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Sample records for adaptive grid hierarchy

  1. Hierarchy-Direction Selective Approach for Locally Adaptive Sparse Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanov, Miroslav K

    2013-09-01

    We consider the problem of multidimensional adaptive hierarchical interpolation. We use sparse grids points and functions that are induced from a one dimensional hierarchical rule via tensor products. The classical locally adaptive sparse grid algorithm uses an isotropic refinement from the coarser to the denser levels of the hierarchy. However, the multidimensional hierarchy provides a more complex structure that allows for various anisotropic and hierarchy selective refinement techniques. We consider the more advanced refinement techniques and apply them to a number of simple test functions chosen to demonstrate the various advantages and disadvantages of each method. While there is no refinement scheme that is optimal for all functions, the fully adaptive family-direction-selective technique is usually more stable and requires fewer samples.

  2. Adaptive 4-8 Texture Hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, L M; Duchaineau, M A; Joy, K I

    2004-08-02

    We address the texture level-of-detail problem for extremely large surfaces such as terrain during real-time, view-dependent rendering. A novel texture hierarchy is introduced based on 4-8 refinement of raster tiles, in which the texture grids in effect rotate 45 degrees for each level of refinement. This hierarchy provides twice as many levels of detail as conventional quad-tree-style refinement schemes such as mipmaps, and thus provides per-pixel view-dependent filtering that is twice as close to the ideal cutoff frequency for an average pixel. Because of this more gradual change in low-pass filtering, and due to the more precise emulation of the ideal cutoff frequency, we find in practice that the transitions between texture levels of detail are not perceptible. This allows rendering systems to avoid the complexity and performance costs of per-pixel blending between texture levels of detail. The 4-8 texturing scheme is integrated into a variant of the Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) algorithm for view-dependent multiresolution mesh generation. Improvements to ROAM included here are: the diamond data structure as a streamlined replacement for the triangle bintree elements, the use of low-pass-filtered geometry patches in place of individual triangles, integration of 4-8 textures, and a simple out-of-core data access mechanism for texture and geometry tiles.

  3. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  4. Grid quality improvement by a grid adaptation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. D.; Henderson, T. L.; Choo, Y. K.

    1991-01-01

    A grid adaptation technique is presented which improves grid quality. The method begins with an assessment of grid quality by defining an appropriate grid quality measure. Then, undesirable grid properties are eliminated by a grid-quality-adaptive grid generation procedure. The same concept has been used for geometry-adaptive and solution-adaptive grid generation. The difference lies in the definition of the grid control sources; here, they are extracted from the distribution of a particular grid property. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the versatility and effectiveness of the method.

  5. LAPS Grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliantini, Cecilia; Delzanno, Gia Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu; Chacon, Luis

    2011-10-01

    LAPS uses a common-data framework in which a general purpose grid generation and adaptation package in toroidal and simply connected domains is implemented. The initial focus is on implementing the Winslow/Laplace-Beltrami method for generating non-overlapping block structured grids. This is to be followed by a grid adaptation scheme based on Monge-Kantorovich optimal transport method [Delzanno et al., J. Comput. Phys,227 (2008), 9841-9864], that equidistributes application-specified error. As an initial set of applications, we will lay out grids for an axisymmetric mirror, a field reversed configuration, and an entire poloidal cross section of a tokamak plasma reconstructed from a CMOD experimental shot. These grids will then be used for computing the plasma equilibrium and transport in accompanying presentations. A key issue for Monge-Kantorovich grid optimization is the choice of error or monitor function for equi-distribution. We will compare the Operator Recovery Error Source Detector (ORESD) [Lapenta, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng,59 (2004) 2065-2087], the Tau method and a strategy based on the grid coarsening [Zhang et al., AIAA J,39 (2001) 1706-1715] to find an ``optimal'' grid. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  6. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  7. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  8. Interactive solution-adaptive grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Henderson, Todd L.

    1992-01-01

    TURBO-AD is an interactive solution-adaptive grid generation program under development. The program combines an interactive algebraic grid generation technique and a solution-adaptive grid generation technique into a single interactive solution-adaptive grid generation package. The control point form uses a sparse collection of control points to algebraically generate a field grid. This technique provides local grid control capability and is well suited to interactive work due to its speed and efficiency. A mapping from the physical domain to a parametric domain was used to improve difficulties that had been encountered near outwardly concave boundaries in the control point technique. Therefore, all grid modifications are performed on a unit square in the parametric domain, and the new adapted grid in the parametric domain is then mapped back to the physical domain. The grid adaptation is achieved by first adapting the control points to a numerical solution in the parametric domain using control sources obtained from flow properties. Then a new modified grid is generated from the adapted control net. This solution-adaptive grid generation process is efficient because the number of control points is much less than the number of grid points and the generation of a new grid from the adapted control net is an efficient algebraic process. TURBO-AD provides the user with both local and global grid controls.

  9. Emerging hierarchies in dynamically adapting webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katifori, Eleni; Graewer, Johannes; Magnasco, Marcelo; Modes, Carl

    Transport networks play a key role across four realms of eukaryotic life: slime molds, fungi, plants, and animals. In addition to the developmental algorithms that build them, many also employ adaptive strategies to respond to stimuli, damage, and other environmental changes. We model these adapting network architectures using a generic dynamical system on weighted graphs and find in simulation that these networks ultimately develop a hierarchical organization of the final weighted architecture accompanied by the formation of a system-spanning backbone. We quantify the hierarchical organization of the networks by developing an algorithm that decomposes the architecture to multiple scales and analyzes how the organization in each scale relates to that of the scale above and below it. The methodologies developed in this work are applicable to a wide range of systems including the slime mold physarum polycephalum, human microvasculature, and force chains in granular media.

  10. Hierarchy and polysynchrony in an adaptive network.

    PubMed

    Botella-Soler, V; Glendinning, P

    2014-06-01

    We describe a simple adaptive network of coupled chaotic maps. The network reaches a stationary state (frozen topology) for all values of the coupling parameter, although the dynamics of the maps at the nodes of the network can be nontrivial. The structure of the network shows interesting hierarchical properties and in certain parameter regions the dynamics is polysynchronous: Nodes can be divided in differently synchronized classes but, contrary to cluster synchronization, nodes in the same class need not be connected to each other. These complicated synchrony patterns have been conjectured to play roles in systems biology and circuits. The adaptive system we study describes ways whereby this behavior can evolve from undifferentiated nodes. PMID:25019835

  11. Interactive solution-adaptive grid generation procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Todd L.; Choo, Yung K.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    TURBO-AD is an interactive solution adaptive grid generation program under development. The program combines an interactive algebraic grid generation technique and a solution adaptive grid generation technique into a single interactive package. The control point form uses a sparse collection of control points to algebraically generate a field grid. This technique provides local grid control capability and is well suited to interactive work due to its speed and efficiency. A mapping from the physical domain to a parametric domain was used to improve difficulties encountered near outwardly concave boundaries in the control point technique. Therefore, all grid modifications are performed on the unit square in the parametric domain, and the new adapted grid is then mapped back to the physical domain. The grid adaption is achieved by adapting the control points to a numerical solution in the parametric domain using control sources obtained from the flow properties. Then a new modified grid is generated from the adapted control net. This process is efficient because the number of control points is much less than the number of grid points and the generation of the grid is an efficient algebraic process. TURBO-AD provides the user with both local and global controls.

  12. Real-time optimal adaptation for planetary geometry and texture: 4-8 tile hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Hwa, Lok M; Duchaineau, Mark A; Joy, Kenneth I

    2005-01-01

    The real-time display of huge geometry and imagery databases involves view-dependent approximations, typically through the use of precomputed hierarchies that are selectively refined at runtime. A classic motivating problem is terrain visualization in which planetary databases involving billions of elevation and color values are displayed on PC graphics hardware at high frame rates. This paper introduces a new diamond data structure for the basic selective-refinement processing, which is a streamlined method of representing the well-known hierarchies of right triangles that have enjoyed much success in real-time, view-dependent terrain display. Regular-grid tiles are proposed as the payload data per diamond for both geometry and texture. The use of 4-8 grid refinement and coarsening schemes allows level-of-detail transitions that are twice as gradual as traditional quadtree-based hierarchies, as well as very high-quality low-pass filtering compared to subsampling-based hierarchies. An out-of-core storage organization is introduced based on Sierpinski indices per diamond, along with a tile preprocessing framework based on fine-to-coarse, same-level, and coarse-to-fine gathering operations. To attain optimal frame-to-frame coherence and processing-order priorities, dual split and merge queues are developed similar to the Realtime Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM) Algorithm, as well as an adaptation of the ROAM frustum culling technique. Example applications of lake-detection and procedural terrain generation demonstrate the flexibility of the tile processing framework. PMID:16138547

  13. An adaptive grid with directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive grid generator for adaptive node movement is here derived by combining a variational formulation of Winslow's (1981) variable-diffusion method with a directional control functional. By applying harmonic-function theory, it becomes possible to define conditions under which there exist unique solutions of the resulting elliptic equations. The results obtained for the grid generator's application to the complex problem posed by the fluid instability-driven magnetic field reconnection demonstrate one-tenth the computational cost of either a Eulerian grid or an adaptive grid without directional control.

  14. An Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method by Grid Subdivision, Local Remeshing, and Grid Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured grid adaptation technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The approach is based on a combination of grid subdivision, local remeshing, and grid movement. For solution adaptive grids, the surface triangulation is locally refined by grid subdivision, and the tetrahedral grid in the field is partially remeshed at locations of dominant flow features. A grid redistribution strategy is employed for geometric adaptation of volume grids to moving or deforming surfaces. The method is automatic and fast and is designed for modular coupling with different solvers. Several steady state test cases with different inviscid flow features were tested for grid/solution adaptation. In all cases, the dominant flow features, such as shocks and vortices, were accurately and efficiently predicted with the present approach. A new and robust method of moving tetrahedral "viscous" grids is also presented and demonstrated on a three-dimensional example.

  15. The fundamentals of adaptive grid movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Basic grid point movement schemes are studied. The schemes are referred to as adaptive grids. Weight functions and equidistribution in one dimension are treated. The specification of coefficients in the linear weight, attraction to a given grid or a curve, and evolutionary forces are considered. Curve by curve and finite volume methods are described. The temporal coupling of partial differential equations solvers and grid generators was discussed.

  16. Static multiresolution grids with inline hierarchy information for cosmic ray propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Gero

    2016-08-01

    For numerical simulations of cosmic-ray propagation fast access to static magnetic field data is required. We present a data structure for multiresolution vector grids which is optimized for fast access, low overhead and shared memory use. The hierarchy information is encoded into the grid itself, reducing the memory overhead. Benchmarks show that in certain scenarios the differences in deflections introduced by sampling the magnetic field model can be significantly reduced when using the multiresolution approach.

  17. Structured adaptive grid generation using algebraic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, Bharat K.; Roger, R. P.; Chan, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical algorithm depends not only on the formal order of approximation but also on the distribution of grid points in the computational domain. Grid adaptation is a procedure which allows optimal grid redistribution as the solution progresses. It offers the prospect of accurate flow field simulations without the use of an excessively timely, computationally expensive, grid. Grid adaptive schemes are divided into two basic categories: differential and algebraic. The differential method is based on a variational approach where a function which contains a measure of grid smoothness, orthogonality and volume variation is minimized by using a variational principle. This approach provided a solid mathematical basis for the adaptive method, but the Euler-Lagrange equations must be solved in addition to the original governing equations. On the other hand, the algebraic method requires much less computational effort, but the grid may not be smooth. The algebraic techniques are based on devising an algorithm where the grid movement is governed by estimates of the local error in the numerical solution. This is achieved by requiring the points in the large error regions to attract other points and points in the low error region to repel other points. The development of a fast, efficient, and robust algebraic adaptive algorithm for structured flow simulation applications is presented. This development is accomplished in a three step process. The first step is to define an adaptive weighting mesh (distribution mesh) on the basis of the equidistribution law applied to the flow field solution. The second, and probably the most crucial step, is to redistribute grid points in the computational domain according to the aforementioned weighting mesh. The third and the last step is to reevaluate the flow property by an appropriate search/interpolate scheme at the new grid locations. The adaptive weighting mesh provides the information on the desired concentration

  18. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  19. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  20. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  1. Large-Scale Liquid Simulation on Adaptive Hexahedral Grids.

    PubMed

    Ferstl, Florian; Westermann, Rudiger; Dick, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Regular grids are attractive for numerical fluid simulations because they give rise to efficient computational kernels. However, for simulating high resolution effects in complicated domains they are only of limited suitability due to memory constraints. In this paper we present a method for liquid simulation on an adaptive octree grid using a hexahedral finite element discretization, which reduces memory requirements by coarsening the elements in the interior of the liquid body. To impose free surface boundary conditions with second order accuracy, we incorporate a particular class of Nitsche methods enforcing the Dirichlet boundary conditions for the pressure in a variational sense. We then show how to construct a multigrid hierarchy from the adaptive octree grid, so that a time efficient geometric multigrid solver can be used. To improve solver convergence, we propose a special treatment of liquid boundaries via composite finite elements at coarser scales. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method for liquid simulations that would require hundreds of millions of simulation elements in a non-adaptive regime. PMID:26357387

  2. SAGE - MULTIDIMENSIONAL SELF-ADAPTIVE GRID CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    SAGE, Self Adaptive Grid codE, is a flexible tool for adapting and restructuring both 2D and 3D grids. Solution-adaptive grid methods are useful tools for efficient and accurate flow predictions. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, strong gradient regions such as shocks, contact discontinuities, shear layers, etc., require careful distribution of grid points to minimize grid error and produce accurate flow-field predictions. SAGE helps the user obtain more accurate solutions by intelligently redistributing (i.e. adapting) the original grid points based on an initial or interim flow-field solution. The user then computes a new solution using the adapted grid as input to the flow solver. The adaptive-grid methodology poses the problem in an algebraic, unidirectional manner for multi-dimensional adaptations. The procedure is analogous to applying tension and torsion spring forces proportional to the local flow gradient at every grid point and finding the equilibrium position of the resulting system of grid points. The multi-dimensional problem of grid adaption is split into a series of one-dimensional problems along the computational coordinate lines. The reduced one dimensional problem then requires a tridiagonal solver to find the location of grid points along a coordinate line. Multi-directional adaption is achieved by the sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The tension forces direct the redistribution of points to the strong gradient region. To maintain smoothness and a measure of orthogonality of grid lines, torsional forces are introduced that relate information between the family of lines adjacent to one another. The smoothness and orthogonality constraints are direction-dependent, since they relate only the coordinate lines that are being adapted to the neighboring lines that have already been adapted. Therefore the solutions are non-unique and depend on the order and direction of adaption. Non-uniqueness of the adapted grid is

  3. Dynamic Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaptation on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady three-dimensional problems that require grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. By locally refining and coarsening the mesh to capture phenomena of interest, such procedures make standard computational methods more cost effective. Highly refined meshes are required to accurately capture shock waves, contact discontinuities, vortices, and shear layers in fluid flow problems. Adaptive meshes have also proved to be useful in several other areas of computational science and engineering like computer vision and graphics, semiconductor device modeling, and structural mechanics. Local mesh adaptation provides the opportunity to obtain solutions that are comparable to those obtained on globally-refined grids but at a much lower cost. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Adaptive refinement tools for tetrahedral unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul (Inventor); Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An exemplary embodiment providing one or more improvements includes software which is robust, efficient, and has a very fast run time for user directed grid enrichment and flow solution adaptive grid refinement. All user selectable options (e.g., the choice of functions, the choice of thresholds, etc.), other than a pre-marked cell list, can be entered on the command line. The ease of application is an asset for flow physics research and preliminary design CFD analysis where fast grid modification is often needed to deal with unanticipated development of flow details.

  5. AES based secure low energy adaptive clustering hierarchy for WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, K. R.; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide a low cost solution in diversified application areas. The wireless sensor nodes are inexpensive tiny devices with limited storage, computational capability and power. They are being deployed in large scale in both military and civilian applications. Security of the data is one of the key concerns where large numbers of nodes are deployed. Here, an energy-efficient secure routing protocol, secure-LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy) for WSNs based on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is being proposed. This crypto system is a session based one and a new session key is assigned for each new session. The network (WSN) is divided into number of groups or clusters and a cluster head (CH) is selected among the member nodes of each cluster. The measured data from the nodes is aggregated by the respective CH's and then each CH relays this data to another CH towards the gateway node in the WSN which in turn sends the same to the Base station (BS). In order to maintain confidentiality of data while being transmitted, it is necessary to encrypt the data before sending at every hop, from a node to the CH and from the CH to another CH or to the gateway node.

  6. Load Balancing Sequences of Unstructured Adaptive Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid

    1997-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured grid computations but causes load imbalance on multiprocessor systems. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, an automatic portable framework for performing adaptive large-scale numerical computations in a message-passing environment. This paper makes several important additions to our previous work. First, a new remapping cost model is presented and empirically validated on an SP2. Next, our load balancing strategy is applied to sequences of dynamically adapted unstructured grids. Results indicate that our framework is effective on many processors for both steady and unsteady problems with several levels of adaption. Additionally, we demonstrate that a coarse starting mesh produces high quality load balancing, at a fraction of the cost required for a fine initial mesh. Finally, we show that the data remapping overhead can be significantly reduced by applying our heuristic processor reassignment algorithm.

  7. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P; Fragile, P C; Salmonson, J D

    2005-05-06

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. it provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threated oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  8. Elliptic Solvers for Adaptive Mesh Refinement Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D.J.; Dendy, J.E., Jr.; Shapira, Y.

    1999-06-03

    We are developing multigrid methods that will efficiently solve elliptic problems with anisotropic and discontinuous coefficients on adaptive grids. The final product will be a library that provides for the simplified solution of such problems. This library will directly benefit the efforts of other Laboratory groups. The focus of this work is research on serial and parallel elliptic algorithms and the inclusion of our black-box multigrid techniques into this new setting. The approach applies the Los Alamos object-oriented class libraries that greatly simplify the development of serial and parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications. In the final year of this LDRD, we focused on putting the software together; in particular we completed the final AMR++ library, we wrote tutorials and manuals, and we built example applications. We implemented the Fast Adaptive Composite Grid method as the principal elliptic solver. We presented results at the Overset Grid Conference and other more AMR specific conferences. We worked on optimization of serial and parallel performance and published several papers on the details of this work. Performance remains an important issue and is the subject of continuing research work.

  9. An Adaptive VOF Method on Unstructured Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L. L.; Huang, M.; Chen, B.

    2011-09-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of interface capturing and keeping the computational efficiency, an adaptive VOF method on unstructured grid is proposed in this paper. The volume fraction in each cell is regarded as the criterion to locally refine the interface cell. With the movement of interface, new interface cells (0 ≤ f ≤ 1) are subdivided into child cells, while those child cells that no longer contain interface will be merged back into the original parent cell. In order to avoid the complicated redistribution of volume fraction during the subdivision and amalgamation procedure, a predictor-corrector algorithm is proposed to implement the subdivision and amalgamation procedures only in empty or full cell ( f = 0 or 1). Thus volume fraction in the new cell can take the value from the original cell directly, and the interpolation of the interface is avoided. The advantage of this method is that the re-generation of the whole grid system is not necessary, so its implementation is very efficient. Moreover, an advection flow test of a hollow square was performed, and the relative shape error of the result obtained by adaptive mesh is smaller than those by non-refined grid, which verifies the validation of our method.

  10. Shape optimization including finite element grid adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, N.; Taylor, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The prediction of optimal shape design for structures depends on having a sufficient level of precision in the computation of structural response. These requirements become critical in situations where the region to be designed includes stress concentrations or unilateral contact surfaces, for example. In the approach to shape optimization discussed here, a means to obtain grid adaptation is incorporated into the finite element procedures. This facility makes it possible to maintain a level of quality in the computational estimate of response that is surely adequate for the shape design problem.

  11. Conservative Smoothing on an Adaptive Quadrilateral Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, M.; Takayama, K.

    1999-03-01

    The Lax-Wendroff scheme can be freed of spurious oscillations by introducing conservative smoothing. In this paper the approach is first tested in 1-D modeling equations and then extended to multidimensional flows by the finite volume method. The scheme is discretized by a space-splitting method on an adaptive quadrilateral grid. The artificial viscosity coefficients in the conservative smoothing step are specially designed to capture slipstreams and vortices. Algorithms are programmed using a vectorizable data structure, under which not only the flow solver but also the adaptation procedure is well vectorized. The good resolution and high efficiency of the approach are demonstrated in calculating both unsteady and steady compressible flows with either weak or strong shock waves.

  12. On Accuracy of Adaptive Grid Methods for Captured Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of two grid adaptation strategies, grid redistribution and local grid refinement, is examined by solving the 2-D Euler equations for the supersonic steady flow around a cylinder. Second- and fourth-order linear finite difference shock-capturing schemes, based on the Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting, are used to discretize the governing equations. The grid refinement study shows that for the second-order scheme, neither grid adaptation strategy improves the numerical solution accuracy compared to that calculated on a uniform grid with the same number of grid points. For the fourth-order scheme, the dominant first-order error component is reduced by the grid adaptation, while the design-order error component drastically increases because of the grid nonuniformity. As a result, both grid adaptation techniques improve the numerical solution accuracy only on the coarsest mesh or on very fine grids that are seldom found in practical applications because of the computational cost involved. Similar error behavior has been obtained for the pressure integral across the shock. A simple analysis shows that both grid adaptation strategies are not without penalties in the numerical solution accuracy. Based on these results, a new grid adaptation criterion for captured shocks is proposed.

  13. Dynamic mesh adaption for triangular and tetrahedral grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: requirements for dynamic mesh adaption; linked-list data structure; edge-based data structure; adaptive-grid data structure; three types of element subdivision; mesh refinement; mesh coarsening; additional constraints for coarsening; anisotropic error indicator for edges; unstructured-grid Euler solver; inviscid 3-D wing; and mesh quality for solution-adaptive grids. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  15. Comparing Anisotropic Output-Based Grid Adaptation Methods by Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Loseille, Adrien; Krakos, Joshua A.; Michal, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic grid adaptation is examined by decomposing the steps of flow solution, ad- joint solution, error estimation, metric construction, and simplex grid adaptation. Multiple implementations of each of these steps are evaluated by comparison to each other and expected analytic results when available. For example, grids are adapted to analytic metric fields and grid measures are computed to illustrate the properties of multiple independent implementations of grid adaptation mechanics. Different implementations of each step in the adaptation process can be evaluated in a system where the other components of the adaptive cycle are fixed. Detailed examination of these properties allows comparison of different methods to identify the current state of the art and where further development should be targeted.

  16. Moving and adaptive grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trepanier, Jean-Yves; Camarero, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes adaptive grid methods developed specifically for compressible flow computations. The basic flow solver is a finite-volume implementation of Roe's flux difference splitting scheme or arbitrarily moving unstructured triangular meshes. The grid adaptation is performed according to geometric and flow requirements. Some results are included to illustrate the potential of the methodology.

  17. Solving Fluid Flow Problems on Moving and Adaptive Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2005-07-28

    Solution of fluid dynamics problems on overlapping grids will be discussed. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured component grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Overlapping grids provide an effective approach for developing efficient and accurate approximations for complex, possibly moving geometry. Topics to be addressed include the reactive Euler equations, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and elliptic equations solved with a multigrid algorithm. Recent developments coupling moving grids and adaptive mesh refinement and preliminary parallel results will also be presented.

  18. Adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Gary P.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical algorithm is presented for solving the two-dimensional flux-split Euler equations using a multigrid method with adaptive grid embedding. The method uses an unstructured data set along with a system of pointers for communication on the irregularly shaped grid topologies. An explicit two-stage time advancement scheme is implemented. A multigrid algorithm is used to provide grid level communication and to accelerate the convergence of the solution to steady state. Results are presented for an NACA 0012 airfoil in a freestream with Mach numbers of 0.95 and 1.054. Excellent resolution of the shock structures is obtained with the adaptive grid embedding method with significantly fewer grid points than the comparable structured grid.

  19. Development of a dynamically adaptive grid method for multidimensional problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, J. E.; Hindman, R. G.

    1984-06-01

    An approach to solution adaptive grid generation for use with finite difference techniques, previously demonstrated on model problems in one space dimension, has been extended to multidimensional problems. The method is based on the popular elliptic steady grid generators, but is 'dynamically' adaptive in the sense that a grid is maintained at all times satisfying the steady grid law driven by a solution-dependent source term. Testing has been carried out on Burgers' equation in one and two space dimensions. Results appear encouraging both for inviscid wave propagation cases and viscous boundary layer cases, suggesting that application to practical flow problems is now possible. In the course of the work, obstacles relating to grid correction, smoothing of the solution, and elliptic equation solvers have been largely overcome. Concern remains, however, about grid skewness, boundary layer resolution and the need for implicit integration methods. Also, the method in 3-D is expected to be very demanding of computer resources.

  20. A generic efficient adaptive grid scheme for rocket propulsion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, J. D.; Chow, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient, time-accurate numerical algorithm to discretize the Navier-Stokes equations for the predictions of internal one-, two-dimensional and axisymmetric flows. A generic, efficient, elliptic adaptive grid generator is implicitly coupled with the Lower-Upper factorization scheme in the development of ALUNS computer code. The calculations of one-dimensional shock tube wave propagation and two-dimensional shock wave capture, wave-wave interactions, shock wave-boundary interactions show that the developed scheme is stable, accurate and extremely robust. The adaptive grid generator produced a very favorable grid network by a grid speed technique. This generic adaptive grid generator is also applied in the PARC and FDNS codes and the computational results for solid rocket nozzle flowfield and crystal growth modeling by those codes will be presented in the conference, too. This research work is being supported by NASA/MSFC.

  1. Conservative treatment of boundary interfaces for overlaid grids and multi-level grid adaptations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1989-01-01

    Conservative algorithms for boundaray interfaces of overlaid grids are presented. The basic method is zeroth order, and is extended to a higher order method using interpolation and subcell decomposition. The present method, strictly based on a conservative constraint, is tested with overlaid grids for various applications of unsteady and steady supersonic inviscid flows with strong shock waves. The algorithm is also applied to a multi-level grid adaptation in which the next level finer grid is overlaid on the coarse base grid with an arbitrary orientation.

  2. Conservative treatment of boundary interfaces for overlaid grids and multi-level grid adaptations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Young J.; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1989-01-01

    Conservative algorithms for boundary interfaces of overlaid grids are presented. The basic method is zeroth order, and is extended to a higher order method using interpolation and subcell decomposition. The present method, strictly based on a conservative constraint, is tested with overlaid grids for various applications of unsteady and steady supersonic inviscid flows with strong shock waves. The algorithm is also applied to a multi-level grid adaptation in which the next level finer grid is overlaid on the coarse base grid with an arbitrary orientation.

  3. Workshop on adaptive grid methods for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    The author describes a general `hp` finite element method with adaptive grids. The code was based on the work of Oden, et al. The term `hp` refers to the method of spatial refinement (h), in conjunction with the order of polynomials used as a part of the finite element discretization (p). This finite element code seems to handle well the different mesh grid sizes occuring between abuted grids with different resolutions.

  4. Rapid Structured Volume Grid Smoothing and Adaption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid, structured volume grid smoothing and adaption technique, based on signal processing methods, was developed and applied to the Shuttle Orbiter at hypervelocity flight conditions in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation. Because of the fast pace of the investigation, computational aerothermodynamicists, applying hypersonic viscous flow solving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, refined and enhanced a grid for an undamaged baseline vehicle to assess a variety of damage scenarios. Of the many methods available to modify a structured grid, most are time-consuming and require significant user interaction. By casting the grid data into different coordinate systems, specifically two computational coordinates with arclength as the third coordinate, signal processing methods are used for filtering the data [Taubin, CG v/29 1995]. Using a reverse transformation, the processed data are used to smooth the Cartesian coordinates of the structured grids. By coupling the signal processing method with existing grid operations within the Volume Grid Manipulator tool, problems related to grid smoothing are solved efficiently and with minimal user interaction. Examples of these smoothing operations are illustrated for reductions in grid stretching and volume grid adaptation. In each of these examples, other techniques existed at the time of the Columbia accident, but the incorporation of signal processing techniques reduced the time to perform the corrections by nearly 60%. This reduction in time to perform the corrections therefore enabled the assessment of approximately twice the number of damage scenarios than previously possible during the allocated investigation time.

  5. Rapid Structured Volume Grid Smoothing and Adaption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, structured volume grid smoothing and adaption technique, based on signal processing methods, was developed and applied to the Shuttle Orbiter at hypervelocity flight conditions in support of the Columbia Accident Investigation. Because of the fast pace of the investigation, computational aerothermodynamicists, applying hypersonic viscous flow solving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, refined and enhanced a grid for an undamaged baseline vehicle to assess a variety of damage scenarios. Of the many methods available to modify a structured grid, most are time-consuming and require significant user interaction. By casting the grid data into different coordinate systems, specifically two computational coordinates with arclength as the third coordinate, signal processing methods are used for filtering the data [Taubin, CG v/29 1995]. Using a reverse transformation, the processed data are used to smooth the Cartesian coordinates of the structured grids. By coupling the signal processing method with existing grid operations within the Volume Grid Manipulator tool, problems related to grid smoothing are solved efficiently and with minimal user interaction. Examples of these smoothing operations are illustrated for reduction in grid stretching and volume grid adaptation. In each of these examples, other techniques existed at the time of the Columbia accident, but the incorporation of signal processing techniques reduced the time to perform the corrections by nearly 60%. This reduction in time to perform the corrections therefore enabled the assessment of approximately twice the number of damage scenarios than previously possible during the allocated investigation time.

  6. Stability and error estimation for Component Adaptive Grid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph; Zhu, Xiaolei

    1994-01-01

    Component adaptive grid (CAG) methods for solving hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDE's) are discussed in this paper. Applying recent stability results for a class of numerical methods on uniform grids. The convergence of these methods for linear problems on component adaptive grids is established here. Furthermore, the computational error can be estimated on CAG's using the stability results. Using these estimates, the error can be controlled on CAG's. Thus, the solution can be computed efficiently on CAG's within a given error tolerance. Computational results for time dependent linear problems in one and two space dimensions are presented.

  7. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-Fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    To be truly compatible with structured grids, an AMR algorithm should employ a block structure for the refined grids to allow flow solvers to take advantage of the strengths of unstructured grid systems, such as efficient solution algorithms for implicit discretizations and multigrid schemes. One such algorithm, the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella, has been applied to and adapted for use with body-fitted structured grid systems. Results are presented for a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil (AGARD-03 test case) and a reflection of a shock over a double wedge.

  8. Topology and grid adaption for high-speed flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of grid topology and grid adaptation on numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. In the first part of this study, a general procedure is presented for computation of high-speed flow over complex three-dimensional configurations. The flow field is simulated on the surface of a Butler wing in a uniform stream. Results are presented for Mach number 3.5 and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000. The O-type and H-type grids have been used for this study, and the results are compared together and with other theoretical and experimental results. The results demonstrate that while the H-type grid is suitable for the leading and trailing edges, a more accurate solution can be obtained for the middle part of the wing with an O-type grid. In the second part of this study, methods of grid adaption are reviewed and a method is developed with the capability of adapting to several variables. This method is based on a variational approach and is an algebraic method. Also, the method has been formulated in such a way that there is no need for any matrix inversion. This method is used in conjunction with the calculation of hypersonic flow over a blunt-nose body. A movie has been produced which shows simultaneously the transient behavior of the solution and the grid adaption.

  9. Adaptive grid generation in a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    Adapting grid density to flow behavior provides the advantage of increasing solution accuracy while decreasing the number of grid elements in the simulation domain, therefore reducing the computational time. One method for grid adaptation requires successive refinement of grid density based on observed solution behavior until the numerical errors between successive grids are negligible. However, such an approach is time consuming and it is often neglected by the researchers. We present a technique to calculate the grid size distribution of an adaptive grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in a complex cerebral aneurysm geometry based on the kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field. The relationship between the kinematic characteristics of the flow and the element size of the adaptive grid leads to a mathematical equation to calculate the grid size in different regions of the flow. The adaptive grid density is obtained such that it captures the more complex details of the flow with locally smaller grid size, while less complex flow characteristics are calculated on locally larger grid size. The current study shows that kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field in a cerebral aneurysm can be used to find the locations of complex flow where the computational grid needs to be refined in order to obtain an accurate solution. We found that the complexity of the flow can be adequately described by velocity and vorticity and the angle between the two vectors. For example, inside the aneurysm bleb, at the bifurcation, and at the major arterial turns the element size in the lumen needs to be less than 10% of the artery radius, while at the boundary layer, the element size should be smaller than 1% of the artery radius, for accurate results within a 0.5% relative approximation error. This technique of quantifying flow complexity and adaptive remeshing has the potential to improve results accuracy and reduce

  10. Adaptive grid generation in a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodis, Simona; Kallmes, David F.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    Adapting grid density to flow behavior provides the advantage of increasing solution accuracy while decreasing the number of grid elements in the simulation domain, therefore reducing the computational time. One method for grid adaptation requires successive refinement of grid density based on observed solution behavior until the numerical errors between successive grids are negligible. However, such an approach is time consuming and it is often neglected by the researchers. We present a technique to calculate the grid size distribution of an adaptive grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in a complex cerebral aneurysm geometry based on the kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field. The relationship between the kinematic characteristics of the flow and the element size of the adaptive grid leads to a mathematical equation to calculate the grid size in different regions of the flow. The adaptive grid density is obtained such that it captures the more complex details of the flow with locally smaller grid size, while less complex flow characteristics are calculated on locally larger grid size. The current study shows that kinematic curvature and torsion calculated from the velocity field in a cerebral aneurysm can be used to find the locations of complex flow where the computational grid needs to be refined in order to obtain an accurate solution. We found that the complexity of the flow can be adequately described by velocity and vorticity and the angle between the two vectors. For example, inside the aneurysm bleb, at the bifurcation, and at the major arterial turns the element size in the lumen needs to be less than 10% of the artery radius, while at the boundary layer, the element size should be smaller than 1% of the artery radius, for accurate results within a 0.5% relative approximation error. This technique of quantifying flow complexity and adaptive remeshing has the potential to improve results accuracy and reduce

  11. Methods for prismatic/tetrahedral grid generation and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinderis, Y.

    1995-10-01

    The present work involves generation of hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grids for complex 3-D geometries including multi-body domains. The prisms cover the region close to each body's surface, while tetrahedra are created elsewhere. Two developments are presented for hybrid grid generation around complex 3-D geometries. The first is a new octree/advancing front type of method for generation of the tetrahedra of the hybrid mesh. The main feature of the present advancing front tetrahedra generator that is different from previous such methods is that it does not require the creation of a background mesh by the user for the determination of the grid-spacing and stretching parameters. These are determined via an automatically generated octree. The second development is a method for treating the narrow gaps in between different bodies in a multiply-connected domain. This method is applied to a two-element wing case. A High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) type of aircraft geometry is considered. The generated hybrid grid required only 170 K tetrahedra instead of an estimated two million had a tetrahedral mesh been used in the prisms region as well. A solution adaptive scheme for viscous computations on hybrid grids is also presented. A hybrid grid adaptation scheme that employs both h-refinement and redistribution strategies is developed to provide optimum meshes for viscous flow computations. Grid refinement is a dual adaptation scheme that couples 3-D, isotropic division of tetrahedra and 2-D, directional division of prisms.

  12. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  13. SAGE: The Self-Adaptive Grid Code. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1999-01-01

    The multi-dimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, is an important tool in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It provides an efficient method to improve the accuracy of flow solutions while simultaneously reducing computer processing time. Briefly, SAGE enhances an initial computational grid by redistributing the mesh points into more appropriate locations. The movement of these points is driven by an equal-error-distribution algorithm that utilizes the relationship between high flow gradients and excessive solution errors. The method also provides a balance between clustering points in the high gradient regions and maintaining the smoothness and continuity of the adapted grid, The latest version, Version 3, includes the ability to change the boundaries of a given grid to more efficiently enclose flow structures and provides alternative redistribution algorithms.

  14. Variational method for adaptive grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1983-01-01

    A variational method for generating adaptive meshes is described. Functionals measuring smoothness, skewness, orientation, and the Jacobian are minimized to generate a mapping from a rectilinear domain in natural coordinate to an arbitrary domain in physical coordinates. From the mapping, a mesh is easily constructed. In using the method to adaptively zone computational problems, as few as one third the number of mesh points are required in each coordinate direction compared with a uniformly zoned mesh.

  15. An adaptive grid algorithm for one-dimensional nonlinear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, William E.; Hills, Richard G.

    1990-01-01

    Richards' equation, which models the flow of liquid through unsaturated porous media, is highly nonlinear and difficult to solve. Step gradients in the field variables require the use of fine grids and small time step sizes. The numerical instabilities caused by the nonlinearities often require the use of iterative methods such as Picard or Newton interation. These difficulties result in large CPU requirements in solving Richards equation. With this in mind, adaptive and multigrid methods are investigated for use with nonlinear equations such as Richards' equation. Attention is focused on one-dimensional transient problems. To investigate the use of multigrid and adaptive grid methods, a series of problems are studied. First, a multigrid program is developed and used to solve an ordinary differential equation, demonstrating the efficiency with which low and high frequency errors are smoothed out. The multigrid algorithm and an adaptive grid algorithm is used to solve one-dimensional transient partial differential equations, such as the diffusive and convective-diffusion equations. The performance of these programs are compared to that of the Gauss-Seidel and tridiagonal methods. The adaptive and multigrid schemes outperformed the Gauss-Seidel algorithm, but were not as fast as the tridiagonal method. The adaptive grid scheme solved the problems slightly faster than the multigrid method. To solve nonlinear problems, Picard iterations are introduced into the adaptive grid and tridiagonal methods. Burgers' equation is used as a test problem for the two algorithms. Both methods obtain solutions of comparable accuracy for similar time increments. For the Burgers' equation, the adaptive grid method finds the solution approximately three times faster than the tridiagonal method. Finally, both schemes are used to solve the water content formulation of the Richards' equation. For this problem, the adaptive grid method obtains a more accurate solution in fewer work units and

  16. Cellular differentiation hierarchies in normal and culture-adapted human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Enver, Tariq; Soneji, Shamit; Joshi, Chirag; Brown, John; Iborra, Francisco; Orntoft, Torben; Thykjaer, Thomas; Maltby, Edna; Smith, Kath; Abu Dawud, Raed; Jones, Mark; Matin, Maryam; Gokhale, Paul; Draper, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) lines vary in their characteristics and behaviour not only because they are derived from genetically outbred populations, but also because they may undergo progressive adaptation upon long-term culture in vitro. Such adaptation may reflect selection of variants with altered propensity for survival and retention of an undifferentiated phenotype. Elucidating the mechanisms involved will be important for understanding normal self-renewal and commitment to differentiation and for validating the safety of HESC-based therapy. We have investigated this process of adaptation at the cellular and molecular levels through a comparison of early passage (normal) and late passage (adapted) sublines of a single HESC line, H7. To account for spontaneous differentiation that occurs in HESC cultures, we sorted cells for SSEA3, which marks undifferentiated HESC. We show that the gene expression programmes of the adapted cells partially reflected their aberrant karyotype, but also resulted from a failure in X-inactivation, emphasizing the importance in adaptation of karyotypically silent epigenetic changes. On the basis of growth potential, ability to re-initiate ES cultures and global transcription profiles, we propose a cellular differentiation hierarchy for maintenance cultures of HESC: normal SSEA3+ cells represent pluripotent stem cells. Normal SSEA3- cells have exited this compartment, but retain multilineage differentiation potential. However, adapted SSEA3+ and SSEA3- cells co-segregate within the stem cell territory, implying that adaptation reflects an alteration in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. As this balance is also an essential feature of cancer, the mechanisms of culture adaptation may mirror those of oncogenesis and tumour progression. PMID:16159889

  17. ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Adaptive Grid Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, Jerry C., Jr. (Editor); Thomas, James L. (Editor); Vanrosendale, John (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Solution-adaptive grid techniques are essential to the attainment of practical, user friendly, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. In this three-day workshop, experts gathered together to describe state-of-the-art methods in solution-adaptive grid refinement, analysis, and implementation; to assess the current practice; and to discuss future needs and directions for research. This was accomplished through a series of invited and contributed papers. The workshop focused on a set of two-dimensional test cases designed by the organizers to aid in assessing the current state of development of adaptive grid technology. In addition, a panel of experts from universities, industry, and government research laboratories discussed their views of needs and future directions in this field.

  18. Fast adaptive composite grid methods on distributed parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Max; Quinlan, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite (FAC) grid method is compared with the adaptive composite method (AFAC) under variety of conditions including vectorization and parallelization. Results are given for distributed memory multiprocessor architectures (SUPRENUM, Intel iPSC/2 and iPSC/860). It is shown that the good performance of AFAC and its superiority over FAC in a parallel environment is a property of the algorithm and not dependent on peculiarities of any machine.

  19. Adaptive hybrid prismatic-tetrahedral grids for viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Khawaja, Aly; McMorris, Harlan

    1995-03-01

    The paper presents generation of adaptive hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grids for complex 3-D geometries including multi-body domains. The prisms cover the region close to each body's surface, while tetrahedra are created elsewhere. Two developments are presented for hybrid grid generation around complex 3-D geometries. The first is a new octree/advancing front type of method for generation of the tetrahedra of the hybrid mesh. The main feature of the present advancing front tetrahedra generator that is different from previous such methods is that it does not require the creation of a background mesh by the user for the determination of the grid-spacing and stretching parameters. These are determined via an automatically generated octree. The second development is an Automatic Receding Method (ARM) for treating the narrow gaps in between different bodies in a multiply-connected domain. This method is applied to a two-element wing case. A hybrid grid adaptation scheme that employs both h-refinement and redistribution strategies is developed to provide optimum meshes for viscous flow computations. Grid refinement is a dual adaptation scheme that couples division of tetrahedra, as well as 2-D directional division of prisms.

  20. Adaptive hybrid prismatic-tetrahedral grids for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Khawaja, Aly; Mcmorris, Harlan

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents generation of adaptive hybrid prismatic/tetrahedral grids for complex 3-D geometries including multi-body domains. The prisms cover the region close to each body's surface, while tetrahedra are created elsewhere. Two developments are presented for hybrid grid generation around complex 3-D geometries. The first is a new octree/advancing front type of method for generation of the tetrahedra of the hybrid mesh. The main feature of the present advancing front tetrahedra generator that is different from previous such methods is that it does not require the creation of a background mesh by the user for the determination of the grid-spacing and stretching parameters. These are determined via an automatically generated octree. The second development is an Automatic Receding Method (ARM) for treating the narrow gaps in between different bodies in a multiply-connected domain. This method is applied to a two-element wing case. A hybrid grid adaptation scheme that employs both h-refinement and redistribution strategies is developed to provide optimum meshes for viscous flow computations. Grid refinement is a dual adaptation scheme that couples division of tetrahedra, as well as 2-D directional division of prisms.

  1. A novel hyperbolic grid generation procedure with inherent adaptive dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.H.; Yin, S.L.; Soong, C.Y.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports a novel hyperbolic grid-generation with an inherent adaptive dissipation (HGAD), which is capable of improving the oscillation and overlapping of grid lines. In the present work upwinding differencing is applied to discretize the hyperbolic system and, thereby, to develop the adaptive dissipation coefficient. Complex configurations with the features of geometric discontinuity, exceptional concavity and convexity are used as the test cases for comparison of the present HGAD procedure with the conventional hyerbolic and elliptic ones. The results reveal that the HGAD method is superior in orthogonality and smoothness of the grid system. In addition, the computational efficiency of the flow solver may be improved by using the present HGAD procedure. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  2. A Grid Sourcing and Adaptation Study Using Unstructured Grids for Supersonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA created the Supersonics Project as part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program to advance technology that will make a supersonic flight over land viable. Computational flow solvers have lacked the ability to accurately predict sonic boom from the near to far field. The focus of this investigation was to establish gridding and adaptation techniques to predict near-to-mid-field (<10 body lengths below the aircraft) boom signatures at supersonic speeds using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The study began by examining sources along the body the aircraft, far field sourcing and far field boundaries. The study then examined several techniques for grid adaptation. During the course of the study, volume sourcing was introduced as a new way to source grids using the grid generation code VGRID. Two different methods of using the volume sources were examined. The first method, based on manual insertion of the numerous volume sources, made great improvements in the prediction capability of USM3D for boom signatures. The second method (SSGRID), which uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid and pressure waves, showed similar results with a more automated approach. Due to SSGRID s results and ease of use, the rest of the study focused on developing a best practice using SSGRID. The best practice created by this study for boom predictions using the CFD code USM3D involved: 1) creating a small cylindrical outer boundary either 1 or 2 body lengths in diameter (depending on how far below the aircraft the boom prediction is required), 2) using a single volume source under the aircraft, and 3) using SSGRID to stretch and shear the grid to the desired length.

  3. The multidimensional Self-Adaptive Grid code, SAGE, version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1995-01-01

    This new report on Version 2 of the SAGE code includes all the information in the original publication plus all upgrades and changes to the SAGE code since that time. The two most significant upgrades are the inclusion of a finite-volume option and the ability to adapt and manipulate zonal-matching multiple-grid files. In addition, the original SAGE code has been upgraded to Version 1.1 and includes all options mentioned in this report, with the exception of the multiple grid option and its associated features. Since Version 2 is a larger and more complex code, it is suggested (but not required) that Version 1.1 be used for single-grid applications. This document contains all the information required to run both versions of SAGE. The formulation of the adaption method is described in the first section of this document. The second section is presented in the form of a user guide that explains the input and execution of the code. The third section provides many examples. Successful application of the SAGE code in both two and three dimensions for the solution of various flow problems has proven the code to be robust, portable, and simple to use. Although the basic formulation follows the method of Nakahashi and Deiwert, many modifications have been made to facilitate the use of the self-adaptive grid method for complex grid structures. Modifications to the method and the simple but extensive input options make this a flexible and user-friendly code. The SAGE code can accommodate two-dimensional and three-dimensional, finite-difference and finite-volume, single grid, and zonal-matching multiple grid flow problems.

  4. The emergence of grid cells: Intelligent design or just adaptation?

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Treves, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Individual medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) 'grid' cells provide a representation of space that appears to be essentially invariant across environments, modulo simple transformations, in contrast to multiple, rapidly acquired hippocampal maps; it may therefore be established gradually during rodent development. We explore with a simplified mathematical model the possibility that the self-organization of multiple grid fields into a triangular grid pattern may be a single-cell process, driven by firing rate adaptation and slowly varying spatial inputs. A simple analytical derivation indicates that triangular grids are favored asymptotic states of the self-organizing system, and computer simulations confirm that such states are indeed reached during a model learning process, provided it is sufficiently slow to effectively average out fluctuations. The interactions among local ensembles of grid units serve solely to stabilize a common grid orientation. Spatial information, in the real mEC network, may be provided by any combination of feedforward cortical afferents and feedback hippocampal projections from place cells, since either input alone is likely sufficient to yield grid fields. PMID:19021261

  5. Self-Avoiding Walks Over Adaptive Triangular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Space-filling curves is a popular approach based on a geometric embedding for linearizing computational meshes. We present a new O(n log n) combinatorial algorithm for constructing a self avoiding walk through a two dimensional mesh containing n triangles. We show that for hierarchical adaptive meshes, the algorithm can be locally adapted and easily parallelized by taking advantage of the regularity of the refinement rules. The proposed approach should be very useful in the runtime partitioning and load balancing of adaptive unstructured grids.

  6. Efficient Load Balancing and Data Remapping for Adaptive Grid Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1997-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured- grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. We present a novel method to dynamically balance the processor workloads with a global view. This paper presents, for the first time, the implementation and integration of all major components within our dynamic load balancing strategy for adaptive grid calculations. Mesh adaption, repartitioning, processor assignment, and remapping are critical components of the framework that must be accomplished rapidly and efficiently so as not to cause a significant overhead to the numerical simulation. Previous results indicated that mesh repartitioning and data remapping are potential bottlenecks for performing large-scale scientific calculations. We resolve these issues and demonstrate that our framework remains viable on a large number of processors.

  7. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  8. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2001-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65deg delta wing with different values of leading-edge bluntness, and the second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the windtunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  9. Digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction with an adaptive voxel grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Bernhard; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2014-03-01

    In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume datasets are typically reconstructed with an anisotropic voxel size, where the in-plane voxel size usually reflects the detector pixel size (e.g., 0.1 mm), and the slice separation is generally between 0.5-1.0 mm. Increasing the tomographic angle is expected to give better 3D image quality; however, the slice spacing in the reconstruction should be reduced, otherwise one may risk losing fine-scale image detail (e.g., small microcalcifications). An alternative strategy consists of reconstructing on an adaptive voxel grid, where the voxel height at each location is adapted based on the backprojected data at this location, with the goal to improve image quality for microcalcifications. In this paper we present an approach for generating such an adaptive voxel grid. This approach is based on an initial reconstruction step that is performed at a finer slice-spacing combined with a selection of an "optimal" height for each voxel. This initial step is followed by a (potentially iterative) reconstruction acting now on the adaptive grid only.

  10. Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations on an Array of SMPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Pramanick, Ira; Sohn, Andrew; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic load balancing is necessary for parallel adaptive methods to solve unsteady CFD problems on unstructured grids. We have presented such a dynamic load balancing framework called JOVE, in this paper. Results on a four-POWERnode POWER CHALLENGEarray demonstrated that load balancing gives significant performance improvements over no load balancing for such adaptive computations. The parallel speedup of JOVE, implemented using MPI on the POWER CHALLENCEarray, was significant, being as high as 31 for 32 processors. An implementation of JOVE that exploits 'an array of SMPS' architecture was also studied; this hybrid JOVE outperformed flat JOVE by up to 28% on the meshes and adaption models tested. With large, realistic meshes and actual flow-solver and adaption phases incorporated into JOVE, hybrid JOVE can be expected to yield significant advantage over flat JOVE, especially as the number of processors is increased, thus demonstrating the scalability of an array of SMPs architecture.

  11. Fast transport simulation with an adaptive grid refinement.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Frieder; Boy, Siegrun

    2003-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in transport modeling and calibration is the extraordinarily long computing times necessary for simulation runs. Improved execution time is a prerequisite for calibration in transport modeling. In this paper we investigate the problem of code acceleration using an adaptive grid refinement, neglecting subdomains, and devising a method by which the Courant condition can be ignored while maintaining accurate solutions. Grid refinement is based on dividing selected cells into regular subcells and including the balance equations of subcells in the equation system. The connection of coarse and refined cells satisfies the mass balance with an interpolation scheme that is implicitly included in the equation system. The refined subdomain can move with the average transport velocity of the subdomain. Very small time steps are required on a fine or a refined grid, because of the combined effect of the Courant and Peclet conditions. Therefore, we have developed a special upwind technique in small grid cells with high velocities (velocity suppression). We have neglected grid subdomains with very small concentration gradients (zero suppression). The resulting software, MODCALIF, is a three-dimensional, modularly constructed FORTRAN code. For convenience, the package names used by the well-known MODFLOW and MT3D computer programs are adopted, and the same input file structure and format is used, but the program presented here is separate and independent. Also, MODCALIF includes algorithms for variable density modeling and model calibration. The method is tested by comparison with an analytical solution, and illustrated by means of a two-dimensional theoretical example and three-dimensional simulations of the variable-density Cape Cod and SALTPOOL experiments. Crossing from fine to coarse grid produces numerical dispersion when the whole subdomain of interest is refined; however, we show that accurate solutions can be obtained using a fraction of the

  12. Adaptive grid methods for RLV environment assessment and nozzle analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburg, Hugh J.

    1996-01-01

    Rapid access to highly accurate data about complex configurations is needed for multi-disciplinary optimization and design. In order to efficiently meet these requirements a closer coupling between the analysis algorithms and the discretization process is needed. In some cases, such as free surface, temporally varying geometries, and fluid structure interaction, the need is unavoidable. In other cases the need is to rapidly generate and modify high quality grids. Techniques such as unstructured and/or solution-adaptive methods can be used to speed the grid generation process and to automatically cluster mesh points in regions of interest. Global features of the flow can be significantly affected by isolated regions of inadequately resolved flow. These regions may not exhibit high gradients and can be difficult to detect. Thus excessive resolution in certain regions does not necessarily increase the accuracy of the overall solution. Several approaches have been employed for both structured and unstructured grid adaption. The most widely used involve grid point redistribution, local grid point enrichment/derefinement or local modification of the actual flow solver. However, the success of any one of these methods ultimately depends on the feature detection algorithm used to determine solution domain regions which require a fine mesh for their accurate representation. Typically, weight functions are constructed to mimic the local truncation error and may require substantial user input. Most problems of engineering interest involve multi-block grids and widely disparate length scales. Hence, it is desirable that the adaptive grid feature detection algorithm be developed to recognize flow structures of different type as well as differing intensity, and adequately address scaling and normalization across blocks. These weight functions can then be used to construct blending functions for algebraic redistribution, interpolation functions for unstructured grid generation

  13. JPEG 2000 coding of image data over adaptive refinement grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamito, Manuel N.; Dias, Miguel S.

    2003-06-01

    An extension of the JPEG 2000 standard is presented for non-conventional images resulting from an adaptive subdivision process. Samples, generated through adaptive subdivision, can have different sizes, depending on the amount of subdivision that was locally introduced in each region of the image. The subdivision principle allows each individual sample to be recursively subdivided into sets of four progressively smaller samples. Image datasets generated through adaptive subdivision find application in Computational Physics where simulations of natural processes are often performed over adaptive grids. It is also found that compression gains can be achieved for non-natural imagery, like text or graphics, if they first undergo an adaptive subdivision process. The representation of adaptive subdivision images is performed by first coding the subdivision structure into the JPEG 2000 bitstream, ina lossless manner, followed by the entropy coded and quantized transform coefficients. Due to the irregular distribution of sample sizes across the image, the wavelet transform must be applied on irregular image subsets that are nested across all the resolution levels. Using the conventional JPEG 2000 coding standard, adaptive subdivision images would first have to be upsampled to the smallest sample size in order to attain a uniform resolution. The proposed method for coding adaptive subdivision images is shown to perform better than conventional JPEG 2000 for medium to high bitrates.

  14. A geometry-based adaptive unstructured grid generation algorithm for complex geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrainian, Seyed Saied; Dezfuli, Alireza Daneh

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a novel unstructured grid generation algorithm is presented that considers the effect of geological features and well locations in grid resolution. The proposed grid generation algorithm presents a strategy for definition and construction of an initial grid based on the geological model, geometry adaptation of geological features, and grid resolution control. The algorithm is applied to seismotectonic map of the Masjed-i-Soleiman reservoir. Comparison of grid results with the “Triangle” program shows a more suitable permeability contrast. Immiscible two-phase flow solutions are presented for a fractured porous media test case using different grid resolutions. Adapted grid on the fracture geometry gave identical results with that of a fine grid. The adapted grid employed 88.2% less CPU time when compared to the solutions obtained by the fine grid.

  15. OMEGA: The operational multiscale environment model with grid adaptivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This review talk describes the OMEGA code, used for weather simulation and the modeling of aerosol transport through the atmosphere. Omega employs a 3D mesh of wedge shaped elements (triangles when viewed from above) that adapt with time. Because wedges are laid out in layers of triangular elements, the scheme can utilize structured storage and differencing techniques along the elevation coordinate, and is thus a hybrid of structured and unstructured methods. The utility of adaptive gridding in this moded, near geographic features such as coastlines, where material properties change discontinuously, is illustrated. Temporal adaptivity was used additionally to track moving internal fronts, such as clouds of aerosol contaminants. The author also discusses limitations specific to this problem, including manipulation of huge data bases and fixed turn-around times. In practice, the latter requires a carefully tuned optimization between accuracy and computation speed.

  16. Load Balancing Unstructured Adaptive Grids for CFD Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid

    1996-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured-grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. A dynamic load balancing method is presented that balances the workload across all processors with a global view. After each parallel tetrahedral mesh adaption, the method first determines if the new mesh is sufficiently unbalanced to warrant a repartitioning. If so, the adapted mesh is repartitioned, with new partitions assigned to processors so that the redistribution cost is minimized. The new partitions are accepted only if the remapping cost is compensated by the improved load balance. Results indicate that this strategy is effective for large-scale scientific computations on distributed-memory multiprocessors.

  17. The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the multidimensional self-adaptive grid code SAGE. A two-dimensional version of this code was described in an earlier report by the authors. The formulation of the multidimensional version is described in the first section of this document. The second section is presented in the form of a user guide that explains the input and execution of the code and provides many examples. Successful application of the SAGE code in both two and three dimensions for the solution of various flow problems has proven the code to be robust, portable, and simple to use. Although the basic formulation follows the method of Nakahashi and Deiwert, many modifications have been made to facilitate the use of the self-adaptive grid method for complex grid structures. Modifications to the method and the simplified input options make this a flexible and user-friendly code. The new SAGE code can accommodate both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow problems.

  18. Parallel architectures for iterative methods on adaptive, block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gannon, D.; Vanrosendale, J.

    1983-01-01

    A parallel computer architecture well suited to the solution of partial differential equations in complicated geometries is proposed. Algorithms for partial differential equations contain a great deal of parallelism. But this parallelism can be difficult to exploit, particularly on complex problems. One approach to extraction of this parallelism is the use of special purpose architectures tuned to a given problem class. The architecture proposed here is tuned to boundary value problems on complex domains. An adaptive elliptic algorithm which maps effectively onto the proposed architecture is considered in detail. Two levels of parallelism are exploited by the proposed architecture. First, by making use of the freedom one has in grid generation, one can construct grids which are locally regular, permitting a one to one mapping of grids to systolic style processor arrays, at least over small regions. All local parallelism can be extracted by this approach. Second, though there may be a regular global structure to the grids constructed, there will be parallelism at this level. One approach to finding and exploiting this parallelism is to use an architecture having a number of processor clusters connected by a switching network. The use of such a network creates a highly flexible architecture which automatically configures to the problem being solved.

  19. A Solution Adaptive Technique Using Tetrahedral Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2000-01-01

    An adaptive unstructured grid refinement technique has been developed and successfully applied to several three dimensional inviscid flow test cases. The method is based on a combination of surface mesh subdivision and local remeshing of the volume grid Simple functions of flow quantities are employed to detect dominant features of the flowfield The method is designed for modular coupling with various error/feature analyzers and flow solvers. Several steady-state, inviscid flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical three-dimensional problems. In all cases, accurate solutions featuring complex, nonlinear flow phenomena such as shock waves and vortices have been generated automatically and efficiently.

  20. Automation of assertion testing - Grid and adaptive techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Assertions can be used to automate the process of testing software. Two methods for automating the generation of input test data are described in this paper. One method selects the input values of variables at regular intervals in a 'grid'. The other, adaptive testing, uses assertion violations as a measure of errors detected and generates new test cases based on test results. The important features of assertion testing are that: it can be used throughout the entire testing cycle; it provides automatic notification of error conditions; and it can be used with automatic input generation techniques which eliminate the subjectivity in choosing test data.

  1. INITIAL APPL;ICATION OF THE ADAPTIVE GRID AIR POLLUTION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an adaptive-grid algorithm used in air pollution models. The algorithm reduces errors related to insufficient grid resolution by automatically refining the grid scales in regions of high interest. Meanwhile the grid scales are coarsened in other parts of the d...

  2. An improved bi-level algorithm for partitioning dynamic grid hierarchies.

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA); Johansson, Henrik (Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden); Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2006-05-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement methods are being widely used for computer simulations of various physical phenomena. Parallel implementations potentially offer realistic simulations of complex three-dimensional applications. But achieving good scalability for large-scale applications is non-trivial. Performance is limited by the partitioner's ability to efficiently use the underlying parallel computer's resources. Designed on sound SAMR principles, Nature+Fable is a hybrid, dedicated SAMR partitioning tool that brings together the advantages of both domain-based and patch-based techniques while avoiding their drawbacks. But the original bi-level partitioning approach in Nature+Fable is insufficient as it for realistic applications regards frequently occurring bi-levels as ''impossible'' and fails. This document describes an improved bi-level partitioning algorithm that successfully copes with all possible bi-levels. The improved algorithm uses the original approach side-by-side with a new, complementing approach. By using a new, customized classification method, the improved algorithm switches automatically between the two approaches. This document describes the algorithms, discusses implementation issues, and presents experimental results. The improved version of Nature+Fable was found to be able to handle realistic applications and also to generate less imbalances, similar box count, but more communication as compared to the native, domain-based partitioner in the SAMR framework AMROC.

  3. An improved bi-level algorithm for partitioning dynamic structured grid hierarchies.

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2006-02-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement methods are being widely used for computer simulations of various physical phenomena. Parallel implementations potentially offer realistic simulations of complex three-dimensional applications. But achieving good scalability for large-scale applications is non-trivial. Performance is limited by the partitioner's ability to efficiently use the underlying parallel computer's resources. Designed on sound SAMR principles, Nature+Fable is a hybrid, dedicated SAMR partitioning tool that brings together the advantages of both domain-based and patch-based techniques while avoiding their drawbacks. But the original bi-level partitioning approach in Nature+Fable is insufficient as it for realistic applications regards frequently occurring bi-levels as 'impossible' and fails. This document describes an improved bi-level partitioning algorithm that successfully copes with all possible hi-levels. The improved algorithm uses the original approach side-by-side with a new, complementing approach. By using a new, customized classification method, the improved algorithm switches automatically between the two approaches. This document describes the algorithms, discusses implementation issues, and presents experimental results. The improved version of Nature+Fable was found to be able to handle realistic applications and also to generate less imbalances, similar box count, but more communication as compared to the native, domain-based partitioner in the SAMR framework AMROC.

  4. Self-Avoiding Walks over Adaptive Triangular Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heber, Gerd; Biswas, Rupak; Gao, Guang R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach to constructing a "self-avoiding" walk through a triangular mesh. Unlike the popular approach of visiting mesh elements using space-filling curves which is based on a geometric embedding, our approach is combinatorial in the sense that it uses the mesh connectivity only. We present an algorithm for constructing a self-avoiding walk which can be applied to any unstructured triangular mesh. The complexity of the algorithm is O(n x log(n)), where n is the number of triangles in the mesh. We show that for hierarchical adaptive meshes, the algorithm can be easily parallelized by taking advantage of the regularity of the refinement rules. The proposed approach should be very useful in the run-time partitioning and load balancing of adaptive unstructured grids.

  5. Modeling scramjet combustor flowfields with a grid adaptation scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Singh, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate description of flow features associated with the normal injection of fuel into supersonic primary flows is essential in the design of efficient engines for hypervelocity aerospace vehicles. The flow features in such injections are complex with multiple interactions between shocks and between shocks boundary layers. Numerical studies of perpendicular sonic N2 injection and mixing in a Mach 3.8 scramjet combustor environment are discussed. A dynamic grid adaptation procedure based on the equilibration of spring-mass system is employed to enhanced the description of the complicated flow features. Numerical results are compared with experimental measurements and indicate that the adaptation procedure enhances the capability of the modeling procedure to describe the flow features associated with scramjet combustor components.

  6. The significance of 'hierarchy' in a research project on adoption and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mander, R

    1999-06-01

    In the course of phenomenological research project focusing on the midwife's care of the mother who relinquishes her baby for adoption, hierarchy emerged repeatedly as a significant theme. This concept manifested itself both methodologically as well as thematically. In methodological terms, hierarchy first became apparent during the planning phase in the selection of the research design: at this point it took the form of the distinction between quantitative and qualitative research design. In the course of applying for research access the same attitudes re-emerged in the gatekeepers' responses to the research design which had been chose. Later, during the field work, hierarchy appeared in the course of the interviews, in the form of the unequal balance of power between the interviewer and the informant. Specific tactics were required to overcome the likelihood of hierarchy affecting the data at this stage. Eventually this concept was raised by the informants, who included both relinquishing mothers an midwives, and became a major theme. The informants' use of hierarchy to explain the unselfishness of relinquishment proved to be one of a number of strategies which facilitated coping either with the experience of relinquishment or with caring for a women going through that experience. The conclusion which emerges is that hierarchy features in many aspects of life. While it may be beneficial when applied to certain situations to facilitate coping, in other circumstances it may be less than positive. PMID:10703416

  7. Assessing Adolescents’ Attachment Hierarchies: Differences Across Developmental Periods and Associations With Individual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Natalie L.; Kobak, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ attachment hierarchies were assessed in a sample of 212 high school and 198 college students. The Important People Interview (IPI) differentiated attachment bonds from other supportive or affiliative relationships and indicated that adolescents show a hierarchical ordering of preferences for multiple attachment figures. Differences in the composition and structure of adolescents’ attachment hierarchies were found between the early high school (9th and 10th grades), later high school (11th and 12th grades), and college samples. In the college sample, romantic partners were placed in higher positions in adolescents’ hierarchies, fathers were placed in lower positions, and the structure of adolescents’ hierarchies were less differentiated than in the high school samples. Individual differences in the composition of adolescents’ hierarchies were associated with adjustment outcomes. Friends’ placement in higher positions and fathers’ exclusion from or placement in quaternary positions was associated with increased behavior problems. Findings demonstrate that the IPI provides a measure of adolescents’ attachment hierarchies that is sensitive to developmental stage and individual differences. PMID:22545000

  8. A Domain-Decomposed Multilevel Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary verification and validation of an efficient Euler solver for adaptively refined Cartesian meshes with embedded boundaries is presented. The parallel, multilevel method makes use of a new on-the-fly parallel domain decomposition strategy based upon the use of space-filling curves, and automatically generates a sequence of coarse meshes for processing by the multigrid smoother. The coarse mesh generation algorithm produces grids which completely cover the computational domain at every level in the mesh hierarchy. A series of examples on realistically complex three-dimensional configurations demonstrate that this new coarsening algorithm reliably achieves mesh coarsening ratios in excess of 7 on adaptively refined meshes. Numerical investigations of the scheme's local truncation error demonstrate an achieved order of accuracy between 1.82 and 1.88. Convergence results for the multigrid scheme are presented for both subsonic and transonic test cases and demonstrate W-cycle multigrid convergence rates between 0.84 and 0.94. Preliminary parallel scalability tests on both simple wing and complex complete aircraft geometries shows a computational speedup of 52 on 64 processors using the run-time mesh partitioner.

  9. Adaptive sparse grid expansions of the vibrational Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobusch, D.; Scheurer, Ch.

    2014-02-01

    The vibrational Hamiltonian involves two high dimensional operators, the kinetic energy operator (KEO), and the potential energy surface (PES). Both must be approximated for systems involving more than a few atoms. Adaptive approximation schemes are not only superior to truncated Taylor or many-body expansions (MBE), they also allow for error estimates, and thus operators of predefined precision. To this end, modified sparse grids (SG) are developed that can be combined with adaptive MBEs. This MBE/SG hybrid approach yields a unified, fully adaptive representation of the KEO and the PES. Refinement criteria, based on the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) methods, are presented. The combination of the adaptive MBE/SG approach and the VSCF plus VCI methods yields a black box like procedure to compute accurate vibrational spectra. This is demonstrated on a test set of molecules, comprising water, formaldehyde, methanimine, and ethylene. The test set is first employed to prove convergence for semi-empirical PM3-PESs and subsequently to compute accurate vibrational spectra from CCSD(T)-PESs that agree well with experimental values.

  10. Adaptive sparse grid expansions of the vibrational Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Strobusch, D.; Scheurer, Ch.

    2014-02-21

    The vibrational Hamiltonian involves two high dimensional operators, the kinetic energy operator (KEO), and the potential energy surface (PES). Both must be approximated for systems involving more than a few atoms. Adaptive approximation schemes are not only superior to truncated Taylor or many-body expansions (MBE), they also allow for error estimates, and thus operators of predefined precision. To this end, modified sparse grids (SG) are developed that can be combined with adaptive MBEs. This MBE/SG hybrid approach yields a unified, fully adaptive representation of the KEO and the PES. Refinement criteria, based on the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) and vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) methods, are presented. The combination of the adaptive MBE/SG approach and the VSCF plus VCI methods yields a black box like procedure to compute accurate vibrational spectra. This is demonstrated on a test set of molecules, comprising water, formaldehyde, methanimine, and ethylene. The test set is first employed to prove convergence for semi-empirical PM3-PESs and subsequently to compute accurate vibrational spectra from CCSD(T)-PESs that agree well with experimental values.

  11. The use of solution adaptive grids in solving partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Rai, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    The grid point distribution used in solving a partial differential equation using a numerical method has a substantial influence on the quality of the solution. An adaptive grid which adjusts as the solution changes provides the best results when the number of grid points available for use during the calculation is fixed. Basic concepts used in generating and applying adaptive grids are reviewed in this paper, and examples illustrating applications of these concepts are presented.

  12. Anisotropic Solution Adaptive Unstructured Grid Generation Using AFLR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An existing volume grid generation procedure, AFLR3, was successfully modified to generate anisotropic tetrahedral elements using a directional metric transformation defined at source nodes. The procedure can be coupled with a solver and an error estimator as part of an overall anisotropic solution adaptation methodology. It is suitable for use with an error estimator based on an adjoint, optimization, sensitivity derivative, or related approach. This offers many advantages, including more efficient point placement along with robust and efficient error estimation. It also serves as a framework for true grid optimization wherein error estimation and computational resources can be used as cost functions to determine the optimal point distribution. Within AFLR3 the metric transformation is implemented using a set of transformation vectors and associated aspect ratios. The modified overall procedure is presented along with details of the anisotropic transformation implementation. Multiple two-and three-dimensional examples are also presented that demonstrate the capability of the modified AFLR procedure to generate anisotropic elements using a set of source nodes with anisotropic transformation metrics. The example cases presented use moderate levels of anisotropy and result in usable element quality. Future testing with various flow solvers and methods for obtaining transformation metric information is needed to determine practical limits and evaluate the efficacy of the overall approach.

  13. Volumetric Rendering of Geophysical Data on Adaptive Wavelet Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezolainen, A.; Erlebacher, G.; Vasilyev, O.; Yuen, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical modeling of geological phenomena frequently involves processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In the last several years, transport phenomena governed by the Navier-Stokes equations have been simulated in wavelet space using second generation wavelets [1], and most recently on fully adaptive meshes. Our objective is to visualize this time-dependent data using volume rendering while capitalizing on the available sparse data representation. We present a technique for volumetric ray casting of multi-scale datasets in wavelet space. Rather of working with the wavelets at the finest possible resolution, we perform a partial inverse wavelet transform as a preprocessing step to obtain scaling functions on a uniform grid at a user-prescribed resolution. As a result, a function in physical space is represented by a superposition of scaling functions on a coarse regular grid and wavelets on an adaptive mesh. An efficient and accurate ray casting algorithm is based just on these scaling functions. Additional detail is added during the ray tracing by taking an appropriate number of wavelets into account based on support overlap with the interpolation point, wavelet amplitude, and other characteristics, such as opacity accumulation (front to back ordering) and deviation from frontal viewing direction. Strategies for hardware implementation will be presented if available, inspired by the work in [2]. We will pressent error measures as a function of the number of scaling and wavelet functions used for interpolation. Data from mantle convection will be used to illustrate the method. [1] Vasilyev, O.V. and Bowman, C., Second Generation Wavelet Collocation Method for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations. J. Comp. Phys., 165, pp. 660-693, 2000. [2] Guthe, S., Wand, M., Gonser, J., and Straßer, W. Interactive rendering of large volume data sets. In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization '02 (Boston, Massachusetts, October 27 - November

  14. Assessing Adolescents' Attachment Hierarchies: Differences across Developmental Periods and Associations with Individual Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Natalie L.; Kobak, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Adolescents' attachment hierarchies were assessed in a sample of 212 high school and 198 college students. The Important People Interview (IPI) differentiated attachment bonds from other supportive or affiliative relationships and indicated that adolescents show a hierarchical ordering of preferences for multiple attachment figures. Differences in…

  15. A wavelet-optimized, very high order adaptive grid and order numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1996-01-01

    Differencing operators of arbitrarily high order can be constructed by interpolating a polynomial through a set of data followed by differentiation of this polynomial and finally evaluation of the polynomial at the point where a derivative approximation is desired. Furthermore, the interpolating polynomial can be constructed from algebraic, trigonometric, or, perhaps exponential polynomials. This paper begins with a comparison of such differencing operator construction. Next, the issue of proper grids for high order polynomials is addressed. Finally, an adaptive numerical method is introduced which adapts the numerical grid and the order of the differencing operator depending on the data. The numerical grid adaptation is performed on a Chebyshev grid. That is, at each level of refinement the grid is a Chebvshev grid and this grid is refined locally based on wavelet analysis.

  16. Three-dimensional adaptive grid generation for body-fitted coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. C.

    1988-08-01

    This report describes a numerical method for generating 3-D grids for general configurations. The basic method involves the solution of a set of quasi-linear elliptic partial differential equations via pointwise relaxation with a local relaxation factor. It allows specification of the grid spacing off the boundary surfaces and the grid orthogonality at the boundary surfaces. It includes adaptive mechanisms to improve smoothness, orthogonality, and flow resolution in the grid interior.

  17. Three-dimensional adaptive grid generation for body-fitted coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. C.

    This report describes a numerical method for generating 3-D grids for general configurations. The basic method involves the solution of a set of quasi-linear elliptic partial differential equations via pointwise relaxation with a local relaxation factor. It allows specification of the grid spacing off the boundary surfaces and the grid orthogonality at the boundary surfaces. It includes adaptive mechanisms to improve smoothness, orthogonality, and flow resolution in the grid interior.

  18. Introducing Enabling Computational Tools to the Climate Sciences: Multi-Resolution Climate Modeling with Adaptive Cubed-Sphere Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    2015-07-14

    The research investigates and advances strategies how to bridge the scale discrepancies between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global cloud-resolving simulations. In particular, the research explores new frontiers in computational geoscience by introducing high-order Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques into climate research. AMR and statically-adapted variable-resolution approaches represent an emerging trend for atmospheric models and are likely to become the new norm in future-generation weather and climate models. The research advances the understanding of multi-scale interactions in the climate system and showcases a pathway how to model these interactions effectively with advanced computational tools, like the Chombo AMR library developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is interdisciplinary and combines applied mathematics, scientific computing and the atmospheric sciences. In this research project, a hierarchy of high-order atmospheric models on cubed-sphere computational grids have been developed that serve as an algorithmic prototype for the finite-volume solution-adaptive Chombo-AMR approach. The foci of the investigations have lied on the characteristics of both static mesh adaptations and dynamically-adaptive grids that can capture flow fields of interest like tropical cyclones. Six research themes have been chosen. These are (1) the introduction of adaptive mesh refinement techniques into the climate sciences, (2) advanced algorithms for nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, (3) an assessment of the interplay between resolved-scale dynamical motions and subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, (4) evaluation techniques for atmospheric model hierarchies, (5) the comparison of AMR refinement strategies and (6) tropical cyclone studies with a focus on multi-scale interactions and variable-resolution modeling. The results of this research project

  19. FUN3D Grid Refinement and Adaptation Studies for the Ares Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Vasta, Veer; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Park, Mike; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents grid refinement and adaptation studies performed in conjunction with computational aeroelastic analyses of the Ares crew launch vehicle (CLV). The unstructured grids used in this analysis were created with GridTool and VGRID while the adaptation was performed using the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code FUN3D with a feature based adaptation software tool. GridTool was developed by ViGYAN, Inc. while the last three software suites were developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The feature based adaptation software used here operates by aligning control volumes with shock and Mach line structures and by refining/de-refining where necessary. It does not redistribute node points on the surface. This paper assesses the sensitivity of the complex flow field about a launch vehicle to grid refinement. It also assesses the potential of feature based grid adaptation to improve the accuracy of CFD analysis for a complex launch vehicle configuration. The feature based adaptation shows the potential to improve the resolution of shocks and shear layers. Further development of the capability to adapt the boundary layer and surface grids of a tetrahedral grid is required for significant improvements in modeling the flow field.

  20. A time-accurate adaptive grid method and the numerical simulation of a shock-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelie, Michael J.; Eiseman, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    A time accurate, general purpose, adaptive grid method is developed that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady numerical simulations. The grid point movement is performed in a manner that generates smooth grids which resolve the severe solution gradients and the sharp transitions in the solution gradients. The temporal coupling of the adaptive grid and the PDE solver is performed with a grid prediction correction method that is simple to implement and ensures the time accuracy of the grid. Time accurate solutions of the 2-D Euler equations for an unsteady shock vortex interaction demonstrate the ability of the adaptive method to accurately adapt the grid to multiple solution features.

  1. Cartesian Off-Body Grid Adaption for Viscous Time- Accurate Flow Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    An improved solution adaption capability has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid CFD code. Building on the Cartesian off-body approach inherent in OVERFLOW and the original adaptive refinement method developed by Meakin, the new scheme provides for automated creation of multiple levels of finer Cartesian grids. Refinement can be based on the undivided second-difference of the flow solution variables, or on a specific flow quantity such as vorticity. Coupled with load-balancing and an inmemory solution interpolation procedure, the adaption process provides very good performance for time-accurate simulations on parallel compute platforms. A method of using refined, thin body-fitted grids combined with adaption in the off-body grids is presented, which maximizes the part of the domain subject to adaption. Two- and three-dimensional examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the adaption scheme.

  2. Analysis of a Major Electric Grid -- Stability and Adaptive Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanzi, Sultan

    Protective systems of the electric grid are designed to detect and mitigate the effects of faults and other disturbances that may occur. Distance relays are used extensively for the detection of faults on transmission lines. Out-of-step relays are used for generator protection to detect loss of synchronism conditions that result from disturbances on the electric grid. Also, when a disturbance occurs and generators may tend to lose synchronism with each other, it is beneficial to separate the overall system into several independent systems that can remain stable. Unfortunately there have been cases, such as the 2003 Northeast blackout where the operation of protective relays, namely the zone 3 distance relay used for transmission line protection, contributed to the cascading effect of the blackout. It is the objective of this dissertation to propose adaptive relays for both distance protection of transmission lines and out-of-step protection of generators. By being adaptive, the relays are made aware of the system operating conditions and can adjust its settings accordingly. Inputs to the adaptive logic can come from system or environmental conditions. As a result of this effort, a new distance relay operating characteristic is proposed, referred to as a mushroom relay, which is a combination of a quadrilateral relay and a Mho relay. Also, a new criterion for determining if a power swing following a disturbance is stable or unstable is proposed. Distance protection of transmission lines is very important when discussing system responses to faults and disturbances. Distance relays are very common worldwide and although they offer great protection, there are limitations that need to be addressed. Parallel line operations (infeed effect) and the loadability limits are among the limitations that lead to improper response of relays. An Adaptive Distance Relays (ADR) offer great benefits to the protection scheme as their settings can be changed in accordance with prefault

  3. Analysis of a Major Electric Grid -- Stability and Adaptive Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanzi, Sultan

    Protective systems of the electric grid are designed to detect and mitigate the effects of faults and other disturbances that may occur. Distance relays are used extensively for the detection of faults on transmission lines. Out-of-step relays are used for generator protection to detect loss of synchronism conditions that result from disturbances on the electric grid. Also, when a disturbance occurs and generators may tend to lose synchronism with each other, it is beneficial to separate the overall system into several independent systems that can remain stable. Unfortunately there have been cases, such as the 2003 Northeast blackout where the operation of protective relays, namely the zone 3 distance relay used for transmission line protection, contributed to the cascading effect of the blackout. It is the objective of this dissertation to propose adaptive relays for both distance protection of transmission lines and out-of-step protection of generators. By being adaptive, the relays are made aware of the system operating conditions and can adjust its settings accordingly. Inputs to the adaptive logic can come from system or environmental conditions. As a result of this effort, a new distance relay operating characteristic is proposed, referred to as a mushroom relay, which is a combination of a quadrilateral relay and a Mho relay. Also, a new criterion for determining if a power swing following a disturbance is stable or unstable is proposed. Distance protection of transmission lines is very important when discussing system responses to faults and disturbances. Distance relays are very common worldwide and although they offer great protection, there are limitations that need to be addressed. Parallel line operations (infeed effect) and the loadability limits are among the limitations that lead to improper response of relays. An Adaptive Distance Relays (ADR) offer great benefits to the protection scheme as their settings can be changed in accordance with prefault

  4. Adaptive data management in the ARC Grid middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, D.; Gholami, A.; Karpenko, D.; Konstantinov, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) Grid middleware was designed almost 10 years ago, and has proven to be an attractive distributed computing solution and successful in adapting to new data management and storage technologies. However, with an ever-increasing user base and scale of resources to manage, along with the introduction of more advanced data transfer protocols, some limitations in the current architecture have become apparent. The simple first-in first-out approach to data transfer leads to bottlenecks in the system, as does the built-in assumption that all data is immediately available from remote data storage. We present an entirely new data management architecture for ARC which aims to alleviate these problems, by introducing a three-layer structure. The top layer accepts incoming requests for data transfer and directs them to the middle layer, which schedules individual transfers and negotiates with various intermediate catalog and storage systems until the physical file is ready to be transferred. The lower layer performs all operations which use large amounts of bandwidth, i.e. the physical data transfer. Using such a layered structure allows more efficient use of the available bandwidth as well as enabling late-binding of jobs to data transfer slots based on a priority system. Here we describe in full detail the design and implementation of the new system.

  5. Adapting wave-front algorithms to efficiently utilize systems with deep communication hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbyson, Darren J; Lang, Michael; Pakin, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale systems increasingly exhibit a differential between intra-chip and inter-chip communication performance. Processor-cores on the same socket are able to communicate at lower latencies, and with higher bandwidths, than cores on different sockets either within the same node or between nodes. A key challenge is to efficiently use this communication hierarchy and hence optimize performance. We consider here the class of applications that contain wave-front processing. In these applications data can only be processed after their upstream neighbors have been processed. Similar dependencies result between processors in which communication is required to pass boundary data downstream and whose cost is typically impacted by the slowest communication channel in use. In this work we develop a novel hierarchical wave-front approach that reduces the use of slower communications in the hierarchy but at the cost of additional computation and higher use of on-chip communications. This tradeoff is explored using a performance model and an implementation on the Petascale Roadrunner system demonstrates a 27% performance improvement at full system-scale on a kernel application. The approach is generally applicable to large-scale multi-core and accelerated systems where a differential in system communication performance exists.

  6. Adaptive-grid methods for time-dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, G.W.; Rodrique, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper contains a survey of recent developments of adaptive-grid algorithms for time-dependent partial differential equations. Two lines of research are discussed. One involves the automatic selection of moving grids to follow propagating waves. The other is based on stationary grids but uses local mesh refinement in both space and time. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are discussed. The development of adaptive-grid schemes shows promise of greatly increasing our ability to solve problems in several spatial dimensions.

  7. Generation and adaptation of 3-D unstructured grids for transient problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    Grid generation and adaptive refinement techniques suitable for the simulation of strongly unsteady flows past geometrically complex bodies in 3-D are described. The grids are generated using the advancing front technique. Emphasis is placed not to generate elements that are too small, as this would severely increase the cost of simulations with explicit flow solvers. The grids are adapted to an evolving flowfield using simple h-refinement. A grid change is performed every 5 to 10 timesteps, and only one level of refinement/coarsening is allowed per mesh change.

  8. Automated Grid Disruption Response System: Robust Adaptive Topology Control (RATC)

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-01

    GENI Project: The RATC research team is using topology control as a mechanism to improve system operations and manage disruptions within the electric grid. The grid is subject to interruption from cascading faults caused by extreme operating conditions, malicious external attacks, and intermittent electricity generation from renewable energy sources. The RATC system is capable of detecting, classifying, and responding to grid disturbances by reconfiguring the grid in order to maintain economically efficient operations while guaranteeing reliability. The RATC system would help prevent future power outages, which account for roughly $80 billion in losses for businesses and consumers each year. Minimizing the time it takes for the grid to respond to expensive interruptions will also make it easier to integrate intermittent renewable energy sources into the grid.

  9. A multigrid method for steady Euler equations on unstructured adaptive grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemslagh, Kris; Dick, Erik

    1993-01-01

    A flux-difference splitting type algorithm is formulated for the steady Euler equations on unstructured grids. The polynomial flux-difference splitting technique is used. A vertex-centered finite volume method is employed on a triangular mesh. The multigrid method is in defect-correction form. A relaxation procedure with a first order accurate inner iteration and a second-order correction performed only on the finest grid, is used. A multi-stage Jacobi relaxation method is employed as a smoother. Since the grid is unstructured a Jacobi type is chosen. The multi-staging is necessary to provide sufficient smoothing properties. The domain is discretized using a Delaunay triangular mesh generator. Three grids with more or less uniform distribution of nodes but with different resolution are generated by successive refinement of the coarsest grid. Nodes of coarser grids appear in the finer grids. The multigrid method is started on these grids. As soon as the residual drops below a threshold value, an adaptive refinement is started. The solution on the adaptively refined grid is accelerated by a multigrid procedure. The coarser multigrid grids are generated by successive coarsening through point removement. The adaption cycle is repeated a few times. Results are given for the transonic flow over a NACA-0012 airfoil.

  10. Aeroacoustic Simulation of Nose Landing Gear on Adaptive Unstructured Grids With FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Park, Michael A.; Lockhard, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed nose landing gear configuration that was tested in NASA Langley s closed-wall Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D, developed at NASA Langley Research center, is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Starting with a coarse grid, a series of successively finer grids were generated using the adaptive gridding methodology available in the FUN3D code. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these computations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these grids are compared with the measured data. In general, the correlation with the experimental data improves with grid refinement. A similar trend is observed for sound pressure levels obtained by using these CFD solutions as input to a FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels. In general, the numerical solutions obtained on adapted grids compare well with the hand-tuned enriched fine grid solutions and experimental data. In addition, the grid adaption strategy discussed here simplifies the grid generation process, and results in improved computational efficiency of CFD simulations.

  11. Simulation of the dispersion of nuclear contamination using an adaptive Eulerian grid model.

    PubMed

    Lagzi, I; Kármán, D; Turányi, T; Tomlin, A S; Haszpra, L

    2004-01-01

    Application of an Eulerian model using layered adaptive unstructured grids coupled to a meso-scale meteorological model is presented for modelling the dispersion of nuclear contamination following the accidental release from a single but strong source to the atmosphere. The model automatically places a finer resolution grid, adaptively in time, in regions were high spatial numerical error is expected. The high-resolution grid region follows the movement of the contaminated air over time. Using this method, grid resolutions of the order of 6 km can be achieved in a computationally effective way. The concept is illustrated by the simulation of hypothetical nuclear accidents at the Paks NPP, in Central Hungary. The paper demonstrates that the adaptive model can achieve accuracy comparable to that of a high-resolution Eulerian model using significantly less grid points and computer simulation time. PMID:15149762

  12. SIMULATION OF DISPERSION OF A POWER PLANT PLUME USING AN ADAPTIVE GRID ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new dynamic adaptive grid algorithm has been developed for use in air quality modeling. This algorithm uses a higher order numerical scheme?the piecewise parabolic method (PPM)?for computing advective solution fields; a weight function capable of promoting grid node clustering ...

  13. Adaptive gridding strategies for Free-Lagrangian calculations of low speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Martin J.

    1988-01-01

    Free-Lagrangian methods have been employed in two-dimensional simulations of the long-term evolution of fluid instabilities for low speed flows. For example, calculations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability have proceeded through the inversion and mixing of two fluid layers and simulations of droplet deformations have continued well beyond droplet shattering. The freedom to choose grid connections permits several important benefits for these calculations. 1. Mass conservation is enforced for all individual fluid elements. 2. Vertex movement is always Lagrangian. 3. Grid adjustments can be made automatically, with no user intervention. 4. Grid connections may be selected to ensure accuracy in the difference equations. 5. Adaptive gridding schemes are local, adding and deleting vertices as dictated by local accuracy estimators. 6. Any geometric configuration may be easily gridded, for any vertex distribution on the boundaries or in the interior of the fluids. This paper will review some two-dimensional results, with the emphasis on the adaptive gridding algorithms and the accuracy of the resultant difference templates for the mathematical operators. The relation of the triangular mesh to the Voronoi mesh will be explored, particularly for the case when they are dual meshes. Three-dimensional algorithms for adaptive gridding will be presented which are exact analogues to the two-dimensional case. Gridding efficiencies will be discussed for several schemes.

  14. An Efficient Means of Adaptive Refinement Within Systems of Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    An efficient means of adaptive refinement within systems of overset grids is presented. Problem domains are segregated into near-body and off-body fields. Near-body fields are discretized via overlapping body-fitted grids that extend only a short distance from body surfaces. Off-body fields are discretized via systems of overlapping uniform Cartesian grids of varying levels of refinement. a novel off-body grid generation and management scheme provides the mechanism for carrying out adaptive refinement of off-body flow dynamics and solid body motion. The scheme allows for very efficient use of memory resources, and flow solvers and domain connectivity routines that can exploit the structure inherent to uniform Cartesian grids.

  15. FLAG: A multi-dimensional adaptive free-Lagrange code for fully unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.E.; Miller, D.S.; Palmer, T.

    1995-07-01

    The authors describe FLAG, a 3D adaptive free-Lagrange method for unstructured grids. The grid elements were 3D polygons, which move with the flow, and are refined or reconnected as necessary to achieve uniform accuracy. The authors stressed that they were able to construct a 3D hydro version of this code in 3 months, using an object-oriented FORTRAN approach.

  16. A Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for advection-dispersion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, Y.; Karasaki, K.

    1994-02-01

    In the present paper, a Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method with adaptive gridding for solving advection-dispersion equations is described. The code creates new grid points in the vicinity of sharp fronts at every time step in order to reduce numerical dispersion. The code yields quite accurate solutions for a wide range of mesh Peclet numbers and for mesh Courant numbers well in excess of 1.

  17. Unstructured Grid Adaptation: Status, Potential Impacts, and Recommended Investments Toward CFD Vision 2030

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Krakos, Joshua A.; Michal, Todd; Loseille, Adrien; Alonso, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Unstructured grid adaptation is a powerful tool to control discretization error for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It has enabled key increases in the accuracy, automation, and capacity of some fluid simulation applications. Slotnick et al. provides a number of case studies in the CFD Vision 2030 Study: A Path to Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences to illustrate the current state of CFD capability and capacity. The authors forecast the potential impact of emerging High Performance Computing (HPC) environments forecast in the year 2030 and identify that mesh generation and adaptivity continue to be significant bottlenecks in the CFD work flow. These bottlenecks may persist because very little government investment has been targeted in these areas. To motivate investment, the impacts of improved grid adaptation technologies are identified. The CFD Vision 2030 Study roadmap and anticipated capabilities in complementary disciplines are quoted to provide context for the progress made in grid adaptation in the past fifteen years, current status, and a forecast for the next fifteen years with recommended investments. These investments are specific to mesh adaptation and impact other aspects of the CFD process. Finally, a strategy is identified to diffuse grid adaptation technology into production CFD work flows.

  18. Higher-order schemes with CIP method and adaptive Soroban grid towards mesh-free scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Mizoe, Hiroki; Takizawa, Kenji; Moriki, Hiroshi; Im, Hyo-Nam; Ogata, Youichi

    2004-02-01

    A new class of body-fitted grid system that can keep the third-order accuracy in time and space is proposed with the help of the CIP (constrained interpolation profile/cubic interpolated propagation) method. The grid system consists of the straight lines and grid points moving along these lines like abacus - Soroban in Japanese. The length of each line and the number of grid points in each line can be different. The CIP scheme is suitable to this mesh system and the calculation of large CFL (>10) at locally refined mesh is easily performed. Mesh generation and searching of upstream departure point are very simple and almost mesh-free treatment is possible. Adaptive grid movement and local mesh refinement are demonstrated.

  19. Grid coupling mechanism in the semi-implicit adaptive Multi-Level Multi-Domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Tronci, C.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The Multi-Level Multi-Domain (MLMD) method is a semi-implicit adaptive method for Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. It has been demonstrated in the past in simulations of Maxwellian plasmas, electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, plasma expansion in vacuum, magnetic reconnection [1, 2, 3]. In multiple occasions, it has been commented on the coupling between the coarse and the refined grid solutions. The coupling mechanism itself, however, has never been explored in depth. Here, we investigate the theoretical bases of grid coupling in the MLMD system. We obtain an evolution law for the electric field solution in the overlap area of the MLMD system which highlights a dependance on the densities and currents from both the coarse and the refined grid, rather than from the coarse grid alone: grid coupling is obtained via densities and currents.

  20. Error-measure for anisotropic grid-adaptation in turbulence-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, Siavash; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Grid-adaptation requires an error-measure that identifies where the grid should be refined. In the case of turbulence-resolving simulations (DES, LES, DNS), a simple error-measure is the small-scale resolved energy, which scales with both the modeled subgrid-stresses and the numerical truncation errors in many situations. Since this is a scalar measure, it does not carry any information on the anisotropy of the optimal grid-refinement. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new error-measure for turbulence-resolving simulations that is capable of predicting nearly-optimal anisotropic grids. Turbulent channel flow at Reτ ~ 300 is used to assess the performance of the proposed error-measure. The formulation is geometrically general, applicable to any type of unstructured grid.

  1. An object-oriented approach for parallel self adaptive mesh refinement on block structured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Max; Witsch, Kristian; Quinlan, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Self-adaptive mesh refinement dynamically matches the computational demands of a solver for partial differential equations to the activity in the application's domain. In this paper we present two C++ class libraries, P++ and AMR++, which significantly simplify the development of sophisticated adaptive mesh refinement codes on (massively) parallel distributed memory architectures. The development is based on our previous research in this area. The C++ class libraries provide abstractions to separate the issues of developing parallel adaptive mesh refinement applications into those of parallelism, abstracted by P++, and adaptive mesh refinement, abstracted by AMR++. P++ is a parallel array class library to permit efficient development of architecture independent codes for structured grid applications, and AMR++ provides support for self-adaptive mesh refinement on block-structured grids of rectangular non-overlapping blocks. Using these libraries, the application programmers' work is greatly simplified to primarily specifying the serial single grid application and obtaining the parallel and self-adaptive mesh refinement code with minimal effort. Initial results for simple singular perturbation problems solved by self-adaptive multilevel techniques (FAC, AFAC), being implemented on the basis of prototypes of the P++/AMR++ environment, are presented. Singular perturbation problems frequently arise in large applications, e.g. in the area of computational fluid dynamics. They usually have solutions with layers which require adaptive mesh refinement and fast basic solvers in order to be resolved efficiently.

  2. A self-adaptive-grid method with application to airfoil flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakahashi, K.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A self-adaptive-grid method is described that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady computations. Based on variational principles, a spring analogy is used to redistribute grid points in an optimal sense to reduce the overall solution error. User-specified parameters, denoting both maximum and minimum permissible grid spacings, are used to define the all-important constants, thereby minimizing the empiricism and making the method self-adaptive. Operator splitting and one-sided controls for orthogonality and smoothness are used to make the method practical, robust, and efficient. Examples are included for both steady and unsteady viscous flow computations about airfoils in two dimensions, as well as for a steady inviscid flow computation and a one-dimensional case. These examples illustrate the precise control the user has with the self-adaptive method and demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy and quality of the solutions.

  3. Adaptively-refined overlapping grids for the numerical solution of systems of hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brislawn, Kristi D.; Brown, David L.; Chesshire, Geoffrey S.; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in conjunction with higher-order upwind finite-difference methods have been used effectively on a variety of problems in two and three dimensions. In this paper we introduce an approach for resolving problems that involve complex geometries in which resolution of boundary geometry is important. The complex geometry is represented by using the method of overlapping grids, while local resolution is obtained by refining each component grid with the AMR algorithm, appropriately generalized for this situation. The CMPGRD algorithm introduced by Chesshire and Henshaw is used to automatically generate the overlapping grid structure for the underlying mesh.

  4. A Solution Adaptive Structured/Unstructured Overset Grid Flow Solver with Applications to Helicopter Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method that solves both the three dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations and the Euler equations using overset structured and solution adaptive unstructured grids with applications to helicopter rotor flowfields. The overset structured grids use an implicit finite-difference method to solve the thin-layer Navier-Stokes/Euler equations while the unstructured grid uses an explicit finite-volume method to solve the Euler equations. Solutions on a helicopter rotor in hover show the ability to accurately convect the rotor wake. However, isotropic subdivision of the tetrahedral mesh rapidly increases the overall problem size.

  5. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  6. An assessment of the adaptive unstructured tetrahedral grid, Euler Flow Solver Code FELISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Erickson, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional solution-adaptive Euler flow solver for unstructured tetrahedral meshes is assessed, and the accuracy and efficiency of the method for predicting sonic boom pressure signatures about simple generic models are demonstrated. Comparison of computational and wind tunnel data and enhancement of numerical solutions by means of grid adaptivity are discussed. The mesh generation is based on the advancing front technique. The FELISA code consists of two solvers, the Taylor-Galerkin and the Runge-Kutta-Galerkin schemes, both of which are spacially discretized by the usual Galerkin weighted residual finite-element methods but with different explicit time-marching schemes to steady state. The solution-adaptive grid procedure is based on either remeshing or mesh refinement techniques. An alternative geometry adaptive procedure is also incorporated.

  7. Parallel Implementation of an Adaptive Scheme for 3D Unstructured Grids on the SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger C.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady flows that require local grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. For this work, we consider an edge-based adaption scheme that has shown good single-processor performance on the C90. We report on our experience parallelizing this code for the SP2. Results show a 47.OX speedup on 64 processors when 10% of the mesh is randomly refined. Performance deteriorates to 7.7X when the same number of edges are refined in a highly-localized region. This is because almost all mesh adaption is confined to a single processor. However, this problem can be remedied by repartitioning the mesh immediately after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual adaption takes place. With this change, the speedup improves dramatically to 43.6X.

  8. Parallel implementation of an adaptive scheme for 3D unstructured grids on the SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic mesh adaption on unstructured grids is a powerful tool for computing unsteady flows that require local grid modifications to efficiently resolve solution features. For this work, we consider an edge-based adaption scheme that has shown good single-processor performance on the C90. We report on our experience parallelizing this code for the SP2. Results show a 47.0X speedup on 64 processors when 10 percent of the mesh is randomly refined. Performance deteriorates to 7.7X when the same number of edges are refined in a highly-localized region. This is because almost all the mesh adaption is confined to a single processor. However, this problem can be remedied by repartitioning the mesh immediately after targeting edges for refinement but before the actual adaption takes place. With this change, the speedup improves dramatically to 43.6X.

  9. Grid-Adapted FUN3D Computations for the Second High Lift Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Rumsey, C. L.; Park, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Contributions of the unstructured Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code FUN3D to the 2nd AIAA CFD High Lift Prediction Workshop are described, and detailed comparisons are made with experimental data. Using workshop-supplied grids, results for the clean wing configuration are compared with results from the structured code CFL3D Using the same turbulence model, both codes compare reasonably well in terms of total forces and moments, and the maximum lift is similarly over-predicted for both codes compared to experiment. By including more representative geometry features such as slat and flap brackets and slat pressure tube bundles, FUN3D captures the general effects of the Reynolds number variation, but under-predicts maximum lift on workshop-supplied grids in comparison with the experimental data, due to excessive separation. However, when output-based, off-body grid adaptation in FUN3D is employed, results improve considerably. In particular, when the geometry includes both brackets and the pressure tube bundles, grid adaptation results in a more accurate prediction of lift near stall in comparison with the wind-tunnel data. Furthermore, a rotation-corrected turbulence model shows improved pressure predictions on the outboard span when using adapted grids.

  10. Application of a solution adaptive grid scheme, SAGE, to complex three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1991-01-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) adaptive grid code based on the algebraic, solution-adaptive scheme of Nakahashi and Deiwert is developed and applied to a variety of problems. The new computer code, SAGE, is an extension of the same-named two-dimensional (2D) solution-adaptive program that has already proven to be a powerful tool in computational fluid dynamics applications. The new code has been applied to a range of complex three-dimensional, supersonic and hypersonic flows. Examples discussed are a tandem-slot fuel injector, the hypersonic forebody of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE), the 3D base flow behind the AFE, the supersonic flow around a 3D swept ramp and a generic, hypersonic, 3D nozzle-plume flow. The associated adapted grids and the solution enhancements resulting from the grid adaption are presented for these cases. Three-dimensional adaption is more complex than its 2D counterpart, and the complexities unique to the 3D problems are discussed.

  11. A Hyperspherical Adaptive Sparse-Grid Method for High-Dimensional Discontinuity Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Burkardt, John V.

    2015-06-24

    This study proposes and analyzes a hyperspherical adaptive hierarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces. The method is motivated by the theoretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a function representation of the discontinuity hypersurface of an N-dimensional discontinuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyperspherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyperspherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smoothness of the hypersurface, the new technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. In addition, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous complexity analyses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  12. Self-adaptive Fault-Tolerance of HLA-Based Simulations in the Grid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jijie; Chai, Xudong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Bo Hu

    The objects of a HLA-based simulation can access model services to update their attributes. However, the grid server may be overloaded and refuse the model service to handle objects accesses. Because these objects have been accessed this model service during last simulation loop and their medium state are stored in this server, this may terminate the simulation. A fault-tolerance mechanism must be introduced into simulations. But the traditional fault-tolerance methods cannot meet the above needs because the transmission latency between a federate and the RTI in grid environment varies from several hundred milliseconds to several seconds. By adding model service URLs to the OMT and expanding the HLA services and model services with some interfaces, this paper proposes a self-adaptive fault-tolerance mechanism of simulations according to the characteristics of federates accessing model services. Benchmark experiments indicate that the expanded HLA/RTI can make simulations self-adaptively run in the grid environment.

  13. AN OPTIMAL ADAPTIVE LOCAL GRID REFINEMENT APPROACH TO MODELING CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Lagrangian-Eulerian method with an optimal adaptive local grid refinement is used to model contaminant transport equations. pplication of this approach to two bench-mark problems indicates that it completely resolves difficulties of peak clipping, numerical diffusion, and spuri...

  14. White Light Schlieren Optics Using Bacteriorhodopsin as an Adaptive Image Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert; Ruffin, Boh; Donahue, Jeff; Barrett, Carolyn

    1996-01-01

    A Schlieren apparatus using a bacteriorhodopsin film as an adaptive image grid with white light illumination is demonstrated for the first time. The time dependent spectral properties of the film are characterized. Potential applications include a single-ended Schlieren system for leak detection.

  15. Algebraic grid adaptation method using non-uniform rational B-spline surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiann-Cherng; Soni, B. K.

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic adaptive grid system based on equidistribution law and utilized by the Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface for redistribution is presented. A weight function, utilizing a properly weighted boolean sum of various flow field characteristics is developed. Computational examples are presented to demonstrate the success of this technique.

  16. Generalized Monge-Kantorovich optimization for grid generation and adaptation in LP

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, G L; Finn, J M

    2009-01-01

    The Monge-Kantorovich grid generation and adaptation scheme of is generalized from a variational principle based on L{sub 2} to a variational principle based on L{sub p}. A generalized Monge-Ampere (MA) equation is derived and its properties are discussed. Results for p > 1 are obtained and compared in terms of the quality of the resulting grid. We conclude that for the grid generation application, the formulation based on L{sub p} for p close to unity leads to serious problems associated with the boundary. Results for 1.5 {approx}< p {approx}< 2.5 are quite good, but there is a fairly narrow range around p = 2 where the results are close to optimal with respect to grid distortion. Furthermore, the Newton-Krylov methods used to solve the generalized MA equation perform best for p = 2.

  17. A chimera grid scheme. [multiple overset body-conforming mesh system for finite difference adaptation to complex aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Dougherty, F. C.; Benek, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A mesh system composed of multiple overset body-conforming grids is described for adapting finite-difference procedures to complex aircraft configurations. In this so-called 'chimera mesh,' a major grid is generated about a main component of the configuration and overset minor grids are used to resolve all other features. Methods for connecting overset multiple grids and modifications of flow-simulation algorithms are discussed. Computational tests in two dimensions indicate that the use of multiple overset grids can simplify the task of grid generation without an adverse effect on flow-field algorithms and computer code complexity.

  18. Emergent Adaptive Noise Reduction from Communal Cooperation of Sensor Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas M.; Lodding, Kenneth N.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, the realization of small, inexpensive, and powerful devices with sensors, computers, and wireless communication has promised the development of massive sized sensor networks with dense deployments over large areas capable of high fidelity situational assessments. However, most management models have been based on centralized control and research has concentrated on methods for passing data from sensor devices to the central controller. Most implementations have been small but, as it is not scalable, this methodology is insufficient for massive deployments. Here, a specific application of a large sensor network for adaptive noise reduction demonstrates a new paradigm where communities of sensor/computer devices assess local conditions and make local decisions from which emerges a global behaviour. This approach obviates many of the problems of centralized control as it is not prone to single point of failure and is more scalable, efficient, robust, and fault tolerant

  19. Carving and adaptive drainage enforcement of grid digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soille, Pierre; Vogt, Jürgen; Colombo, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    An effective and widely used method for removing spurious pits in digital elevation models consists of filling them until they overflow. However, this method sometimes creates large flat regions which in turn pose a problem for the determination of accurate flow directions. In this study, we propose to suppress each pit by creating a descending path from it to the nearest point having a lower elevation value. This is achieved by carving, i.e., lowering, the terrain elevations along the detected path. Carving paths are identified through a flooding simulation starting from the river outlets. The proposed approach allows for adaptive drainage enforcement whereby river networks coming from other data sources are imposed to the digital elevation model only in places where the automatic river network extraction deviates substantially from the known networks. An improvement to methods for routing flow over flat regions is also introduced. Detailed results are presented over test areas of the Danube basin.

  20. A propagation method with adaptive mesh grid based on wave characteristics for wave optics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiuyan; Wang, Jing; Lv, Pin; Sun, Quan

    2015-10-01

    Propagation simulation method and choosing mesh grid are both very important to get the correct propagation results in wave optics simulation. A new angular spectrum propagation method with alterable mesh grid based on the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method is introduced. With this method, the sampling space after propagation is not limited to propagation methods no more, but freely alterable. However, choosing mesh grid on target board influences the validity of simulation results directly. So an adaptive mesh choosing method based on wave characteristics is proposed with the introduced propagation method. We can calculate appropriate mesh grids on target board to get satisfying results. And for complex initial wave field or propagation through inhomogeneous media, we can also calculate and set the mesh grid rationally according to above method. Finally, though comparing with theoretical results, it's shown that the simulation result with the proposed method coinciding with theory. And by comparing with the traditional angular spectrum method and the direct FFT method, it's known that the proposed method is able to adapt to a wider range of Fresnel number conditions. That is to say, the method can simulate propagation results efficiently and correctly with propagation distance of almost zero to infinity. So it can provide better support for more wave propagation applications such as atmospheric optics, laser propagation and so on.

  1. Vortical Flow Prediction using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  2. The development and application of the self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Carol B.

    The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, has proven to be a flexible and useful tool in the solution of complex flow problems. Both 2- and 3-D examples given in this report show the code to be reliable and to substantially improve flowfield solutions. Since the adaptive procedure is a marching scheme the code is extremely fast and uses insignificant CPU time compared to the corresponding flow solver. The SAGE program is also machine and flow solver independent. Significant effort was made to simplify user interaction, though some parameters still need to be chosen with care. It is also difficult to tell when the adaption process has provided its best possible solution. This is particularly true if no experimental data are available or if there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the flow. Another difficulty occurs if local features are important but missing in the original grid; the adaption to this solution will not result in any improvement, and only grid refinement can result in an improved solution. These are complex issues that need to be explored within the context of each specific problem.

  3. The development and application of the self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.

    1993-01-01

    The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, has proven to be a flexible and useful tool in the solution of complex flow problems. Both 2- and 3-D examples given in this report show the code to be reliable and to substantially improve flowfield solutions. Since the adaptive procedure is a marching scheme the code is extremely fast and uses insignificant CPU time compared to the corresponding flow solver. The SAGE program is also machine and flow solver independent. Significant effort was made to simplify user interaction, though some parameters still need to be chosen with care. It is also difficult to tell when the adaption process has provided its best possible solution. This is particularly true if no experimental data are available or if there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the flow. Another difficulty occurs if local features are important but missing in the original grid; the adaption to this solution will not result in any improvement, and only grid refinement can result in an improved solution. These are complex issues that need to be explored within the context of each specific problem.

  4. Parallel Computation of Three-Dimensional Flows using Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W; Schwendeman, D

    2007-11-15

    This paper describes an approach for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations in complex three-dimensional domains. The domains are represented by overlapping structured grids, and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is employed to locally increase the grid resolution. In addition, the numerical method is implemented on parallel distributed-memory computers using a domain-decomposition approach. The implementation is flexible so that each base grid within the overlapping grid structure and its associated refinement grids can be independently partitioned over a chosen set of processors. A modified bin-packing algorithm is used to specify the partition for each grid so that the computational work is evenly distributed amongst the processors. All components of the AMR algorithm such as error estimation, regridding, and interpolation are performed in parallel. The parallel time-stepping algorithm is illustrated for initial-boundary-value problems involving a linear advection-diffusion equation and the (nonlinear) reactive Euler equations. Numerical results are presented for both equations to demonstrate the accuracy and correctness of the parallel approach. Exact solutions of the advection-diffusion equation are constructed, and these are used to check the corresponding numerical solutions for a variety of tests involving different overlapping grids, different numbers of refinement levels and refinement ratios, and different numbers of processors. The problem of planar shock diffraction by a sphere is considered as an illustration of the numerical approach for the Euler equations, and a problem involving the initiation of a detonation from a hot spot in a T-shaped pipe is considered to demonstrate the numerical approach for the reactive case. For both problems, the solutions are shown to be well resolved on the finest grid. The parallel performance of the approach is examined in detail for the shock diffraction problem.

  5. Adaptive Harmonic Detection Control of Grid Interfaced Solar Photovoltaic Energy System with Power Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.; Goel, S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a grid interfaced solar photovoltaic (SPV) energy system with a novel adaptive harmonic detection control for power quality improvement at ac mains under balanced as well as unbalanced and distorted supply conditions. The SPV energy system is capable of compensation of linear and nonlinear loads with the objectives of load balancing, harmonics elimination, power factor correction and terminal voltage regulation. The proposed control increases the utilization of PV infrastructure and brings down its effective cost due to its other benefits. The adaptive harmonic detection control algorithm is used to detect the fundamental active power component of load currents which are subsequently used for reference source currents estimation. An instantaneous symmetrical component theory is used to obtain instantaneous positive sequence point of common coupling (PCC) voltages which are used to derive inphase and quadrature phase voltage templates. The proposed grid interfaced PV energy system is modelled and simulated in MATLAB Simulink and its performance is verified under various operating conditions.

  6. A new procedure for dynamic adaption of three-dimensional unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Strawn, Roger

    1993-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the simultaneous coarsening and refinement of three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes. This algorithm allows for localized grid adaption that is used to capture aerodynamic flow features such as vortices and shock waves in helicopter flowfield simulations. The mesh-adaption algorithm is implemented in the C programming language and uses a data structure consisting of a series of dynamically-allocated linked lists. These lists allow the mesh connectivity to be rapidly reconstructed when individual mesh points are added and/or deleted. The algorithm allows the mesh to change in an anisotropic manner in order to efficiently resolve directional flow features. The procedure has been successfully implemented on a single processor of a Cray Y-MP computer. Two sample cases are presented involving three-dimensional transonic flow. Computed results show good agreement with conventional structured-grid solutions for the Euler equations.

  7. Iso-deviant 2D gridding with efficient adaptive gridder for littoral environments (EAGLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rike, Erik R.; Delbalzo, Donald R.

    2005-09-01

    Transmission loss (TL) computations in littoral areas require a dense spatial and azimuthal grid to achieve acceptable accuracy and detail. The computational cost of accurate predictions led to a new concept, OGRES (Objective Grid/Radials using Environmentally-sensitive Selection), which produces sparse, irregular acoustic grids, with controlled accuracy. Recent work to further increase accuracy and efficiency with better metrics and interpolation led to EAGLE (Efficient Adaptive Gridder for Littoral Environments). On each iteration, EAGLE produces grids with approximately constant spatial uncertainty (hence, iso-deviance), yielding predictions with ever-increasing resolution and accuracy. The EAGLE point-selection mechanism is tested using the predictive error metric and 2D synthetic data sets created from combinations of simple signal functions (e.g., polynomials, sines, cosines, exponentials), along with white and chromatic noise. The speed, efficiency, fidelity, and iso-deviance of EAGLE are determined for each combination of signal, noise, and interpolator. The results show significant efficiency enhancements compared to uniform grids of the same accuracy. [Work sponsored by NAVAIR.

  8. Adjoint-Based, Three-Dimensional Error Prediction and Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and design applications focus on output functions (e.g., lift, drag). Errors in these output functions are generally unknown and conservatively accurate solutions may be computed. Computable error estimates can offer the possibility to minimize computational work for a prescribed error tolerance. Such an estimate can be computed by solving the flow equations and the linear adjoint problem for the functional of interest. The computational mesh can be modified to minimize the uncertainty of a computed error estimate. This robust mesh-adaptation procedure automatically terminates when the simulation is within a user specified error tolerance. This procedure for estimating and adapting to error in a functional is demonstrated for three-dimensional Euler problems. An adaptive mesh procedure that links to a Computer Aided Design (CAD) surface representation is demonstrated for wing, wing-body, and extruded high lift airfoil configurations. The error estimation and adaptation procedure yielded corrected functions that are as accurate as functions calculated on uniformly refined grids with ten times as many grid points.

  9. A Fast and Robust Poisson-Boltzmann Solver Based on Adaptive Cartesian Grids.

    PubMed

    Boschitsch, Alexander H; Fenley, Marcia O

    2011-05-10

    An adaptive Cartesian grid (ACG) concept is presented for the fast and robust numerical solution of the 3D Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE) governing the electrostatic interactions of large-scale biomolecules and highly charged multi-biomolecular assemblies such as ribosomes and viruses. The ACG offers numerous advantages over competing grid topologies such as regular 3D lattices and unstructured grids. For very large biological molecules and multi-biomolecule assemblies, the total number of grid-points is several orders of magnitude less than that required in a conventional lattice grid used in the current PBE solvers thus allowing the end user to obtain accurate and stable nonlinear PBE solutions on a desktop computer. Compared to tetrahedral-based unstructured grids, ACG offers a simpler hierarchical grid structure, which is naturally suited to multigrid, relieves indirect addressing requirements and uses fewer neighboring nodes in the finite difference stencils. Construction of the ACG and determination of the dielectric/ionic maps are straightforward, fast and require minimal user intervention. Charge singularities are eliminated by reformulating the problem to produce the reaction field potential in the molecular interior and the total electrostatic potential in the exterior ionic solvent region. This approach minimizes grid-dependency and alleviates the need for fine grid spacing near atomic charge sites. The technical portion of this paper contains three parts. First, the ACG and its construction for general biomolecular geometries are described. Next, a discrete approximation to the PBE upon this mesh is derived. Finally, the overall solution procedure and multigrid implementation are summarized. Results obtained with the ACG-based PBE solver are presented for: (i) a low dielectric spherical cavity, containing interior point charges, embedded in a high dielectric ionic solvent - analytical solutions are available for this case, thus allowing rigorous

  10. An a-posteriori finite element error estimator for adaptive grid computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, an a-posteriori error estimator is presented and employed for solving viscous incompressible flow problems. In an effort to detect local flow features, such as vortices and separation, and to resolve flow details precisely, a velocity angle error estimator e theta which is based on the spatial derivative of velocity direction fields is designed and constructed. The a-posteriori error estimator corresponds to the antisymmetric part of the deformation-rate-tensor, and it is sensitive to the second derivative of the velocity angle field. Rationality discussions reveal that the velocity angle error estimator is a curvature error estimator, and its value reflects the accuracy of streamline curves. It is also found that the velocity angle error estimator contains the nonlinear convective term of the Navier-Stokes equations, and it identifies and computes the direction difference when the convective acceleration direction and the flow velocity direction have a disparity. Through benchmarking computed variables with the analytic solution of Kovasznay flow or the finest grid of cavity flow, it is demonstrated that the velocity angle error estimator has a better performance than the strain error estimator. The benchmarking work also shows that the computed profile obtained by using etheta can achieve the best matching outcome with the true theta field, and that it is asymptotic to the true theta variation field, with a promise of fewer unknowns. Unstructured grids are adapted by employing local cell division as well as unrefinement of transition cells. Using element class and node class can efficiently construct a hierarchical data structure which provides cell and node inter-reference at each adaptive level. Employing element pointers and node pointers can dynamically maintain the connection of adjacent elements and adjacent nodes, and thus avoids time-consuming search processes. The adaptive scheme is applied to viscous incompressible flow at different

  11. Adaptive grid artifact reduction in the frequency domain with spatial properties for x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Sanggyun

    2012-03-01

    By applying band-rejection filters (BRFs) in the frequency domain, we can efficiently reduce the grid artifacts, which are caused by using the antiscatter grid in obtaining x-ray digital images. However, if the frequency component of the grid artifact is relatively close to that of the object, then simply applying a BRF may seriously distort the object and cause the ringing artifacts. Since the ringing artifacts are quite dependent on the shape of the object to be recovered in the spatial domain, the spatial property of the x-ray image should be considered in applying BRFs. In this paper, we propose an adaptive filtering scheme, which can cooperate such different properties in the spatial domain. In the spatial domain, we compare several approaches, such as the mangnitude, edge, and frequency-modulation (FM) model-based algorithms, to detect the ringing artifact or the grid artifact component. In order to perform a robust detection whether the ringing artifact is strong or not, we employ the FM model for the extracted signal, which corresponds to a specific grid artifact. A detection of the position for the ringing artifact is then conducted based on the slope detection algorithm, which is commonly used as an FM discriminator in the communication area. However, the detected position of the ringing artifact is not accurate. Hence, in order to obtain an accurate detection result, we combine the edge-based approach with the FM model approach. Numerical result for real x-ray images shows that applying BRFs in the frequency domain in conjunction with the spatial property of the ringing artifact can successfully remove the grid artifact, distorting the object less.

  12. A Hyperspherical Adaptive Sparse-Grid Method for High-Dimensional Discontinuity Detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Burkardt, John V.

    2015-06-24

    This study proposes and analyzes a hyperspherical adaptive hierarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces. The method is motivated by the theoretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a function representation of the discontinuity hypersurface of an N-dimensional discontinuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyperspherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyperspherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smoothness of the hypersurface, the newmore » technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. In addition, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous complexity analyses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.« less

  13. A hyper-spherical adaptive sparse-grid method for high-dimensional discontinuity detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G; Gunzburger, Max D; Burkardt, John V

    2014-03-01

    This work proposes and analyzes a hyper-spherical adaptive hi- erarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces is proposed. The method is motivated by the the- oretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a func- tion representation of the discontinuity hyper-surface of an N-dimensional dis- continuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyper-spherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyper-spherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smooth- ness of the hyper-surface, the new technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. Moreover, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous error estimates and complexity anal- yses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  14. Grid and basis adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perkó, Zoltán Gilli, Luca Lathouwers, Danny Kloosterman, Jan Leen

    2014-03-01

    The demand for accurate and computationally affordable sensitivity and uncertainty techniques is constantly on the rise and has become especially pressing in the nuclear field with the shift to Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies in the licensing of nuclear installations. Besides traditional, already well developed methods – such as first order perturbation theory or Monte Carlo sampling – Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) has been given a growing emphasis in recent years due to its simple application and good performance. This paper presents new developments of the research done at TU Delft on such Polynomial Chaos (PC) techniques. Our work is focused on the Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (NISP) approach and adaptive methods for building the PCE of responses of interest. Recent efforts resulted in a new adaptive sparse grid algorithm designed for estimating the PC coefficients. The algorithm is based on Gerstner's procedure for calculating multi-dimensional integrals but proves to be computationally significantly cheaper, while at the same it retains a similar accuracy as the original method. More importantly the issue of basis adaptivity has been investigated and two techniques have been implemented for constructing the sparse PCE of quantities of interest. Not using the traditional full PC basis set leads to further reduction in computational time since the high order grids necessary for accurately estimating the near zero expansion coefficients of polynomial basis vectors not needed in the PCE can be excluded from the calculation. Moreover the sparse PC representation of the response is easier to handle when used for sensitivity analysis or uncertainty propagation due to the smaller number of basis vectors. The developed grid and basis adaptive methods have been implemented in Matlab as the Fully Adaptive Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (FANISP) algorithm and were tested on four analytical problems. These show consistent good performance both

  15. A parallel dynamic load balancing algorithm for 3-D adaptive unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidwans, A.; Kallinderis, Y.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive local grid refinement and coarsening results in unequal distribution of workload among the processors of a parallel system. A novel method for balancing the load in cases of dynamically changing tetrahedral grids is developed. The approach employs local exchange of cells among processors in order to redistribute the load equally. An important part of the load balancing algorithm is the method employed by a processor to determine which cells within its subdomain are to be exchanged. Two such methods are presented and compared. The strategy for load balancing is based on the Divide-and-Conquer approach which leads to an efficient parallel algorithm. This method is implemented on a distributed-memory MIMD system.

  16. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  17. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  18. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  19. Evaluating two sparse grid surrogates and two adaptation criteria for groundwater Bayesian uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiankui; Ye, Ming; Burkardt, John; Wu, Jichun; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Sparse grid (SG) stochastic collocation methods have been recently used to build accurate but cheap-to-run surrogates for groundwater models to reduce the computational burden of Bayesian uncertainty analysis. The surrogates can be built for either a log-likelihood function or state variables such as hydraulic head and solute concentration. Using a synthetic groundwater flow model, this study evaluates the log-likelihood and head surrogates in terms of the computational cost of building them, the accuracy of the surrogates, and the accuracy of the distributions of model parameters and predictions obtained using the surrogates. The head surrogates outperform the log-likelihood surrogates for the following four reasons: (1) the shape of the head response surface is smoother than that of the log-likelihood response surface in parameter space, (2) the head variation is smaller than the log-likelihood variation in parameter space, (3) the interpolation error of the head surrogates does not accumulate to be larger than the interpolation error of the log-likelihood surrogates, and (4) the model simulations needed for building one head surrogate can be recycled for building others. For both log-likelihood and head surrogates, adaptive sparse grids are built using two indicators: absolute error and relative error. The adaptive head surrogates are insensitive to the error indicators, because the ratio between the two indicators is hydraulic head, which has small variation in the parameter space. The adaptive log-likelihood surrogates based on the relative error indicators outperform those based on the absolute error indicators, because adaptation based on the relative error indicator puts more sparse-grid nodes in the areas in the parameter space where the log-likelihood is high. While our numerical study suggests building state-variable surrogates and using the relative error indicator for building log-likelihood surrogates, selecting appropriate type of surrogates and

  20. Time-dependent grid adaptation for meshes of triangles and tetrahedra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, Russ D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents in viewgraph form a method of optimizing grid generation for unsteady CFD flow calculations that distributes the numerical error evenly throughout the mesh. Adaptive meshing is used to locally enrich in regions of relatively large errors and to locally coarsen in regions of relatively small errors. The enrichment/coarsening procedures are robust for isotropic cells; however, enrichment of high aspect ratio cells may fail near boundary surfaces with relatively large curvature. The enrichment indicator worked well for the cases shown, but in general requires user supervision for a more efficient solution.

  1. Micro Benchmarking, Performance Assertions and Sensitivity Analysis: A Technique for Developing Adaptive Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, I R; Johnson, J R; Vetter, J S

    2002-02-25

    This study presents a technique that can significantly improve the performance of a distributed application by allowing the application to locally adapt to architectural characteristics of distinct resources in a distributed system. Application performance is sensitive to application parameter--system architecture pairings. In a distributed or Grid enabled applciation, a single parameter configuration for the whole application will not always be optimal for every participating resource. In particular, some configurations can significantly degrade performance. Furthermore, the behavior of a system may change during the course of the run. The technique described here provides an automated mechanism for run-time adaptation of application parameters to the local system architecture. Using a simulation of a Monte Carlo physics code, the authors demonstrate that this technique can achieve speedups of 18%-37% on individual resources in a distributed environment.

  2. Fair Energy Scheduling for Vehicle-to-Grid Networks Using Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengli; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Kan; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Research on the smart grid is being given enormous supports worldwide due to its great significance in solving environmental and energy crises. Electric vehicles (EVs), which are powered by clean energy, are adopted increasingly year by year. It is predictable that the huge charge load caused by high EV penetration will have a considerable impact on the reliability of the smart grid. Therefore, fair energy scheduling for EV charge and discharge is proposed in this paper. By using the vehicle-to-grid technology, the scheduler controls the electricity loads of EVs considering fairness in the residential distribution network. We propose contribution-based fairness, in which EVs with high contributions have high priorities to obtain charge energy. The contribution value is defined by both the charge/discharge energy and the timing of the action. EVs can achieve higher contribution values when discharging during the load peak hours. However, charging during this time will decrease the contribution values seriously. We formulate the fair energy scheduling problem as an infinite-horizon Markov decision process. The methodology of adaptive dynamic programming is employed to maximize the long-term fairness by processing online network training. The numerical results illustrate that the proposed EV energy scheduling is able to mitigate and flatten the peak load in the distribution network. Furthermore, contribution-based fairness achieves a fast recovery of EV batteries that have deeply discharged and guarantee fairness in the full charge time of all EVs. PMID:26930694

  3. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of

  5. An adaptive discretization of incompressible flow using a multitude of moving Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, R. Elliot; Qiu, Linhai; Yu, Yue; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel method for discretizing the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on a multitude of moving and overlapping Cartesian grids each with an independently chosen cell size to address adaptivity. Advection is handled with first and second order accurate semi-Lagrangian schemes in order to alleviate any time step restriction associated with small grid cell sizes. Likewise, an implicit temporal discretization is used for the parabolic terms including Navier-Stokes viscosity which we address separately through the development of a method for solving the heat diffusion equations. The most intricate aspect of any such discretization is the method used in order to solve the elliptic equation for the Navier-Stokes pressure or that resulting from the temporal discretization of parabolic terms. We address this by first removing any degrees of freedom which duplicately cover spatial regions due to overlapping grids, and then providing a discretization for the remaining degrees of freedom adjacent to these regions. We observe that a robust second order accurate symmetric positive definite readily preconditioned discretization can be obtained by constructing a local Voronoi region on the fly for each degree of freedom in question in order to obtain both its stencil (logically connected neighbors) and stencil weights. Internal curved boundaries such as at solid interfaces are handled using a simple immersed boundary approach which is directly applied to the Voronoi mesh in both the viscosity and pressure solves. We independently demonstrate each aspect of our approach on test problems in order to show efficacy and convergence before finally addressing a number of common test cases for incompressible flow with stationary and moving solid bodies.

  6. Adaptive-Grid Methods for Phase Field Models of Microstructure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provatas, Nikolas; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Dantzig, Jonathan A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the authors show how the phase field model can be solved in a computationally efficient manner that opens a new large-scale simulational window on solidification physics. Our method uses a finite element, adaptive-grid formulation, and exploits the fact that the phase and temperature fields vary significantly only near the interface. We illustrate how our method allows efficient simulation of phase-field models in very large systems, and verify the predictions of solvability theory at intermediate undercooling. We then present new results at low undercoolings that suggest that solvability theory may not give the correct tip speed in that regime. We model solidification using the phase-field model used by Karma and Rappel.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF DISCONTINUITIES IN HIGH-DIMENSIONAL STOCHASTIC PROBLEMS ON ADAPTIVE SPARSE GRIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jakeman, John D; Archibald, Richard K; Xiu, Dongbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a set of efficient algorithms for detection and identification of discontinuities in high dimensional space. The method is based on extension of polynomial annihilation for edge detection in low dimensions. Compared to the earlier work, the present method poses significant improvements for high dimensional problems. The core of the algorithms relies on adaptive refinement of sparse grids. It is demonstrated that in the commonly encountered cases where a discontinuity resides on a small subset of the dimensions, the present method becomes optimal , in the sense that the total number of points required for function evaluations depends linearly on the dimensionality of the space. The details of the algorithms will be presented and various numerical examples are utilized to demonstrate the efficacy of the method.

  8. Practical improvements of multi-grid iteration for adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Hisashi; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement(AMR) is a powerful tool to efficiently solve multi-scaled problems. However, the vanilla AMR method has a well-known critical demerit, i.e., it cannot be applied to non-local problems. Although multi-grid iteration (MGI) can be regarded as a good remedy for a non-local problem such as the Poisson equation, we observed fundamental difficulties in applying the MGI technique in AMR to realistic problems under complicated mesh layouts because it does not converge or it requires too many iterations even if it does converge. To cope with the problem, when updating the next approximation in the MGI process, we calculate the precise total corrections that are relatively accurate to the current residual by introducing a new iteration for such a total correction. This procedure greatly accelerates the MGI convergence speed especially under complicated mesh layouts.

  9. An efficient second-order accurate and continuous interpolation for block-adaptive grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, Dmitry; Sokolov, Igor V.; Tóth, Gábor

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a second-order and continuous interpolation algorithm for cell-centered adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) grids. Continuity requirement poses a non-trivial problem at resolution changes. We develop a classification of the resolution changes, which allows us to employ efficient and simple linear interpolation in the majority of the computational domain. The algorithm is well suited for massively parallel computations. Our interpolation algorithm allows extracting jump-free interpolated data distribution along lines and surfaces within the computational domain. This capability is important for various applications, including kinetic particles tracking in three dimensional vector fields, visualization (i.e. surface extraction) and extracting variables along one-dimensional curves such as field lines, streamlines and satellite trajectories, etc. Particular examples are models for acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) along magnetic field-lines. As such models are sensitive to sharp gradients and discontinuities the capability to interpolate the data from the AMR grid to be passed to the SEP model without producing false gradients numerically becomes crucial. We provide a complete description of the algorithm and make the code publicly available as a Fortran 90 library.

  10. Adaptive multi-grid method for a periodic heterogeneous medium in 1-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.; Belsky, V.

    1995-12-31

    A multi-grid method for a periodic heterogeneous medium in 1-D is presented. Based on the homogenization theory special intergrid connection operators have been developed to imitate a low frequency response of the differential equations with oscillatory coefficients. The proposed multi-grid method has been proved to have a fast rate of convergence governed by the ratio q/(4-q), where oadaptive multiscale computational scheme is developed. By this technique a computational model entirely constructed on the scale of material heterogeneity is only used where it is necessary to do so, or as indicated by so called Microscale Reduction Error (MRE) indicators, while in the remaining portion of the problem domain, the medium is treated as homogeneous with effective properties. Such a posteriori MRE indicators and estimators are developed on the basis of assessing the validity of two-scale asymptotic expansion.

  11. An Adaptive Reputation-Based Algorithm for Grid Virtual Organization Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongrui; Li, Mingchu; Ren, Yizhi; Sakurai, Kouichi

    A novel adaptive reputation-based virtual organization formation is proposed. It restrains the bad performers effectively based on the consideration of the global experience of the evaluator and evaluates the direct trust relation between two grid nodes accurately by consulting the previous trust value rationally. It also consults and improves the reputation evaluation process in PathTrust model by taking account of the inter-organizational trust relationship and combines it with direct and recommended trust in a weighted way, which makes the algorithm more robust against collusion attacks. Additionally, the proposed algorithm considers the perspective of the VO creator and takes required VO services as one of the most important fine-grained evaluation criterion, which makes the algorithm more suitable for constructing VOs in grid environments that include autonomous organizations. Simulation results show that our algorithm restrains the bad performers and resists against fake transaction attacks and badmouth attacks effectively. It provides a clear advantage in the design of a VO infrastructure.

  12. Application of Open Loop H-Adaptation to an Unstructured Grid Tidal Flat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, G. W.

    2008-12-01

    The complex topology of tidal flats presents a challenge to coastal ocean models. Recently, several models have been developed employing unstructured grids, which can provide the flexibility in mesh resolution required to resolve the complex bathymetry and coastline. However, the distribution of element size in the initial mesh can be somewhat arbitrary, and is in general the product of the operator tailoring the resolution to the underlying bathymetry and regions of interest. In this work, the flow solution from an idealized tidal flat application is used to drive an open loop h-adaptation of the mesh. The model used for this work is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), an open source, terrain following model. A background length scale distribution derived from model output is used to generate a new initial mesh for the model run, thus defining an iteration of the procedure. Several metrics for computing the background length scale will be examined. These include direct estimation of spatial discretization error using Richardson's extrapolation from a sequence of meshes as well as heuristics derived from gradients in the primitive variables. Examination of grid independence, computational efficiency, and performance of the scheme for idealized tidal flats with inclusion of morphodynamics will be discussed.

  13. The use of the spectral method within the fast adaptive composite grid method

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The use of efficient algorithms for the solution of partial differential equations has been sought for many years. The fast adaptive composite grid (FAC) method combines an efficient algorithm with high accuracy to obtain low cost solutions to partial differential equations. The FAC method achieves fast solution by combining solutions on different grids with varying discretizations and using multigrid like techniques to find fast solution. Recently, the continuous FAC (CFAC) method has been developed which utilizes an analytic solution within a subdomain to iterate to a solution of the problem. This has been shown to achieve excellent results when the analytic solution can be found. The CFAC method will be extended to allow solvers which construct a function for the solution, e.g., spectral and finite element methods. In this discussion, the spectral methods will be used to provide a fast, accurate solution to the partial differential equation. As spectral methods are more accurate than finite difference methods, the ensuing accuracy from this hybrid method outside of the subdomain will be investigated.

  14. Axisymmetric modeling of cometary mass loading on an adaptively refined grid: MHD results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.; Powell, Kenneth G.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.

    1994-01-01

    The first results of an axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the interaction of an expanding cometary atmosphere with the solar wind are presented. The model assumes that far upstream the plasma flow lines are parallel to the magnetic field vector. The effects of mass loading and ion-neutral friction are taken into account by the governing equations, whcih are solved on an adaptively refined unstructured grid using a Monotone Upstream Centered Schemes for Conservative Laws (MUSCL)-type numerical technique. The combination of the adaptive refinement with the MUSCL-scheme allows the entire cometary atmosphere to be modeled, while still resolving both the shock and the near nucleus of the comet. The main findingsare the following: (1) A shock is formed approximately = 0.45 Mkm upstream of the comet (its location is controlled by the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers of the ambient solar wind flow and by the cometary mass addition rate). (2) A contact surface is formed approximately = 5,600 km upstream of the nucleus separating an outward expanding cometary ionosphere from the nearly stagnating solar wind flow. The location of the contact surface is controlled by the upstream flow conditions, the mass loading rate and the ion-neutral drag. The contact surface is also the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. (3) A closed inner shock terminates the supersonic expansion of the cometary ionosphere. This inner shock is closer to the nucleus on dayside than on the nightside.

  15. Moving Overlapping Grids with Adaptive Mesh Refinement for High-Speed Reactive and Non-reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D; Schwendeman, D W

    2005-08-30

    We consider the solution of the reactive and non-reactive Euler equations on two-dimensional domains that evolve in time. The domains are discretized using moving overlapping grids. In a typical grid construction, boundary-fitted grids are used to represent moving boundaries, and these grids overlap with stationary background Cartesian grids. Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to resolve fine-scale features in the flow such as shocks and detonations. Refinement grids are added to base-level grids according to an estimate of the error, and these refinement grids move with their corresponding base-level grids. The numerical approximation of the governing equations takes place in the parameter space of each component grid which is defined by a mapping from (fixed) parameter space to (moving) physical space. The mapped equations are solved numerically using a second-order extension of Godunov's method. The stiff source term in the reactive case is handled using a Runge-Kutta error-control scheme. We consider cases when the boundaries move according to a prescribed function of time and when the boundaries of embedded bodies move according to the surface stress exerted by the fluid. In the latter case, the Newton-Euler equations describe the motion of the center of mass of the each body and the rotation about it, and these equations are integrated numerically using a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. Numerical boundary conditions at slip walls are described, and numerical results are presented for both reactive and non-reactive flows in order to demonstrate the use and accuracy of the numerical approach.

  16. Adaptive grid embedding for the two-dimensional flux-split Euler equations. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Gary Patrick

    1990-01-01

    A numerical algorithm is presented for solving the 2-D flux-split Euler equations using a multigrid method with adaptive grid embedding. The method uses an unstructured data set along with a system of pointers for communication on the irregularly shaped grid topologies. An explicit two-stage time advancement scheme is implemented. A multigrid algorithm is used to provide grid level communication and to accelerate the convergence of the solution to steady state. Results are presented for a subcritical airfoil and a transonic airfoil with 3 levels of adaptation. Comparisons are made with a structured upwind Euler code which uses the same flux integration techniques of the present algorithm. Good agreement is obtained with converged surface pressure coefficients. The lift coefficients of the adaptive code are within 2 1/2 percent of the structured code for the sub-critical case and within 4 1/2 percent of the structured code for the transonic case using approximately one-third the number of grid points.

  17. Computation of shock waves in media with an interphase boundary by the CIP-CUP method on an adaptive grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical technique of computing shock waves in compressible media with movable deforming interphase boundaries including those of the gas-liquid type has been realized. The approach without explicit separation of the interphase boundary is applied. The CIP-CUP method is used for integrating the equations of gas dynamics. An adaptive grid of special kind (the soroban-grid) is utilized. Some results of testing the technique using one- and two-dimensional problems are given. Results of computation of impact of a jet on a thin liquid layer on a wall are presented.

  18. A General Hybrid Radiation Transport Scheme for Star Formation Simulations on an Adaptive Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Kuiper, Rolf; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  19. A Domain-Decomposed Multi-Level Method for Adaptively Refined Cartesian Grids with Embedded Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Berger, M. J.; Adomavicius, G.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The work presents a new method for on-the-fly domain decomposition technique for mapping grids and solution algorithms to parallel machines, and is applicable to both shared-memory and message-passing architectures. It will be demonstrated on the Cray T3E, HP Exemplar, and SGI Origin 2000. Computing time has been secured on all these platforms. The decomposition technique is an outgrowth of techniques used in computational physics for simulations of N-body problems and the event horizons of black holes, and has not been previously used by the CFD community. Since the technique offers on-the-fly partitioning, it offers a substantial increase in flexibility for computing in heterogeneous environments, where the number of available processors may not be known at the time of job submission. In addition, since it is dynamic it permits the job to be repartitioned without global communication in cases where additional processors become available after the simulation has begun, or in cases where dynamic mesh adaptation changes the mesh size during the course of a simulation. The platform for this partitioning strategy is a completely new Cartesian Euler solver tarcreted at parallel machines which may be used in conjunction with Ames' "Cart3D" arbitrary geometry simulation package.

  20. Features of CPB: A Poisson-Boltzmann Solver that Uses an Adaptive Cartesian Grid

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robert C.; Mackoy, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities of an adaptive Cartesian grid (ACG)-based Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) solver (CPB) are demonstrated. CPB solves various PB equations with an ACG, built from a hierarchical octree decomposition of the computational domain. This procedure decreases the number of points required, thereby reducing computational demands. Inside the molecule, CPB solves for the reaction-field component (ϕrf) of the electrostatic potential (ϕ), eliminating the charge-induced singularities in ϕ. CPB can also use a least-squares reconstruction method to improve estimates of ϕ at the molecular surface. All surfaces, which include solvent excluded, Gaussians and others, are created analytically, eliminating errors associated with triangulated surfaces. These features allow CPB to produce detailed surface maps of ϕ and compute polar solvation and binding free energies for large biomolecular assemblies, such as ribosomes and viruses, with reduced computational demands compared to other PBE solvers. The reader is referred to http://www.continuum-dynamics.com/solution-mm.html for how to obtain the CPB software. PMID:25430617

  1. An efficient Bayesian inference approach to inverse problems based on an adaptive sparse grid collocation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    A new approach to modeling inverse problems using a Bayesian inference method is introduced. The Bayesian approach considers the unknown parameters as random variables and seeks the probabilistic distribution of the unknowns. By introducing the concept of the stochastic prior state space to the Bayesian formulation, we reformulate the deterministic forward problem as a stochastic one. The adaptive hierarchical sparse grid collocation (ASGC) method is used for constructing an interpolant to the solution of the forward model in this prior space which is large enough to capture all the variability/uncertainty in the posterior distribution of the unknown parameters. This solution can be considered as a function of the random unknowns and serves as a stochastic surrogate model for the likelihood calculation. Hierarchical Bayesian formulation is used to derive the posterior probability density function (PPDF). The spatial model is represented as a convolution of a smooth kernel and a Markov random field. The state space of the PPDF is explored using Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms to obtain statistics of the unknowns. The likelihood calculation is performed by directly sampling the approximate stochastic solution obtained through the ASGC method. The technique is assessed on two nonlinear inverse problems: source inversion and permeability estimation in flow through porous media.

  2. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-12-10

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  3. Features of CPB: a Poisson-Boltzmann solver that uses an adaptive Cartesian grid.

    PubMed

    Fenley, Marcia O; Harris, Robert C; Mackoy, Travis; Boschitsch, Alexander H

    2015-02-01

    The capabilities of an adaptive Cartesian grid (ACG)-based Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) solver (CPB) are demonstrated. CPB solves various PB equations with an ACG, built from a hierarchical octree decomposition of the computational domain. This procedure decreases the number of points required, thereby reducing computational demands. Inside the molecule, CPB solves for the reaction-field component (ϕrf ) of the electrostatic potential (ϕ), eliminating the charge-induced singularities in ϕ. CPB can also use a least-squares reconstruction method to improve estimates of ϕ at the molecular surface. All surfaces, which include solvent excluded, Gaussians, and others, are created analytically, eliminating errors associated with triangulated surfaces. These features allow CPB to produce detailed surface maps of ϕ and compute polar solvation and binding free energies for large biomolecular assemblies, such as ribosomes and viruses, with reduced computational demands compared to other Poisson-Boltzmann equation solvers. The reader is referred to http://www.continuum-dynamics.com/solution-mm.html for how to obtain the CPB software. PMID:25430617

  4. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  5. The Evolutionary Origins of Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, Joost; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical organization—the recursive composition of sub-modules—is ubiquitous in biological networks, including neural, metabolic, ecological, and genetic regulatory networks, and in human-made systems, such as large organizations and the Internet. To date, most research on hierarchy in networks has been limited to quantifying this property. However, an open, important question in evolutionary biology is why hierarchical organization evolves in the first place. It has recently been shown that modularity evolves because of the presence of a cost for network connections. Here we investigate whether such connection costs also tend to cause a hierarchical organization of such modules. In computational simulations, we find that networks without a connection cost do not evolve to be hierarchical, even when the task has a hierarchical structure. However, with a connection cost, networks evolve to be both modular and hierarchical, and these networks exhibit higher overall performance and evolvability (i.e. faster adaptation to new environments). Additional analyses confirm that hierarchy independently improves adaptability after controlling for modularity. Overall, our results suggest that the same force–the cost of connections–promotes the evolution of both hierarchy and modularity, and that these properties are important drivers of network performance and adaptability. In addition to shedding light on the emergence of hierarchy across the many domains in which it appears, these findings will also accelerate future research into evolving more complex, intelligent computational brains in the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics. PMID:27280881

  6. The Evolutionary Origins of Hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Henok; Huizinga, Joost; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste; Clune, Jeff

    2016-06-01

    Hierarchical organization-the recursive composition of sub-modules-is ubiquitous in biological networks, including neural, metabolic, ecological, and genetic regulatory networks, and in human-made systems, such as large organizations and the Internet. To date, most research on hierarchy in networks has been limited to quantifying this property. However, an open, important question in evolutionary biology is why hierarchical organization evolves in the first place. It has recently been shown that modularity evolves because of the presence of a cost for network connections. Here we investigate whether such connection costs also tend to cause a hierarchical organization of such modules. In computational simulations, we find that networks without a connection cost do not evolve to be hierarchical, even when the task has a hierarchical structure. However, with a connection cost, networks evolve to be both modular and hierarchical, and these networks exhibit higher overall performance and evolvability (i.e. faster adaptation to new environments). Additional analyses confirm that hierarchy independently improves adaptability after controlling for modularity. Overall, our results suggest that the same force-the cost of connections-promotes the evolution of both hierarchy and modularity, and that these properties are important drivers of network performance and adaptability. In addition to shedding light on the emergence of hierarchy across the many domains in which it appears, these findings will also accelerate future research into evolving more complex, intelligent computational brains in the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics. PMID:27280881

  7. Grid generation and adaptation for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method. [for complex flows past wedges and cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David P.; Hassan, H. A.; Moss, James N.

    1988-01-01

    A grid generation and adaptation procedure based on the method of transfinite interpolation is incorporated into the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method of Bird. In addition, time is advanced based on a local criterion. The resulting procedure is used to calculate steady flows past wedges and cones. Five chemical species are considered. In general, the modifications result in a reduced computational effort. Moreover, preliminary results suggest that the simulation method is time step dependent if requirements on cell sizes are not met.

  8. QoS Differential Scheduling in Cognitive-Radio-Based Smart Grid Networks: An Adaptive Dynamic Programming Approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Shengli; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yun

    2016-02-01

    As the next-generation power grid, smart grid will be integrated with a variety of novel communication technologies to support the explosive data traffic and the diverse requirements of quality of service (QoS). Cognitive radio (CR), which has the favorable ability to improve the spectrum utilization, provides an efficient and reliable solution for smart grid communications networks. In this paper, we study the QoS differential scheduling problem in the CR-based smart grid communications networks. The scheduler is responsible for managing the spectrum resources and arranging the data transmissions of smart grid users (SGUs). To guarantee the differential QoS, the SGUs are assigned to have different priorities according to their roles and their current situations in the smart grid. Based on the QoS-aware priority policy, the scheduler adjusts the channels allocation to minimize the transmission delay of SGUs. The entire transmission scheduling problem is formulated as a semi-Markov decision process and solved by the methodology of adaptive dynamic programming. A heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) architecture is established for the scheduling problem. By the online network training, the HDP can learn from the activities of primary users and SGUs, and adjust the scheduling decision to achieve the purpose of transmission delay minimization. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed priority policy ensures the low transmission delay of high priority SGUs. In addition, the emergency data transmission delay is also reduced to a significantly low level, guaranteeing the differential QoS in smart grid. PMID:25910254

  9. Adapting a commercial power system simulator for smart grid based system study and vulnerability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaratne, Uditha Sudheera

    The smart grid is the future of the power grid. Smart meters and the associated network play a major role in the distributed system of the smart grid. Advance Metering Infrastructure (AMI) can enhance the reliability of the grid, generate efficient energy management opportunities and many innovations around the future smart grid. These innovations involve intense research not only on the AMI network itself but as also on the influence an AMI network can have upon the rest of the power grid. This research describes a smart meter testbed with hardware in loop that can facilitate future research in an AMI network. The smart meters in the testbed were developed such that their functionality can be customized to simulate any given scenario such as integrating new hardware components into a smart meter or developing new encryption algorithms in firmware. These smart meters were integrated into the power system simulator to simulate the power flow variation in the power grid on different AMI activities. Each smart meter in the network also provides a communication interface to the home area network. This research delivers a testbed for emulating the AMI activities and monitoring their effect on the smart grid.

  10. An adaptive discretization of compressible flow using a multitude of moving Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Linhai; Lu, Wenlong; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method for simulating compressible flow on a multitude of Cartesian grids that can rotate and translate. Following previous work, we split the time integration into an explicit step for advection followed by an implicit solve for the pressure. A second order accurate flux based scheme is devised to handle advection on each moving Cartesian grid using an effective characteristic velocity that accounts for the grid motion. In order to avoid the stringent time step restriction imposed by very fine grids, we propose strategies that allow for a fluid velocity CFL number larger than 1. The stringent time step restriction related to the sound speed is alleviated by formulating an implicit linear system in order to find a pressure consistent with the equation of state. This implicit linear system crosses overlapping Cartesian grid boundaries by utilizing local Voronoi meshes to connect the various degrees of freedom obtaining a symmetric positive-definite system. Since a straightforward application of this technique contains an inherent central differencing which can result in spurious oscillations, we introduce a new high order diffusion term similar in spirit to ENO-LLF but solved for implicitly in order to avoid any associated time step restrictions. The method is conservative on each grid, as well as globally conservative on the background grid that contains all other grids. Moreover, a conservative interpolation operator is devised for conservatively remapping values in order to keep them consistent across different overlapping grids. Additionally, the method is extended to handle two-way solid fluid coupling in a monolithic fashion including cases (in the appendix) where solids in close proximity do not properly allow for grid based degrees of freedom in between them.

  11. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac-Neice, Peter; Olson, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement Library (PARAMESH) is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide a computer programmer with an easy route to extension of (1) a previously written serial code that uses a logically Cartesian structured mesh into (2) a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, PARAMESH can operate as a domain-decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes but who do not wish to utilize adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain of a given application program, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. The sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data structure (a quad-tree in two or an oct-tree in three dimensions). Each grid block has a logically Cartesian mesh. The package supports one-, two- and three-dimensional models.

  12. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  13. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  14. Computations of Unsteady Viscous Compressible Flows Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for accurate and efficient simulation of unsteady, compressible flows is presented. The cornerstones of the methodology are a special discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations on structured body-fitted grid systems and an efficient solution-adaptive mesh refinement technique for structured grids. The discretization employs an explicit multidimensional upwind scheme for the inviscid fluxes and an implicit treatment of the viscous terms. The mesh refinement technique is based on the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella. In this approach, cells on each level of refinement are organized into a small number of topologically rectangular blocks, each containing several thousand cells. The small number of blocks leads to small overhead in managing data, while their size and regular topology means that a high degree of optimization can be achieved on computers with vector processors.

  15. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  16. Adaptive analog-SSOR iterative method for solving grid equations with nonselfadjoint operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Sukhinov, Alexander; Chistyakov, Alexander; Shishenya, Alexander; Roux, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Motion models of wave processes in the coastal zone are highly demanded in the projection and construction of coastal surface structures and breakwaters, and also as a component of other models. The most common of the grid approaches is currently vof-method. A significant drawback of this method is in the necessity to solve the convection equation to find fullness of cells. The numerical solution of this equation leads to a strong grid viscosity and "smearing" of the interface. In this paper, we propose a method, which is based on the idea of using a fill, as in vof method, but its conversion is not required to solve the equation of convection. Thus in this work, a mathematical model for the wave hydrodynamics problem, describing wash ashore and taking into account such physical parameters as turbulent exchange, complexity of domain and coastal line geometry, and bottom friction is developed. For the given mathematical model a discrete model is constructed, taking into account dynamical changing of the calculation domain. Discretization of the model is performed on the structured rectangular grid with a new developed finite-volume technique that takes into account fullness of the grid cells that allows describing geometry more accurate. Proposed technique allows improving the real accuracy of a solution in case of complex domain geometry, by improving approximation of the boundary. A software implementation and numerical experiments of the posed problem of the wave hydrodynamics is performed. The results of numerical experiments show the feasibility of using discrete mathematical models of processes that take into account fullness of grid cells, for the simulation of systems with complex geometry of the border. Numerical experiments show that the use of this technique sufficiently smooth solutions are obtained even on coarse grids.

  17. Grid generation strategies for turbomachinery configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. D.; Henderson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    Turbomachinery flow fields involve unique grid generation issues due to their geometrical and physical characteristics. Several strategic approaches are discussed to generate quality grids. The grid quality is further enhanced through blending and adapting. Grid blending smooths the grids locally through averaging and diffusion operators. Grid adaptation redistributes the grid points based on a grid quality assessment. These methods are demonstrated with several examples.

  18. An adaptive quadrature-free implementation of the high-order spectral volume method on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert Evan

    2008-10-01

    An efficient implementation of the high-order spectral volume (SV) method is presented for multi-dimensional conservation laws on unstructured grids. In the SV method, each simplex cell is called a spectral volume (SV), and the SV is further subdivided into polygonal (2D), or polyhedral (3D) control volumes (CVs) to support high-order data reconstructions. In the traditional implementation, Gauss quadrature formulas are used to approximate the flux integrals on all faces. In the new approach, a nodal set is selected and used to reconstruct a high-order polynomial approximation for the flux vector, and then the flux integrals on the internal faces are computed analytically, without the need for Gauss quadrature formulas. This gives a significant advantage over the traditional SV method in efficiency and ease of implementation. Fundamental properties of the new SV implementation are studied and high-order accuracy is demonstrated for linear and nonlinear advection equations, and the Euler equations. The new quadrature-free approach is then extended to handle local adaptive hp-refinement (grid and order refinement). Efficient edge-based adaptation utilizing a binary tree search algorithm is employed. Several different adaptation criteria which focus computational effort near high gradient regions are presented. Both h- and p-refinements are presented in a general framework where it is possible to perform either or both on any grid cell at any time. Several well-known inviscid flow test cases, subjected to various levels of adaptation, are utilized to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. An analysis of the accuracy and stability properties of the spectral volume (SV) method is then presented. The current work seeks to address the issue of stability, as well as polynomial quality, in the design of SV partitions. A new approach is presented, which efficiently locates stable partitions by means of constrained minimization. Once stable partitions are located, a

  19. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the physics of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  20. Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement using direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.L.; Bell, J.B.; Crutchfield, W.Y.; Alder, B.J.

    1999-09-01

    Adaptive mesh and algorithm refinement (AMAR) embeds a particle method within a continuum method at the finest level of an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hierarchy. The coupling between the particle region and the overlaying continuum grid is algorithmically equivalent to that between the fine and coarse levels of AMR. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used as the particle algorithm embedded within a Godunov-type compressible Navier-Stokes solver. Several examples are presented and compared with purely continuum calculations.

  1. A parallel second-order adaptive mesh algorithm for incompressible flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Pau, George S H; Almgren, Ann S; Bell, John B; Lijewski, Michael J

    2009-11-28

    In this paper, we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multi-phase, incompressible flow in porous media. We assume a multi-phase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting, the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data at different levels are then synchronized. The single-grid algorithm is described briefly, but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behaviour of the method. PMID:19840985

  2. A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multiphase, incompressible flows in porous media. We assume a multiphase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence-free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids areadvanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data atdifferent levels are then synchronized. The single grid algorithm is described briefly,but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behavior of the method.

  3. Impact of Load Balancing on Unstructured Adaptive Grid Computations for Distributed-Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Andrew; Biswas, Rupak; Simon, Horst D.

    1996-01-01

    The computational requirements for an adaptive solution of unsteady problems change as the simulation progresses. This causes workload imbalance among processors on a parallel machine which, in turn, requires significant data movement at runtime. We present a new dynamic load-balancing framework, called JOVE, that balances the workload across all processors with a global view. Whenever the computational mesh is adapted, JOVE is activated to eliminate the load imbalance. JOVE has been implemented on an IBM SP2 distributed-memory machine in MPI for portability. Experimental results for two model meshes demonstrate that mesh adaption with load balancing gives more than a sixfold improvement over one without load balancing. We also show that JOVE gives a 24-fold speedup on 64 processors compared to sequential execution.

  4. ADAPTIVE-GRID SIMULATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW IN HETEROGENEOUS AQUIFERS. (R825689C068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The prediction of contaminant transport in porous media requires the computation of the flow velocity. This work presents a methodology for high-accuracy computation of flow in a heterogeneous isotropic formation, employing a dual-flow formulation and adaptive...

  5. An adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation method for Bayesian inference in groundwater reactive transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G; Gunzburger, Max D

    2012-09-01

    Although Bayesian analysis has become vital to the quantification of prediction uncertainty in groundwater modeling, its application has been hindered due to the computational cost associated with numerous model executions needed for exploring the posterior probability density function (PPDF) of model parameters. This is particularly the case when the PPDF is estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. In this study, we develop a new approach that improves computational efficiency of Bayesian inference by constructing a surrogate system based on an adaptive sparse-grid high-order stochastic collocation (aSG-hSC) method. Unlike previous works using first-order hierarchical basis, we utilize a compactly supported higher-order hierar- chical basis to construct the surrogate system, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of computational simulations required. In addition, we use hierarchical surplus as an error indi- cator to determine adaptive sparse grids. This allows local refinement in the uncertain domain and/or anisotropic detection with respect to the random model parameters, which further improves computational efficiency. Finally, we incorporate a global optimization technique and propose an iterative algorithm for building the surrogate system for the PPDF with multiple significant modes. Once the surrogate system is determined, the PPDF can be evaluated by sampling the surrogate system directly with very little computational cost. The developed method is evaluated first using a simple analytical density function with multiple modes and then using two synthetic groundwater reactive transport models. The groundwater models represent different levels of complexity; the first example involves coupled linear reactions and the second example simulates nonlinear ura- nium surface complexation. The results show that the aSG-hSC is an effective and efficient tool for Bayesian inference in groundwater modeling in comparison with conventional

  6. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  7. Adjoint-Based Algorithms for Adaptation and Design Optimizations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Schemes based on discrete adjoint algorithms present several exciting opportunities for significantly advancing the current state of the art in computational fluid dynamics. Such methods provide an extremely efficient means for obtaining discretely consistent sensitivity information for hundreds of design variables, opening the door to rigorous, automated design optimization of complex aerospace configuration using the Navier-Stokes equation. Moreover, the discrete adjoint formulation provides a mathematically rigorous foundation for mesh adaptation and systematic reduction of spatial discretization error. Error estimates are also an inherent by-product of an adjoint-based approach, valuable information that is virtually non-existent in today's large-scale CFD simulations. An overview of the adjoint-based algorithm work at NASA Langley Research Center is presented, with examples demonstrating the potential impact on complex computational problems related to design optimization as well as mesh adaptation.

  8. The fluid dynamic approach to equidistribution methods for grid generation and adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M

    2009-01-01

    The equidistribution methods based on L{sub p} Monge-Kantorovich optimization [Finn and Delzanno, submitted to SISC, 2009] and on the deformation [Moser, 1965; Dacorogna and Moser, 1990, Liao and Anderson, 1992] method are analyzed primarily in the context of grid generation. It is shown that the first class of methods can be obtained from a fluid dynamic formulation based on time-dependent equations for the mass density and the momentum density, arising from a variational principle. In this context, deformation methods arise from a fluid formulation by making a specific assumption on the time evolution of the density (but with some degree of freedom for the momentum density). In general, deformation methods do not arise from a variational principle. However, it is possible to prescribe an optimal deformation method, related to L{sub 1} Monge-Kantorovich optimization, by making a further assumption on the momentum density. Some applications of the L{sub p} fluid dynamic formulation to imaging are also explored.

  9. Adaptive Generation of Multimaterial Grids from imaging data for Biomedical Lagrangian Fluid-Structure Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Dyedov, Volodymyr; del Pin, Facundo; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial discretization of complex imaging-derived fluid-solid geometries, such as the cardiac environment, is a critical but often overlooked challenge in biomechanical computations. This is particularly true in problems with Lagrangian interfaces, where, the fluid and solid phases must match geometrically. For simplicity and better accuracy, it is also highly desirable for the two phases to share the same surface mesh at the interface between them. We outline a method for solving this problem, and illustrate the approach with a 3D fluid-solid mesh of the mouse heart. An MRI perfusion-fixed dataset of a mouse heart with 50μm isotropic resolution was semi-automatically segmented using a customized multimaterial connected-threshold approach that divided the volume into non-overlapping regions of blood, tissue and background. Subsequently, a multimaterial marching cubes algorithm was applied to the segmented data to produce two detailed, compatible isosurfaces, one for blood and one for tissue. Both isosurfaces were simultaneously smoothed with a multimaterial smoothing algorithm that exactly conserves the volume for each phase. Using these two isosurfaces, we developed and applied novel automated meshing algorithms to generate anisotropic hybrid meshes on arbitrary biological geometries with the number of layers and the desired element anisotropy for each phase as the only input parameters. Since our meshes adapt to the local feature sizes and include boundary layer prisms, they are more efficient and accurate than non-adaptive, isotropic meshes, and the fluid-structure interaction computations will tend to have relative error equilibrated over the whole mesh.

  10. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  11. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  12. Two general methods for population pharmacokinetic modeling: non-parametric adaptive grid and non-parametric Bayesian

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael; Bartroff, Jay; van Guilder, Michael; Yamada, Walter; Bayard, David; Jelliffe, Roger; Leary, Robert; Chubatiuk, Alyona; Schumitzky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling methods can be statistically classified as either parametric or nonparametric (NP). Each classification can be divided into maximum likelihood (ML) or Bayesian (B) approazches. In this paper we discuss the nonparametric case using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches. We present two nonparametric methods for estimating the unknown joint population distribution of model parameter values in a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) dataset. The first method is the NP Adaptive Grid (NPAG). The second is the NP Bayesian (NPB) algorithm with a stick-breaking process to construct a Dirichlet prior. Our objective is to compare the performance of these two methods using a simulated PK/PD dataset. Our results showed excellent performance of NPAG and NPB in a realistically simulated PK study. This simulation allowed us to have benchmarks in the form of the true population parameters to compare with the estimates produced by the two methods, while incorporating challenges like unbalanced sample times and sample numbers as well as the ability to include the covariate of patient weight. We conclude that both NPML and NPB can be used in realistic PK/PD population analysis problems. The advantages of one versus the other are discussed in the paper. NPAG and NPB are implemented in R and freely available for download within the Pmetrics package from www.lapk.org. PMID:23404393

  13. Neutrino Oscillations:. Hierarchy Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. J.; Cogswell, B. K.; Burroughs, H. R.; Escamilla-Roa, J.; Latimer, D. L.

    2014-09-01

    The only experimentally observed phenomenon that lies outside the standard model of the electroweak interaction is neutrino oscillations. A way to try to unify the extensive neutrino oscillation data is to add a phenomenological mass term to the Lagrangian that is not diagonal in the flavor basis. The goal is then to understand the world's data in terms of the parameters of the mixing matrix and the differences between the squares of the masses of the neutrinos. An outstanding question is what is the correct ordering of the masses, the hierarchy question. We point out a broken symmetry relevant to this question, the symmetry of the simultaneous interchange of hierarchy and the sign of θ13. We first present the results of an analysis of data that well determine the phenomenological parameters but are not sensitive to the hierarchy. We find θ13 = 0.152±0.014, θ 23 = 0.25{ - 0.05}{ + 0.03} π and Δ32 = 2.45±0.14×10-3 eV2, results consistent with others. We then include data that are sensitive to the hierarchy and the sign of θ13. We find, unlike others, four isolated minimum in the χ2-space as predicted by the symmetry. Now that Daya Bay and RENO have determined θ13 to be surprisingly large, the Super-K atmospheric data produce meaningful symmetry breaking such that the inverse hierarchy is preferred at the 97.2 % level.

  14. A new algorithm for high-dimensional uncertainty quantification based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2015-10-01

    In this work we develop an adaptive and reduced computational algorithm based on dimension-adaptive sparse grid approximation and reduced basis methods for solving high-dimensional uncertainty quantification (UQ) problems. In order to tackle the computational challenge of "curse of dimensionality" commonly faced by these problems, we employ a dimension-adaptive tensor-product algorithm [16] and propose a verified version to enable effective removal of the stagnation phenomenon besides automatically detecting the importance and interaction of different dimensions. To reduce the heavy computational cost of UQ problems modelled by partial differential equations (PDE), we adopt a weighted reduced basis method [7] and develop an adaptive greedy algorithm in combination with the previous verified algorithm for efficient construction of an accurate reduced basis approximation. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  15. Smoothed aggregation adaptive spectral element-based algebraic multigrid

    2015-01-20

    SAAMGE provides parallel methods for building multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for elliptic equations with highly heterogeneous coefficients. Additionally, hierarchy adaptation is implemented allowing solving multiple problems with close coefficients without rebuilding the hierarchy.

  16. Hierarchy from baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2006-02-15

    We study a recently proposed mechanism to solve the hierarchy problem in the context of the landscape, where the solution of the hierarchy problem is connected to the requirement of having baryons in our Universe via electroweak baryogenesis. The phase transition is triggered by the fermion condensation of a new gauge sector which becomes strong at a scale {lambda} determined by dimensional transmutation, and it is mediated to the standard model by a new singlet field. In a 'friendly' neighborhood of the landscape, where only the relevant operators are ''scanned'' among the vacua, baryogenesis is effective only if the Higgs mass m{sub h} is comparable to this low scale {lambda}, forcing m{sub h}{approx}{lambda}, and solving the hierarchy problem. A new CP violating phase is needed coupling the new singlet and the Higgs field to new matter fields. We study the constraints on this model given by baryogenesis and by the electron electric dipole moment (EDM), and we briefly comment on gauge coupling unification and on dark matter relic abundance. We find that next generation experiments on the EDM will be sensitive to essentially the entire viable region of the parameter space, so that absence of a signal would effectively rule out the model.

  17. TranAir: A full-potential, solution-adaptive, rectangular grid code for predicting subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows about arbitrary configurations. Theory document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Samant, S. S.; Bieterman, M. B.; Melvin, R. G.; Young, D. P.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Hilmes, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new computer program, called TranAir, for analyzing complex configurations in transonic flow (with subsonic or supersonic freestream) was developed. This program provides accurate and efficient simulations of nonlinear aerodynamic flows about arbitrary geometries with the ease and flexibility of a typical panel method program. The numerical method implemented in TranAir is described. The method solves the full potential equation subject to a set of general boundary conditions and can handle regions with differing total pressure and temperature. The boundary value problem is discretized using the finite element method on a locally refined rectangular grid. The grid is automatically constructed by the code and is superimposed on the boundary described by networks of panels; thus no surface fitted grid generation is required. The nonlinear discrete system arising from the finite element method is solved using a preconditioned Krylov subspace method embedded in an inexact Newton method. The solution is obtained on a sequence of successively refined grids which are either constructed adaptively based on estimated solution errors or are predetermined based on user inputs. Many results obtained by using TranAir to analyze aerodynamic configurations are presented.

  18. Finite-difference modeling with variable grid-size and adaptive time-step in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinxin; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2014-04-01

    Forward modeling of elastic wave propagation in porous media has great importance for understanding and interpreting the influences of rock properties on characteristics of seismic wavefield. However, the finite-difference forward-modeling method is usually implemented with global spatial grid-size and time-step; it consumes large amounts of computational cost when small-scaled oil/gas-bearing structures or large velocity-contrast exist underground. To overcome this handicap, combined with variable grid-size and time-step, this paper developed a staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for elastic wave modeling in porous media. Variable finite-difference coefficients and wavefield interpolation were used to realize the transition of wave propagation between regions of different grid-size. The accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm were shown by numerical examples. The proposed method is advanced with low computational cost in elastic wave simulation for heterogeneous oil/gas reservoirs.

  19. Using specific and adaptive arrangement of grid-type pilot in channel estimation for white-lightLED-based OFDM visible light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wan-Feng; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2015-03-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is a promising candidate for light emitting diode (LED)-based optical wireless communication (OWC); however, precise channel estimation is required for synchronization and equalization. In this work, we study and discover that the channel response of the white-lightLED-based OWC was smooth and stable. Hence we propose and demonstrate using a specific and adaptive arrangement of grid-type pilot scheme to estimate the LED OWC channel response. Experimental results show that our scheme can achieve better transmission performance and with some transmission capacity enhancement when compared with the method using training-symbol scheme (also called block-type pilot scheme).

  20. PARAMESH V4.1: Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Olson, Kevin M.; Mobarry, Clark; de Fainchtein, Rosalinda; Packer, Charles

    2011-06-01

    PARAMESH is a package of Fortran 90 subroutines designed to provide an application developer with an easy route to extend an existing serial code which uses a logically cartesian structured mesh into a parallel code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Alternatively, in its simplest use, and with minimal effort, it can operate as a domain decomposition tool for users who want to parallelize their serial codes, but who do not wish to use adaptivity. The package builds a hierarchy of sub-grids to cover the computational domain, with spatial resolution varying to satisfy the demands of the application. These sub-grid blocks form the nodes of a tree data-structure (quad-tree in 2D or oct-tree in 3D). Each grid block has a logically cartesian mesh. The package supports 1, 2 and 3D models. PARAMESH is released under the NASA-wide Open-Source software license.

  1. The tensor hierarchy algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmkvist, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra which is an extension of the U-duality Lie algebra of maximal supergravity in D dimensions, for 3 ⩽ D ⩽ 7. The level decomposition with respect to the U-duality Lie algebra gives exactly the tensor hierarchy of representations that arises in gauge deformations of the theory described by an embedding tensor, for all positive levels p. We prove that these representations are always contained in those coming from the associated Borcherds-Kac-Moody superalgebra, and we explain why some of the latter representations are not included in the tensor hierarchy. The most remarkable feature of our Lie superalgebra is that it does not admit a triangular decomposition like a (Borcherds-)Kac-Moody (super)algebra. Instead the Hodge duality relations between level p and D - 2 - p extend to negative p, relating the representations at the first two negative levels to the supersymmetry and closure constraints of the embedding tensor.

  2. The tensor hierarchy algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Palmkvist, Jakob

    2014-01-15

    We introduce an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra which is an extension of the U-duality Lie algebra of maximal supergravity in D dimensions, for 3 ⩽ D ⩽ 7. The level decomposition with respect to the U-duality Lie algebra gives exactly the tensor hierarchy of representations that arises in gauge deformations of the theory described by an embedding tensor, for all positive levels p. We prove that these representations are always contained in those coming from the associated Borcherds-Kac-Moody superalgebra, and we explain why some of the latter representations are not included in the tensor hierarchy. The most remarkable feature of our Lie superalgebra is that it does not admit a triangular decomposition like a (Borcherds-)Kac-Moody (super)algebra. Instead the Hodge duality relations between level p and D − 2 − p extend to negative p, relating the representations at the first two negative levels to the supersymmetry and closure constraints of the embedding tensor.

  3. Models of random graph hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, Robert; Suchecki, Krzysztof; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce two models of inclusion hierarchies: random graph hierarchy (RGH) and limited random graph hierarchy (LRGH). In both models a set of nodes at a given hierarchy level is connected randomly, as in the Erdős-Rényi random graph, with a fixed average degree equal to a system parameter c. Clusters of the resulting network are treated as nodes at the next hierarchy level and they are connected again at this level and so on, until the process cannot continue. In the RGH model we use all clusters, including those of size 1, when building the next hierarchy level, while in the LRGH model clusters of size 1 stop participating in further steps. We find that in both models the number of nodes at a given hierarchy level h decreases approximately exponentially with h. The height of the hierarchy H, i.e. the number of all hierarchy levels, increases logarithmically with the system size N, i.e. with the number of nodes at the first level. The height H decreases monotonically with the connectivity parameter c in the RGH model and it reaches a maximum for a certain c max in the LRGH model. The distribution of separate cluster sizes in the LRGH model is a power law with an exponent about - 1.25. The above results follow from approximate analytical calculations and have been confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. Coupling a local adaptive grid refinement technique with an interface sharpening scheme for the simulation of two-phase flow and free-surface flows using VOF methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgarinos, Ilias; Nikolopoulos, Nikolaos; Gavaises, Manolis

    2015-11-01

    This study presents the implementation of an interface sharpening scheme on the basis of the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, as well as its application in a number of theoretical and real cases usually modelled in literature. More specifically, the solution of an additional sharpening equation along with the standard VOF model equations is proposed, offering the advantage of "restraining" interface numerical diffusion, while also keeping a quite smooth induced velocity field around the interface. This sharpening equation is solved right after volume fraction advection; however a novel method for its coupling with the momentum equation has been applied in order to save computational time. The advantages of the proposed sharpening scheme lie on the facts that a) it is mass conservative thus its application does not have a negative impact on one of the most important benefits of VOF method and b) it can be used in coarser grids as now the suppression of the numerical diffusion is grid independent. The coupling of the solved equation with an adaptive local grid refinement technique is used for further decrease of computational time, while keeping high levels of accuracy at the area of maximum interest (interface). The numerical algorithm is initially tested against two theoretical benchmark cases for interface tracking methodologies followed by its validation for the case of a free-falling water droplet accelerated by gravity, as well as the normal liquid droplet impingement onto a flat substrate. Results indicate that the coupling of the interface sharpening equation with the HRIC discretization scheme used for volume fraction flux term, not only decreases the interface numerical diffusion, but also allows the induced velocity field to be less perturbed owed to spurious velocities across the liquid-gas interface. With the use of the proposed algorithmic flow path, coarser grids can replace finer ones at the slight expense of accuracy.

  5. Hybrid Grid Generation Using NW Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Oliveira, Janet B.; Oliveira, Joseph S.; Trease, Lynn L.; Trease, Harold E.; B.K. Soni, J. Hauser, J.F. Thompson, P.R. Eiseman

    2000-09-01

    We describe the development and use of a hybrid n-dimensional grid generation system called NWGRID. The Applied Mathematics Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing this tool to support the Laboratory's computational science efforts in chemistry, biology, engineering and environmental (subsurface and atmospheric) modeling. NWGRID is the grid generation system, which is designed for multi-scale, multi-material, multi-physics, time-dependent, 3-D, hybrid grids that are either statically adapted or evolved in time. NWGRID'S capabilities include static and dynamic grids, hybrid grids, managing colliding surfaces, and grid optimization[using reconnections, smoothing, and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithms]. NWGRID'S data structure can manage an arbitrary number of grid objects, each with an arbitrary number of grid attributes. NWGRID uses surface geometry to build volumes by using combinations of Boolean operators and order relations. Point distributions can be input, generated using either ray shooting techniques or defined point-by-point. Connectivity matrices are then generated automatically for all variations of hybrid grids.

  6. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  7. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frame, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs and characterization of the self-actualizing personality, suggesting that since few people meet his self-actualization criteria, an educational system designed to produce such personalities may fail, with teachers attending only to the hierarchy's lower stages (self-esteem and self-actualization) which dilutes…

  8. A consistent approach to large eddy simulation using adaptive mesh refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A.W.

    1999-09-01

    The large eddy simulation of turbulent flows is discussed with particular attention paid to the issue of commutation of differentiation and filtering. Multi-level adaptive mesh refinement is proposed as a means of mostly avoiding commutation errors where increased grid resolution is required to capture key flow features. The strategy is to employ multiple uniform grids in a nested hierarchy using a constant-width filter for each grid. It is shown that commutivity of fine and coarse grid filters must be enforced in order to consistently relate variables at different refinement levels. Methods for treating fine grid boundaries and walls are also discussed. It is shown that errors associated with boundary treatments are small and localized.

  9. Application of Parallel Adjoint-Based Error Estimation and Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Three-Dimensional Aerospace Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Park, M. A.; Jones, W. T.; Hammond, D. P.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the extension of error estimation and adaptation methods to parallel computations enabling larger, more realistic aerospace applications and the quantification of discretization errors for complex 3-D solutions. Results were shown for an inviscid sonic-boom prediction about a double-cone configuration and a wing/body segmented leading edge (SLE) configuration where the output function of the adjoint was pressure integrated over a part of the cylinder in the near field. After multiple cycles of error estimation and surface/field adaptation, a significant improvement in the inviscid solution for the sonic boom signature of the double cone was observed. Although the double-cone adaptation was initiated from a very coarse mesh, the near-field pressure signature from the final adapted mesh compared very well with the wind-tunnel data which illustrates that the adjoint-based error estimation and adaptation process requires no a priori refinement of the mesh. Similarly, the near-field pressure signature for the SLE wing/body sonic boom configuration showed a significant improvement from the initial coarse mesh to the final adapted mesh in comparison with the wind tunnel results. Error estimation and field adaptation results were also presented for the viscous transonic drag prediction of the DLR-F6 wing/body configuration, and results were compared to a series of globally refined meshes. Two of these globally refined meshes were used as a starting point for the error estimation and field-adaptation process where the output function for the adjoint was the total drag. The field-adapted results showed an improvement in the prediction of the drag in comparison with the finest globally refined mesh and a reduction in the estimate of the remaining drag error. The adjoint-based adaptation parameter showed a need for increased resolution in the surface of the wing/body as well as a need for wake resolution downstream of the fuselage and wing trailing edge

  10. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  11. Anarchy and hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2000-09-14

    We advocate a new approach to study models of fermion massesand mixings, namely anarchy proposed in hep-ph/9911341. In this approach,we scan the O(1) coefficients randomly. We argue that this is the correctapproach when the fundamental theory is sufficiently complicated.Assuming there is no physical distinction among three generations ofneutrinos, the probability distributions in MNS mixing angles can bepredicted independent of the choice of the measure. This is because themixing angles are distributed according to the Haar measure of the Liegroups whose elements diagonalize the mass matrices. The near-maximalmixings, as observed in the atmospheric neutrino data and as required inthe LMA solution to the solar neutrino problem, are highly probable. Asmall hierarchy between the Delta m2 for the atmospheric and the solarneutrinos is obtained very easily; the complex seesaw case gives ahierarchy of a factor of 20 as the most probable one, even though thisconclusion is more measure-dependent. U_e3 has to be just below thecurrent limit from the CHOOZ experiment. The CP-violating parameter sindelta is preferred to be maximal. We present a simple SU(5)-likeextension of anarchy to the charged-lepton and quark sectors which workswell phenomenologically.

  12. Dynamical hierarchies - A summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S.; Barrett, C.L. |; Olesen, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    This paper summarizes some of the problems associated with the generation of higher order emergent structures in formal dynamical systems. In biological systems, higher order hyperstructures occur both in an intuitive and a formal sense: monomers, polymers, membranes, organelles, cells, tissues, organs, etc. constitute an observable hierarchy, apparently generated by the underlying biomolecular process. However, in models and simulations of these systems, it has turned out to be quite difficult to produce higher order emergent structures from first principles. The first problem is to agree on what a higher order structure is. An emergent structure can be defined through an introduction of an observational function. If a property can be observed in the dynamics, but not at the level of the fundamental first order interacting structures, we define it to be emergent. It is well known that second order structures occur relatively easy in simulation, so the problem is how to proceed to third and higher order without external interference. A third order structure is defined through the interaction of second order structures forming a new observable not found at the lower levels.

  13. Prediction and Control of Network Cascade: Example of Power Grid or Networking Adaptability from WMD Disruption and Cascading Failures

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael

    2012-07-24

    The goal of the DTRA project is to develop a mathematical framework that will provide the fundamental understanding of network survivability, algorithms for detecting/inferring pre-cursors of abnormal network behaviors, and methods for network adaptability and self-healing from cascading failures.

  14. A Load Frequency Control in an Off-Grid Sustainable Power System Based on a Parameter Adaptive PID-Type Fuzzy Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronilaya, Ferdian; Miyauchi, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new implementation of a parameter adaptive PID-type fuzzy controller (PAPIDfc) for a grid-supporting inverter of battery to alleviate frequency fluctuations in a wind-diesel power system. A variable speed wind turbine that drives a permanent magnet synchronous generator is assumed for demonstrations. The PAPIDfc controller is built from a set of control rules that adopts the droop method and uses only locally measurable frequency signal. The output control signal is determined from the knowledge base and the fuzzy inference. The input-derivative gain and the output-integral gain of the PAPIDfc are tuned online. To ensure safe battery operating limits, we also propose a protection scheme called intelligent battery protection (IBP). Several simulation experiments are performed by using MATLAB®/SimPowersystems™. Next, to verify the scheme's effectiveness, the simulation results are compared with the results of conventional controllers. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the PAPIDfc scheme to control a grid-supporting inverter of the battery in the reduction of frequency fluctuations.

  15. Spiking neurons in a hierarchical self-organizing map model can learn to develop spatial and temporal properties of entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells.

    PubMed

    Pilly, Praveen K; Grossberg, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Medial entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells provide neural correlates of spatial representation in the brain. A place cell typically fires whenever an animal is present in one or more spatial regions, or places, of an environment. A grid cell typically fires in multiple spatial regions that form a regular hexagonal grid structure extending throughout the environment. Different grid and place cells prefer spatially offset regions, with their firing fields increasing in size along the dorsoventral axes of the medial entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. The spacing between neighboring fields for a grid cell also increases along the dorsoventral axis. This article presents a neural model whose spiking neurons operate in a hierarchy of self-organizing maps, each obeying the same laws. This spiking GridPlaceMap model simulates how grid cells and place cells may develop. It responds to realistic rat navigational trajectories by learning grid cells with hexagonal grid firing fields of multiple spatial scales and place cells with one or more firing fields that match neurophysiological data about these cells and their development in juvenile rats. The place cells represent much larger spaces than the grid cells, which enable them to support navigational behaviors. Both self-organizing maps amplify and learn to categorize the most frequent and energetic co-occurrences of their inputs. The current results build upon a previous rate-based model of grid and place cell learning, and thus illustrate a general method for converting rate-based adaptive neural models, without the loss of any of their analog properties, into models whose cells obey spiking dynamics. New properties of the spiking GridPlaceMap model include the appearance of theta band modulation. The spiking model also opens a path for implementation in brain-emulating nanochips comprised of networks of noisy spiking neurons with multiple-level adaptive weights for controlling autonomous adaptive robots

  16. Spiking Neurons in a Hierarchical Self-Organizing Map Model Can Learn to Develop Spatial and Temporal Properties of Entorhinal Grid Cells and Hippocampal Place Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pilly, Praveen K.; Grossberg, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Medial entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells provide neural correlates of spatial representation in the brain. A place cell typically fires whenever an animal is present in one or more spatial regions, or places, of an environment. A grid cell typically fires in multiple spatial regions that form a regular hexagonal grid structure extending throughout the environment. Different grid and place cells prefer spatially offset regions, with their firing fields increasing in size along the dorsoventral axes of the medial entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. The spacing between neighboring fields for a grid cell also increases along the dorsoventral axis. This article presents a neural model whose spiking neurons operate in a hierarchy of self-organizing maps, each obeying the same laws. This spiking GridPlaceMap model simulates how grid cells and place cells may develop. It responds to realistic rat navigational trajectories by learning grid cells with hexagonal grid firing fields of multiple spatial scales and place cells with one or more firing fields that match neurophysiological data about these cells and their development in juvenile rats. The place cells represent much larger spaces than the grid cells, which enable them to support navigational behaviors. Both self-organizing maps amplify and learn to categorize the most frequent and energetic co-occurrences of their inputs. The current results build upon a previous rate-based model of grid and place cell learning, and thus illustrate a general method for converting rate-based adaptive neural models, without the loss of any of their analog properties, into models whose cells obey spiking dynamics. New properties of the spiking GridPlaceMap model include the appearance of theta band modulation. The spiking model also opens a path for implementation in brain-emulating nanochips comprised of networks of noisy spiking neurons with multiple-level adaptive weights for controlling autonomous adaptive robots

  17. Information slows down hierarchy growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Suchecki, Krzysztof; Miñano, Borja; Trias, Miquel; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2014-06-01

    We consider models of growing multilevel systems wherein the growth process is driven by rules of tournament selection. A system can be conceived as an evolving tree with a new node being attached to a contestant node at the best hierarchy level (a level nearest to the tree root). The proposed evolution reflects limited information on system properties available to new nodes. It can also be expressed in terms of population dynamics. Two models are considered: a constant tournament (CT) model wherein the number of tournament participants is constant throughout system evolution, and a proportional tournament (PT) model where this number increases proportionally to the growing size of the system itself. The results of analytical calculations based on a rate equation fit well to numerical simulations for both models. In the CT model all hierarchy levels emerge, but the birth time of a consecutive hierarchy level increases exponentially or faster for each new level. The number of nodes at the first hierarchy level grows logarithmically in time, while the size of the last, "worst" hierarchy level oscillates quasi-log-periodically. In the PT model, the occupations of the first two hierarchy levels increase linearly, but worse hierarchy levels either do not emerge at all or appear only by chance in the early stage of system evolution to further stop growing at all. The results allow us to conclude that information available to each new node in tournament dynamics restrains the emergence of new hierarchy levels and that it is the absolute amount of information, not relative, which governs such behavior.

  18. Discontinuous finite element solution of the radiation diffusion equation on arbitrary polygonal meshes and locally adapted quadrilateral grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a piece-wise linear discontinuous (PWLD) finite element discretization of the diffusion equation for arbitrary polygonal meshes. It is based on the standard diffusion form and uses the symmetric interior penalty technique, which yields a symmetric positive definite linear system matrix. A preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm is employed to solve the linear system. Piece-wise linear approximations also allow a straightforward implementation of local mesh adaptation by allowing unrefined cells to be interpreted as polygons with an increased number of vertices. Several test cases, taken from the literature on the discretization of the radiation diffusion equation, are presented: random, sinusoidal, Shestakov, and Z meshes are used. The last numerical example demonstrates the application of the PWLD discretization to adaptive mesh refinement.

  19. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  20. Complex Volume Grid Generation Through the Use of Grid Reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a set of surface and volume grid generation techniques which reuse existing surface and volume grids. These methods use combinations of data manipulations to reduce grid generation time, improve grid characteristics, and increase the capabilities of existing domain discretization software. The manipulation techniques utilize physical and computational domains to produce basis function on which to operate and modify grid character and smooth grids using Trans-Finite Interpolation, a vector interpolation method and parametric re-mapping technique. With these new techniques, inviscid grids can be converted to viscous grids, multiple zone grid adaption can be performed to improve CFD solver efficiency, and topological changes to improve modeling of flow fields can be done simply and quickly. Examples of these capabilities are illustrated as applied to various configurations.

  1. An Approach for Dynamic Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Liou, Meng-Sing; Hindman, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    An approach is presented for the generation of two-dimensional, structured, dynamic grids. The grid motion may be due to the motion of the boundaries of the computational domain or to the adaptation of the grid to the transient, physical solution. A time-dependent grid is computed through the time integration of the grid speeds which are computed from a system of grid speed equations. The grid speed equations are derived from the time-differentiation of the grid equations so as to ensure that the dynamic grid maintains the desired qualities of the static grid. The grid equations are the Euler-Lagrange equations derived from a variational statement for the grid. The dynamic grid method is demonstrated for a model problem involving boundary motion, an inviscid flow in a converging-diverging nozzle during startup, and a viscous flow over a flat plate with an impinging shock wave. It is shown that the approach is more accurate for transient flows than an approach in which the grid speeds are computed using a finite difference with respect to time of the grid. However, the approach requires significantly more computational effort.

  2. Growth and evolution of small porous icy bodies with an adaptive-grid thermal evolution code. I. Application to Kuiper belt objects and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prialnik, Dina; Merk, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    We present a new 1-dimensional thermal evolution code suited for small icy bodies of the Solar System, based on modern adaptive grid numerical techniques, and suited for multiphase flow through a porous medium. The code is used for evolutionary calculations spanning 4.6×10 yr of a growing body made of ice and rock, starting with a 10 km radius seed and ending with an object 250 km in radius. Initial conditions are chosen to match two different classes of objects: a Kuiper belt object, and Saturn's moon Enceladus. Heating by the decay of 26Al, as well as long-lived radionuclides is taken into account. Several values of the thermal conductivity and accretion laws are tested. We find that in all cases the melting point of ice is reached in a central core. Evaporation and flow of water and vapor gradually remove the water from the core and the final (present) structure is differentiated, with a rocky, highly porous core of 80 km radius (and up to 160 km for very low conductivities). Outside the core, due to refreezing of water and vapor, a compact, ice-rich layer forms, a few tens of km thick (except in the case of very high conductivity). If the ice is initially amorphous, as expected in the Kuiper belt, the amorphous ice is preserved in an outer layer about 20 km thick. We conclude by suggesting various ways in which the code may be extended.

  3. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  4. Chaotic Hierarchy in High Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, D. E.; Balanov, A. G.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.; Mosekilde, E.

    The paper suggests a new mechanism for the development of higher-order chaos in accordance with the concept of a chaotic hierarchy. A discrete-time model is proposed which demonstrates how the creation of coexisting chaotic attractors combined with boundary crises can produce a continued growth of the Lyapunov dimension of the resulting chaotic behavior.

  5. Dominance Hierarchies in Leptothorax Ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Blaine J.

    1981-04-01

    The social organization of Leptothorax allardycei is unique among ant species thus far studied. The workers form linear dominance hierarchies characterized by routine displays of dominance, avoidance behavior, and even fighting. The high-ranking ants are favored in liquid food exchange, have greater ovarian development, and produce 20 percent of the eggs.

  6. Hierarchy in directed random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mones, Enys

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, the theory and application of complex networks have been quickly developing in a markable way due to the increasing amount of data from real systems and the fruitful application of powerful methods used in statistical physics. Many important characteristics of social or biological systems can be described by the study of their underlying structure of interactions. Hierarchy is one of these features that can be formulated in the language of networks. In this paper we present some (qualitative) analytic results on the hierarchical properties of random network models with zero correlations and also investigate, mainly numerically, the effects of different types of correlations. The behavior of the hierarchy is different in the absence and the presence of giant components. We show that the hierarchical structure can be drastically different if there are one-point correlations in the network. We also show numerical results suggesting that the hierarchy does not change monotonically with the correlations and there is an optimal level of nonzero correlations maximizing the level of hierarchy.

  7. An Assessment of Hierarchy Validation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capie, William; Jones, Howard L.

    1971-01-01

    Describes an empirical method of developing learning hierarchies by comparing success on each tested behavior with all other behaviors. Advantages, compared with validation of a particular logical hierarchy, are illustrated by application of density principles to prediction of flotation. (AL)

  8. An adaptive multiblock high-order finite-volume method for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Ullrich, Paul; Johansen, Hans; Colella, Phillip

    2015-09-04

    We present a high-order finite-volume approach for solving the shallow-water equations on the sphere, using multiblock grids on the cubed-sphere. This approach combines a Runge--Kutta time discretization with a fourth-order accurate spatial discretization, and includes adaptive mesh refinement and refinement in time. Results of tests show fourth-order convergence for the shallow-water equations as well as for advection in a highly deformational flow. Hierarchical adaptive mesh refinement allows solution error to be achieved that is comparable to that obtained with uniform resolution of the most refined level of the hierarchy, but with many fewer operations.

  9. Application of multi-objective controller to optimal tuning of PID gains for a hydraulic turbine regulating system using adaptive grid particle swam optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihuan; Yuan, Yanbin; Yuan, Xiaohui; Huang, Yuehua; Li, Xianshan; Li, Wenwu

    2015-05-01

    A hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) is one of the most important components of hydropower plant, which plays a key role in maintaining safety, stability and economical operation of hydro-electrical installations. At present, the conventional PID controller is widely applied in the HTRS system for its practicability and robustness, and the primary problem with respect to this control law is how to optimally tune the parameters, i.e. the determination of PID controller gains for satisfactory performance. In this paper, a kind of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, named adaptive grid particle swarm optimization (AGPSO) is applied to solve the PID gains tuning problem of the HTRS system. This newly AGPSO optimized method, which differs from a traditional one-single objective optimization method, is designed to take care of settling time and overshoot level simultaneously, in which a set of non-inferior alternatives solutions (i.e. Pareto solution) is generated. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based membership value assignment method is employed to choose the best compromise solution from the obtained Pareto set. An illustrative example associated with the best compromise solution for parameter tuning of the nonlinear HTRS system is introduced to verify the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed AGPSO-based optimization approach, as compared with two another prominent multi-objective algorithms, i.e. Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII) and Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II (SPEAII), for the quality and diversity of obtained Pareto solutions set. Consequently, simulation results show that this AGPSO optimized approach outperforms than compared methods with higher efficiency and better quality no matter whether the HTRS system works under unload or load conditions. PMID:25481821

  10. Hierarchy Measure for Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Lilla; Vicsek, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Nature, technology and society are full of complexity arising from the intricate web of the interactions among the units of the related systems (e.g., proteins, computers, people). Consequently, one of the most successful recent approaches to capturing the fundamental features of the structure and dynamics of complex systems has been the investigation of the networks associated with the above units (nodes) together with their relations (edges). Most complex systems have an inherently hierarchical organization and, correspondingly, the networks behind them also exhibit hierarchical features. Indeed, several papers have been devoted to describing this essential aspect of networks, however, without resulting in a widely accepted, converging concept concerning the quantitative characterization of the level of their hierarchy. Here we develop an approach and propose a quantity (measure) which is simple enough to be widely applicable, reveals a number of universal features of the organization of real-world networks and, as we demonstrate, is capable of capturing the essential features of the structure and the degree of hierarchy in a complex network. The measure we introduce is based on a generalization of the m-reach centrality, which we first extend to directed/partially directed graphs. Then, we define the global reaching centrality (GRC), which is the difference between the maximum and the average value of the generalized reach centralities over the network. We investigate the behavior of the GRC considering both a synthetic model with an adjustable level of hierarchy and real networks. Results for real networks show that our hierarchy measure is related to the controllability of the given system. We also propose a visualization procedure for large complex networks that can be used to obtain an overall qualitative picture about the nature of their hierarchical structure. PMID:22470477

  11. Grid generation research at OSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1992-01-01

    In the last two years, effort was concentrated on: (1) surface modeling; (2) surface grid generation; and (3) 3-D flow space grid generation. The surface modeling shares the same objectives as the surface modeling in computer aided design (CAD), so software available in CAD can in principle be used for solid modeling. Unfortunately, however, the CAD software cannot be easily used in practice for grid generation purposes, because they are not designed to provide appropriate data base for grid generation. Therefore, we started developing a generalized surface modeling software from scratch, that provides the data base for the surface grid generation. Generating surface grid is an important step in generating a 3-D space for flow space. To generate a surface grid on a given surface representation, we developed a unique algorithm that works on any non-smooth surfaces. Once the surface grid is generated, a 3-D space can be generated. For this purpose, we also developed a new algorithm, which is a hybrid of the hyperbolic and the elliptic grid generation methods. With this hybrid method, orthogonality of the grid near the solid boundary can be easily achieved without introducing empirical fudge factors. Work to develop 2-D and 3-D grids for turbomachinery blade geometries was performed, and as an extension of this research we are planning to develop an adaptive grid procedure with an interactive grid environment.

  12. Solving the wrong hierarchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Nikita; Hook, Anson

    2016-06-01

    Many theories require augmenting the Standard Model with additional scalar fields with large order one couplings. We present a new solution to the hierarchy problem for these scalar fields. We explore parity- and Z_2 -symmetric theories where the Standard Model Higgs potential has two vacua. The parity or Z_2 copy of the Higgs lives in the minimum far from the origin while our Higgs occupies the minimum near the origin of the potential. This approach results in a theory with multiple light scalar fields but with only a single hierarchy problem, since the bare mass is tied to the Higgs mass by a discrete symmetry. The new scalar does not have a new hierarchy problem associated with it because its expectation value and mass are generated by dimensional transmutation of the scalar quartic coupling. The location of the second Higgs minimum is not a free parameter, but is rather a function of the matter content of the theory. As a result, these theories are extremely predictive. We develop this idea in the context of a solution to the strong CP problem. We show this mechanism postdicts the top Yukawa to be within 1 σ of the currently measured value and predicts scalar color octets with masses in the range 9-200 TeV.

  13. Solving the wrong hierarchy problem

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blinov, Nikita; Hook, Anson

    2016-06-29

    Many theories require augmenting the Standard Model with additional scalar fields with large order one couplings. We present a new solution to the hierarchy problem for these scalar fields. We explore parity- and Z2-symmetric theories where the Standard Model Higgs potential has two vacua. The parity or Z2 copy of the Higgs lives in the minimum far from the origin while our Higgs occupies the minimum near the origin of the potential. This approach results in a theory with multiple light scalar fields but with only a single hierarchy problem, since the bare mass is tied to the Higgs massmore » by a discrete symmetry. The new scalar does not have a new hierarchy problem associated with it because its expectation value and mass are generated by dimensional transmutation of the scalar quartic coupling. The location of the second Higgs minimum is not a free parameter, but is rather a function of the matter content of the theory. As a result, these theories are extremely predictive. We develop this idea in the context of a solution to the strong CP problem. Lastly, we show this mechanism postdicts the top Yukawa to be within 1σ of the currently measured value and predicts scalar color octets with masses in the range 9-200 TeV.« less

  14. Patch-based Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Multimaterial Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Pember, R; Greenough, J; Liu, B

    2005-10-18

    We present a patch-based direct Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for modeling real equation-of-state, multimaterial compressible flow with strength. Our approach to AMR uses a hierarchical, structured grid approach first developed by (Berger and Oliger 1984), (Berger and Oliger 1984). The grid structure is dynamic in time and is composed of nested uniform rectangular grids of varying resolution. The integration scheme on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which the coarse grids are advanced, then the fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time, and finally the coarse and fine grids are synchronized to remove conservation errors during the separate advances. The methodology presented here is based on a single grid algorithm developed for multimaterial gas dynamics by (Colella et al. 1993), refined by(Greenough et al. 1995), and extended to the solution of solid mechanics problems with significant strength by (Lomov and Rubin 2003). The single grid algorithm uses a second-order Godunov scheme with an approximate single fluid Riemann solver and a volume-of-fluid treatment of material interfaces. The method also uses a non-conservative treatment of the deformation tensor and an acoustic approximation for shear waves in the Riemann solver. This departure from a strict application of the higher-order Godunov methodology to the equation of solid mechanics is justified due to the fact that highly nonlinear behavior of shear stresses is rare. This algorithm is implemented in two codes, Geodyn and Raptor, the latter of which is a coupled rad-hydro code. The present discussion will be solely concerned with hydrodynamics modeling. Results from a number of simulations for flows with and without strength will be presented.

  15. Grid Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pointwise Inc.'s, Gridgen Software is a system for the generation of 3D (three dimensional) multiple block, structured grids. Gridgen is a visually-oriented, graphics-based interactive code used to decompose a 3D domain into blocks, distribute grid points on curves, initialize and refine grid points on surfaces and initialize volume grid points. Gridgen is available to U.S. citizens and American-owned companies by license.

  16. On matrix Painlevé hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordoa, P. R.; Pickering, A.; Zhu, Z. N.

    2016-07-01

    We define a matrix first Painlevé hierarchy and a matrix second Painlevé (PII) hierarchy. For our matrix PII hierarchy we also give auto-Bäcklund transformations and consider the iteration of solutions. This is the first paper to define matrix Painlevé hierarchies and to give auto-Bäcklund transformations for a matrix Painlevé hierarchy. We also consider, amongst other results, the derivation of sequences of special integrals and autonomous limits. Until now it has been unknown how to connect the known matrix PII equation to the obvious candidates for related completely integrable matrix partial differential equations. Our matrix PII hierarchy is placed firmly within the context of a matrix modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) hierarchy. In deriving our matrix PII hierarchy we make use of the Hamiltonian structure of this matrix mKdV hierarchy. We thus see once again the importance for Painlevé hierarchies of the integrability structures of related completely integrable equations.

  17. Incorporation of a hierarchical grid component structure into GRIDGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Chawner, John R.

    1993-01-01

    The underlying framework of the GRIDGEN multiple block grid generation system has been refined so that grid components are now stored within a hierarchical data structure. This restructuring has enhanced the usability of the software by allowing grids to be generated on a more intuitive level. This new framework also provides a means by which the multiple block system can be edited at most any level in the grid generation process. Editing tools are currently being added to GRIDGEN so that a change to the grid can be propagated backward and forward in the data hierarchy. The new data structure, the editing tools, and other recent GRIDGEN improvements are described in this paper.

  18. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  19. The Volume Grid Manipulator (VGM): A Grid Reusability Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a manual describing how to use the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) software. The code is specifically designed to alter or manipulate existing surface and volume structured grids to improve grid quality through the reduction of grid line skewness, removal of negative volumes, and adaption of surface and volume grids to flow field gradients. The software uses a command language to perform all manipulations thereby offering the capability of executing multiple manipulations on a single grid during an execution of the code. The command language can be input to the VGM code by a UNIX style redirected file, or interactively while the code is executing. The manual consists of 14 sections. The first is an introduction to grid manipulation; where it is most applicable and where the strengths of such software can be utilized. The next two sections describe the memory management and the manipulation command language. The following 8 sections describe simple and complex manipulations that can be used in conjunction with one another to smooth, adapt, and reuse existing grids for various computations. These are accompanied by a tutorial section that describes how to use the commands and manipulations to solve actual grid generation problems. The last two sections are a command reference guide and trouble shooting sections to aid in the use of the code as well as describe problems associated with generated scripts for manipulation control.

  20. Psychophysical "blinding" methods reveal a functional hierarchy of unconscious visual processing.

    PubMed

    Breitmeyer, Bruno G

    2015-09-01

    Numerous non-invasive experimental "blinding" methods exist for suppressing the phenomenal awareness of visual stimuli. Not all of these suppressive methods occur at, and thus index, the same level of unconscious visual processing. This suggests that a functional hierarchy of unconscious visual processing can in principle be established. The empirical results of extant studies that have used a number of different methods and additional reasonable theoretical considerations suggest the following tentative hierarchy. At the highest levels in this hierarchy is unconscious processing indexed by object-substitution masking. The functional levels indexed by crowding, the attentional blink (and other attentional blinding methods), backward pattern masking, metacontrast masking, continuous flash suppression, sandwich masking, and single-flash interocular suppression, fall at progressively lower levels, while unconscious processing at the lowest levels is indexed by eye-based binocular-rivalry suppression. Although unconscious processing levels indexed by additional blinding methods is yet to be determined, a tentative placement at lower levels in the hierarchy is also given for unconscious processing indexed by Troxler fading and adaptation-induced blindness, and at higher levels in the hierarchy indexed by attentional blinding effects in addition to the level indexed by the attentional blink. The full mapping of levels in the functional hierarchy onto cortical activation sites and levels is yet to be determined. The existence of such a hierarchy bears importantly on the search for, and the distinctions between, neural correlates of conscious and unconscious vision. PMID:25704454

  1. GRChombo: Numerical relativity with adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Katy; Figueras, Pau; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A.; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we introduce {\\mathtt{GRChombo}}: a new numerical relativity code which incorporates full adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) using block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation. The code supports non-trivial 'many-boxes-in-many-boxes' mesh hierarchies and massive parallelism through the message passing interface. {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} evolves the Einstein equation using the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. The AMR capability permits the study of a range of new physics which has previously been computationally infeasible in a full 3 + 1 setting, while also significantly simplifying the process of setting up the mesh for these problems. We show that {\\mathtt{GRChombo}} can stably and accurately evolve standard spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers and scalar collapses into black holes, demonstrate the performance characteristics of our code, and discuss various physics problems which stand to benefit from the AMR technique.

  2. Multilevel adaptive solution procedure for material nonlinear problems in visual programming environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Ghanem, R.

    1994-12-31

    Multigrid solution technique to solve a material nonlinear problem in a visual programming environment using the finite element method is discussed. The nonlinear equation of equilibrium is linearized to incremental form using Newton-Rapson technique, then multigrid solution technique is used to solve linear equations at each Newton-Rapson step. In the process, adaptive mesh refinement, which is based on the bisection of a pair of triangles, is used to form grid hierarchy for multigrid iteration. The solution process is implemented in a visual programming environment with distributed computing capability, which enables more intuitive understanding of solution process, and more effective use of resources.

  3. The Grid

    SciTech Connect

    White, Vicky

    2003-05-21

    By now almost everyone has heard of 'The Grid', or 'Grid Computing' as it should more properly be described. There are frequent articles in both the popular and scientific press talking about 'The Grid' or about some specific Grid project. Run II Experiments, US-CMS, BTeV, the Sloane Digital Sky Survey and the Lattice QCD folks are all incorporating aspects of Grid Computing in their plans, and the Fermilab Computing Division is supporting and encouraging these efforts. Why are we doing this and what does it have to do with running a physics experiment or getting scientific results? I will explore some of these questions and try to give an overview, not so much of the technical aspects of Grid Computing, rather of what the phenomenon means for our field.

  4. Super Integrable Hierarchy and Super Hamiltonian Structures Associated with Guo Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Dong, Huanhe

    A Lie superalgebra is constructed from which establishes an isospectral problems. By solving the zero curvature equation, a resulting super hierarchies of the Guo hierarchy are obtained. By making use of the super identity, the Hamiltonian structures of the above super integrable hierarchies are generated, this method can be used to other superhierarchy.

  5. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  6. Flavor hierarchies from dynamical scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Pomarol, Alex

    2016-07-01

    One main obstacle for any beyond the SM (BSM) scenario solving the hierarchy problem is its potentially large contributions to electric dipole moments. An elegant way to avoid this problem is to have the light SM fermions couple to the BSM sector only through bilinears, overline{f}f . This possibility can be neatly implemented in composite Higgs models. We study the implications of dynamically generating the fermion Yukawa couplings at different scales, relating larger scales to lighter SM fermions. We show that all flavor and CP-violating constraints can be easily accommodated for a BSM scale of few TeV, without requiring any extra symmetry. Contributions to B physics are mainly mediated by the top, giving a predictive pattern of deviations in Δ F = 2 and Δ F = 1 flavor observables that could be seen in future experiments.

  7. Hierarchy in a double braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rommel; Rodriguez, R. Omar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson

    2006-10-15

    We show that the hierarchy between the Planck and the weak scales can follow from the tendency of gravitons and fermions to localize at different edges of a thick double wall embedded in an AdS{sub 5} spacetime without reflection symmetry. This double wall is a stable BPS thick-wall solution with two subwalls located at its edges; fermions are coupled to the scalar field through Yukawa interactions, but the lack of reflection symmetry forces them to be localized in one of the subwalls. We show that the graviton zero-mode wave function is suppressed in the fermion edge by an exponential function of the distance between the subwalls, and that the massive modes decouple so that Newtonian gravity is recuperated.

  8. Models of Neutrino Masses: Anarchy versus Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarelli, Guido; Feruglio, Ferruccio; Masina, Isabella

    2003-01-01

    We present a quantitative study of the ability of models with different levels of hierarchy to reproduce the solar neutrino solutions, in particular the LA solution. As a flexible testing ground we consider models based on SU(5) × U(1)F. In this context, we have made statistical simulations of models with different patterns from anarchy to various types of hierarchy: normal hierarchical models with and without automatic suppression of the 23 (sub)determinant and inverse hierarchy models. We find that, not only for the LOW or VO solutions, but even in the LA case, the hierarchical models have a significantly better success rate than those based on anarchy. The normal hierarchy and the inverse hierarchy models have comparable performances in models with see-saw dominance, while the inverse hierarchy models are particularly good in the no see-saw versions. As a possible distinction between these categories of models, the inverse hierarchy models favour a maximal solar mixing angle and their rate of success drops dramatically as the mixing angle decreases, while normal hierarchy models are far more stable in this respect.

  9. A Suggested Modification to Maslow's Need Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, David L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Since its development, Maslow's need hierarchy has been criticized and applauded. This investigation was undertaken to explore a modification of the upper levels of the need hierarchy based upon the application of power, competition, and achievement to self, as well as the concept of "other directed." (Author)

  10. On the robustness of Herlihy's hierarchy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayanti, Prasad

    1993-01-01

    A wait-free hierarchy maps object types to levels in Z(+) U (infinity) and has the following property: if a type T is at level N, and T' is an arbitrary type, then there is a wait-free implementation of an object of type T', for N processes, using only registers and objects of type T. The infinite hierarchy defined by Herlihy is an example of a wait-free hierarchy. A wait-free hierarchy is robust if it has the following property: if T is at level N, and S is a finite set of types belonging to levels N - 1 or lower, then there is no wait-free implementation of an object of type T, for N processes, using any number and any combination of objects belonging to the types in S. Robustness implies that there are no clever ways of combining weak shared objects to obtain stronger ones. Contrary to what many researchers believe, we prove that Herlihy's hierarchy is not robust. We then define some natural variants of Herlihy's hierarchy, which are also infinite wait-free hierarchies. With the exception of one, which is still open, these are not robust either. We conclude with the open question of whether non-trivial robust wait-free hierarchies exist.

  11. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  12. Sex-Specific Mechanism of Social Hierarchy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Wouter E; Lamballais, Sander; Kushner, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of social hierarchies is a naturally occurring, evolutionarily conserved phenomenon with a well-established impact on fitness and health. Investigations of complex social group dynamics may offer novel opportunities for translational studies of autism spectrum disorder. Here we describe a robust behavioral paradigm using an automated version of the tube test. Isogenic groups of male and female mice establish linear social hierarchies that remain highly stable for at least 14 days, the longest interval tested. Remarkably, however, their social strategy is sex-specific: females primarily utilize intrinsic attributes, whereas males are strongly influenced by prior social experience. Using both genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we identify testosterone as a critical sex-specific factor for determining which social strategy is used. Males inheriting a null mutation of the sex-determining region Y (Sry) gene used a similar social cognitive strategy as females. In contrast, females with transgenic expression of Sry utilized a typically male social strategy. Analogously, castration of males and testosterone supplementation of females yielded similar outcomes, with a reversal of their social cognitive strategy. Together, our results demonstrate a sex-specific mechanism underlying social hierarchy, in which both males and females retain the functional capacity to adapt their social strategy. More generally, we expect the automated tube test to provide an important complementary approach for both fundamental and translational studies of social behavior. PMID:25469681

  13. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) as a tool in asset allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainol Abidin, Siti Nazifah; Mohd Jaffar, Maheran

    2013-04-01

    Allocation capital investment into different assets is the best way to balance the risk and reward. This can prevent from losing big amount of money. Thus, the aim of this paper is to help investors in making wise investment decision in asset allocation. This paper proposes modifying and adapting Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) model. The AHP model is widely used in various fields of study that are related in decision making. The results of the case studies show that the proposed model can categorize stocks and determine the portion of capital investment. Hence, it can assist investors in decision making process and reduce the risk of loss in stock market investment.

  14. Hierarchy is Detrimental for Human Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Katherine A; Acheson, Daniel J; Hernández, Penélope; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Studies of animal behavior consistently demonstrate that the social environment impacts cooperation, yet the effect of social dynamics has been largely excluded from studies of human cooperation. Here, we introduce a novel approach inspired by nonhuman primate research to address how social hierarchies impact human cooperation. Participants competed to earn hierarchy positions and then could cooperate with another individual in the hierarchy by investing in a common effort. Cooperation was achieved if the combined investments exceeded a threshold, and the higher ranked individual distributed the spoils unless control was contested by the partner. Compared to a condition lacking hierarchy, cooperation declined in the presence of a hierarchy due to a decrease in investment by lower ranked individuals. Furthermore, hierarchy was detrimental to cooperation regardless of whether it was earned or arbitrary. These findings mirror results from nonhuman primates and demonstrate that hierarchies are detrimental to cooperation. However, these results deviate from nonhuman primate findings by demonstrating that human behavior is responsive to changing hierarchical structures and suggests partnership dynamics that may improve cooperation. This work introduces a controlled way to investigate the social influences on human behavior, and demonstrates the evolutionary continuity of human behavior with other primate species. PMID:26692287

  15. Recursion Relations for Double Ramification Hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Alexandr; Rossi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study various properties of the double ramification hierarchy, an integrable hierarchy of hamiltonian PDEs introduced in Buryak (CommunMath Phys 336(3):1085-1107, 2015) using intersection theory of the double ramification cycle in the moduli space of stable curves. In particular, we prove a recursion formula that recovers the full hierarchy starting from just one of the Hamiltonians, the one associated to the first descendant of the unit of a cohomological field theory. Moreover, we introduce analogues of the topological recursion relations and the divisor equation both for the Hamiltonian densities and for the string solution of the double ramification hierarchy. This machinery is very efficient and we apply it to various computations for the trivial and Hodge cohomological field theories, and for the r -spin Witten's classes. Moreover, we prove the Miura equivalence between the double ramification hierarchy and the Dubrovin-Zhang hierarchy for the Gromov-Witten theory of the complex projective line (extended Toda hierarchy).

  16. X3D moving grid methods for semiconductor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.; Cartwright, D.; Gammel, J.T.; George, D.; Kendrick, B.; Kilcrease, D.; Trease, H.; Walker, R.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos 3D grid toolbox handles grid maintenance chores and provides access to a sophisticated set of optimization algorithms for unstructured grids. The application of these tools to semiconductor problems is illustrated in three examples: grain growth, topographic deposition and electrostatics. These examples demonstrate adaptive smoothing, front tracking, and automatic, adaptive refinement/derefinement.

  17. Fermion hierarchy from sfermion anarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2014-12-01

    We present a framework to generate the hierarchical flavor structure of Standard Model quarks and leptons from loops of superpartners. The simplest model consists of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with tree level Yukawa couplings for the third generation only and anarchic squark and slepton mass matrices. Agreement with constraints from low energy flavor observables, in particular Kaon mixing, is obtained for supersymmetric particles with masses at the PeV scale or above. In our framework both the second and the first generation fermion masses are generated at 1-loop. Despite this, a novel mechanism generates a hierarchy among the first and second generations without imposing a symmetry or small parameters. A second-to-first generation mass ratio of order 100 is typical. The minimal supersymmetric standard model thus includes all the necessary ingredients to realize a fermion spectrum that is qualitatively similar to observation, with hierarchical masses and mixing. The minimal framework produces only a few quantitative discrepancies with observation, most notably the muon mass is too low. We discuss simple modifications which resolve this and also investigate the compatibility of our model with gauge and Yukawa coupling Unification.

  18. Fermion hierarchy from sfermion anarchy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2014-12-31

    We present a framework to generate the hierarchical flavor structure of Standard Model quarks and leptons from loops of superpartners. The simplest model consists of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with tree level Yukawa couplings for the third generation only and anarchic squark and slepton mass matrices. Agreement with constraints from low energy flavor observables, in particular Kaon mixing, is obtained for supersymmetric particles with masses at the PeV scale or above. In our framework both the second and the first generation fermion masses are generated at 1-loop. Despite this, a novel mechanism generates a hierarchy among the first andmore » second generations without imposing a symmetry or small parameters. A second-to-first generation mass ratio of order 100 is typical. The minimal supersymmetric standard model thus includes all the necessary ingredients to realize a fermion spectrum that is qualitatively similar to observation, with hierarchical masses and mixing. The minimal framework produces only a few quantitative discrepancies with observation, most notably the muon mass is too low. Furthermore, we discuss simple modifications which resolve this and also investigate the compatibility of our model with gauge and Yukawa coupling Unification.« less

  19. Quark masses and their hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, M.

    1987-12-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is attributed to dynamical generation of quark masses. Quarks q (and leptons l) are assumed to be produced by hypercolor confinement of preons at an intermediate scale Λ hc. Hierarchies observed in the q mass spectra can be explained by a BCS mechanism if the color interaction is enough asymptotically free and if residual ones emerging by the confinement are medium strong. The former assumption claims that N≦4, where N is the family number of q and l. Dynamical equations to determine q masses and mixings are given, but they require knowledge on the physics at Λ hc. A phenomenological approach is also made on the basis of an SU(7)× SU(7) chiral preon model with N=4. The mass ratio m t/ mb is related to ( m c/ m s)ηB with η B≃1.1 and m t'/ mb' to ( m u/ m d)ηA with η A≃1.4. In this scheme the fourth down quark is the heaviest (˜ 110 GeV) and contributes dominantly to F 2, where F is the Fermi scale.

  20. Fermion hierarchy from sfermion anarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Frugiuele, Claudia; Harnik, Roni

    2014-12-31

    We present a framework to generate the hierarchical flavor structure of Standard Model quarks and leptons from loops of superpartners. The simplest model consists of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with tree level Yukawa couplings for the third generation only and anarchic squark and slepton mass matrices. Agreement with constraints from low energy flavor observables, in particular Kaon mixing, is obtained for supersymmetric particles with masses at the PeV scale or above. In our framework both the second and the first generation fermion masses are generated at 1-loop. Despite this, a novel mechanism generates a hierarchy among the first and second generations without imposing a symmetry or small parameters. A second-to-first generation mass ratio of order 100 is typical. The minimal supersymmetric standard model thus includes all the necessary ingredients to realize a fermion spectrum that is qualitatively similar to observation, with hierarchical masses and mixing. The minimal framework produces only a few quantitative discrepancies with observation, most notably the muon mass is too low. Furthermore, we discuss simple modifications which resolve this and also investigate the compatibility of our model with gauge and Yukawa coupling Unification.

  1. Grid oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zorana B.; Kim, Moonil; Rutledge, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Loading a two-dimensional grid with active devices offers a means of combining the power of solid-state oscillators in the microwave and millimeter-wave range. The grid structure allows a large number of negative resistance devices to be combined. This approach is attractive because the active devices do not require an external locking signal, and the combining is done in free space. In addition, the loaded grid is a planar structure amenable to monolithic integration. Measurements on a 25-MESFET grid at 9.7 GHz show power-combining and frequency-locking without an external locking signal, with an ERP of 37 W. Experimental far-field patterns agree with theoretical results obtained using reciprocity.

  2. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  3. NLO Hierarchy of Wilson Lines Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Balitsky, Ian

    2015-03-01

    The high-energy behavior of QCD amplitudes can be described in terms of the rapidity evolution of Wilson lines. I present the hierarchy of evolution equations for Wilson lines in the next-to-leading order.

  4. The extended Z N -Toda hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong

    2015-11-01

    We construct the extended flow equations of a new Z N -Toda hierarchy taking values in a commutative subalgebra Z N of gl( N, C). We give the Hirota bilinear equations and tau function of this new extended Z N -Toda hierarchy. Taking the presence of logarithmic terms into account, we construct some extended vertex operators in generalized Hirota bilinear equations, which might be useful in topological field theory and the Gromov-Witten theory. We present the Darboux transformations and bi-Hamiltonian structure of this hierarchy. Using Hamiltonian tau-symmetry, we obtain another tau function of this hierarchy with some unknown mysterious relation to the tau function derived using the Sato theory.

  5. Liouville Correspondence Between the Modified KdV Hierarchy and Its Dual Integrable Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jing; Liu, Xiaochuan; Olver, Peter J.; Qu, Changzheng

    2016-02-01

    We study an explicit correspondence between the integrable modified KdV hierarchy and its dual integrable modified Camassa-Holm hierarchy. A Liouville transformation between the isospectral problems of the two hierarchies also relates their respective recursion operators and serves to establish the Liouville correspondence between their flows and Hamiltonian conservation laws. In addition, a novel transformation mapping the modified Camassa-Holm equation to the Camassa-Holm equation is found. Furthermore, it is shown that the Hamiltonian conservation laws in the negative direction of the modified Camassa-Holm hierarchy are both local in the field variables and homogeneous under rescaling.

  6. Grid Generation Techniques Utilizing the Volume Grid Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents grid generation techniques available in the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) code. The VGM code is designed to manipulate existing line, surface and volume grids to improve the quality of the data. It embodies an easy to read rich language of commands that enables such alterations as topology changes, grid adaption and smoothing. Additionally, the VGM code can be used to construct simplified straight lines, splines, and conic sections which are common curves used in the generation and manipulation of points, lines, surfaces and volumes (i.e., grid data). These simple geometric curves are essential in the construction of domain discretizations for computational fluid dynamic simulations. By comparison to previously established methods of generating these curves interactively, the VGM code provides control of slope continuity and grid point-to-point stretchings as well as quick changes in the controlling parameters. The VGM code offers the capability to couple the generation of these geometries with an extensive manipulation methodology in a scripting language. The scripting language allows parametric studies of a vehicle geometry to be efficiently performed to evaluate favorable trends in the design process. As examples of the powerful capabilities of the VGM code, a wake flow field domain will be appended to an existing X33 Venturestar volume grid; negative volumes resulting from grid expansions to enable flow field capture on a simple geometry, will be corrected; and geometrical changes to a vehicle component of the X33 Venturestar will be shown.

  7. Maslow's hierarchy of needs: a framework for achieving human potential in hospice.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, Robert J; Raspa, Richard

    2006-10-01

    Although the widespread implementation of hospice in the United States has led to tremendous advances in the care of the dying, there has been no widely accepted psychological theory to drive needs assessment and intervention design for the patient and family. The humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow, especially his theory of motivation and the hierarchy of needs, has been widely applied in business and social science, but only sparsely discussed in the palliative care literature. In this article we review Maslow's original hierarchy, adapt it to hospice and palliative care, apply the adaptation to a case example, and then discuss its implications for patient care, education, and research. The five levels of the hierarchy of needs as adapted to palliative care are: (1) distressing symptoms, such as pain or dyspnea; (2) fears for physical safety, of dying or abandonment; (3) affection, love and acceptance in the face of devastating illness; (4) esteem, respect, and appreciation for the person; (5) selfactualization and transcendence. Maslow's modified hierarchy of palliative care needs could be utilized to provide a comprehensive approach for the assessment of patients' needs and the design of interventions to achieve goals that start with comfort and potentially extend to the experience of transcendence. PMID:17040150

  8. Optimal hierarchies for fuzzy object models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2013-03-01

    In radiologic clinical practice, the analysis underlying image examinations are qualitative, descriptive, and to some extent subjective. Quantitative radiology (QR) is valuable in clinical radiology. Computerized automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) is an essential step toward that goal. AAR is a body-wide organ recognition strategy. The AAR framework is based on fuzzy object models (FOMs) wherein the models for the different objects are encoded in a hierarchy. We investigated ways of optimally designing the hierarchy tree while building the models. The hierarchy among the objects is a core concept of AAR. The parent-offspring relationships have two main purposes in this context: (i) to bring into AAR more understanding and knowledge about the form, geography, and relationships among objects, and (ii) to foster guidance to object recognition and object delineation. In this approach, the relationship among objects is represented by a graph, where the vertices are the objects (organs) and the edges connect all pairs of vertices into a complete graph. Each pair of objects is assigned a weight described by the spatial distance between them, their intensity profile differences, and their correlation in size, all estimated over a population. The optimal hierarchy tree is obtained by the shortest-path algorithm as an optimal spanning tree. To evaluate the optimal hierarchies, we have performed some preliminary tests involving the subsequent recognition step. The body region used for initial investigation was the thorax.

  9. PINGU sensitivity to neutrino mass hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Groß, Andreas; Collaboration: IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    Determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (NMH) is among the most fundamental questions in particle physics. Recent measurements of 1) a large mixing angle between the first and the third neutrino mass eigenstates and 2) the first observation of atmospheric neutrino oscillations at tens of GeV with neutrino telescopes, open the intriguing new possibility to exploit matter effects in neutrino oscillation to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. A further extension of IceCube/DeepCore called PINGU (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade) has been recently envisioned with the ultimate goal to measure neutrino mass hierarchy. PINGU would consist of additional IceCube-like strings of detectors deployed in the deepest and cleanest ice in the center of IceCube. More densely deployed instrumentation would provide a threshold substantially below 10 GeV and enhance the sensitivity to the mass hierarchy signal in atmospheric neutrinos. Here we discuss an estimate of the PINGU sensitivity to the mass hierarchy determined using an approximation with an Asimov dataset and an oscillation parameter fit.

  10. Hierarchy of correlations: Application to Green's functions and interacting topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-León, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    We study the many-body physics of different quantum systems using a hierarchy of correlations, which corresponds to a generalization of the 1 /Z hierarchy. The decoupling scheme obtained from this hierarchy is adapted to calculate double-time Green's functions and due to its nonperturbative nature, we describe quantum phase transition and topological features characteristic of strongly correlated phases. As concrete examples we consider spinless fermions in a dimerized chain and in a honeycomb lattice. We present analytical results which are valid for any dimension and can be generalized to different types of interactions (e.g., long-range interactions), which allows us to shed light on the effect of quantum correlations in a very systematic way. Furthermore, we show that this approach provides an efficient framework for the calculation of topological invariants in interacting systems.

  11. Formal language theory: refining the Chomsky hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Gerhard; Rogers, James

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article gives a brief overview of the four levels of the Chomsky hierarchy, with a special emphasis on context-free and regular languages. It then recapitulates the arguments why neither regular nor context-free grammar is sufficiently expressive to capture all phenomena in the natural language syntax. In the second part, two refinements of the Chomsky hierarchy are reviewed, which are both relevant to the extant research in cognitive science: the mildly context-sensitive languages (which are located between context-free and context-sensitive languages), and the sub-regular hierarchy (which distinguishes several levels of complexity within the class of regular languages). PMID:22688632

  12. A hierarchy of topological tensor network states

    SciTech Connect

    Buerschaper, Oliver; Mombelli, Juan Martin; Aguado, Miguel

    2013-01-15

    We present a hierarchy of quantum many-body states among which many examples of topological order can be identified by construction. We define these states in terms of a general, basis-independent framework of tensor networks based on the algebraic setting of finite-dimensional Hopf C*-algebras. At the top of the hierarchy we identify ground states of new topological lattice models extending Kitaev's quantum double models [Ann. Phys. 303, 2 (2003)]. For these states we exhibit the mechanism responsible for their non-zero topological entanglement entropy by constructing an entanglement renormalization flow. Furthermore, we argue that the hierarchy states are related to each other by the condensation of topological charges.

  13. DASH--distributed analysis system hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masafumi; Yoshihiko, Mizumoto; Ogasawara, Ryusuke; Kosugi, George; Takata, Tadafumi; Ishihara, Yasuhide; Yokono, Yasunori; Morita, Yasuhiro; Nakamoto, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Noboru; Ukawa, Kentaro

    2002-12-01

    We have developed and are operating an object-oriented data reduction and data analysis system, DASH ( Distributed Analysis Software Hierarchy ), for efficient data processing for SUBARU telescope. In DASH, all information for reducing a set of data is packed into an abstracted object, named as ``Hierarchy''. It contains rules how to search calibration data, reduction procedure to the final result, and also the reduction log. With Hierarchy, DASH works as an automated reduction pipeline platform cooperated with STARS (Subaru Telescope ARchive System). DASH is implemented on CORBA and Java technology. The portability of these technology enables us to make a subset of the system for a small stand-alone system, SASH. SASH is compatible with DASH and one can continuously reduce and analyze data between DASH and SASH.

  14. Low-mass Galaxy Formation in Cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations: The Effects of Varying the Sub-grid Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colín, Pedro; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Valenzuela, Octavio; Ceverino, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    We present numerical simulations aimed at exploring the effects of varying the sub-grid physics parameters on the evolution and the properties of the galaxy formed in a low-mass dark matter halo (~7 × 1010 h -1 M sun at redshift z = 0). The simulations are run within a cosmological setting with a nominal resolution of 218 pc comoving and are stopped at z = 0.43. For simulations that cannot resolve individual molecular clouds, we propose the criterion that the threshold density for star formation, n SF, should be chosen such that the column density of the star-forming cells equals the threshold value for molecule formation, N ~ 1021 cm-2, or ~8 M sun pc-2. In all of our simulations, an extended old/intermediate-age stellar halo and a more compact younger stellar disk are formed, and in most cases, the halo's specific angular momentum is slightly larger than that of the galaxy, and sensitive to the SF/feedback parameters. We found that a non-negligible fraction of the halo stars are formed in situ in a spheroidal distribution. Changes in the sub-grid physics parameters affect significantly and in a complex way the evolution and properties of the galaxy: (1) lower threshold densities n SF produce larger stellar effective radii Re , less peaked circular velocity curves Vc (R), and greater amounts of low-density and hot gas in the disk mid-plane; (2) when stellar feedback is modeled by temporarily switching off radiative cooling in the star-forming regions, Re increases (by a factor of ~2 in our particular model), the circular velocity curve becomes flatter, and a complex multi-phase gaseous disk structure develops; (3) a more efficient local conversion of gas mass to stars, measured by a stellar particle mass distribution biased toward larger values, increases the strength of the feedback energy injection—driving outflows and inducing burstier SF histories; (4) if feedback is too strong, gas loss by galactic outflows—which are easier to produce in low

  15. Randomization and the Gross-Pitaevskii Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohinger, Vedran; Staffilani, Gigliola

    2015-10-01

    We study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on the spatial domain . By using an appropriate randomization of the Fourier coefficients in the collision operator, we prove an averaged form of the main estimate which is used in order to contract the Duhamel terms that occur in the study of the hierarchy. In the averaged estimate, we do not need to integrate in the time variable. An averaged spacetime estimate for this range of regularity exponents then follows as a direct corollary. The range of regularity exponents that we obtain is . It was shown in our previous joint work with Gressman (J Funct Anal 266(7):4705-4764, 2014) that the range is sharp in the corresponding deterministic spacetime estimate. This is in contrast to the non-periodic setting, which was studied by Klainerman and Machedon (Commun Math Phys 279(1):169-185, 2008), where the spacetime estimate is known to hold whenever . The goal of our paper is to extend the range of α in this class of estimates in a probabilistic sense. We use the new estimate and the ideas from its proof in order to study randomized forms of the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy. More precisely, we consider hierarchies similar to the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy, but in which the collision operator has been randomized. For these hierarchies, we show convergence to zero in low regularity Sobolev spaces of Duhamel expansions of fixed deterministic density matrices. We believe that the study of the randomized collision operators could be the first step in the understanding of a nonlinear form of randomization.

  16. Implementing a bubble memory hierarchy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segura, R.; Nichols, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on implementation of a magnetic bubble memory in a two-level hierarchial system. The hierarchy used a major-minor loop device and RAM under microprocessor control. Dynamic memory addressing, dual bus primary memory, and hardware data modification detection are incorporated in the system to minimize access time. It is the objective of the system to incorporate the advantages of bipolar memory with that of bubble domain memory to provide a smart, optimal memory system which is easy to interface and independent of user's system.

  17. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  18. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  19. Mass conservation of the unified continuous and discontinuous element-based Galerkin methods on dynamically adaptive grids with application to atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopera, Michal A.; Giraldo, Francis X.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a comparison of mass conservation properties of the continuous (CG) and discontinuous (DG) Galerkin methods on non-conforming, dynamically adaptive meshes for two atmospheric test cases. The two methods are implemented in a unified way which allows for a direct comparison of the non-conforming edge treatment. We outline the implementation details of the non-conforming direct stiffness summation algorithm for the CG method and show that the mass conservation error is similar to the DG method. Both methods conserve to machine precision, regardless of the presence of the non-conforming edges. For lower order polynomials the CG method requires additional stabilization to run for very long simulation times. We addressed this issue by using filters and/or additional artificial viscosity. The mathematical proof of mass conservation for CG with non-conforming meshes is presented in Appendix B.

  20. Using Analytic Hierarchy Process in Textbook Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) in English language teaching materials evaluation, focusing in particular on its potential for systematically integrating different components of evaluation criteria in a variety of teaching contexts. AHP is a measurement procedure wherein pairwise comparisons are made…

  1. Hidden integrable hierarchies of AKNS type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelchenko, Boris; Martínez Alonso, Luis; Medina, Elena

    1999-05-01

    A method for constructing integrable hierarchies by restricting AKNS flows on manifolds of finite codimension in the space of independent parameters is provided. Two particular types of hierachies are characterized: one is given by nonlinear differential equations with coordinate-dependent coefficients and the other is related to Schrödinger spectral problems with energy-dependent potentials of even degree.

  2. Large Hierarchies from Approximate R Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kappl, Rolf; Ratz, Michael; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Nilles, Hans Peter; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul; Vaudrevange, Patrick K. S.

    2009-03-27

    We show that hierarchically small vacuum expectation values of the superpotential in supersymmetric theories can be a consequence of an approximate R symmetry. We briefly discuss the role of such small constants in moduli stabilization and understanding the huge hierarchy between the Planck and electroweak scales.

  3. A Hierarchy Among Attitudes Toward Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bart, William M.

    1972-01-01

    Changing attitudes of man toward many animal species are viewed as one aspect in stabilizing ecosystems. This research study attempts to indicate a hierarchy among attitudes toward animals, particularly for the purpose of developing positive attitudes toward rare and endangered species. (BL)

  4. Variables in a Hierarchy of Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickel, Gerhard

    1971-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to show what parameters come into play when dealing with the problem of difficulty in foreign language learning. After subjecting the hierarchy of difficulty set up by R.P. Stockwell and J.D. Bowen to a critical examination, the author discusses various parameters such as individual and national difficulties, the…

  5. Approaches to the Validation of Learning Hierarchies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Lauren B.; Wang, Margaret C.

    This paper describes a program of research in the application of scalogram analysis to the validation of learning hierarchies, together with the development of an alternative method for assessing hierarchical relationships among tests of instructional objectives. The relationship between scalability of tests and positive transfer between…

  6. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  7. Dark energy and the hierarchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin

    2009-03-01

    The well-known hierarchy between the Planck scale (˜10GeV) and the TeV scale, namely a ratio of ˜10 between the two, is coincidentally repeated in a inverted order between the TeV scale and the dark energy scale at ˜10eV implied by the observations. We argue that this is not a numerical coincidence. The same brane-world setups to address the first hierarchy problem may also in principle address this second hierarchy issue. Specifically, we consider supersymmetry in the bulk and its breaking on the brane and resort to the Casimir energy induced by the bulk graviton-gravitino mass-shift on the brane as the dark energy. For the ADD model we found that our notion is sensible only if the number of extra dimension n=2. We extend our study to the Randall-Sundrum model. Invoking the chirality-flip on the boundaries for SUSY-breaking, the zero-mode gravitino contribution to the Casimir energy does give rise to the double hierarchy. Unfortunately since the higher Kaluza-Klein modes acquire relative mass-shifts at the TeV level, the zero-mode contribution to Casimir energy is overshadowed.

  8. M Theory Solution to the Hierarchy Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon; Kumar, Piyush; Vaman, Diana

    2006-11-10

    An old idea for explaining the hierarchy is strong gauge dynamics. We show that such dynamics also stabilizes the moduli in M theory compactifications on manifolds of G{sub 2} holonomy without fluxes. This gives stable vacua with softly broken supersymmetry, grand unification, and a distinctive spectrum of TeV and sub-TeV sparticle masses.

  9. The Role of Hierarchy in Parental Nurturance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of parental hierarchy in regard to meeting the developmental nurturing needs of the child. It builds on Stonefish's (2000) epigenetic model of hierarchical relationship development. Through complementary and supplementary relationships between parent and child, the child is able to have his or her nurturing…

  10. Coordination of behavioral hierarchies during environmental transitions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G.; Davis, Scott; Becker, Lindsay; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.

    2012-01-01

    For animals inhabiting multiple environments, the ability to select appropriate behaviors is crucial as their adaptability is often context dependent. Caenorhabditis elegans uses distinct gaits to move on land and in water. Gait transitions can potentially coordinate behaviors associated with distinct environments. We investigated whether land and water differentially affect the behavioral repertoire of C. elegans. Swimming worms interrupted foraging, feeding, egg-laying and defecation. Exogenous dopamine induced bouts of these land-associated behaviors in water. Our finding that worms do not drink fluid while immersed may explain why higher drug doses are required in water than on land to elicit the same effects. C. elegans is a valid model to study behavioral hierarchies and how environmental pressures alter their balance. PMID:23525841

  11. Non-Galerkin Coarse Grids for Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, Robert D.; Schroder, Jacob B.

    2014-06-26

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular and effective solver for systems of linear equations that arise from discretized partial differential equations. And while AMG has been effectively implemented on large scale parallel machines, challenges remain, especially when moving to exascale. Particularly, stencil sizes (the number of nonzeros in a row) tend to increase further down in the coarse grid hierarchy, and this growth leads to more communication. Therefore, as problem size increases and the number of levels in the hierarchy grows, the overall efficiency of the parallel AMG method decreases, sometimes dramatically. This growth in stencil size is due to the standard Galerkin coarse grid operator, $P^T A P$, where $P$ is the prolongation (i.e., interpolation) operator. For example, the coarse grid stencil size for a simple three-dimensional (3D) seven-point finite differencing approximation to diffusion can increase into the thousands on present day machines, causing an associated increase in communication costs. We therefore consider algebraically truncating coarse grid stencils to obtain a non-Galerkin coarse grid. First, the sparsity pattern of the non-Galerkin coarse grid is determined by employing a heuristic minimal “safe” pattern together with strength-of-connection ideas. Second, the nonzero entries are determined by collapsing the stencils in the Galerkin operator using traditional AMG techniques. The result is a reduction in coarse grid stencil size, overall operator complexity, and parallel AMG solve phase times.

  12. GrouseFlocks: steerable exploration of graph hierarchy space.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Daniel; Munzner, Tamara; Auber, David

    2008-01-01

    Several previous systems allow users to interactively explore a large input graph through cuts of a superimposed hierarchy. This hierarchy is often created using clustering algorithms or topological features present in the graph. However, many graphs have domain-specific attributes associated with the nodes and edges, which could be used to create many possible hierarchies providing unique views of the input graph. GrouseFlocks is a system for the exploration of this graph hierarchy space. By allowing users to see several different possible hierarchies on the same graph, the system helps users investigate graph hierarchy space instead of a single fixed hierarchy. GrouseFlocks provides a simple set of operations so that users can create and modify their graph hierarchies based on selections. These selections can be made manually or based on patterns in the attribute data provided with the graph. It provides feedback to the user within seconds, allowing interactive exploration of this space. PMID:18467763

  13. TURBOGRID - Turbomachinery applications of grid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Bharat K.; Shih, Ming-Hsin

    1990-07-01

    Numerical grid generation algorithm associated with the field region about turbomachinery systems is presented. The algorithm is incorporated as a module, TIGER (Turbomachinery Interactive Grid genERation) of the modular general purpose computer code GENIE. Interactive definitions of the mathematical description of blades, hub and shroud with minimal user interactions, adaption of the weighted transfinite interpolation technique for efficient generation of grid blocks/zones, automatic construction of the Bezier curves to accomplish slope continuity, and efficient utilization of IRIS-graphics capabilities are the salient features of this algorithm which results in a significant time savings for a given turbomachinery geometry-grid application.

  14. A Practical Reinforcement Hierarchy for Classroom Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Barry T.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed a practical reinforcement hierarchy for classroom-based behavior modification programs. The seven-level hierarchy ranged from primitive consequences (Infantile Physical Contact and Food) through the more abstract consequences (Praise and Internal Self-Reinforcement). Suggestions were made for using the hierarchy in teacher consultation…

  15. The Construction of an Ontology-Based Ubiquitous Learning Grid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Ching-Jung; Chou, Chien-Chih; Yang, Jin-Tan David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to incorporate adaptive ontology into ubiquitous learning grid to achieve seamless learning environment. Ubiquitous learning grid uses ubiquitous computing environment to infer and determine the most adaptive learning contents and procedures in anytime, any place and with any device. To achieve the goal, an…

  16. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    ScienceCinema

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-03-13

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  17. An interactive grid generation technique for turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Tim

    1992-01-01

    A combination algebraic/elliptic technique is presented for the generation of 3-D grids about turbomachinery blade rows for both axial and radial flow machinery. The technique is build around use of an advanced engineering workstation to construct several 2-D grids interactively on predetermined blade-to-blade surfaces. A 3-D grid is generated by interpolating these surface grids onto an axisymmetric grid. On each blade to blade surface, a grid is created using algebraic techniques near the blade to control orthogonality within the boundary layer region and elliptic techniques in the mid-passage to achieve smoothness. The interactive definition of bezier curves as internal boundaries is the key to simple construction. The approach is adapted for use with the average passage solution technique, although this is not a limitation for most other uses. A variety of examples are presented.

  18. ARPA-E: Advancing the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmon, John; Ruiz, Pablo; Sommerer, Tim; Aziz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    The electric grid was designed with the assumption that all energy generation sources would be relatively controllable, and grid operators would always be able to predict when and where those sources would be located. With the addition of renewable energy sources like wind and solar, which can be installed faster than traditional generation technologies, this is no longer the case. Furthermore, the fact that renewable energy sources are imperfectly predictable means that the grid has to adapt in real-time to changing patterns of power flow. We need a dynamic grid that is far more flexible. This video highlights three ARPA-E-funded approaches to improving the grid's flexibility: topology control software from Boston University that optimizes power flow, gas tube switches from General Electric that provide efficient power conversion, and flow batteries from Harvard University that offer grid-scale energy storage.

  19. GridMan: A grid manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Wang, Zhu

    1992-01-01

    GridMan is an interactive grid manipulation system. It operates on grids to produce new grids which conform to user demands. The input grids are not constrained to come from any particular source. They may be generated by algebraic methods, elliptic methods, hyperbolic methods, parabolic methods, or some combination of methods. The methods are included in the various available structured grid generation codes. These codes perform the basic assembly function for the various elements of the initial grid. For block structured grids, the assembly can be quite complex due to a large number of clock corners, edges, and faces for which various connections and orientations must be properly identified. The grid generation codes are distinguished among themselves by their balance between interactive and automatic actions and by their modest variations in control. The basic form of GridMan provides a much more substantial level of grid control and will take its input from any of the structured grid generation codes. The communication link to the outside codes is a data file which contains the grid or section of grid.

  20. Operator splitting and adaptive mesh refinement for the Luo-Rudy I model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trangenstein, John A.; Kim, Chisup

    2004-05-01

    We apply second-order operator splitting to the Luo-Rudy I model for electrical wave propagation in the heart. The purpose of the operator splitting is to separate the nonlinear but local reaction computations from the linear but globally coupled diffusion computations. This approach allows us to use local nonlinear iterations for the stiff nonlinear reactions and to solve global linear systems for the implicit treatment of diffusion. For computational efficiency, we use dynamically adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), involving hierarchies of unions of grid patches on distinct levels of refinement. The linear system for the discretization of the diffusion on the composite AMR grid is formulated via standard conforming finite elements on unions grid patches within a level of refinement and aligned mortar elements along interfaces between levels of refinement. The linear systems are solved iteratively by preconditioned conjugate gradients. Our preconditioner uses multiplicative domain decomposition between levels of refinement; the smoother involves algebraic additive domain decomposition between patches within a level of refinement, and Gauss-Seidel iteration within grid patches. Numerical results are presented in 1D and 2D, including spiral waves.

  1. Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek

    2016-04-01

    The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and neutrino wakes are expected to develop downstream of the dark matter halos. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. This neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21 cm intensity mapping survey, which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make a positive detection if the three neutrino masses are quasidegenerate with each neutrino mass of ˜0.1 eV , and a future high precision 21 cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right-handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable.

  2. Size structures sensory hierarchy in ocean life.

    PubMed

    Martens, Erik A; Wadhwa, Navish; Jacobsen, Nis S; Lindemann, Christian; Andersen, Ken H; Visser, André

    2015-09-22

    Survival in aquatic environments requires organisms to have effective means of collecting information from their surroundings through various sensing strategies. In this study, we explore how sensing mode and range depend on body size. We find a hierarchy of sensing modes determined by body size. With increasing body size, a larger battery of modes becomes available (chemosensing, mechanosensing, vision, hearing and echolocation, in that order) while the sensing range also increases. This size-dependent hierarchy and the transitions between primary sensory modes are explained on the grounds of limiting factors set by physiology and the physical laws governing signal generation, transmission and reception. We theoretically predict the body size limits for various sensory modes, which align well with size ranges found in literature. The treatise of all ocean life, from unicellular organisms to whales, demonstrates how body size determines available sensing modes, and thereby acts as a major structuring factor of aquatic life. PMID:26378212

  3. Size structures sensory hierarchy in ocean life

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Erik A.; Wadhwa, Navish; Jacobsen, Nis S.; Lindemann, Christian; Andersen, Ken H.; Visser, André

    2015-01-01

    Survival in aquatic environments requires organisms to have effective means of collecting information from their surroundings through various sensing strategies. In this study, we explore how sensing mode and range depend on body size. We find a hierarchy of sensing modes determined by body size. With increasing body size, a larger battery of modes becomes available (chemosensing, mechanosensing, vision, hearing and echolocation, in that order) while the sensing range also increases. This size-dependent hierarchy and the transitions between primary sensory modes are explained on the grounds of limiting factors set by physiology and the physical laws governing signal generation, transmission and reception. We theoretically predict the body size limits for various sensory modes, which align well with size ranges found in literature. The treatise of all ocean life, from unicellular organisms to whales, demonstrates how body size determines available sensing modes, and thereby acts as a major structuring factor of aquatic life. PMID:26378212

  4. Risk prioritisation using the analytic hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sum, Rabihah Md.

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrated how to use the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to prioritise risks of an insurance company. AHP is a technique to structure complex problems by arranging elements of the problems in a hierarchy, assigning numerical values to subjective judgements on the relative importance of the elements and synthesizing the judgements to determine which elements have the highest priority. The study is motivated by wide application of AHP as a prioritisation technique in complex problems. It aims to show AHP is able to minimise some limitations of risk assessment technique using likelihood and impact. The study shows AHP is able to provide consistency check on subjective judgements, organise a large number of risks into a structured framework, assist risk managers to make explicit risk trade-offs, and provide an easy to understand and systematic risk assessment process.

  5. Hierarchies of Synergies in Human Movements

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.; Gorniak, Stacey; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    This brief review addresses the problem of motor redundancy, which exists at many levels of the neuromotor hierarchies involved in the production of voluntary movements. An approach to this problem is described based on the principle of abundance. This approach offers an operational definition for motor synergies using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. It is shown that hierarchical systems have inherent trade-offs between synergies at different control levels. These trade-offs have been demonstrated in experimental studies of human multi-finger pressing and prehension. They are likely to be present in other hierarchical systems, for example those involved in the control of large groups of muscles. The framework of the equilibrium-point hypothesis offers a physiologically based mechanism, which may form the basis for hierarchies of synergies. PMID:20354578

  6. Colloquium: Hierarchy of scales in language dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    Methods and insights from statistical physics are finding an increasing variety of applications where one seeks to understand the emergent properties of a complex interacting system. One such area concerns the dynamics of language at a variety of levels of description, from the behaviour of individual agents learning simple artificial languages from each other, up to changes in the structure of languages shared by large groups of speakers over historical timescales. In this Colloquium, we survey a hierarchy of scales at which language and linguistic behaviour can be described, along with the main progress in understanding that has been made at each of them - much of which has come from the statistical physics community. We argue that future developments may arise by linking the different levels of the hierarchy together in a more coherent fashion, in particular where this allows more effective use of rich empirical data sets.

  7. Computing abstraction hierarchies by numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, A.; Giunchiglia, F.; Sebastiani, R.; Walsh, T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a novel method for building ABSTRIPS-style abstraction hierarchies in planning. The aim of this method is to minimize the amount of backtracking between abstraction levels. Previous approaches have determined the criticality of operator preconditions by reasoning about plans directly. Here, we adopt a simpler and faster approach where we use numerical simulation of the planning process. We demonstrate the theoretical advantages of our approach by identifying some simple properties lacking in previous approaches but possessed by our method. We demonstrate the empirical advantages of our approach by a set of four benchmark experiments using the ABTWEAK system. We compare the quality of the abstraction hierarchies generated with those built by the ALPINE and HIGHPOINT algorithms.

  8. Development of Three-Dimensional DRAGON Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yao; Kiou, Meng-Sing; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1999-01-01

    For a typical three dimensional flow in a practical engineering device, the time spent in grid generation can take 70 percent of the total analysis effort, resulting in a serious bottleneck in the design/analysis cycle. The present research attempts to develop a procedure that can considerably reduce the grid generation effort. The DRAGON grid, as a hybrid grid, is created by means of a Direct Replacement of Arbitrary Grid Overlapping by Nonstructured grid. The DRAGON grid scheme is an adaptation to the Chimera thinking. The Chimera grid is a composite structured grid, composing a set of overlapped structured grids, which are independently generated and body-fitted. The grid is of high quality and amenable for efficient solution schemes. However, the interpolation used in the overlapped region between grids introduces error, especially when a sharp-gradient region is encountered. The DRAGON grid scheme is capable of completely eliminating the interpolation and preserving the conservation property. It maximizes the advantages of the Chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured and while at the same time keeping its weaknesses minimal. In the present paper, we describe the progress towards extending the DRAGON grid technology into three dimensions. Essential and programming aspects of the extension, and new challenges for the three-dimensional cases, are addressed.

  9. The Helmholtz Hierarchy: phase space statistics of cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin V.

    2011-10-01

    We present a new formalism to study large-scale structure in the universe. The result is a hierarchy (which we call the ''Helmholtz Hierarchy'') of equations describing the phase space statistics of cold dark matter (CDM). The hierarchy features a physical ordering parameter which interpolates between the Zel'dovich approximation and fully-fledged gravitational interactions. The results incorporate the effects of stream crossing. We show that the Helmholtz hierarchy is self-consistent and obeys causality to all orders. We present an interpretation of the hierarchy in terms of effective particle trajectories.

  10. Integrable dynamical systems with hierarchy. I. Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, S.

    1989-04-01

    It is shown that any model with the zero (generalized) Nijenhuis tensor, under some additional assumptions, will automatically satisfy the hierarchy equation with an infinite number of conserved quantities in involution. Especially, if there is a dual symplectic structure with zero Nijenhuis tensor, then there exist infinite numbers of Poisson brackets and of Lagrangians giving the same equation of motion. Toda lattice is one such example

  11. Context-dependent hierarchies in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Máté; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Pettit, Benjamin; Roberts-Mariani, Isabella; Vicsek, Tamás; Biro, Dora

    2013-08-01

    Hierarchical organization is widespread in the societies of humans and other animals, both in social structure and in decision-making contexts. In the case of collective motion, the majority of case studies report that dominant individuals lead group movements, in agreement with the common conflation of the terms "dominance" and "leadership." From a theoretical perspective, if social relationships influence interactions during collective motion, then social structure could also affect leadership in large, swarm-like groups, such as fish shoals and bird flocks. Here we use computer-vision-based methods and miniature GPS tracking to study, respectively, social dominance and in-flight leader-follower relations in pigeons. In both types of behavior we find hierarchically structured networks of directed interactions. However, instead of being conflated, dominance and leadership hierarchies are completely independent of each other. Although dominance is an important aspect of variation among pigeons, correlated with aggression and access to food, our results imply that the stable leadership hierarchies in the air must be based on a different set of individual competences. In addition to confirming the existence of independent and context-specific hierarchies in pigeons, we succeed in setting out a robust, scalable method for the automated analysis of dominance relationships, and thus of social structure, applicable to many species. Our results, as well as our methods, will help to incorporate the broader context of animal social organization into the study of collective behavior. PMID:23878247

  12. Context-dependent hierarchies in pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Máté; Vásárhelyi, Gábor; Pettit, Benjamin; Roberts-Mariani, Isabella; Vicsek, Tamás; Biro, Dora

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical organization is widespread in the societies of humans and other animals, both in social structure and in decision-making contexts. In the case of collective motion, the majority of case studies report that dominant individuals lead group movements, in agreement with the common conflation of the terms “dominance” and “leadership.” From a theoretical perspective, if social relationships influence interactions during collective motion, then social structure could also affect leadership in large, swarm-like groups, such as fish shoals and bird flocks. Here we use computer-vision–based methods and miniature GPS tracking to study, respectively, social dominance and in-flight leader–follower relations in pigeons. In both types of behavior we find hierarchically structured networks of directed interactions. However, instead of being conflated, dominance and leadership hierarchies are completely independent of each other. Although dominance is an important aspect of variation among pigeons, correlated with aggression and access to food, our results imply that the stable leadership hierarchies in the air must be based on a different set of individual competences. In addition to confirming the existence of independent and context-specific hierarchies in pigeons, we succeed in setting out a robust, scalable method for the automated analysis of dominance relationships, and thus of social structure, applicable to many species. Our results, as well as our methods, will help to incorporate the broader context of animal social organization into the study of collective behavior. PMID:23878247

  13. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy with cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Kitching, Thomas D.; Heavens, Alan; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-12-15

    The combination of current large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background anisotropies data can place strong constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses. Here we show that future cosmic shear experiments, in combination with cosmic microwave background constraints, can provide the statistical accuracy required to answer questions about differences in the mass of individual neutrino species. Allowing for the possibility that masses are nondegenerate we combine Fisher matrix forecasts for a weak lensing survey like Euclid with those for the forthcoming Planck experiment. Under the assumption that neutrino mass splitting is described by a normal hierarchy we find that the combination Planck and Euclid will possibly reach enough sensitivity to put a constraint on the mass of a single species. Using a Bayesian evidence calculation we find that such future experiments could provide strong evidence for either a normal or an inverted neutrino hierarchy. Finally we show that if a particular neutrino hierarchy is assumed then this could bias cosmological parameter constraints, for example, the dark energy equation of state parameter, by > or approx. 1{sigma}, and the sum of masses by 2.3{sigma}. We finally discuss the impact of uncertainties on the theoretical modeling of nonlinearities. The results presented in this analysis are obtained under an approximation to the nonlinear power spectrum. This significant source of uncertainty needs to be addressed in future work.

  14. Hierarchy of Floquet gaps and edge states for driven honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Piskunow, P. M.; Foa Torres, L. E. F.; Usaj, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    Electromagnetic driving in a honeycomb lattice can induce gaps and topological edge states with a structure of increasing complexity as the frequency of the driving lowers. While the high-frequency case is the most simple to analyze we focus on the multiple photon processes allowed in the low-frequency regime to unveil the hierarchy of Floquet edge states. In the case of low intensities an analytical approach allows us to derive effective Hamiltonians and address the topological character of each gap in a constructive manner. At high intensities we obtain the net number of edge states, given by the winding number, with a numerical calculation of the Chern numbers of each Floquet band. Using these methods, we find a hierarchy that resembles that of a Russian nesting doll. This hierarchy classifies the gaps and the associated edge states in different orders according to the electron-photon coupling strength. For large driving intensities, we rely on the numerical calculation of the winding number, illustrated in a map of topological phase transitions. The hierarchy unveiled with the low-energy effective Hamiltonians, along with the map of topological phase transitions, discloses the complexity of the Floquet band structure in the low-frequency regime. The proposed method for obtaining the effective Hamiltonian can be easily adapted to other Dirac Hamiltonians of two-dimensional materials and even the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator.

  15. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  16. Institutional networks and adaptive water governance in the Klamath River Basin, USA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycentric networks of formal organizations and informal stakeholder groups, as opposed to centralized institutional hierarchies, can be critically important for strengthening the capacity of governance systems to adapt to unexpected social and biophysical change. Adaptive gover...

  17. Nurbs and grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.; Farin, G.; Hamann, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a basic overview of NURBS and their application to numerical grid generation. Curve/surface smoothing, accelerated grid generation, and the use of NURBS in a practical grid generation system are discussed.

  18. AstroGrid-D: Grid technology for astronomical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enke, Harry; Steinmetz, Matthias; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Beck-Ratzka, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Brüsemeister, Thomas; Carlson, Arthur; Ensslin, Torsten; Högqvist, Mikael; Nickelt, Iliya; Radke, Thomas; Reinefeld, Alexander; Reiser, Angelika; Scholl, Tobias; Spurzem, Rainer; Steinacker, Jürgen; Voges, Wolfgang; Wambsganß, Joachim; White, Steve

    2011-02-01

    We present status and results of AstroGrid-D, a joint effort of astrophysicists and computer scientists to employ grid technology for scientific applications. AstroGrid-D provides access to a network of distributed machines with a set of commands as well as software interfaces. It allows simple use of computer and storage facilities and to schedule or monitor compute tasks and data management. It is based on the Globus Toolkit middleware (GT4). Chapter 1 describes the context which led to the demand for advanced software solutions in Astrophysics, and we state the goals of the project. We then present characteristic astrophysical applications that have been implemented on AstroGrid-D in chapter 2. We describe simulations of different complexity, compute-intensive calculations running on multiple sites (Section 2.1), and advanced applications for specific scientific purposes (Section 2.2), such as a connection to robotic telescopes (Section 2.2.3). We can show from these examples how grid execution improves e.g. the scientific workflow. Chapter 3 explains the software tools and services that we adapted or newly developed. Section 3.1 is focused on the administrative aspects of the infrastructure, to manage users and monitor activity. Section 3.2 characterises the central components of our architecture: The AstroGrid-D information service to collect and store metadata, a file management system, the data management system, and a job manager for automatic submission of compute tasks. We summarise the successfully established infrastructure in chapter 4, concluding with our future plans to establish AstroGrid-D as a platform of modern e-Astronomy.

  19. Data Grid Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.; Jagatheesan, Arun; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael; Schroeder, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The "Grid" is an emerging infrastructure for coordinating access across autonomous organizations to distributed, heterogeneous computation and data resources. Data grids are being built around the world as the next generation data handling systems for sharing, publishing, and preserving data residing on storage systems located in multiple administrative domains. A data grid provides logical namespaces for users, digital entities and storage resources to create persistent identifiers for controlling access, enabling discovery, and managing wide area latencies. This paper introduces data grids and describes data grid use cases. The relevance of data grids to digital libraries and persistent archives is demonstrated, and research issues in data grids and grid dataflow management systems are discussed.

  20. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems.

  1. Leaching hierarchies in co-combustion residues

    SciTech Connect

    A. George; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2008-05-15

    The leaching propensities from co-combustion residues of 10 trace elements (Be, V, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Hg, Pb) were evaluated. Eight fuels varying from coal blends to coal and secondary fuel mixtures to ternary mixtures were co-combusted in two reactor configurations and at two temperatures (850 and 950{sup o}C). The ash was subjected to a miniaturized toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) developed for this study, and the trace element content in the leachate was analyzed, andpercentage retentions of elements in the ashes and leachates were calculated. Hg and Se were almost completely volatilized during combustion and, therefore, were largely absent from the ashes, in all cases. For the other trace elements, it was not possible to establish a hierarchy of relative trace-element retention. Retention was primarily a function of the combustion method, with no clear effect of temperature retention being observed. The measured trace-element retentions were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, using the MTDATA software. The model successfully predicted the measured values in many cases; however, many anomalies were also noted. From trace-element analysis in the leachates, an extent-of-leaching hierarchy could be established. The elements that underwent low degrees of leaching were Zn, Hg, Pb, low to moderate leaching were Be, Cr, and Cd, and thoseleached to a greater extent were V, As, Se, and Ba. This hierarchy was observed for all fuels and conditions studied. Leaching was found to be a strong function of the combustion temperature and combustion method. When assessing the potential toxicity of leachate from co-combustion residues, Zn, Hg, and Pb may be deemed of least concern, while a greater emphasis should be placed in mitigating the release of the remaining elements. 18 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Vanishing point: Scale independence in geomorphological hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2016-08-01

    Scale linkage problems in geosciences are often associated with a hierarchy of components. Both dynamical systems perspectives and intuition suggest that processes or relationships operating at fundamentally different scales are independent with respect to influences on system dynamics. But how far apart is "fundamentally different"-that is, what is the "vanishing point" at which scales are no longer interdependent? And how do we reconcile that with the idea (again, supported by both theory and intuition) that we can work our way along scale hierarchies from microscale to planetary (and vice-versa)? Graph and network theory are employed here to address these questions. Analysis of two archetypal hierarchical networks shows low algebraic connectivity, indicating low levels of inferential synchronization. This explains the apparent paradox between scale independence and hierarchical linkages. Incorporating more hierarchical levels results in an increase in complexity or entropy of the network as a whole, but at a nonlinear rate. Complexity increases as a power α of the number of levels in the hierarchy, with α < 1 and usually ≤ 0.6. However, algebraic connectivity decreases at a more rapid rate. Thus, the ability to infer one part of the hierarchical network from other level decays rapidly as more levels are added. Relatedness among system components decreases with differences in scale or resolution, analogous to distance decay in the spatial domain. These findings suggest a strategy of identifying and focusing on the most important or interesting scale levels, rather than attempting to identify the smallest or largest scale levels and work top-down or bottom-up from there. Examples are given from soil geomorphology and karst flow networks.

  3. NURBS evaluation and utilization for grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, Non-Uniform Rational BSpline (NURBS) has evolved as an essential tool for a semi-analytical representation of geometrical entities encountered in Computational Field Simulation (CFS). The grid generation techniques based on NURBS have been developed and reported in the literature by various researchers. However, the evaluation of NURBS for surface/volume grid point generation is time consuming and the representation of widely utilized aerodynamic shapes into NURBS is not trivial. This paper addressed these issues. An enhanced algorithm for NURBS evaluation based on the proper utilization of the basis functions is presented. An accurate representation of the widely utilized transition duct designed by using superellipse equation is developed. An example of the NURBS surface definition to a 3D volume and its utilization in grid adaptation by combing NURBS with elliptic generation system is presented. The computational example involving a flow field around a generic missile configuration is presented for demonstrating grid adaptation.

  4. Layout hierarchies for interactive design reuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Darryl; Hunter, Andrew; Slatter, David

    2012-03-01

    The advent of viable long tail & self-publishing solutions ([1], [2]) has spawned new requirements for automatic layout technologies. In most cases these attempt to lay out whole pages, spreads or documents based on complete content data. In this paper we introduce a new approach to document layout based on the principle of interactive design reuse, in which a new design is created from an existing high quality design via a sequence of simple steps to establish the final content. Based on our experience building such a system we propose a method of building layout hierarchies and discuss the implementation of editing operations appropriate to this new paradigm.

  5. DASH---Distributed Analysis System Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Mizumoto, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Kosugi, G.; Takata, T.; Ogasawara, R.; Ishihara, Y.; Morita, Y.; Nakamoto, H.; Watanabe, N.

    We developed the Distributed Analysis Software Hierarchy (DASH), an object-oriented data reduction and data analysis system for efficient processing of data from the SUBARU telescope. DASH consists of many objects (data management objects, reduction engines, GUIs, etc.) distributed on CORBA. We have also developed SASH, a stand-alone system which has the same interface as DASH, but which does not use some of the distributed services such as DA/DB; visiting astronomers can detach PROCube out of DASH and continue the analysis with SASH at their home institute. SASH will be used as a quick reduction tool at the summit.

  6. A perspective on unstructured grid flow solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    This survey paper assesses the status of compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers on unstructured grids. Different spatial and temporal discretization options for steady and unsteady flows are discussed. The integration of these components into an overall framework to solve practical problems is addressed. Issues such as grid adaptation, higher order methods, hybrid discretizations and parallel computing are briefly discussed. Finally, some outstanding issues and future research directions are presented.

  7. Spatial services grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Jicheng

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the concept, key technologies and main application of Spatial Services Grid. The technologies of Grid computing and Webservice is playing a revolutionary role in studying the spatial information services. The concept of the SSG (Spatial Services Grid) is put forward based on the SIG (Spatial Information Grid) and OGSA (open grid service architecture). Firstly, the grid computing is reviewed and the key technologies of SIG and their main applications are reviewed. Secondly, the grid computing and three kinds of SIG (in broad sense)--SDG (spatial data grid), SIG (spatial information grid) and SSG (spatial services grid) and their relationships are proposed. Thirdly, the key technologies of the SSG (spatial services grid) is put forward. Finally, three representative applications of SSG (spatial services grid) are discussed. The first application is urban location based services gird, which is a typical spatial services grid and can be constructed on OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) and digital city platform. The second application is region sustainable development grid which is the key to the urban development. The third application is Region disaster and emergency management services grid.

  8. The Stratified Ocean Model with Adaptive Refinement (SOMAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilli, Edward; Scotti, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    A computational framework for the evolution of non-hydrostatic, baroclinic flows encountered in regional and coastal ocean simulations is presented, which combines the flexibility of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) with a suite of numerical tools specifically developed to deal with the high degree of anisotropy of oceanic flows and their attendant numerical challenges. This framework introduces a semi-implicit update of the terms that give rise to buoyancy oscillations, which permits a stable integration of the Navier-Stokes equations when a background density stratification is present. The lepticity of each grid in the AMR hierarchy, which serves as a useful metric for anisotropy, is used to select one of several different efficient Poisson-solving techniques. In this way, we compute the pressure over the entire set of AMR grids without resorting to the hydrostatic approximation, which can degrade the structure of internal waves whose dynamics may have large-scale significance. We apply the modeling framework to three test cases, for which numerical or analytical solutions are known that can be used to benchmark the results. In all the cases considered, the model achieves an excellent degree of congruence with the benchmark, while at the same time achieving a substantial reduction of the computational resources needed.

  9. Neutrino flavor pendulum in both mass hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffelt, Georg; Seixas, David de Sousa

    2013-08-01

    We construct a simple example for self-induced flavor conversion in dense neutrino gases, showing new solutions that violate the symmetries of initial conditions. Our system consists of two opposite momentum modes 1 and 2, each initially occupied with equal densities of νe and ν¯e. Restricting solutions to symmetry under 1↔2 allows for the usual bimodal instability (“flavor pendulum”) in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy and stability (no self-induced flavor conversion) in the normal hierarchy (NH). Lifting this symmetry restriction allows for a second pendulumlike solution that occurs in NH, where the modes 1 and 2 swing in opposite directions in flavor space. Any small deviation from 1-2 symmetry in the initial condition triggers the new instability in NH. This effect corresponds to the recently identified multi-azimuth angle instability of supernova neutrino fluxes. Both cases show explicitly that solutions of the equations of collective flavor oscillations need not inherit the symmetries of initial conditions, although this has been universally assumed.

  10. Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek

    2016-04-01

    The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and neutrino wakes are expected to develop downstream of the dark matter halos. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. This neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21 cm intensity mapping survey, which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make a positive detection if the three neutrino masses are quasidegenerate with each neutrino mass of ∼0.1  eV, and a future high precision 21 cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right-handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable. PMID:27104695

  11. Maximizing Adaptivity in Hierarchical Topological Models Using Cancellation Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P; Pascucci, V; Hamann, B

    2008-12-08

    We present a highly adaptive hierarchical representation of the topology of functions defined over two-manifold domains. Guided by the theory of Morse-Smale complexes, we encode dependencies between cancellations of critical points using two independent structures: a traditional mesh hierarchy to store connectivity information and a new structure called cancellation trees to encode the configuration of critical points. Cancellation trees provide a powerful method to increase adaptivity while using a simple, easy-to-implement data structure. The resulting hierarchy is significantly more flexible than the one previously reported. In particular, the resulting hierarchy is guaranteed to be of logarithmic height.

  12. Unstructured grid methods for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of the finite element method on unstructured triangular grids is described and the development of centered finite element schemes for the solution of the compressible Euler equation on general triangular and tetrahedral grids is discussed. Explicit and implicit Lax-Wendroff type methods and a method based upon the use of explicit multistep timestepping are considered. In the latter case, the convergence behavior of the method is accelerated by the incorporation of a fully unstructured multigrid procedure. The advancing front method for generating unstructured grids of triangles and tetrahedra is described and the application of adaptive mesh techniques to both steady and transient flow analysis is illustrated.

  13. Gauge transformation and symmetries of the commutative multicomponent BKP hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we defined a new multi-component B type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (BKP) hierarchy that takes values in a commutative subalgebra of {gl}(N,{{C}}). After this, we give the gauge transformation of this commutative multicomponent BKP (CMBKP) hierarchy. Meanwhile, we construct a new constrained CMBKP hierarchy that contains some new integrable systems, including coupled KdV equations under a certain reduction. After this, the quantum torus symmetry and quantum torus constraint on the tau function of the commutative multi-component BKP hierarchy will be constructed.

  14. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  15. Adaptive mesh fluid simulations on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Kaehler, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    We describe an implementation of compressible inviscid fluid solvers with block-structured adaptive mesh refinement on Graphics Processing Units using NVIDIA's CUDA. We show that a class of high resolution shock capturing schemes can be mapped naturally on this architecture. Using the method of lines approach with the second order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta time integration scheme, piecewise linear reconstruction, and a Harten-Lax-van Leer Riemann solver, we achieve an overall speedup of approximately 10 times faster execution on one graphics card as compared to a single core on the host computer. We attain this speedup in uniform grid runs as well as in problems with deep AMR hierarchies. Our framework can readily be applied to more general systems of conservation laws and extended to higher order shock capturing schemes. This is shown directly by an implementation of a magneto-hydrodynamic solver and comparing its performance to the pure hydrodynamic case. Finally, we also combined our CUDA parallel scheme with MPI to make the code run on GPU clusters. Close to ideal speedup is observed on up to four GPUs.

  16. Block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement for hybrid, hyperbolic + N-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Colella, Phillip

    2007-11-01

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the solution of coupled collisional and collisionless systems, based on the block structured adaptive mesh and time refinement strategy (AMR). We describe the issues associated with the discretization of the system equations and the synchronization of the numerical solution on the hierarchy of grid levels. We implement a code based on a higher order, conservative and directionally unsplit Godunov’s method for hydrodynamics; a symmetric, time centered modified symplectic scheme for collisionless component; and a multilevel, multigrid relaxation algorithm for the elliptic equation coupling the two components. Numerical results that illustrate the accuracy of the code and the relative merit of various implemented schemes are also presented.

  17. The Feasibility of Adaptive Unstructured Computations On Petaflops Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Oliker, Leonid; Heber, Gerd; Gao, Guang; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the advantages of mesh adaptation, unstructured grids, and dynamic load balancing. It illustrates parallel adaptive communications, and explains PLUM (Parallel dynamic load balancing for adaptive unstructured meshes), and PSAW (Proper Self Avoiding Walks).

  18. Visualization of grids conforming to geological structures: a topological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caumon, Guillaume; Lévy, Bruno; Castanié, Laurent; Paul, Jean-Claude

    2005-07-01

    Flexible grids are used in many Geoscience applications because they can accurately adapt to the great diversity of shapes encountered in nature. These grids raise a number difficult challenges, in particular for fast volume visualization. We propose a generic incremental slicing algorithm for versatile visualization of unstructured grids, these being constituted of arbitrary convex cells. The tradeoff between the complexity of the grid and the efficiency of the method is addressed by special-purpose data structures and customizations. A general structure based on oriented edges is defined to address the general case. When only a limited number of polyhedron types is present in the grid (zoo grids), memory usage and rendering time are reduced by using a catalog of cell types generated automatically. This data structure is further optimized to deal with stratigraphic grids made of hexahedral cells. The visualization method is applied to several gridded subsurface models conforming to geological structures.

  19. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  20. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  1. Unstructured grids on SIMD torus machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorstad, Petter E.; Schreiber, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Unstructured grids lead to unstructured communication on distributed memory parallel computers, a problem that has been considered difficult. Here, we consider adaptive, offline communication routing for a SIMD processor grid. Our approach is empirical. We use large data sets drawn from supercomputing applications instead of an analytic model of communication load. The chief contribution of this paper is an experimental demonstration of the effectiveness of certain routing heuristics. Our routing algorithm is adaptive, nonminimal, and is generally designed to exploit locality. We have a parallel implementation of the router, and we report on its performance.

  2. Adaptive triangular mesh generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Eiseman, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A general adaptive grid algorithm is developed on triangular grids. The adaptivity is provided by a combination of node addition, dynamic node connectivity and a simple node movement strategy. While the local restructuring process and the node addition mechanism take place in the physical plane, the nodes are displaced on a monitor surface, constructed from the salient features of the physical problem. An approximation to mean curvature detects changes in the direction of the monitor surface, and provides the pulling force on the nodes. Solutions to the axisymmetric Grad-Shafranov equation demonstrate the capturing, by triangles, of the plasma-vacuum interface in a free-boundary equilibrium configuration.

  3. Parallel grid population

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago

    2015-07-28

    Parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. One example embodiment is a method for parallel population of a grid with a plurality of objects using a plurality of processors. The method includes a first act of dividing a grid into n distinct grid portions, where n is the number of processors available for populating the grid. The method also includes acts of dividing a plurality of objects into n distinct sets of objects, assigning a distinct set of objects to each processor such that each processor determines by which distinct grid portion(s) each object in its distinct set of objects is at least partially bounded, and assigning a distinct grid portion to each processor such that each processor populates its distinct grid portion with any objects that were previously determined to be at least partially bounded by its distinct grid portion.

  4. Hypergraph Partitioning for Automatic Memory Hierarchy Management

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Catalyurek, Umit; Nieplocha, Jarek; Rountev, Atanas; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2007-11-15

    The paper presents present a mechanism for automatic management of the memory hierarchy, including secondary storage, in the context of a global address space parallel programming framework. The programmer specifies the parallelism and locality in the computation. The scheduling of the computation into stages, together with the movement of the associated data between secondary storage and global memory, and between global memory and local memory, is automatically managed by the framework. A novel formulation of hypergraph partitioning is used to model the optimization problem of minimizing disk I/O by improving locality of access. Experimental evaluation of the proposed approach using a sub-computation from the quantum chemistry domain shows a reduction in the disk I/O cost by upto a factor of 11, and a reduction in turnaround time by upto 97%, as compared to alternatives used in state-of-the-art quantum chemistry codes.

  5. The hierarchy of values in Jewish bioethics.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Chaya

    2011-07-01

    This article describes how ethical issues in health are approached and resolved within the framework of Jewish bioethics. Its main purpose is to explore the range of sources and methodologies used to determine the appropriate hierarchy of values for various ethical scenarios. Its major thrust is to illustrate how a divinely based but humanly negotiated ethical code stands firm upon 'red flag' principles, while at the same time, allowing for 'shades of gray' flexibility informed by given contexts. It provides significant insights and practical tools that can be instrumental in decision making for nurses and other health providers of all faiths. The following ethical domains are addressed: respect for patient autonomy, truth-telling and allocation of resources. PMID:21788289

  6. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  7. Simple Resonance Hierarchy for Surmounting Quantum Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2010-12-22

    For a hundred years violation or surmounting the Quantum Uncertainty Principle has remained a Holy Grail of both theoretical and empirical physics. Utilizing an operationally completed form of Quantum Theory cast in a string theoretic Higher Dimensional (HD) form of Dirac covariant polarized vacuum with a complex Einstein energy dependent spacetime metric, M{sub 4{+-}}C{sub 4} with sufficient degrees of freedom to be causally free of the local quantum state, we present a simple empirical model for ontologically surmounting the phenomenology of uncertainty through a Sagnac Effect RF pulsed Laser Oscillated Vacuum Energy Resonance hierarchy cast within an extended form of a Wheeler-Feynman-Cramer Transactional Calabi-Yau mirror symmetric spacetime bachcloth.

  8. Order 3 symmetry in the Clifford hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Blanchfield, Kate; Campbell, Earl; Howard, Mark

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the action of the first three levels of the Clifford hierarchy on sets of mutually unbiased bases comprising the Ivanovic mutually unbiased base (MUB) and the Alltop MUBs. Vectors in the Alltop MUBs exhibit additional symmetries when the dimension is a prime number equal to 1 modulo 3 and thus the set of all Alltop vectors splits into three Clifford orbits. These vectors form configurations with so-called Zauner subspaces, eigenspaces of order 3 elements of the Clifford group highly relevant to the SIC problem. We identify Alltop vectors as the magic states that appear in the context of fault-tolerant universal quantum computing, wherein the appearance of distinct Clifford orbits implies a surprising inequivalence between some magic states.

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM's cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  10. Tailoring the porous hierarchy of titanium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong; Azioune, Ammar; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques; Su, Bao-Lian

    2006-04-11

    First hierarchical titanium phosphate (TiPO) materials with multiple porosities of different lengths (meso-macroporous and meso-macro-macroporous) were synthesized by the self-formation process. The further tuning of the porous hierarchy by using the poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant technique was demonstrated. The macroporous structure (50-160 nm in size) of TiPO with mesoporous walls could be self-formed in the absence of any templatable agents, including surfactant molecules. On the basis of spontaneous structurization, the addition of a small quantity of nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant (e.g., 5%) led to an improvement in macroporosity in abundance and in regularity with a slight enlargement in macropore sizes to 80-250 nm. Interestingly, a secondary, larger macropore system with parallel channels 500-1000 nm in size was generated when the synthesis was performed with moderately increasing the content of surfactant (10%), giving rise to an unprecedented trimodal meso-macro-macroporous structure. A uniform three-dimensional co-continuous macroporous structure with accessible wormhole-like mesoporous walls was synthesized by using the higher content of surfactants. This is a direct demonstration of tailoring the porous hierarchy of different lengths integrated in one solid body by fine-tuning the self-formation process and the participation of surfactant. The synthesized hierarchical titanium phosphates possess interesting optical and acidic properties, which should be significant for large application potential from catalysis and separation to electrochromic devices, fuel cells, and bioactive materials. PMID:16584271

  11. Action Learning: The Possibility of Differing Hierarchies in Learning Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeadon-Lee, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the proposition that a variety of differing hierarchies exist in an action learning set at any one time, and each hierarchy has the potential to affect an individual's behaviour within the set. An interpretivist philosophy underpins the research framework adopted in this paper. Data were captured by means of 11 in-depth…

  12. The Diversity Education Dilemma: Exposing Status Hierarchies without Reinforcing Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoroso, Lisa M.; Loyd, Denise Lewin; Hoobler, Jenny M.

    2010-01-01

    A "diversity education dilemma" occurs when exposure to information concerning status hierarchies, related to demographic and other socially salient identity groups, reinforces those hierarchies in the classroom. Discussions of diversity-related issues in a variety of management courses (e.g., immigrant issues in labor relations, the composition…

  13. The Academic Structure in Japan: Institutional Hierarchy and Academic Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira

    The characteristics of the Japanese academic structure are examined with attention to the evolution of institutional hierarchy, the closed academic structure, and the effects of the academic structure upon academic research. The evolution of Japan's institutional hierarchy in academics has been tightly related to factors of nationalism,…

  14. A Validation Study of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Rex J.

    A study was conducted to expand the body of research that tests the validity of Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory in a work context where it often serves as a guide for the supervisor's relationships with his subordinates. Data was gathered by questionnaire which tested for a hierarchy of needs among instructors at four community colleges…

  15. A Second Look at Maslow's Hierarchy of Basic Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles M.

    Implications of Maslow's Need Hierarchy are considered in this paper, along with possible qualifications to the suggested structure and potential effects of superimposing relative deprivation theory onto the hierarchy as an approach to adult education. The interfacing of needs and alternative structurings is discussed in terms of two theories: (1)…

  16. Inferring heuristic classification hierarchies from natural language input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Richard; Gomez, Fernando

    1993-01-01

    A methodology for inferring hierarchies representing heuristic knowledge about the check out, control, and monitoring sub-system (CCMS) of the space shuttle launch processing system from natural language input is explained. Our method identifies failures explicitly and implicitly described in natural language by domain experts and uses those descriptions to recommend classifications for inclusion in the experts' heuristic hierarchies.

  17. Knowledge, Expectations, and Inductive Reasoning within Conceptual Hierarchies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, John D.; Hayes, Brett; Lawson, Christopher; Moloney, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Previous research (e.g. "Cognition" 64 (1997) 73) suggests that the privileged level for inductive inference in a folk biological conceptual hierarchy does not correspond to the ''basic'' level (i.e. the level at which concepts are both informative and distinct). To further explore inductive inference within conceptual hierarchies, we examine…

  18. Adaption of unstructured meshes using node movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.G.; McRae, V.D.S.

    1996-12-31

    The adaption algorithm of Benson and McRae is modified for application to unstructured grids. The weight function generation was modified for application to unstructured grids and movement was limited to prevent cross over. A NACA 0012 airfoil is used as a test case to evaluate the modified algorithm when applied to unstructured grids and compared to results obtained by Warren. An adaptive mesh solution for the Sudhoo and Hall four element airfoil is included as a demonstration case.

  19. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  20. Modelling Dominance Hierarchies Under Winner and Loser Effects.

    PubMed

    Kura, Klodeta; Broom, Mark; Kandler, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Animals that live in groups commonly form themselves into dominance hierarchies which are used to allocate important resources such as access to mating opportunities and food. In this paper, we develop a model of dominance hierarchy formation based upon the concept of winner and loser effects using a simulation-based model and consider the linearity of our hierarchy using existing and new statistical measures. Two models are analysed: when each individual in a group does not know the real ability of their opponents to win a fight and when they can estimate their opponents' ability every time they fight. This estimation may be accurate or fall within an error bound. For both models, we investigate if we can achieve hierarchy linearity, and if so, when it is established. We are particularly interested in the question of how many fights are necessary to establish a dominance hierarchy. PMID:25739931

  1. Status Hierarchy, Attractiveness Hierarchy and Sex Ratio: Three Contextual Factors Explaining the Status-Aggression Link among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaan, Michiel; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Veenstra, Rene

    2013-01-01

    The moderating effects of three specific conditions (status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio) on the link between status (popularity) and physical and relational aggression were examined in a large sample of adolescent boys ("N" = 1,665) and girls ("N" = 1,637) ("M" age = 13.60). In line with the…

  2. Lack of experience-based stratification in homing pigeon leadership hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Isobel; Pettit, Benjamin; Nagy, Máté; de Perera, Theresa Burt; Biro, Dora

    2016-01-01

    In societies that make collective decisions through leadership, a fundamental question concerns the individual attributes that allow certain group members to assume leadership roles over others. Homing pigeons form transitive leadership hierarchies during flock flights, where flock members are ranked according to the average time differences with which they lead or follow others' movement. Here, we test systematically whether leadership ranks in navigational hierarchies are correlated with prior experience of a homing task. We constructed experimental flocks of pigeons with mixed navigational experience: half of the birds within each flock had been familiarized with a specific release site through multiple previous releases, while the other half had never been released from the same site. We measured the birds' hierarchical leadership ranks, then switched the same birds' roles at a second site to test whether the relative hierarchical positions of the birds in the two subsets would reverse in response to the reversal in levels of experience. We found that while across all releases the top hierarchical positions were occupied by experienced birds significantly more often than by inexperienced ones, the remaining experienced birds were not consistently clustered in the top half—in other words, the network did not become stratified. We discuss our results in light of the adaptive value of structuring leadership hierarchies according to ‘merit’ (here, navigational experience). PMID:26909176

  3. The hierarchy of stability and predictability in orthognathic surgery with rigid fixation: an update and extension.

    PubMed

    Proffit, William R; Turvey, Timothy A; Phillips, Ceib

    2007-01-01

    A hierarchy of stability exists among the types of surgical movements that are possible with orthognathic surgery. This report updates the hierarchy, focusing on comparison of the stability of procedures when rigid fixation is used. Two procedures not previously placed in the hierarchy now are included: correction of asymmetry is stable with rigid fixation and repositioning of the chin also is very stable. During the first post-surgical year, surgical movements in patients treated for Class II/long face problems tend to be more stable than those treated for Class III problems. Clinically relevant changes (more than 2 mm) occur in a surprisingly large percentage of orthognathic surgery patients from one to five years post-treatment, after surgical healing is complete. During the first post-surgical year, patients treated for Class II/long face problems are more stable than those treated for Class III problems; from one to five years post-treatment, some patients in both groups experience skeletal change, but the Class III patients then are more stable than the Class II/long face patients. Fewer patients exhibit long-term changes in the dental occlusion than skeletal changes, because the dentition usually adapts to the skeletal change. PMID:17470277

  4. Lack of experience-based stratification in homing pigeon leadership hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Watts, Isobel; Pettit, Benjamin; Nagy, Máté; de Perera, Theresa Burt; Biro, Dora

    2016-01-01

    In societies that make collective decisions through leadership, a fundamental question concerns the individual attributes that allow certain group members to assume leadership roles over others. Homing pigeons form transitive leadership hierarchies during flock flights, where flock members are ranked according to the average time differences with which they lead or follow others' movement. Here, we test systematically whether leadership ranks in navigational hierarchies are correlated with prior experience of a homing task. We constructed experimental flocks of pigeons with mixed navigational experience: half of the birds within each flock had been familiarized with a specific release site through multiple previous releases, while the other half had never been released from the same site. We measured the birds' hierarchical leadership ranks, then switched the same birds' roles at a second site to test whether the relative hierarchical positions of the birds in the two subsets would reverse in response to the reversal in levels of experience. We found that while across all releases the top hierarchical positions were occupied by experienced birds significantly more often than by inexperienced ones, the remaining experienced birds were not consistently clustered in the top half-in other words, the network did not become stratified. We discuss our results in light of the adaptive value of structuring leadership hierarchies according to 'merit' (here, navigational experience). PMID:26909176

  5. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  6. Dynamic Power Grid Simulation

    2015-09-14

    GridDyn is a part of power grid simulation toolkit. The code is designed using modern object oriented C++ methods utilizing C++11 and recent Boost libraries to ensure compatibility with multiple operating systems and environments.

  7. IPG Power Grid Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This presentation will describe what is meant by grids and then cover the current state of the IPG. This will include an overview of the middleware that is key to the operation of the grid. The presentation will then describe some of the future directions that are planned for the IPG. Finally the presentation will conclude with a brief overview of the Global Grid Forum, which is a key activity that will contribute to the successful availability of grid components.

  8. Information Metacatalog for a Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolano, Paul

    2007-01-01

    SWIM is a Software Information Metacatalog that gathers detailed information about the software components and packages installed on a grid resource. Information is currently gathered for Executable and Linking Format (ELF) executables and shared libraries, Java classes, shell scripts, and Perl and Python modules. SWIM is built on top of the POUR framework, which is described in the preceding article. SWIM consists of a set of Perl modules for extracting software information from a system, an XML schema defining the format of data that can be added by users, and a POUR XML configuration file that describes how these elements are used to generate periodic, on-demand, and user-specified information. Periodic software information is derived mainly from the package managers used on each system. SWIM collects information from native package managers in FreeBSD, Solaris, and IRX as well as the RPM, Perl, and Python package managers on multiple platforms. Because not all software is available, or installed in package form, SWIM also crawls the set of relevant paths from the File System Hierarchy Standard that defines the standard file system structure used by all major UNIX distributions. Using these two techniques, the vast majority of software installed on a system can be located. SWIM computes the same information gathered by the periodic routines for specific files on specific hosts, and locates software on a system given only its name and type.

  9. Chimera Grid Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Buning, Pieter G.; Meakin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) is a software package for performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis utilizing the Chimera-overset-grid method. For modeling flows with viscosity about geometrically complex bodies in relative motion, the Chimera-overset-grid method is among the most computationally cost-effective methods for obtaining accurate aerodynamic results. CGT contains a large collection of tools for generating overset grids, preparing inputs for computer programs that solve equations of flow on the grids, and post-processing of flow-solution data. The tools in CGT include grid editing tools, surface-grid-generation tools, volume-grid-generation tools, utility scripts, configuration scripts, and tools for post-processing (including generation of animated images of flows and calculating forces and moments exerted on affected bodies). One of the tools, denoted OVERGRID, is a graphical user interface (GUI) that serves to visualize the grids and flow solutions and provides central access to many other tools. The GUI facilitates the generation of grids for a new flow-field configuration. Scripts that follow the grid generation process can then be constructed to mostly automate grid generation for similar configurations. CGT is designed for use in conjunction with a computer-aided-design program that provides the geometry description of the bodies, and a flow-solver program.

  10. Visual Methods for Model and Grid Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Alex

    1998-01-01

    This joint research interchange proposal allowed us to contribute in two directions that are of interest to NASA. These are: (a) data level comparative visualization of experimental and computational fluid flow, and (b) visualization tools for analysis of adaptively refined Cartesian grids.

  11. Computational Aerothermodynamic Simulation Issues on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; White, Jeffery A.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of physical models for gas chemistry and turbulence from the structured grid codes LAURA and VULCAN into the unstructured grid code FUN3D is described. A directionally Symmetric, Total Variation Diminishing (STVD) algorithm and an entropy fix (eigenvalue limiter) keyed to local cell Reynolds number are introduced to improve solution quality for hypersonic aeroheating applications. A simple grid-adaptation procedure is incorporated within the flow solver. Simulations of flow over an ellipsoid (perfect gas, inviscid), Shuttle Orbiter (viscous, chemical nonequilibrium) and comparisons to the structured grid solvers LAURA (cylinder, Shuttle Orbiter) and VULCAN (flat plate) are presented to show current capabilities. The quality of heating in 3D stagnation regions is very sensitive to algorithm options in general, high aspect ratio tetrahedral elements complicate the simulation of high Reynolds number, viscous flow as compared to locally structured meshes aligned with the flow.

  12. Insightful Workflow For Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Charles Earl

    2008-10-09

    We developed a workflow adaptation and scheduling system for Grid workflow. The system currently interfaces with and uses the Karajan workflow system. We developed machine learning agents that provide the planner/scheduler with information needed to make decisions about when and how to replan. The Kubrick restructures workflow at runtime, making it unique among workflow scheduling systems. The existing Kubrick system provides a platform on which to integrate additional quality of service constraints and in which to explore the use of an ensemble of scheduling and planning algorithms. This will be the principle thrust of our Phase II work.

  13. Grid Architecture 2

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The report describes work done on Grid Architecture under the auspices of the Department of Electricity Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability in 2015. As described in the first Grid Architecture report, the primary purpose of this work is to provide stakeholder insight about grid issues so as to enable superior decision making on their part. Doing this requires the creation of various work products, including oft-times complex diagrams, analyses, and explanations. This report provides architectural insights into several important grid topics and also describes work done to advance the science of Grid Architecture as well.

  14. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  15. Application of a multi-level grid method to transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, J. C., Jr.; Brandt, A.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-level grid method was studied as a possible means of accelerating convergence in relaxation calculations for transonic flows. The method employs a hierarchy of grids, ranging from very coarse to fine. The coarser grids are used to diminish the magnitude of the smooth part of the residuals. The method was applied to the solution of the transonic small disturbance equation for the velocity potential in conservation form. Nonlifting transonic flow past a parabolic arc airfoil is studied with meshes of both constant and variable step size.

  16. On optimal hierarchy of load-bearing biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gao, Huajian

    2011-01-01

    Load-bearing biological materials such as shell, mineralized tendon and bone exhibit two to seven levels of structural hierarchy based on constituent materials (biominerals and proteins) of relatively poor mechanical properties. A key question that remains unanswered is what determines the number of hierarchical levels in these materials. Here we develop a quasi-self-similar hierarchical model to show that, depending on the mineral content, there exists an optimal level of structural hierarchy for maximal toughness of biocomposites. The predicted optimal levels of hierarchy and cooperative deformation across multiple structural levels are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. PMID:20810437

  17. Tau function of the CKP hierarchy and nonlinearizable virasoro symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liang; Wu, Chao-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a single tau function that represents the C-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (CKP) hierarchy in a generalized Hirota ‘bilinear’ equation. The actions on the tau function by additional symmetries for the hierarchy are also calculated, which involve strictly more than a central extension of the w^C_\\infty -algebra. As an application, for Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies associated to affine Kac-Moody algebras of type C, we obtain a formula to compute the obstacles in linearizing their Virasoro symmetries and hence prove the Virasoro symmetries to be nonlinearizable when acting on the tau function.

  18. Quasi-periodic Solutions to the K(-2, -2) Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lihua; Geng, Xianguo

    2016-07-01

    With the help of the characteristic polynomial of Lax matrix for the K(-2, -2) hierarchy, we define a hyperelliptic curve 𝒦n+1 of arithmetic genus n+1. By introducing the Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function, the K(-2, -2) hierarchy is decomposed into Dubrovin-type differential equations. Based on the theory of hyperelliptic curve, the explicit Riemann theta function representation of meromorphic function is given, and from which the quasi-periodic solutions to the K(-2, -2) hierarchy are obtained.

  19. Measuring the hierarchy of feedforward networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we explore the concept of hierarchy as a quantifiable descriptor of ordered structures, departing from the definition of three conditions to be satisfied for a hierarchical structure: order, predictability, and pyramidal structure. According to these principles, we define a hierarchical index taking concepts from graph and information theory. This estimator allows to quantify the hierarchical character of any system susceptible to be abstracted in a feedforward causal graph, i.e., a directed acyclic graph defined in a single connected structure. Our hierarchical index is a balance between this predictability and pyramidal condition by the definition of two entropies: one attending the onward flow and the other for the backward reversion. We show how this index allows to identify hierarchical, antihierarchical, and nonhierarchical structures. Our formalism reveals that departing from the defined conditions for a hierarchical structure, feedforward trees and the inverted tree graphs emerge as the only causal structures of maximal hierarchical and antihierarchical systems respectively. Conversely, null values of the hierarchical index are attributed to a number of different configuration networks; from linear chains, due to their lack of pyramid structure, to full-connected feedforward graphs where the diversity of onward pathways is canceled by the uncertainty (lack of predictability) when going backward. Some illustrative examples are provided for the distinction among these three types of hierarchical causal graphs.

  20. Escalated conflict in a social hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Cant, M.A; English, S; Reeve, H.K; Field, J

    2006-01-01

    Animals that live in cooperative societies form hierarchies in which dominant individuals reap disproportionate benefits from group cooperation. The stability of these societies requires subordinates to accept their inferior status rather than engage in escalated conflict with dominants over rank. Applying the logic of animal contests to these cases predicts that escalated conflict is more likely where subordinates are reproductively suppressed, where group productivity is high, relatedness is low, and where subordinates are relatively strong. We tested these four predictions in the field on co-foundress associations of the paper wasp Polistes dominulus by inducing contests over dominance rank experimentally. Subordinates with lower levels of ovarian development, and those in larger, more productive groups, were more likely to escalate in conflict with their dominant, as predicted. Neither genetic relatedness nor relative body size had significant effects on the probability of escalation. The original dominant emerged as the winner in all except one escalated contest. The results provide the first evidence that reproductive suppression of subordinates increases the threat of escalated conflict, and hence that reproductive sharing can promote stability of the dominant–subordinate relationship. PMID:17015353

  1. Measuring the hierarchy of feedforward networks.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Rodríguez-Caso, Carlos; Goñi, Joaquín; Solé, Ricard

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we explore the concept of hierarchy as a quantifiable descriptor of ordered structures, departing from the definition of three conditions to be satisfied for a hierarchical structure: order, predictability, and pyramidal structure. According to these principles, we define a hierarchical index taking concepts from graph and information theory. This estimator allows to quantify the hierarchical character of any system susceptible to be abstracted in a feedforward causal graph, i.e., a directed acyclic graph defined in a single connected structure. Our hierarchical index is a balance between this predictability and pyramidal condition by the definition of two entropies: one attending the onward flow and the other for the backward reversion. We show how this index allows to identify hierarchical, antihierarchical, and nonhierarchical structures. Our formalism reveals that departing from the defined conditions for a hierarchical structure, feedforward trees and the inverted tree graphs emerge as the only causal structures of maximal hierarchical and antihierarchical systems respectively. Conversely, null values of the hierarchical index are attributed to a number of different configuration networks; from linear chains, due to their lack of pyramid structure, to full-connected feedforward graphs where the diversity of onward pathways is canceled by the uncertainty (lack of predictability) when going backward. Some illustrative examples are provided for the distinction among these three types of hierarchical causal graphs. PMID:21456850

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  3. Grid Technology as a Cyber Infrastructure for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how grids and grid service technologies can be used to develop an infrastructure for the Earth Science community. This cyberinfrastructure would be populated with a hierarchy of services, including discipline specific services such those needed by the Earth Science community as well as a set of core services that are needed by most applications. This core would include data-oriented services used for accessing and moving data as well as computer-oriented services used to broker access to resources and control the execution of tasks on the grid. The availability of such an Earth Science cyberinfrastructure would ease the development of Earth Science applications. With such a cyberinfrastructure, application work flows could be created to extract data from one or more of the Earth Science archives and then process it by passing it through various persistent services that are part of the persistent cyberinfrastructure, such as services to perform subsetting, reformatting, data mining and map projections.

  4. Trade in water and commodities as adaptations to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, R. B.; Hertel, T. W.; Prousevitch, A.; Baldos, U. L. C.; Frolking, S. E.; Liu, J.; Grogan, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The human capacity for altering the water cycle has been well documented and given the expected change due to population, income growth, biofuels, climate, and associated land use change, there remains great uncertainty in both the degree of increased pressure on land and water resources and in our ability to adapt to these changes. Alleviating regional shortages in water supply can be carried out in a spatial hierarchy through i) direct trade of water between all regions, ii) development of infrastructure to improve water availability within regions (e.g. impounding rivers), iii) via inter-basin hydrological transfer between neighboring regions and, iv) via virtual water trade. These adaptation strategies can be managed via market trade in water and commodities to identify those strategies most likely to be adopted. This work combines the physically-based University of New Hampshire Water Balance Model (WBM) with the macro-scale Purdue University Simplified International Model of agricultural Prices Land use and the Environment (SIMPLE) to explore the interaction of supply and demand for fresh water globally. In this work we use a newly developed grid cell-based version of SIMPLE to achieve a more direct connection between the two modeling paradigms of physically-based models with optimization-driven approaches characteristic of economic models. We explore questions related to the global and regional impact of water scarcity and water surplus on the ability of regions to adapt to future change. Allowing for a variety of adaptation strategies such as direct trade of water and expanding the built water infrastructure, as well as indirect trade in commodities, will reduce overall global water stress and, in some regions, significantly reduce their vulnerability to these future changes.

  5. Understanding The Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of what the Smart Grid is and what is being done to define and implement it. The electric industry is preparing to undergo a transition from a centralized, producer-controlled network to a decentralized, user-interactive one. Not only will the technology involved in the electric grid change, but the entire business model of the industry will change too. A major objective of the report is to identify the changes that the Smart Grid will bring about so that industry participants can be prepared to face them. A concise overview of the development of the Smart Grid is provided. It presents an understanding of what the Smart Grid is, what new business opportunities or risks might come about due to its introduction, and what activities are already taking place regarding defining or implementing the Smart Grid. This report will be of interest to the utility industry, energy service providers, aggregators, and regulators. It will also be of interest to home/building automation vendors, information technology vendors, academics, consultants, and analysts. The scope of the report includes an overview of the Smart Grid which identifies the main components of the Smart Grid, describes its characteristics, and describes how the Smart Grid differs from the current electric grid. The overview also identifies the key concepts involved in the transition to the Smart Grid and explains why a Smart Grid is needed by identifying the deficiencies of the current grid and the need for new investment. The report also looks at the impact of the Smart Grid, identifying other industries which have gone through a similar transition, identifying the overall benefits of the Smart Grid, and discussing the impact of the Smart Grid on industry participants. Furthermore, the report looks at current activities to implement the Smart Grid including utility projects, industry collaborations, and government initiatives. Finally, the report takes a look at key technology

  6. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  7. Emergence of hierarchy in cost-driven growth of spatial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louf, Rémi; Jensen, Pablo; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-05-01

    One of the most important features of spatial networks-such as transportation networks, power grids, the Internet, and neural networks-is the existence of a cost associated with the length of links. Such a cost has a profound influence on the global structure of these networks, which usually display a hierarchical spatial organization. The link between local constraints and large-scale structure is not elucidated, however, and we introduce here a generic model for the growth of spatial networks based on the general concept of cost-benefit analysis. This model depends essentially on a single scale and produces a family of networks that range from the star graph to the minimum spanning tree and are characterized by a continuously varying exponent. We show that spatial hierarchy emerges naturally, with structures composed of various hubs controlling geographically separated service areas, and appears as a large-scale consequence of local cost-benefit considerations. Our model thus provides the basic building blocks for a better understanding of the evolution of spatial networks and their properties. We also find that, surprisingly, the average detour is minimal in the intermediate regime as a result of a large diversity in link lengths. Finally, we estimate the important parameters for various world railway networks and find that, remarkably, they all fall in this intermediate regime, suggesting that spatial hierarchy is a crucial feature for these systems and probably possesses an important evolutionary advantage.

  8. Emergence of hierarchy in cost-driven growth of spatial networks

    PubMed Central

    Louf, Rémi; Jensen, Pablo; Barthelemy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important features of spatial networks—such as transportation networks, power grids, the Internet, and neural networks—is the existence of a cost associated with the length of links. Such a cost has a profound influence on the global structure of these networks, which usually display a hierarchical spatial organization. The link between local constraints and large-scale structure is not elucidated, however, and we introduce here a generic model for the growth of spatial networks based on the general concept of cost–benefit analysis. This model depends essentially on a single scale and produces a family of networks that range from the star graph to the minimum spanning tree and are characterized by a continuously varying exponent. We show that spatial hierarchy emerges naturally, with structures composed of various hubs controlling geographically separated service areas, and appears as a large-scale consequence of local cost–benefit considerations. Our model thus provides the basic building blocks for a better understanding of the evolution of spatial networks and their properties. We also find that, surprisingly, the average detour is minimal in the intermediate regime as a result of a large diversity in link lengths. Finally, we estimate the important parameters for various world railway networks and find that, remarkably, they all fall in this intermediate regime, suggesting that spatial hierarchy is a crucial feature for these systems and probably possesses an important evolutionary advantage. PMID:23674674

  9. Grid enabled Service Support Environment - SSE Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goor, Erwin; Paepen, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The SSEGrid project is an ESA/ESRIN project which started in 2009 and is executed by two Belgian companies, Spacebel and VITO, and one Dutch company, Dutch Space. The main project objectives are the introduction of a Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure at the Image Processing Centre for earth observation products at VITO and the inclusion of Grid processing services in the Service Support Environment (SSE) at ESRIN. The Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure is meant to support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators (PI) and allow the design and execution of multi-sensor applications with geographically spread data while minimising the transfer of huge volumes of data. In the first scenario, 'support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators', we aim to provide processing power close to the EO-data at the processing and archiving centres. We will allow a PI (non-Grid expert user) to upload his own algorithm, as a process, and his own auxiliary data from the SSE Portal and use them in an earth observation workflow on the SSEGrid Infrastructure. The PI can design and submit workflows using his own processes, processes made available by VITO/ESRIN and possibly processes from other users that are available on the Grid. These activities must be user-friendly and not requiring detailed knowledge about the underlying Grid middleware. In the second scenario we aim to design, implement and demonstrate a methodology to set up an earth observation processing facility, which uses large volumes of data from various geographically spread sensors. The aim is to provide solutions for problems that we face today, like wasting bandwidth by copying large volumes of data to one location. We will avoid this by processing the data where they are. The multi-mission Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure will allow developing and executing complex and massive multi-sensor data (re-)processing applications more

  10. Hierarchy of scales in B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-08-31

    We show that the naive factorization approach can accommodate the existence of the observed hierarchy of branching ratios for the B{yields}PS decays (P stands for pseudoscalar and S for scalar mesons respectively.

  11. Maslow's Implied Matrix: A Clarification of the Need Hierarchy Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Edward

    1978-01-01

    Maslow's need hierarchy theory is restated by means of a matrix arrangement of the constructs within the theory. After consideration of the consequences of this restatement, some significant research is discussed and directions for future research suggested. (Author)

  12. Commuting flows and conservation laws for noncommutative Lax hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamanaka, Masashi

    2005-05-01

    We discuss commuting flows and conservation laws for Lax hierarchies on noncommutative spaces in the framework of the Sato theory. On commutative spaces, the Sato theory has revealed essential aspects of the integrability for wide class of soliton equations which are derived from the Lax hierarchies in terms of pseudodifferential operators. Noncommutative extension of the Sato theory has been already studied by the author and Toda, and the existence of various noncommutative Lax hierarchies are guaranteed. In this paper, we present conservation laws for the noncommutative Lax hierarchies with both space-space and space-time noncommutativities and prove the existence of infinite number of conserved densities. We also give the explicit representations of them in terms of Lax operators. Our results include noncommutative versions of KP, KdV, Boussinesq, coupled KdV, Sawada-Kotera, modified KdV equation and so on.

  13. A Hierarchy of Basic Organizational Needs in Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Hugh L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    This study, designed to test the hypothesis that decision making in formal organizations is related to a hierarchy of needs, gained empirical support for the hypothesis from the results of a sampling of 139 private liberal arts college presidents. (JH)

  14. Analysing hierarchy in the organization of biological and physical systems.

    PubMed

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, Gerard A J M

    2008-02-01

    A structured approach is discussed for analysing hierarchy in the organization of biological and physical systems. The need for a structured approach follows from the observation that many hierarchies in the literature apply conflicting hierarchy rules and include ill-defined systems. As an alternative, we suggest a framework that is based on the following analytical steps: determination of the succession stage of the universe, identification of a specific system as part of the universe, specification of external influences on a system's creation and analysis of a system's internal organization. At the end, the paper discusses practical implications of the proposed method for the analysis of system organization and hierarchy in biology, ecology and physics. PMID:18211280

  15. Individual recognition, dominance hierarchies and winner and loser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Dugatkin, Lee Alan; Earley, Ryan L.

    2004-01-01

    Winner and loser effects are defined as an increased probability of winning an aggressive interaction at time T, based on victories at time T-1, T-2, etc., and an increased probability of losing at time T, based on losses at time T-1, T-2, etc., respectively. Prior theoretical work on dominance hierarchy formation has demonstrated that when players are not capable of individual recognition, loser effects always produce a clear top-ranked (alpha) individual, but all other ranks in a group remain unclear; whereas winner effects always produce strict linear hierarchies in which the rank of each individual is clear. Paradoxically, however, when individual recognition--a phenomenon long thought to stabilize hierarchies--is possible, winner and loser effects have no impact on the probability of forming strict linear hierarchies. PMID:15306327

  16. Neutrino mass hierarchy determination for theta{sub 13} = 0

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2010-03-30

    We examine the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy in the limit theta{sub 13} = 0 using atmospheric neutrinos as the source. In this limit, theta{sub 13} driven matter effects are absent so independent measurements of DELTA{sub 31} and DELTA{sub 32} can, in principle, lead to hierarchy determination. Since their difference is DELTA{sub 21}, one needs an experimental arrangement where DELTA{sub 21}L/E > or approx. 1 can be achieved. This can be satisfied by atmospheric neutrinos which have a large range of L and E. Still, we find that hierarchy determination in the theta{sub 13} = 0 limit with atmospheric neutrinos is not a realistic possibility, even in conjunction with a beam experiment like T2K or NOnuA. We discuss why, and also reiterate the general conditions for hierarchy determination if theta{sub 13} = 0.

  17. Ambiguities in the grid-inefficiency correction for Frisch-Grid Ionization Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bencardino, R.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-05-01

    Ionization chambers with Frisch grids have been very successfully applied to neutron-induced fission-fragment studies during the past 20 years. They are radiation resistant and can be easily adapted to the experimental conditions. The use of Frisch grids has the advantage to remove the angular dependency from the charge induced on the anode plate. However, due to the Grid Inefficiency (GI) in shielding the charges, the anode signal remains slightly angular dependent. The correction for the GI is, however, essential to determine the correct energy of the ionizing particles. GI corrections can amount to a few percent of the anode signal. Presently, two contradicting correction methods are considered in literature. The first method adding the angular-dependent part of the signal to the signal pulse height; the second method subtracting the former from the latter. Both additive and subtractive approaches were investigated in an experiment where a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) was employed to detect the spontaneous fission fragments (FF) emitted by a 252Cf source. Two parallel-wire grids with different wire spacing (1 and 2 mm, respectively), were used individually, in the same chamber side. All the other experimental conditions were unchanged. The 2 mm grid featured more than double the GI of the 1 mm grid. The induced charge on the anode in both measurements was compared, before and after GI correction. Before GI correction, the 2 mm grid resulted in a lower pulse-height distribution than the 1 mm grid. After applying both GI corrections to both measurements only the additive approach led to consistent grid independent pulse-height distributions. The application of the subtractive correction on the contrary led to inconsistent, grid-dependent results. It is also shown that the impact of either of the correction methods is small on the FF mass distributions of 235U(nth, f).

  18. Securing smart grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Kosaleswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, M. YogaTeja; Reddy G. M., Sreerama; Madhusudhan, E.; AlMuhteb, Sulaiman

    2013-03-01

    In the developing countries electrical energy is very important for its all-round improvement by saving thousands of dollars and investing them in other sector for development. For Growing needs of power existing hierarchical, centrally controlled grid of the 20th Century is not sufficient. To produce and utilize effective power supply for industries or people we should have Smarter Electrical grids that address the challenges of the existing power grid. The Smart grid can be considered as a modern electric power grid infrastructure for enhanced efficiency and reliability through automated control, high-power converters, modern communications infrastructure along with modern IT services, sensing and metering technologies, and modern energy management techniques based on the optimization of demand, energy and network availability and so on. The main objective of this paper is to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in smart grid communications as well as critical issues on smart grid technologies primarily in terms of information and communication technology (ICT) issues like security, efficiency to communications layer field. In this paper we propose new model for security in Smart Grid Technology that contains Security Module(SM) along with DEM which will enhance security in Grid. It is expected that this paper will provide a better understanding of the technologies, potential advantages and research challenges of the smart grid and provoke interest among the research community to further explore this promising research area.

  19. Supersymmetry breaking from superstrings and the gauge hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-07-11

    The gauge hierarchy problem is reviewed and a class of effective field theories obtained from superstrings is described. These are characterized by a classical symmetry, related to the space-time duality of string theory, that is responsible for the suppression of observable supersymmetry breaking effects. At the quantum level, the symmetry is broken by anomalies that provide the seed of observable supersymmetry breaking, and an acceptably large gauge hierarchy may be generated. 39 refs.

  20. Neutrino mass hierarchy extraction using atmospheric neutrinos in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Razzaque, Soebur

    2008-11-01

    We show that the measurements of 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos by an upcoming array of densely-packed phototubes buried deep inside the IceCube detector at the South Pole can be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} close to the present bound, if the hierarchy is normal. These results are obtained for an exposure of 100 Mton years and systematic uncertainties up to 10%.

  1. Honeycomb phononic crystals with self-similar hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousanezhad, Davood; Babaee, Sahab; Ghosh, Ranajay; Mahdi, Elsadig; Bertoldi, Katia; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2015-09-01

    We highlight the effect of structural hierarchy and deformation on band structure and wave-propagation behavior of two-dimensional phononic crystals. Our results show that the topological hierarchical architecture and instability-induced pattern transformations of the structure under compression can be effectively used to tune the band gaps and directionality of phononic crystals. The work provides insights into the role of structural organization and hierarchy in regulating the dynamic behavior of phononic crystals, and opportunities for developing tunable phononic devices.

  2. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  3. Reverse hierarchy theory and medical image perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, T.; Manning, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    We are unsure about what information is extracted from an image to allow a decision about pathology to be made. Our knowledge of the interplay between top down processing or bottom up, local or global perception, perceptual or cognitive processes is uncertain. However recent research has emphasised the importance of the global or holistic look in medical image perception in which recognition of abnormalities precedes search. Reverse Hierarchy Theory [1] is a useful general theory that helps to explain this. It also enables us to understand what information is extracted from an image and how this relates to expertise. Essentially the theory states that perceptual learning begins at high levels areas and progresses down to lower level areas when better signal to noise is needed. So perceptual learning, defined as an improvement in sensory abilities after training, stems from a gradual top down guided increase in usability of first high then lower level task relevant information. Evaluation of the scan paths of groups of observers with different levels of expertise when undertaking a lung nodule perception task seems to be consistent with the theory. Experts' perception is generally immediate and holistic suggesting high level representations whereas those with an intermediate level of expertise tend to be more variable in their scan paths. Interestingly naÃve observers have eye tracking metrics that are more similar to experts suggesting they take a common sense approach using perceptual skills we all have as they lack experience in being able to access the low level information from the chest radiograph.

  4. Grid generation for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    A general survey of grid generators is presented with a concern for understanding why grids are necessary, how they are applied, and how they are generated. After an examination of the need for meshes, the overall applications setting is established with a categorization of the various connectivity patterns. This is split between structured grids and unstructured meshes. Altogether, the categorization establishes the foundation upon which grid generation techniques are developed. The two primary categories are algebraic techniques and partial differential equation techniques. These are each split into basic parts, and accordingly are individually examined in some detail. In the process, the interrelations between the various parts are accented. From the established background in the primary techniques, consideration is shifted to the topic of interactive grid generation and then to adaptive meshes. The setting for adaptivity is established with a suitable means to monitor severe solution behavior. Adaptive grids are considered first and are followed by adaptive triangular meshes. Then the consideration shifts to the temporal coupling between grid generators and PDE-solvers. To conclude, a reflection upon the discussion, herein, is given.

  5. Grid generation for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    A general survey of grid generators is presented with a concern for understanding why grids are necessary, how they are applied, and how they are generated. After an examination of the need for meshes, the overall applications setting is established with a categorization of the various connectivity patterns. This is split between structured grids and unstructured meshes. Altogether, the categorization establishes the foundation upon which grid generation techniques are developed. The two primary categories are algebraic techniques and partial differential equation techniques. These are each split into basic parts, and accordingly are individually examined in some detail. In the process, the interrelations between the various parts are accented. From the established background in the primary techniques, consideration is shifted to the topic of interactive grid generation and then to adaptive meshes. The setting for adaptivity is established with a suitable means to monitor severe solution behavior. Adaptive grids are considered first and are followed by adaptive triangular meshes. Then the consideration shifts to the temporal coupling between grid generators and PDE-solvers. To conclude, a reflection upon the discussion, herein, is given.

  6. Solar cell grid patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A grid pattern is described for a solar cell of the type which includes a semiconductive layer doped to a first polarity and a top counter-doped layer. The grid pattern comprises a plurality of concentric conductive grids of selected geometric shapes which are centered about the center of the exposed active surface of the counter-doped layer. Connected to the grids is one or more conductors which extend to the cell's periphery. For the pattern area, the grids and conductors are arranged in the pattern to minimize the maximum distance which any injected majority carriers have to travel to reach any of the grids or conductors. The pattern has a multiaxes symmetry with respect to the cell center to minimize the maximum temperature differentials between points on the cell surface and to provide a more uniform temperature distribution across the cell face.

  7. Enhanced Elliptic Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    2007-01-01

    An enhanced method of elliptic grid generation has been invented. Whereas prior methods require user input of certain grid parameters, this method provides for these parameters to be determined automatically. "Elliptic grid generation" signifies generation of generalized curvilinear coordinate grids through solution of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). Usually, such grids are fitted to bounding bodies and used in numerical solution of other PDEs like those of fluid flow, heat flow, and electromagnetics. Such a grid is smooth and has continuous first and second derivatives (and possibly also continuous higher-order derivatives), grid lines are appropriately stretched or clustered, and grid lines are orthogonal or nearly so over most of the grid domain. The source terms in the grid-generating PDEs (hereafter called "defining" PDEs) make it possible for the grid to satisfy requirements for clustering and orthogonality properties in the vicinity of specific surfaces in three dimensions or in the vicinity of specific lines in two dimensions. The grid parameters in question are decay parameters that appear in the source terms of the inhomogeneous defining PDEs. The decay parameters are characteristic lengths in exponential- decay factors that express how the influences of the boundaries decrease with distance from the boundaries. These terms govern the rates at which distance between adjacent grid lines change with distance from nearby boundaries. Heretofore, users have arbitrarily specified decay parameters. However, the characteristic lengths are coupled with the strengths of the source terms, such that arbitrary specification could lead to conflicts among parameter values. Moreover, the manual insertion of decay parameters is cumbersome for static grids and infeasible for dynamically changing grids. In the present method, manual insertion and user specification of decay parameters are neither required nor allowed. Instead, the decay parameters are

  8. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  9. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  10. Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, M; Falgout, R; MacLachlan, S; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J

    2004-04-09

    Our ability to simulate physical processes numerically is constrained by our ability to solve the resulting linear systems, prompting substantial research into the development of multiscale iterative methods capable of solving these linear systems with an optimal amount of effort. Overcoming the limitations of geometric multigrid methods to simple geometries and differential equations, algebraic multigrid methods construct the multigrid hierarchy based only on the given matrix. While this allows for efficient black-box solution of the linear systems associated with discretizations of many elliptic differential equations, it also results in a lack of robustness due to assumptions made on the near-null spaces of these matrices. This paper introduces an extension to algebraic multigrid methods that removes the need to make such assumptions by utilizing an adaptive process. The principles which guide the adaptivity are highlighted, as well as their application to algebraic multigrid solution of certain symmetric positive-definite linear systems.

  11. Improving the calculation of rovibrational spectra of five-atom molecules with three identical atoms by using a C3upsilonG6 symmetry-adapted grid: applied to CH3D and CHD3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2005-10-15

    In this paper we report two improvements on the approach we have used to compute rovibrational levels of methane and apply the new ideas to calculate rovibrational levels of two methane isotopomers CH3D and CHD3. Both improvements make the bend calculation better. The first improvement is a G6-invariant (or C3upsilon-invariant) grid which is designed such that each point on the grid is mapped to another point on the grid by any of the G6 operations. The second improvement is the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) to compute the bend potential matrix-vector products. The FFT matrix-vector product is about three and ten times faster than the previous sequential summation method for the J=0 and J>0 cases, respectively. The calculated J=1 rovibrational levels of CH3D and CHD3 on the Schwenke and Partridge [Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 57, 887 (2001)] ab initio potential are in good agreement (within 6 cm(-1) for the levels up to 3000 cm(-1)) with the experimental data. The agreement is even better (within 0.1 cm(-1) for the levels up to 6000 cm(-1)) if the associated J=0 energies are subtracted. PMID:16252944

  12. Spaceflight Operations Services Grid (SOSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Thigpen, William W.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to adapt existing space flight operations services to new emerging Grid technologies we are developing a Grid-based prototype space flight operations Grid. This prototype is based on the operational services being provided to the International Space Station's Payload operations located at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama. The prototype services will be Grid or Web enabled and provided to four user communities through portal technology. Users will have the opportunity to assess the value and feasibility of Grid technologies to their specific areas or disciplines. In this presentation descriptions of the prototype development, User-based services, Grid-based services and status of the project will be presented. Expected benefits, findings and observations (if any) to date will also be discussed. The focus of the presentation will be on the project in general, status to date and future plans. The End-use services to be included in the prototype are voice, video, telemetry, commanding, collaboration tools and visualization among others. Security is addressed throughout the project and is being designed into the Grid technologies and standards development. The project is divided into three phases. Phase One establishes the baseline User-based services required for space flight operations listed above. Phase Two involves applying Gridlweb technologies to the User-based services and development of portals for access by users. Phase Three will allow NASA and end users to evaluate the services and determine the future of the technology as applied to space flight operational services. Although, Phase One, which includes the development of the quasi-operational User-based services of the prototype, development will be completed by March 2004, the application of Grid technologies to these services will have just begun. We will provide status of the Grid technologies to the individual User-based services. This effort will result in an extensible

  13. Spaceflight Operations Services Grid (SOSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Robert N.; Thigpen, William W.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to adapt existing space flight operations services to new emerging Grid technologies we are developing a Grid-based prototype space flight operations Grid. This prototype is based on the operational services being provided to the International Space Station's Payload operations located at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama. The prototype services will be Grid or Web enabled and provided to four user communities through portal technology. Users will have the opportunity to assess the value and feasibility of Grid technologies to their specific areas or disciplines. In this presentation descriptions of the prototype development, User-based services, Grid-based services and status of the project will be presented. Expected benefits, findings and observations (if any) to date will also be discussed. The focus of the presentation will be on the project in general, status to date and future plans. The End-use services to be included in the prototype are voice, video, telemetry, commanding, collaboration tools and visualization among others. Security is addressed throughout the project and is being designed into the Grid technologies and standards development. The project is divided into three phases. Phase One establishes the baseline User-based services required for space flight operations listed above. Phase Two involves applying Gridlweb technologies to the User-based services and development of portals for access by users. Phase Three will allow NASA and end users to evaluate the services and determine the future of the technology as applied to space flight operational services. Although, Phase One, which includes the development of the quasi-operational User-based services of the prototype, development will be completed by March 2004, the application of Grid technologies to these services will have just begun. We will provide status of the Grid technologies to the individual User-based services. This effort will result in an extensible

  14. Adaptive control of a robotic manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A control hierarchy for a robotic manipulator is described. The hierarchy includes perception and robot/environment interaction, the latter consisting of planning, path control, and terminal guidance loops. Environment-sensitive features include the provision of control governed by proximity, tactile, and visual sensors as well as the usual kinematic sensors. The manipulator is considered as part of an overall robot system. 'Adaptive control' in the present context refers to both the hierarchical nature of the control system and to its environment-responsive nature.

  15. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  16. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  17. Security for grids

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-08-14

    Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities that need to be secured into four categories: naming and authentication; secure communication; trust, policy, and authorization; and enforcement of access control. It examines the current state of the art in securing these processes and introduces new technologies that promise to meet the security requirements of Grids more completely.

  18. Data Grid Implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Reagan W.; Studham, Ronald S.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Watson, Chip; Stockinger, Heinz; Kunszt, Peter; Charlie Catlett and Ian Foster

    2002-02-27

    Data grids link distributed, heterogeneous storage resources into a coherent data management system. From a user perspective, the data grid provides a uniform name space across the underlying storage systems, while supporting retrieval and storage of files. In the high energy physics community, at least six data grids have been implemented for the storage and distribution of experimental data. Data grids are also being used to support projects as diverse as digital libraries (National Library of Medicine Visible Embryo project), federation of multiple astronomy sky surveys (NSF National Virtual Observatory project), and integration of distributed data sets (Long Term Ecological Reserve). Data grids also form the core interoperability mechanisms for creating persistent archives, in which data collections are migrated to new technologies over time. The ability to provide a uniform name space across multiple administration domains is becoming a critical component of national-scale, collaborative projects.

  19. The SIM astronmetric grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is fundamentally a one-dimensional instrument with a 15-degree field-of-regard. Mission objectives require a global reference grid of thousands of well-understood stars with positions known to 4 microarcseconds which will be used to establish the instrument baseline vector during scientific observations. This accuracy will be achieved by frequently observing a set of stars throughout the mission and performing a global fit of the observations to determine position, proper motion and parallax for each star. Each star will be observed approximately 200 times with about 6.5 stars per single instrument field on the sky. We describe the nature of the reference grid, the candidate objects, and the results of simulations demonstrating grid performance, including estimates of the grid robustness when including effects such as instrument drift and possible contamination of the grid star sample by undetected binaries.

  20. DICOM image communication in globus-based medical grids.

    PubMed

    Vossberg, Michal; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Krefting, Dagmar

    2008-03-01

    Grid computing, the collaboration of distributed resources across institutional borders, is an emerging technology to meet the rising demand on computing power and storage capacity in fields such as high-energy physics, climate modeling, or more recently, life sciences. A secure, reliable, and highly efficient data transport plays an integral role in such grid environments and even more so in medical grids. Unfortunately, many grid middleware distributions, such as the well-known Globus Toolkit, lack the integration of the world-wide medical image communication standard Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM). Currently, the DICOM protocol first needs to be converted to the file transfer protocol (FTP) that is offered by the grid middleware. This effectively reduces most of the advantages and security an integrated network of DICOM devices offers. In this paper, a solution is proposed that adapts the DICOM protocol to the Globus grid security infrastructure and utilizes routers to transparently route traffic to and from DICOM systems. Thus, all legacy DICOM devices can be seamlessly integrated into the grid without modifications. A prototype of the grid routers with the most important DICOM functionality has been developed and successfully tested in the MediGRID test bed, the German grid project for life sciences. PMID:18348944

  1. Turbulent Output-Based Anisotropic Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2010-01-01

    Controlling discretization error is a remaining challenge for computational fluid dynamics simulation. Grid adaptation is applied to reduce estimated discretization error in drag or pressure integral output functions. To enable application to high O(10(exp 7)) Reynolds number turbulent flows, a hybrid approach is utilized that freezes the near-wall boundary layer grids and adapts the grid away from the no slip boundaries. The hybrid approach is not applicable to problems with under resolved initial boundary layer grids, but is a powerful technique for problems with important off-body anisotropic features. Supersonic nozzle plume, turbulent flat plate, and shock-boundary layer interaction examples are presented with comparisons to experimental measurements of pressure and velocity. Adapted grids are produced that resolve off-body features in locations that are not known a priori.

  2. Using analytic hierarchy process approach in ontological multicriterial decision making - Preliminary considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we consider combining ontologically demarcated information with Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) [1] for the multicriterial assessment of offers during contract negotiations. The context for the proposal is provided by the Agents in Grid project (AiG; [2]), which aims at development of an agent-based infrastructure for efficient resource management in the Grid. In the AiG project, software agents representing users can either (1) join a team and earn money, or (2) find a team to execute a job. Moreover, agents form teams, managers of which negotiate with clients and workers terms of potential collaboration. Here, ontologically described contracts (Service Level Agreements) are the results of autonomous multiround negotiations. Therefore, taking into account relatively complex nature of the negotiated contracts, multicriterial assessment of proposals plays a crucial role. The AHP method is based on pairwise comparisons of criteria and relies on the judgement of a panel of experts. It measures how well does an offer serve the objective of a decision maker. In this paper, we propose how the AHP method can be used to assess ontologically described contract proposals.

  3. Threat assessment using visual hierarchy and conceptual firearms ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Abdullah N.; Hempelmann, Christian F.; Attardo, Salvatore; Blount, Grady Price; Sirakov, Nikolay Metodiev

    2015-05-01

    The work that established and explored the links between visual hierarchy and conceptual ontology of firearms for the purpose of threat assessment is continued. The previous study used geometrical information to find a target in the visual hierarchy and through the links with the conceptual ontology to derive high-level information that was used to assess a potential threat. Multiple improvements and new contributions are reported. The theoretical basis of the geometric feature extraction method was improved in terms of accuracy. The sample space used for validations is expanded from 31 to 153 firearms. Thus, a new larger and more accurate sequence of visual hierarchies was generated using a modified Gonzalez' clustering algorithm. The conceptual ontology is elaborated as well and more links were created between the two kinds of hierarchies (visual and conceptual). The threat assessment equation is refined around ammunition-related properties and uses high-level information from the conceptual hierarchy. The experiments performed on weapons identification and threat assessment showed that our system recognized 100% of the cases if a weapon already belongs to the ontology and in 90.8% of the cases, determined the correct third ancestor (level concept) if the weapon is unknown to the ontology. To validate the accuracy of identification for a very large data set, we calculated the intervals of confidence for our system.

  4. Global network structure of dominance hierarchy of ant workers

    PubMed Central

    Shimoji, Hiroyuki; Abe, Masato S.; Tsuji, Kazuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Dominance hierarchy among animals is widespread in various species and believed to serve to regulate resource allocation within an animal group. Unlike small groups, however, detection and quantification of linear hierarchy in large groups of animals are a difficult task. Here, we analyse aggression-based dominance hierarchies formed by worker ants in Diacamma sp. as large directed networks. We show that the observed dominance networks are perfect or approximate directed acyclic graphs, which are consistent with perfect linear hierarchy. The observed networks are also sparse and random but significantly different from networks generated through thinning of the perfect linear tournament (i.e. all individuals are linearly ranked and dominance relationship exists between every pair of individuals). These results pertain to global structure of the networks, which contrasts with the previous studies inspecting frequencies of different types of triads. In addition, the distribution of the out-degree (i.e. number of workers that the focal worker attacks), not in-degree (i.e. number of workers that attack the focal worker), of each observed network is right-skewed. Those having excessively large out-degrees are located near the top, but not the top, of the hierarchy. We also discuss evolutionary implications of the discovered properties of dominance networks. PMID:25100318

  5. Decentralized Grid Scheduling with Evolutionary Fuzzy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fölling, Alexander; Grimme, Christian; Lepping, Joachim; Papaspyrou, Alexander

    In this paper, we address the problem of finding workload exchange policies for decentralized Computational Grids using an Evolutionary Fuzzy System. To this end, we establish a non-invasive collaboration model on the Grid layer which requires minimal information about the participating High Performance and High Throughput Computing (HPC/HTC) centers and which leaves the local resource managers completely untouched. In this environment of fully autonomous sites, independent users are assumed to submit their jobs to the Grid middleware layer of their local site, which in turn decides on the delegation and execution either on the local system or on remote sites in a situation-dependent, adaptive way. We find for different scenarios that the exchange policies show good performance characteristics not only with respect to traditional metrics such as average weighted response time and utilization, but also in terms of robustness and stability in changing environments.

  6. Optimization Of A Computational Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Daniel G.

    1993-01-01

    In improved method of generation of computational grid, grid-generation process decoupled from definition of geometry. Not necessary to redefine boundary. Instead, continuous boundaries in physical domain specified, and then grid points in computational domain mapped onto continuous boundaries.

  7. Parallel On-Demand Hierarchy Construction on Contemporary GPUs.

    PubMed

    Vinkler, Marek; Havran, Vlastimil; Bittner, Jiri; Sochor, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    We present the first parallel on-demand spatial hierarchy construction algorithm targeting ray tracing on many-core processors such as GPUs. The method performs simultaneous ray traversal and spatial hierarchy construction focused on the parts of the data structure being traversed. The method is based on a versatile framework built around a task pool and runs entirely on the GPU. We show that the on-demand construction can improve rendering times compared to full hierarchy construction. We evaluate our method on both object (BVH) and space (kd-tree) subdivision data structures and compare them mutually. The on-demand method is particularly beneficial for rendering large scenes with high occlusion. We also present SAH kd-tree builder that outperforms previous state-of-the-art builders running on the GPU. PMID:27244710

  8. Organising evidence for environmental management decisions: a '4S' hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Dicks, Lynn V; Walsh, Jessica C; Sutherland, William J

    2014-11-01

    Making decisions informed by the best-available science is an objective for many organisations managing the environment or natural resources. Yet, available science is still not widely used in environmental policy and practice. We describe a '4S' hierarchy for organising relevant science to inform decisions. This hierarchy has already revolutionised clinical practice. It is beginning to emerge for environmental management, although all four levels need substantial development before environmental decision-makers can reliably and efficiently find the evidence they need. We expose common bypass routes that currently lead to poor or biased representation of scientific knowledge. We argue that the least developed level of the hierarchy is that closest to decision-makers, placing synthesised scientific knowledge into environmental decision support systems. PMID:25280588

  9. Quasi-periodic Solutions of the Kaup-Kupershmidt Hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xianguo; Wu, Lihua; He, Guoliang

    2013-08-01

    Based on solving the Lenard recursion equations and the zero-curvature equation, we derive the Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy associated with a 3×3 matrix spectral problem. Resorting to the characteristic polynomial of the Lax matrix for the Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy, we introduce a trigonal curve {K}_{m-1} and present the corresponding Baker-Akhiezer function and meromorphic function on it. The Abel map is introduced to straighten out the Kaup-Kupershmidt flows. With the aid of the properties of the Baker-Akhiezer function and the meromorphic function and their asymptotic expansions, we arrive at their explicit Riemann theta function representations. The Riemann-Jacobi inversion problem is achieved by comparing the asymptotic expansion of the Baker-Akhiezer function and its Riemann theta function representation, from which quasi-periodic solutions of the entire Kaup-Kupershmidt hierarchy are obtained in terms of the Riemann theta functions.

  10. Statefinder hierarchy: An extended null diagnostic for concordance cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Sahni, Varun

    2011-02-15

    We show how higher derivatives of the expansion factor can be developed into a null diagnostic for concordance cosmology ({Lambda}CDM). It is well known that the Statefinder - the third derivative of the expansion factor written in dimensionless form, a{sup (3)}/aH{sup 3}, equals unity for {Lambda}CDM. We generalize this result and demonstrate that the hierarchy, a{sup (n)}/aH{sup n}, can be converted to a form that stays pegged at unity in concordance cosmology. This remarkable property of the Statefinder hierarchy enables it to be used as an extended null diagnostic for the cosmological constant. The Statefinder hierarchy combined with the growth rate of matter perturbations defines a composite null diagnostic which can distinguish evolving dark energy from {Lambda}CDM.

  11. Decentral Smart Grid Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Benjamin; Matthiae, Moritz; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Stable operation of complex flow and transportation networks requires balanced supply and demand. For the operation of electric power grids—due to their increasing fraction of renewable energy sources—a pressing challenge is to fit the fluctuations in decentralized supply to the distributed and temporally varying demands. To achieve this goal, common smart grid concepts suggest to collect consumer demand data, centrally evaluate them given current supply and send price information back to customers for them to decide about usage. Besides restrictions regarding cyber security, privacy protection and large required investments, it remains unclear how such central smart grid options guarantee overall stability. Here we propose a Decentral Smart Grid Control, where the price is directly linked to the local grid frequency at each customer. The grid frequency provides all necessary information about the current power balance such that it is sufficient to match supply and demand without the need for a centralized IT infrastructure. We analyze the performance and the dynamical stability of the power grid with such a control system. Our results suggest that the proposed Decentral Smart Grid Control is feasible independent of effective measurement delays, if frequencies are averaged over sufficiently large time intervals.

  12. The DESY Grid Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, A.; Gellrich, A.; Kemp, Y.; Leffhalm, K.; Ozerov, D.; Wegner, P.

    2012-12-01

    DESY is one of the world-wide leading centers for research with particle accelerators, synchrotron light and astroparticles. DESY participates in LHC as a Tier-2 center, supports on-going analyzes of HERA data, is a leading partner for ILC, and runs the National Analysis Facility (NAF) for LHC and ILC in the framework of the Helmholtz Alliance, Physics at the Terascale. For the research with synchrotron light major new facilities are operated and built (FLASH, PETRA-III, and XFEL). DESY furthermore acts as Data-Tier1 centre for the Neutrino detector IceCube. Established within the EGI-project DESY operates a grid infrastructure which supports a number of virtual Organizations (VO), incl. ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. Furthermore, DESY hosts some of HEP and non-HEP VOs, such as the HERA experiments and ILC as well as photon science communities. The support of the new astroparticle physics VOs IceCube and CTA is currently set up. As the global structure of the grid offers huge resources which are perfect for batch-like computing, DESY has set up the National Analysis Facility (NAF) which complements the grid to allow German HEP users for efficient data analysis. The grid infrastructure and the NAF use the same physics data which is distributed via the grid. We call the conjunction of grid and NAF the DESY Grid Centre. In the contribution to CHEP2012 we will in depth discuss the conceptional and operational aspects of our multi-VO and multi-community Grid Centre and present the system setup. We will in particular focus on the interplay of Grid and NAF and present experiences of the operations.

  13. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome. PMID:26137890

  14. Common origin for neutrino anarchy and charged hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Okui, Takemichi; Sundrum, Raman

    2009-03-13

    The generation of exponential flavor hierarchies from extra-dimensional wave function overlaps is reexamined. We find, surprisingly, that the coexistence of anarchic fermion mass matrices with such hierarchies is intrinsic and natural to this setting. The salient features of charged fermion and neutrino masses and mixings can thereby be captured within a single framework. Both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos can be realized. Implications for a variety of weak-scale scenarios, including warped compactification and supersymmetry, are discussed. When the new weak-scale physics is sensitive to the origin of flavor structure, Dirac neutrinos are preferred. PMID:19392102

  15. Common Origin for Neutrino Anarchy and Charged Hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Okui, Takemichi; Sundrum, Raman

    2009-03-13

    The generation of exponential flavor hierarchies from extra-dimensional wave function overlaps is reexamined. We find, surprisingly, that the coexistence of anarchic fermion mass matrices with such hierarchies is intrinsic and natural to this setting. The salient features of charged fermion and neutrino masses and mixings can thereby be captured within a single framework. Both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos can be realized. Implications for a variety of weak-scale scenarios, including warped compactification and supersymmetry, are discussed. When the new weak-scale physics is sensitive to the origin of flavor structure, Dirac neutrinos are preferred.

  16. Hierarchy plus anarchy in quark masses and mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce a parametrization of the effect of unknown corrections from new physics on quark and lepton mass matrices. This parametrization is used in order to study how the hierarchies of quark masses and mixing angles are modified by random perturbations of the Yukawa matrices. We discuss several examples of flavor relations predicted by different textures, analyzing how these relations are influenced by the random perturbations. We also comment on the unlikely possibility that unknown corrections contribute significantly to the hierarchy of masses and mixings.

  17. Open intersection numbers, matrix models and MKP hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we conjecture that the generating function of the intersection numbers on the moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces with boundary, constructed recently by R. Pandharipande, J. Solomon and R. Tessler and extended by A. Buryak, is a tau-function of the KP integrable hierarchy. Moreover, it is given by a simple modification of the Kontsevich matrix integral so that the generating functions of open and closed intersection numbers are described by the MKP integrable hierarchy. Virasoro constraints for the open intersection numbers naturally follow from the matrix integral representation.

  18. Common Origin for Neutrino Anarchy and Charged Hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Okui, Takemichi; Sundrum, Raman

    2009-03-01

    The generation of exponential flavor hierarchies from extra-dimensional wave function overlaps is reexamined. We find, surprisingly, that the coexistence of anarchic fermion mass matrices with such hierarchies is intrinsic and natural to this setting. The salient features of charged fermion and neutrino masses and mixings can thereby be captured within a single framework. Both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos can be realized. Implications for a variety of weak-scale scenarios, including warped compactification and supersymmetry, are discussed. When the new weak-scale physics is sensitive to the origin of flavor structure, Dirac neutrinos are preferred.

  19. The Gross-Pitaevskii Hierarchy on General Rectangular Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Sebastian; Sohinger, Vedran

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on general—rational and irrational—rectangular tori of dimensions two and three. This is a system of infinitely many linear partial differential equations which arises in the rigorous derivation of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We prove a conditional uniqueness result for the hierarchy. In two dimensions, this result allows us to obtain a rigorous derivation of the defocusing cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. On irrational tori, this question was posed as an open problem in the previous work of Kirkpatrick, Schlein, and Staffilani.

  20. USEPA's hierarchy for municipal solid waste management: Theory vs. practice

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, G. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper will address USEPA's hierarchy for municipal solid waste management (MSWM), which places source reduction and recycling above combustion and landfilling. Many have read this to mean that combustion and landfilling should only be considered after all recycling and reduction efforts have been explored. This mentality has not only left many communities in a MSWM capacity crisis, but also created planning problems for many others. Contrary to commonly held beliefs, it will be shown that the last two methods on the hierarchy should be considered from the beginning when planning for MSWM. It will also be shown that these methods are not antithetical to the first two methods, but are actually complimentary.

  1. Finite-band solutions of the coupled dispersionless hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhu

    2016-08-01

    The coupled dispersionless hierarchy is derived with the help of the zero curvature equation. Based on the Lax matrix, we introduce an algebraic curve {{ K }}n of arithmetic genus n, from which we establish the corresponding meromorphic function ϕ, the Baker–Akhiezer function {\\varphi }1, and Dubrovin-type equations. The straightening out of all the flows is given under the Abel–Jacobi coordinates. Using the asymptotic properties of ϕ and {\\varphi }1, we obtain the explicit theta function representations of the meromorphic function ϕ, the Baker–Akhiezer function {\\varphi }1 and of solutions for the whole hierarchy.

  2. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community. PMID:17254294

  3. Optimizing Data Management in Grid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissimos, Antonis; Doka, Katerina; Chazapis, Antony; Tsoumakos, Dimitrios; Koziris, Nectarios

    Grids currently serve as platforms for numerous scientific as well as business applications that generate and access vast amounts of data. In this paper, we address the need for efficient, scalable and robust data management in Grid environments. We propose a fully decentralized and adaptive mechanism comprising of two components: A Distributed Replica Location Service (DRLS) and a data transfer mechanism called GridTorrent. They both adopt Peer-to-Peer techniques in order to overcome performance bottlenecks and single points of failure. On one hand, DRLS ensures resilience by relying on a Byzantine-tolerant protocol and is able to handle massive concurrent requests even during node churn. On the other hand, GridTorrent allows for maximum bandwidth utilization through collaborative sharing among the various data providers and consumers. The proposed integrated architecture is completely backwards-compatible with already deployed Grids. To demonstrate these points, experiments have been conducted in LAN as well as WAN environments under various workloads. The evaluation shows that our scheme vastly outperforms the conventional mechanisms in both efficiency (up to 10 times faster) and robustness in case of failures and flash crowd instances.

  4. The Particle Physics Data Grid. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Livny, Miron

    2002-08-16

    The main objective of the Particle Physics Data Grid (PPDG) project has been to implement and evaluate distributed (Grid-enabled) data access and management technology for current and future particle and nuclear physics experiments. The specific goals of PPDG have been to design, implement, and deploy a Grid-based software infrastructure capable of supporting the data generation, processing and analysis needs common to the physics experiments represented by the participants, and to adapt experiment-specific software to operate in the Grid environment and to exploit this infrastructure. To accomplish these goals, the PPDG focused on the implementation and deployment of several critical services: reliable and efficient file replication service, high-speed data transfer services, multisite file caching and staging service, and reliable and recoverable job management services. The focus of the activity was the job management services and the interplay between these services and distributed data access in a Grid environment. Software was developed to study the interaction between HENP applications and distributed data storage fabric. One key conclusion was the need for a reliable and recoverable tool for managing large collections of interdependent jobs. An attached document provides an overview of the current status of the Directed Acyclic Graph Manager (DAGMan) with its main features and capabilities.

  5. Adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cololla, P.

    1995-07-01

    This review describes a structured approach to adaptivity. The Automated Mesh Refinement (ARM) algorithms developed by M Berger are described, touching on hyperbolic and parabolic applications. Adaptivity is achieved by overlaying finer grids only in areas flagged by a generalized error criterion. The author discusses some of the issues involved in abutting disparate-resolution grids, and demonstrates that suitable algorithms exist for dissipative as well as hyperbolic systems.

  6. Block algebra in two-component BKP and D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanzhong He, Jingsong

    2013-11-15

    We construct generalized additional symmetries of a two-component BKP hierarchy defined by two pseudo-differential Lax operators. These additional symmetry flows form a Block type algebra with some modified (or additional) terms because of a B type reduction condition of this integrable hierarchy. Further we show that the D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy, which is a reduction of the two-component BKP hierarchy, possess a complete Block type additional symmetry algebra. That D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchy has a similar algebraic structure as the bigraded Toda hierarchy which is a differential-discrete integrable system.

  7. Grid Computing Education Support

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Crumb

    2008-01-15

    The GGF Student Scholar program enabled GGF the opportunity to bring over sixty qualified graduate and under-graduate students with interests in grid technologies to its three annual events over the three-year program.

  8. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  9. IDL Grid Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.

    2008-08-01

    Image Data Language is a software for data analysis, visualization and cross-platform application development. The potentiality of IDL is well-known in the academic scientific world, especially in the astronomical environment where thousands of procedures are developed by using IDL. The typical use of IDL is the interactive mode but it is also possible to run IDL programs that do not require any interaction with the user, submitting them in batch or background modality. Through the interactive mode the user immediately receives images or other data produced in the running phase of the program; in batch or background mode, the user will have to wait for the end of the program, sometime for many hours or days to obtain images or data that IDL produced as output: in fact in Grid environment it is possible to access to or retrieve data only after completion of the program. The work that we present gives flexibility to IDL procedures submitted to the Grid computer infrastructure. For this purpose we have developed an IDL Grid Web Portal to allow the user to access the Grid and to submit IDL programs granting a full job control and the access to images and data generated during the running phase, without waiting for their completion. We have used the PHP technology and we have given the same level of security that Grid normally offers to its users. In this way, when the user notices that the intermediate program results are not those expected, he can stop the job, change the parameters to better satisfy the computational algorithm and resubmit the program, without consuming the CPU time and other Grid resources. The IDL Grid Web Portal allows you to obtain IDL generated images, graphics and data tables by using a normal browser. All conversations from the user and the Grid resources occur via Web, as well as authentication phases. The IDL user has not to change the program source much because the Portal will automatically introduce the appropriate modification before

  10. Implementing Production Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.; Ziobarth, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have presented the essence of experience gained in building two production Grids, and provided some of the global context for this work. As the reader might imagine, there were a lot of false starts, refinements to the approaches and to the software, and several substantial integration projects (SRB and Condor integrated with Globus) to get where we are today. However, the point of this paper is to try and make it substantially easier for others to get to the point where Information Power Grids (IPG) and the DOE Science Grids are today. This is what is needed in order to move us toward the vision of a common cyber infrastructure for science. The author would also like to remind the readers that this paper primarily represents the actual experiences that resulted from specific architectural and software choices during the design and implementation of these two Grids. The choices made were dictated by the criteria laid out in section 1. There is a lot more Grid software available today that there was four years ago, and various of these packages are being integrated into IPG and the DOE Grids. However, the foundation choices of Globus, SRB, and Condor would not be significantly different today than they were four years ago. Nonetheless, if the GGF is successful in its work - and we have every reason to believe that it will be - then in a few years we will see that the 28 functions provided by these packages will be defined in terms of protocols and MIS, and there will be several robust implementations available for each of the basic components, especially the Grid Common Services. The impact of the emerging Web Grid Services work is not yet clear. It will likely have a substantial impact on building higher level services, however it is the opinion of the author that this will in no way obviate the need for the Grid Common Services. These are the foundation of Grids, and the focus of almost all of the operational and persistent infrastructure aspects of Grids.

  11. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  12. Elliptic Volume Grid Generation for Viscous CFD Parametric Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a robust method for the generation of zonal volume grids of design parametrics for aerodynamic configurations. The process utilizes simple algebraic techniques with parametric splines coupled with elliptic volume grid generation to generate isolated zonal grids for changes in body configuration needed to perform parametric design studies. Speed of the algorithm is maximized through the algebraic methods and reduced number of grid points to be regenerated for each design parametric without sacrificing grid quality and continuity within the volume domain. The method is directly applicable to grid reusability, because it modifies existing ow adapted volume grids and enables the user to restart the CFD solution process with an established flow field. Use of this zonal approach reduces computer usage time to create new volume grids for design parametric studies by an order of magnitude, as compared to current methods which require the regeneration of an entire volume grid. A sample configuration of a proposed Single Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle is used to illustrate an application of this method.

  13. Beyond grid security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, B.; Epting, U.; Koenig, T.

    2008-07-01

    While many fields relevant to Grid security are already covered by existing working groups, their remit rarely goes beyond the scope of the Grid infrastructure itself. However, security issues pertaining to the internal set-up of compute centres have at least as much impact on Grid security. Thus, this talk will present briefly the EU ISSeG project (Integrated Site Security for Grids). In contrast to groups such as OSCT (Operational Security Coordination Team) and JSPG (Joint Security Policy Group), the purpose of ISSeG is to provide a holistic approach to security for Grid computer centres, from strategic considerations to an implementation plan and its deployment. The generalised methodology of Integrated Site Security (ISS) is based on the knowledge gained during its implementation at several sites as well as through security audits, and this will be briefly discussed. Several examples of ISS implementation tasks at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe will be presented, including segregation of the network for administration and maintenance and the implementation of Application Gateways. Furthermore, the web-based ISSeG training material will be introduced. This aims to offer ISS implementation guidance to other Grid installations in order to help avoid common pitfalls.

  14. Using Grid Benchmarks for Dynamic Scheduling of Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Navigation or dynamic scheduling of applications on computational grids can be improved through the use of an application-specific characterization of grid resources. Current grid information systems provide a description of the resources, but do not contain any application-specific information. We define a GridScape as dynamic state of the grid resources. We measure the dynamic performance of these resources using the grid benchmarks. Then we use the GridScape for automatic assignment of the tasks of a grid application to grid resources. The scalability of the system is achieved by limiting the navigation overhead to a few percent of the application resource requirements. Our task submission and assignment protocol guarantees that the navigation system does not cause grid congestion. On a synthetic data mining application we demonstrate that Gridscape-based task assignment reduces the application tunaround time.

  15. Exploring Hypersonic, Unstructured-Grid Issues through Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Kleb, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Pure-tetrahedral unstructured grids have been shown to produce asymmetric heat transfer rates for symmetric problems. Meanwhile, two-dimensional structured grids produce symmetric solutions and as documented here, introducing a spanwise degree of freedom to these structured grids also yields symmetric solutions. The effects of grid skewness and other perturbations of structured-grids are investigated to uncover possible mechanisms behind the unstructured-grid solution asymmetries. By using controlled experiments around a known, good solution, the effects of particular grid pathologies are uncovered. These structured-grid experiments reveal that similar solution degradation occurs as for unstructured grids, especially for heat transfer rates. Non-smooth grids within the boundary layer is also shown to produce large local errors in heat flux but do not affect surface pressures.

  16. Investigating the Diurnal Phase of Tropical Precipitation Using a Hierarchy of Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbengue, Cheikh; Schneider, Tapio; Pressel, Kyle; Kaul, Colleen; Zhihong, Tan; Teixeira, Joao

    2014-05-01

    Global climate models generally do not capture the diurnal cycle of convection: their peak precipitation over both land and oceans in the tropics occurs before the peak seen in observational data. Models also err in predicting the diurnal amplitude of precipitation. These errors have significant consequences for the models' energy budgets, hydrological cycle, and overall forecast skill. Given the present availability of computational resources, moist convection remains a sub-grid scale phenomenon in global climate models, and thus the parameterization of convection in these models is likely the major source of the precipitation bias. Previous work on this bias suggests that an inadequate evolution of the convective boundary layer in some models (penetrative downdrafts from the first precipitation events do not delay after-sunrise deep convection by stabilizing the convective boundary layer and allowing its growth; in other words, there is a lack of effective coupling between deep convection and the boundary layer) and poor communication between shallow and deep convection schemes in the models may be responsible for the precipitation bias. Large eddy simulation (LES), as part of a hierarchy of models (models of varying complexity), provides a unique opportunity to investigate the precipitation bias because it not only resolves the convective scale, but also allows for numerical experiments over a broad parameter space. Our results show that LES can faithfully reproduce the late afternoon precipitation peak associated with tropical land convection, and the nighttime or early morning peak associated with tropical maritime convection. We use the LES and a hierarchy of models to investigate the diurnal phase of precipitation and to develop a simple model to help understand and improve the bias in the precipitation diurnal cycle seen in global climate models.

  17. Deploying web-based visual exploration tools on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jankun-Kelly, T.J.; Kreylos, Oliver; Shalf, John; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth; Bethel, E. Wes

    2002-02-01

    We discuss a web-based portal for the exploration, encapsulation, and dissemination of visualization results over the Grid. This portal integrates three components: an interface client for structured visualization exploration, a visualization web application to manage the generation and capture of the visualization results, and a centralized portal application server to access and manage grid resources. We demonstrate the usefulness of the developed system using an example for Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) data visualization.

  18. The Answerable Question and a Hierarchy of Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a hierarchy of evidence is useful in rapid electronic searching to answer questions arising during the natural course of clinical practice. The answerable question often begins "What is the evidence that ..." and, when focused on a treatment, usually includes a population, an intervention, a comparison group, and an outcome, often…

  19. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs in Relation to Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Dorothy R.

    1972-01-01

    The author contends that the counselor, accepting a hierarchy of needs, can assist the client in assessing the fulfillment of those needs and choosing from social institutions the alternatives that will permit adequate gratification of unmet needs. Plans to satisfy needs at higher levels can then be made. (Author/BY)

  20. Principles of Organization in Young Children's Natural Language Hierarchies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callanan, Maureen A.; Markman, Ellen M.

    1982-01-01

    When preschool children think of objects as organized into collections (e.g., forest, army) they solve certain problems better than when they think of the same objects as organized into classes (e.g., trees, soldiers). Present studies indicate preschool children occasionally distort natural language inclusion hierarchies (e.g., oak, tree) into the…

  1. Tau Functions and Virasoro Actions for soliton Hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terng, Chuu-Lian; Uhlenbeck, Karen

    2016-02-01

    There is a general method for constructing a soliton hierarchy from a splitting {{L_{±}}} of a loop group as positive and negative sub-groups together with a commuting linearly independent sequence in the positive Lie algebra {{L}+}. Many known soliton hierarchies can be constructed this way. The formal inverse scattering associates to each f in the negative subgroup {L_-} a solution {uf} of the hierarchy. When there is a 2 co-cycle of the Lie algebra that vanishes on both sub-algebras, Wilson constructed a tau function {τf} for each element {f in L_-}. In this paper, we give integral formulas for variations of {lnτf} and second partials of {lnτf}, discuss whether we can recover solutions {uf} from {τf}, and give a general construction of actions of the positive half of the Virasoro algebra on tau functions. We write down formulas relating tau functions and formal inverse scattering solutions and the Virasoro vector fields for the {GL(n,{C})}-hierarchy.

  2. Dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lin; Min, Luo; Ma, Jingxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the model of dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree, as a combination of the dynamic fuzzy theory and the AHP, which can show the changes and trends of the value of each index of professionalization.

  3. Maslow's Need Hierarchy and the Adjustment of Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Seymour

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the need hierarchy theory of Abraham Maslow is used to describe stages in the adjustment process of new immigrants. This notion is developed and applied to interpreting some longitudinal data on the changing needs of immigrants to Israel during the first two years after their arrival. (Author/GC)

  4. Teaching Place: Developing Early Understanding of "Nested Hierarchies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storey, Colin

    2005-01-01

    The perceptions of a group of 5-6-year olds were tested against two disparate hypotheses, one for nested hierarchies, the other for symbolic representations in language and learning. There is evidence that young children have the foundation for tackling more sophisticated and challenging ideas than is usually recognised. Linguistically, children…

  5. Student Affairs as Perceived Through Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowacki, Steven

    The needs of human behavior are explored and correlated to the various departments within Student Affairs in an effort to show how Student Affairs can satisfy those needs. Maslow's Hierarchy of needs is briefly explained and related to the following Student Affairs departments: Financial Aid, Student Management, Career Development and Placement,…

  6. Effects of Hierarchy Vocabulary Exercises on English Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wei Shu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of hierarchy vocabulary exercises and copying vocabulary exercises on EFL students' vocabulary acquisition and reading comprehension. Two specific factors were probed: (a) vocabulary gains and retention from different exercises; (b) reading comprehension performance through different…

  7. To Matrix, Network, or Hierarchy: That Is the Question.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Laura R.; Hurley, Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Developed a structural analysis of 3 spatial diagrams (matrices, networks, and hierarchies) that specifies 10 properties on which these diagrammatic representations are hypothesized to differ. Coded verbal protocols of 23 college students about these representations. Results suggest that the organization of students knowledge is consistent with…

  8. Shifting and Narrowing Masculinity Hierarchies in Physical Education: Status Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Amy; McCaughtry, Nate

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine boys' perceptions of masculinity hierarchies in adventure physical education in relation to past experiences in sport-based physical education and their evolving views about physical activity in their lives. Theoretical principles of masculinity guided this study. Data were collected with 55 male high…

  9. Developmental Transitions as Successive Reorganizations of a Control Hierarchy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plooij, Frans X.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes two studies involving chimpanzee mother-infant pairs in Tanzania between 1980 and 1987 that implemented control theory concepts. The first identified behavioral development in infant chimps; the second observed the growth of independence and parenting patterns. Concludes that the hierarchy of controlled variables develops consecutively…

  10. Scientific Graphs and the Hierarchy of the Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Laurence D.; Best, Lisa A.; Stubbs, D. Alan; Johnston, John; Archibald, Andrea Bastiani

    2000-01-01

    Applies Latour's notion of graphism to the hierarchy of sciences. Finds that the use of graphs across seven scientific disciplines correlates almost perfectly with their hardness, and that the same pattern held up across 10 specialty fields in psychology. (Author/CCM)

  11. Knowledge-Based Hierarchies: Using Organizations to Understand the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garicano, Luis; Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the decision of how to organize the acquisition, use, and communication of knowledge into economic models is essential to understand a wide variety of economic phenomena. We survey the literature that has used knowledge-based hierarchies to study issues such as the evolution of wage inequality, the growth and productivity of firms,…

  12. Restructuring Large Data Hierarchies for Scientific Query Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M

    2005-02-08

    Today's large-scale scientific simulations produce data sets tens to hundreds of terabytes in size. The DataFoundry project is developing querying and analysis tools for these data sets. The Approximate Ad-Hoc Query Engine for Simulation Data (AQSIM) uses a multi-resolution, tree-shaped data structure that allows users to place runtime limits on queries over scientific simulation data. In this AQSIM data hierarchy, each node in the tree contains an abstract model describing all of the information contained in the subtree below that node. AQSIM is able to create the data hierarchy in a single pass. However, the nodes in the hierarchy frequently have low node fanout, which leads to inefficient I/O behavior during query processing. Low node fanout is a common problem in tree-shaped indices. This paper presents a set of one-pass tree ''pruning'' algorithms that efficiently restructure the data hierarchy by removing inner nodes, thereby increasing node fanout. As our experimental results show, the best approach is a combination of two algorithms, one that focuses on increasing node fanout and one that attempts to reduce the maximum tree height.

  13. Social hierarchy and depression: the role of emotion suppression.

    PubMed

    Langner, Carrie A; Epel, Elissa S; Matthews, Karen A; Moskowitz, Judith T; Adler, Nancy E

    2012-01-01

    Position in the social hierarchy is a major determinant of health outcomes. We examined the associations between aspects of social hierarchy and depressive symptoms with a specific focus on one potential psychological mechanism: emotion suppression. Suppressing negative emotion has mental health costs, but individuals with low social power and low social status may use these strategies to avoid conflict. Study 1 assessed perceived social power, tendency to suppress negative emotion, and depressive symptoms in a community sample of women. Low social power was related to greater depressive symptoms, and this relationship was partially mediated by emotion suppression. Study 2 examined education as a proxy for social hierarchy position, anger suppression, and depressive symptoms in a national, longitudinal cohort study (The coronary artery risk development in young adults [CARDIA] study; Cutter et al., 1991). Much as in study 1, low education levels were correlated with greater depressive symptoms, and this relationship was partially mediated by anger suppression. Further, suppression mediated the relationship between low education and subsequent depression up to 15 years later. These findings support the theory that social hierarchy affects mental health in part through a process of emotion suppression. PMID:22808688

  14. Factorization and resummation for generic hierarchies between Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrulewicz, Piotr; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-08-01

    Jets are an important probe to identify the hard interaction of interest at the LHC. They are routinely used in Standard Model precision measurements as well as in searches for new heavy particles, including jet substructure methods. In processes with several jets, one typically encounters hierarchies in the jet transverse momenta and/or dijet invariant masses. Large logarithms of the ratios of these kinematic jet scales in the cross section are at present primarily described by parton showers. We present a general factorization framework called SCET+, which is an extension of Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and allows for a systematic higher-order resummation of such kinematic logarithms for generic jet hierarchies. In SCET+ additional intermediate soft/collinear modes are used to resolve jets arising from additional soft and/or collinear QCD emissions. The resulting factorized cross sections utilize collinear splitting amplitudes and soft gluon currents and fully capture spin and color correlations. We discuss how to systematically combine the different kinematic regimes to obtain a complete description of the jet phase space. To present its application in a simple context, we use the case of e + e - → 3 jets. We then discuss in detail the application to N -jet processes at hadron colliders, considering representative classes of hierarchies from which the general case can be built. This includes in particular multiple hierarchies that are either strongly ordered in angle or energy or not.

  15. Dispersionless 2D Toda hierarchy, Hurwitz numbers and Riemann theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natanzon, Sergey M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe all formal symmetric solutions of dispersionless 2D Toda hierarchy. This classification we use for solving of two classical problems: 1) The calculation of conformal mapping of an arbitrary simply connected domain to the standard disk; 2) Calculation of 2- Hurwitz numbers of genus 0.

  16. Response-Class Hierarchies and Resurgence of Severe Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieving, Gregory A.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Long, Ethan S.; O'Connor, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Resurgence may be defined generally as the extinction-induced recurrence of previously learned response patterns. Understanding the conditions under which this phenomenon occurs has theoretical, clinical, and applied implications, particularly with respect to a related area of research on response-class hierarchies. In the current study, we…

  17. Approaches to the Validation of Learning Hierarchies. Preprint 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Lauren B.; Wang, Margaret C.

    The authors describe a program of research in the application of scalogram analysis to the validation of learning hierarchies, together with the development of an alternative method for assessing hierarchical relationships among tests of instructional objectives. The relationship between scalability of tests and positive transfer between…

  18. A Bayesian generative model for learning semantic hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Mittelman, Roni; Sun, Min; Kuipers, Benjamin; Savarese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Building fine-grained visual recognition systems that are capable of recognizing tens of thousands of categories, has received much attention in recent years. The well known semantic hierarchical structure of categories and concepts, has been shown to provide a key prior which allows for optimal predictions. The hierarchical organization of various domains and concepts has been subject to extensive research, and led to the development of the WordNet domains hierarchy (Fellbaum, 1998), which was also used to organize the images in the ImageNet (Deng et al., 2009) dataset, in which the category count approaches the human capacity. Still, for the human visual system, the form of the hierarchy must be discovered with minimal use of supervision or innate knowledge. In this work, we propose a new Bayesian generative model for learning such domain hierarchies, based on semantic input. Our model is motivated by the super-subordinate organization of domain labels and concepts that characterizes WordNet, and accounts for several important challenges: maintaining context information when progressing deeper into the hierarchy, learning a coherent semantic concept for each node, and modeling uncertainty in the perception process. PMID:24904452

  19. The Hierarchy of Minority Languages in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bres, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for the existence of a minority language hierarchy in New Zealand. Based on an analysis of language ideologies expressed in recent policy documents and interviews with policymakers and representatives of minority language communities, it presents the arguments forwarded in support of the promotion of different types of…

  20. Optimizing an Immersion ESL Curriculum Using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui-Wen Vivian

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to fill a substantial knowledge gap regarding reaching a uniform group decision in English curriculum design and planning. A comprehensive content-based course criterion model extracted from existing literature and expert opinions was developed. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to identify the relative…