koch, Paul; Baroni, Carlo; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-03-22

    Genetic diversity provides the raw material for populations to respond to changing environmental conditions. The evolution of diversity within populations is based on the accumulation of mutations and their retention or loss through selection and genetic drift, while migration can also introduce new variation. However, the extent to which population growth and sustained large population size can lead to rapid and significant increases in diversity has not been widely investigated. Here, we assess this empirically by applying approximate Bayesian computation to a novel ancient DNA dataset that spans the life of a southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) population, from initial founding approximately 7000 years ago to eventual extinction within the past millennium. We find that rapid population growth and sustained large population size can explain substantial increases in population genetic diversity over a period of several hundred generations, subsequently lost when the population went to extinction. Results suggest that the impact of diversity introduced through migration was relatively minor. We thus demonstrate, by examining genetic diversity across the life of a population, that environmental change could generate the raw material for adaptive evolution over a very short evolutionary time scale through rapid establishment of a large, stable population.

  6. Rapid increase in southern elephant seal genetic diversity after a founder event.

    PubMed

    de Bruyn, Mark; Pinsky, Malin L; Hall, Brenda; Koch, Paul; Baroni, Carlo; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2014-03-22

    Genetic diversity provides the raw material for populations to respond to changing environmental conditions. The evolution of diversity within populations is based on the accumulation of mutations and their retention or loss through selection and genetic drift, while migration can also introduce new variation. However, the extent to which population growth and sustained large population size can lead to rapid and significant increases in diversity has not been widely investigated. Here, we assess this empirically by applying approximate Bayesian computation to a novel ancient DNA dataset that spans the life of a southern elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) population, from initial founding approximately 7000 years ago to eventual extinction within the past millennium. We find that rapid population growth and sustained large population size can explain substantial increases in population genetic diversity over a period of several hundred generations, subsequently lost when the population went to extinction. Results suggest that the impact of diversity introduced through migration was relatively minor. We thus demonstrate, by examining genetic diversity across the life of a population, that environmental change could generate the raw material for adaptive evolution over a very short evolutionary time scale through rapid establishment of a large, stable population. PMID:24478305

  7. Genetic diversity, parasite prevalence and immunity in wild bumblebees

    PubMed Central

    Whitehorn, Penelope R.; Tinsley, Matthew C.; Brown, Mark J. F.; Darvill, Ben; Goulson, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Inbreeding and a consequent loss of genetic diversity threaten small, isolated populations. One mechanism by which genetically impoverished populations may become extinct is through decreased immunocompetence and higher susceptibility to parasites. Here, we investigate the relationship between immunity and inbreeding in bumblebees, using Hebridean island populations of Bombus muscorum. We sampled nine populations and recorded parasite prevalence and measured two aspects of immunity: the encapsulation response and levels of phenoloxidase (PO). We found that prevalence of the gut parasite Crithidia bombi was higher in populations with lower genetic diversity. Neither measure of immune activity was correlated with genetic diversity. However, levels of PO declined with age and were also negatively correlated with parasite abundance. Our results suggest that as insect populations lose heterozygosity, the impact of parasitism will increase, pushing threatened populations closer to extinction. PMID:20926436

  8. Genetic and Metabolite Diversity of Sardinian Populations of Helichrysum italicum

    PubMed Central

    Melito, Sara; Sias, Angela; Petretto, Giacomo L.; Chessa, Mario; Pintore, Giorgio; Porceddu, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background Helichrysum italicum (Asteraceae) is a small shrub endemic to the Mediterranean Basin, growing in fragmented and diverse habitats. The species has attracted attention due to its secondary metabolite content, but little effort has as yet been dedicated to assessing the genetic and metabolite diversity present in these populations. Here, we describe the diversity of 50 H. italicum populations collected from a range of habitats in Sardinia. Methods H. italicum plants were AFLP fingerprinted and the composition of their leaf essential oil characterized by GC-MS. The relationships between the genetic structure of the populations, soil, habitat and climatic variables and the essential oil chemotypes present were evaluated using Bayesian clustering, contingency analyses and AMOVA. Key results The Sardinian germplasm could be partitioned into two AFLP-based clades. Populations collected from the southwestern region constituted a homogeneous group which remained virtually intact even at high levels of K. The second, much larger clade was more diverse. A positive correlation between genetic diversity and elevation suggested the action of natural purifying selection. Four main classes of compounds were identified among the essential oils, namely monoterpenes, oxygenated monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Oxygenated monoterpene levels were significantly correlated with the AFLP-based clade structure, suggesting a correspondence between gene pool and chemical diversity. Conclusions The results suggest an association between chemotype, genetic diversity and collection location which is relevant for the planning of future collections aimed at identifying valuable sources of essential oil. PMID:24260149

  9. The relationship between species diversity and genetic structure in the rare Picea chihuahuana tree species community, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as "Endangered" on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions between

  10. The relationship between species diversity and genetic structure in the rare Picea chihuahuana tree species community, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as "Endangered" on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions between

  11. The Relationship between Species Diversity and Genetic Structure in the Rare Picea chihuahuana Tree Species Community, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Simental-Rodríguez, Sergio Leonel; Quiñones-Pérez, Carmen Zulema; Moya, Daniel; Hernández-Tecles, Enrique; López-Sánchez, Carlos Antonio; Wehenkel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Species diversity and genetic diversity, the most basic elements of biodiversity, have long been treated as separate topics, although populations evolve within a community context. Recent studies on community genetics and ecology have suggested that genetic diversity is not completely independent of species diversity. The Mexican Picea chihuahuana Martínez is an endemic species listed as “Endangered” on the Red List. Forty populations of Chihuahua spruce have been identified. This species is often associated with tree species of eight genera in gallery forests. This rare Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area no more than 300 ha and has been subject of several studies involving different topics such as ecology, genetic structure and climate change. The overall aim of these studies was to obtain a dataset for developing management tools to help decision makers implement preservation and conservation strategies. However, this unique forest tree community may also represent an excellent subject for helping us to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary processes in determining community structure and dynamics. The AFLP technique and species composition data were used together to test the hypothesis that species diversity is related to the adaptive genetic structure of some dominant tree species (Picea chihuahuana, Pinus strobiformis, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Populus tremuloides) of the Picea chihuahuana tree community at fourteen locations. The Hill numbers were used as a diversity measure. The results revealed a significant correlation between tree species diversity and genetic structure in Populus tremuloides. Because the relationship between the two levels of diversity was found to be positive for the putative adaptive AFLP detected, genetic and species structures of the tree community were possibly simultaneously adapted to a combination of ecological or environmental factors. The present findings indicate that interactions

  12. Rates of inbreeding and genetic diversity in Iranian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Dadar, Mohsen; Mahyari, Saeid Ansari; Rokouei, Mohammad; Edriss, Mohammd Ali

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of inbreeding and the loss of genetic diversity is a potential problem in Holstein dairy cattle. The goal of this study was to estimate inbreeding levels and other measures of genetic diversity, using pedigree information from Iranian Holstein cattle. Edited pedigree included 1,048,572 animals. The average number of discrete generation equivalents and pedigree completeness index reached 13.4 and 90%, respectively. The rate of inbreeding was 0.3% per year. Effective number of founders, founder genomes, non-founders and ancestors of animals born between 2003 and 2011 were 503, 15.6, 16.1 and 25.7, respectively. It was proven that the unequal founder contributions as well as bottlenecks and genetic drift were important reasons for the loss of genetic diversity in the population. The top 10 ancestors with the highest marginal genetic contributions to animals born between 2003 and 2011 and with the highest contributions to inbreeding were 48.20% and 63.94%, respectively. Analyses revealed that the most important cause of genetic diversity loss was genetic drift accumulated over non-founder generations, which occurred due to small effective population size. Therefore, it seems that managing selection and mating decisions are controlling future co-ancestry and inbreeding, which would lead to better handling of the effective population size. PMID:25041055

  13. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  14. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Chaput, John C.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson–Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  15. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Dunn, Matthew R; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D; Egli, Martin

    2016-02-18

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson-Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space.

  16. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly.

    PubMed

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-11-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations.

  17. Rapid range expansion increases genetic differentiation while causing limited reduction in genetic diversity in a damselfly

    PubMed Central

    Swaegers, J; Mergeay, J; Therry, L; Larmuseau, M H D; Bonte, D; Stoks, R

    2013-01-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their geographic range due to global warming. This can modify the population genetic diversity and structure of these species because of genetic drift during the colonization of new areas. Although the genetic signatures of historical range expansions have been investigated in an array of species, the genetic consequences of natural, contemporary range expansions have received little attention, with the only studies available focusing on range expansions along a narrow front. We investigate the genetic consequences of a natural range expansion in the Mediterranean damselfly Coenagrion scitulum, which is currently rapidly expanding along a broad front in different directions. We assessed genetic diversity and genetic structure using 12 microsatellite markers in five centrally located populations and five recently established populations at the edge of the geographic distribution. Our results suggest that, although a marginal significant decrease in the allelic richness was found in the edge populations, genetic diversity has been preserved during the range expansion of this species. Nevertheless, edge populations were genetically more differentiated compared with core populations, suggesting genetic drift during the range expansion. The smaller effective population sizes of the edge populations compared with central populations also suggest a contribution of genetic drift after colonization. We argue and document that range expansion along multiple axes of a broad expansion front generates little reduction in genetic diversity, yet stronger differentiation of the edge populations. PMID:23820582

  18. Plasmodium vivax genetic diversity: microsatellite length matters.

    PubMed

    Russell, Bruce; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Lek-Uthai, Usa

    2006-09-01

    The Plasmodium vivax genome is very diverse but has a relatively low abundance of microsatellites. Leclerc et al. had shown that these di-nucleotide repeats have a low level of polymorphism, suggesting a recent bottleneck event in the evolutionary history of P. vivax. By contrast, in a recent paper, Imwong et al. show that there is a very high level of microsatellite diversity. The difference in these results is probably due to the set array lengths chosen by each group. Longer arrays are more diverse than are shorter ones because slippage mutations become exponentially more common with an increase in array length. These studies highlight the need to consider carefully the application and design of studies involving microsatellites.

  19. Theory predicts the uneven distribution of genetic diversity within species.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Erik M; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2004-09-23

    Global efforts to conserve species have been strongly influenced by the heterogeneous distribution of species diversity across the Earth. This is manifest in conservation efforts focused on diversity hotspots. The conservation of genetic diversity within an individual species is an important factor in its survival in the face of environmental changes and disease. Here we show that diversity within species is also distributed unevenly. Using simple genealogical models, we show that genetic distinctiveness has a scale-free power law distribution. This property implies that a disproportionate fraction of the diversity is concentrated in small sub-populations, even when the population is well-mixed. Small groups are of such importance to overall population diversity that even without extrinsic perturbations, there are large fluctuations in diversity owing to extinctions of these small groups. We also show that diversity can be geographically non-uniform--potentially including sharp boundaries between distantly related organisms--without extrinsic causes such as barriers to gene flow or past migration events. We obtained these results by studying the fundamental scaling properties of genealogical trees. Our theoretical results agree with field data from global samples of Pseudomonas bacteria. Contrary to previous studies, our results imply that diversity loss owing to severe extinction events is high, and focusing conservation efforts on highly distinctive groups can save much of the diversity. PMID:15386012

  20. [Evolutionary process unveiled by the maximum genetic diversity hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Min; Xia, Meng-Ying; Huang, Shi

    2013-05-01

    As two major popular theories to explain evolutionary facts, the neutral theory and Neo-Darwinism, despite their proven virtues in certain areas, still fail to offer comprehensive explanations to such fundamental evolutionary phenomena as the genetic equidistance result, abundant overlap sites, increase in complexity over time, incomplete understanding of genetic diversity, and inconsistencies with fossil and archaeological records. Maximum genetic diversity hypothesis (MGD), however, constructs a more complete evolutionary genetics theory that incorporates all of the proven virtues of existing theories and adds to them the novel concept of a maximum or optimum limit on genetic distance or diversity. It has yet to meet a contradiction and explained for the first time the half-century old Genetic Equidistance phenomenon as well as most other major evolutionary facts. It provides practical and quantitative ways of studying complexity. Molecular interpretation using MGD-based methods reveal novel insights on the origins of humans and other primates that are consistent with fossil evidence and common sense, and reestablished the important role of China in the evolution of humans. MGD theory has also uncovered an important genetic mechanism in the construction of complex traits and the pathogenesis of complex diseases. We here made a series of sequence comparisons among yeasts, fishes and primates to illustrate the concept of limit on genetic distance. The idea of limit or optimum is in line with the yin-yang paradigm in the traditional Chinese view of the universal creative law in nature.

  1. Global resources of genetic diversity in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collecting and preserving genetic resources is critical in order to improve agricultural production around the world. Ensuring enough food to provide adequate nutrition for the global population is going to be a hugh challenge for plant breeders going forward as the human populations increases. Fa...

  2. Genetic Diversity and Genome Complexity of Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as a C4 plant, is one of the most efficient crops in converting solar energy into chemical energy. Sugarcane cultivar improvement programs have not yet systematically utilized the most of the genetic sources of yield potential and resistance to stresses that may exist in t...

  3. Genetic Diversity of US Sheep Breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the genetic relationships between US sheep breeds is useful in developing conservation strategies and actions. A broad sampling of individual sheep from 28 breeds was performed. Breed types included: fine wool, meat types, long wool, hair, prolific, and fat tailed. Blood and semen samp...

  4. Polishing the craft of genetic diversity creation in directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Tee, Kang Lan; Wong, Tuck Seng

    2013-12-01

    Genetic diversity creation is a core technology in directed evolution where a high quality mutant library is crucial to its success. Owing to its importance, the technology in genetic diversity creation has seen rapid development over the years and its application has diversified into other fields of scientific research. The advances in molecular cloning and mutagenesis since 2008 were reviewed. Specifically, new cloning techniques were classified based on their principles of complementary overhangs, homologous sequences, overlapping PCR and megaprimers and the advantages, drawbacks and performances of these methods were highlighted. New mutagenesis methods developed for random mutagenesis, focused mutagenesis and DNA recombination were surveyed. The technical requirements of these methods and the mutational spectra were compared and discussed with references to commonly used techniques. The trends of mutant library preparation were summarised. Challenges in genetic diversity creation were discussed with emphases on creating "smart" libraries, controlling the mutagenesis spectrum and specific challenges in each group of mutagenesis methods. An outline of the wider applications of genetic diversity creation includes genome engineering, viral evolution, metagenomics and a study of protein functions. The review ends with an outlook for genetic diversity creation and the prospective developments that can have future impact in this field.

  5. [Genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton of eight lakes in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bi-ying; Chen, Mei-jun; Sun, Ying; Chen, Fei-zhou; Yang, Jia-xin

    2010-05-01

    The method of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to study the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton (0.2-5.0 microm) in the pelagic and littoral zones in 8 lakes with different trophic status in Nanjing. The objectives of this study were to confirm the difference of the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton among lakes and the main factors affecting this difference. T-RFLP indicated that there were various fingerprints among lakes and zones. The average terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) in the littoral and pelagic zones were 16.4 and 15.9, respectively. The littoral zone in Lake Nan and the pelagic zone in Lake Mochou had 30 T-RFs and 27 T-RFs, respectively. The T-RFs were the least abundant (10) in the pelagic zone in Lake Baijia with relatively low trophic status. The genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton was higher in the littoral zone than that in the pelagic zone except Lake Pipa and Mochou. The cluster analysis indicated that the similarities of the littoral zones and the pelagic zones were very high except Lake Baijia, Qian and Nan. The canonical correspondence analysis between the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton and environmental factors revealed the concentration of chlorophyll a had the most important impact on the eukaryotic picoplankton communities (p = 0.004). The results indicated that the genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton is affected by the trophic status and has the difference in the pelagic and littoral zones.

  6. Clonal structure and genetic diversity of three desert phreatophytes.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Beatrix; Zhang, Ximing; Bruelheide, Helge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess clone sizes of three perennial desert plant species with AFLP markers and to relate them to clonal and genetic diversity and to hydroecology. The study was carried out at the southern rim of the Taklamakan Desert, where sexual regeneration is only possible shortly after rare flooding events, resulting in rarely established cohorts with subsequent extensive vertical growth and horizontal clonal spread. In this environment, repeated seedling establishment is excluded. We expected decreasing clonal and genetic diversity with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table and a common response pattern among all study species. Maximum sizes of Populus euphratica and Alhagi sparsifolia clones were 121 ha and 6.1 ha, respectively, while Tamarix ramosissima clones reached a maximum size of only 38 m(2). In P. euphratica and A. sparsifolia, clonal diversity declined with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table, while genetic diversity remained unaffected. Tamarix ramosissima differed from the other species because of a much smaller clonality. Clone size and clonal diversity were found to be good proxy variables for clone age. Despite the considerable age of the clones, genetic diversity is maintained in the populations.

  7. Genotyping by sequencing reveals the genetic diversity of the USDA pisum diversity collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA expanded Pisum Single Plant (PSP) core collection is a unique resource that represents the breadth of the genetic diversity of the genus in an inbred format that facilitates genetic study. The collection includes inbred accessions from the refined pea core collection, parent lines of USDA r...

  8. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  9. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  10. Crater lake habitat predicts morphological diversity in adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Recknagel, Hans; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive radiations provide an excellent opportunity for studying the correlates and causes for the origin of biodiversity. In these radiations, species diversity may be influenced by either the ecological and physical environment, intrinsic lineage effects, or both. Disentangling the relative contributions of these factors in generating biodiversity remains a major challenge in understanding why a lineage does or does not radiate. Here, we examined morphological variation in body shape for replicate flocks of Nicaraguan Midas cichlid fishes and tested its association with biological and physical characteristics of their crater lakes. We found that variability of body elongation, an adaptive trait in freshwater fishes, is mainly predicted by average lake depth (N = 6, P < 0.001, R(2) = 0.96). Other factors considered, including lake age, surface area, littoral zone area, number of co-occurring fish species, and genetic diversity of the Midas flock, did not significantly predict morphological variability. We also showed that lakes with a larger littoral zone have on average higher bodied Midas cichlids, indicating that Midas cichlid flocks are locally adapted to their crater lake habitats. In conclusion, we found that a lake's habitat predicts the magnitude and the diversity of body elongation in repeated cichlid adaptive radiations.

  11. Adaptive genetic variation and heart disease risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: Obesity, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease are complex and determined by both genetic and environmental factors and their interrelationships. Many associations from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches have described a multitude of polymorphis...

  12. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians (approximately 2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture.

  13. Genetic diversity and population differentiation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum collected from canola in China and in USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and phenotypic diversity and population differentiation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates infecting canola from China and the United States were investigated. Genetic diversity was assessed with eight microsatellite markers and mycelial compatibility groups (MCGs). Phenotypic diversity wa...

  14. Tracking Dengue Virus Intra-host Genetic Diversity during Human-to-Mosquito Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Shuzhen; Aw, Pauline P. K.; Wilm, Andreas; Teoh, Garrett; Hue, Kien Duong Thi; Nguyen, Nguyet Minh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Simmons, Cameron P.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection of an individual human or mosquito host produces a dynamic population of closely-related sequences. This intra-host genetic diversity is thought to offer an advantage for arboviruses to adapt as they cycle between two very different host species, but it remains poorly characterized. To track changes in viral intra-host genetic diversity during horizontal transmission, we infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by allowing them to feed on DENV2-infected patients. We then performed whole-genome deep-sequencing of human- and matched mosquito-derived DENV samples on the Illumina platform and used a sensitive variant-caller to detect single nucleotide variants (SNVs) within each sample. >90% of SNVs were lost upon transition from human to mosquito, as well as from mosquito abdomen to salivary glands. Levels of viral diversity were maintained, however, by the regeneration of new SNVs at each stage of transmission. We further show that SNVs maintained across transmission stages were transmitted as a unit of two at maximum, suggesting the presence of numerous variant genomes carrying only one or two SNVs each. We also present evidence for differences in selection pressures between human and mosquito hosts, particularly on the structural and NS1 genes. This analysis provides insights into how population drops during transmission shape RNA virus genetic diversity, has direct implications for virus evolution, and illustrates the value of high-coverage, whole-genome next-generation sequencing for understanding viral intra-host genetic diversity. PMID:26325059

  15. Tracking Dengue Virus Intra-host Genetic Diversity during Human-to-Mosquito Transmission.

    PubMed

    Sim, Shuzhen; Aw, Pauline P K; Wilm, Andreas; Teoh, Garrett; Hue, Kien Duong Thi; Nguyen, Nguyet Minh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Simmons, Cameron P; Hibberd, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection of an individual human or mosquito host produces a dynamic population of closely-related sequences. This intra-host genetic diversity is thought to offer an advantage for arboviruses to adapt as they cycle between two very different host species, but it remains poorly characterized. To track changes in viral intra-host genetic diversity during horizontal transmission, we infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by allowing them to feed on DENV2-infected patients. We then performed whole-genome deep-sequencing of human- and matched mosquito-derived DENV samples on the Illumina platform and used a sensitive variant-caller to detect single nucleotide variants (SNVs) within each sample. >90% of SNVs were lost upon transition from human to mosquito, as well as from mosquito abdomen to salivary glands. Levels of viral diversity were maintained, however, by the regeneration of new SNVs at each stage of transmission. We further show that SNVs maintained across transmission stages were transmitted as a unit of two at maximum, suggesting the presence of numerous variant genomes carrying only one or two SNVs each. We also present evidence for differences in selection pressures between human and mosquito hosts, particularly on the structural and NS1 genes. This analysis provides insights into how population drops during transmission shape RNA virus genetic diversity, has direct implications for virus evolution, and illustrates the value of high-coverage, whole-genome next-generation sequencing for understanding viral intra-host genetic diversity.

  16. [Genetic diversity of microbial communities in tea orchard soil].

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Yao, Huai-Ying; Huang, Chang-Yong

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the total microbial DNA was extracted from the soils in 8-, 50- and 90 years old tea orchards, adjacent wasteland, and 90 years old forestland in Meijiawu tea area of Hangzhou. The 16S rDNA V3 fragment was amplified by PCR, and the polymorphism of this fragment was analyzed by DGGE. The results indicated that both the tea orchard age and the land use type had significant effects on soil microbial genetic diversity. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in the microbial genetic diversity index among wasteland, tea orchards and forestland, which was decreased in the order of wasteland > tea orchard > forestland. For the tea orchards of different ages, the soil microbial genetic diversity index, microbial biomass C, and basal respiration were significantly higher in 50 years old than in 8 and 90 years old tea orchards.

  17. The study of relatedness and genetic diversity in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Dessauer, H.C.; Longmire, J.; Briles, W.E.; Simon, R.C.; Wood, Don A.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is responsible for recovery of endangered species in the wild and, when necessary, maintenance in captivity. These programs provide an immediate measure of insurance against extinction. A prerequisite inherent in all of these programs is the preservation of enough genetic diversity to maintain a viable population and to maintain the capacity of the population to respond to change. Measures of genetic diversity examine polymorphic genes that are not influenced by selection pressures. Examples of these techniques and those used to determine relatedness are discussed. Studies of genetic diversity, electrophoresis of blood proteins, relatedness, blood typing, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms which are being used by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center are discussed in detail.

  18. Cognitive adaptation to the experience of social and cultural diversity.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Richard J; Turner, Rhiannon N

    2011-03-01

    Diversity is a defining characteristic of modern society, yet there remains considerable debate over the benefits that it brings. The authors argue that positive psychological and behavioral outcomes will be observed only when social and cultural diversity is experienced in a way that challenges stereotypical expectations and that when this precondition is met, the experience has cognitive consequences that resonate across multiple domains. A model, rooted in social categorization theory and research, outlines the preconditions and processes through which people cognitively adapt to the experience of social and cultural diversity and the resulting cross-domain benefits that this brings. Evidence is drawn from a range of literatures to support this model, including work on biculturalism, minority influence, cognitive development, stereotype threat, work group productivity, creativity, and political ideology. The authors bring together a range of differing diversity experiences and explicitly draw parallels between programs of research that have focused on both perceiving others who are multicultural and being multicultural oneself. The findings from this integrative review suggest that experiencing diversity that challenges expectations may not only encourage greater tolerance but also have benefits beyond intergroup relations to varied aspects of psychological functioning.

  19. Genetic diversity of Acanthamoeba isolates from ocean sediments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sung-Tae; Hong, Yean-Chul; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 18 Acanthamoeba isolates from ocean sediments was evaluated by comparing mitochondrial (mt) DNA RFLP, 18S rDNA sequences and by examining their cytopathic effects on human corneal epithelial cells versus reference strains. All isolates belonged to morphologic group II. Total of 16 restriction phenotypes of mtDNA from 18 isolates demonstrated the genetic diversity of Acanthamoeba in ocean sediments. Phylogenetic analysis using 18s rDNA sequences revealed that the 18 isolates were distinct from morphological groups I and III. Fifteen isolates showed close relatedness with 17 clinical isolates and A. castellanii Castellani and formed a lineage equivalent to T4 genotype of Byers' group. Two reference strains from ocean sediment, A. hatchetti BH-2 and A. griffini S-7 clustered unequivocally with these 15 isolates. Diversity among isolates was also evident from their cytopathic effects on human corneal cells. This is the first time describing Acanthamoeba diversity in ocean sediments in Korea. PMID:16809959

  20. Conservation priorities of genetic diversity in domesticated metapopulations: a study in taurine cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    Medugorac, Ivica; Veit-Kensch, Claudia E; Ramljak, Jelena; Brka, Muhamed; Marković, Božidarka; Stojanović, Srđan; Bytyqi, Hysen; Kochoski, Ljupche; Kume, Kristaq; Grünenfelder, Hans-Peter; Bennewitz, Jörn; Förster, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We estimated neutral diversity of 21 European cattle breeds with 105 microsatellites. Nine of them resembled unselected Balkan Buša strains with diffuse breeding barriers and the 12 others were strongly differentiated, isolated breeds. Because of the impact of neutral genetic diversity on long-term population adaptive capacity, we discuss the long-term outcome of different conservation priorities in a subdivided metapopulation of the investigated cattle breeds. The optimal contribution to a pool of total genetic diversity allocated more than 95% of long-term relevant neutral diversity to virtually unselected strains of the Balkan Buša, while the maximization of total variance preferred inbred breeds. Current artificial selection methods, such as genomic selection sped up and a recovery of underestimated traits becomes quickly impossible. We emphasize that currently neutral and even deleterious alleles might be required for future genotypes in sustainable and efficient livestock breeding and production systems of a 21st century. We provide cumulative evidences that long-term survival relies on genetic complexity and complexity relies on allelic diversity. Our results suggest that virtually unselected, nonuniform strains harbor a crucial proportion of neutral diversity and should be conserved with high global priority. As one example, we suggest a cooperative maintenance of the nondifferentiated, highly fragmented, and fast vanishing metapopulation of Balkan Buša. PMID:22393510

  1. Relaxed trait covariance in interspecific cichlid hybrids predicts morphological diversity in adaptive radiations.

    PubMed

    Selz, O M; Lucek, K; Young, K A; Seehausen, O

    2014-01-01

    The process of adaptive radiation involves multiple events of speciation in short succession, associated with ecological diversification. Understanding this process requires identifying the origins of heritable phenotypic variation that allows adaptive radiation to progress. Hybridization is one source of genetic and morphological variation that may spur adaptive radiation. We experimentally explored the potential role of hybridization in facilitating the onset of adaptive radiation. We generated first- and second-generation hybrids of four species of African cichlid fish, extant relatives of the putative ancestors of the adaptive radiations of Lakes Victoria and Malawi. We compared patterns in hybrid morphological variation with the variation in the lake radiations. We show that significant fractions of the interspecific morphological variation and the major trajectories in morphospace that characterize whole radiations can be generated in second-generation hybrids. Furthermore, we show that covariation between traits is relaxed in second-generation hybrids, which may facilitate adaptive diversification. These results support the idea that hybridization can provide the heritable phenotypic diversity necessary to initiate adaptive radiation.

  2. [Application of ISSR technology in genetic diversity detection of jute].

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianmin; Zhou, Dongxin; Wu, Weiren; Lin, Lihui; Wu, Jianmei; Fang, Pingping

    2003-09-01

    The genetic diversity among 27 accessions of Corchorus, including 10 Jute species, was investigated with ISSR technique. 283 DNA bands were amplified with 25 ISSR primers, among which, 263 (92.85%) were polymorphic, with 10.48 bands per primer in average. A further systemic cluster analysis indicated that the accessions could be clustered into three groups, and the group II (including two cultispecies and their close wild species) was obviously genetically different from the groups I and III (including eight wild species). Moreover, 16 accessions in group II presented a higher intraspecific genetic resemblance, while 11 accessions among groups I & III showed an abundant interspecific genetic diversity. After synthesized the relevant findings of morphology and DNA classification, it's found that C. urticifolius could be one of the original wild species, C. tilaculariszic was a variation of C. tilaculari, and Tian Jute could be an untitled wild species.

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of fruit characteristics of hawthorn germplasm.

    PubMed

    Su, K; Guo, Y S; Wang, G; Zhao, Y H; Dong, W X

    2015-12-07

    One hundred and six accessions of hawthorn intraspecific resources, from the National Germplasm Repository at Shenyang, were subjected to genetic diversity and principal component analysis based on evaluation data of 15 fruit traits. Results showed that the genetic diversity of hawthorn fruit traits varied. Among the 15 traits, the fruit shape variable coefficient had the most obvious evaluation, followed by fruit surface state, dot color, taste, weight of single fruit, sepal posture, peduncle form, and metula traits. These are the primary traits by which hawthorn could be classified in the future. The principal component demonstrated that these traits are the most influential factors of hawthorn fruit characteristics.

  4. Detection of diverse HIV-1 genetic subtypes in the USA.

    PubMed

    Brodine, S K; Mascola, J R; Weiss, P J; Ito, S I; Porter, K R; Artenstein, A W; Garland, F C; McCutchan, F E; Burke, D S

    1995-11-01

    Of the nine genetic subtypes of HIV-1 that exist world wide, subtype B predominates in North America and Europe. Thus, most knowledge about HIV-1 and most vaccine development efforts are based on subtype B viruses. We document here the detection of HIV-1 subtypes A, D, and E in five US servicemen who acquired these non-subtype-B infections during overseas deployments. The dispersal of diverse HIV-1 subtypes into regions of the world with previously restricted genetic diversity may have important implications for the epidemiology of the epidemic and for the design and implementation of vaccine trials. PMID:7475661

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jéssica Rosset; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Turchetto, Caroline; Minella, Euclydes; Consoli, Luciano; Delatorre, Carla Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC), with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs. PMID:27007902

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity in Brazilian barley using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jéssica Rosset; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Turchetto, Caroline; Minella, Euclydes; Consoli, Luciano; Delatorre, Carla Andréa

    2016-03-01

    Barley is a major cereal grown widely and used in several food products, beverage production and animal fodder. Genetic diversity is a key component in breeding programs. We have analyzed the genetic diversity of barley accessions using microsatellite markers. The accessions were composed of wild and domesticated barley representing genotypes from six countries and three breeding programs in Brazil. A total of 280 alleles were detected, 36 unique to Brazilian barley. The marker Bmag120 showed the greatest polymorphism information content (PIC), with the highest mean value found on chromosome three, and the lowest on chromosomes four and six. The wild accessions presented the highest diversity followed by the foreign genotypes. Genetic analysis was performed using Principal Coordinates Analysis, UPGMA clustering, and Bayesian clustering analysis implemented in Structure. All results obtained by the different methods were similar. Loss of genetic diversity has occurred in Brazilian genotypes. The number of alleles detected in genotypes released in 1980s was higher, whereas most of the cultivars released thereafter showed lower PIC and clustered in separate subgroups from the older cultivars. The use of a more diverse panel of genotypes should be considered in order to exploit novel alleles in Brazilian barley breeding programs. PMID:27007902

  7. Increased genetic diversity of Viola tricolor L. (Violaceae) in metal-polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Słomka, A; Sutkowska, A; Szczepaniak, M; Malec, P; Mitka, J; Kuta, E

    2011-04-01

    Changes in DNA sequences affecting cryptic intraspecific variability are very important mechanisms of plant microevolutionary processes, initiating species diversification. In polluted environments, intra- and interpopulation changes at the molecular level proceed rapidly and lead to the formation of new ecotypes in a relatively short time. We used ISSR PCR fingerprinting data to analyze the genetic diversity and genetic structure of seven populations of Viola tricolor: four growing on soil contaminated with heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd; waste heaps) and three from control soil. The populations from the polluted sites showed higher genetic polymorphism (%(poly)=84%) and gene diversity (H(T)=0.1709) than the control populations (%(poly)=75% and H(T)=0.1448). The number of private markers we detected within metallicolous (MET) populations was more than double that found within non-metallicolous (NON) populations (15 vs. 7). The STRUCTURE and UPGMA analyses showed clear genetic differences between the NON and MET populations. Based on broad analyses of the genetic parameters, we conclude that the effect of these polluted environments on the genetic diversity of the MET populations, separating them from the NON populations, is evidence of microevolutionary processes at species level, leading to species divergence and the emergence of local ecotypes better adapted to their different environments.

  8. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  9. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of Arabidopsis thaliana along an altitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Antariksh; Singh, Shivani; Mishra, Parneeta; Singh, Akanksha; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Jena, Satya Narayan; Roy, Sribash

    2016-01-01

    The natural genetic variation within a plant species is primarily a consequence of its phylogeography and evolutionary history. This variation largely determines its present-day population structure. Arabidopsis thaliana, as a model plant, has been studied in great detail including its probable origin, local as well as global genetic diversity pattern, population structure, adaptation, etc. However, no such studies have so far been reported from the Indian Himalayan region. Here, we describe a comprehensive study on the genetic diversity and population structure of A. thaliana from an altitudinal range of 700–3400 m above mean sea level the highest altitudinal range reported so far. We also compare these populations with previously reported worldwide populations. A total of 48 accessions representing six populations were analysed using 19 microsatellites and 11 chloroplast markers. Genetic diversity analysis indicated populations to be highly diverse and comparable with worldwide populations. STRUCTURE, principal coordinate and isolation by distance (IBD) analyses showed that genetic variation in different populations is structured at geographical and altitudinal level. Further analyses indicate that these populations are genetically distinct from the rest of the world populations. Different parameters of the demographic expansion model support a rapid expansion. Based on mismatch distribution, the initial time of expansion of west Himalayan populations was found to be about 130 000 years. Bayesian analysis of divergence time indicated that these populations have a long evolutionary history in this region. Based on the results of genetic diversity parameters, demographic expansion and divergence time estimation, it appears that west Himalayan populations may be the source of the west–east expansion model. PMID:26672075

  11. Intra-specific genetic diversity in wild olives (Olea europaea ssp cuspidata) in Hormozgan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadi, Z; Samadi-Molayousefi, H; Sheidai, M

    2012-03-19

    Wild olive (O. europaea ssp cuspidata) plants grow in various regions of Iran and are expected to have considerable genetic diversity due to adaptation to the various environmental conditions. We examined the genetic diversity of four populations of wild olive growing in Hormozgan Province located in southern Iran by using 30 RAPDs and 10 ISSR markers. The mean value of polymorphism for RAPD loci was 73.71%, while the value for ISSR loci was 81.74%. The Keshar population had the highest value of intra-population polymorphism for both RAPD and ISSR loci (66.86 and 62.71%, respectively), while the Tudar population had the lowest values (20.35 and 28.81%, respectively). Similarly, the highest and lowest number of effective alleles, Shannon index and Nei's genetic diversity were also found for these two populations. The highest value of H(pop)/H(sp) within population genetic diversity for RAPD and ISSR loci was found for the Keshar population (H(pop) = 0.85 and H(sp) = 0.90). OPA04-750, OPA13-650 and OPA02-350 RAPD bands were specific for Tudar, Bondon and Keshar populations, respectively, while no specific ISSR bands were observed. Analysis of molecular variance as well as the pairwise F(ST) test showed significant differences for RAPD and ISSR markers among the populations. The NJ and UPGMA trees also separated the wild olive populations from each other, indicating their genetic distinctness. UPGMA clustering of the four wild olive populations placed the Tudar population far from the other populations; Keshar and Bokhoon population samples revealed more similarity and were grouped together. We conclude that there is high genetic diversity among O. europaea ssp cuspidata populations located in southern Iran. We also found RAPD and ISSR markers to be useful molecular tools to discriminate and evaluate genetic variations in wild olive trees.

  12. Genetic diversity in wild populations of Paulownia fortune.

    PubMed

    Li, H Y; Ru, G X; Zhang, J; Lu, Y Y

    2014-11-01

    The genetic diversities of 16 Paulownia fortunei populations involving 143 individuals collected from 6 provinces in China were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A total of 9 primer pairs with 1169 polymorphic loci were screened out, and each pair possessed 132 bands on average. The percentage of polymorphic bands (98.57%), the effective number of alleles (1.2138-1.2726), Nei's genetic diversity (0.1566-0.1887), and Shannon's information index (0.2692-0.3117) indicated a plentiful genetic diversity and different among Paulownia fortunei populations. The genetic differentiation coefficient between populations was 0.2386, while the gene flow was 1.0954, and the low gene exchange promoted genetic differentiation. Analysis of variance indicated that genetic variation mainly occurred within populations (81.62% of total variation) rather than among populations (18.38%). The 16 populations were divided by unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) into 4 groups with obvious regionalism, in which the populations with close geographical locations (latitude) were clustered together. PMID:25739286

  13. Patterns and dynamics of genetic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum: what past human migrations tell us about malaria.

    PubMed

    Mita, Toshihiro; Jombart, Thibaut

    2015-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the main agent of malaria, one of the major human infectious diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. The genetic diversity of P. falciparum populations is an essential factor in the parasite's ability to adapt to changes in its environment, enabling the development of drug resistance and the evasion from the host immune system through antigenic variation. Therefore, characterizing these patterns and understanding the main drivers of the pathogen's genetic diversity can provide useful inputs for informing control strategies. In this paper, we review the pioneering work led by Professor Kazuyuki Tanabe on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum populations. In a first part, we recall basic results from population genetics for quantifying within-population genetic diversity, and discuss the main mechanisms driving this diversity. Then, we show how these approaches have been used for reconstructing the historical spread of malaria worldwide, and how current patterns of genetic diversity suggest that the pathogen followed our ancestors in their journey out of Africa. Because these results are robust to different types of genetic markers, they provide a baseline for predicting the pathogen's diversity in unsampled populations, and some useful elements for predicting vaccine efficacy and informing malaria control strategies.

  14. Genetic erosion impedes adaptive responses to stressful environments

    PubMed Central

    Bijlsma, R; Loeschcke, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Biodiversity is increasingly subjected to human-induced changes of the environment. To persist, populations continually have to adapt to these often stressful changes including pollution and climate change. Genetic erosion in small populations, owing to fragmentation of natural habitats, is expected to obstruct such adaptive responses: (i) genetic drift will cause a decrease in the level of adaptive genetic variation, thereby limiting evolutionary responses; (ii) inbreeding and the concomitant inbreeding depression will reduce individual fitness and, consequently, the tolerance of populations to environmental stress. Importantly, inbreeding generally increases the sensitivity of a population to stress, thereby increasing the amount of inbreeding depression. As adaptation to stress is most often accompanied by increased mortality (cost of selection), the increase in the ‘cost of inbreeding’ under stress is expected to severely hamper evolutionary adaptive processes. Inbreeding thus plays a pivotal role in this process and is expected to limit the probability of genetically eroded populations to successfully adapt to stressful environmental conditions. Consequently, the dynamics of small fragmented populations may differ considerably from large nonfragmented populations. The resilience of fragmented populations to changing and deteriorating environments is expected to be greatly decreased. Alleviating inbreeding depression, therefore, is crucial to ensure population persistence. PMID:25568035

  15. Genetic Diversity of Coastal Bottlenose Dolphins Revealed by Structurally and Functionally Diverse Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Nicole; Stevens, Robert D.; Wells, Randall S.; Hohn, Aleta; Dhungana, Suraj; Taboy, Celine H.; Crumbliss, Alvin L.; Henkens, Robert; Bonaventura, Celia

    2007-01-01

    Studies of structure-function relationships in the respiratory proteins of marine mammals revealed unexpected variations in the number and types of hemoglobins (Hbs) present in coastal bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus. We obtained blood samples from free-ranging coastal bottlenose dolphins as a component of capture-release studies. We found that the oxygen-binding functions of bottlenose dolphin blood are poised between effector-saturated and unsaturated levels, enabling exercise-dependent shifts in oxygen transfer functions. Isolated bottlenose dolphin Hbs showed elevated pH sensitivities (Bohr effects) and appreciably lower oxygen affinities than adult human Hb in the absence of allosteric effectors. These properties may be an adaptive modification that enhance oxygen delivery during diving episodes when oxygen tensions and effector levels are low. The Hbs of individual dolphins showed similar oxygen affinities, responses to effectors, and expression of heme-heme interaction in oxygen binding, but differed in their redox potentials and rates of autoxidation. The heterogeneity suggested by these functional variations in Hbs of individual dolphins was born out by variations in the molecular weights and numbers of their α and β globin chains. Although coastal bottlenose dolphins were expected to have a single type of Hb, the mass differences observed revealed considerable genetic diversity. There were multiple Hb forms in some individuals and differences in Hb patterns among individuals within the same community. PMID:17604574

  16. High risks of losing genetic diversity in an endemic Mauritian gecko: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Groombridge, Jim J; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A; Gallagher, Laura E; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations.

  17. High risks of losing genetic diversity in an endemic Mauritian gecko: implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Groombridge, Jim J; Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Dawson, Deborah A; Gallagher, Laura E; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Genetic structure can be a consequence of recent population fragmentation and isolation, or a remnant of historical localised adaptation. This poses a challenge for conservationists since misinterpreting patterns of genetic structure may lead to inappropriate management. Of 17 species of reptile originally found in Mauritius, only five survive on the main island. One of these, Phelsuma guimbeaui (lowland forest day gecko), is now restricted to 30 small isolated subpopulations following severe forest fragmentation and isolation due to human colonisation. We used 20 microsatellites in ten subpopulations and two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers in 13 subpopulations to: (i) assess genetic diversity, population structure and genetic differentiation of subpopulations; (ii) estimate effective population sizes and migration rates of subpopulations; and (iii) examine the phylogenetic relationships of haplotypes found in different subpopulations. Microsatellite data revealed significant population structure with high levels of genetic diversity and isolation by distance, substantial genetic differentiation and no migration between most subpopulations. MtDNA, however, showed no evidence of population structure, indicating that there was once a genetically panmictic population. Effective population sizes of ten subpopulations, based on microsatellite markers, were small, ranging from 44 to 167. Simulations suggested that the chance of survival and allelic diversity of some subpopulations will decrease dramatically over the next 50 years if no migration occurs. Our DNA-based evidence reveals an urgent need for a management plan for the conservation of P. guimbeaui. We identified 18 threatened and 12 viable subpopulations and discuss a range of management options that include translocation of threatened subpopulations to retain maximum allelic diversity, and habitat restoration and assisted migration to decrease genetic erosion and inbreeding for the viable subpopulations. PMID

  18. Genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation between blooms of a microalgal species

    PubMed Central

    Lebret, Karen; Kritzberg, Emma S; Figueroa, Rosa; Rengefors, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The field of genetic diversity in protists, particularly phytoplankton, is under expansion. However, little is known regarding variation in genetic diversity within populations over time. The aim of our study was to investigate intrapopulation genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in the freshwater bloom-forming microalga Gonyostomum semen (Raphidophyceae). The study covered a 2-year period including all phases of the bloom. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to determine the genetic structure and diversity of the population. Our results showed a significant differentiation between samples collected during the two blooms from consecutive years. Also, an increase of gene diversity and a loss of differentiation among sampling dates were observed over time within a single bloom. The latter observations may reflect the continuous germination of cysts from the sediment. The life cycle characteristics of G. semen, particularly reproduction and recruitment, most likely explain a high proportion of the observed variation. This study highlights the importance of the life cycle for the intraspecific genetic diversity of microbial species, which alternates between sexual and asexual reproduction. PMID:22568551

  19. Genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation between blooms of a microalgal species.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Karen; Kritzberg, Emma S; Figueroa, Rosa; Rengefors, Karin

    2012-09-01

    The field of genetic diversity in protists, particularly phytoplankton, is under expansion. However, little is known regarding variation in genetic diversity within populations over time. The aim of our study was to investigate intrapopulation genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in the freshwater bloom-forming microalga Gonyostomum semen (Raphidophyceae). The study covered a 2-year period including all phases of the bloom. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to determine the genetic structure and diversity of the population. Our results showed a significant differentiation between samples collected during the two blooms from consecutive years. Also, an increase of gene diversity and a loss of differentiation among sampling dates were observed over time within a single bloom. The latter observations may reflect the continuous germination of cysts from the sediment. The life cycle characteristics of G. semen, particularly reproduction and recruitment, most likely explain a high proportion of the observed variation. This study highlights the importance of the life cycle for the intraspecific genetic diversity of microbial species, which alternates between sexual and asexual reproduction.

  20. Kinetic Adaptations of Myosins for Their Diverse Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-08-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are involved in all aspects of eukaryotic life. Their function ranges from the transport of organelles and cargos to the generation of membrane tension, and the contraction of muscle. The diversity of physiological functions is remarkable, given that all enzymatically active myosins follow a conserved mechanoenzymatic cycle in which the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate is coupled to either actin-based transport or tethering of actin to defined cellular compartments. Kinetic capacities and limitations of a myosin are determined by the extent to which actin can accelerate the hydrolysis of ATP and the release of the hydrolysis products and are indispensably linked to its physiological tasks. This review focuses on kinetic competencies that - together with structural adaptations - result in myosins with unique mechanoenzymatic properties targeted to their diverse cellular functions.

  1. Diversity of immune strategies explained by adaptation to pathogen statistics

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andreas; Mora, Thierry; Rivoire, Olivier; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological organisms have evolved a wide range of immune mechanisms to defend themselves against pathogens. Beyond molecular details, these mechanisms differ in how protection is acquired, processed, and passed on to subsequent generations—differences that may be essential to long-term survival. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework to compare the long-term adaptation of populations as a function of the pathogen dynamics that they experience and of the immune strategy that they adopt. We find that the two key determinants of an optimal immune strategy are the frequency and the characteristic timescale of the pathogens. Depending on these two parameters, our framework identifies distinct modes of immunity, including adaptive, innate, bet-hedging, and CRISPR-like immunities, which recapitulate the diversity of natural immune systems. PMID:27432970

  2. General and craniofacial development are complex adaptive processes influenced by diversity.

    PubMed

    Brook, A H; O'Donnell, M Brook; Hone, A; Hart, E; Hughes, T E; Smith, R N; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    Complex systems are present in such diverse areas as social systems, economies, ecosystems and biology and, therefore, are highly relevant to dental research, education and practice. A Complex Adaptive System in biological development is a dynamic process in which, from interacting components at a lower level, higher level phenomena and structures emerge. Diversity makes substantial contributions to the performance of complex adaptive systems. It enhances the robustness of the process, allowing multiple responses to external stimuli as well as internal changes. From diversity comes variation in outcome and the possibility of major change; outliers in the distribution enhance the tipping points. The development of the dentition is a valuable, accessible model with extensive and reliable databases for investigating the role of complex adaptive systems in craniofacial and general development. The general characteristics of such systems are seen during tooth development: self-organization; bottom-up emergence; multitasking; self-adaptation; variation; tipping points; critical phases; and robustness. Dental findings are compatible with the Random Network Model, the Threshold Model and also with the Scale Free Network Model which has a Power Law distribution. In addition, dental development shows the characteristics of Modularity and Clustering to form Hierarchical Networks. The interactions between the genes (nodes) demonstrate Small World phenomena, Subgraph Motifs and Gene Regulatory Networks. Genetic mechanisms are involved in the creation and evolution of variation during development. The genetic factors interact with epigenetic and environmental factors at the molecular level and form complex networks within the cells. From these interactions emerge the higher level tissues, tooth germs and mineralized teeth. Approaching development in this way allows investigation of why there can be variations in phenotypes from identical genotypes; the phenotype is the outcome

  3. General and craniofacial development are complex adaptive processes influenced by diversity.

    PubMed

    Brook, A H; O'Donnell, M Brook; Hone, A; Hart, E; Hughes, T E; Smith, R N; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    Complex systems are present in such diverse areas as social systems, economies, ecosystems and biology and, therefore, are highly relevant to dental research, education and practice. A Complex Adaptive System in biological development is a dynamic process in which, from interacting components at a lower level, higher level phenomena and structures emerge. Diversity makes substantial contributions to the performance of complex adaptive systems. It enhances the robustness of the process, allowing multiple responses to external stimuli as well as internal changes. From diversity comes variation in outcome and the possibility of major change; outliers in the distribution enhance the tipping points. The development of the dentition is a valuable, accessible model with extensive and reliable databases for investigating the role of complex adaptive systems in craniofacial and general development. The general characteristics of such systems are seen during tooth development: self-organization; bottom-up emergence; multitasking; self-adaptation; variation; tipping points; critical phases; and robustness. Dental findings are compatible with the Random Network Model, the Threshold Model and also with the Scale Free Network Model which has a Power Law distribution. In addition, dental development shows the characteristics of Modularity and Clustering to form Hierarchical Networks. The interactions between the genes (nodes) demonstrate Small World phenomena, Subgraph Motifs and Gene Regulatory Networks. Genetic mechanisms are involved in the creation and evolution of variation during development. The genetic factors interact with epigenetic and environmental factors at the molecular level and form complex networks within the cells. From these interactions emerge the higher level tissues, tooth germs and mineralized teeth. Approaching development in this way allows investigation of why there can be variations in phenotypes from identical genotypes; the phenotype is the outcome

  4. Partially repeatable genetic basis of benthic adaptation in threespine sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Killingbeck, Emily E; Agoglia, Rachel M; Baek, Jiyeon; Carsanaro, Sara M; Lee, Anthony M; Cleves, Phillip A; Schluter, Dolph; Miller, Craig T

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which convergent adaptation to similar ecological niches occurs by a predictable genetic basis remains a fundamental question in biology. Threespine stickleback fish have undergone an adaptive radiation in which ancestral oceanic populations repeatedly colonized and adapted to freshwater habitats. In multiple lakes in British Columbia, two different freshwater ecotypes have evolved: a deep-bodied benthic form adapted to forage near the lake substrate, and a narrow-bodied limnetic form adapted to forage in open water. Here, we use genome-wide linkage mapping in marine × benthic F2 genetic crosses to test the extent of shared genomic regions underlying benthic adaptation in three benthic populations. We identify at least 100 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) harboring genes influencing skeletal morphology. The majority of QTL (57%) are unique to one cross. However, four genomic regions affecting eight craniofacial and armor phenotypes are found in all three benthic populations. We find that QTL are clustered in the genome and overlapping QTL regions are enriched for genomic signatures of natural selection. These findings suggest that benthic adaptation has occurred via both parallel and nonparallel genetic changes. PMID:26947264

  5. The genetic architecture of climatic adaptation of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Prayaga, Kishore C; Chan, Eva K F; Johnston, David J; Hawken, Rachel J; Fordyce, Geoffry; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Goddard, Michael E; Burrow, Heather M; Henshall, John M; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Barendse, William

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity.

  6. The genetic architecture of climatic adaptation of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Reverter, Antonio; Prayaga, Kishore C; Chan, Eva K F; Johnston, David J; Hawken, Rachel J; Fordyce, Geoffry; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Goddard, Michael E; Burrow, Heather M; Henshall, John M; Lehnert, Sigrid A; Barendse, William

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity. PMID:25419663

  7. The Genetic Architecture of Climatic Adaptation of Tropical Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Porto-Neto, Laercio R.; Reverter, Antonio; Prayaga, Kishore C.; Chan, Eva K. F.; Johnston, David J.; Hawken, Rachel J.; Fordyce, Geoffry; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Goddard, Michael E.; Burrow, Heather M.; Henshall, John M.; Lehnert, Sigrid A.; Barendse, William

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of global food systems to climate change is essential to feed the world. Tropical cattle production, a mainstay of profitability for farmers in the developing world, is dominated by heat, lack of water, poor quality feedstuffs, parasites, and tropical diseases. In these systems European cattle suffer significant stock loss, and the cross breeding of taurine x indicine cattle is unpredictable due to the dilution of adaptation to heat and tropical diseases. We explored the genetic architecture of ten traits of tropical cattle production using genome wide association studies of 4,662 animals varying from 0% to 100% indicine. We show that nine of the ten have genetic architectures that include genes of major effect, and in one case, a single location that accounted for more than 71% of the genetic variation. One genetic region in particular had effects on parasite resistance, yearling weight, body condition score, coat colour and penile sheath score. This region, extending 20 Mb on BTA5, appeared to be under genetic selection possibly through maintenance of haplotypes by breeders. We found that the amount of genetic variation and the genetic correlations between traits did not depend upon the degree of indicine content in the animals. Climate change is expected to expand some conditions of the tropics to more temperate environments, which may impact negatively on global livestock health and production. Our results point to several important genes that have large effects on adaptation that could be introduced into more temperate cattle without detrimental effects on productivity. PMID:25419663

  8. Hybridisation and genetic diversity in introduced Mimulus (Phrymaceae).

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Marin, M; Lye, G C

    2013-02-01

    Hybridisation among taxa with different ploidy levels is often associated with hybrid sterility. Clonal reproduction can stabilise these hybrids, but pervasive clonality may have a profound impact on the distribution of genetic diversity in natural populations. Here we investigate a widespread triploid taxon resulting from hybridisation between diploid Mimulus guttatus and tetraploid Mimulus luteus, two species that were introduced into the United Kingdom (UK) in the nineteenth century. This hybrid, Mimulus x robertsii, is largely sterile but capable of prolific vegetative propagation and has been recorded in the wild since 1872. We surveyed 40 Mimulus populations from localities across the UK to examine the current incidence of hybrids, and selected seventeen populations for genetic analysis using codominant markers. Cluster analyses revealed two main groups of genetically distinct individuals, corresponding to either diploid (M. guttatus) or polyploid (M. luteus and M. x robertsii) samples. Triploid hybrids were found in around 50% of sampled sites, sometimes coexisting with one of the parental species (M. guttatus). The other parent, M. luteus, was restricted to a single locality. Individual populations of M. x robertsii were genetically variable, containing multiple, highly heterozygous clones, with the majority of genetic variation distributed among- rather than within populations. Our findings demonstrate that this largely sterile, clonal taxon can preserve non-negligible amounts of genetic variation. The presence of genetically variable hybrid populations may provide the material for the continued success of asexual taxa in diverse environments.

  9. Hybridisation and genetic diversity in introduced Mimulus (Phrymaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Marin, M; Lye, G C

    2013-01-01

    Hybridisation among taxa with different ploidy levels is often associated with hybrid sterility. Clonal reproduction can stabilise these hybrids, but pervasive clonality may have a profound impact on the distribution of genetic diversity in natural populations. Here we investigate a widespread triploid taxon resulting from hybridisation between diploid Mimulus guttatus and tetraploid Mimulus luteus, two species that were introduced into the United Kingdom (UK) in the nineteenth century. This hybrid, Mimulus x robertsii, is largely sterile but capable of prolific vegetative propagation and has been recorded in the wild since 1872. We surveyed 40 Mimulus populations from localities across the UK to examine the current incidence of hybrids, and selected seventeen populations for genetic analysis using codominant markers. Cluster analyses revealed two main groups of genetically distinct individuals, corresponding to either diploid (M. guttatus) or polyploid (M. luteus and M. x robertsii) samples. Triploid hybrids were found in around 50% of sampled sites, sometimes coexisting with one of the parental species (M. guttatus). The other parent, M. luteus, was restricted to a single locality. Individual populations of M. x robertsii were genetically variable, containing multiple, highly heterozygous clones, with the majority of genetic variation distributed among- rather than within populations. Our findings demonstrate that this largely sterile, clonal taxon can preserve non-negligible amounts of genetic variation. The presence of genetically variable hybrid populations may provide the material for the continued success of asexual taxa in diverse environments. PMID:23169562

  10. Pneumocystis carinii: genetic diversity and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Smulian, A G

    2001-12-01

    As an important opportunistic pulmonary pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii has been the focus of extensive research over the decades. The use of laboratory animal models has permitted a detailed understanding of the host-parasite interaction but an understanding of the basic biology of P. carinii has lagged due in large part to the inability of the organism to grow well in culture and to the lack of a tractable genetic system. Molecular techniques have demonstrated extensive heterogeneity among P. carinii organisms isolated from different host species. Characterization of the genes and genomes of the Pneumocystis family has supported the notion that the family comprises different species rather than strains within the genus Pneumocystis and contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology of infection. Many of the technical obstacles in the study of the organisms have been overcome in the past decade and the pace of research into the basic biology of the organism has accelerated. Biochemical pathways have been inferred from the presence of key enzyme activities or gene sequences, and attempts to dissect cellular pathways have been initiated. The Pneumocystis genome project promises to be a rich source of information with regard to the functional activity of the organism and the presence of specific biochemical pathways. These advances in our understanding of the biology of this organism should provide for future studies leading to the control of this opportunistic pathogen.

  11. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    PubMed

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation. PMID:25344263

  12. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    PubMed

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation.

  13. Strength in Diversity: Hidden Genetic Depths of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Samantha L

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation whole genome sequencing data is currently being utilised to explore Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity. Studies have focused in particular on the evolution of drug resistance, and have revealed a surprising degree of dynamic population heterogeneity, with implications for transmission studies, treatment regimens and new drug target development.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  15. Parasites and genetic diversity in an invasive bumblebee

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Catherine M; Brown, Mark J F; Ings, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Biological invasions are facilitated by the global transportation of species and climate change. Given that invasions may cause ecological and economic damage and pose a major threat to biodiversity, understanding the mechanisms behind invasion success is essential. Both the release of non-native populations from natural enemies, such as parasites, and the genetic diversity of these populations may play key roles in their invasion success. We investigated the roles of parasite communities, through enemy release and parasite acquisition, and genetic diversity in the invasion success of the non-native bumblebee, Bombus hypnorum, in the United Kingdom. The invasive B. hypnorum had higher parasite prevalence than most, or all native congeners for two high-impact parasites, probably due to higher susceptibility and parasite acquisition. Consequently parasites had a higher impact on B. hypnorum queens’ survival and colony-founding success than on native species. Bombus hypnorum also had lower functional genetic diversity at the sex-determining locus than native species. Higher parasite prevalence and lower genetic diversity have not prevented the rapid invasion of the United Kingdom by B. hypnorum. These data may inform our understanding of similar invasions by commercial bumblebees around the world. This study suggests that concerns about parasite impacts on the small founding populations common to re-introduction and translocation programs may be less important than currently believed. PMID:24749545

  16. Bovine Genetic Diversity Revealed By mtDNA Sequence Variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data were used to determine genetic distance, nucleotide diversity, construction of haplotypes, estimation of information contents, and phylogenic relationships in bovine HapMap breeds. The Bovine International HapMap panel consists of 720 anima...

  17. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Pseudophoenix (Arecaceae) in Hispaniola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Pseudophoenix ekmanii Burret, P. lediniana Read, and P. vinifera (Mart.) Becc. (Arecaceae) are endemic to Hispaniola. The more wide-ranging P. sargentii H.Wendl. ex Sarg. occurs on this island as well. The population genetic diversity and structure of Pseudophoenix was investigate...

  18. Assessing genetic diversity in Valencia peanut germplasm using SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Valencia peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.ssp. fastigiata var. fastigiata) are well known for their in-shell market value. Assessment of genetic diversity of the available Valencia germplasm is key to the success of developing improved cultivars with desirable agronomic and quality traits. In the pres...

  19. Estimation of genetic diversity using SSR markers in sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower is a major oilseed crop in central Asia, but little is known of the molecular diversity among collections of sunflower from Pakistan region. This paper described inherent genetic relationships among sunflower collections using Simple Sequence Repeat molecular markers. Results should help...

  20. Origin and genetic diversity of Chinese domestic ducks.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Fang; Zhu, Wen-Qi; Song, Wei-Tao; Shu, Jing-Ting; Han, Wei; Chen, Kuan-Wei

    2010-11-01

    China is particularly rich in duck genetic resources. In order to reveal the genetic diversity and origin of Chinese domestic duck, the 667 bp control region of mitochondrial DNA of 238 domestic ducks from 26 indigenous breeds, 25 wild mallards and nine spot-billed ducks were sequenced and analyzed them together with the published data for 12 mallards and nine spot-billed ducks. The haplotype diversity (Hd, 0.645) and average nucleotide diversity (Pi, 0.115%) indicate low genetic diversity of Chinese domestic ducks. The NJ phylogenetic tree and reduced median-joining network chart were constructed using a total of 72 haplotypes. The genetic contribution of mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) can be detected in most of Chinese indigenous duck breeds and that of spot-billed duck (Anas zonorhyncha) can also be detected in few Chinese indigenous duck breeds. The results indicated that the Chinese domestic ducks mainly derived from mallard (A. platyrhynchos) and few derived from spot-billed duck (A. zonorhyncha).

  1. Aedes aegypti in Senegal: genetic diversity and genetic structure of domestic and sylvatic populations.

    PubMed

    Huber, Karine; Ba, Yamar; Dia, Ibrahima; Mathiot, Christian; Sall, Amadou A; Diallo, Mawlouth

    2008-08-01

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector of dengue viruses. The epidemiology of dengue fever remains poorly understood in Senegal. A sylvatic transmission seems to predominate. However, despite the sylvatic circulation of the dengue virus and the presence of vectors in urban areas, only sporadic cases have been reported. Ae. aegypti is a polytypic species. In Senegal, a purely sylvatic form is found in the forest gallery areas and a domestic form is found in the villages in savannah and sahelian areas and in urban areas. Using allozymes, we analyzed the genetic diversity and the genetic structure of Ae. aegypti populations differing in their ecological characteristics. Populations from Senegal were significantly structured but with a low level of genetic differentiation. Ae. aegypti from the "domestic" populations show a decreased genetic diversity and a lower genetic differentiation compared with "sylvatic" populations. These findings suggest that environmental conditions, ecological factors, and human activities may impact the genetic structure of Ae. aegypti populations in Senegal.

  2. Microsatellite polymorphism in the sexually transmitted human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis indicates a genetically diverse parasite.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Melissa; Zubacova, Zuzana; Dunn, Linda A; Upcroft, Jacqui; Sullivan, Steven A; Tachezy, Jan; Carlton, Jane M

    2011-01-01

    Given the growing appreciation of serious health sequelae from widespread Trichomonas vaginalis infection, new tools are needed to study the parasite's genetic diversity. To this end we have identified and characterized a panel of 21 microsatellites and six single-copy genes from the T. vaginalis genome, using seven laboratory strains of diverse origin. We have (1) adapted our microsatellite typing method to incorporate affordable fluorescent labeling, (2) determined that the microsatellite loci remain stable in parasites continuously cultured for up to 17 months, and (3) evaluated microsatellite marker coverage of the six chromosomes that comprise the T. vaginalis genome, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We have used the markers to show that T. vaginalis is a genetically diverse parasite in a population of commonly used laboratory strains. In addition, we have used phylogenetic methods to infer evolutionary relationships from our markers in order to validate their utility in future population analyses. Our panel is the first series of robust polymorphic genetic markers for T. vaginalis that can be used to classify and monitor lab strains, as well as provide a means to measure the genetic diversity and population structure of extant and future T. vaginalis isolates. PMID:20813140

  3. Microsatellite polymorphism in the sexually transmitted human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis indicates a genetically diverse parasite.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Melissa; Zubacova, Zuzana; Dunn, Linda A; Upcroft, Jacqui; Sullivan, Steven A; Tachezy, Jan; Carlton, Jane M

    2011-01-01

    Given the growing appreciation of serious health sequelae from widespread Trichomonas vaginalis infection, new tools are needed to study the parasite's genetic diversity. To this end we have identified and characterized a panel of 21 microsatellites and six single-copy genes from the T. vaginalis genome, using seven laboratory strains of diverse origin. We have (1) adapted our microsatellite typing method to incorporate affordable fluorescent labeling, (2) determined that the microsatellite loci remain stable in parasites continuously cultured for up to 17 months, and (3) evaluated microsatellite marker coverage of the six chromosomes that comprise the T. vaginalis genome, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We have used the markers to show that T. vaginalis is a genetically diverse parasite in a population of commonly used laboratory strains. In addition, we have used phylogenetic methods to infer evolutionary relationships from our markers in order to validate their utility in future population analyses. Our panel is the first series of robust polymorphic genetic markers for T. vaginalis that can be used to classify and monitor lab strains, as well as provide a means to measure the genetic diversity and population structure of extant and future T. vaginalis isolates.

  4. Inferring recent historic abundance from current genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Palsbøll, Per J; Zachariah Peery, M; Olsen, Morten T; Beissinger, Steven R; Bérubé, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Recent historic abundance is an elusive parameter of great importance for conserving endangered species and understanding the pre-anthropogenic state of the biosphere. The number of studies that have used population genetic theory to estimate recent historic abundance from contemporary levels of genetic diversity has grown rapidly over the last two decades. Such assessments often yield unexpectedly large estimates of historic abundance. We review the underlying theory and common practices of estimating recent historic abundance from contemporary genetic diversity, and critically evaluate the potential issues at various estimation steps. A general issue of mismatched spatio-temporal scales between the estimation itself and the objective of the estimation emerged from our assessment; genetic diversity-based estimates of recent historic abundance represent long-term averages, whereas the objective typically is an estimate of recent abundance for a specific population. Currently, the most promising approach to estimate the difference between recent historic and contemporary abundance requires that genetic data be collected from samples of similar spatial and temporal duration. Novel genome-enabled inference methods may be able to utilize additional information of dense genome-wide distributions of markers, such as of identity-by-descent tracts, to infer recent historic abundance from contemporary samples only. PMID:23181682

  5. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G”ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  6. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on the dynamics and spatial genetic structure of populations as they may enable long-distance seed dispersal and thus maintain gene flow between fragmented populations. In this study, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of 28 populations of Saxifraga granulata along two rivers in central Belgium. We hypothesized that rivers might be essential for gene flow among increasingly isolated populations of this species. Genetic diversity was high (HS = 0.68), which to a certain extent can be explained by the octoploid nature of S. granulata in the study area. Populations along the Dijle and Demer rivers were also highly differentiated (G"ST = 0.269 and 0.164 and DEST = 0.190 and 0.124, respectively) and showed significant isolation-by-distance, indicating moderate levels of gene flow primarily between populations that are geographically close to each other. Along the river Demer population genetic diversity was higher upstream than downstream, suggesting that seed dispersal via the water was not the primary mode of dispersal. Overall, these results indicate that despite increasing fragmentation populations along both rivers were highly genetically diverse. The high ploidy level and longevity of S. granulata have most likely buffered negative effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure of populations in riparian grasslands. PMID:26079603

  7. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation. PMID:20383613

  8. [Screening of peafowl microsatellite primers and analysis of genetic diversity].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Shu, Jing-Ting; Xu, Qi; Li, Hui-Fang

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of chicken microsatellite primers to peafowl population was analyzed in the present paper, and the results showed 14 of 29 pairs of microsatellite primers from chicken could amplify peafowl DNA and produce specific allele patterns. A mean of 1.71 alleles was found for each locus. Seven pairs were highly polymorphic, and MCW0080 and MCW0098 were ideal markers for peafowl. Genetic diversity analysis within and between the green peafowl and the blue peafowl populations demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity of two peafowl populations were 0.2482 and 0.2744, respectively. The inbreeding index (FST), Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.078, 0.0603 and 3.896 respectively. These results indicate that the heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of these two peafowl populations were very low, and suggest a tendency towards intermixing.

  9. Synthetic biology: advancing the design of diverse genetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Hsiang; Wei, Kathy Y.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    A main objective of synthetic biology is to make the process of designing genetically-encoded biological systems more systematic, predictable, robust, scalable, and efficient. The examples of genetic systems in the field vary widely in terms of operating hosts, compositional approaches, and network complexity, ranging from a simple genetic switch to search-and-destroy systems. While significant advances in synthesis capabilities support the potential for the implementation of pathway- and genome-scale programs, several design challenges currently restrict the scale of systems that can be reasonably designed and implemented. Synthetic biology offers much promise in developing systems to address challenges faced in manufacturing, the environment and sustainability, and health and medicine, but the realization of this potential is currently limited by the diversity of available parts and effective design frameworks. As researchers make progress in bridging this design gap, advances in the field hint at ever more diverse applications for biological systems. PMID:23413816

  10. [Screening of peafowl microsatellite primers and analysis of genetic diversity].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Shu, Jing-Ting; Xu, Qi; Li, Hui-Fang

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of chicken microsatellite primers to peafowl population was analyzed in the present paper, and the results showed 14 of 29 pairs of microsatellite primers from chicken could amplify peafowl DNA and produce specific allele patterns. A mean of 1.71 alleles was found for each locus. Seven pairs were highly polymorphic, and MCW0080 and MCW0098 were ideal markers for peafowl. Genetic diversity analysis within and between the green peafowl and the blue peafowl populations demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity of two peafowl populations were 0.2482 and 0.2744, respectively. The inbreeding index (FST), Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.078, 0.0603 and 3.896 respectively. These results indicate that the heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of these two peafowl populations were very low, and suggest a tendency towards intermixing. PMID:17035182

  11. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  12. Combining molecular evolution and environmental genomics to unravel adaptive processes of MHC class IIB diversity in European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus)

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Helene; Burri, Reto; Comtesse, Fabien; Fumagalli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Host–pathogen interactions are a major evolutionary force promoting local adaptation. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) represent unique candidates to investigate evolutionary processes driving local adaptation to parasite communities. The present study aimed at identifying the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus). To this end, we isolated and genotyped exon 2 of two MHCIIB gene duplicates (DAB1 and DAB3) and 1′665 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in nine populations, and characterized local bacterial communities by 16S rDNA barcoding using 454 amplicon sequencing. Both MHCIIB loci exhibited signs of historical balancing selection. Whereas genetic differentiation exceeded that of neutral markers at both loci, the populations' genetic diversities were positively correlated with local pathogen diversities only at DAB3. Overall, our results suggest pathogen-mediated local adaptation in European minnows at both MHCIIB loci. While at DAB1 selection appears to favor different alleles among populations, this is only partially the case in DAB3, which appears to be locally adapted to pathogen communities in terms of genetic diversity. These results provide new insights into the importance of host–pathogen interactions in driving local adaptation in the European minnow, and highlight that the importance of adaptive processes driving MHCIIB gene evolution may differ among duplicates within species, presumably as a consequence of alternative selective regimes or different genomic context. Using next-generation sequencing, the present manuscript identifies the relative roles of neutral and adaptive processes driving the evolution of MHC class IIB (MHCIIB) genes in natural populations of a cyprinid fish: the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus). We highlight that the relative importance of neutral

  13. Genetic diversity and floral width variation in introduced and native populations of a long-lived woody perennial

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Jane C.; Duffy, Karl J.; Egan, Paul A.; Harbourne, Maeve; Hodkinson, Trevor R.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of introduced species in their new environments are expected to differ from native populations, due to processes such as genetic drift, founder effects and local adaptation, which can often result in rapid phenotypic change. Such processes can also lead to changes in the genetic structure of these populations. This study investigated the populations of Rhododendron ponticum in its introduced range in Ireland, where it is severely invasive, to determine both genetic and flower width diversity and differentiation. We compared six introduced Irish populations with two populations from R. ponticum's native range in Spain, using amplified fragment length polymorphism and simple sequence repeat genetic markers. We measured flower width, a trait that may affect pollinator visitation, from four Irish and four Spanish populations by measuring both the width at the corolla tip and tube base (nectar holder width). With both genetic markers, populations were differentiated between Ireland and Spain and from each other in both countries. However, populations displayed low genetic diversity (mean Nei's genetic diversity = 0.22), with the largest proportion (76–93 %) of genetic variation contained within, rather than between, populations. Although corolla width was highly variable between individuals within populations, tube width was significantly wider (>0.5 mm) in introduced, compared with native, populations. Our results show that the same species can have genetically distinct populations in both invasive and native regions, and that differences in floral width may occur, possibly in response to ecological sorting processes or local adaptation to pollinator communities. PMID:25527475

  14. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  15. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-02-10

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community.

  16. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  17. Transferability of Cucurbita SSR markers for genetic diversity assessment of Turkish bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity present in crop landraces represents a valuable genetic resource for breeding and genetic studies. Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) landraces in Turkey are highly genetically diverse. However, the limited genomic resources available for this crop hinder the molecular characte...

  18. Environmental pollution affects genetic diversity in wild bird populations.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Belskii, Eugen; Kuranov, Boris

    2006-09-19

    Many common environmental pollutants, together with nuclear radiation, are recognized as genotoxic. There is, however, very little information on pollution-related genetic effects on free-living animal populations, especially in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated whether genetic diversity in two small insectivorous passerines, the great tit (Parus major) and the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca), was changed near point sources of heavy metals (two copper smelters) or radioactive isotopes (nuclear material reprocessing plant). We measured concentration of heavy metals and nucleotide diversity in mitochondrial DNA in feather samples taken from nestlings in multiple polluted areas and at control sites. In both species, heavy metal concentrations - especially of arsenic - were increased in feathers collected at smelter sites. The P. major population living near a smelter showed significantly higher nucleotide diversity than a control population in an unpolluted site, suggesting increased mutation rates in a polluted environment. On the contrary, F. hypoleuca showed reduced nucleotide diversity at both smelter sites but increased nucleotide diversity near the source of radioactivity. Our results show that heavy metal pollution and low level nuclear radiation affect the nucleotide diversity in two free-living insectivorous passerines. We suggest that the different response in these two species may be due to their different ability to handle toxic compounds in the body. PMID:16807076

  19. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Maria A; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Safonova, Yana Y; Naumenko, Sergey A; Klepikova, Anna V; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Bazykin, Georgii A; James, Timothy Y; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2015-10-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity π, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10(-8) (95% CI: 1.1 × 10(-8) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. PMID:26163667

  20. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Maria A; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Safonova, Yana Y; Naumenko, Sergey A; Klepikova, Anna V; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Bazykin, Georgii A; James, Timothy Y; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2015-10-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity π, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10(-8) (95% CI: 1.1 × 10(-8) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics.

  1. Genetic diversity and structure of an estuarine fish (Fundulus heteroclitus) indigenous to sites associated with a highly contaminated urban harbor.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Amy M; Bagley, Mark J; Jackson, Suzanne A; Nacci, Diane E

    2006-08-01

    Intense selection on isolated populations can cause loss of genetic diversity, which if persistent, reduces adaptive potential and increases extinction probability. Phenotypic evidence of inherited tolerance suggests that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), have acted as strong selective agents on populations of a non-migratory fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, indigenous to heavily contaminated sites. To evaluate population genetic structure and test for effects of intense, multi-generational PCB contamination on genetic diversity, we used AFLP analysis on fish collected from six sites along the east coast of North America that varied widely in PCB contamination. The sites included a heavily contaminated urban harbor (New Bedford, MA), an adjacent moderately contaminated sub-estuary (Buzzards Bay, MA), and an uncontaminated estuary 60 km away (Narragansett, RI). AFLP markers distinguished populations at moderate and small scales, suggesting genetic differentiation at distances of 2 km or less. Genetic diversity did not differ across the study sites. Genome-wide diversity may have been preserved because of large effective population sizes and/or because the mechanism for genetic adaptation to these contaminants affected only a small number of loci. Alternatively, loss in diversity may have been restored with moderate levels of migration and relatively short generation time for this species.

  2. Comparative population genetic structures and local adaptation of two mutualists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bruce; Olivieri, Isabelle; Lourmas, Mathieu; Stewart, Barbara A

    2004-08-01

    Similar patterns of dispersal and gene flow between closely associated organisms may promote local adaptation and coevolutionary processes. We compare the genetic structures of the two species of a plant genus (Roridula gorgonias and R. dentata) and their respective obligately associated hemipteran mutualists (Pameridea roridulae and P. marlothi) using allozymes. In addition, we determine whether genetic structure is related to differences in host choice by Pameridea. Allozyme variation was found to be very structured among plant populations but less so among hemipteran populations. Strong genetic structuring among hemipteran populations was only evident when large distances isolated the plant populations on which they live. Although genetic distances among plant populations were correlated with genetic distances among hemipteran populations, genetic distances of both plants and hemipterans were better correlated with geographic distance. Because Roridula and Pameridea have different scales of gene flow, adaptation at the local population level is unlikely. However, the restricted gene flow of both plants and hemipterans could enable adaptation to occur at a regional level. In choice experiments, the hemipteran (Pameridea) has a strong preference for its carnivorous host plant (Roridula) above unrelated host plants. Pameridea also prefers its host species to its closely related sister species. Specialization at the specific level is likely to reinforce cospeciation processes in this mutualism. However, Pameridea does not exhibit intraspecific preferences toward plants from their natal populations above plants from isolated, non-natal populations. PMID:15446426

  3. Comparative population genetic structures and local adaptation of two mutualists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bruce; Olivieri, Isabelle; Lourmas, Mathieu; Stewart, Barbara A

    2004-08-01

    Similar patterns of dispersal and gene flow between closely associated organisms may promote local adaptation and coevolutionary processes. We compare the genetic structures of the two species of a plant genus (Roridula gorgonias and R. dentata) and their respective obligately associated hemipteran mutualists (Pameridea roridulae and P. marlothi) using allozymes. In addition, we determine whether genetic structure is related to differences in host choice by Pameridea. Allozyme variation was found to be very structured among plant populations but less so among hemipteran populations. Strong genetic structuring among hemipteran populations was only evident when large distances isolated the plant populations on which they live. Although genetic distances among plant populations were correlated with genetic distances among hemipteran populations, genetic distances of both plants and hemipterans were better correlated with geographic distance. Because Roridula and Pameridea have different scales of gene flow, adaptation at the local population level is unlikely. However, the restricted gene flow of both plants and hemipterans could enable adaptation to occur at a regional level. In choice experiments, the hemipteran (Pameridea) has a strong preference for its carnivorous host plant (Roridula) above unrelated host plants. Pameridea also prefers its host species to its closely related sister species. Specialization at the specific level is likely to reinforce cospeciation processes in this mutualism. However, Pameridea does not exhibit intraspecific preferences toward plants from their natal populations above plants from isolated, non-natal populations.

  4. Genetic diversity and structuring across the range of a widely distributed ladybird: focus on rear-edge populations phenotypically divergent.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Émilie; Bouanani, Mohand-Ameziane; Magro, Alexandra; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte

    2016-08-01

    Population genetics and phenotypic structures are often predicted to vary along the geographic range of a species. This phenomenon would be accentuated for species with large range areas, with discontinuities and marginal populations. We herein compare the genetic patterns of central populations of Coccinella septempunctata L. with those of two phenotypically differentiated populations considered as rear-edge populations and subspecies based on phenotype (Algeria and Japan). According to the central-marginal model and expected characteristics of rear-edge populations, we hypothesize that these rear-edge populations have (1) a reduced genetic diversity, resulting from their relative isolation over long periods of time, (2) a higher population genetic differentiation, explained by low contemporary gene flow levels, and (3) a relationship between genetic diversity characteristics and phenotypes, due to historical isolation and/or local adaptation. Based on genotyping of 28 populations for 18 microsatellite markers, several levels of regional genetic diversity and differentiation are observed between and within populations, according to their localization: low within-population genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation of rear-edge populations. The genetic structuring clearly dissociates the Algerian and Eastern Asia populations from the others. Geographical patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation support the hypothesis of the central-marginal model. The pattern observed is in agreement with the phenotypic structure across species range. A clear genetic break between populations of Algeria, the Eastern Asia, and the remaining populations is a dominant feature of the data. Differential local adaptations, absence of gene flow between marginal and central populations, and/or incapacity to mate after colonization, have contributed to their distinct genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. PMID:27551401

  5. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins.

  6. Genetic diversity in three invasive clonal aquatic species in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elodea canadensis, Egeria densa and Lagarosiphon major are dioecious clonal species which are invasive in New Zealand and other regions. Unlike many other invasive species, the genetic variation in New Zealand is very limited. Clonal reproduction is often considered an evolutionary dead end, even though a certain amount of genetic divergence may arise due to somatic mutations. The successful growth and establishment of invasive clonal species may be explained not by adaptability but by pre-existing ecological traits that prove advantageous in the new environment. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure in the North Island of New Zealand using AFLPs and related the findings to the number of introductions and the evolution that has occurred in the introduced area. Results Low levels of genetic diversity were found in all three species and appeared to be due to highly homogeneous founding gene pools. Elodea canadensis was introduced in 1868, and its populations showed more genetic structure than those of the more recently introduced of E. densa (1946) and L. major (1950). Elodea canadensis and L. major, however, had similar phylogeographic patterns, in spite of the difference in time since introduction. Conclusions The presence of a certain level of geographically correlated genetic structure in the absence of sexual reproduction, and in spite of random human dispersal of vegetative propagules, can be reasonably attributed to post-dispersal somatic mutations. Direct evidence of such evolutionary events is, however, still insufficient. PMID:20565861

  7. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H. Tageldin, Mohammed.; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H.; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Background Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Methods Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. Results We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST

  8. Determinants of Genetic Diversity of Spontaneous Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Any pathogen population sufficiently large is expected to harbor spontaneous drug-resistant mutants, often responsible for disease relapse after antibiotic therapy. It is seldom appreciated, however, that while larger populations harbor more mutants, the abundance distribution of these mutants is expected to be markedly uneven. This is because a larger population size allows early mutants to expand for longer, exacerbating their predominance in the final mutant subpopulation. Here, we investigate the extent to which this reduction in evenness can constrain the genetic diversity of spontaneous drug resistance in bacteria. Combining theory and experiments, we show that even small variations in growth rate between resistant mutants and the wild type result in orders-of-magnitude differences in genetic diversity. Indeed, only a slight fitness advantage for the mutant is enough to keep diversity low and independent of population size. These results have important clinical implications. Genetic diversity at antibiotic resistance loci can determine a population's capacity to cope with future challenges (i.e., second-line therapy). We thus revealed an unanticipated way in which the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance can affect the evolvability of pathogens surviving a drug-induced bottleneck. This insight will assist in the fight against multidrug-resistant microbes, as well as contribute to theories aimed at predicting cancer evolution.

  9. Microbialite genetic diversity and composition relate to environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Carla M; Legendre, Pierre; Beltrán, Yislem; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío J; Lidström, Ulrika E; Ashby, Matthew N; Falcón, Luisa I

    2012-12-01

    Microbialites have played an important role in the early history of life on Earth. Their fossilized forms represent the oldest evidence of life on our planet dating back to 3500 Ma. Extant microbialites have been suggested to be highly productive and diverse communities with an evident role in the cycling of major elements, and in contributing to carbonate precipitation. Although their ecological and evolutionary importance has been recognized, the study of their genetic diversity is yet scanty. The main goal of this study was to analyse microbial genetic diversity of microbialites living in different types of environments throughout Mexico, including desert ponds, coastal lagoons and a crater-lake. We followed a pyrosequencing approach of hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Results showed that microbialite communities were very diverse (H' = 6-7) and showed geographic variation in composition, as well as an environmental effect related to pH and conductivity, which together explained 33% of the genetic variation. All microbialites had similar proportions of major bacterial and archaeal phyla. PMID:22775797

  10. Population genetic diversity and hybrid detection in captive zebras

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Zebras are members of the horse family. There are three species of zebras: the plains zebra Equus quagga, the Grevy’s zebra E. grevyi and the mountain zebra E. zebra. The Grevy’s zebra and the mountain zebra are endangered, and hybridization between the Grevy’s zebra and the plains zebra has been documented, leading to a requirement for conservation genetic management within and between the species. We characterized 28 microsatellite markers in Grevy’s zebra and assessed cross-amplification in plains zebra and two of its subspecies, as well as mountain zebra. A range of standard indices were employed to examine population genetic diversity and hybrid populations between Grevy’s and plains zebra were simulated to investigate subspecies and hybrid detection. Microsatellite marker polymorphism was conserved across species with sufficient variation to enable individual identification in all populations. Comparative diversity estimates indicated greater genetic variation in plains zebra and its subspecies than Grevy’s zebra, despite potential ascertainment bias. Species and subspecies differentiation were clearly demonstrated and F1 and F2 hybrids were correctly identified. These findings provide insights into captive population genetic diversity in zebras and support the use of these markers for identifying hybrids, including the known hybrid issue in the endangered Grevy’s zebra. PMID:26294133

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth. PMID:21684917

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae).

    PubMed

    Massey, L; Hamrick, J

    1998-03-01

    Using 19 allozyme loci we studied genetic diversity in 18 populations of Yucca filamentosa (Agavaceae) from the southeastern United States. Of the 19 loci surveyed, 17 (89.5%) were polymorphic in at least one of the populations sampled. There was considerable variation among populations in the percentage of polymorphic loci (range = 31.6-84.2%, mean = 67.6%). Similar heterogeneity among populations was observed for mean number of alleles per polymorphic locus (range = 2.0-3.0; mean = 2.48) and mean expected heterozygosity (range = 0.113-0.288; mean = 0.213). On average, 83% of the total genetic diversity was found within populations. Duplications of three allozyme loci were detected in several populations. The life-history characteristics of Y. filamentosa (a long-lived, semiwoody, predominantly outcrossing monocot with a large geographical range) may contribute to the maintenance of such high levels of genetic diversity. These results contradict expectations of the genetic structure of Y. filamentosa based on observations of the dispersal and pollination behavior of its sole pollinator, Tegeticula yuccasella, the yucca moth.

  13. Population genetic diversity and hybrid detection in captive zebras.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-08-21

    Zebras are members of the horse family. There are three species of zebras: the plains zebra Equus quagga, the Grevy's zebra E. grevyi and the mountain zebra E. zebra. The Grevy's zebra and the mountain zebra are endangered, and hybridization between the Grevy's zebra and the plains zebra has been documented, leading to a requirement for conservation genetic management within and between the species. We characterized 28 microsatellite markers in Grevy's zebra and assessed cross-amplification in plains zebra and two of its subspecies, as well as mountain zebra. A range of standard indices were employed to examine population genetic diversity and hybrid populations between Grevy's and plains zebra were simulated to investigate subspecies and hybrid detection. Microsatellite marker polymorphism was conserved across species with sufficient variation to enable individual identification in all populations. Comparative diversity estimates indicated greater genetic variation in plains zebra and its subspecies than Grevy's zebra, despite potential ascertainment bias. Species and subspecies differentiation were clearly demonstrated and F1 and F2 hybrids were correctly identified. These findings provide insights into captive population genetic diversity in zebras and support the use of these markers for identifying hybrids, including the known hybrid issue in the endangered Grevy's zebra.

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of Tibetan wild barley using SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zong-Yun; Liu, Xian-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2006-10-01

    One hundred and six accessions of wild barley collected from Tibet, China, including 50 entries of the two-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum (HS), 29 entries of the six-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. agriocrithon (HA), and 27 entries of the six-rowed wild barley Hordeum vulgare ssp. agriocrithon var. lagunculiforme (HL), were analyzed using 30 SSR markers selected from the seven barley linkage groups for studying genetic diversity and evolutionary relationship of the three subspecies of Tibetan wild barley to cultivated barley in China. Over the 30 genetic loci that were studied, 229 alleles were identified among the 106 accessions, of which 70 were common alleles. H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum possesses about thrice more private alleles (2.83 alleles/locus) than HS (0.93 alleles/locus), whereas almost no private alleles were detected in HL. The genetic diversity among-subspecies is much higher than that within-subspecies. Generally, the genetic diversity among the three subspecies is of the order HS > HL > HA. Phylogenetic analysis of the 106 accessions showed that all the accessions of HS and HA was clustered in their own groups, whereas the 27 accessions of HL were separated into two groups (14 entries with group HS and the rest with group HA). This indicated that HL was an intermediate form between HS and HA. Based on this study and previous works, we suggested that Chinese cultivated barley might evolve from HS via HL to HA. PMID:17046592

  15. Genetic diversity and population genetics of large lungworms (Dictyocaulus, Nematoda) in wild deer in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Ács, Zoltán; Hayward, Alexander; Sugár, László

    2016-09-01

    Dictyocaulus nematode worms live as parasites in the lower airways of ungulates and can cause significant disease in both wild and farmed hosts. This study represents the first population genetic analysis of large lungworms in wildlife. Specifically, we quantify genetic variation in Dictyocaulus lungworms from wild deer (red deer, fallow deer and roe deer) in Hungary, based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) sequence data, using population genetic and phylogenetic analyses. The studied Dictyocaulus taxa display considerable genetic diversity. At least one cryptic species and a new parasite-host relationship are revealed by our molecular study. Population genetic analyses for Dictyocaulus eckerti revealed high gene flow amongst weakly structured spatial populations that utilise the three host deer species considered here. Our results suggest that D. eckerti is a widespread generalist parasite in ungulates, with a diverse genetic backround and high evolutionary potential. In contrast, evidence of cryptic genetic structure at regional geographic scales was observed for Dictyocaulus capreolus, which infects just one host species, suggesting it is a specialist within the studied area. D. capreolus displayed lower genetic diversity overall, with only moderate gene flow compared to the closely related D. eckerti. We suggest that the differing vagility and dispersal behaviour of hosts are important contributing factors to the population structure of lungworms, and possibly other nematode parasites with single-host life cycles. Our findings are of relevance for the management of lungworms in deer farms and wild deer populations. PMID:27150969

  16. Genetic diversity in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] at the University of Florida: past present and future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The University of Florida (UF) stone fruit breeding and genetics program was created in 1952 to develop early ripening stone fruit cultivars with high quality, adaptation to summer rainfall, low chilling requirements, and the ability to withstand high disease pressure. Diverse germplasm sources were...

  17. Lessons in Fundamental Mechanisms and Diverse Adaptations from the 2015 Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Prüβ, Birgit M.; Liu, Jun; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2015-01-01

    In response to rapid changes in their environment, bacteria control a number of processes, including motility, cell division, biofilm formation, and virulence. Research presented in January 2015 at the biennial Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST) meeting in Tucson, AZ, illustrates the elegant complexity of the nanoarrays, nanomachines, and networks of interacting proteins that mediate such processes. Studies employing an array of biophysical, genetic, cell biology, and mathematical methods are providing an increasingly detailed understanding of the mechanisms of these systems within well-studied bacteria. Furthermore, comparisons of these processes in diverse bacterial species are providing insight into novel regulatory and functional mechanisms. This review summarizes research presented at the BLAST meeting on these fundamental mechanisms and diverse adaptations, including findings of importance for applications involving bacteria of medical or agricultural relevance. PMID:26195592

  18. Microsatellite based genetic diversity and relationships among ten Creole and commercial cattle breeds raised in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Egito, Andréa A; Paiva, Samuel R; Albuquerque, Maria do Socorro M; Mariante, Arthur S; Almeida, Leonardo D; Castro, Silvia R; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2007-01-01

    Background Brazil holds the largest commercial cattle populations worldwide. Local cattle breeds can be classified according to their origin, as exotic or Creole. Exotic breeds imported in the last 100 years, both zebuine and taurine, currently make up the bulk of the intensively managed populations. Locally adapted Creole breeds, originated from cattle introduced by the European conquerors derive from natural selection and events of breed admixture. While historical knowledge exists on the Brazilian Creole breeds very little is known on their genetic composition. The objective of this study was to assess the levels of genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships and patterns of taurine/zebuine admixture among ten cattle breeds raised in Brazil. Results Significant reduction of heterozygosity exists due both to within-population inbreeding and to breed differentiation in both subspecies (taurine and zebuine). For taurine breeds the number of markers that contribute to breed differentiation is larger than for zebuine. A consistently similar number of alleles was seen in both subspecies for all microsatellites. Four Creole breeds were the most genetically diverse followed by the zebuine breeds, the two specialized taurine breeds and the Creole Caracu. Pairwise genetic differentiation were all significant indicating that all breeds can be considered as genetically independent entities. A STRUCTURE based diagram indicated introgression of indicine genes in the local Creole breeds and suggested that occasional Creole introgression can be detected in some Zebuine animals. Conclusion This study reports on a comprehensive study of the genetic structure and diversity of cattle breeds in Brazil. A significant amount of genetic variation is maintained in the local cattle populations. The genetic data show that Brazilian Creole breeds constitute an important and diverse reservoir of genetic diversity for bovine breeding and conservation. The genetic data was able to shed

  19. Patterns of genetic diversity reveal multiple introductions and recurrent founder effects during range expansion in invasive populations of Geranium carolinianum (Geraniaceae).

    PubMed

    Shirk, R Y; Hamrick, J L; Zhang, C; Qiang, S

    2014-05-01

    Genetic diversity, and thus the adaptive potential of invasive populations, is largely based on three factors: patterns of genetic diversity in the species' native range, the number and location of introductions and the number of founding individuals per introduction. Specifically, reductions in genetic diversity ('founder effects') should be stronger for species with low within-population diversity in their native range and few introductions of few individuals to the invasive range. We test these predictions with Geranium carolinianum, a winter annual herb native to North America and invasive in China. We measure the extent of founder effects using allozymes and microsatellites, and ask whether this is consistent with its colonization history and patterns of diversity in the native range. In the native range, genetic diversity is higher and structure is lower than expected based on life history traits. In China, our results provide evidence for multiple introductions near Nanjing, Jiangsu province, with subsequent range expansion to the west and south. Patterns of genetic diversity across China reveal weak founder effects that are driven largely by low-diversity populations at the expansion front, away from the introduction location. This suggests that reduced diversity in China has resulted from successive founder events during range expansion, and that the loss of genetic diversity in the Nanjing area was mitigated by multiple introductions from diverse source populations. This has implications for the future of G. carolinianum in China, as continued gene flow among populations should eventually increase genetic diversity within the more recently founded populations.

  20. Genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with potato tubers in France.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Marie; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Héraud, Cécile; Gautheron, Nadine; Chatot, Catherine; Le Hingrat, Yves; Bouchek-Mechiche, Karima; Steinberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of many plants and causes severe damage in crops around the world. Strains of R. solani from the anastomosis group (AG) 3 attack potatoes, leading to great yield losses and to the downgrading of production. The study of the genetic diversity of the strains of R. solani in France allows the structure of the populations to be determined and adapted control strategies against this pathogen to be established. The diversity of 73 French strains isolated from tubers grown in the main potato seed production areas and 31 strains isolated in nine other countries was assessed by phylogenetic analyses of (i) the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), (ii) a part of the gene tef-1α and (iii) the total DNA fingerprints of each strain established by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The determination of the AGs of R. solani based on the sequencing of the ITS region showed three different AGs among our collection (60 AG 3 PT, 8 AG 2-1 and 5 AG 5). Grouping of the strains belonging to the same AG was confirmed by sequencing of the gene tef-1α used for the first time to study the genetic diversity of R. solani. About 42% of ITS sequences and 72% of tef-1α sequences contained polymorphic sites, suggesting that the cells of R. solani strains contain several copies of ITS and the tef-1α gene within the same nucleus or between different nuclei. Phylogenetic trees showed a greater genetic diversity within AGs in tef-1α sequences than in ITS sequences. The AFLP analyses showed an even greater diversity among the strains demonstrating that the French strains of R. solani isolated from potatoes were not a clonal population. Moreover there was no relationship between the geographical origins of the strains or the variety from which they were isolated and their genetic diversity.

  1. Genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with potato tubers in France.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Marie; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Héraud, Cécile; Gautheron, Nadine; Chatot, Catherine; Le Hingrat, Yves; Bouchek-Mechiche, Karima; Steinberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of many plants and causes severe damage in crops around the world. Strains of R. solani from the anastomosis group (AG) 3 attack potatoes, leading to great yield losses and to the downgrading of production. The study of the genetic diversity of the strains of R. solani in France allows the structure of the populations to be determined and adapted control strategies against this pathogen to be established. The diversity of 73 French strains isolated from tubers grown in the main potato seed production areas and 31 strains isolated in nine other countries was assessed by phylogenetic analyses of (i) the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), (ii) a part of the gene tef-1α and (iii) the total DNA fingerprints of each strain established by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The determination of the AGs of R. solani based on the sequencing of the ITS region showed three different AGs among our collection (60 AG 3 PT, 8 AG 2-1 and 5 AG 5). Grouping of the strains belonging to the same AG was confirmed by sequencing of the gene tef-1α used for the first time to study the genetic diversity of R. solani. About 42% of ITS sequences and 72% of tef-1α sequences contained polymorphic sites, suggesting that the cells of R. solani strains contain several copies of ITS and the tef-1α gene within the same nucleus or between different nuclei. Phylogenetic trees showed a greater genetic diversity within AGs in tef-1α sequences than in ITS sequences. The AFLP analyses showed an even greater diversity among the strains demonstrating that the French strains of R. solani isolated from potatoes were not a clonal population. Moreover there was no relationship between the geographical origins of the strains or the variety from which they were isolated and their genetic diversity. PMID:21642342

  2. Turtle Carapace Anomalies: The Roles of Genetic Diversity and Environment

    PubMed Central

    Velo-Antón, Guillermo; Becker, C. Guilherme; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Background Phenotypic anomalies are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because anomalies are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute anomalies across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of anomalies in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of anomalies. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute anomalies among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our results suggest that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of anomalies would be useful to better understand the complex origin of anomalies in natural populations. PMID:21533278

  3. Genetic diversity and selection regulates evolution of infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; van Santen, Vicky L; Jackwood, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    Conventional and molecular epidemiologic studies have confirmed the ability of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) to rapidly evolve and successfully circumvent extensive vaccination programs implemented since the early 1950s. IBV evolution has often been explained as variation in gene frequencies as if evolution were driven by genetic drift alone. However, the mechanisms regulating the evolution of IBV include both the generation of genetic diversity and the selection process. IBV's generation of genetic diversity has been extensively investigated and ultimately involves mutations and recombination events occurring during viral replication. The relevance of the selection process has been further understood more recently by identifying genetic and phenotypic differences between IBV populations prior to, and during, replication in the natural host. Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple environmental forces within the host, including immune responses (or lack thereof) and affinity for cell receptors, as well as physical and biochemical conditions, are responsible for the selection process. Some scientists have used or adopted the related quasispecies frame to explain IBV evolution. The quasispecies frame, while providing a distinct explanation of the dynamics of populations in which mutation is a frequent event, exhibits relevant limitations which are discussed herein. Instead, it seems that IBV populations evolving by the generation of genetic variability and selection on replicons follow the evolutionary mechanisms originally proposed by Darwin. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the evolution of IBV is of basic relevance and, without doubt, essential to appropriately control and prevent the disease.

  4. Genetic diversity and environmental associations of sacsaoul ( Haloxylon ammodendron)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjing; Zhao, Guifang; Yue, Ming; Pan, Xiaoling

    2003-07-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to assess levels and patterns of genetic diversity in H. ammodendron (Chenopodiaceae). A total of 117 plants from 6 subpopulations on oasis-desert ecotone was analyzed by 16 arbitrarily chosen primers resulting in highly reproducible RAPD bands. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) with distances among individuals showed that most of the variation (74%) occurred among individuals within subpopulations, which is expected for a crossing organism, and 26% of variation among subpopulations. Estimates of Shannon index and Nei"s index from allele frequencies corroborated AMOVA partitioning in H. ammodendron. UPGMA cluster analyses, based on genetic distance, do not revealed grouping of some geographically proximate populations. This is the first report of the partitioning of genetic variability within and between subpopulations of H. ammodendron and provides important baseline data for optimizing sampling strategies and for conserving the genetic resources of this species. The Percentage of polymorphic loci was as high as 96%, presumably being response to oasis-desert ecotone. There were gene flows (Nm=5.38 individuals/generation), based on gene differentiation coefficient (GST was 0.1567) between subpopulations, and strong habitat selection override the gene flow to maintain the subpopulation differentiation. Correlation analyses showed that there was significant relationship between genetic diversity and soil CL ion.

  5. [Genetic diversity of Mongolian gazelle Procapra guttorosa Pallas, 1777].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, P A; Kiriliuk, V E; Lushchekina, A A; Kholodova, M V

    2005-10-01

    The mitochondrial DNA D-loop hypervariable fragment sequence polymorphism was examined in 27 Mongolian gazelles from Mongolia, Russia, and China. Intraspecific polymorphism of the D-loop fragment examined was demonstrated. All haplotypes described were unique. The average nucleotide diversity (pi) for the mtDNA fragment investigated constituted 5.85 +/- 2.92%. A relatively high number of insertions and deletions was observed. In particular, a haplotype with the 77-bp insertion was described. The data obtained point to high genetic diversity of Mongolian populations. There was no correlation between the distribution of haplotypes examined and geographical location of the animal tissue sampling sites. PMID:16316006

  6. Adaptive Process Control with Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision-making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, an analysis element to recognize changes in the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  7. Adaptive process control using fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    Researchers at the U.S. Bureau of Mines have developed adaptive process control systems in which genetic algorithms (GA's) are used to augment fuzzy logic controllers (FLC's). GA's are search algorithms that rapidly locate near-optimum solutions to a wide spectrum of problems by modeling the search procedures of natural genetics. FLC's are rule based systems that efficiently manipulate a problem environment by modeling the 'rule-of-thumb' strategy used in human decision making. Together, GA's and FLC's possess the capabilities necessary to produce powerful, efficient, and robust adaptive control systems. To perform efficiently, such control systems require a control element to manipulate the problem environment, and a learning element to adjust to the changes in the problem environment. Details of an overall adaptive control system are discussed. A specific laboratory acid-base pH system is used to demonstrate the ideas presented.

  8. The genetic basis of laboratory adaptation in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Marks, Melissa E; Castro-Rojas, Cyd Marie; Teiling, Clotilde; Du, Lei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Walunas, Theresa L; Crosson, Sean

    2010-07-01

    The dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has evolved marked phenotypic changes during its 50-year history of culture in the laboratory environment, providing an excellent system for the study of natural selection and phenotypic microevolution in prokaryotes. Combining whole-genome sequencing with classical molecular genetic tools, we have comprehensively mapped a set of polymorphisms underlying multiple derived phenotypes, several of which arose independently in separate strain lineages. The genetic basis of phenotypic differences in growth rate, mucoidy, adhesion, sedimentation, phage susceptibility, and stationary-phase survival between C. crescentus strain CB15 and its derivative NA1000 is determined by coding, regulatory, and insertion/deletion polymorphisms at five chromosomal loci. This study evidences multiple genetic mechanisms of bacterial evolution as driven by selection for growth and survival in a new selective environment and identifies a common polymorphic locus, zwf, between lab-adapted C. crescentus and clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that have adapted to a human host during chronic infection.

  9. Adaptable Constrained Genetic Programming: Extensions and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    2005-01-01

    An evolutionary algorithm applies evolution-based principles to problem solving. To solve a problem, the user defines the space of potential solutions, the representation space. Sample solutions are encoded in a chromosome-like structure. The algorithm maintains a population of such samples, which undergo simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and survival of the fittest principles. Genetic Programming (GP) uses tree-like chromosomes, providing very rich representation suitable for many problems of interest. GP has been successfully applied to a number of practical problems such as learning Boolean functions and designing hardware circuits. To apply GP to a problem, the user needs to define the actual representation space, by defining the atomic functions and terminals labeling the actual trees. The sufficiency principle requires that the label set be sufficient to build the desired solution trees. The closure principle allows the labels to mix in any arity-consistent manner. To satisfy both principles, the user is often forced to provide a large label set, with ad hoc interpretations or penalties to deal with undesired local contexts. This unfortunately enlarges the actual representation space, and thus usually slows down the search. In the past few years, three different methodologies have been proposed to allow the user to alleviate the closure principle by providing means to define, and to process, constraints on mixing the labels in the trees. Last summer we proposed a new methodology to further alleviate the problem by discovering local heuristics for building quality solution trees. A pilot system was implemented last summer and tested throughout the year. This summer we have implemented a new revision, and produced a User's Manual so that the pilot system can be made available to other practitioners and researchers. We have also designed, and partly implemented, a larger system capable of dealing with much more powerful heuristics.

  10. Limited Pollen Dispersal Contributes to Population Genetic Structure but Not Local Adaptation in Quercus oleoides Forests of Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, Nicholas John; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Background Quercus oleoides Cham. and Schlect., tropical live oak, is a species of conservation importance in its southern range limit of northwestern Costa Rica. It occurs in high-density stands across a fragmented landscape spanning a contrasting elevation and precipitation gradient. We examined genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure in this geographically isolated and genetically distinct population. We characterized population genetic diversity at 11 nuclear microsatellite loci in 260 individuals from 13 sites. We monitored flowering time at 10 sites, and characterized the local environment in order to compare observed spatial genetic structure to hypotheses of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment. Finally, we quantified pollen dispersal distances and tested for local adaptation through a reciprocal transplant experiment in order to experimentally address these hypotheses. Results High genetic diversity is maintained in the population and the genetic variation is significantly structured among sampled sites. We identified 5 distinct genetic clusters and average pollen dispersal predominately occurred over short distances. Differences among sites in flowering phenology and environmental factors, however, were not strictly associated with genetic differentiation. Growth and survival of upland and lowland progeny in their native and foreign environments was expected to exhibit evidence of local adaptation due to the more extreme dry season in the lowlands. Seedlings planted in the lowland garden experienced much higher mortality than seedlings in the upland garden, but we did not identify evidence for local adaptation. Conclusion Overall, this study indicates that the Costa Rican Q. oleoides population has a rich population genetic history. Despite environmental heterogeneity and habitat fragmentation, isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment alone do not explain spatial genetic structure. These results add to studies of genetic

  11. Hot spots of genetic diversity descended from multiple Pleistocene refugia in an alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2011-01-01

    Species that inhabit naturally fragmented environments are expected to be spatially structured and exhibit reduced genetic diversity at the periphery of their range. Patterns of differentiation may also reflect historical processes such as recolonization from glacial refugia. We examined the relative importance of these factors in shaping the spatial patterns of genetic differentiation across the range of an alpine specialist, the North American mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Contrary to fossil evidence that suggests a single southern refugium, we detected evidence for additional refugia in northern British Columbia and the Alaskan coast using both mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA. A core area of elevated genetic diversity characterized both regions, and molecular dating suggested a recent Pleistocene split was followed by demographic expansion. Across their range, mountain goats were highly genetically structured and displayed the expected pattern of declining diversity toward the periphery. Gene flow was high within contiguous mountain ranges, but cross-assignments paradoxically suggest that long-distance contemporary dispersal movements are not uncommon. These results improve our understanding of how historical vicariance and contemporary fragmentation influence population differentiation, and have implications for conserving the adaptive potential of alpine populations and habitat. PMID:20731714

  12. Iterative-Transform Phase Retrieval Using Adaptive Diversity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A phase-diverse iterative-transform phase-retrieval algorithm enables high spatial-frequency, high-dynamic-range, image-based wavefront sensing. [The terms phase-diverse, phase retrieval, image-based, and wavefront sensing are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles, Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing (GSC-14899-1).] As described below, no prior phase-retrieval algorithm has offered both high dynamic range and the capability to recover high spatial-frequency components. Each of the previously developed image-based phase-retrieval techniques can be classified into one of two categories: iterative transform or parametric. Among the modifications of the original iterative-transform approach has been the introduction of a defocus diversity function (also defined in the cited companion article). Modifications of the original parametric approach have included minimizing alternative objective functions as well as implementing a variety of nonlinear optimization methods. The iterative-transform approach offers the advantage of ability to recover low, middle, and high spatial frequencies, but has disadvantage of having a limited dynamic range to one wavelength or less. In contrast, parametric phase retrieval offers the advantage of high dynamic range, but is poorly suited for recovering higher spatial frequency aberrations. The present phase-diverse iterative transform phase-retrieval algorithm offers both the high-spatial-frequency capability of the iterative-transform approach and the high dynamic range of parametric phase-recovery techniques. In implementation, this is a focus-diverse iterative-transform phaseretrieval algorithm that incorporates an adaptive diversity function, which makes it possible to avoid phase unwrapping while preserving high-spatial-frequency recovery. The algorithm includes an inner and an outer loop (see figure). An initial estimate of phase is used to start the algorithm on the inner loop, wherein

  13. Genetic diversity in Malus × domestica (Rosaceae) through time in response to domestication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of genetic diversity in domesticated plants are affected by geographic region of origin and cultivation, intentional artificial selection, and unintentional loss of diversity referred to as genetic bottlenecks. While bottlenecks are mainly associated with the initial domestication process, ...

  14. Genetic diversity in Swiss goat breeds based on microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Saitbekova, N; Gaillard, C; Obexer-Ruff, G; Dolf, G

    1999-02-01

    Genetic diversity in eight Swiss goat breeds was estimated using PCR amplification of 20 bovine microsatellites on 20-40 unrelated animals per breed. In addition, the Creole breed from the Caribbean and samples of Ibex and Bezoar goat were included. A total of 352 animals were tested. The bovine microsatellites chosen amplified well in goat. The average heterozygosity within population was higher in domestic goat (0.51-0.58) than in Ibex (0.17) and Bezoar goat (0.19). Twenty-seven per cent of the genetic diversity in the total population could be attributed to differences between the populations. However, with the exclusion of Ibex from the total population, this proportion dropped to 17%. Principal component analysis showed that all Swiss goat breeds are closely related, whereas the Creole breed, Ibex and Bezoar goat are clearly distinct from all eight Swiss breeds.

  15. Molecular phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Lin, B Z; Odahara, S; Ishida, M; Kato, T; Sasazaki, S; Nozawa, K; Mannen, H

    2013-02-01

    The domestic goat is one of the most important livestock species, but its origins and genetic diversity still remain uncertain. Multiple highly divergent maternal lineages of goat have been reported in previous studies. Although one of the mitochondrial DNA lineages, lineage B, was detected only in eastern and southern Asia, the geographic distribution of these lineages was previously unclear. Here, we examine the genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of Asian goats by mitochondrial DNA sequences and morphological characteristics. The analyses of a total of 1661 Asian goats from 12 countries revealed a high frequency of lineage B in Southeast Asia. The frequency of this lineage tended to be higher in mountain areas than in plain areas in Southeast Asian countries, and there was a significant correlation between its frequency and morphological traits. The results suggest an original predominance of lineage B in Southeast Asia and the recent infiltration of lineage A into Southeast Asian goats. PMID:22524237

  16. Isolation of Genetically Diverse Marburg Viruses from Egyptian Fruit Bats

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Jonathan S.; Amman, Brian R.; Sealy, Tara K.; Carroll, Serena A. Reeder; Comer, James A.; Kemp, Alan; Swanepoel, Robert; Paddock, Christopher D.; Balinandi, Stephen; Khristova, Marina L.; Formenty, Pierre B. H.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Miller, David M.; Reed, Zachary D.; Kayiwa, John T.; Mills, James N.; Cannon, Deborah L.; Greer, Patricia W.; Byaruhanga, Emmanuel; Farnon, Eileen C.; Atimnedi, Patrick; Okware, Samuel; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward; Downing, Robert; Tappero, Jordan W.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2009-01-01

    In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1%) bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans. PMID:19649327

  17. Low worldwide genetic diversity in the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Rus Hoelzel, A; Shivji, Mahmood S; Magnussen, Jennifer; Francis, Malcolm P

    2006-01-01

    The basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) is found in temperate waters throughout the world's oceans, and has been subjected to extensive exploitation in some regions. However, little is known about its current abundance and genetic status. Here, we investigate the diversity of the mitochondrial DNA control region among samples from the western North Atlantic, eastern North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean and western Pacific. We find just six haplotypes defined by five variable sites, a comparatively low genetic diversity of π=0.0013 and no significant differentiation between ocean basins. We provide evidence for a bottleneck event within the Holocene, estimate an effective population size (Ne) that is low for a globally distributed species, and discuss the implications. PMID:17148309

  18. Molecular phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Lin, B Z; Odahara, S; Ishida, M; Kato, T; Sasazaki, S; Nozawa, K; Mannen, H

    2013-02-01

    The domestic goat is one of the most important livestock species, but its origins and genetic diversity still remain uncertain. Multiple highly divergent maternal lineages of goat have been reported in previous studies. Although one of the mitochondrial DNA lineages, lineage B, was detected only in eastern and southern Asia, the geographic distribution of these lineages was previously unclear. Here, we examine the genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure of Asian goats by mitochondrial DNA sequences and morphological characteristics. The analyses of a total of 1661 Asian goats from 12 countries revealed a high frequency of lineage B in Southeast Asia. The frequency of this lineage tended to be higher in mountain areas than in plain areas in Southeast Asian countries, and there was a significant correlation between its frequency and morphological traits. The results suggest an original predominance of lineage B in Southeast Asia and the recent infiltration of lineage A into Southeast Asian goats.

  19. Morphological and genetic diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria from cycads.

    PubMed

    Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Sundaramoorthy, Mariappan; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Akbarsha, Mohamed Abdulkadar; Gunasekaran, Muthukumaran

    2010-06-01

    The morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria associated with cycads was examined using PCR amplification techniques and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from different cycad species. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously reported to form symbioses with Cycadaceae family, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the repetitive sequences. Based on fingerprint patterns and phenograms, it was revealed that cyanobacterial symbionts exhibit important genetic diversity among host plants, both within and between cycad populations. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of the symbiotic cyanobacterial isolates fell into well-separated clades. PMID:20473963

  20. Morphological and genetic diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria from cycads.

    PubMed

    Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Sundaramoorthy, Mariappan; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Akbarsha, Mohamed Abdulkadar; Gunasekaran, Muthukumaran

    2010-06-01

    The morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria associated with cycads was examined using PCR amplification techniques and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from different cycad species. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously reported to form symbioses with Cycadaceae family, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the repetitive sequences. Based on fingerprint patterns and phenograms, it was revealed that cyanobacterial symbionts exhibit important genetic diversity among host plants, both within and between cycad populations. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of the symbiotic cyanobacterial isolates fell into well-separated clades.

  1. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations.

  2. A general condition for adaptive genetic polymorphism in temporally and spatially heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    Svardal, Hannes; Rueffler, Claus; Hermisson, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Both evolution and ecology have long been concerned with the impact of variable environmental conditions on observed levels of genetic diversity within and between species. We model the evolution of a quantitative trait under selection that fluctuates in space and time, and derive an analytical condition for when these fluctuations promote genetic diversification. As ecological scenario we use a generalized island model with soft selection within patches in which we incorporate generation overlap. We allow for arbitrary fluctuations in the environment including spatio-temporal correlations and any functional form of selection on the trait. Using the concepts of invasion fitness and evolutionary branching, we derive a simple and transparent condition for the adaptive evolution and maintenance of genetic diversity. This condition relates the strength of selection within patches to expectations and variances in the environmental conditions across space and time. Our results unify, clarify, and extend a number of previous results on the evolution and maintenance of genetic variation under fluctuating selection. Individual-based simulations show that our results are independent of the details of the genetic architecture and whether reproduction is clonal or sexual. The onset of increased genetic variance is predicted accurately also in small populations in which alleles can go extinct due to environmental stochasticity.

  3. Genetic Diversity of the Two Commercial Tetraploid Cotton Species in the Gossypium Diversity Reference Set.

    PubMed

    Hinze, Lori L; Gazave, Elodie; Gore, Michael A; Fang, David D; Scheffler, Brian E; Yu, John Z; Jones, Don C; Frelichowski, James; Percy, Richard G

    2016-05-01

    A diversity reference set has been constructed for the Gossypium accessions in the US National Cotton Germplasm Collection to facilitate more extensive evaluation and utilization of accessions held in the Collection. A set of 105 mapped simple sequence repeat markers was used to study the allelic diversity of 1933 tetraploid Gossypium accessions representative of the range of diversity of the improved and wild accessions of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. The reference set contained 410 G. barbadense accessions and 1523 G. hirsutum accessions. Observed numbers of polymorphic and private bands indicated a greater diversity in G. hirsutum as compared to G. barbadense as well as in wild-type accessions as compared to improved accessions in both species. The markers clearly differentiated the 2 species. Patterns of diversity within species were observed but not clearly delineated, with much overlap occurring between races and regions of origin for wild accessions and between historical and geographic breeding pools for cultivated accessions. Although the percentage of accessions showing introgression was higher among wild accessions than cultivars in both species, the average level of introgression within individual accessions, as indicated by species-specific bands, was much higher in wild accessions of G. hirsutum than in wild accessions of G. barbadense. The average level of introgression within individual accessions was higher in improved G. barbadense cultivars than in G. hirsutum cultivars. This molecular characterization reveals the levels and distributions of genetic diversity that will allow for better exploration and utilization of cotton genetic resources.

  4. Molecular diversity analysis of eggplant (Solanum melongena) genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; He, X L; Bahadur, S; Yi, J X

    2011-06-14

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena), a vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, is of considerable importance to agriculture in China. We analyzed the diversity of this plant using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and RAPD procedures to subdivide 143 Chinese-cultivated eggplants based on coefficient of parentage, genetic diversity index (GDI) and canonical discriminant analysis. ISSR markers were more effective than RAPD markers for detecting genetic diversity, which ranged from 0.10-0.51, slightly lower than what is known from other crops. Our ISSR/RAPD data provide molecular evidence that coincides with morphological-based classification into three varieties and further subdivision into eight groups, except for two groups. Intensive use of elite parents and extensive crossing within groups have resulted in increased coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution but decreased GDI during the past decades. The mean coefficient of parentage and proportional contribution increased from 0.05 to 0.10% and from 3.22 to 6.46% during 1980-1991 and 1992-2003, respectively. The GDI of landraces was 0.21, higher than the 0.09 and 0.08 calculated for the hybrid cultivars released during the two periods. The recent introduction of alien genotypes into eggplant breeding programs may broaden the genetic base.

  5. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis of sweepoviruses from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monopartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) that infect sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) around the world are known as sweepoviruses. Because sweet potato plants are vegetatively propagated, the accumulation of viruses can become a major constraint for root production. Mixed infections of sweepovirus species and strains can lead to recombination, which may contribute to the generation of new recombinant sweepoviruses. Results This study reports the full genome sequence of 34 sweepoviruses sampled from a sweet potato germplasm bank and commercial fields in Brazil. These sequences were compared with others from public nucleotide sequence databases to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic diversity and patterns of genetic exchange in sweepoviruses isolated from Brazil, as well as to review the classification and nomenclature of sweepoviruses in accordance with the current guidelines proposed by the Geminiviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Co-infections and extensive recombination events were identified in Brazilian sweepoviruses. Analysis of the recombination breakpoints detected within the sweepovirus dataset revealed that most recombination events occurred in the intergenic region (IR) and in the middle of the C1 open reading frame (ORF). Conclusions The genetic diversity of sweepoviruses was considerably greater than previously described in Brazil. Moreover, recombination analysis revealed that a genomic exchange is responsible for the emergence of sweepovirus species and strains and provided valuable new information for understanding the diversity and evolution of sweepoviruses. PMID:23082767

  6. Loss of genetic diversity and increased subdivision in an endemic Alpine Stonefly threatened by climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, Jonathan J.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hotalling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing “historic” (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms.

  7. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J. Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing “historic” (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  8. Loss of Genetic Diversity and Increased Subdivision in an Endemic Alpine Stonefly Threatened by Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Steve; Giersch, J Joseph; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Hotaling, Scott; Fanning, Liz; Tappenbeck, Tyler H; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Much remains unknown about the genetic status and population connectivity of high-elevation and high-latitude freshwater invertebrates, which often persist near snow and ice masses that are disappearing due to climate change. Here we report on the conservation genetics of the meltwater stonefly Lednia tumana (Ricker) of Montana, USA, a cold-water obligate species. We sequenced 1530 bp of mtDNA from 116 L. tumana individuals representing "historic" (>10 yr old) and 2010 populations. The dominant haplotype was common in both time periods, while the second-most-common haplotype was found only in historic samples, having been lost in the interim. The 2010 populations also showed reduced gene and nucleotide diversity and increased genetic isolation. We found lower genetic diversity in L. tumana compared to two other North American stonefly species, Amphinemura linda (Ricker) and Pteronarcys californica Newport. Our results imply small effective sizes, increased fragmentation, limited gene flow, and loss of genetic variation among contemporary L. tumana populations, which can lead to reduced adaptive capacity and increased extinction risk. This study reinforces concerns that ongoing glacier loss threatens the persistence of L. tumana, and provides baseline data and analysis of how future environmental change could impact populations of similar organisms. PMID:27348125

  9. DNA methylation mediates genetic variation for adaptive transgenerational plasticity.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jacob J; Sultan, Sonia E

    2016-09-14

    Environmental stresses experienced by individual parents can influence offspring phenotypes in ways that enhance survival under similar conditions. Although such adaptive transgenerational plasticity is well documented, its transmission mechanisms are generally unknown. One possible mechanism is environmentally induced DNA methylation changes. We tested this hypothesis in the annual plant Polygonum persicaria, a species known to express adaptive transgenerational plasticity in response to parental drought stress. Replicate plants of 12 genetic lines (sampled from natural populations) were grown in dry versus moist soil. Their offspring were exposed to the demethylating agent zebularine or to control conditions during germination and then grown in dry soil. Under control germination conditions, the offspring of drought-stressed parents grew longer root systems and attained greater biomass compared with offspring of well-watered parents of the same genetic lines. Demethylation removed these adaptive developmental effects of parental drought, but did not significantly alter phenotypic expression in offspring of well-watered parents. The effect of demethylation on the expression of the parental drought effect varied among genetic lines. Differential seed provisioning did not contribute to the effect of parental drought on offspring phenotypes. These results demonstrate that DNA methylation can mediate adaptive, genotype-specific effects of parental stress on offspring phenotypes. PMID:27629032

  10. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  11. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  12. Genetic analysis of population differentiation and adaptation in Leuciscus waleckii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yumei; Tang, Ran; Sun, Xiaowen; Liang, Liqun; Chen, Jinping; Huang, Jinfeng; Dou, Xinjie; Tao, Ran

    2013-12-01

    Demographic events and natural selection both influence animal phenotypic and genetic variation; exploring the effects of demography and selection on population divergence is of great significance in evolutionary biology. To uncover the causes behind the patterns of genetic differentiation and adaptation among six populations of Leuciscus waleckii from Dali Basin (two populations, alkaline vs. freshwater) and Amur Basin (four populations, freshwater rivers vs. alkaline lake), a set of 21 unlinked polymorphic microsatellite markers and two mitochondrial DNA sequences (Cytb and D-loop) were applied to examine whether populations from different environments or habitats have distinct genetic differentiation and whether alkalinity is the major factor that caused population divergence. Bayesian analysis and principal component analysis as well as haplotype network analysis showed that these populations are primarily divided into two groups, which are congruent with geographic separation but not inconsistent with the habitat environment (alkalinity). Using three different approaches, outlier detection indicated that one locus, HLJYL017, may be under directional selection and involved in local adaptation processes. Overall, this study suggested that demographic events and selection of local environmental conditions including of alkalinity are jointly responsible for population divergence. These findings constitute an important step towards the understanding of the genetic basis of differentiation and adaptation, as well as towards the conservation of L. waleckii.

  13. Genetic diversity of hydrothermal-vent barnacles in Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plouviez, Sophie; Schultz, Thomas F.; McGinnis, Gwendolyn; Minshall, Halle; Rudder, Meghan; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I genetic diversity of two barnacle species (Eochionelasmus ohtai manusensis, Vulcanolepas cf. parensis) at three sites in Manus Basin (Solwara 1, South Su, Solwara 8). There was no evidence for within-site or between-site genetic differentiation for either species. While E. ohtai manusensis showed limited genetic variation, V. cf. parensis showed greater variation, with sequences distributed between two divergent groups. Assuming the cytochrome oxidase I gene is not under selection, significantly negative Tajima's D in E. ohtai manusensis is consistent with a recent population expansion due to a bottleneck or founder effect, whereas V. cf. parensis (combined groups) did not depart from a stable effective population size. Considering the groups separately, V. cf. parensis Group 1 (but not Group 2) showed a negative Tajima's D, indicating these groups may have encountered different historical demographic conditions. Data reported here are part of a baseline study against which recovery of genetic diversity following mineral extraction at Solwara 1 can be measured.

  14. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats. PMID:26813022

  15. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinwang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O. wuchuanensis to elevated UV radiation was investigated. Compared with O. wuchuanensis, O. andersonii exhibited greater diversity and free radical scavenging potentiality of skin antioxidant peptides to cope with UV radiation. This implied that O. andersonii evolved a much more complicated and powerful skin antioxidant peptide system to survive high-altitude UV levels. Our results provided valuable peptidomic clues for understanding the novel molecular basis for adaptation to high elevation habitats. PMID:26813022

  16. Genetic and morphological differentiation in Populus nigra L.: isolation by colonization or isolation by adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    DeWoody, Jennifer; Trewin, Harriet; Taylor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Identifying processes underlying the genetic and morphological differences among populations is a central question of evolutionary biology. Forest trees typically contain high levels of neutral genetic variation, and genetic differences are often correlated with geographic distance between populations [isolation by distance (IBD)] or are due to historic vicariance events [isolation by colonization (IBC)]. In contrast, morphological differences are largely due to local adaptation. Here, we examined genetic (microsatellite) and morphological (from a common garden experiment) variation in Populus nigra L., European black poplar, collected from 13 sites across western Europe and grown in a common garden in Belgium. Significant genetic differentiation was observed, with populations from France displaying greater admixture than the distinct Spanish and central European gene pools, consistent with previously described glacial refugia (IBC). Many quantitative traits displayed a bimodal distribution, approximately corresponding to small-leaf and large-leaf ecotypes. Examination of nine climatic variables revealed the sampling locations to have diverse climates, and although the correlation between morphological and climatic differences was significant, the pattern was not consistent with strict local adaptation. Partial Mantel tests based on multivariate summary statistics identified significant residual correlation in comparisons of small-leaf to large-leaf ecotypes, and within the small-leaf samples, but not within large-leaf ecotypes, indicating that variation within the small-leaf morphotype in particular may be adaptive. Some small-leaf populations experience climates very similar to those in large-leaf sites. We conclude that adaptive differentiation and persistent IBC acted in combination to produce the genetic and morphological patterns observed in P. nigra. PMID:25857321

  17. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed.

  18. Genetic diversity of Poa pratensis L. depending on geographical origin and compared with genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Śmietana, Przemysław; Stępień, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background Poa pratensis is one of the most common species of meadow grass in Europe. Most cultivars of the species found in Poland were originally derived from its ecotypes. We compared the effectiveness of the RAPD and ISSR methods in assessing the genetic diversity of the selected populations of P. pratensis. We examined whether these methods could be useful for detecting a possible link between the geographical origin of a given population and its assessed genetic variation. Methods The molecular markers RAPD and ISSR were used and their efficiency compared using, inter alia, statistical multivariate methods (UPGMA and PCA). Results The low value of Dice’s coefficient (0.369) along with the significantly high percentage of polymorphic products indicates a substantial degree of genetic diversity among the studied populations. Our results found a correlation between the geographical origin of the studied populations and their genetic variations. For ISSR, which proved to be the more effective method in that respect, we selected primers with the greatest differentiating powers correlating to geographical origin. Discussion The populations evaluated in this study were characterized by a high genetic diversity. This seems to confirm the hypothesis that ecotypes of P. pratensis originating from different regions of Central Europe with different terrain structures and habitat conditions can be a source of great genetic variability. PMID:27703847

  19. Initial genetic diversity enhances population establishment and alters genetic structuring of a newly established Daphnia metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher J; Pantel, Jelena H; Schulz, Kimberly L; Cáceres, Carla E

    2016-07-01

    When newly created habitats are initially colonized by genotypes with rapid population growth rates, later arriving colonists may be prevented from establishing. Although these priority effects have been documented in multiple systems, their duration may be influenced by the diversity of the founding population. We conducted a large-scale field manipulation to investigate how initial clonal diversity influences temporal and landscape patterns of genetic structure in a developing metapopulation. Six genotypes of obligately asexual Daphnia pulex were stocked alone (no clonal diversity) or in combination ('high' clonal diversity) into newly created experimental woodland ponds. We also measured the population growth rate of all clones in the laboratory when raised on higher-quality and lower-quality resources. Our predictions were that in the 3 years following stocking, clonally diverse populations would be more likely to persist than nonclonally diverse populations and exhibit evidence for persistent founder effects. We expected that faster growing clones would be found in more pools and comprise a greater proportion of individuals genotyped from the landscape. Genetic composition, both locally and regionally, changed significantly following stocking. Six of 27 populations exhibited evidence for persistent founder effects, and populations stocked with 'high' clonal diversity were more likely to exhibit these effects than nonclonally diverse populations. Performance in the laboratory was not predictive of clonal persistence or overall dominance in the field. Hence, we conclude that although laboratory estimates of fitness did not fully explain metapopulation genetic structure, initial clonal diversity did enhance D. pulex population establishment and persistence in this system.

  20. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity

    PubMed Central

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D; Lebot, V

    2013-01-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally derived from the Northern neotropical genepool (Camote and Batata lines, from the Caribbean and Central America). However, chloroplast data suggest that South American clones (early Kumara line clones or, more probably, later reintroductions) were also introduced into New Guinea and then recombined with existing genotypes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distances between New Guinea landraces suggests that sexual reproduction, rather than somaclonal variation, has played a predominant role in the diversification of sweet potato. The frequent incorporation of plants issued from true seed by farmers, and the geographical and cultural barriers constraining crop diffusion in this topographically and linguistically heterogeneous island, has led to the accumulation of an impressive number of variants. As the diversification of sweet potato in New Guinea is primarily the result of farmers' management of the reproductive biology of their crop, we argue that on-farm conservation programmes that implement distribution of core samples (clones representing the useful diversity of the species) and promote on-farm selection of locally adapted variants may allow local communities to fashion relatively autonomous strategies for coping with ongoing global change. PMID:23531982

  1. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity.

    PubMed

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D; Lebot, V

    2013-06-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm previous results, suggesting that New Guinea landraces are principally derived from the Northern neotropical genepool (Camote and Batata lines, from the Caribbean and Central America). However, chloroplast data suggest that South American clones (early Kumara line clones or, more probably, later reintroductions) were also introduced into New Guinea and then recombined with existing genotypes. The frequency distribution of pairwise distances between New Guinea landraces suggests that sexual reproduction, rather than somaclonal variation, has played a predominant role in the diversification of sweet potato. The frequent incorporation of plants issued from true seed by farmers, and the geographical and cultural barriers constraining crop diffusion in this topographically and linguistically heterogeneous island, has led to the accumulation of an impressive number of variants. As the diversification of sweet potato in New Guinea is primarily the result of farmers' management of the reproductive biology of their crop, we argue that on-farm conservation programmes that implement distribution of core samples (clones representing the useful diversity of the species) and promote on-farm selection of locally adapted variants may allow local communities to fashion relatively autonomous strategies for coping with ongoing global change.

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation in the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Woodroffe, Rosie; Mills, Michael G L; McNutt, J Weldon; Creel, Scott; Groom, Rosemary; Emmanuel, Masenga; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kat, Pieter; Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Ginsberg, Joshua; Lines, Robin; André, Jean-Marc; Begg, Colleen; Wayne, Robert K; Mable, Barbara K

    2012-03-01

    Deciphering patterns of genetic variation within a species is essential for understanding population structure, local adaptation and differences in diversity between populations. Whilst neutrally evolving genetic markers can be used to elucidate demographic processes and genetic structure, they are not subject to selection and therefore are not informative about patterns of adaptive variation. As such, assessments of pertinent adaptive loci, such as the immunity genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are increasingly being incorporated into genetic studies. In this study, we combined neutral (microsatellite, mtDNA) and adaptive (MHC class II DLA-DRB1 locus) markers to elucidate the factors influencing patterns of genetic variation in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus); an endangered canid that has suffered extensive declines in distribution and abundance. Our genetic analyses found all extant wild dog populations to be relatively small (N(e)  < 30). Furthermore, through coalescent modelling, we detected a genetic signature of a recent and substantial demographic decline, which correlates with human expansion, but contrasts with findings in some other African mammals. We found strong structuring of wild dog populations, indicating the negative influence of extensive habitat fragmentation and loss of gene flow between habitat patches. Across populations, we found that the spatial and temporal structure of microsatellite diversity and MHC diversity were correlated and strongly influenced by demographic stability and population size, indicating the effects of genetic drift in these small populations. Despite this correlation, we detected signatures of selection at the MHC, implying that selection has not been completely overwhelmed by genetic drift. PMID:22320891

  3. Spatial and temporal patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation in the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Woodroffe, Rosie; Mills, Michael G L; McNutt, J Weldon; Creel, Scott; Groom, Rosemary; Emmanuel, Masenga; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kat, Pieter; Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Ginsberg, Joshua; Lines, Robin; André, Jean-Marc; Begg, Colleen; Wayne, Robert K; Mable, Barbara K

    2012-03-01

    Deciphering patterns of genetic variation within a species is essential for understanding population structure, local adaptation and differences in diversity between populations. Whilst neutrally evolving genetic markers can be used to elucidate demographic processes and genetic structure, they are not subject to selection and therefore are not informative about patterns of adaptive variation. As such, assessments of pertinent adaptive loci, such as the immunity genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are increasingly being incorporated into genetic studies. In this study, we combined neutral (microsatellite, mtDNA) and adaptive (MHC class II DLA-DRB1 locus) markers to elucidate the factors influencing patterns of genetic variation in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus); an endangered canid that has suffered extensive declines in distribution and abundance. Our genetic analyses found all extant wild dog populations to be relatively small (N(e)  < 30). Furthermore, through coalescent modelling, we detected a genetic signature of a recent and substantial demographic decline, which correlates with human expansion, but contrasts with findings in some other African mammals. We found strong structuring of wild dog populations, indicating the negative influence of extensive habitat fragmentation and loss of gene flow between habitat patches. Across populations, we found that the spatial and temporal structure of microsatellite diversity and MHC diversity were correlated and strongly influenced by demographic stability and population size, indicating the effects of genetic drift in these small populations. Despite this correlation, we detected signatures of selection at the MHC, implying that selection has not been completely overwhelmed by genetic drift.

  4. Understanding Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of a Poa pratensis Worldwide Collection through Morphological, Nuclear and Chloroplast Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Luigi; Marconi, Gianpiero; Sharbel, Timothy F.; Veronesi, Fabio; Albertini, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    Poa pratensis L. is a forage and turf grass species well adapted to a wide range of mesic to moist habitats. Due to its genome complexity little is known regarding evolution, genome composition and intraspecific phylogenetic relationships of this species. In the present study we investigated the morphological and genetic diversity of 33 P. pratensis accessions from 23 different countries using both nuclear and chloroplast molecular markers as well as flow cytometry of somatic tissues. This with the aim of shedding light on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the collection that includes both cultivated and wild materials. Morphological characterization showed that the most relevant traits able to distinguish cultivated from wild forms were spring growth habit and leaf colour. The genome size analysis revealed high variability both within and between accessions in both wild and cultivated materials. The sequence analysis of the trnL-F chloroplast region revealed a low polymorphism level that could be the result of the complex mode of reproduction of this species. In addition, a strong reduction of chloroplast SSR variability was detected in cultivated materials, where only two alleles were conserved out of the four present in wild accessions. Contrarily, at nuclear level, high variability exist in the collection where the analysis of 11 SSR loci allowed the detection of a total of 91 different alleles. A Bayesian analysis performed on nuclear SSR data revealed that studied materials belong to two main clusters. While wild materials are equally represented in both clusters, the domesticated forms are mostly belonging to cluster P2 which is characterized by lower genetic diversity compared to the cluster P1. In the Neighbour Joining tree no clear distinction was found between accessions with the exception of those from China and Mongolia that were clearly separated from all the others. PMID:25893249

  5. Understanding Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of a Poa pratensis Worldwide Collection through Morphological, Nuclear and Chloroplast Diversity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Lorenzo; Bitocchi, Elena; Russi, Luigi; Marconi, Gianpiero; Sharbel, Timothy F; Veronesi, Fabio; Albertini, Emidio

    2015-01-01

    Poa pratensis L. is a forage and turf grass species well adapted to a wide range of mesic to moist habitats. Due to its genome complexity little is known regarding evolution, genome composition and intraspecific phylogenetic relationships of this species. In the present study we investigated the morphological and genetic diversity of 33 P. pratensis accessions from 23 different countries using both nuclear and chloroplast molecular markers as well as flow cytometry of somatic tissues. This with the aim of shedding light on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of the collection that includes both cultivated and wild materials. Morphological characterization showed that the most relevant traits able to distinguish cultivated from wild forms were spring growth habit and leaf colour. The genome size analysis revealed high variability both within and between accessions in both wild and cultivated materials. The sequence analysis of the trnL-F chloroplast region revealed a low polymorphism level that could be the result of the complex mode of reproduction of this species. In addition, a strong reduction of chloroplast SSR variability was detected in cultivated materials, where only two alleles were conserved out of the four present in wild accessions. Contrarily, at nuclear level, high variability exist in the collection where the analysis of 11 SSR loci allowed the detection of a total of 91 different alleles. A Bayesian analysis performed on nuclear SSR data revealed that studied materials belong to two main clusters. While wild materials are equally represented in both clusters, the domesticated forms are mostly belonging to cluster P2 which is characterized by lower genetic diversity compared to the cluster P1. In the Neighbour Joining tree no clear distinction was found between accessions with the exception of those from China and Mongolia that were clearly separated from all the others. PMID:25893249

  6. Climate variables explain neutral and adaptive variation within salmonid metapopulations: the importance of replication in landscape genetics.

    PubMed

    Hand, Brian K; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Wade, Alisa A; Kovach, Ryan P; Whited, Diane C; Narum, Shawn R; Matala, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael W; Garner, Brittany A; Kimball, John S; Stanford, Jack A; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how environmental variation influences population genetic structure is important for conservation management because it can reveal how human stressors influence population connectivity, genetic diversity and persistence. We used riverscape genetics modelling to assess whether climatic and habitat variables were related to neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation (population-specific and pairwise FST ) within five metapopulations (79 populations, 4583 individuals) of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, USA. Using 151 putatively neutral and 29 candidate adaptive SNP loci, we found that climate-related variables (winter precipitation, summer maximum temperature, winter highest 5% flow events and summer mean flow) best explained neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation within metapopulations, suggesting that climatic variation likely influences both demography (neutral variation) and local adaptation (adaptive variation). However, we did not observe consistent relationships between climate variables and FST across all metapopulations, underscoring the need for replication when extrapolating results from one scale to another (e.g. basin-wide to the metapopulation scale). Sensitivity analysis (leave-one-population-out) revealed consistent relationships between climate variables and FST within three metapopulations; however, these patterns were not consistent in two metapopulations likely due to small sample sizes (N = 10). These results provide correlative evidence that climatic variation has shaped the genetic structure of steelhead populations and highlight the need for replication and sensitivity analyses in land and riverscape genetics. PMID:26677031

  7. Climate variables explain neutral and adaptive variation within salmonid metapopulations: The importance of replication in landscape genetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hand, Brian K; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Wade, Alisa A.; Kovach, Ryan; Whited, Diane C.; Narum, Shawn R; Matala, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael W.; Garner, B. A.; Kimball, John S; Stanford, Jack A.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how environmental variation influences population genetic structure is important for conservation management because it can reveal how human stressors influence population connectivity, genetic diversity and persistence. We used riverscape genetics modelling to assess whether climatic and habitat variables were related to neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation (population-specific and pairwise FST) within five metapopulations (79 populations, 4583 individuals) of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, USA. Using 151 putatively neutral and 29 candidate adaptive SNP loci, we found that climate-related variables (winter precipitation, summer maximum temperature, winter highest 5% flow events and summer mean flow) best explained neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation within metapopulations, suggesting that climatic variation likely influences both demography (neutral variation) and local adaptation (adaptive variation). However, we did not observe consistent relationships between climate variables and FST across all metapopulations, underscoring the need for replication when extrapolating results from one scale to another (e.g. basin-wide to the metapopulation scale). Sensitivity analysis (leave-one-population-out) revealed consistent relationships between climate variables and FST within three metapopulations; however, these patterns were not consistent in two metapopulations likely due to small sample sizes (N = 10). These results provide correlative evidence that climatic variation has shaped the genetic structure of steelhead populations and highlight the need for replication and sensitivity analyses in land and riverscape genetics.

  8. Climate variables explain neutral and adaptive variation within salmonid metapopulations: the importance of replication in landscape genetics.

    PubMed

    Hand, Brian K; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Wade, Alisa A; Kovach, Ryan P; Whited, Diane C; Narum, Shawn R; Matala, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael W; Garner, Brittany A; Kimball, John S; Stanford, Jack A; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how environmental variation influences population genetic structure is important for conservation management because it can reveal how human stressors influence population connectivity, genetic diversity and persistence. We used riverscape genetics modelling to assess whether climatic and habitat variables were related to neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation (population-specific and pairwise FST ) within five metapopulations (79 populations, 4583 individuals) of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, USA. Using 151 putatively neutral and 29 candidate adaptive SNP loci, we found that climate-related variables (winter precipitation, summer maximum temperature, winter highest 5% flow events and summer mean flow) best explained neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation within metapopulations, suggesting that climatic variation likely influences both demography (neutral variation) and local adaptation (adaptive variation). However, we did not observe consistent relationships between climate variables and FST across all metapopulations, underscoring the need for replication when extrapolating results from one scale to another (e.g. basin-wide to the metapopulation scale). Sensitivity analysis (leave-one-population-out) revealed consistent relationships between climate variables and FST within three metapopulations; however, these patterns were not consistent in two metapopulations likely due to small sample sizes (N = 10). These results provide correlative evidence that climatic variation has shaped the genetic structure of steelhead populations and highlight the need for replication and sensitivity analyses in land and riverscape genetics.

  9. Genetic diversity for wheat improvement as a conduit to food security

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity is paramount for any crops genetic improvement and this resides in three gene pools of the Triticeae for wheat. Access to the diversity and its exploitation is based upon genetic distance of the species relatives from the wheat genomes. Apart from the conventional genetic base fo...

  10. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  11. Hidden genetic diversity in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The unbranched filamentous green alga Spirogyra (Streptophyta, Zygnemataceae) is easily recognizable based on its vegetative morphology, which shows one to several spiral chloroplasts. This simple structure falsely points to a low genetic diversity: Spirogyra is commonly excluded from phylogenetic analyses because the genus is known as a long-branch taxon caused by a high evolutionary rate. Results We focused on this genetic diversity and sequenced 130 Spirogyra small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) strands of different origin. The resulting SSU rDNA sequences were used for phylogenetic analyses using complex evolutionary models (posterior probability, maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, and maximum parsimony methods). The sequences were between 1672 and 1779 nucleotides long. Sequence comparisons revealed 53 individual clones, but our results still support monophyly of the genus. Our data set did not contain a single slow-evolving taxon that would have been placed on a shorter branch compared to the remaining sequences. Out of 130 accessions analyzed, 72 showed a secondary loss of the 1506 group I intron, which formed a long-branched group within the genus. The phylogenetic relationship to the genus Spirotaenia was not resolved satisfactorily. The genetic distance within the genus Spirogyra exceeded the distances measured within any other genus of the remaining Zygnemataceae included in this study. Conclusion Overall, we define eight distinct clades of Spirogyra, one of them including the genus Sirogonium. A large number of non-homoplasious synapomorphies (NHS; 114 NHS in total) was found for Spirogyra (41 NHS) and for each clade (totaling 73 NHS). This emphasizes the high genetic diversity of this genus and the distance to the remaining Zygnematophyceae. PMID:22655677

  12. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L; Hanner, Robert H; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-06-28

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a more accessible molecular identification key for its application, we generated a standard reference library of mtDNA sequences (DNA barcodes) derived from expert-identified museum specimens for 752 North American freshwater fish species. This study demonstrates that 90% of known species can be delineated using barcodes. Moreover, it reveals numerous genetic discontinuities indicative of independently evolving lineages within described species, which points to the presence of morphologically cryptic diversity. From the 752 species analyzed, our survey flagged 138 named species that represent as many as 347 candidate species, which suggests a 28% increase in species diversity. In contrast, several species of parasitic and nonparasitic lampreys lack such discontinuity and may represent alternative life history strategies within single species. Therefore, it appears that the current North American freshwater fish taxonomy at the species level significantly conceals diversity in some groups, although artificially creating diversity in others. In addition to providing an easily accessible digital identification system, this study identifies 151 fish species for which taxonomic revision is required.

  13. Dynamics of genetic variability in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) during adaptation to laboratory rearing conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important fruit fly plagues in the American continent and only chemical control is applied in the field to diminish its population densities. A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts. Methods The present study aims to analyze the dynamics of changes in genetic variability during the first six generations under artificial rearing conditions in two populations: a) a wild population recently introduced to laboratory culture, named TW and, b) a long-established control line, named CL. Results Results showed a declining tendency of genetic variability in TW. In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time. Discussion The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed. PMID:25471362

  14. Exploiting a wheat EST database to assess genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Expressed sequence tag (EST) markers have been used to assess variety and genetic diversity in wheat (Triticum aestivum). In this study, 1549 ESTs from wheat infested with yellow rust were used to examine the genetic diversity of six susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars. The aim of using these cultivars was to improve the competitiveness of public wheat breeding programs through the intensive use of modern, particularly marker-assisted, selection technologies. The F2 individuals derived from cultivar crosses were screened for resistance to yellow rust at the seedling stage in greenhouses and adult stage in the field to identify DNA markers genetically linked to resistance. Five hundred and sixty ESTs were assembled into 136 contigs and 989 singletons. BlastX search results showed that 39 (29%) contigs and 96 (10%) singletons were homologous to wheat genes. The database-matched contigs and singletons were assigned to eight functional groups related to protein synthesis, photosynthesis, metabolism and energy, stress proteins, transporter proteins, protein breakdown and recycling, cell growth and division and reactive oxygen scavengers. PCR analyses with primers based on the contigs and singletons showed that the most polymorphic functional categories were photosynthesis (contigs) and metabolism and energy (singletons). EST analysis revealed considerable genetic variability among the Turkish wheat cultivars resistant and susceptible to yellow rust disease and allowed calculation of the mean genetic distance between cultivars, with the greatest similarity (0.725) being between Harmankaya99 and Sönmez2001, and the lowest (0.622) between Aytin98 and Izgi01. PMID:21637582

  15. Diversity in M. tuberculosis mannosylated cell wall determinants impacts adaptation to the host

    PubMed Central

    Torrelles, Jordi B.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (the causal agent of TB) has co-evolved with humans for centuries. It infects via the airborne route and is a prototypic highly adapted intracellular pathogen of macrophages. Extensive sequencing of the M. tuberculosis genome along with recent molecular phylogenetic studies is enabling us to gain insight into the biologic diversity that exists among bacterial strains that impact the pathogenesis of latent infection and disease. The majority of the M. tuberculosis cell envelope is comprised of carbohydrates and lipids, and there is increasing evidence that these microbial determinants that are readily exposed to the host immune system play critical roles in disease pathogenesis. Studies from our laboratory and others have raised the possibility that M. tuberculosis is adapting to the human host by cloaking its cell envelope molecules with terminal mannosylated (i.e. Man-α-(1→2)-Man) oligosaccharides that resemble the glycoforms of mammalian mannoproteins. These mannosylated biomolecules engage the mannose receptor (MR) on macrophages during phagocytosis and dictate the intracellular fate of M. tuberculosis by regulating formation of the unique vesicular compartment in which the bacterium survives. The MR is highly expressed on alveolar macrophages (predominant C-type lectin on human cells) and functions as a scavenger receptor to maintain the healthiness of the lung by clearing foreign particles and at the same time regulating dangerous inflammatory responses. Thus M. tuberculosis exploits MR functions to gain entry into the macrophage and survive. Key biochemical pathways and mycobacterial determinants involved in the development and maintenance of the M. tuberculosis phagosome are being identified. The phylogenetic diversity observed in M. tuberculosis strains that impact its cell wall structure together with the genetic diversity observed in human populations, including those elements that affect macrophage function, may help

  16. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  17. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei’s genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance

  18. Assessment of Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Corylus mandshurica in China Using SSR Markers.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Tian-Tian; Ma, Qing-Hua; Liang, Li-Song; Wang, Gui-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Corylus mandshurica, also known as pilose hazelnut, is an economically and ecologically important species in China. In this study, ten polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were applied to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of 348 C. mandshurica individuals among 12 populations in China. The SSR markers expressed a relatively high level of genetic diversity (Na = 15.3, Ne = 5.6604, I = 1.8853, Ho = 0.6668, and He = 0.7777). According to the coefficient of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.1215), genetic variation within the populations (87.85%) were remarkably higher than among populations (12.15%). The average gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) significantly impacts the genetic structure of C. mandshurica populations. The relatively high gene flow (Nm = 1.8080) among wild C. mandshurica may be caused by wind-pollinated flowers, highly nutritious seeds and self-incompatible mating system. The UPGMA (unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages) dendrogram was divided into two main clusters. Moreover, the results of STRUCTURE analysis suggested that C. mandshurica populations fell into two main clusters. Comparison of the UPGMA dendrogram and the Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed general agreement between the population subdivisions and the genetic relationships among populations of C. mandshurica. Group I accessions were located in Northeast China, while Group II accessions were in North China. It is worth noting that a number of genetically similar populations were located in the same geographic region. The results further showed that there was obvious genetic differentiation among populations from Northeast China to North China. Results from the Mantel test showed a weak but still significant positive correlation between Nei's genetic distance and geographic distance (km) among populations (r = 0.419, P = 0.005), suggesting that genetic differentiation in the 12 C. mandshurica populations might be related to geographic distance. These

  19. Limited Genetic Diversity Preceded Extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Heider, Thomas; Mayer, Frieder; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.; Pask, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial when Europeans first reached Australia. Sadly, the last known thylacine died in captivity in 1936. A recent analysis of the genome of the closely related and extant Tasmanian devil demonstrated limited genetic diversity between individuals. While a similar lack of diversity has been reported for the thylacine, this analysis was based on just two individuals. Here we report the sequencing of an additional 12 museum-archived specimens collected between 102 and 159 years ago. We examined a portion of the mitochondrial DNA hyper-variable control region and determined that all sequences were on average 99.5% identical at the nucleotide level. As a measure of accuracy we also sequenced mitochondrial DNA from a mother and two offspring. As expected, these samples were found to be 100% identical, validating our methods. We also used 454 sequencing to reconstruct 2.1 kilobases of the mitochondrial genome, which shared 99.91% identity with the two complete thylacine mitochondrial genomes published previously. Our thylacine genomic data also contained three highly divergent putative nuclear mitochondrial sequences, which grouped phylogenetically with the published thylacine mitochondrial homologs but contained 100-fold more polymorphisms than the conserved fragments. Together, our data suggest that the thylacine population in Tasmania had limited genetic diversity prior to its extinction, possibly as a result of their geographic isolation from mainland Australia approximately 10,000 years ago. PMID:22530022

  20. Origin, genetic diversity, and population structure of Chinese domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Yuan; Duan, Zi-Yuan; Sha, Tao; Xiangyu, Jinggong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2006-07-19

    To characterize the origin, genetic diversity, and phylogeographic structure of Chinese domestic sheep, we here analyzed a 531-bp fragment of mtDNA control region of 449 Chinese autochthonous sheep from 19 breeds/populations from 13 geographic regions, together with previously reported 44 sequences from Chinese indigenous sheep. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all three previously defined lineages A, B, and C were found in all sampled Chinese sheep populations, except for the absence of lineage C in four populations. Network profiles revealed that the lineages B and C displayed a star-like phylogeny with the founder haplotype in the centre, and that two star-like subclades with two founder haplotypes were identified in lineage A. The pattern of genetic variation in lineage A, together with the divergence time between the two central founder haplotypes suggested that two independent domestication events have occurred in sheep lineage A. Considerable mitochondrial diversity was observed in Chinese sheep. Weak structuring was observed either among Chinese indigenous sheep populations or between Asian and European sheep and this can be attributable to long-term strong gene flow induced by historical human movements. The high levels of intra-population diversity in Chinese sheep and the weak phylogeographic structuring indicated three geographically independent domestication events have occurred and the domestication place was not only confined to the Near East, but also occurred in other regions.

  1. Genetic Diversity and Molecular Evolution of Chinese Waxy Maize Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongjian; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hua; Wu, Jinhong; Shi, Biao; Cai, Run; Xu, Yunbi; Wu, Aizhong; Luo, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Waxy maize (Zea mays L. var. certaina Kulesh), with many excellent characters in terms of starch composition and economic value, has grown in China for a long history and its production has increased dramatically in recent decades. However, the evolution and origin of waxy maize still remains unclear. We studied the genetic diversity of Chinese waxy maize including typical landraces and inbred lines by SSR analysis and the results showed a wide genetic diversity in the Chinese waxy maize germplasm. We analyzed the origin and evolution of waxy maize by sequencing 108 samples, and downloading 52 sequences from GenBank for the waxy locus in a number of accessions from genus Zea. A sharp reduction of nucleotide diversity and significant neutrality tests (Tajima’s D and Fu and Li’s F*) were observed at the waxy locus in Chinese waxy maize but not in nonglutinous maize. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Chinese waxy maize originated from the cultivated flint maize and most of the modern waxy maize inbred lines showed a distinct independent origin and evolution process compared with the germplasm from Southwest China. The results indicated that an agronomic trait can be quickly improved to meet production demand by selection. PMID:23818949

  2. Sézary Syndrome: Translating Genetic Diversity into Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Chevret, Edith; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is probably the most studied cutaneous T-cell lymphoma subtype. Beyond the consensus criteria for Sézary syndrome diagnosis, Sézary cells display heterogeneous phenotypes and differentiation profiles. In the face of SS diversity, the great hope is to develop targeted therapies based on next-generation sequencing to define the genetic landscape of Sézary syndrome. Prasad et al. report on the use of exome sequencing and RNA sequencing to study selected CD4(+) blood cells from 15 patients with erythroderma Sézary syndrome, 14 of whom fulfilled the conventional criteria for diagnosis. The most common genetic abnormality, TP53 gene deletion on chromosome arm 17p and/or mutation, was observed in 58% of patients. However, mutations affecting PLCG1, STAT5B, GLI3, and CARD11 each were detected in only one individual. Nevertheless, Prasad et al. report single point mutations or copy number alterations in several new genes and in new fusion genes, with predicted biological relevance. This information underscores the diversity of genetic alterations and of the mechanisms of alterations of single genes. At the individual level, Sézary cells may combine alterations of genes involved in T-cell signaling, NF-kB and JAK-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, apoptosis control, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. The therapeutic relevance of these potential targets needs to be evaluated with tests of function. PMID:27342034

  3. Genetic diversity of coronaviruses in Miniopterus fuliginosus bats.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ren, Xianwen; Zhang, Junpeng; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Shuyi; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Coronaviruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, pose significant public health threats. Bats have been suggested to act as natural reservoirs for both these viruses, and periodic monitoring of coronaviruses in bats may thus provide important clues about emergent infectious viruses. The Eastern bent-wing bat Miniopterus fuliginosus is distributed extensively throughout China. We therefore analyzed the genetic diversity of coronaviruses in samples of M. fuliginosus collected from nine Chinese provinces during 2011-2013. The only coronavirus genus found was Alphacoronavirus. We established six complete and five partial genomic sequences of alphacoronaviruses, which revealed that they could be divided into two distinct lineages, with close relationships to coronaviruses in Miniopterus magnater and Miniopterus pusillus. Recombination was confirmed by detecting putative breakpoints of Lineage 1 coronaviruses in M. fuliginosus and M. pusillus (Wu et al., 2015), which supported the results of topological and phylogenetic analyses. The established alphacoronavirus genome sequences showed high similarity to other alphacoronaviruses found in other Miniopterus species, suggesting that their transmission in different Miniopterus species may provide opportunities for recombination with different alphacoronaviruses. The genetic information for these novel alphacoronaviruses will improve our understanding of the evolution and genetic diversity of coronaviruses, with potentially important implications for the transmission of human diseases. PMID:27125516

  4. Genetic variation in biomass traits among 20 diverse rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Courtney E; Mckay, John K; Mauleon, Ramil; Stephens, Janice; McNally, Kenneth L; Bush, Daniel R; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels provide a promising route of producing energy while reducing reliance on petroleum. Developing sustainable liquid fuel production from cellulosic feedstock is a major challenge and will require significant breeding efforts to maximize plant biomass production. Our approach to elucidating genes and genetic pathways that can be targeted for improving biomass production is to exploit the combination of genomic tools and genetic diversity in rice (Oryza sativa). In this study, we analyzed a diverse set of 20 recently resequenced rice varieties for variation in biomass traits at several different developmental stages. The traits included plant size and architecture, aboveground biomass, and underlying physiological processes. We found significant genetic variation among the 20 lines in all morphological and physiological traits. Although heritability estimates were significant for all traits, heritabilities were higher in traits relating to plant size and architecture than for physiological traits. Trait variation was largely explained by variety and breeding history (advanced versus landrace) but not by varietal groupings (indica, japonica, and aus). In the context of cellulosic biofuels development, cell wall composition varied significantly among varieties. Surprisingly, photosynthetic rates among the varieties were inversely correlated with biomass accumulation. Examining these data in an evolutionary context reveals that rice varieties have achieved high biomass production via independent developmental and physiological pathways, suggesting that there are multiple targets for biomass improvement. Future efforts to identify loci and networks underlying this functional variation will facilitate the improvement of biomass traits in other grasses being developed as energy crops.

  5. Polymorphic Alu insertions and genetic diversity among African populations.

    PubMed

    Terreros, Maria C; Martinez, Laisel; Herrera, Rene J

    2005-10-01

    Thorough assessment of modern genetic diversity and interpopulation affinities within the African continent is essential for understanding the processes that have been at work during the course of worldwide human evolution. Regardless of whether autosomal, Y-chromosome, or mtDNA markers are used, allele- or haplotype-frequency data from African populations are necessary in setting the framework for the construction of global population phylogenies. In the present study we analyze genetic differentiation and population structure in a data set of nine African populations using 12 polymorphic Alu insertions (PAls). Furthermore, to place our findings within a global context, we also examined an equal number of non-African groups. Frequency data from 456 individuals presented for the first time in this work plus additional data obtained from the literature indicate an overall pattern of higher intrapopulation diversity in sub-Saharan populations than in northern Africa, a prominent differentiation between these two locations, an appreciably high degree of transcontinental admixture in Egypt, and significant discontinuity between Morocco and the Iberian peninsula. Moreover, the topologies of our phylogenetic analyses suggest that out of the studied sub-Saharan groups, the southern Bantu population of Sotho/ Tswana presents the highest level of antiquity, perhaps as a result of ancestral or acquired Khoisan genetic signals. Close affinities of eastern sub-Saharan populations with Egypt in the phylogenetic trees may indicate the existence of gene flow along the Nile River.

  6. Genetics of water use physiology in locally adapted Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Julius P; Mullen, Jack; Lovell, John T; Monroe, J Grey; Paul, John R; Oakley, Christopher G; McKay, John K

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the genetic basis of adaptation to climate has long been a goal in evolutionary biology and has applications in agriculture. Adaptation to drought represents one important aspect of local adaptation, and drought is the major factor limiting agricultural yield. We examined local adaptation between Sweden and Italy Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, which show contrasting levels of water availability in their local environments. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling water use physiology traits and adaptive trait QTL (genomic regions where trait QTL and fitness QTL colocalize), we performed QTL mapping on 374F9 recombinant inbred lines in well-watered and terminal drought conditions. We found 72 QTL (32 in well-watered, 31 in drought, 9 for plasticity) across five water use physiology traits: δ(13)C, rosette area, dry rosette weight, leaf water content and percent leaf nitrogen. Some of these genomic regions colocalize with fitness QTL and with other physiology QTL in defined hotspots. In addition, we found evidence of both constitutive and inducible water use physiology QTL. Finally, we identified highly divergent candidate genes, in silico. Our results suggest that many genes with minor effects may influence adaptation through water use physiology and that pleiotropic water use physiology QTL have fitness consequences.

  7. Genetics of water use physiology in locally adapted Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Julius P; Mullen, Jack; Lovell, John T; Monroe, J Grey; Paul, John R; Oakley, Christopher G; McKay, John K

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the genetic basis of adaptation to climate has long been a goal in evolutionary biology and has applications in agriculture. Adaptation to drought represents one important aspect of local adaptation, and drought is the major factor limiting agricultural yield. We examined local adaptation between Sweden and Italy Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes, which show contrasting levels of water availability in their local environments. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling water use physiology traits and adaptive trait QTL (genomic regions where trait QTL and fitness QTL colocalize), we performed QTL mapping on 374F9 recombinant inbred lines in well-watered and terminal drought conditions. We found 72 QTL (32 in well-watered, 31 in drought, 9 for plasticity) across five water use physiology traits: δ(13)C, rosette area, dry rosette weight, leaf water content and percent leaf nitrogen. Some of these genomic regions colocalize with fitness QTL and with other physiology QTL in defined hotspots. In addition, we found evidence of both constitutive and inducible water use physiology QTL. Finally, we identified highly divergent candidate genes, in silico. Our results suggest that many genes with minor effects may influence adaptation through water use physiology and that pleiotropic water use physiology QTL have fitness consequences. PMID:27593459

  8. Diverse phenotypic and genetic responses to short-term selection in evolving Escherichia coli populations.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Marcus M; Rouillard, Nicholas P; Van Dam, Brian; Gallet, Romain; Cooper, Vaughn S

    2016-03-01

    Beneficial mutations fuel adaptation by altering phenotypes that enhance the fit of organisms to their environment. However, the phenotypic effects of mutations often depend on ecological context, making the distribution of effects across multiple environments essential to understanding the true nature of beneficial mutations. Studies that address both the genetic basis and ecological consequences of adaptive mutations remain rare. Here, we characterize the direct and pleiotropic fitness effects of a collection of 21 first-step beneficial mutants derived from naïve and adapted genotypes used in a long-term experimental evolution of Escherichia coli. Whole-genome sequencing was able to identify the majority of beneficial mutations. In contrast to previous studies, we find diverse fitness effects of mutations selected in a simple environment and few cases of genetic parallelism. The pleiotropic effects of these mutations were predominantly positive but some mutants were highly antagonistic in alternative environments. Further, the fitness effects of mutations derived from the adapted genotypes were dramatically reduced in nearly all environments. These findings suggest that many beneficial variants are accessible from a single point on the fitness landscape, and the fixation of alternative beneficial mutations may have dramatic consequences for niche breadth reduction via metabolic erosion. PMID:26995338

  9. Genetic diversity and population history of the endangered killifish Aphanius baeticus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Elena G; Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The secondary freshwater fish fauna of the western-Iberian Peninsula basin is primarily restricted to local coastal streams, and man-made salt evaporation ponds, etc., which are susceptible to periodical flood and drought events. Despite its uniqueness in ecological adaptation to high saltwater tolerance, very little is known about this fauna's population dynamics and evolutionary history. The killifish, Aphanius baeticus (Cyprinodontidae) is an endemic species restricted to river basins on Spain's southern Atlantic coastline, considered as "Endangered." In this study, the genetic structure, diversity and historical demography of A. baeticus were analyzed using mitochondrial (cytochrome b, N=131) and nuclear (4 out of 19 microsatellites tested, N=288) markers across its distribution range. The phylogenetic and networking reconstruction revealed subtle phylogeographic structuring. A scattered expansion at the beginning of the interglacial periods, coupled with posterior events of extinction and colonization caused by periodical cycles of flooding, could explain the absence of well-defined phylogenetic relationships among populations. Moreover, very low genetic diversity values and a weak population differentiation were detected. We proposed that dispersals allowed by periodic floods connecting river drainages may have promoted a wide genetic exchange among populations and could have contributed to the current genetic relatedness of these populations.

  10. Genetic diversity and population history of the endangered killifish Aphanius baeticus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Elena G; Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The secondary freshwater fish fauna of the western-Iberian Peninsula basin is primarily restricted to local coastal streams, and man-made salt evaporation ponds, etc., which are susceptible to periodical flood and drought events. Despite its uniqueness in ecological adaptation to high saltwater tolerance, very little is known about this fauna's population dynamics and evolutionary history. The killifish, Aphanius baeticus (Cyprinodontidae) is an endemic species restricted to river basins on Spain's southern Atlantic coastline, considered as "Endangered." In this study, the genetic structure, diversity and historical demography of A. baeticus were analyzed using mitochondrial (cytochrome b, N=131) and nuclear (4 out of 19 microsatellites tested, N=288) markers across its distribution range. The phylogenetic and networking reconstruction revealed subtle phylogeographic structuring. A scattered expansion at the beginning of the interglacial periods, coupled with posterior events of extinction and colonization caused by periodical cycles of flooding, could explain the absence of well-defined phylogenetic relationships among populations. Moreover, very low genetic diversity values and a weak population differentiation were detected. We proposed that dispersals allowed by periodic floods connecting river drainages may have promoted a wide genetic exchange among populations and could have contributed to the current genetic relatedness of these populations. PMID:24939890

  11. Genetic diversity of turmeric germplasm (Curcuma longa; Zingiberaceae) identified by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, M S; Pinheiro, J B; Filho, J A Azevedo; Zucchi, M I

    2011-03-09

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a triploid, vegetatively propagated crop introduced early during the colonization of Brazil. Turmeric rhizomes are ground into a powder used as a natural dye in the food industry, although recent research suggests a greater potential for the development of drugs and cosmetics. In Brazil, little is known about the genetic variability available for crop improvement. We examined the genetic diversity among turmeric accessions from a Brazilian germplasm collection comprising 39 accessions collected from the States of Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Pará. For comparison, 18 additional genotypes were analyzed, including samples from India and Puerto Rico. Total DNA was extracted from lyophilized leaf tissue and genetic analysis was performed using 17 microsatellite markers (single-sequence repeats). Shannon-Weiner indexes ranged from 0.017 (Minas Gerais) to 0.316 (São Paulo). Analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated major differences between countries (63.4%) and that most of the genetic diversity in Brazil is found within states (75.3%). Genotypes from São Paulo State were the most divergent and potentially useful for crop improvement. Structure analysis indicated two main groups of accessions. These results can help target future collecting efforts for introduction of new materials needed to develop more productive and better adapted cultivars.

  12. Multiple mating but not recombination causes quantitative increase in offspring genetic diversity for varying genetic architectures.

    PubMed

    Rueppell, Olav; Meier, Stephen; Deutsch, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the evolution of sex and recombination is particularly intriguing for some species of eusocial insects because they display exceptionally high mating frequencies and genomic recombination rates. Explanations for both phenomena are based on the notion that both increase colony genetic diversity, with demonstrated benefits for colony disease resistance and division of labor. However, the relative contributions of mating number and recombination rate to colony genetic diversity have never been simultaneously assessed. Our study simulates colonies, assuming different mating numbers, recombination rates, and genetic architectures, to assess their worker genotypic diversity. The number of loci has a strong negative effect on genotypic diversity when the allelic effects are inversely scaled to locus number. In contrast, dominance, epistasis, lethal effects, or limiting the allelic diversity at each locus does not significantly affect the model outcomes. Mating number increases colony genotypic variance and lowers variation among colonies with quickly diminishing returns. Genomic recombination rate does not affect intra- and inter-colonial genotypic variance, regardless of mating frequency and genetic architecture. Recombination slightly increases the genotypic range of colonies and more strongly the number of workers with unique allele combinations across all loci. Overall, our study contradicts the argument that the exceptionally high recombination rates cause a quantitative increase in offspring genotypic diversity across one generation. Alternative explanations for the evolution of high recombination rates in social insects are therefore needed. Short-term benefits are central to most explanations of the evolution of multiple mating and high recombination rates in social insects but our results also apply to other species.

  13. Impact of alternative regeneration methods on genetic diversity in coastal Douglas-fir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.T.; Zuo, J.; Shimizu, J.Y.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic implications of natural and artificial regeneration following three regeneration methods (group selection, shelterwood, and clearcut) were investigated in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) using genetic markers (17 allozyme loci). In general, harvesting followed by either natural or artificial regeneration resulted in offspring populations little altered from those in the previous generation. Cutting the smallest trees to form shelterwoods, however, resulted in the removal of rare, presumably deleterious, alleles, such that slightly fewer alleles per locus were observed among residual trees (2.76) and natural regeneration (2.75) than found in uncut (control) stands (2.86). Thus, although the shelterwood regime appears quite compatible with gene conservation, it would be best to leave parent trees of a range of sizes in shelterwoods designated as gene conservation reserves, in order to maximize the number of alleles (regardless of current adaptive value) in naturally regenerated offspring. Seedling stocks used for artificial regeneration in clearcut, shelterwood, and group selection stands (7 total) had significantly greater levels of genetic diversity, on average, than found in natural regeneration. This is probably because the seeds used in artificial seedling stocks came from many wild stands and thus, sampled more diversity than found in single populations.Genetic implications of natural and artificial regeneration following three regeneration methods (group selection, shelterwood, and clearcut) were investigated in coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) using genetic markers (17 allozyme loci). In general, harvesting followed by either natural or artificial regeneration resulted in offspring populations little altered from those in the previous generation. Cutting the smallest trees to form shelterwoods, however, resulted in the removal of rare, presumably deleterious, alleles

  14. Selection from parasites favours immunogenetic diversity but not divergence among locally adapted host populations.

    PubMed

    Tobler, M; Plath, M; Riesch, R; Schlupp, I; Grasse, A; Munimanda, G K; Setzer, C; Penn, D J; Moodley, Y

    2014-05-01

    The unprecedented polymorphism in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by balancing selection from parasites. However, do parasites also drive divergence at MHC loci between host populations, or do the effects of balancing selection maintain similarities among populations? We examined MHC variation in populations of the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana and characterized their parasite communities. Poecilia mexicana populations in the Cueva del Azufre system are locally adapted to darkness and the presence of toxic hydrogen sulphide, representing highly divergent ecotypes or incipient species. Parasite communities differed significantly across populations, and populations with higher parasite loads had higher levels of diversity at class II MHC genes. However, despite different parasite communities, marked divergence in adaptive traits and in neutral genetic markers, we found MHC alleles to be remarkably similar among host populations. Our findings indicate that balancing selection from parasites maintains immunogenetic diversity of hosts, but this process does not promote MHC divergence in this system. On the contrary, we suggest that balancing selection on immunogenetic loci may outweigh divergent selection causing divergence, thereby hindering host divergence and speciation. Our findings support the hypothesis that balancing selection maintains MHC similarities among lineages during and after speciation (trans-species evolution). PMID:24725091

  15. Paternal phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Waki, A; Sasazaki, S; Kobayashi, E; Mannen, H

    2015-06-01

    This study was a first analysis of paternal genetic diversity for extensive Asian domestic goats using SRY gene sequences. Sequencing comparison of the SRY 3'-untranslated region among 210 Asian goats revealed four haplotypes (Y1A, Y1B, Y2A and Y2B) derived from four variable sites including a novel substitution detected in this study. In Asian goats, the predominant haplotype was Y1A (62%) and second most common was Y2B (30%). Interestingly, the Y2B was a unique East Asian Y chromosomal variant, which differentiates eastern and western Eurasian goats. The SRY geographic distribution in Myanmar and Cambodia indicated predominant the haplotype Y1A in plains areas and a high frequency of Y2B in mountain areas. The results suggest recent genetic infiltration of modern breeds into South-East Asian goats and an ancestral SRY Y2B haplotype in Asian native goats. PMID:25917305

  16. The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Mark A

    2012-03-19

    The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics.

  17. The impact of recent events on human genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The historical record tells us stories of migrations, population expansions and colonization events in the last few thousand years, but what was their demographic impact? Genetics can throw light on this issue, and has mostly done so through the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the male-specific Y chromosome. However, there are a number of problems, including marker ascertainment bias, possible influences of natural selection, and the obscuring layers of the palimpsest of historical and prehistorical events. Y-chromosomal lineages are particularly affected by genetic drift, which can be accentuated by recent social selection. A diversity of approaches to expansions in Europe is yielding insights into the histories of Phoenicians, Roma, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, and new methods for producing and analysing genome-wide data hold much promise. The field would benefit from more consensus on appropriate methods, and better communication between geneticists and experts in other disciplines, such as history, archaeology and linguistics. PMID:22312046

  18. Paternal phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Waki, A; Sasazaki, S; Kobayashi, E; Mannen, H

    2015-06-01

    This study was a first analysis of paternal genetic diversity for extensive Asian domestic goats using SRY gene sequences. Sequencing comparison of the SRY 3'-untranslated region among 210 Asian goats revealed four haplotypes (Y1A, Y1B, Y2A and Y2B) derived from four variable sites including a novel substitution detected in this study. In Asian goats, the predominant haplotype was Y1A (62%) and second most common was Y2B (30%). Interestingly, the Y2B was a unique East Asian Y chromosomal variant, which differentiates eastern and western Eurasian goats. The SRY geographic distribution in Myanmar and Cambodia indicated predominant the haplotype Y1A in plains areas and a high frequency of Y2B in mountain areas. The results suggest recent genetic infiltration of modern breeds into South-East Asian goats and an ancestral SRY Y2B haplotype in Asian native goats.

  19. The impact of genetic diversity in protozoa on molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Verweij, Jaco J

    2011-02-01

    Detection of intestinal parasitic protists, commonly referred to as 'intestinal protozoa,' by PCR is increasingly used not only for identification or confirmation but also as a first-line diagnostic tool. Apart from the ability to sample correctly and extract parasite DNA directly from faeces, primer and probe specificity and sensitivity affect predictive values and hence the utility of diagnostic assays. Molecular characterization of intestinal protists is necessary to design primers and probes because this is the basic material for current and future improved diagnostic PCRs for either detecting all genetic variants or specifically differentiating among such variants. As an example, this paper highlights the existence of interspecific and intraspecific genetic diversity among intestinal, unicellular parasites and its implications for nucleic acid-based diagnostic assays.

  20. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum strains in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M; Morais e Silva Tavares, Patrícia; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros

    2005-09-01

    This study establishes the genetic relatedness among Brazilian Histoplasma capsulatum samples obtained from different sources. A PCR-based random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay was used to delineate polymorphisms among isolates in geographically diverse regions in Brazil. RAPD fingerprints revealed distinct DNA profiles and provided a high level of discrimination among H. capsulatum strains from different locations. Cluster I was composed of H. capsulatum isolates from the northeast region. The majority of strains from southeast and south were categorized as major cluster II. The strain 84564 from Rio de Janeiro State showed no genetic correlation to any of the isolates from the same state. The RAPD patterns of H. capsulatum isolates from Goias (Cluster III) were unrelated to DNA fingerprints observed among the other H. capsulatum strains (48% similarity). This study is the first report that stratifies the clusters of H. capsulatum strains from Brazil by molecular typing and associates them with the geographical origin. PMID:16055317

  1. Genetic Diversity of Eight Domestic Goat Populations Raised in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Zafer; Kurar, Ercan; Ozsensoy, Yusuf; Altunok, Vahdettin; Nizamlioglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the intra- and intergenetic diversities of eight different goat populations in Turkey including Hair, Angora, Kilis, Yayladag, Shami, Honamli, Saanen, and Alpine. A total of 244 DNA samples were genotyped using 11 microsatellites loci. The genetic differentiation between breeds was considerable as a result of the statistically significant (P < 0.001) pairwise F ST values of each pair of breeds. Exceptionally, F ST values calculated for Honamli and Hair breeds were statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05). Heterozygosity values ranged between 0.62 and 0.73. According to the structure and assignment test, Angora and Yayladag goats were assigned to the breed they belong to, while other breeds were assigned to two or more different groups. Because this study for the first time presented genetic data on the Yayladag goat, results of structure analysis and assigned test suggest that further analyses are needed using additional and different molecular markers. PMID:27092309

  2. Effects of inbreeding on the genetic diversity of populations.

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The study of variability within species is important to all biologists who use genetic markers. Since the discovery of molecular variability among normal individuals, data have been collected from a wide range of organisms, and it is important to understand the major factors affecting diversity levels and patterns. Comparisons of inbreeding and outcrossing populations can contribute to this understanding, and therefore studying plant populations is important, because related species often have different breeding systems. DNA sequence data are now starting to become available from suitable plant and animal populations, to measure and compare variability levels and test predictions. PMID:12831472

  3. Diversity and genetic structure among subpopulations of Gossypium mustelinum (Malvaceae).

    PubMed

    Alves, M F; Barroso, P A V; Ciampi, A Y; Hoffmann, L V; Azevedo, V C R; Cavalcante, U

    2013-02-27

    Gossypium mustelinum is the only cotton species native to Brazil; it is endemic to the semi-arid region of the northeast. The populations are found near perennial and semi-perennial sources of water, such as ponds or pools in intermittent streams. Problems with in situ conservation derive from human interference in its habitat, mainly because of excessive cattle grazing and deforestation. Establishing efficient strategies for in situ conservation requires knowledge of the genetic structure of the populations. We evaluated the structure and genetic variability of populations of G. mustelinum in the Tocó and Capivara Rivers (State of Bahia). Two hundred and eighteen mature G. mustelinum plants were genotyped with SSR markers. The molecular data were used to estimate the allelic frequencies, the heterozygosity, the F statistics, and the genetic distance among the populations and among individuals. We found high genetic diversity among the populations. The FST indexes for each population were also high and strongly correlated with physical distance. The high estimated level of endogamy and the low observed heterozygosity are indicative that the populations reproduce mainly by self-fertilization and crosses between related individuals. Consequently, strategies for in situ preservation should include at least three occurrence sites of G. mustelinum from each population. For ex situ conservation, the collections should include as many sites as possible.

  4. Centennial olive trees as a reservoir of genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Concepción M.; Trujillo, Isabel; Barrio, Eladio; Belaj, Angjelina; Barranco, Diego; Rallo, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the oldest trees could be a powerful tool both for germplasm collection and for understanding the earliest origins of clonally propagated fruit crops. The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a suitable model to study the origin of cultivars due to its long lifespan, resulting in the existence of both centennial and millennial trees across the Mediterranean Basin. Methods The genetic identity and diversity as well as the phylogenetic relationships among the oldest wild and cultivated olives of southern Spain were evaluated by analysing simple sequence repeat markers. Samples from both the canopy and the roots of each tree were analysed to distinguish which trees were self-rooted and which were grafted. The ancient olives were also put into chronological order to infer the antiquity of traditional olive cultivars. Key Results Only 9·6 % out of 104 a priori cultivated ancient genotypes matched current olive cultivars. The percentage of unidentified genotypes was higher among the oldest olives, which could be because they belong to ancient unknown cultivars or because of possible intra-cultivar variability. Comparing the observed patterns of genetic variation made it possible to distinguish which trees were grafted onto putative wild olives. Conclusions This study of ancient olives has been fruitful both for germplasm collection and for enlarging our knowledge about olive domestication. The findings suggest that grafting pre-existing wild olives with olive cultivars was linked to the beginnings of olive growing. Additionally, the low number of genotypes identified in current cultivars points out that the ancient olives from southern Spain constitute a priceless reservoir of genetic diversity. PMID:21852276

  5. Genetic variation in the Sorbs of eastern Germany in the context of broader European genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Veeramah, Krishna R; Tönjes, Anke; Kovacs, Peter; Gross, Arnd; Wegmann, Daniel; Geary, Patrick; Gasperikova, Daniela; Klimes, Iwar; Scholz, Markus; Novembre, John; Stumvoll, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Population isolates have long been of interest to genetic epidemiologists because of their potential to increase power to detect disease-causing genetic variants. The Sorbs of Germany are considered as cultural and linguistic isolates and have recently been the focus of disease association mapping efforts. They are thought to have settled in their present location in eastern Germany after a westward migration from a largely Slavic-speaking territory during the Middle Ages. To examine Sorbian genetic diversity within the context of other European populations, we analyzed genotype data for over 30 000 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms from over 200 Sorbs individuals. We compare the Sorbs with other European individuals, including samples from population isolates. Despite their geographical proximity to German speakers, the Sorbs showed greatest genetic similarity to Polish and Czech individuals, consistent with the linguistic proximity of Sorbian to other West Slavic languages. The Sorbs also showed evidence of subtle levels of genetic isolation in comparison with samples from non-isolated European populations. The level of genetic isolation was less than that observed for the Sardinians and French Basque, who were clear outliers on multiple measures of isolation. The finding of the Sorbs as only a minor genetic isolate demonstrates the need to genetically characterize putative population isolates, as they possess a wide range of levels of isolation because of their different demographic histories. PMID:21559053

  6. The Relative Importance of Genetic Diversity and Phenotypic Plasticity in Determining Invasion Success of a Clonal Weed in the USA and China.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yupeng; van Klinken, Rieks D; Sosa, Alejandro; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Xu, Cheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an important adaptive strategy for clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats. Increased phenotypic plasticity can be especially beneficial for invasive clonal plants, allowing them to colonize new environments even when genetic diversity is low. However, the relative importance of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity for invasion success remains largely unknown. Here, we performed molecular marker analyses and a common garden experiment to investigate the genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of the globally important weed Alternanthera philoxeroides in response to different water availability (terrestrial vs. aquatic habitats). This species relies predominantly on clonal propagation in introduced ranges. We therefore expected genetic diversity to be restricted in the two sampled introduced ranges (the USA and China) when compared to the native range (Argentina), but that phenotypic plasticity may allow the species' full niche range to nonetheless be exploited. We found clones from China had very low genetic diversity in terms of both marker diversity and quantitative variation when compared with those from the USA and Argentina, probably reflecting different introduction histories. In contrast, similar patterns of phenotypic plasticity were found for clones from all three regions. Furthermore, despite the different levels of genetic diversity, bioclimatic modeling suggested that the full potential bioclimatic distribution had been invaded in both China and USA. Phenotypic plasticity, not genetic diversity, was therefore critical in allowing A. philoxeroides to invade diverse habitats across broad geographic areas.

  7. The Relative Importance of Genetic Diversity and Phenotypic Plasticity in Determining Invasion Success of a Clonal Weed in the USA and China

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yupeng; van Klinken, Rieks D.; Sosa, Alejandro; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Xu, Cheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an important adaptive strategy for clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats. Increased phenotypic plasticity can be especially beneficial for invasive clonal plants, allowing them to colonize new environments even when genetic diversity is low. However, the relative importance of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity for invasion success remains largely unknown. Here, we performed molecular marker analyses and a common garden experiment to investigate the genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of the globally important weed Alternanthera philoxeroides in response to different water availability (terrestrial vs. aquatic habitats). This species relies predominantly on clonal propagation in introduced ranges. We therefore expected genetic diversity to be restricted in the two sampled introduced ranges (the USA and China) when compared to the native range (Argentina), but that phenotypic plasticity may allow the species' full niche range to nonetheless be exploited. We found clones from China had very low genetic diversity in terms of both marker diversity and quantitative variation when compared with those from the USA and Argentina, probably reflecting different introduction histories. In contrast, similar patterns of phenotypic plasticity were found for clones from all three regions. Furthermore, despite the different levels of genetic diversity, bioclimatic modeling suggested that the full potential bioclimatic distribution had been invaded in both China and USA. Phenotypic plasticity, not genetic diversity, was therefore critical in allowing A. philoxeroides to invade diverse habitats across broad geographic areas. PMID:26941769

  8. The Relative Importance of Genetic Diversity and Phenotypic Plasticity in Determining Invasion Success of a Clonal Weed in the USA and China.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yupeng; van Klinken, Rieks D; Sosa, Alejandro; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiakuan; Xu, Cheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an important adaptive strategy for clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats. Increased phenotypic plasticity can be especially beneficial for invasive clonal plants, allowing them to colonize new environments even when genetic diversity is low. However, the relative importance of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity for invasion success remains largely unknown. Here, we performed molecular marker analyses and a common garden experiment to investigate the genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity of the globally important weed Alternanthera philoxeroides in response to different water availability (terrestrial vs. aquatic habitats). This species relies predominantly on clonal propagation in introduced ranges. We therefore expected genetic diversity to be restricted in the two sampled introduced ranges (the USA and China) when compared to the native range (Argentina), but that phenotypic plasticity may allow the species' full niche range to nonetheless be exploited. We found clones from China had very low genetic diversity in terms of both marker diversity and quantitative variation when compared with those from the USA and Argentina, probably reflecting different introduction histories. In contrast, similar patterns of phenotypic plasticity were found for clones from all three regions. Furthermore, despite the different levels of genetic diversity, bioclimatic modeling suggested that the full potential bioclimatic distribution had been invaded in both China and USA. Phenotypic plasticity, not genetic diversity, was therefore critical in allowing A. philoxeroides to invade diverse habitats across broad geographic areas. PMID:26941769

  9. How closely does genetic diversity in finite populations conform to predictions of neutral theory? Large deficits in regions of low recombination

    PubMed Central

    Frankham, R

    2012-01-01

    Levels of genetic diversity in finite populations are crucial in conservation and evolutionary biology. Genetic diversity is required for populations to evolve and its loss is related to inbreeding in random mating populations, and thus to reduced population fitness and increased extinction risk. Neutral theory is widely used to predict levels of genetic diversity. I review levels of genetic diversity in finite populations in relation to predictions of neutral theory. Positive associations between genetic diversity and population size, as predicted by neutral theory, are observed for microsatellites, allozymes, quantitative genetic variation and usually for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, there are frequently significant deviations from neutral theory owing to indirect selection at linked loci caused by balancing selection, selective sweeps and background selection. Substantially lower genetic diversity than predicted under neutrality was found for chromosomes with low recombination rates and high linkage disequilibrium (compared with ‘normally' recombining chromosomes within species and adjusted for different copy numbers and mutation rates), including W (median 100% lower) and Y (89% lower) chromosomes, dot fourth chromosomes in Drosophila (94% lower) and mtDNA (67% lower). Further, microsatellite genetic and allelic diversity were lost at 12 and 33% faster rates than expected in populations adapting to captivity, owing to widespread selective sweeps. Overall, neither neutral theory nor most versions of the genetic draft hypothesis are compatible with all empirical results. PMID:21878983

  10. Multilocus genotypic data reveal high genetic diversity and low population genetic structure of Iranian indigenous sheep.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, S M F; Faruque, M O; Falahati Anbaran, M; Afraz, F; Mousavi, S M; Boettcher, P; Joost, S; Han, J L; Colli, L; Periasamy, K; Negrini, R; Ajmone-Marsan, P

    2016-08-01

    Iranian livestock diversity is still largely unexplored, in spite of the interest in the populations historically reared in this country located near the Fertile Crescent, a major livestock domestication centre. In this investigation, the genetic diversity and differentiation of 10 Iranian indigenous fat-tailed sheep breeds were investigated using 18 microsatellite markers. Iranian breeds were found to host a high level of diversity. This conclusion is substantiated by the large number of alleles observed across loci (average 13.83, range 7-22) and by the high within-breed expected heterozygosity (average 0.75, range 0.72-0.76). Iranian sheep have a low level of genetic differentiation, as indicated by the analysis of molecular variance, which allocated a very small proportion (1.67%) of total variation to the between-population component, and by the small fixation index (FST  = 0.02). Both Bayesian clustering and principal coordinates analysis revealed the absence of a detectable genetic structure. Also, no isolation by distance was observed through comparison of genetic and geographical distances. In spite of high within-breed variation, signatures of inbreeding were detected by the FIS indices, which were positive in all and statistically significant in three breeds. Possible factors explaining the patterns observed, such as considerable gene flow and inbreeding probably due to anthropogenic activities in the light of population management and conservation programmes, are discussed. PMID:26953226

  11. Genetic diversity and adaptedness in tetraploid Avena barbata and its diploid ancestors Avena hirtula and Avena wiestii.

    PubMed Central

    García, P; Morris, M I; Sáenz-de-Miera, L E; Allard, R W; Pérez de la Vega, M; Ladizinsky, G

    1991-01-01

    Avena barbata, a tetraploid grass, is much more widely adapted and successful in forming dense stands than its diploid ancestors. The success of such polyploids has often been attributed to heterosis associated with ability to breed true for a highly heterozygous state in which allelic differences between the parents are fixed in the polyploid by chromosome doubling. We have examined the relationship between genetic diversity and adaptedness for 14 allozyme loci in A. barbata and its diploid ancestors in samples collected from diverse habitats in Israel and Spain. The relationship varied from locus to locus: superior adaptedness was associated with genetic uniformity for five loci, in part with genetic uniformity and in part with genetic diversity (monomorphism for a single heteroallelic quadriplex) for one locus, and with allelic diversity in the form of heteroallelic quadriplexes combined with genotypic diversity in the form of complex polymorphisms among different homoallelic and/or heteroallelic quadriplexes for the eight remaining loci. These results indicate that allelic diversity fixed in nonsegregating form through chromosome doubling was an important factor in the evolution of adaptedness in A. barbata. However, it is unlikely that heterosis associated with heterozygosity contributed significantly to superior adaptedness in either the diploids or the tetraploid because virtually all loci (approximately 99%) were homozygous in the Avena diploids and tetraploid. PMID:1996323

  12. Almost 20 years of Neanderthal palaeogenetics: adaptation, admixture, diversity, demography and extinction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2015-01-19

    Nearly two decades since the first retrieval of Neanderthal DNA, recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the generation of high-coverage genomes from two archaic hominins, a Neanderthal and a Denisovan, as well as a complete mitochondrial genome from remains which probably represent early members of the Neanderthal lineage. This genomic information, coupled with diversity exome data from several Neanderthal specimens is shedding new light on evolutionary processes such as the genetic basis of Neanderthal and modern human-specific adaptations-including morphological and behavioural traits-as well as the extent and nature of the admixture events between them. An emerging picture is that Neanderthals had a long-term small population size, lived in small and isolated groups and probably practised inbreeding at times. Deleterious genetic effects associated with these demographic factors could have played a role in their extinction. The analysis of DNA from further remains making use of new large-scale hybridization-capture-based methods as well as of new approaches to discriminate contaminant DNA sequences will provide genetic information in spatial and temporal scales that could help clarify the Neanderthal's-and our very own-evolutionary history.

  13. Patterns of genetic and eco-geographical diversity in Spanish barleys.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, S; Igartua, Ernesto; Moralejo, M; Ramsay, L; Molina-Cano, J L; Ciudad, F J; Lasa, J M; Gracia, M P; Casas, A M

    2008-01-01

    The pool of Western Mediterranean landraces has been under-utilised for barley breeding so far. The objectives of this study were to assess genetic diversity in a core collection of inbred lines derived from Spanish barley landraces to establish its relationship to barleys from other origins, and to correlate the distribution of diversity with geographical and climatic factors. To this end, 64 SSR were used to evaluate the polymorphism among 225 barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) genotypes, comprising two-row and six-row types. These included 159 landraces from the Spanish barley core collection (SBCC) plus 66 cultivars, mainly from European countries, as a reference set. Out of the 669 alleles generated, a large proportion of them were unique to the six-row Spanish barleys. An analysis of molecular variance revealed a clear genetic divergence between the six-row Spanish barleys and the reference cultivars, whereas this was not evident for the two-row barleys. A model-based clustering analysis identified an underlying population structure, consisting of four main populations for the whole genotype set, and suggested further possible subdivision within two of these populations. Most of the six-row Spanish landraces clustered into two groups that corresponded to geographic regions with contrasting environmental conditions. The existence of wide genetic diversity in Spanish germplasm, possibly related to adaptation to a broad range of environmental conditions, and its divergence from current European cultivars confirm its potential as a new resource for barley breeders, and make the SBCC a valuable tool for the study of adaptation in barley. PMID:18026712

  14. Changes in Genetic Diversity from Field to Laboratory During Colonization of Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Lainhart, William; Bickersmith, Sara A; Moreno, Marta; Rios, Carlos Tong; Vinetz, Joseph M; Conn, Jan E

    2015-11-01

    The process of colonizing any arthropod species, including vector mosquitoes, necessarily involves adaptation to laboratory conditions. The adaptation and evolution of colonized mosquito populations needs consideration when such colonies are used as representative models for pathogen transmission dynamics. A recently established colony of Anopheles darlingi, the primary malaria vector in Amazonian South America, was tested for genetic diversity and bottleneck after 21 generations, using microsatellites. As expected, laboratory An. darlingi had fewer private and rare alleles (frequency < 0.05), decreased observed heterozygosity, and more common alleles (frequency > 0.50), but no significant evidence of a bottleneck, decrease in total alleles, or increase in inbreeding compared with field specimens (founder population). Low-moderate differentiation between field and laboratory populations was detected. With these findings, and the documented inherent differences between laboratory and field populations, results of pathogen transmission studies using this An. darlingi colony need to be interpreted cautiously.

  15. Considerable MHC diversity suggests that the functional extinction of baiji is not related to population genetic collapse.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shixia; Ju, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xuming; Wang, Lian; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2012-01-01

    To further extend our understanding of the mechanism causing the current nearly extinct status of the baiji (Lipotes vexillifer), one of the most critically endangered species in the world, genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DRB locus was investigated in the baiji. Nine highly divergent DRB alleles were identified in 17 samples, with an average of 28.4 (13.2%) nucleotide difference and 16.7 (23.5%) amino acid difference between alleles. The unexpectedly high levels of DRB allelic diversity in the baiji may partly be attributable to its evolutionary adaptations to the freshwater environment which is regarded to have a higher parasite diversity compared to the marine environment. In addition, balancing selection was found to be the main mechanisms in generating sequence diversity at baiji DRB gene. Considerable sequence variation at the adaptive MHC genes despite of significant loss of neutral genetic variation in baiji genome might suggest that intense selection has overpowered random genetic drift as the main evolutionary forces, which further suggested that the critically endangered or nearly extinct status of the baiji is not an outcome of genetic collapse. PMID:22272349

  16. Considerable MHC Diversity Suggests That the Functional Extinction of Baiji Is Not Related to Population Genetic Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shixia; Ju, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xuming; Wang, Lian; Zhou, Kaiya; Yang, Guang

    2012-01-01

    To further extend our understanding of the mechanism causing the current nearly extinct status of the baiji (Lipotes vexillifer), one of the most critically endangered species in the world, genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DRB locus was investigated in the baiji. Nine highly divergent DRB alleles were identified in 17 samples, with an average of 28.4 (13.2%) nucleotide difference and 16.7 (23.5%) amino acid difference between alleles. The unexpectedly high levels of DRB allelic diversity in the baiji may partly be attributable to its evolutionary adaptations to the freshwater environment which is regarded to have a higher parasite diversity compared to the marine environment. In addition, balancing selection was found to be the main mechanisms in generating sequence diversity at baiji DRB gene. Considerable sequence variation at the adaptive MHC genes despite of significant loss of neutral genetic variation in baiji genome might suggest that intense selection has overpowered random genetic drift as the main evolutionary forces, which further suggested that the critically endangered or nearly extinct status of the baiji is not an outcome of genetic collapse. PMID:22272349

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity in earthworms using DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshul; Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Gupta, Navneet K; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2011-01-01

    Earthworms are one of the most important and beneficial macrofauna, and are used extensively in organic farming. Earthworms mediate soil biological regulation systems, and produce biogenic structures. They help to maintain soil structure, water infiltration, and regulate the availability of nutrients assimilated by plants. The objectives of this study were to perform morphological and molecular characterizations of 24 earthworm individuals collected from geographically diverse locations to assess the level of genetic variation. For molecular analysis, the effectiveness of RAPD, ISSR, and Universal rice primers (URPs) markers was investigated to identify polymorphism among 24 isolates of earthworms. A total of 62 molecular markers were used for amplification of genomic DNA of earthworms. Of these, 10 RAPD, 10 ISSR, and 10 URPs markers were used for characterization, which showed 95.7%, 96.7% and 98.3% polymorphism, respectively. The dendrogram, generated from the DNA markers by the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages, grouped all the isolates into two main clusters. All Eisenia fetida isolates were clustered in group A, whereas group B included three isolates belonging to Eudrilus eugeniae. Molecular markers allowed a rapid assessment of genetic variation among these closely related isolates of earthworms. These results suggest that molecular markers are a good choice for diversity analysis of earthworm individuals. PMID:21186943

  18. Whole mitochondrial genome genetic diversity in an Estonian population sample.

    PubMed

    Stoljarova, Monika; King, Jonathan L; Takahashi, Maiko; Aaspõllu, Anu; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is a useful marker for population studies, human identification, and forensic analysis. Commonly used hypervariable regions I and II (HVI/HVII) were reported to contain as little as 25% of mitochondrial DNA variants and therefore the majority of power of discrimination of mitochondrial DNA resides in the coding region. Massively parallel sequencing technology enables entire mitochondrial genome sequencing. In this study, buccal swabs were collected from 114 unrelated Estonians and whole mitochondrial genome sequences were generated using the Illumina MiSeq system. The results are concordant with previous mtDNA control region reports of high haplogroup HV and U frequencies (47.4 and 23.7% in this study, respectively) in the Estonian population. One sample with the Northern Asian haplogroup D was detected. The genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample was estimated to be 99.67 and 95.85%, for mtGenome and HVI/HVII data, respectively. The random match probability for mtGenome data was 1.20 versus 4.99% for HVI/HVII. The nucleotide mean pairwise difference was 27 ± 11 for mtGenome and 7 ± 3 for HVI/HVII data. These data describe the genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample and emphasize the power of discrimination of the entire mitochondrial genome over the hypervariable regions.

  19. Genetic diversity in Spanish donkey breeds using microsatellite DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    Aranguren-Méndez, José; Jordana, Jordi; Gomez, Mariano

    2001-01-01

    Genetic diversity at 13 equine microsatellite loci was compared in five endangered Spanish donkey breeds: Andaluza, Catalana, Mallorquina, Encartaciones and Zamorano-Leonesa. All of the equine microsatellites used in this study were amplified and were polymorphic in the domestic donkey breeds with the exception of HMS1, which was monomorphic, and ASB2, which failed to amplify. Allele number, frequency distributions and mean heterozygosities were very similar among the Spanish donkey breeds. The unbiased expected heterozygosity (HE) over all the populations varied between 0.637 and 0.684 in this study. The low GST value showed that only 3.6% of the diversity was between breeds (P < 0.01). Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were shown for a number of locus-population combinations, except HMS5 that showed agreement in all analysed populations. The cumulative exclusion probability (PE) was 0.999 in each breed, suggesting that the loci would be suitable for donkey parentage testing. The constructed dendrogram from the DA distance matrix showed little differentiation between Spanish breeds, but great differentiation between them and the Moroccan ass and also with the horse, used as an outgroup. These results confirm the potential use of equine microsatellite loci as a tool for genetic studies in domestic donkey populations, which could also be useful for conservation plans. PMID:11559485

  20. Complexity of Infection and Genetic Diversity in Cambodian Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Lindsey R.; Popovici, Jean; Kim, Saorin; Dysoley, Lek; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Menard, Didier; Serre, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is the most widely distributed human malaria parasite with 2.9 billion people living in endemic areas. Despite intensive malaria control efforts, the proportion of cases attributed to P. vivax is increasing in many countries. Genetic analyses of the parasite population and its dynamics could provide an assessment of the efficacy of control efforts, but, unfortunately, these studies are limited in P. vivax by the lack of informative markers and high-throughput genotyping methods. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a sequencing-based assay to simultaneously genotype more than 100 SNPs and applied this approach to ~500 P. vivax-infected individuals recruited across nine locations in Cambodia between 2004 and 2013. Our analyses showed that the vast majority of infections are polyclonal (92%) and that P. vivax displays high genetic diversity in Cambodia without apparent geographic stratification. Interestingly, our analyses also revealed that the proportion of monoclonal infections significantly increased between 2004 and 2013, possibly suggesting that malaria control strategies in Cambodia may be successfully affecting the parasite population. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that this high-throughput genotyping assay is efficient in characterizing P. vivax diversity and can provide valuable insights to assess the efficacy of malaria elimination programs or to monitor the spread of specific parasites. PMID:27018585

  1. Insights into Penicillium roqueforti Morphological and Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Gillot, Guillaume; Jany, Jean-Luc; Coton, Monika; Le Floch, Gaétan; Debaets, Stella; Ropars, Jeanne; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana; Coton, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Fungi exhibit substantial morphological and genetic diversity, often associated with cryptic species differing in ecological niches. Penicillium roqueforti is used as a starter culture for blue-veined cheeses, being responsible for their flavor and color, but is also a common spoilage organism in various foods. Different types of blue-veined cheeses are manufactured and consumed worldwide, displaying specific organoleptic properties. These features may be due to the different manufacturing methods and/or to the specific P. roqueforti strains used. Substantial morphological diversity exists within P. roqueforti and, although not taxonomically valid, several technological names have been used for strains on different cheeses (e.g., P. gorgonzolae, P. stilton). A worldwide P. roqueforti collection from 120 individual blue-veined cheeses and 21 other substrates was analyzed here to determine (i) whether P. roqueforti is a complex of cryptic species, by applying the Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition criterion (GC-PSR), (ii) whether the population structure assessed using microsatellite markers correspond to blue cheese types, and (iii) whether the genetic clusters display different morphologies. GC-PSR multi-locus sequence analyses showed no evidence of cryptic species. The population structure analysis using microsatellites revealed the existence of highly differentiated populations, corresponding to blue cheese types and with contrasted morphologies. This suggests that the population structure has been shaped by different cheese-making processes or that different populations were recruited for different cheese types. Cheese-making fungi thus constitute good models for studying fungal diversification under recent selection. PMID:26091176

  2. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  3. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  4. [Temporal evolution of the genetic diversity of Chaerophyllum bulbosum: consequences on the genetic resources management].

    PubMed

    Le Clerc, Valérie; Suel, Anita; Geoffriau, Emmanuel; Huet, Sébastien; Briard, Mathilde

    2014-05-01

    To increase the germplasm necessary for varietal improvement of tuberous-rooted chervil, a food apiaceae of increasing importance, two successive surveys of wild populations were carried out in Germany, in the Rhine and the Weser River basins. These mainly riparian populations are likely to be shaped by changes in hydrographic networks that characterize their habitat. Molecular studies have shown a strong structuration between wild populations (GST∼32%), but did not reveal any structuring effect of the hydrographic network on diversity or any global phenomenon of genetic erosion. A discussion about the strategy for maintaining the diversity of this species on a long-term period is proposed. PMID:24841963

  5. Genetic characterization of northeastern Italian population isolates in the context of broader European genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Esko, Tõnu; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Nelis, Mari; Borel, Christelle; Debniak, Tadeusz; Jakkula, Eveliina; Julia, Antonio; Karachanak, Sena; Khrunin, Andrey; Kisfali, Peter; Krulisova, Veronika; Aušrelé Kučinskiené, Zita; Rehnström, Karola; Traglia, Michela; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Zimprich, Fritz; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Estivill, Xavier; Glavač, Damjan; Gut, Ivo; Klovins, Janis; Krawczak, Michael; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lathrop, Mark; Macek, Milan; Marsal, Sara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melegh, Béla; Limborska, Svetlana; Lubinski, Jan; Paolotie, Aarno; Schreiber, Stefan; Toncheva, Draga; Toniolo, Daniela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zimprich, Alexander; Metspalu, Mait; Gasparini, Paolo; Metspalu, Andres; D'Adamo, Pio

    2013-01-01

    Population genetic studies on European populations have highlighted Italy as one of genetically most diverse regions. This is possibly due to the country's complex demographic history and large variability in terrain throughout the territory. This is the reason why Italy is enriched for population isolates, Sardinia being the best-known example. As the population isolates have a great potential in disease-causing genetic variants identification, we aimed to genetically characterize a region from northeastern Italy, which is known for isolated communities. Total of 1310 samples, collected from six geographically isolated villages, were genotyped at >145 000 single-nucleotide polymorphism positions. Newly genotyped data were analyzed jointly with the available genome-wide data sets of individuals of European descent, including several population isolates. Despite the linguistic differences and geographical isolation the village populations still show the greatest genetic similarity to other Italian samples. The genetic isolation and small effective population size of the village populations is manifested by higher levels of genomic homozygosity and elevated linkage disequilibrium. These estimates become even more striking when the detected substructure is taken into account. The observed level of genetic isolation in Friuli-Venezia Giulia region is more extreme according to several measures of isolation compared with Sardinians, French Basques and northern Finns, thus proving the status of an isolate. PMID:23249956

  6. Genomic hotspots for adaptation: the population genetics of Müllerian mimicry in Heliconius erato.

    PubMed

    Counterman, Brian A; Araujo-Perez, Felix; Hines, Heather M; Baxter, Simon W; Morrison, Clay M; Lindstrom, Daniel P; Papa, Riccardo; Ferguson, Laura; Joron, Mathieu; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Smith, Christopher P; Nielsen, Dahlia M; Chen, Rui; Jiggins, Chris D; Reed, Robert D; Halder, Georg; Mallet, Jim; McMillan, W Owen

    2010-02-05

    Wing pattern evolution in Heliconius butterflies provides some of the most striking examples of adaptation by natural selection. The genes controlling pattern variation are classic examples of Mendelian loci of large effect, where allelic variation causes large and discrete phenotypic changes and is responsible for both convergent and highly divergent wing pattern evolution across the genus. We characterize nucleotide variation, genotype-by-phenotype associations, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and candidate gene expression patterns across two unlinked genomic intervals that control yellow and red wing pattern variation among mimetic forms of Heliconius erato. Despite very strong natural selection on color pattern, we see neither a strong reduction in genetic diversity nor evidence for extended LD across either patterning interval. This observation highlights the extent that recombination can erase the signature of selection in natural populations and is consistent with the hypothesis that either the adaptive radiation or the alleles controlling it are quite old. However, across both patterning intervals we identified SNPs clustered in several coding regions that were strongly associated with color pattern phenotype. Interestingly, coding regions with associated SNPs were widely separated, suggesting that color pattern alleles may be composed of multiple functional sites, conforming to previous descriptions of these loci as "supergenes." Examination of gene expression levels of genes flanking these regions in both H. erato and its co-mimic, H. melpomene, implicate a gene with high sequence similarity to a kinesin as playing a key role in modulating pattern and provides convincing evidence for parallel changes in gene regulation across co-mimetic lineages. The complex genetic architecture at these color pattern loci stands in marked contrast to the single casual mutations often identified in genetic studies of adaptation, but may be more indicative of the type of

  7. Genetic diversity, linkage disequilibrium, and genome evolution in a soft winter wheat population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding genetic diversity within a crop is fundamental to its efficient exploitation. The advent of new high-throughput marker systems offers the opportunity to expand the scope and depth of our investigation of diversity. Our objectives were to analyze the genetic diversity of two populatio...

  8. Genetic structure at range edge: low diversity and high inbreeding in Southeast Asian mangrove (Avicennia marina) populations.

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Haond, S; Teixeira, S; Massa, S I; Billot, C; Saenger, P; Coupland, G; Duarte, C M; Serrão, E A

    2006-10-01

    Understanding the genetic composition and mating systems of edge populations provides important insights into the environmental and demographic factors shaping species' distribution ranges. We analysed samples of the mangrove Avicennia marina from Vietnam, northern Philippines and Australia, with microsatellite markers. We compared genetic diversity and structure in edge (Southeast Asia, and Southern Australia) and core (North and Eastern Australia) populations, and also compared our results with previously published data from core and southern edge populations. Comparisons highlighted significantly reduced gene diversity and higher genetic structure in both margins compared to core populations, which can be attributed to very low effective population size, pollinator scarcity and high environmental pressure at distribution margins. The estimated level of inbreeding was significantly higher in northeastern populations compared to core and southern populations. This suggests that despite the high genetic load usually associated with inbreeding, inbreeding or even selfing may be advantageous in margin habitats due to the possible advantages of reproductive assurance, or local adaptation. The very high level of genetic structure and inbreeding show that populations of A. marina are functioning as independent evolutionary units more than as components of a metapopulation system connected by gene flow. The combinations of those characteristics make these peripheral populations likely to develop local adaptations and therefore to be of particular interest for conservation strategies as well as for adaptation to possible future environmental changes. PMID:17032254

  9. Genetic diversity of water use efficiency in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity in crop germplasm is an important resource for crop improvement, but information on genetic diversity is rare for Jerusalem artichoke, especially for traits related to water use efficiency. The objectives of this study were to investigate genetic variations for water use and water...

  10. Population size and time since island isolation determine genetic diversity loss in insular frog populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Supen; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Xu; Li, Xianping; Yan, Shaofei; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Ji; Gao, Zengxiang; Li, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to loss of genetic diversity in fragmented populations is crucial for conservation measurements. Land-bridge archipelagoes offer ideal model systems for identifying the long-term effects of these factors on genetic variations in wild populations. In this study, we used nine microsatellite markers to quantify genetic diversity and differentiation of 810 pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) from 24 islands of the Zhoushan Archipelago and three sites on nearby mainland China and estimated the effects of the island area, population size, time since island isolation, distance to the mainland and distance to the nearest larger island on reduced genetic diversity of insular populations. The mainland populations displayed higher genetic diversity than insular populations. Genetic differentiations and no obvious gene flow were detected among the frog populations on the islands. Hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that only time since island isolation (square-root-transformed) and population size (log-transformed) significantly contributed to insular genetic diversity. These results suggest that decreased genetic diversity and genetic differentiations among insular populations may have been caused by random genetic drift following isolation by rising sea levels during the Holocene. The results provide strong evidence for a relationship between retained genetic diversity and population size and time since island isolation for pond frogs on the islands, consistent with the prediction of the neutral theory for finite populations. Our study highlights the importance of the size and estimated isolation time of populations in understanding the mechanisms of genetic diversity loss and differentiation in fragmented wild populations.

  11. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptomyces Species Reveals Their Adaptation to the Marine Environment and Their Diversity at the Genomic Level

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Zhewen; Yang, Tingting; Chen, Meili; Li, Jie; Chen, Fei; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Zhang; Wu, Jiayan; Zhang, Changsheng; Long, Lijuan; Xiao, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Over 200 genomes of streptomycete strains that were isolated from various environments are available from the NCBI. However, little is known about the characteristics that are linked to marine adaptation in marine-derived streptomycetes. The particularity and complexity of the marine environment suggest that marine streptomycetes are genetically diverse. Here, we sequenced nine strains from the Streptomyces genus that were isolated from different longitudes, latitudes, and depths of the South China Sea. Then we compared these strains to 22 NCBI downloaded streptomycete strains. Thirty-one streptomycete strains are clearly grouped into a marine-derived subgroup and multiple source subgroup-based phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic analyses have revealed the dynamic process underlying streptomycete genome evolution, and lateral gene transfer is an important driving force during the process. Pan-genomics analyses have revealed that streptomycetes have an open pan-genome, which reflects the diversity of these streptomycetes and guarantees the species a quick and economical response to diverse environments. Functional and comparative genomics analyses indicate that the marine-derived streptomycetes subgroup possesses some common characteristics of marine adaptation. Our findings have expanded our knowledge of how ocean isolates of streptomycete strains adapt to marine environments. The availability of streptomycete genomes from the South China Sea will be beneficial for further analysis on marine streptomycetes and will enrich the South China Sea’s genetic data sources. PMID:27446038

  12. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptomyces Species Reveals Their Adaptation to the Marine Environment and Their Diversity at the Genomic Level.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Zhewen; Yang, Tingting; Chen, Meili; Li, Jie; Chen, Fei; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Zhang; Wu, Jiayan; Zhang, Changsheng; Long, Lijuan; Xiao, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Over 200 genomes of streptomycete strains that were isolated from various environments are available from the NCBI. However, little is known about the characteristics that are linked to marine adaptation in marine-derived streptomycetes. The particularity and complexity of the marine environment suggest that marine streptomycetes are genetically diverse. Here, we sequenced nine strains from the Streptomyces genus that were isolated from different longitudes, latitudes, and depths of the South China Sea. Then we compared these strains to 22 NCBI downloaded streptomycete strains. Thirty-one streptomycete strains are clearly grouped into a marine-derived subgroup and multiple source subgroup-based phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic analyses have revealed the dynamic process underlying streptomycete genome evolution, and lateral gene transfer is an important driving force during the process. Pan-genomics analyses have revealed that streptomycetes have an open pan-genome, which reflects the diversity of these streptomycetes and guarantees the species a quick and economical response to diverse environments. Functional and comparative genomics analyses indicate that the marine-derived streptomycetes subgroup possesses some common characteristics of marine adaptation. Our findings have expanded our knowledge of how ocean isolates of streptomycete strains adapt to marine environments. The availability of streptomycete genomes from the South China Sea will be beneficial for further analysis on marine streptomycetes and will enrich the South China Sea's genetic data sources. PMID:27446038

  13. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptomyces Species Reveals Their Adaptation to the Marine Environment and Their Diversity at the Genomic Level.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Zhewen; Yang, Tingting; Chen, Meili; Li, Jie; Chen, Fei; Yang, Jin; Li, Wenjie; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Zhang; Wu, Jiayan; Zhang, Changsheng; Long, Lijuan; Xiao, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Over 200 genomes of streptomycete strains that were isolated from various environments are available from the NCBI. However, little is known about the characteristics that are linked to marine adaptation in marine-derived streptomycetes. The particularity and complexity of the marine environment suggest that marine streptomycetes are genetically diverse. Here, we sequenced nine strains from the Streptomyces genus that were isolated from different longitudes, latitudes, and depths of the South China Sea. Then we compared these strains to 22 NCBI downloaded streptomycete strains. Thirty-one streptomycete strains are clearly grouped into a marine-derived subgroup and multiple source subgroup-based phylogenetic tree. The phylogenetic analyses have revealed the dynamic process underlying streptomycete genome evolution, and lateral gene transfer is an important driving force during the process. Pan-genomics analyses have revealed that streptomycetes have an open pan-genome, which reflects the diversity of these streptomycetes and guarantees the species a quick and economical response to diverse environments. Functional and comparative genomics analyses indicate that the marine-derived streptomycetes subgroup possesses some common characteristics of marine adaptation. Our findings have expanded our knowledge of how ocean isolates of streptomycete strains adapt to marine environments. The availability of streptomycete genomes from the South China Sea will be beneficial for further analysis on marine streptomycetes and will enrich the South China Sea's genetic data sources.

  14. Genetic diversity in tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Kebebew; Cannarozzi, Gina; Girma, Dejene; Kamies, Rizqah; Chanyalew, Solomon; Plaza-Wüthrich, Sonia; Blösch, Regula; Rindisbacher, Abiel; Rafudeen, Suhail; Tadele, Zerihun

    2015-01-01

    Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is a cereal crop resilient to adverse climatic and soil conditions, and possessing desirable storage properties. Although tef provides high quality food and grows under marginal conditions unsuitable for other cereals, it is considered to be an orphan crop because it has benefited little from genetic improvement. Hence, unlike other cereals such as maize and wheat, the productivity of tef is extremely low. In spite of the low productivity, tef is widely cultivated by over six million small-scale farmers in Ethiopia where it is annually grown on more than three million hectares of land, accounting for over 30% of the total cereal acreage. Tef, a tetraploid with 40 chromosomes (2n = 4x = 40), belongs to the family Poaceae and, together with finger millet (Eleusine coracana Gaerth.), to the subfamily Chloridoideae. It was originated and domesticated in Ethiopia. There are about 350 Eragrostis species of which E. tef is the only species cultivated for human consumption. At the present time, the gene bank in Ethiopia holds over five thousand tef accessions collected from geographical regions diverse in terms of climate and elevation. These germplasm accessions appear to have huge variability with regard to key agronomic and nutritional traits. In order to properly utilize the variability in developing new tef cultivars, various techniques have been implemented to catalog the extent and unravel the patterns of genetic diversity. In this review, we show some recent initiatives investigating the diversity of tef using genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics and discuss the prospect of these efforts in providing molecular resources that can aid modern tef breeding. PMID:25859251

  15. Evaluation of the genetic diversity of avian paramyxovirus type 4

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Baibaswata; Nayak, Shreeraj; Paldurai, Anandan; Kumar, Sachin; De Nardi, Roberta; Terregino, Calogero; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2012-01-01

    Avian paramyxoviruses (APMVs) belong to the genus Avulavirus in the family Paramyxoviridae and include at least nine serotypes, APMV-1 to -9, as well as two additional provisional serotypes. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which comprises APMV-1, is the most extensively studied APMV because it is an important poultry pathogen. A moderate level of antigenic and genetic diversity is recognized for APMV-1 isolates, but our knowledge of the antigenic and genetic diversity of the other APMV serotypes is limited. APMV-4 is frequently isolated from waterfowl around the world. To date complete genome sequences of APMV-4 are available for only strains, which were isolated from ducks in Hong Kong, Korea and Belgium over a period of 37 years. We have carried out genome sequencing from the nucleocapsid (N) gene-end signal to the polymerase (L) gene-start signal of five APMV-4 strains recently isolated from Italy. Each of the eight APMV-4 strains has the same F protein cleavage site, DIQPR↓F. They also share a high level of nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity: for example, the F and HN glycoproteins have greater than 97% sequence identity between the various strains. Thus, comparison of these eight strains of APMV-4 did not provide evidence of substantial diversity, in contrast to similar studies with APMV-2, -3, and -6, in which the F and HN glycoproteins exhibited up to 20-30% amino acid sequence variation within a subgroup. Reciprocal cross-HI assay using post infection chicken sera also failed to detect significant antigenic variation among the available APMV-4 strains. PMID:23178589

  16. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR. PMID:26915094

  17. Genetic diversity in tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter].

    PubMed

    Assefa, Kebebew; Cannarozzi, Gina; Girma, Dejene; Kamies, Rizqah; Chanyalew, Solomon; Plaza-Wüthrich, Sonia; Blösch, Regula; Rindisbacher, Abiel; Rafudeen, Suhail; Tadele, Zerihun

    2015-01-01

    Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is a cereal crop resilient to adverse climatic and soil conditions, and possessing desirable storage properties. Although tef provides high quality food and grows under marginal conditions unsuitable for other cereals, it is considered to be an orphan crop because it has benefited little from genetic improvement. Hence, unlike other cereals such as maize and wheat, the productivity of tef is extremely low. In spite of the low productivity, tef is widely cultivated by over six million small-scale farmers in Ethiopia where it is annually grown on more than three million hectares of land, accounting for over 30% of the total cereal acreage. Tef, a tetraploid with 40 chromosomes (2n = 4x = 40), belongs to the family Poaceae and, together with finger millet (Eleusine coracana Gaerth.), to the subfamily Chloridoideae. It was originated and domesticated in Ethiopia. There are about 350 Eragrostis species of which E. tef is the only species cultivated for human consumption. At the present time, the gene bank in Ethiopia holds over five thousand tef accessions collected from geographical regions diverse in terms of climate and elevation. These germplasm accessions appear to have huge variability with regard to key agronomic and nutritional traits. In order to properly utilize the variability in developing new tef cultivars, various techniques have been implemented to catalog the extent and unravel the patterns of genetic diversity. In this review, we show some recent initiatives investigating the diversity of tef using genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics and discuss the prospect of these efforts in providing molecular resources that can aid modern tef breeding.

  18. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR. PMID:26915094

  19. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR.

  20. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jane E.; Brooks, Kyle; Brannen, Phillip M.; Cline, William O.; Brewer, Marin T.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing host population

  1. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jane E; Brooks, Kyle; Brannen, Phillip M; Cline, William O; Brewer, Marin T

    2015-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing host population

  2. Genetic Structure and Diversity in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Garris, Amanda J.; Tai, Thomas H.; Coburn, Jason; Kresovich, Steve; McCouch, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The population structure of domesticated species is influenced by the natural history of the populations of predomesticated ancestors, as well as by the breeding system and complexity of the breeding practices exercised by humans. Within Oryza sativa, there is an ancient and well-established divergence between the two major subspecies, indica and japonica, but finer levels of genetic structure are suggested by the breeding history. In this study, a sample of 234 accessions of rice was genotyped at 169 nuclear SSRs and two chloroplast loci. The data were analyzed to resolve the genetic structure and to interpret the evolutionary relationships between groups. Five distinct groups were detected, corresponding to indica, aus, aromatic, temperate japonica, and tropical japonica rices. Nuclear and chloroplast data support a closer evolutionary relationship between the indica and the aus and among the tropical japonica, temperate japonica, and aromatic groups. Group differences can be explained through contrasting demographic histories. With the availability of rice genome sequence, coupled with a large collection of publicly available genetic resources, it is of interest to develop a population-based framework for the molecular analysis of diversity in O. sativa. PMID:15654106

  3. The Nuclear DNA Content and Genetic Diversity of Lampetra morii

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinyu; Meng, Wenbin; Wu, Fenfang; Xu, Anlong; Chen, Shangwu; Huang, Shengfeng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the nuclear DNA content and genetic diversity of a river lamprey, the Korean lamprey Lampetra morii, which is distributed in the northeast of China. L. morii spends its whole life cycle in fresh water, and its adult size is relatively small (~160 mm long) compared with that of other lampreys. The haploid nuclear DNA content of L. morii is 1.618 pg (approximately 1.582 Gb) in germline cells, and there is ~15% germline DNA loss in somatic cells. These values are significantly smaller than those of Petromyzon marinus, a lamprey with a published draft genome. The chromosomes of L. morii are small and acrocentric, with a diploid modal number of 2n = 132, lower than some other lampreys. Sequence and AFLP analyses suggest that the allelic polymorphism rate (~0.14% based on examined nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences) of L. morii is much lower than that (~2%) of P. marinus. Phylogenetic analysis based on a mitochondrial DNA fragment confirms that L. morii belongs to the genus Lampetra, which, together with the genus Lethenteron, forms a sister group to P. marinus. These genetic background data are valuable for subsequent genetic and genomic research on L. morii. PMID:27388621

  4. Genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from chickens from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Velmurugan, G V; Chockalingam, A; Pena, H F J; de Oliveira, L Nunes; Leifer, C A; Gennari, S M; Bahia Oliveira, L M G; Su, C

    2008-11-01

    Until recently, Toxoplasma gondii was considered clonal with very little genetic variability. Recent studies indicate that T. gondii isolates from Brazil are genetically and biologically different from T. gondii isolates from USA and Europe. In the present study, we retyped 151 free range chicken isolates from Brazil including 117 newly isolated samples from 11 geographically areas (Alagoas, Bahia, Ceará, Maranhão, Paraná, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, São Paulo, Sergipe, and Rondonia) and 34 previously reported isolates from the very north (Pará) and the very south (Rio Grande do Sul). Ten PCR-RFLP markers including SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico were used to genotype all isolates. Overall analysis of 151 T. gondii isolates revealed 58 genotypes. Half (29/58) of these genotypes had single isolate and the other half of the genotypes were characterized with two or more isolates. Only 1 of 151 isolates was clonal Type I strain and 5 were clonal Type III strains. Two isolates had mixed infections. Clonal Type II strain was absent. One strain was Type II at all loci, except BTUB. The results confirm high genetic diversity of T. gondii isolates from Brazil.

  5. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Kermode bear populations.

    PubMed

    Marshall, H D; Ritland, K

    2002-04-01

    The Kermode bear is a white phase of the North American black bear that occurs in low to moderate frequency on British Columbia's mid-coast. To investigate the genetic uniqueness of populations containing the white phase, and to ascertain levels of gene flow among populations, we surveyed 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci, assayed from trapped bear hairs. A total of 216 unique bear genotypes, 18 of which were white, was sampled among 12 localities. Island populations, where Kermodes are most frequent, show approximately 4% less diversity than mainland populations, and the island richest in white bears (Gribbell) exhibited substantial genetic isolation, with a mean pairwise FST of 0.14 with other localities. Among all localities, FST for the molecular variant underlying the coat-colour difference (A893G) was 0.223, which falls into the 95th percentile of the distribution of FST values among microsatellite alleles, suggestive of greater differentiation for coat colour than expected under neutrality. Control-region sequences confirm that Kermode bears are part of a coastal or western lineage of black bears whose existence predates the Wisconsin glaciation, but microsatellite variation gave no evidence of past population expansion. We conclude that Kermodism was established and is maintained in populations by a combination of genetic isolation and somewhat reduced population sizes in insular habitat, with the possible contribution of selective pressure and/or nonrandom mating. PMID:11972757

  6. Genetic diversity of Ostreopsis ovata (Dinophyceae) from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Pin, L C; Teen, L P; Ahmad, A; Usup, G

    2001-05-01

    The genus Ostreopsis is an important component of benthic and epiphytic dinoflagellate assemblages in coral reefs and seaweed beds of Malaysia. Members of the species may produce toxins that contribute to ciguatera fish poisoning. In this study, two species have been isolated and cultured, Ostreopsis ovata and Ostreopsis lenticularis. Analyses of the 5.8S subunit and internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2 of the ribosomal RNA gene sequences of these two species showed that they are separate species, consistent with morphological designations. The nucleotide sequences of the 5.8S subunit and ITS1 and ITS2 regions of the rRNA gene were also used to evaluate the interpopulation and intrapopulation genetic diversity of O. ovata found in Malaysian waters. Results showed a low level of sequence divergence within populations. At the interpopulation level, the rRNA gene sequence distinguished two groups of genetically distinct strains, representative of a Malacca Straits group (isolates from Port Dickson) and a South China Sea group (isolates from Pulau Redang and Kota Kinabalu). Part of the sequences in the ITS regions may be useful in the design of oligonucleotide probes specific for each group. Results from this study show that the ITS regions can be used as genetic markers for taxonomic, biogeographic, and fine-scale population studies of this species.

  7. Genetic diversity comparison of the DQA gene in European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) populations.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Vanessa; Abrantes, Joana; Munõz-Pajares, Antonio Jesús; Esteves, Pedro J

    2015-10-01

    The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) natural populations within the species native region, the Iberian Peninsula, are considered a reservoir of genetic diversity. Indeed, the Iberia was a Pleistocene refuge to the species and currently two subspecies are found in the peninsula (Oryctolagus cuniculus cuniculus and Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus). The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been substantially studied in wild populations due to their exceptional variability, believed to be pathogen driven. They play an important function as part of the adaptive immune system affecting the individual fitness and population viability. In this study, the MHC variability was assessed by analysing the exon 2 of the DQA gene in several European rabbit populations from Portugal, Spain and France and in domestic breeds. Twenty-eight DQA alleles were detected, among which 18 are described for the first time. The Iberian rabbit populations are well differentiated from the French population and domestic breeds. The Iberian populations retained the higher allelic diversity with the domestic breeds harbouring the lowest; in contrast, the DQA nucleotide diversity was higher in the French population. Signatures of positive selection were detected in four codons which are putative peptide-binding sites and have been previously detected in other mammals. The evolutionary relationships showed instances of trans-species polymorphism. Overall, our results suggest that the DQA in European rabbits is evolving under selection and genetic drift. PMID:26307416

  8. Greenlandic Inuit show genetic signatures of diet and climate adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Moltke, Ida; Grarup, Niels; Racimo, Fernando; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Gerbault, Pascale; Skotte, Line; Linneberg, Allan; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Jørgensen, Torben; Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Schmidt, Erik B; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Albrechtsen, Anders; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-09-18

    The indigenous people of Greenland, the Inuit, have lived for a long time in the extreme conditions of the Arctic, including low annual temperatures, and with a specialized diet rich in protein and fatty acids, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). A scan of Inuit genomes for signatures of adaptation revealed signals at several loci, with the strongest signal located in a cluster of fatty acid desaturases that determine PUFA levels. The selected alleles are associated with multiple metabolic and anthropometric phenotypes and have large effect sizes for weight and height, with the effect on height replicated in Europeans. By analyzing membrane lipids, we found that the selected alleles modulate fatty acid composition, which may affect the regulation of growth hormones. Thus, the Inuit have genetic and physiological adaptations to a diet rich in PUFAs.

  9. Searching for adaptive traits in genetic resources - phenology based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Abdallah

    2015-04-01

    Searching for adaptive traits in genetic resources - phenology based approach Abdallah Bari, Kenneth Street, Eddy De Pauw, Jalal Eddin Omari, and Chandra M. Biradar International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Rabat Institutes, Rabat, Morocco Phenology is an important plant trait not only for assessing and forecasting food production but also for searching in genebanks for adaptive traits. Among the phenological parameters we have been considering to search for such adaptive and rare traits are the onset (sowing period) and the seasonality (growing period). Currently an application is being developed as part of the focused identification of germplasm strategy (FIGS) approach to use climatic data in order to identify crop growing seasons and characterize them in terms of onset and duration. These approximations of growing period characteristics can then be used to estimate flowering and maturity dates for dryland crops, such as wheat, barley, faba bean, lentils and chickpea, and assess, among others, phenology-related traits such as days to heading [dhe] and grain filling period [gfp]. The approach followed here is based on first calculating long term average daily temperatures by fitting a curve to the monthly data over days from beginning of the year. Prior to the identification of these phenological stages the onset is extracted first from onset integer raster GIS layers developed based on a model of the growing period that considers both moisture and temperature limitations. The paper presents some examples of real applications of the approach to search for rare and adaptive traits.

  10. Genetic diversity of the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis from Russia and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Chelomina, Galina N; Tatonova, Yulia V; Hung, Nguyen Manh; Ngo, Ha Duy

    2014-10-01

    Clonorchiasis is a parasitic disease of high public health importance in many countries in southeastern Asia and is caused by the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. However, the genetic structure and demographic history of its populations has not been sufficiently studied throughout the geographic range of the species and available data are based mainly on partial gene sequencing. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity of the complete 1560 bp cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequence for geographically isolated C. sinensis populations in Russia and Vietnam, to our knowledge for the first time. The results demonstrated low nucleotide and high haplotype differentiation within and between the two compared regions and a clear geographical vector for the distribution of genetic diversity patterns among the studied populations. These results suggest a deep local adaptation of the parasite to its environment including intermediate hosts and the existence of gene flow across the species' range. Additionally, we have predicted an amino acid substitution in the functional site of the COX1 protein among the Vietnamese populations, which were reported to be difficult to treat with praziquantel. The haplotype networks consisted of several region-specific phylogenetic lineages, the formation of which could have occurred during the most extensive penultimate glaciations in the Pleistocene Epoch. The patterns of genetic diversity and demographics are consistent with population growth of the liver fluke in the late Pleistocene following the Last Glacial Maximum, indicating the lack of a population bottleneck during the recent past in the species' history. The data obtained have important implications for understanding the phylogeography of C. sinensis, its host-parasite interactions, the ability of this parasite to evolve drug resistance, and the epidemiology of clonorchiasis under global climate change. PMID:25123068

  11. Genetic diversity of the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis from Russia and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Chelomina, Galina N; Tatonova, Yulia V; Hung, Nguyen Manh; Ngo, Ha Duy

    2014-10-01

    Clonorchiasis is a parasitic disease of high public health importance in many countries in southeastern Asia and is caused by the Chinese liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis. However, the genetic structure and demographic history of its populations has not been sufficiently studied throughout the geographic range of the species and available data are based mainly on partial gene sequencing. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity of the complete 1560 bp cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequence for geographically isolated C. sinensis populations in Russia and Vietnam, to our knowledge for the first time. The results demonstrated low nucleotide and high haplotype differentiation within and between the two compared regions and a clear geographical vector for the distribution of genetic diversity patterns among the studied populations. These results suggest a deep local adaptation of the parasite to its environment including intermediate hosts and the existence of gene flow across the species' range. Additionally, we have predicted an amino acid substitution in the functional site of the COX1 protein among the Vietnamese populations, which were reported to be difficult to treat with praziquantel. The haplotype networks consisted of several region-specific phylogenetic lineages, the formation of which could have occurred during the most extensive penultimate glaciations in the Pleistocene Epoch. The patterns of genetic diversity and demographics are consistent with population growth of the liver fluke in the late Pleistocene following the Last Glacial Maximum, indicating the lack of a population bottleneck during the recent past in the species' history. The data obtained have important implications for understanding the phylogeography of C. sinensis, its host-parasite interactions, the ability of this parasite to evolve drug resistance, and the epidemiology of clonorchiasis under global climate change.

  12. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  13. Effects of the interaction between genetic diversity and UV-B radiation on wood frog fitness.

    PubMed

    Weyrauch, Shauna L; Grubb, Thomas C

    2006-06-01

    Genetic diversity may buffer amphibian populations against environmental vicissitudes. We hypothesized that wood frogs (Rana sylvatica)from populations with lower genetic diversity are more susceptible to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation than those from populations with higher diversity. We used RAPD markers to obtain genetic diversity estimates for 12 wood frog populations. We reared larval wood frogs from these populations and exposed experimental groups of eggs and larvae to one of three treatments: unfiltered sunlight, sunlight filtered through a UM-B-blocking filter (Mylar), and sunlight filtered through a UV-B-transmitting filter (acetate). In groups exposed to UVB, larval mortality and deformity rates increased significantly, but egg mortality did not. We found a significant negative relationship between genetic diversity and egg mortality, larval mortality, and deformity rates. Furthermore, the interaction between UV-B treatment and genetic diversity significantly affected larval mortality. Populations with low genetic diversity experienced higher larval mortality rates when exposed to UVB than did populations with high genetic diversity. This is the first time an interaction between genetic diversity and an environmental stressor has been documented in amphibians. Differences in genetic diversity among populations, coupled with environmental stressors, may help explain patterns of amphibian decline. PMID:16909573

  14. Genetic linkage of distinct adaptive traits in sympatrically speciating crater lake cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Fruciano, Carmelo; Franchini, Paolo; Kovacova, Viera; Elmer, Kathryn R; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2016-09-06

    Our understanding of how biological diversity arises is limited, especially in the case of speciation in the face of gene flow. Here we investigate the genomic basis of adaptive traits, focusing on a sympatrically diverging species pair of crater lake cichlid fishes. We identify the main quantitative trait loci (QTL) for two eco-morphological traits: body shape and pharyngeal jaw morphology. These traits diverge in parallel between benthic and limnetic species in the repeated adaptive radiations of this and other fish lineages. Remarkably, a single chromosomal region contains the highest effect size QTL for both traits. Transcriptomic data show that the QTL regions contain genes putatively under selection. Independent population genomic data corroborate QTL regions as areas of high differentiation between the sympatric sister species. Our results provide empirical support for current theoretical models that emphasize the importance of genetic linkage and pleiotropy in facilitating rapid divergence in sympatry.

  15. Genetic linkage of distinct adaptive traits in sympatrically speciating crater lake cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Fruciano, Carmelo; Franchini, Paolo; Kovacova, Viera; Elmer, Kathryn R; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how biological diversity arises is limited, especially in the case of speciation in the face of gene flow. Here we investigate the genomic basis of adaptive traits, focusing on a sympatrically diverging species pair of crater lake cichlid fishes. We identify the main quantitative trait loci (QTL) for two eco-morphological traits: body shape and pharyngeal jaw morphology. These traits diverge in parallel between benthic and limnetic species in the repeated adaptive radiations of this and other fish lineages. Remarkably, a single chromosomal region contains the highest effect size QTL for both traits. Transcriptomic data show that the QTL regions contain genes putatively under selection. Independent population genomic data corroborate QTL regions as areas of high differentiation between the sympatric sister species. Our results provide empirical support for current theoretical models that emphasize the importance of genetic linkage and pleiotropy in facilitating rapid divergence in sympatry. PMID:27597183

  16. Genetic linkage of distinct adaptive traits in sympatrically speciating crater lake cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Fruciano, Carmelo; Franchini, Paolo; Kovacova, Viera; Elmer, Kathryn R.; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how biological diversity arises is limited, especially in the case of speciation in the face of gene flow. Here we investigate the genomic basis of adaptive traits, focusing on a sympatrically diverging species pair of crater lake cichlid fishes. We identify the main quantitative trait loci (QTL) for two eco-morphological traits: body shape and pharyngeal jaw morphology. These traits diverge in parallel between benthic and limnetic species in the repeated adaptive radiations of this and other fish lineages. Remarkably, a single chromosomal region contains the highest effect size QTL for both traits. Transcriptomic data show that the QTL regions contain genes putatively under selection. Independent population genomic data corroborate QTL regions as areas of high differentiation between the sympatric sister species. Our results provide empirical support for current theoretical models that emphasize the importance of genetic linkage and pleiotropy in facilitating rapid divergence in sympatry. PMID:27597183

  17. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field.

  18. Genetic diversity through the looking glass: Effect of enrichment bias

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.; Forney, L.; White, S.

    1997-04-01

    The effect of enrichment bias on the diversity of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D)-degrading (2,4-D{sup +}) bacteria recovered from soil was evaluated by comparing the diversity of isolates obtained by direct plating to the diversity of isolates obtained from 85 liquid batch cultures. By the two methods, a total of 159 isolates were purified from 1 g of soil and divided into populations based on repeated extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints. Approximately 42% of the direct-plating isolates hybridized with the tfdA and tfdB genes from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4), 27% hybridized with the tfdA and tfdB genes from Burk holderia sp. strain RASC, and 30% hybridized with none of the probes. In contrast, the enrichment isolates not only represented fewer populations than the isolates obtained by direct plating but also exhibited, almost exclusively, a single hybridization pattern with 2,4-D catabolic gene probes. Approximately 98% of the enrichment isolates possessed pJP4-type tfd4 and tfdB genes, whereas isolates containing RASC-type tfdA and tfdB genes were obtained from only 2 of the 85 enrichment cultures. The skewed occurrence of the pJP4-type genes among the isolates obtained by enrichment suggests that the competitive fitness of 2,4-D{sup +} populations during growth with 2,4-D may be influenced either by specific tfd alleles or by genetic factors linked to these alleles. Moreover, the results indicate that evaluation of the diversity and distribution of catabolic pathways in nature can be highly distorted by the use of enrichment culture techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Genetic diversity of picocyanobacteria in tibetan lakes: assessing the endemic and universal distributions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sijun; Liu, Yongqin; Hu, Anyi; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Feng; Yao, Tandong; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-12-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of picocyanobacteria in seven alkaline lakes on the Tibetan Plateau was analyzed using the molecular marker 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequence. A total of 1,077 environmental sequences retrieved from the seven lakes were grouped into seven picocyanobacterial clusters, with two clusters newly described here. Each of the lakes was dominated by only one or two clusters, while different lakes could have disparate communities, suggesting low alpha diversity but high beta diversity of picocyanobacteria in these high-altitude freshwater and saline lakes. Several globally distributed clusters were found in these Tibetan lakes, such as subalpine cluster I and the Cyanobium gracile cluster. Although other clusters likely exhibit geographic restriction to the plateau temporally, reflecting endemicity, they can indeed be distributed widely on the plateau. Lakes with similar salinities may have similar genetic populations despite a large geographic distance. Canonical correspondence analysis identified salinity as the only environmental factor that may in part explain the diversity variations among lakes. Mantel tests suggested that the community similarities among lakes are independent of geographic distance. A portion of the picocyanobacterial clusters appear to be restricted to a narrow salinity range, while others are likely adapted to a broad range. A seasonal survey of Lake Namucuo across 3 years did not show season-related variations in diversity, and depth-related population partitioning was observed along a vertical profile of the lake. Our study emphasizes the high dispersive potential of picocyanobacteria and suggests that the regional distribution may result from adaptation to specified environments.

  20. Whole genome SNP discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production. Genetic improvement is attributed largely to selective breeding programs that rely on highly heritable phenotypic traits, such as body size and breast muscle development. Commercial breeding with small effective population sizes and epistasis can result in loss of genetic diversity, which in turn can lead to reduced individual fitness and reduced response to selection. The presence of genomic diversity in domestic livestock species therefore, is of great importance and a prerequisite for rapid and accurate genetic improvement of selected breeds in various environments, as well as to facilitate rapid adaptation to potential changes in breeding goals. Genomic selection requires a large number of genetic markers such as e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) the most abundant source of genetic variation within the genome. Results Alignment of next generation sequencing data of 32 individual turkeys from different populations was used for the discovery of 5.49 million SNPs, which subsequently were used for the analysis of genetic diversity among the different populations. All of the commercial lines branched from a single node relative to the heritage varieties and the South Mexican turkey population. Heterozygosity of all individuals from the different turkey populations ranged from 0.17-2.73 SNPs/Kb, while heterozygosity of populations ranged from 0.73-1.64 SNPs/Kb. The average frequency of heterozygous SNPs in individual turkeys was 1.07 SNPs/Kb. Five genomic regions with very low nucleotide variation were identified in domestic turkeys that showed state of fixation towards alleles different than wild alleles. Conclusion The turkey genome is much less diverse with a relatively low frequency of heterozygous SNPs as compared to other livestock species like chicken and pig. The whole genome SNP discovery

  1. On the relative roles of background selection and genetic hitchhiking in shaping human cytomegalovirus genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Renzette, Nicholas; Kowalik, Timothy F; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    A central focus of population genetics has been examining the contribution of selective and neutral processes in shaping patterns of intraspecies diversity. In terms of selection specifically, surveys of higher organisms have shown considerable variation in the relative contributions of background selection and genetic hitchhiking in shaping the distribution of polymorphisms, although these analyses have rarely been extended to bacteria and viruses. Here, we study the evolution of a ubiquitous, viral pathogen, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), by analysing the relationship among intraspecies diversity, interspecies divergence and rates of recombination. We show that there is a strong correlation between diversity and divergence, consistent with expectations of neutral evolution. However, after correcting for divergence, there remains a significant correlation between intraspecies diversity and recombination rates, with additional analyses suggesting that this correlation is largely due to the effects of background selection. In addition, a small number of loci, centred on long noncoding RNAs, also show evidence of selective sweeps. These data suggest that HCMV evolution is dominated by neutral mechanisms as well as background selection, expanding our understanding of linked selection to a novel class of organisms. PMID:26211679

  2. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings. PMID:23569417

  3. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Francisco, Flávio; Santiago, Leandro Rodrigues; Arias, Maria Cristina

    2013-03-01

    Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained by analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings. PMID:23569417

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of cottons (Gossypium spp.) of the New World assessed by SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A global analysis of cotton (Gossypium spp.) genetic diversity is the first step to understand its geographical distribution, dissemination, genetic relatedness, and population structure. To assess the genetic diversity and population structure in Gossypium species, 111 cotton accessions representin...

  5. Anagenetic speciation in Ullung Island, Korea: genetic diversity and structure in the island endemic species, Acer takesimense (Sapindaceae).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Koji; Sun, Byung-Yun; Stuessy, Tod F

    2013-05-01

    Anagenetic speciation is an important mode of speciation in oceanic islands; one-fourth of the endemic plants are estimated to have been derived via this process. Few studies, however, have critically examined the genetic consequences of anagenesis in comparison with cladogenesis (involved with adaptive radiation). We hypothesize that endemic species originating via anagenetic speciation in a relatively uniform environment should accumulate genetic variation with limited populational differentiation. We undertook a population genetic analysis using nine nuclear microsatellite loci of Acer takesimense, an anagenetically derived species endemic to Ullung Island, Korea, and its continental progenitor A. pseudosieboldianum on the Korean Peninsula. Microsatellite data reveal a clear genetic distinction between the two species. A high F value in the cluster of A. takesimense was found by Bayesian clustering analysis, suggesting a strong episode of genetic drift during colonization and speciation. In comparison with A. pseudosieboldianum, A. takesimense has slightly lower genetic diversity and possesses less than half the number of private and rare alleles. Consistent with predictions, weak geographical genetic structure within the island was found in A. takesimense. These results imply that anagenetic speciation leads to a different pattern of specific and genetic diversity than often seen with cladogenesis. PMID:23090156

  6. Rock outcrop orchids reveal the genetic connectivity and diversity of inselbergs of northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of their fragmented nature, inselberg species are interesting biological models for studying the genetic consequences of disjoint populations. Inselbergs are commonly compared with oceanic islands, as most of them display a marked ecological isolation from the surrounding area. The isolation of these rock outcrops is reflected in the high number of recorded endemic species and the strong floristic differences between individual inselbergs and adjacent habitats. We examined the genetic connectivity of orchids Epidendrum cinnabarinum and E. secundum adapted to Neotropical inselbergs of northeastern Brazil. Our goals were to identify major genetic divergences or disjunctions across the range of the species and to investigate potential demographic and evolutionary mechanisms leading to lineage divergence in Neotropical mountain ecosystems. Results Based on plastid markers, high genetic differentiation was found for E. cinnabarinum (FST = 0.644) and E. secundum (FST = 0.636). Haplotypes were not geographically structured in either taxon, suggesting that restricted gene flow and genetic drift may be significant factors influencing the diversification of these inselberg populations. Moreover, strong differentiation was found between populations over short spatial scales, indicating substantial periods of isolation among populations. For E. secundum, nuclear markers indicated higher gene flow by pollen than by seeds. Conclusions The comparative approach adopted in this study contributed to the elucidation of patterns in both species. Our results confirm the ancient and highly isolated nature of inselberg populations. Both species showed similar patterns of genetic diversity and structure, highlighting the importance of seed-restricted gene flow and genetic drift as drivers of plant diversification in terrestrial islands such as inselbergs. PMID:24629134

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Tibetan poplar (Populus szechuanica var. tibetica) along an altitude gradient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Tibetan poplar (Populus szechuanica var. tibetica Schneid), which is distributed at altitudes of 2,000-4,500 m above sea level, is an ecologically important species of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and adjacent areas. However, the genetic adaptations responsible for its ability to cope with the harsh environment remain unknown. Results In this study, a total of 24 expressed sequence tag microsatellite (EST-SSR) markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and population structure of Tibetan poplars along an altitude gradient. The 172 individuals were of genotypes from low-, medium- and high-altitude populations, and 126 alleles were identified. The expected heterozygosity (HE) value ranged from 0.475 to 0.488 with the highest value found in low-altitude populations and the lowest in high-altitude populations. Genetic variation was low among populations, indicating a limited influence of altitude on microsatellite variation. Low genetic differentiation and high levels of gene flow were detected both between and within the populations along the altitude gradient. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 6.38% of the total molecular variance was attributed to diversity between populations, while 93.62% variance was associated with differences within populations. There was no clear correlation between genetic variation and altitude, and a Mantel test between genetic distance and altitude resulted in a coefficient of association of r = 0.001, indicating virtually no correlation. Conclusion Microsatellite genotyping results showing genetic diversity and low differentiation suggest that extensive gene flow may have counteracted local adaptations imposed by differences in altitude. The genetic analyses carried out in this study provide new insight for conservation and optimization of future arboriculture. PMID:25079034

  8. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in local cattle breeds of Senegal based on autosomal microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Ndèye Penda; Sow, Adama; Dayo, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan; Ndiaye, Saliou; Sawadogo, Germain Jerôme; Sembène, Mbacké

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In Senegal, uncontrolled cross-breeding of cattle breeds and changes in production systems are assumed to lead to an increase of gene flow between populations. This might constitute a relevant threat to livestock improvement. Therewith, this study was carried out to assess the current genetic diversity and the phylogenetic relationships of the four native Senegalese cattle breeds (Gobra zebu, Maure zebu, Djakoré, and N’Dama). Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 120 unrelated animals collected from three agro-ecological areas of Senegal according to their phenotypic traits. Genotyping was done using 11 specific highly polymorphic microsatellite makers recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization. The basic measures of genetic variation and phylogenetic trees were computed using bioinformatics’ software. Results: A total of 115 alleles were identified with a number of alleles (Na) at one locus ranging from 6 to 16. All loci were polymorphic with a mean polymorphic information content of 0.76. The mean allelic richness (Rs) lay within the narrow range of 5.14 in N’Dama taurine to 6.10 in Gobra zebu. While, the expected heterozygosity (HE) per breed was high in general with an overall mean of 0.76±0.04. Generally, the heterozygote deficiency (FIS) of 0.073±0.026 was relatively due to inbreeding among these cattle breeds or the occurrence of population substructure. The high values of allelic and gene diversity showed that Senegalese native cattle breeds represented an important reservoir of genetic variation. The genetic distances and clustering trees concluded that the N’Dama cattle were most distinct among the investigated cattle populations. So, the principal component analyses showed qualitatively that there was an intensive genetic admixture between the Gobra zebu and Maure zebu breeds. Conclusions: The broad genetic diversity in Senegalese cattle breeds will allow for greater opportunities for improvement of productivity

  9. Cellular and genetic adaptation in low-gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R

    2009-04-01

    Genetic response suites in human lymphocytes in response to microgravity are important to identify and study further to augment physiological adaptation to new milieus. Human peripheral blood from normal donors was used to isolate peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blood traverses through most organs and hence is a suitable overall physiological predictor. The cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity for 24 and 72 h. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis. Data were collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. Different groups of genes related to the immune response, cardiovascular system, and stress response were then analyzed. These three groups focused on human adaptation to new environments. Many molecules related to T cell activation and second messengers, located both in the cell membrane and cytoplasm, were significantly altered (positive or negative regulation) in modeled microgravity. Cardiovascular biomarker expression and stress response gene expression also presented an aberrant response in analog microgravity. Previous findings in our laboratory showed lymphocyte activation and locomotion to be significantly suppressed in microgravity. Further analysis at the protein levels of genes involved in these responses could lead to development of prophylactic and countermeasure steps to augment human physiology for long-term space travel. Detailed results from the genetic analyses are presented in this study, including differential responses in stress response genes, cardiovascular and atherogenic genes, and T cell activation genes.

  10. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS ON GENETIC DIVERSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOMONITORING AND ECOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conservation of genetic diversity has emerged as one of the central issues in conservation biology. Although researchers in the areas of evolutionary biology, population management, and conservation biology routinely investigate genetic variability in natural populations, onl...

  11. Genetic diversity of rhizobia nodulating native Vicia spp. in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Huss-Danell, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recognition that Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae is the most common symbiont of Vicia species worldwide, there is no available information on rhizobia nodulating native Vicia species in Sweden. We have therefore studied the genetic diversity and phylogeny of root nodule bacteria isolated from V. cracca, V. hirsuta, V. sepium, V. tetrasperma and V. sylvatica growing in different locations in Sweden as well as an isolate each from V. cracca in Tromsø, Norway, and V. multicaulis in Siberia, Russia. Out of 25 isolates sampled from the six Vicia species in 12 different locations, there were 14 different genotypes based on the atpD, recA and nodA gene phylogenies. All isolates were classified into Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae group based on the concatenated atpD and recA phylogeny and the nodA phylogeny.

  12. Genetic diversity of rhizobia nodulating native Vicia spp. in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Huss-Danell, Kerstin

    2016-05-01