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Sample records for adaptive image segmentation

  1. Adaptive fuzzy segmentation of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Pham, D L; Prince, J L

    1999-09-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fuzzy segmentation of two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images that have been corrupted by intensity inhomogeneities, also known as shading artifacts. The algorithm is an extension of the 2-D adaptive fuzzy C-means algorithm (2-D AFCM) presented in previous work by the authors. This algorithm models the intensity inhomogeneities as a gain field that causes image intensities to smoothly and slowly vary through the image space. It iteratively adapts to the intensity inhomogeneities and is completely automated. In this paper, we fully generalize 2-D AFCM to three-dimensional (3-D) multispectral images. Because of the potential size of 3-D image data, we also describe a new faster multigrid-based algorithm for its implementation. We show, using simulated MR data, that 3-D AFCM yields lower error rates than both the standard fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm and two other competing methods, when segmenting corrupted images. Its efficacy is further demonstrated using real 3-D scalar and multispectral MR brain images.

  2. Adaptive image segmentation applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico; Zapata, Jose L.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents that experimental results obtained on indoor tissue culture using the adaptive image segmentation system. The performance of the adaptive technique is contrasted with different non-adaptive techniques commonly used in the computer vision field to demonstrate the improvement provided by the adaptive image segmentation system.

  3. Adaptive textural segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Walter S.; Frost, Gordon S.; MacLaughlin, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    A number of important problems in medical imaging can be described as segmentation problems. Previous fractal-based image segmentation algorithms have used either the local fractal dimension alone or the local fractal dimension and the corresponding image intensity as features for subsequent pattern recognition algorithms. An image segmentation algorithm that utilized the local fractal dimension, image intensity, and the correlation coefficient of the local fractal dimension regression analysis computation, to produce a three-dimension feature space that was partitioned to identify specific pixels of dental radiographs as being either bone, teeth, or a boundary between bone and teeth also has been reported. In this work we formulated the segmentation process as a configurational optimization problem and discuss the application of simulated annealing optimization methods to the solution of this specific optimization problem. The configurational optimization method allows information about both, the degree of correspondence between a candidate segment and an assumed textural model, and morphological information about the candidate segment to be used in the segmentation process. To apply this configurational optimization technique with a fractal textural model however, requires the estimation of the fractal dimension of an irregularly shaped candidate segment. The potential utility of a discrete Gerchberg-Papoulis bandlimited extrapolation algorithm to the estimation of the fractal dimension of an irregularly shaped candidate segment is also discussed.

  4. Image segmentation on adaptive edge-preserving smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Xiuqing

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, typical active contour models are widely applied in image segmentation. However, they perform badly on real images with inhomogeneous subregions. In order to overcome the drawback, this paper proposes an edge-preserving smoothing image segmentation algorithm. At first, this paper analyzes the edge-preserving smoothing conditions for image segmentation and constructs an edge-preserving smoothing model inspired by total variation. The proposed model has the ability to smooth inhomogeneous subregions and preserve edges. Then, a kind of clustering algorithm, which reasonably trades off edge-preserving and subregion-smoothing according to the local information, is employed to learn the edge-preserving parameter adaptively. At last, according to the confidence level of segmentation subregions, this paper constructs a smoothing convergence condition to avoid oversmoothing. Experiments indicate that the proposed algorithm has superior performance in precision, recall, and F-measure compared with other segmentation algorithms, and it is insensitive to noise and inhomogeneous-regions.

  5. An adaptive multi-feature segmentation model for infrared image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Han, Jin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2016-04-01

    Active contour models (ACM) have been extensively applied to image segmentation, conventional region-based active contour models only utilize global or local single feature information to minimize the energy functional to drive the contour evolution. Considering the limitations of original ACMs, an adaptive multi-feature segmentation model is proposed to handle infrared images with blurred boundaries and low contrast. In the proposed model, several essential local statistic features are introduced to construct a multi-feature signed pressure function (MFSPF). In addition, we draw upon the adaptive weight coefficient to modify the level set formulation, which is formed by integrating MFSPF with local statistic features and signed pressure function with global information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can make up for the inadequacy of the original method and get desirable results in segmenting infrared images.

  6. Adaptive geodesic transform for segmentation of vertebrae on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Shu, Liao; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral segmentation is a critical first step in any quantitative evaluation of vertebral pathology using CT images. This is especially challenging because bone marrow tissue has the same intensity profile as the muscle surrounding the bone. Thus simple methods such as thresholding or adaptive k-means fail to accurately segment vertebrae. While several other algorithms such as level sets may be used for segmentation any algorithm that is clinically deployable has to work in under a few seconds. To address these dual challenges we present here, a new algorithm based on the geodesic distance transform that is capable of segmenting the spinal vertebrae in under one second. To achieve this we extend the theory of the geodesic distance transforms proposed in1 to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge through adaptive weighting of image gradients. Such knowledge may be provided by the user directly or may be automatically generated by another algorithm. We incorporate information 'learnt' using a previously published machine learning algorithm2 to segment the L1 to L5 vertebrae. While we present a particular application here, the adaptive geodesic transform is a generic concept which can be applied to segmentation of other organs as well.

  7. Image segmentation by EM-based adaptive pulse coupled neural networks in brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, J C; Chen, C C; Chai, J W; Wong, S T C; Li, I C

    2010-06-01

    We propose an automatic hybrid image segmentation model that integrates the statistical expectation maximization (EM) model and the spatial pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) for brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) segmentation. In addition, an adaptive mechanism is developed to fine tune the PCNN parameters. The EM model serves two functions: evaluation of the PCNN image segmentation and adaptive adjustment of the PCNN parameters for optimal segmentation. To evaluate the performance of the adaptive EM-PCNN, we use it to segment MR brain image into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The performance of the adaptive EM-PCNN is compared with that of the non-adaptive EM-PCNN, EM, and Bias Corrected Fuzzy C-Means (BCFCM) algorithms. The result is four sets of boundaries for the GM and the brain parenchyma (GM+WM), the two regions of most interest in medical research and clinical applications. Each set of boundaries is compared with the golden standard to evaluate the segmentation performance. The adaptive EM-PCNN significantly outperforms the non-adaptive EM-PCNN, EM, and BCFCM algorithms in gray mater segmentation. In brain parenchyma segmentation, the adaptive EM-PCNN significantly outperforms the BCFCM only. However, the adaptive EM-PCNN is better than the non-adaptive EM-PCNN and EM on average. We conclude that of the three approaches, the adaptive EM-PCNN yields the best results for gray matter and brain parenchyma segmentation.

  8. Adaptive Distance Metric Learning for Diffusion Tensor Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Youyong; Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Hui, Steve C. N.; Chu, Winnie C. W.

    2014-01-01

    High quality segmentation of diffusion tensor images (DTI) is of key interest in biomedical research and clinical application. In previous studies, most efforts have been made to construct predefined metrics for different DTI segmentation tasks. These methods require adequate prior knowledge and tuning parameters. To overcome these disadvantages, we proposed to automatically learn an adaptive distance metric by a graph based semi-supervised learning model for DTI segmentation. An original discriminative distance vector was first formulated by combining both geometry and orientation distances derived from diffusion tensors. The kernel metric over the original distance and labels of all voxels were then simultaneously optimized in a graph based semi-supervised learning approach. Finally, the optimization task was efficiently solved with an iterative gradient descent method to achieve the optimal solution. With our approach, an adaptive distance metric could be available for each specific segmentation task. Experiments on synthetic and real brain DTI datasets were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed distance metric learning approach. The performance of our approach was compared with three classical metrics in the graph based semi-supervised learning framework. PMID:24651858

  9. Fast unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation with adaptive spatial regularisation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marcelo; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2017-03-15

    This paper presents a new Bayesian estimation technique for hidden Potts-Markov random fields with unknown regularisation parameters, with application to fast unsupervised K-class image segmentation. The technique is derived by first removing the regularisation parameter from the Bayesian model by marginalisation, followed by a small-variance-asymptotic (SVA) analysis in which the spatial regularisation and the integer-constrained terms of the Potts model are decoupled. The evaluation of this SVA Bayesian estimator is then relaxed into a problem that can be computed efficiently by iteratively solving a convex total-variation denoising problem and a least-squares clustering (K-means) problem, both of which can be solved straightforwardly, even in high-dimensions, and with parallel computing techniques. This leads to a fast fully unsupervised Bayesian image segmentation methodology in which the strength of the spatial regularisation is adapted automatically to the observed image during the inference procedure, and that can be easily applied in large 2D and 3D scenarios or in applications requiring low computing times. Experimental results on synthetic and real images, as well as extensive comparisons with state-ofthe- art algorithms, confirm that the proposed methodology offer extremely fast convergence and produces accurate segmentation results, with the important additional advantage of self-adjusting regularisation parameters.

  10. Image segmentation on adaptive sub-region smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junruo; Liu, Xin; He, Kun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the performance of the active contour segmentation on real images, a new segmentation method is proposed. In this model, we construct a function about Gaussian variance according to sub-regions intensity. Further, to avoid the curve vanishing, we design the convergence condition based on the confidence level of segmentation sub-regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method is less sensitive to noise and can suppress inhomogeneous intensity regions efficiently.

  11. Pattern matching and adaptive image segmentation applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    1999-03-01

    This paper shows the results obtained in a system vision applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture using adaptive image segmentation and pattern matching algorithms, this analysis improves the number of tissue obtained and minimize errors, the image features of tissue are considered join to statistical analysis to determine the best match and results. Tests make on potato plants are used to present comparative results with original images processed with adaptive segmentation algorithm and non adaptive algorithms and pattern matching.

  12. Streak image denoising and segmentation using adaptive Gaussian guided filter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhuocheng; Guo, Baoping

    2014-09-10

    In streak tube imaging lidar (STIL), streak images are obtained using a CCD camera. However, noise in the captured streak images can greatly affect the quality of reconstructed 3D contrast and range images. The greatest challenge for streak image denoising is reducing the noise while preserving details. In this paper, we propose an adaptive Gaussian guided filter (AGGF) for noise removal and detail enhancement of streak images. The proposed algorithm is based on a guided filter (GF) and part of an adaptive bilateral filter (ABF). In the AGGF, the details are enhanced by optimizing the offset parameter. AGGF-denoised streak images are significantly sharper than those denoised by the GF. Moreover, the AGGF is a fast linear time algorithm achieved by recursively implementing a Gaussian filter kernel. Experimentally, AGGF demonstrates its capacity to preserve edges and thin structures and outperforms the existing bilateral filter and domain transform filter in terms of both visual quality and peak signal-to-noise ratio performance.

  13. Region-based retrieval of remote sensing image patches with adaptive image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shijin; Zhu, Jiali; Zhu, Yuelong; Feng, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Over the past four decades, the satellite imaging sensors have acquired huge quantities of Earth- observation data. Content-based image retrieval allows for fast and effective queries of remote sensing images. Here, we take the following two issues into consideration. Firstly, different features and their combination should be chosen for different land covers. Secondly, for the block dividing strategy and the complexities of the remote sensing images, it can not effectively retrieve some small target areas scattered in multiple nontarget blocks. Aiming at the above two issues, a new region-based retrieval method with adaptive image segmentation is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of remote sensing image segmentation, feature selection and weighing is performed by two-stage clustering, and image segmentation is accomplished based on the chosen features and mean shift procedure. Meanwhile, for the homogeneous characteristics of remote sensing land covers, a new regional representation and matching scheme are adopted to perform image retrieval. Experimental results on retrieving various land covers show that the method can avoid the impact of traditional blocking strategies, and can achieve an average percentage of 19% higher precision with the same level of recall rate, than the relevance feedback method for small target areas.

  14. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  15. [CT image segmentation based on automatic adaptive minimal fuzzy entropy measure].

    PubMed

    Gong, Guifang; Feng, Chengde; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Yanfang

    2008-04-01

    In order to extract the anatomical feature of several tissues from CT image and solve the contradiction between the improvement of searching speed and the instability of results,we propose a method for image segmentation using auto adaptive minimal fuzzy entropy measure. Firstly, to find the optimal threshoding for segmenting image, the values of the exponent parameters of membership function of fuzzy subsets and the range of the searching thresholding values can be determined by using the iterative approach and the image histogram, and then the thresholding of minimizing the fuzzy entropy is implemented by searching all possible combinations of every thresholding in determinate searching range. The experiment results show that our proposed method facilitates good performance for CT image segmentation. The searching speed is quick, the segmented images show more details, and the results of many runs are steadier than those obtained by using genetic algorithm or simulated annealing algorithm.

  16. The new image segmentation algorithm using adaptive evolutionary programming and fuzzy c-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang

    2011-06-01

    Image segmentation remains one of the major challenges in image analysis and computer vision. Fuzzy clustering, as a soft segmentation method, has been widely studied and successfully applied in mage clustering and segmentation. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm is the most popular method used in mage segmentation. However, most clustering algorithms such as the k-means and the FCM clustering algorithms search for the final clusters values based on the predetermined initial centers. The FCM clustering algorithms does not consider the space information of pixels and is sensitive to noise. In the paper, presents a new fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm with adaptive evolutionary programming that provides image clustering. The features of this algorithm are: 1) firstly, it need not predetermined initial centers. Evolutionary programming will help FCM search for better center and escape bad centers at local minima. Secondly, the spatial distance and the Euclidean distance is also considered in the FCM clustering. So this algorithm is more robust to the noises. Thirdly, the adaptive evolutionary programming is proposed. The mutation rule is adaptively changed with learning the useful knowledge in the evolving process. Experiment results shows that the new image segmentation algorithm is effective. It is providing robustness to noisy images.

  17. Segmentation of brain PET-CT images based on adaptive use of complementary information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2009-02-01

    Dual modality PET-CT imaging provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scanning session, which can potentially be used to improve image segmentation of PET-CT data. The ability to distinguish structures for segmentation is a function of structure and modality and varies across voxels. Thus optimal contribution of a particular modality to segmentation is spatially variant. Existing segmentation algorithms, however, seldom account for this characteristic of PET-CT data and the results using these algorithms are not optimal. In this study, we propose a relative discrimination index (RDI) to characterize the relative abilities of PET and CT to correctly classify each voxel into the correct structure for segmentation. The definition of RDI is based on the information entropy of the probability distribution of the voxel's class label. If the class label derived from CT data for a particular voxel has more certainty than that derived from PET data, the corresponding RDI will have a higher value. We applied the RDI matrix to balance adaptively the contributions of PET and CT data to segmentation of brain PET-CT images on a voxel-by-voxel basis, with the aim to give the modality with higher discriminatory power a larger weight. The resultant segmentation approach is distinguished from traditional approaches by its innovative and adaptive use of the dual-modality information. We compared our approach to the non-RDI version and two commonly used PET-only based segmentation algorithms for simulation and clinical data. Our results show that the RDI matrix markedly improved PET-CT image segmentation.

  18. A class-adaptive spatially variant mixture model for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Christophoros; Galatsanos, Nikolaos P; Likas, Aristidis C

    2007-04-01

    We propose a new approach for image segmentation based on a hierarchical and spatially variant mixture model. According to this model, the pixel labels are random variables and a smoothness prior is imposed on them. The main novelty of this work is a new family of smoothness priors for the label probabilities in spatially variant mixture models. These Gauss-Markov random field-based priors allow all their parameters to be estimated in closed form via the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation using the expectation-maximization methodology. Thus, it is possible to introduce priors with multiple parameters that adapt to different aspects of the data. Numerical experiments are presented where the proposed MAP algorithms were tested in various image segmentation scenarios. These experiments demonstrate that the proposed segmentation scheme compares favorably to both standard and previous spatially constrained mixture model-based segmentation.

  19. SAR image segmentation with entropy ranking based adaptive semi-supervised spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Yang, Jie; Hou, Biao; Jiao, Licheng

    2010-10-01

    Spectral clustering has become one of the most popular modern clustering algorithms in recent years. In this paper, a new algorithm named entropy ranking based adaptive semi-supervised spectral clustering for SAR image segmentation is proposed. We focus not only on finding a suitable scaling parameter but also determining automatically the cluster number with the entropy ranking theory. Also, two kinds of constrains must-link and cannot-link based semi-supervised spectral clustering is applied to gain better segmentation results. Experimental results on SAR images show that the proposed method outperforms other spectral clustering algorithms.

  20. Cellular pulse-coupled neural network with adaptive weights for image segmentation and its VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiter, Juerg; Ramacher, Ulrich; Heittmann, Arne; Matolin, Daniel; Schuffny, Rene

    2004-05-01

    We present a cellular pulse coupled neural network with adaptive weights and its analog VLSI implementation. The neural network operates on a scalar image feature, such as grey scale or the output of a spatial filter. It detects segments and marks them with synchronous pulses of the corresponding neurons. The network consists of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are coupled to their nearest neighbors via adaptive synaptic weights. Adaptation follows either one of two empirical rules. Both rules lead to spike grouping in wave like patterns. This synchronous activity binds groups of neurons and labels the corresponding image segments. Applications of the network also include feature preserving noise removal, image smoothing, and detection of bright and dark spots. The adaptation rules are insensitive for parameter deviations, mismatch and non-ideal approximation of the implied functions. That makes an analog VLSI implementation feasible. Simulations showed no significant differences in the synchronization properties between networks using the ideal adaptation rules and networks resembling implementation properties such as randomly distributed parameters and roughly implemented adaptation functions. A prototype is currently being designed and fabricated using an Infineon 130nm technology. It comprises a 128 × 128 neuron array, analog image memory, and an address event representation pulse output.

  1. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images.

  2. Local adaptive approach toward segmentation of microscopic images of activated sludge flocs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Lo, Po Kim; Yap, Vooi Voon

    2015-11-01

    Activated sludge process is a widely used method to treat domestic and industrial effluents. The conditions of activated sludge wastewater treatment plant (AS-WWTP) are related to the morphological properties of flocs (microbial aggregates) and filaments, and are required to be monitored for normal operation of the plant. Image processing and analysis is a potential time-efficient monitoring tool for AS-WWTPs. Local adaptive segmentation algorithms are proposed for bright-field microscopic images of activated sludge flocs. Two basic modules are suggested for Otsu thresholding-based local adaptive algorithms with irregular illumination compensation. The performance of the algorithms has been compared with state-of-the-art local adaptive algorithms of Sauvola, Bradley, Feng, and c-mean. The comparisons are done using a number of region- and nonregion-based metrics at different microscopic magnifications and quantification of flocs. The performance metrics show that the proposed algorithms performed better and, in some cases, were comparable to the state-of the-art algorithms. The performance metrics were also assessed subjectively for their suitability for segmentations of activated sludge images. The region-based metrics such as false negative ratio, sensitivity, and negative predictive value gave inconsistent results as compared to other segmentation assessment metrics.

  3. A fully automatic framework for cell segmentation on non-confocal adaptive optics images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfei; Dubra, Alfredo; Tam, Johnny

    2016-03-01

    By the time most retinal diseases are diagnosed, macroscopic irreversible cellular loss has already occurred. Earlier detection of subtle structural changes at the single photoreceptor level is now possible, using the adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). This work aims to develop a fully automatic segmentation framework to extract cell boundaries from non-confocal split-detection AOSLO images of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living human eye. Significant challenges include anisotropy, heterogeneous cell regions arising from shading effects, and low contrast between cells and background. To overcome these challenges, we propose the use of: 1) multi-scale Hessian response to detect heterogeneous cell regions, 2) convex hulls to create boundary templates, and 3) circularlyconstrained geodesic active contours to refine cell boundaries. We acquired images from three healthy subjects at eccentric retinal regions and manually contoured cells to generate ground-truth for evaluating segmentation accuracy. Dice coefficient, relative absolute area difference, and average contour distance were 82±2%, 11±6%, and 2.0±0.2 pixels (Mean±SD), respectively. We find that strong shading effects from vessels are a main factor that causes cell oversegmentation and false segmentation of non-cell regions. Our segmentation algorithm can automatically and accurately segment photoreceptor cells on non-confocal AOSLO images, which is the first step in longitudinal tracking of cellular changes in the individual eye over the time course of disease progression.

  4. Adaptive Mesh Expansion Model (AMEM) for Liver Segmentation from CT Image

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuehu; Yang, Jian; Ai, Danni; Zheng, Yongchang; Tang, Songyuan; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel adaptive mesh expansion model (AMEM) for liver segmentation from computed tomography images. The virtual deformable simplex model (DSM) is introduced to represent the mesh, in which the motion of each vertex can be easily manipulated. The balloon, edge, and gradient forces are combined with the binary image to construct the external force of the deformable model, which can rapidly drive the DSM to approach the target liver boundaries. Moreover, tangential and normal forces are combined with the gradient image to control the internal force, such that the DSM degree of smoothness can be precisely controlled. The triangular facet of the DSM is adaptively decomposed into smaller triangular components, which can significantly improve the segmentation accuracy of the irregularly sharp corners of the liver. The proposed method is evaluated on the basis of different criteria applied to 10 clinical data sets. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed AMEM algorithm is effective and robust and thus outperforms six other up-to-date algorithms. Moreover, AMEM can achieve a mean overlap error of 6.8% and a mean volume difference of 2.7%, whereas the average symmetric surface distance and the root mean square symmetric surface distance can reach 1.3 mm and 2.7 mm, respectively. PMID:25769030

  5. Segmentation of the optic disk in color eye fundus images using an adaptive morphological approach.

    PubMed

    Welfer, Daniel; Scharcanski, Jacob; Kitamura, Cleyson M; Dal Pizzol, Melissa M; Ludwig, Laura W B; Marinho, Diane Ruschel

    2010-02-01

    The identification of some important retinal anatomical regions is a prerequisite for the computer aided diagnosis of several retinal diseases. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive method for the automatic segmentation of the optic disk in digital color fundus images, using mathematical morphology. The proposed method has been designed to be robust under varying illumination and image acquisition conditions, common in eye fundus imaging. Our experimental results based on two publicly available eye fundus image databases are encouraging, and indicate that our approach potentially can achieve a better performance than other known methods proposed in the literature. Using the DRIVE database (which consists of 40 retinal images), our method achieves a success rate of 100% in the correct location of the optic disk, with 41.47% of mean overlap. In the DIARETDB1 database (which consists of 89 retinal images), the optic disk is correctly located in 97.75% of the images, with a mean overlap of 43.65%.

  6. Image segmentation for uranium isotopic analysis by SIMS: Combined adaptive thresholding and marker controlled watershed approach

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, David G.; Naes, Benjamin E.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Zimmer, Mindy M.; Barrett, Christopher A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-05-31

    A novel approach to particle identification and particle isotope ratio determination has been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This particle search approach combines an adaptive thresholding algorithm and marker-controlled watershed segmentation (MCWS) transform, which improves the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) isotopic analysis of uranium containing particle populations for nuclear safeguards applications. The Niblack assisted MCWS approach (a.k.a. SEEKER) developed for this work has improved the identification of isotopically unique uranium particles under conditions that have historically presented significant challenges for SIMS image data processing techniques. Particles obtained from five NIST uranium certified reference materials (CRM U129A, U015, U150, U500 and U850) were successfully identified in regions of SIMS image data 1) where a high variability in image intensity existed, 2) where particles were touching or were in close proximity to one another and/or 3) where the magnitude of ion signal for a given region was count limited. Analysis of the isotopic distributions of uranium containing particles identified by SEEKER showed four distinct, accurately identified 235U enrichment distributions, corresponding to the NIST certified 235U/238U isotope ratios for CRM U129A/U015 (not statistically differentiated), U150, U500 and U850. Additionally, comparison of the minor uranium isotope (234U, 235U and 236U) atom percent values verified that, even in the absence of high precision isotope ratio measurements, SEEKER could be used to segment isotopically unique uranium particles from SIMS image data. Although demonstrated specifically for SIMS analysis of uranium containing particles for nuclear safeguards, SEEKER has application in addressing a broad set of image processing challenges.

  7. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  8. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:26793269

  9. Novel and powerful 3D adaptive crisp active contour method applied in the segmentation of CT lung images.

    PubMed

    Rebouças Filho, Pedro Pedrosa; Cortez, Paulo César; da Silva Barros, Antônio C; C Albuquerque, Victor Hugo; R S Tavares, João Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 300 million people have asthma, 210 million people have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and, according to WHO, COPD will become the third major cause of death worldwide in 2030. Computational Vision systems are commonly used in pulmonology to address the task of image segmentation, which is essential for accurate medical diagnoses. Segmentation defines the regions of the lungs in CT images of the thorax that must be further analyzed by the system or by a specialist physician. This work proposes a novel and powerful technique named 3D Adaptive Crisp Active Contour Method (3D ACACM) for the segmentation of CT lung images. The method starts with a sphere within the lung to be segmented that is deformed by forces acting on it towards the lung borders. This process is performed iteratively in order to minimize an energy function associated with the 3D deformable model used. In the experimental assessment, the 3D ACACM is compared against three approaches commonly used in this field: the automatic 3D Region Growing, the level-set algorithm based on coherent propagation and the semi-automatic segmentation by an expert using the 3D OsiriX toolbox. When applied to 40 CT scans of the chest the 3D ACACM had an average F-measure of 99.22%, revealing its superiority and competency to segment lungs in CT images.

  10. Segmentation of the heart and great vessels in CT images using a model-based adaptation framework.

    PubMed

    Ecabert, Olivier; Peters, Jochen; Walker, Matthew J; Ivanc, Thomas; Lorenz, Cristian; von Berg, Jens; Lessick, Jonathan; Vembar, Mani; Weese, Jürgen

    2011-12-01

    Recently, model-based methods for the automatic segmentation of the heart chambers have been proposed. An important application of these methods is the characterization of the heart function. Heart models are, however, increasingly used for interventional guidance making it necessary to also extract the attached great vessels. It is, for instance, important to extract the left atrium and the proximal part of the pulmonary veins to support guidance of ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation treatment. For cardiac resynchronization therapy, a heart model including the coronary sinus is needed. We present a heart model comprising the four heart chambers and the attached great vessels. By assigning individual linear transformations to the heart chambers and to short tubular segments building the great vessels, variable sizes of the heart chambers and bending of the vessels can be described in a consistent way. A configurable algorithmic framework that we call adaptation engine matches the heart model automatically to cardiac CT angiography images in a multi-stage process. First, the heart is detected using a Generalized Hough Transformation. Subsequently, the heart chambers are adapted. This stage uses parametric as well as deformable mesh adaptation techniques. In the final stage, segments of the large vascular structures are successively activated and adapted. To optimize the computational performance, the adaptation engine can vary the mesh resolution and freeze already adapted mesh parts. The data used for validation were independent from the data used for model-building. Ground truth segmentations were generated for 37 CT data sets reconstructed at several cardiac phases from 17 patients. Segmentation errors were assessed for anatomical sub-structures resulting in a mean surface-to-surface error ranging 0.50-0.82mm for the heart chambers and 0.60-1.32mm for the parts of the great vessels visible in the images.

  11. Personalized articulated atlas with a dynamic adaptation strategy for bone segmentation in CT or CT/MR head and neck images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Sebastian; Jung, Florian; Wesarg, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation method for the joint segmentation of individual bones in CT- or CT/MR- head and neck images. It is based on an articulated atlas for CT images that learned the shape and appearance of the individual bones along with the articulation between them from annotated training instances. First, a novel dynamic adaptation strategy for the atlas is presented in order to increase the rate of successful adaptations. Then, if a corresponding CT image is available the atlas can be enriched with personalized information about shape, appearance and size of the individual bones from that image. Using mutual information, this personalized atlas is adapted to an MR image in order to propagate segmentations. For evaluation, a head and neck bone atlas created from 15 manually annotated training images was adapted to 58 clinically acquired head andneck CT datasets. Visual inspection showed that the automatic dynamic adaptation strategy was successful for all bones in 86% of the cases. This is a 22% improvement compared to the traditional gradient descent based approach. In leave-one-out cross validation manner the average surface distance of the correctly adapted items was found to be 0.6 8mm. In 20 cases corresponding CT/MR image pairs were available and the atlas could be personalized and adapted to the MR image. This was successful in 19 cases.

  12. Image segmentation using globally optimal growth in three dimensions with an adaptive feature set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David C.; Barrett, William A.

    1994-09-01

    A globally optimal region growing algorithm for 3D segmentation of anatomical objects is developed. The notion of simple 3D connected component labelling is extended to enable the combination of arbitrary features in the segmentation process. This algorithm uses a hybrid octree-btree structure to segment an object of interest in an ordered fashion. This tree structure overcomes the computational complexity of global optimality in three dimensions. The segmentation process is controlled by a set of active features, which work in concert to extract the object of interest. The cost function used to enforce the order is based on the combination of active features. The characteristics of the data throughout the volume dynamically influences which features are active. A foundation for applying user interaction with the object directly to the feature set is established. The result is a system which analyzes user input and neighborhood data and optimizes the tools used in the segmentation process accordingly.

  13. Adaptive multi-objective archive-based hybrid scatter search for segmentation in lung computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Chin Wei; Yoong Lam, Hong; Tajudin Khader, Ahamad; Kamarulzaman, Hamzah

    2012-03-01

    This article proposes a multi-objective clustering ensemble method for medical image segmentation. The proposed method is called adaptive multi-objective archive-based hybrid scatter search (AMAHSS). It utilizes fuzzy clustering with optimization of three fitness functions: global fuzzy compactness of the clusters, fuzzy separation and symmetry distance-based cluster validity index. The AMAHSS enables the search strategy to explore intensively the search space with high-quality solutions and to move to unexplored search space when necessary. The best single solution is processed using the metaclustering algorithm. The proposed framework is designed to segment lung computed tomography images for candidate nodule detection. This candidate nodule will then be classified as cancerous or non-cancerous. The authors validate the method with standard k-means, fuzzy c-means and the multi-objective genetic algorithm with different postprocessing methods for the final solution. The results obtained from the benchmark experiment indicate that the method achieves up to 90% of the positive predictive rate.

  14. The PCNN adaptive segmentation algorithm based on visual perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanming

    To solve network adaptive parameter determination problem of the pulse coupled neural network (PCNN), and improve the image segmentation results in image segmentation. The PCNN adaptive segmentation algorithm based on visual perception of information is proposed. Based on the image information of visual perception and Gabor mathematical model of Optic nerve cells receptive field, the algorithm determines adaptively the receptive field of each pixel of the image. And determines adaptively the network parameters W, M, and β of PCNN by the Gabor mathematical model, which can overcome the problem of traditional PCNN parameter determination in the field of image segmentation. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the region connectivity and edge regularity of segmentation image. And also show the PCNN of visual perception information for segmentation image of advantage.

  15. Scorpion image segmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  16. Intra-patient semi-automated segmentation of the cervix-uterus in CT-images for adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiza Bondar, M.; Hoogeman, Mischa; Schillemans, Wilco; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-08-01

    For online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer, fast and accurate image segmentation is required to facilitate daily treatment adaptation. Our aim was twofold: (1) to test and compare three intra-patient automated segmentation methods for the cervix-uterus structure in CT-images and (2) to improve the segmentation accuracy by including prior knowledge on the daily bladder volume or on the daily coordinates of implanted fiducial markers. The tested methods were: shape deformation (SD) and atlas-based segmentation (ABAS) using two non-rigid registration methods: demons and a hierarchical algorithm. Tests on 102 CT-scans of 13 patients demonstrated that the segmentation accuracy significantly increased by including the bladder volume predicted with a simple 1D model based on a manually defined bladder top. Moreover, manually identified implanted fiducial markers significantly improved the accuracy of the SD method. For patients with large cervix-uterus volume regression, the use of CT-data acquired toward the end of the treatment was required to improve segmentation accuracy. Including prior knowledge, the segmentation results of SD (Dice similarity coefficient 85 ± 6%, error margin 2.2 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 1 min) and of ABAS using hierarchical non-rigid registration (Dice 82 ± 10%, error margin 3.1 ± 2.3 mm, average time around 30 s) support their use for image guided online adaptive radiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  17. Adaptive multi-level conditional random fields for detection and segmentation of small enhanced pathology in medical images.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Arnold, Douglas L; Arbel, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Detection and segmentation of large structures in an image or within a region of interest have received great attention in the medical image processing domains. However, the problem of small pathology detection and segmentation still remains an unresolved challenge due to the small size of these pathologies, their low contrast and variable position, shape and texture. In many contexts, early detection of these pathologies is critical in diagnosis and assessing the outcome of treatment. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Fields (AMCRF) with the incorporation of higher order cliques for detecting and segmenting such pathologies. In the first level of our graphical model, a voxel-based CRF is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, in order to further remove falsely detected regions, a new CRF is developed that incorporates higher order textural features, which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. At this level, higher order textures are considered together with the voxel-wise cliques to refine boundaries and is therefore adaptive. The proposed algorithm is tested in the context of detecting enhancing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain MRI, where the problem is further complicated as many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI. The algorithm is trained and tested on large multi-center clinical trials from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients. The effect of several different parameter learning and inference techniques is further investigated. When tested on 120 cases, the proposed method reaches a lesion detection rate of 90%, with very few false positive lesion counts on average, ranging from 0.17 for very small (3-5 voxels) to 0 for very large (50+ voxels) regions. The proposed model is further tested on a very large clinical trial containing 2770 scans where a high sensitivity of 91% with an average false positive

  18. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  19. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  20. Image segmentation using common techniques and illumination applied to tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    1998-03-01

    This paper present the comparation and performance on no adaptive image segmentation techniques using illumination and adaptive image segmentation techniques. Results obtained on indoor plant reproduction by tissue culture, show the improve in time process, simplify the image segmentation process, experimental results are presented using common techniques in image processing and illumination, contrasted with adaptive image segmentation.

  1. XRA image segmentation using regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jesse S.

    1996-04-01

    Segmentation is an important step in image analysis. Thresholding is one of the most important approaches. There are several difficulties in segmentation, such as automatic selecting threshold, dealing with intensity distortion and noise removal. We have developed an adaptive segmentation scheme by applying the Central Limit Theorem in regression. A Gaussian regression is used to separate the distribution of background from foreground in a single peak histogram. The separation will help to automatically determine the threshold. A small 3 by 3 widow is applied and the modal of the local histogram is used to overcome noise. Thresholding is based on local weighting, where regression is used again for parameter estimation. A connectivity test is applied to the final results to remove impulse noise. We have applied the algorithm to x-ray angiogram images to extract brain arteries. The algorithm works well for single peak distribution where there is no valley in the histogram. The regression provides a method to apply knowledge in clustering. Extending regression for multiple-level segmentation needs further investigation.

  2. Segment adaptive gradient angle interpolation.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Christine M; Frakes, David H

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new edge-directed interpolator based on locally defined, straight line approximations of image isophotes. Spatial derivatives of image intensity are used to describe the principal behavior of pixel-intersecting isophotes in terms of their slopes. The slopes are determined by inverting a tridiagonal matrix and are forced to vary linearly from pixel-to-pixel within segments. Image resizing is performed by interpolating along the approximated isophotes. The proposed method can accommodate arbitrary scaling factors, provides state-of-the-art results in terms of PSNR as well as other quantitative visual quality metrics, and has the advantage of reduced computational complexity that is directly proportional to the number of pixels.

  3. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  4. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets.

  5. Adaptive thresholding algorithm based on SAR images and wind data to segment oil spills along the northwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Mera, David; Cotos, José M; Varela-Pet, José; Garcia-Pineda, Oscar

    2012-10-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been established as a useful tool for detecting hydrocarbon spillage on the ocean's surface. Several surveillance applications have been developed based on this technology. Environmental variables such as wind speed should be taken into account for better SAR image segmentation. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding algorithm for detecting oil spills based on SAR data and a wind field estimation as well as its implementation as a part of a functional prototype. The algorithm was adapted to an important shipping route off the Galician coast (northwest Iberian Peninsula) and was developed on the basis of confirmed oil spills. Image testing revealed 99.93% pixel labelling accuracy. By taking advantage of multi-core processor architecture, the prototype was optimized to get a nearly 30% improvement in processing time.

  6. Influence of reconstruction settings on the performance of adaptive thresholding algorithms for FDG-PET image segmentation in radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, Roberta; Della Monica, Patrizia; Loi, Gianfranco; Vigna, Luca; Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Brambilla, Marco

    2011-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the behavior of a contouring algorithm for PET images based on adaptive thresholding depending on lesions size and target-to-background (TB) ratio under different conditions of image reconstruction parameters. Based on this analysis, the image reconstruction scheme able to maximize the goodness of fit of the thresholding algorithm has been selected. A phantom study employing spherical targets was designed to determine slice-specific threshold (TS) levels which produce accurate cross-sectional areas. A wide range of TB ratio was investigated. Multiple regression methods were used to fit the data and to construct algorithms depending both on target cross-sectional area and TB ratio, using various reconstruction schemes employing a wide range of iteration number and amount of postfiltering Gaussian smoothing. Analysis of covariance was used to test the influence of iteration number and smoothing on threshold determination. The degree of convergence of ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithms does not influence TS determination. Among these approaches, the OSEM at two iterations and eight subsets with a 6-8 mm post-reconstruction Gaussian three-dimensional filter provided the best fit with a coefficient of determination R² = 0.90 for cross-sectional areas ≤ 133 mm² and R² = 0.95 for cross-sectional areas > 133 mm². The amount of post-reconstruction smoothing has been directly incorporated in the adaptive thresholding algorithms. The feasibility of the method was tested in two patients with lymph node FDG accumulation and in five patients using the bladder to mimic an anatomical structure of large size and uniform uptake, with satisfactory results. Slice-specific adaptive thresholding algorithms look promising as a reproducible method for delineating PET target volumes with good accuracy.

  7. Neural network for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourikhine, Alexei N.; Prasad, Lakshman; Schlei, Bernd R.

    2000-10-01

    Image analysis is an important requirement of many artificial intelligence systems. Though great effort has been devoted to inventing efficient algorithms for image analysis, there is still much work to be done. It is natural to turn to mammalian vision systems for guidance because they are the best known performers of visual tasks. The pulse- coupled neural network (PCNN) model of the cat visual cortex has proven to have interesting properties for image processing. This article describes the PCNN application to the processing of images of heterogeneous materials; specifically PCNN is applied to image denoising and image segmentation. Our results show that PCNNs do well at segmentation if we perform image smoothing prior to segmentation. We use PCNN for obth smoothing and segmentation. Combining smoothing and segmentation enable us to eliminate PCNN sensitivity to the setting of the various PCNN parameters whose optimal selection can be difficult and can vary even for the same problem. This approach makes image processing based on PCNN more automatic in our application and also results in better segmentation.

  8. Segmenting Images for a Better Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) software has been adapted by Bartron Medical Imaging, LLC, for use in segmentation feature extraction, pattern recognition, and classification of medical images. Bartron acquired licenses from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for application of the HSEG concept to medical imaging, from the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory to incorporate pattern-matching software, and from Kennedy Space Center for data-mining and edge-detection programs. The Med-Seg[TM] united developed by Bartron provides improved diagnoses for a wide range of medical images, including computed tomography scans, positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, digitized Z-ray, digitized mammography, dental X-ray, soft tissue analysis, and moving object analysis. It also can be used in analysis of soft-tissue slides. Bartron's future plans include the application of HSEG technology to drug development. NASA is advancing it's HSEG software to learn more about the Earth's magnetosphere.

  9. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well, and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. PMID:19380268

  10. Medical image segmentation by MDP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yisu; Chen, Wufan

    2011-11-01

    MDP (Dirichlet Process Mixtures) model is applied to segment medical images in this paper. Segmentation can been automatically done without initializing segmentation class numbers. The MDP model segmentation algorithm is used to segment natural images and MR (Magnetic Resonance) images in the paper. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MDP model segmentation algorithm, many compared experiments, such as EM (Expectation Maximization) image segmentation algorithm, K-means image segmentation algorithm and MRF (Markov Field) image segmentation algorithm, have been done to segment medical MR images. All the methods are also analyzed quantitatively by using DSC (Dice Similarity Coefficients). The experiments results show that DSC of MDP model segmentation algorithm of all slices exceed 90%, which show that the proposed method is robust and accurate.

  11. Image Information Mining Utilizing Hierarchical Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Marchisio, Giovanni; Koperski, Krzysztof; Datcu, Mihai

    2002-01-01

    The Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) algorithm is an approach for producing high quality, hierarchically related image segmentations. The VisiMine image information mining system utilizes clustering and segmentation algorithms for reducing visual information in multispectral images to a manageable size. The project discussed herein seeks to enhance the VisiMine system through incorporating hierarchical segmentations from HSEG into the VisiMine system.

  12. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Texture Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Xavier; Leonardi, Riccardo; Gersho, Allen

    1988-10-01

    Past work on unsupervised segmentation of a texture image has been based on several restrictive assumptions to reduce the difficulty of this challenging segmentation task. Typically, a fixed number of different texture regions is assumed and each region is assumed to be generated by a simple model. Also, different first order statistics are used to facilitate discrimination between different textures. This paper introduces an approach to unsupervised segmentation that offers promise for handling unrestricted natural scenes containing textural regions. A simple but effective feature set and a novel measure of dissimilarity are used to accurately generate boundaries between an unknown number of regions without using first order statistics or texture models. A two stage approach is used to partition a texture image. In the first stage, a set of sliding windows scans the image to generate a sequence of feature vectors. The windowed regions providing the highest inhomo-geneity in their textural characteristics determine a crude first-stage boundary, separating textured areas that are unambiguously homogeneous from one another. These regions are used to estimate a set of prototype feature vectors. In the second stage, supervised segmentation is performed to obtain an accurate boundary between different textured regions by means of a constrained hierarchical clustering technique. Each inhomo-geneous window obtained in the first stage is split into four identical subwindows for which the feature vectors are estimated. Each of the subwindows is assigned to a homogeneous region to which it is connected. This region is chosen according to the closest prototype vector in the feature space. Any two adjacent subwindows that are assigned to different regions will in turn be considered as inhomogeneous windows and each is then split into four subwindows. The classification scheme is repeated in this hierarchical manner until the desired boundary resolution is achieved. The

  13. Intelligent segmentation of industrial radiographic images using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Parker, Graham A.

    1994-10-01

    An application of machine vision, incorporating neural networks, which aims to fully automate real-time radiographic inspection in welding process is described. The current methodology adopted comprises two distinct stages - the segmentation of the weld from the background content of the radiographic image, and the segmentation of suspect defect areas inside the weld region itself. In the first stage, a back propagation neural network has been employed to adaptively and accurately segment the weld region from a given image. The training of the network is achieved with a single image showing a typical weld in the run which is to be inspected, coupled with a very simple schematic weld 'template'. The second processing stage utilizes a further backpropagation network which is trained on a test set of image data previously segmented by a conventional adaptive threshold method. It is shown that the two techniques can be combined to fully segment radiographic weld images.

  14. Colony image acquisition and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2007-12-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems. The main problems are image acquisition and image segmentation. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. The developed colony image segmentation algorithm consists of the sub-algorithms: (1) image classification; (2) image processing; and (3) colony delineation. The colony delineation algorithm main contain: the procedures based on grey level similarity, on boundary tracing, on shape information and colony excluding. In addition, a number of algorithms are developed for colony analysis. The system has been tested and satisfactory.

  15. Spectral clustering algorithms for ultrasound image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Archip, Neculai; Rohling, Robert; Cooperberg, Peter; Tahmasebpour, Hamid; Warfield, Simon K

    2005-01-01

    Image segmentation algorithms derived from spectral clustering analysis rely on the eigenvectors of the Laplacian of a weighted graph obtained from the image. The NCut criterion was previously used for image segmentation in supervised manner. We derive a new strategy for unsupervised image segmentation. This article describes an initial investigation to determine the suitability of such segmentation techniques for ultrasound images. The extension of the NCut technique to the unsupervised clustering is first described. The novel segmentation algorithm is then performed on simulated ultrasound images. Tests are also performed on abdominal and fetal images with the segmentation results compared to manual segmentation. Comparisons with the classical NCut algorithm are also presented. Finally, segmentation results on other types of medical images are shown.

  16. Estimation of breast percent density in raw and processed full field digital mammography images via adaptive fuzzy c-means clustering and support vector machine segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brad M.; Nathan, Diane L.; Wang Yan; Zheng Yuanjie; Gee, James C.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The amount of fibroglandular tissue content in the breast as estimated mammographically, commonly referred to as breast percent density (PD%), is one of the most significant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Approaches to quantify breast density commonly focus on either semiautomated methods or visual assessment, both of which are highly subjective. Furthermore, most studies published to date investigating computer-aided assessment of breast PD% have been performed using digitized screen-film mammograms, while digital mammography is increasingly replacing screen-film mammography in breast cancer screening protocols. Digital mammography imaging generates two types of images for analysis, raw (i.e., 'FOR PROCESSING') and vendor postprocessed (i.e., 'FOR PRESENTATION'), of which postprocessed images are commonly used in clinical practice. Development of an algorithm which effectively estimates breast PD% in both raw and postprocessed digital mammography images would be beneficial in terms of direct clinical application and retrospective analysis. Methods: This work proposes a new algorithm for fully automated quantification of breast PD% based on adaptive multiclass fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering and support vector machine (SVM) classification, optimized for the imaging characteristics of both raw and processed digital mammography images as well as for individual patient and image characteristics. Our algorithm first delineates the breast region within the mammogram via an automated thresholding scheme to identify background air followed by a straight line Hough transform to extract the pectoral muscle region. The algorithm then applies adaptive FCM clustering based on an optimal number of clusters derived from image properties of the specific mammogram to subdivide the breast into regions of similar gray-level intensity. Finally, a SVM classifier is trained to identify which clusters within the breast tissue are likely fibroglandular, which are then

  17. Exo-planet Direct Imaging with On-Axis and/or Segmented Apertures in Space: Adaptive Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi

    Capitalizing on a recent breakthrough in wavefront control theory for obscured apertures made by our group, we propose to demonstrate a method to achieve high contrast exoplanet imaging with on-axis obscured apertures. Our new algorithm, which we named Adaptive Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD), provides the ability to compensate for aperture discontinuities (segment gaps and/or secondary mirror supports) by controlling deformable mirrors in a nonlinear wavefront control regime not utilized before but conceptually similar to the beam reshaping used in PIAA coronagraphy. We propose here an in-air demonstration at 1E- 7 contrast, enabled by adding a second deformable mirror to our current test-bed. This expansion of the scope of our current efforts in exoplanet imaging technologies will enabling us to demonstrate an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. It is directly applicable at scales from moderate-cost exoplanet probe missions to the 2.4 m AFTA telescopes to future flagship UVOIR observatories with apertures potentially 16-20 m. Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging is one of the top scientific priorities established by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey. Achieving this ambitious goal will require 1e-10 contrast on a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of nearby stars. Such a mission must of course also be realized at an achievable cost. Lightweight segmented mirror technology allows larger diameter optics to fit in any given launch vehicle as compared to monolithic mirrors, and lowers total life-cycle costs from construction through integration & test, making it a compelling option for future large space telescopes. At smaller scales, on-axis designs with secondary obscurations and supports are less challenging to fabricate and thus more affordable than the off-axis unobscured primary mirror designs

  18. Metric Learning to Enhance Hyperspectral Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Castano, Rebecca; Bue, Brian; Gilmore, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    Unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation can reveal spatial trends that show the physical structure of the scene to an analyst. They highlight borders and reveal areas of homogeneity and change. Segmentations are independently helpful for object recognition, and assist with automated production of symbolic maps. Additionally, a good segmentation can dramatically reduce the number of effective spectra in an image, enabling analyses that would otherwise be computationally prohibitive. Specifically, using an over-segmentation of the image instead of individual pixels can reduce noise and potentially improve the results of statistical post-analysis. In this innovation, a metric learning approach is presented to improve the performance of unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation. The prototype demonstrations attempt a superpixel segmentation in which the image is conservatively over-segmented; that is, the single surface features may be split into multiple segments, but each individual segment, or superpixel, is ensured to have homogenous mineralogy.

  19. Image segmentation using association rule features.

    PubMed

    Rushing, John A; Ranganath, Heggere; Hinke, Thomas H; Graves, Sara J

    2002-01-01

    A new type of texture feature based on association rules is described. Association rules have been used in applications such as market basket analysis to capture relationships present among items in large data sets. It is shown that association rules can be adapted to capture frequently occurring local structures in images. The frequency of occurrence of these structures can be used to characterize texture. Methods for segmentation of textured images based on association rule features are described. Simulation results using images consisting of man made and natural textures show that association rule features perform well compared to other widely used texture features. Association rule features are used to detect cumulus cloud fields in GOES satellite images and are found to achieve higher accuracy than other statistical texture features for this problem.

  20. Neonatal Brain Tissue Classification with Morphological Adaptation and Unified Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Beare, Richard J.; Chen, Jian; Kelly, Claire E.; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Smyser, Christopher D.; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Loh, Wai Y.; Matthews, Lillian G.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Spittle, Alicia J.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Seal, Marc L.; Thompson, Deanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the distribution of brain tissue types (tissue classification) in neonates is necessary for studying typical and atypical brain development, such as that associated with preterm birth, and may provide biomarkers for neurodevelopmental outcomes. Compared with magnetic resonance images of adults, neonatal images present specific challenges that require the development of specialized, population-specific methods. This paper introduces MANTiS (Morphologically Adaptive Neonatal Tissue Segmentation), which extends the unified segmentation approach to tissue classification implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software to neonates. MANTiS utilizes a combination of unified segmentation, template adaptation via morphological segmentation tools and topological filtering, to segment the neonatal brain into eight tissue classes: cortical gray matter, white matter, deep nuclear gray matter, cerebellum, brainstem, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), hippocampus and amygdala. We evaluated the performance of MANTiS using two independent datasets. The first dataset, provided by the NeoBrainS12 challenge, consisted of coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born ≤30 weeks' gestation) acquired at 30 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5), coronal T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5) and axial T2-weighted images of preterm infants acquired at 40 weeks' corrected gestational age (n = 5). The second dataset, provided by the Washington University NeuroDevelopmental Research (WUNDeR) group, consisted of T2-weighted images of preterm infants (born <30 weeks' gestation) acquired shortly after birth (n = 12), preterm infants acquired at term-equivalent age (n = 12), and healthy term-born infants (born ≥38 weeks' gestation) acquired within the first 9 days of life (n = 12). For the NeoBrainS12 dataset, mean Dice scores comparing MANTiS with manual segmentations were all above 0.7, except for the cortical gray

  1. Image segmentation using fuzzy LVQ clustering networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Eric Chen-Kuo; Bezdek, James C.; Pal, Nikhil R.

    1992-01-01

    In this note we formulate image segmentation as a clustering problem. Feature vectors extracted from a raw image are clustered into subregions, thereby segmenting the image. A fuzzy generalization of a Kohonen learning vector quantization (LVQ) which integrates the Fuzzy c-Means (FCM) model with the learning rate and updating strategies of the LVQ is used for this task. This network, which segments images in an unsupervised manner, is thus related to the FCM optimization problem. Numerical examples on photographic and magnetic resonance images are given to illustrate this approach to image segmentation.

  2. Image Segmentation, Registration, Compression, and Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Wei, Hai; Yadegar, Joseph; Ray, Nilanjan; Zabuawala, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational framework was developed of a 2D affine invariant matching exploiting a parameter space. Named as affine invariant parameter space (AIPS), the technique can be applied to many image-processing and computer-vision problems, including image registration, template matching, and object tracking from image sequence. The AIPS is formed by the parameters in an affine combination of a set of feature points in the image plane. In cases where the entire image can be assumed to have undergone a single affine transformation, the new AIPS match metric and matching framework becomes very effective (compared with the state-of-the-art methods at the time of this reporting). No knowledge about scaling or any other transformation parameters need to be known a priori to apply the AIPS framework. An automated suite of software tools has been created to provide accurate image segmentation (for data cleaning) and high-quality 2D image and 3D surface registration (for fusing multi-resolution terrain, image, and map data). These tools are capable of supporting existing GIS toolkits already in the marketplace, and will also be usable in a stand-alone fashion. The toolkit applies novel algorithmic approaches for image segmentation, feature extraction, and registration of 2D imagery and 3D surface data, which supports first-pass, batched, fully automatic feature extraction (for segmentation), and registration. A hierarchical and adaptive approach is taken for achieving automatic feature extraction, segmentation, and registration. Surface registration is the process of aligning two (or more) data sets to a common coordinate system, during which the transformation between their different coordinate systems is determined. Also developed here are a novel, volumetric surface modeling and compression technique that provide both quality-guaranteed mesh surface approximations and compaction of the model sizes by efficiently coding the geometry and connectivity

  3. Example-based segmentation for breast mass images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingying; Xu, Songhua; Luo, Xiaonan

    2013-03-01

    A new example-based mass segmentation algorithm is proposed for breast mass images. The training examples used in the new algorithm are prepared by three medical imaging professionals who manually outlined mass contours of 45 sample breast mass images. These manually segmented mass images are then partitioned into small regular grid cells, which are used as reference samples by the algorithm. Each time when the algorithm is applied to segment a previously unseen breast mass image, it first detects grid cell regions in the image that likely overlap with the underlying mass region. Upon identifying such candidate regions, the algorithm then locates the exact mass contour through an example based segmentation procedure where the algorithm retrieves, transfers, and re-applies the human expert knowledge regarding mass segmentation as encoded in the reference samples. The key advantage of our approach lies in its adaptability in tailoring to the skills and preferences of multiple experts through simply switching to a different corpus of human segmentation samples. To explore the effectiveness of the new approach, we comparatively evaluated the accuracy of the algorithm for mass segmentation against segmentation results both manually produced by several medical imaging professionals and automatically by a state-of-the-art level set based method. The comparison results demonstrate that the new algorithm achieves a higher accuracy than the level set based peer method with statistical significance.2

  4. Segmentation of branching vascular structures using adaptive subdivision surface fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitslaar, Pieter H.; van't Klooster, Ronald; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van der Geest, Rob J.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for segmentation and modeling of branching vessel structures in medical images using adaptive subdivision surfaces fitting. The method starts with a rough initial skeleton model of the vessel structure. A coarse triangular control mesh consisting of hexagonal rings and dedicated bifurcation elements is constructed from this skeleton. Special attention is paid to ensure a topological sound control mesh is created around the bifurcation areas. Then, a smooth tubular surface is obtained from this coarse mesh using a standard subdivision scheme. This subdivision surface is iteratively fitted to the image. During the fitting, the target update locations of the subdivision surface are obtained using a scanline search along the surface normals, finding the maximum gradient magnitude (of the imaging data). In addition to this surface fitting framework, we propose an adaptive mesh refinement scheme. In this step the coarse control mesh topology is updated based on the current segmentation result, enabling adaptation to varying vessel lumen diameters. This enhances the robustness and flexibility of the method and reduces the amount of prior knowledge needed to create the initial skeletal model. The method was applied to publicly available CTA data from the Carotid Bifurcation Algorithm Evaluation Framework resulting in an average dice index of 89.2% with the ground truth. Application of the method to the complex vascular structure of a coronary artery tree in CTA and to MRI images were performed to show the versatility and flexibility of the proposed framework.

  5. A fast and efficient segmentation scheme for cell microscopic image.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, G; Charrier, C; Lezoray, O; Meurie, C; Cardot, H

    2007-04-27

    Microscopic cellular image segmentation schemes must be efficient for reliable analysis and fast to process huge quantity of images. Recent studies have focused on improving segmentation quality. Several segmentation schemes have good quality but processing time is too expensive to deal with a great number of images per day. For segmentation schemes based on pixel classification, the classifier design is crucial since it is the one which requires most of the processing time necessary to segment an image. The main contribution of this work is focused on how to reduce the complexity of decision functions produced by support vector machines (SVM) while preserving recognition rate. Vector quantization is used in order to reduce the inherent redundancy present in huge pixel databases (i.e. images with expert pixel segmentation). Hybrid color space design is also used in order to improve data set size reduction rate and recognition rate. A new decision function quality criterion is defined to select good trade-off between recognition rate and processing time of pixel decision function. The first results of this study show that fast and efficient pixel classification with SVM is possible. Moreover posterior class pixel probability estimation is easy to compute with Platt method. Then a new segmentation scheme using probabilistic pixel classification has been developed. This one has several free parameters and an automatic selection must dealt with, but criteria for evaluate segmentation quality are not well adapted for cell segmentation, especially when comparison with expert pixel segmentation must be achieved. Another important contribution in this paper is the definition of a new quality criterion for evaluation of cell segmentation. The results presented here show that the selection of free parameters of the segmentation scheme by optimisation of the new quality cell segmentation criterion produces efficient cell segmentation.

  6. Hierarchical image segmentation for learning object priors

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J; Li, Nan

    2010-11-10

    The proposed segmentation approach naturally combines experience based and image based information. The experience based information is obtained by training a classifier for each object class. For a given test image, the result of each classifier is represented as a probability map. The final segmentation is obtained with a hierarchial image segmentation algorithm that considers both the probability maps and the image features such as color and edge strength. We also utilize image region hierarchy to obtain not only local but also semi-global features as input to the classifiers. Moreover, to get robust probability maps, we take into account the region context information by averaging the probability maps over different levels of the hierarchical segmentation algorithm. The obtained segmentation results are superior to the state-of-the-art supervised image segmentation algorithms.

  7. Image Segmentation Using Hierarchical Merge Tree.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-07-18

    This paper investigates one of the most fundamental computer vision problems: image segmentation. We propose a supervised hierarchical approach to object-independent image segmentation. Starting with over-segmenting superpixels, we use a tree structure to represent the hierarchy of region merging, by which we reduce the problem of segmenting image regions to finding a set of label assignment to tree nodes. We formulate the tree structure as a constrained conditional model to associate region merging with likelihoods predicted using an ensemble boundary classifier. Final segmentations can then be inferred by finding globally optimal solutions to the model efficiently. We also present an iterative training and testing algorithm that generates various tree structures and combines them to emphasize accurate boundaries by segmentation accumulation. Experiment results and comparisons with other recent methods on six public data sets demonstrate that our approach achieves state-of-the-art region accuracy and is competitive in image segmentation without semantic priors.

  8. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  9. Robust vessel segmentation in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Budai, A; Bock, R; Maier, A; Hornegger, J; Michelson, G

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common modalities to examine the human eye is the eye-fundus photograph. The evaluation of fundus photographs is carried out by medical experts during time-consuming visual inspection. Our aim is to accelerate this process using computer aided diagnosis. As a first step, it is necessary to segment structures in the images for tissue differentiation. As the eye is the only organ, where the vasculature can be imaged in an in vivo and noninterventional way without using expensive scanners, the vessel tree is one of the most interesting and important structures to analyze. The quality and resolution of fundus images are rapidly increasing. Thus, segmentation methods need to be adapted to the new challenges of high resolutions. In this paper, we present a method to reduce calculation time, achieve high accuracy, and increase sensitivity compared to the original Frangi method. This method contains approaches to avoid potential problems like specular reflexes of thick vessels. The proposed method is evaluated using the STARE and DRIVE databases and we propose a new high resolution fundus database to compare it to the state-of-the-art algorithms. The results show an average accuracy above 94% and low computational needs. This outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  10. A hybrid technique for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nyma, Alamgir; Kang, Myeongsu; Kwon, Yung-Keun; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2012-01-01

    Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  11. Livewire based single still image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Rong; Liu, Xiaomao; Yue, Hao; Zhu, Hao; Tian, Dandan; Chen, Shu; Li, Yiquan; Tian, Jinwen

    2011-11-01

    In the application of the video contactless measurement, the quality of the image taken from underwater is not very well. It is well known that automatic image segmental method cannot provide acceptable segmentation result with low quality single still image. Snake algorithm can provide better result in this case with the aiding of human. However, sometimes the segmental result of Snake may far from the initial segmental contour drawn by user. Livewire algorithm can keep the location of the seed points that user selected nailed from the beginning to the end. But the contour may have burrs when the image's noise is quite high and the contrast is low. In this paper, we modified the cost function of Livewire algorithm and proposed a new segmentation method that can be used for single still image segmentation with high noise and low contrast.

  12. Overlapping image segmentation for context-dependent anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James; Prasad, Lakshman

    2011-06-01

    The challenge of finding small targets in big images lies in the characterization of the background clutter. The more homogeneous the background, the more distinguishable a typical target will be from its background. One way to homogenize the background is to segment the image into distinct regions, each of which is individually homogeneous, and then to treat each region separately. In this paper we will report on experiments in which the target is unspecified (it is an anomaly), and various segmentation strategies are employed, including an adaptive hierarchical tree-based scheme. We find that segmentations that employ overlap achieve better performance in the low false alarm rate regime.

  13. Pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optical microscopy with full-pupil illumination.

    PubMed

    Milkie, Daniel E; Betzig, Eric; Ji, Na

    2011-11-01

    Optical aberrations deteriorate the performance of microscopes. Adaptive optics can be used to improve imaging performance via wavefront shaping. Here, we demonstrate a pupil-segmentation based adaptive optical approach with full-pupil illumination. When implemented in a two-photon fluorescence microscope, it recovers diffraction-limited performance and improves imaging signal and resolution.

  14. Multispectral image segmentation of breast pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornak, Joseph P.; Blaakman, Andre; Rubens, Deborah; Totterman, Saara

    1991-06-01

    The signal intensity in a magnetic resonance image is not only a function of imaging parameters but also of several intrinsic tissue properties. Therefore, unlike other medical imaging modalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows the imaging scientist to locate pathology using multispectral image segmentation. Multispectral image segmentation works best when orthogonal spectral regions are employed. In MRI, possible spectral regions are spin density (rho) , spin-lattice relaxation time T1, spin-spin relaxation time T2, and texture for each nucleus type and chemical shift. This study examines the ability of multispectral image segmentation to locate breast pathology using the total hydrogen T1, T2, and (rho) . The preliminary results indicate that our technique can locate cysts and fibroadenoma breast lesions with a minimum number of false-positives and false-negatives. Results, T1, T2, and (rho) algorithms, and segmentation techniques are presented.

  15. Metric Learning for Hyperspectral Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Brian D.; Thompson, David R.; Gilmore, Martha S.; Castano, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    We present a metric learning approach to improve the performance of unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation. Unsupervised spatial segmentation can assist both user visualization and automatic recognition of surface features. Analysts can use spatially-continuous segments to decrease noise levels and/or localize feature boundaries. However, existing segmentation methods use tasks-agnostic measures of similarity. Here we learn task-specific similarity measures from training data, improving segment fidelity to classes of interest. Multiclass Linear Discriminate Analysis produces a linear transform that optimally separates a labeled set of training classes. The defines a distance metric that generalized to a new scenes, enabling graph-based segmentation that emphasizes key spectral features. We describe tests based on data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) in which learned metrics improve segment homogeneity with respect to mineralogical classes.

  16. Joint contrast optimization and object segmentation in active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Anna, Guillaume; Bertaux, Nicolas; Galland, Frédéric; Goudail, François; Dolfi, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    We present a method for automatic target detection based on the iterative interplay between an active polarimetric imager with adaptive capabilities and a snake-based image segmentation algorithm. It successfully addresses the difficult situations where the target and the background differ only by their polarimetric properties. This method illustrates the benefits of integrating digital processing algorithms at the heart of the image acquisition process rather than using them only for postprocessing.

  17. Segmentation by surface-to-image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhiyong; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Gieseg, Michael; Liachenko, Serguei; Dhamija, Shantanu; Chiao, Ping

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation algorithm using surface-to-image registration. The algorithm employs multi-level transformations and multi-resolution image representations to progressively register atlas surfaces (modeling anatomical structures) to subject images based on weighted external forces in which weights and forces are determined by gradients and local intensity profiles obtained from images. The algorithm is designed to prevent atlas surfaces converging to unintended strong edges or leaking out of structures of interest through weak edges where the image contrast is low. Segmentation of bone structures on MR images of rat knees analyzed in this manner performs comparably to technical experts using a semi-automatic tool.

  18. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  19. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H.; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the Expectation-Maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad-hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper: First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  20. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  1. Regression Segmentation for M³ Spinal Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Zhen, Xiantong; Tay, KengYeow; Osman, Said; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Clinical routine often requires to analyze spinal images of multiple anatomic structures in multiple anatomic planes from multiple imaging modalities (M(3)). Unfortunately, existing methods for segmenting spinal images are still limited to one specific structure, in one specific plane or from one specific modality (S(3)). In this paper, we propose a novel approach, Regression Segmentation, that is for the first time able to segment M(3) spinal images in one single unified framework. This approach formulates the segmentation task innovatively as a boundary regression problem: modeling a highly nonlinear mapping function from substantially diverse M(3) images directly to desired object boundaries. Leveraging the advancement of sparse kernel machines, regression segmentation is fulfilled by a multi-dimensional support vector regressor (MSVR) which operates in an implicit, high dimensional feature space where M(3) diversity and specificity can be systematically categorized, extracted, and handled. The proposed regression segmentation approach was thoroughly tested on images from 113 clinical subjects including both disc and vertebral structures, in both sagittal and axial planes, and from both MRI and CT modalities. The overall result reaches a high dice similarity index (DSI) 0.912 and a low boundary distance (BD) 0.928 mm. With our unified and expendable framework, an efficient clinical tool for M(3) spinal image segmentation can be easily achieved, and will substantially benefit the diagnosis and treatment of spinal diseases.

  2. An enhanced fast scanning algorithm for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Ahmed Naser; Yusof, Yuhanis binti

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is an essential and important process that separates an image into regions that have similar characteristics or features. This will transform the image for a better image analysis and evaluation. An important benefit of segmentation is the identification of region of interest in a particular image. Various algorithms have been proposed for image segmentation and this includes the Fast Scanning algorithm which has been employed on food, sport and medical images. It scans all pixels in the image and cluster each pixel according to the upper and left neighbor pixels. The clustering process in Fast Scanning algorithm is performed by merging pixels with similar neighbor based on an identified threshold. Such an approach will lead to a weak reliability and shape matching of the produced segments. This paper proposes an adaptive threshold function to be used in the clustering process of the Fast Scanning algorithm. This function used the gray'value in the image's pixels and variance Also, the level of the image that is more the threshold are converted into intensity values between 0 and 1, and other values are converted into intensity values zero. The proposed enhanced Fast Scanning algorithm is realized on images of the public and private transportation in Iraq. Evaluation is later made by comparing the produced images of proposed algorithm and the standard Fast Scanning algorithm. The results showed that proposed algorithm is faster in terms the time from standard fast scanning.

  3. Generalization of Hindi OCR Using Adaptive Segmentation and Font Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Mudit; Ma, Huanfeng; Doermann, David

    In this chapter, we describe an adaptive Indic OCR system implemented as part of a rapidly retargetable language tool effort and extend work found in [20, 2]. The system includes script identification, character segmentation, training sample creation, and character recognition. For script identification, Hindi words are identified in bilingual or multilingual document images using features of the Devanagari script and support vector machine (SVM). Identified words are then segmented into individual characters, using a font-model-based intelligent character segmentation and recognition system. Using characteristics of structurally similar TrueType fonts, our system automatically builds a model to be used for the segmentation and recognition of the new script, independent of glyph composition. The key is a reliance on known font attributes. In our recognition system three feature extraction methods are used to demonstrate the importance of appropriate features for classification. The methods are tested on both Latin and non-Latin scripts. Results show that the character-level recognition accuracy exceeds 92% for non-Latin and 96% for Latin text on degraded documents. This work is a step toward the recognition of scripts of low-density languages which typically do not warrant the development of commercial OCR, yet often have complete TrueType font descriptions.

  4. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-MRI images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Le Minh, Hung; Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting; Sung, Kyung Hyun; Liu, Wenyu

    2016-08-01

    Renal compartment segmentation from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images is an important task for functional kidney evaluation. Despite advancement in segmentation methods, most of them focus on segmenting an entire kidney on CT images, there still lacks effective and automatic solutions for accurate segmentation of internal renal structures (i.e. cortex, medulla and renal pelvis) from DCE-MRI images. In this paper, we introduce a method for renal compartment segmentation which can robustly achieve high segmentation accuracy for a wide range of DCE-MRI data, and meanwhile requires little manual operations and parameter settings. The proposed method consists of five main steps. First, we pre-process the image time series to reduce the motion artifacts caused by the movement of the patients during the scans and enhance the kidney regions. Second, the kidney is segmented as a whole based on the concept of Maximally Stable Temporal Volume (MSTV). The proposed MSTV detects anatomical structures that are homogeneous in the spatial domain and stable in terms of temporal dynamics. MSTV-based kidney segmentation is robust to noises and does not require a training phase. It can well adapt to kidney shape variations caused by renal dysfunction. Third, voxels in the segmented kidney are described by principal components (PCs) to remove temporal redundancy and noises. And then k-means clustering of PCs is applied to separate voxels into multiple clusters. Fourth, the clusters are automatically labeled as cortex, medulla and pelvis based on voxels' geometric locations and intensity distribution. Finally, an iterative refinement method is introduced to further remove noises in each segmented compartment. Experiments on 14 real clinical kidney datasets and 12 synthetic dataset demonstrate that results produced by our method match very well with those segmented manually and the performance of our method is superior to the other five existing methods.

  5. Adaptable active contour model with applications to infrared ship target segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lingling; Wang, Xianghai; Wan, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Active contour model is widely and popularly used in the field of image segmentation because of its superior theoretical properties and efficient numerical methods. An algorithm to segment a ship target in infrared (IR) images using Chan-Vese (C-V) active contour model is proposed here. The method effectively integrates both image regional and boundary information by an adaptable weight function. The method can segment IR ship images, which usually contain noises, blurry boundaries, and heterogeneous regions. In addition, compared with the state-of-the-art methods, experiment results demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of this method.

  6. SAR Image Segmentation Using Morphological Attribute Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, M.; Thiele, A.; Schulz, K.; Hinz, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the last years, the spatial resolution of remote sensing sensors and imagery has continuously improved. Focusing on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, the satellites of the current generation (TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SykMed) are able to acquire images with sub-meter resolution. Indeed, high resolution imagery is visually much better interpretable, but most of the established pixel-based analysis methods have become more or less impracticable since, in high resolution images, self-sufficient objects (vehicle, building) are represented by a large number of pixels. Methods dealing with Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) provide help. Objects (segments) are groupings of pixels resulting from image segmentation algorithms based on homogeneity criteria. The image set is represented by image segments, which allows the development of rule-based analysis schemes. For example, segments can be described or categorized by their local neighborhood in a context-based manner. In this paper, a novel method for the segmentation of high resolution SAR images is presented. It is based on the calculation of morphological differential attribute profiles (DAP) which are analyzed pixel-wise in a region growing procedure. The method distinguishes between heterogeneous and homogeneous image content and delivers a precise segmentation result.

  7. Contour detection and hierarchical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Arbeláez, Pablo; Maire, Michael; Fowlkes, Charless; Malik, Jitendra

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates two fundamental problems in computer vision: contour detection and image segmentation. We present state-of-the-art algorithms for both of these tasks. Our contour detector combines multiple local cues into a globalization framework based on spectral clustering. Our segmentation algorithm consists of generic machinery for transforming the output of any contour detector into a hierarchical region tree. In this manner, we reduce the problem of image segmentation to that of contour detection. Extensive experimental evaluation demonstrates that both our contour detection and segmentation methods significantly outperform competing algorithms. The automatically generated hierarchical segmentations can be interactively refined by user-specified annotations. Computation at multiple image resolutions provides a means of coupling our system to recognition applications.

  8. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  9. A segmentation algorithm for noisy images

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a 2-D image segmentation algorithm and addresses issues related to its performance on noisy images. The algorithm segments an image by first constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of the image and then partitioning the spanning tree into sub-trees representing different homogeneous regions. The spanning tree is partitioned in such a way that the sum of gray-level variations over all partitioned subtrees is minimized under the constraints that each subtree has at least a specified number of pixels and two adjacent subtrees have significantly different ``average`` gray-levels. Two types of noise, transmission errors and Gaussian additive noise. are considered and their effects on the segmentation algorithm are studied. Evaluation results have shown that the segmentation algorithm is robust in the presence of these two types of noise.

  10. Medical image segmentation using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Ujjwal

    2009-03-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been found to be effective in the domain of medical image segmentation, since the problem can often be mapped to one of search in a complex and multimodal landscape. The challenges in medical image segmentation arise due to poor image contrast and artifacts that result in missing or diffuse organ/tissue boundaries. The resulting search space is therefore often noisy with a multitude of local optima. Not only does the genetic algorithmic framework prove to be effective in coming out of local optima, it also brings considerable flexibility into the segmentation procedure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to review the major applications of GAs to the domain of medical image segmentation.

  11. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  12. Adaptive Optics Educational Outreach and the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-06-01

    One of the limiting factors in telescope performance is atmospheric seeing. Atmospheric seeing limits the resolution of ground based optical telescopes. Even telescopes in good locations on top of mountains cannot achieve diffraction-limited resolution. Until recently, the only way to overcome this limitation was to use space-based telescopes. Adaptive Optics (AO) is a collection of technologies that measure the turbulence of Earth's atmosphere and compensate for the turbulence, resulting in high-resolution images without the expense and complexity of space based telescopes. Our Hands-On Optics program has developed activities that teach students how telescopes form images and make observations about the resolution of a telescope. We are developing materials for high school students to use in the study of adaptive optics. These activities include various ways to illustrate atmospheric distortion by using everyday materials such as bubble wrap and mineral oil. We will also illustrate how to demonstrate the workings of a Shack-Hartman sensor to measure atmospheric distortion through the use of a unique model. We will also show activities illustrating two techniques astronomers use to improve the image: tip-tilt mirrors and deformable mirrors. We are developing an activity where students learn how to use a tip-tilt mirror to keep an image focused at one point on a screen. The culminating activity has students learn to use a deformable mirror to correct a distorted wavefront. These activities are being developed in conjunction with the Education program for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT).

  13. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  14. Active segmentation of 3D axonal images.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, Gautam S; Gopinath, Ajay; Bovik, Alan C; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2012-01-01

    We present an active contour framework for segmenting neuronal axons on 3D confocal microscopy data. Our work is motivated by the need to conduct high throughput experiments involving microfluidic devices and femtosecond lasers to study the genetic mechanisms behind nerve regeneration and repair. While most of the applications for active contours have focused on segmenting closed regions in 2D medical and natural images, there haven't been many applications that have focused on segmenting open-ended curvilinear structures in 2D or higher dimensions. The active contour framework we present here ties together a well known 2D active contour model [5] along with the physics of projection imaging geometry to yield a segmented axon in 3D. Qualitative results illustrate the promise of our approach for segmenting neruonal axons on 3D confocal microscopy data.

  15. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-12-04

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.

  16. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation.

  17. Improved Segmentation of White Matter Tracts with Adaptive Riemannian Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiang; Zygmunt, Kristen; Whitaker, Ross T.; Fletcher, P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel geodesic approach to segmentation of white matter tracts from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Compared to deterministic and stochastic tractography, geodesic approaches treat the geometry of the brain white matter as a manifold, often using the inverse tensor field as a Riemannian metric. The white matter pathways are then inferred from the resulting geodesics, which have the desirable property that they tend to follow the main eigenvectors of the tensors, yet still have the flexibility to deviate from these directions when it results in lower costs. While this makes such methods more robust to noise, the choice of Riemannian metric in these methods is ad hoc. A serious drawback of current geodesic methods is that geodesics tend to deviate from the major eigenvectors in high-curvature areas in order to achieve the shortest path. In this paper we propose a method for learning an adaptive Riemannian metric from the DTI data, where the resulting geodesics more closely follow the principal eigenvector of the diffusion tensors even in high-curvature regions. We also develop a way to automatically segment the white matter tracts based on the computed geodesics. We show the robustness of our method on simulated data with different noise levels. We also compare our method with tractography methods and geodesic approaches using other Riemannian metrics and demonstrate that the proposed method results in improved geodesics and segmentations using both synthetic and real DTI data. PMID:24211814

  18. Fully automatic segmentation of complex organ systems: example of trachea, esophagus and heart segmentation in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Carsten; Peters, Jochen; Weese, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Automatic segmentation is a prerequisite to efficiently analyze the large amount of image data produced by modern imaging modalities. Many algorithms exist to segment individual organs or organ systems. However, new clinical applications and the progress in imaging technology will require the segmentation of more and more complex organ systems composed of a number of substructures, e.g., the heart, the trachea, and the esophagus. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that such complex organ systems can be successfully segmented by integrating the individual organs into a general model-based segmentation framework, without tailoring the core adaptation engine to the individual organs. As an example, we address the fully automatic segmentation of the trachea (around its main bifurcation, including the proximal part of the two main bronchi) and the esophagus in addition to the heart with all chambers and attached major vessels. To this end, we integrate the trachea and the esophagus into a model-based cardiac segmentation framework. Specifically, in a first parametric adaptation step of the segmentation workflow, the trachea and the esophagus share global model transformations with adjacent heart structures. This allows to obtain a robust, approximate segmentation for the trachea even if it is only partly inside the field-of-view, and for the esophagus in spite of limited contrast. The segmentation is then refined in a subsequent deformable adaptation step. We obtained a mean segmentation error of about 0.6mm for the trachea and 2.3mm for the esophagus on a database of 23 volumetric cardiovascular CT images. Furthermore, we show by quantitative evaluation that our integrated framework outperforms individual esophagus segmentation, and individual trachea segmentation if the trachea is only partly inside the field-of-view.

  19. Learning image context for segmentation of prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation of prostate is highly important in the external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, it is challenging to localize prostate in the CT images due to low image contrast, prostate motion, and both intensity and shape changes of bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online learning and patient-specific classification method based on location-adaptive image context is proposed to precisely segment prostate in the CT image. Specifically, two sets of position-adaptive classifiers are respectively placed along the two coordinate directions, and further trained with the previous segmented treatment images to jointly perform the prostate segmentation. In particular, each location-adaptive classifier is recursively trained with different image context collected at different scales and orientations for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on a large set of patients, achieving very promising results.

  20. Self imaging in segmented waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Szameit, Alexander; Dreisow, Felix; Pertsch, Thomas; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas; Suran, Eric; Louradour, Frédéric; Bathélémy, Alain; Longhi, Stefano

    2009-02-01

    Self-imaging in integrated optical devices is interesting for many applications including image transmission, optical collimation and even reshaping of ultrashort laser pulses. However, in general this relies on boundary-free light propagation, since interaction with boundaries results in a considerable distortion of the self-imaging effect. This problem can be overcome in waveguide arrays by segmentation of particular lattice sites, yielding phase shifts which result in image reconstruction in one- as well as two-dimensional configurations. Here, we demonstrate the first experimental realization of this concept. For the fabrication of the segmented waveguide arrays we used the femtosecond laser direct-writing technique. The total length of the arrays is 50mm with a waveguide spacing of 16 μm and 20μm in the one- and two-dimensional case, respectively. The length of the segmented area was 2.6mm, while the segmentation period was chosen to be 16 μm. This results in a complete inversion of the global phase of the travelling field inside the array, so that the evolution dynamics are reversed and the input field is imaged onto the sample output facet. Accordingly, segmented integrated optical devices provide a new and attractive opportunity for image transmission in finite systems.

  1. Image segmentation using neural tree networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, Sumitro; Mammone, Richard J.

    1993-06-01

    We present a technique for Image Segmentation using Neural Tree Networks (NTN). We also modify the NTN architecture to let is solve multi-class classification problems with only binary fan-out. We have used a realistic case study of segmenting the pole, coil and painted coil regions of light bulb filaments (LBF). The input to the network is a set of maximum, minimum and average of intensities in radial slices of a circular window around a pixel, taken from a front-lit and a back-lit image of an LBF. Training is done with a composite image drawn from images of many LBFs. Each node of the NTN is a multi-layer perceptron and has one output for each segment class. These outputs are treated as probabilities to compute a confidence value for the segmentation of that pixel. Segmentation results with high confidence values are deemed to be correct and not processed further, while those with moderate and low confidence values are deemed to be outliers by this node and passed down the tree to children nodes. These tend to be pixels in boundary of different regions. The results are favorably compared with a traditional segmentation technique applied to the LBF test case.

  2. Neural tree network method for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, Sumitro; Mammone, Richard J.

    1994-02-01

    We present an extension of the neural tree network (NTN) architecture to let it solve multi- class classification problems with only binary fan-out. We then demonstrate it's effectiveness by applying it in a method for image segmentation. Each node of the NTN is a multi-layer perceptron and has one output for each segment class. These outputs are treated as probabilities to compute a confidence value for the segmentation of that pixel. Segmentation results with high confidence values are deemed to be correct and not processed further, while those with moderate and low confidence values are deemed to be outliers by this node and passed down the tree to children nodes. These tend to be pixels in boundary of different regions. We have used a realistic case study of segmenting the pole, coil and painted coil regions of light bulb filaments (LBF). The input to the network is a set of maximum, minimum and average of intensities in radial slices of a circular window around a pixel, taken from a front-lit and a back-lit image of an LBF. Training is done with a composite image drawn from images of many LBFs. The results are favorably compared with a traditional segmentation technique applied to the LBF test case.

  3. Intuitionistic fuzzy segmentation of medical images.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel and probably the first method, using Attanassov intuitionistic fuzzy set theory to segment blood vessels and also the blood cells in pathological images. This type of segmentation is very important in detecting different types of human diseases, e.g., an increase in the number of vessels may lead to cancer in prostates, mammary, etc. The medical images are not properly illuminated, and segmentation in that case becomes very difficult. A novel image segmentation approach using intuitionistic fuzzy set theory and a new membership function is proposed using restricted equivalence function from automorphisms, for finding the membership values of the pixels of the image. An intuitionistic fuzzy image is constructed using Sugeno type intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Local thresholding is applied to threshold medical images. The results showed a much better performance on poor contrast medical images, where almost all the blood vessels and blood cells are visible properly. There are several fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy thresholding methods, but these methods are not related to the medical images. To make a comparison with the proposed method with other thresholding methods, the method is compared with six nonfuzzy, fuzzy, and intuitionistic fuzzy methods.

  4. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms.

  5. CONSTRAINED SPECTRAL CLUSTERING FOR IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Sourati, Jamshid; Brooks, Dana H.; Dy, Jennifer G.; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Constrained spectral clustering with affinity propagation in its original form is not practical for large scale problems like image segmentation. In this paper we employ novelty selection sub-sampling strategy, besides using efficient numerical eigen-decomposition methods to make this algorithm work efficiently for images. In addition, entropy-based active learning is also employed to select the queries posed to the user more wisely in an interactive image segmentation framework. We evaluate the algorithm on general and medical images to show that the segmentation results will improve using constrained clustering even if one works with a subset of pixels. Furthermore, this happens more efficiently when pixels to be labeled are selected actively. PMID:24466500

  6. MEMS segmented-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Manzanera, Silvestre; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Kempf, Carl J.; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical-system) segmented deformable mirror was evaluated in an adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The tested AO mirror (Iris AO, Inc, Berkeley, CA) is composed of 37 hexagonal segments that allow piston/tip/tilt motion up to 5 μm stroke and ±5 mrad angle over a 3.5 mm optical aperture. The control system that implements the closed-loop operation employs a 1:1 matched 37-lenslet Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor whose measurements are used to apply modal corrections to the deformable mirror. After a preliminary evaluation of the AO mirror optical performance, retinal images from 4 normal subjects over a 0.9°x0.9° field size were acquired through a 6.4 mm ocular pupil, showing resolved retinal features at the cellular level. Cone photoreceptors were observed as close as 0.25 degrees from the foveal center. In general, the quality of these images is comparable to that obtained using deformable mirrors based on different technologies. PMID:21559132

  7. Statistical Segmentation of Regions of Interest on a Mammographic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, Mouloud; Rasigni, Monique; Bourennane, Salah; Juhan, Valerie

    2007-12-01

    This paper deals with segmentation of breast anatomical regions, pectoral muscle, fatty and fibroglandular regions, using a Bayesian approach. This work is a part of a computer aided diagnosis project aiming at evaluating breast cancer risk and its association with characteristics (density, texture, etc.) of regions of interest on digitized mammograms. Novelty in this paper consists in applying and adapting Markov random field for detecting breast anatomical regions on digitized mammograms whereas most of previous works were focused on masses and microcalcifications. The developed method was tested on 50 digitized mammograms of the mini-MIAS database. Computer segmentation is compared to manual one made by a radiologist. A good agreement is obtained on 68% of the mini-MIAS mammographic image database used in this study. Given obtained segmentation results, the proposed method could be considered as a satisfying first approach for segmenting regions of interest in a breast.

  8. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  9. Adaptive skin segmentation via feature-based face detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael J.; Morris, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Variations in illumination can have significant effects on the apparent colour of skin, which can be damaging to the efficacy of any colour-based segmentation approach. We attempt to overcome this issue by presenting a new adaptive approach, capable of generating skin colour models at run-time. Our approach adopts a Viola-Jones feature-based face detector, in a moderate-recall, high-precision configuration, to sample faces within an image, with an emphasis on avoiding potentially detrimental false positives. From these samples, we extract a set of pixels that are likely to be from skin regions, filter them according to their relative luma values in an attempt to eliminate typical non-skin facial features (eyes, mouths, nostrils, etc.), and hence establish a set of pixels that we can be confident represent skin. Using this representative set, we train a unimodal Gaussian function to model the skin colour in the given image in the normalised rg colour space - a combination of modelling approach and colour space that benefits us in a number of ways. A generated function can subsequently be applied to every pixel in the given image, and, hence, the probability that any given pixel represents skin can be determined. Segmentation of the skin, therefore, can be as simple as applying a binary threshold to the calculated probabilities. In this paper, we touch upon a number of existing approaches, describe the methods behind our new system, present the results of its application to arbitrary images of people with detectable faces, which we have found to be extremely encouraging, and investigate its potential to be used as part of real-time systems.

  10. Computer Based Melanocytic and Nevus Image Enhancement and Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Uzma; Khalid, Shehzad; Abbas, Sarmad; Saleem, Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Digital dermoscopy aids dermatologists in monitoring potentially cancerous skin lesions. Melanoma is the 5th common form of skin cancer that is rare but the most dangerous. Melanoma is curable if it is detected at an early stage. Automated segmentation of cancerous lesion from normal skin is the most critical yet tricky part in computerized lesion detection and classification. The effectiveness and accuracy of lesion classification are critically dependent on the quality of lesion segmentation. In this paper, we have proposed a novel approach that can automatically preprocess the image and then segment the lesion. The system filters unwanted artifacts including hairs, gel, bubbles, and specular reflection. A novel approach is presented using the concept of wavelets for detection and inpainting the hairs present in the cancer images. The contrast of lesion with the skin is enhanced using adaptive sigmoidal function that takes care of the localized intensity distribution within a given lesion's images. We then present a segmentation approach to precisely segment the lesion from the background. The proposed approach is tested on the European database of dermoscopic images. Results are compared with the competitors to demonstrate the superiority of the suggested approach. PMID:27774454

  11. Video-based noncooperative iris image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Du, Yingzi; Arslanturk, Emrah; Zhou, Zhi; Belcher, Craig

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a video-based noncooperative iris image segmentation scheme that incorporates a quality filter to quickly eliminate images without an eye, employs a coarse-to-fine segmentation scheme to improve the overall efficiency, uses a direct least squares fitting of ellipses method to model the deformed pupil and limbic boundaries, and develops a window gradient-based method to remove noise in the iris region. A remote iris acquisition system is set up to collect noncooperative iris video images. An objective method is used to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the segmentation results. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. The proposed method would make noncooperative iris recognition or iris surveillance possible.

  12. A new distribution metric for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Romeil; Georgiou, Tryphon; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new distribution metric for image segmentation that arises as a result in prediction theory. Forming a natural geodesic, our metric quantifies "distance" for two density functionals as the standard deviation of the difference between logarithms of those distributions. Using level set methods, we incorporate an energy model based on the metric into the Geometric Active Contour framework. Moreover, we briefly provide a theoretical comparison between the popular Fisher Information metric, from which the Bhattacharyya distance originates, with the newly proposed similarity metric. In doing so, we demonstrate that segmentation results are directly impacted by the type of metric used. Specifically, we qualitatively compare the Bhattacharyya distance and our algorithm on the Kaposi Sarcoma, a pathology that infects the skin. We also demonstrate the algorithm on several challenging medical images, which further ensure the viability of the metric in the context of image segmentation.

  13. Hierarchical Segmentation Enhances Diagnostic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Bartron Medical Imaging LLC (BMI), of New Haven, Connecticut, gained a nonexclusive license from Goddard Space Flight Center to use the RHSEG software in medical imaging. To manage image data, BMI then licensed two pattern-matching software programs from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that were used in image analysis and three data-mining and edge-detection programs from Kennedy Space Center. More recently, BMI made NASA history by being the first company to partner with the Space Agency through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to develop a 3-D version of RHSEG. With U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance, BMI will sell its Med-Seg imaging system with the 2-D version of the RHSEG software to analyze medical imagery from CAT and PET scans, MRI, ultrasound, digitized X-rays, digitized mammographies, dental X-rays, soft tissue analyses, moving object analyses, and soft-tissue slides such as Pap smears for the diagnoses and management of diseases. Extending the software's capabilities to three dimensions will eventually enable production of pixel-level views of a tumor or lesion, early identification of plaque build-up in arteries, and identification of density levels of microcalcification in mammographies.

  14. Performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data.

    PubMed

    Beneš, Miroslav; Zitová, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In our paper, we present a performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data. In spite of the existence of many algorithms for image data partitioning, there is no universal and 'the best' method yet. Moreover, images of microscopic samples can be of various character and quality which can negatively influence the performance of image segmentation algorithms. Thus, the issue of selecting suitable method for a given set of image data is of big interest. We carried out a large number of experiments with a variety of segmentation methods to evaluate the behaviour of individual approaches on the testing set of microscopic images (cross-section images taken in three different modalities from the field of art restoration). The segmentation results were assessed by several indices used for measuring the output quality of image segmentation algorithms. In the end, the benefit of segmentation combination approach is studied and applicability of achieved results on another representatives of microscopic data category - biological samples - is shown.

  15. Space Adaptation of Active Mirror Segment Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Gregory H.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a three year effort by Blue Line Engineering Co. to advance the state of segmented mirror systems in several separate but related areas. The initial set of tasks were designed to address the issues of system level architecture, digital processing system, cluster level support structures, and advanced mirror fabrication concepts. Later in the project new tasks were added to provide support to the existing segmented mirror testbed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the form of upgrades to the 36 subaperture wavefront sensor. Still later, tasks were added to build and install a new system processor based on the results of the new system architecture. The project was successful in achieving a number of important results. These include the following most notable accomplishments: 1) The creation of a new modular digital processing system that is extremely capable and may be applied to a wide range of segmented mirror systems as well as many classes of Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) control systems such as active structures or industrial automation. 2) A new graphical user interface was created for operation of segmented mirror systems. 3) The development of a high bit rate serial data loop that permits bi-directional flow of data to and from as many as 39 segments daisy-chained to form a single cluster of segments. 4) Upgrade of the 36 subaperture Hartmann type Wave Front Sensor (WFS) of the Phased Array Mirror, Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) testbed at MSFC resulting in a 40 to 5OX improvement in SNR which in turn enabled NASA personnel to achieve many significant strides in improved closed-loop system operation in 1998. 5) A new system level processor was built and delivered to MSFC for use with the PAMELA testbed. This new system featured a new graphical user interface to replace the obsolete and non-supported menu system originally delivered with the PAMELA system. The hardware featured Blue Line's new stackable

  16. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  17. Segmentation of fluorescence microscopy cell images using unsupervised mining.

    PubMed

    Du, Xian; Dua, Sumeet

    2010-05-28

    The accurate measurement of cell and nuclei contours are critical for the sensitive and specific detection of changes in normal cells in several medical informatics disciplines. Within microscopy, this task is facilitated using fluorescence cell stains, and segmentation is often the first step in such approaches. Due to the complex nature of cell issues and problems inherent to microscopy, unsupervised mining approaches of clustering can be incorporated in the segmentation of cells. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the performance of multiple unsupervised data mining techniques in cell image segmentation. We adapt four distinctive, yet complementary, methods for unsupervised learning, including those based on k-means clustering, EM, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC. Validation measures are defined, and the performance of the techniques is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using synthetic and recently published real data. Experimental results demonstrate that k-means, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC perform similarly, and have more precise segmentation results than EM. We report that EM has higher recall values and lower precision results from under-segmentation due to its Gaussian model assumption. We also demonstrate that these methods need spatial information to segment complex real cell images with a high degree of efficacy, as expected in many medical informatics applications.

  18. Structure similarity-guided image binarization for automatic segmentation of epidermis surface microstructure images.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y; Lei, B; Dong, F; Xu, G; Sun, S; Xia, P

    2017-01-24

    Partitioning epidermis surface microstructure (ESM) images into skin ridge and skin furrow regions is an important preprocessing step before quantitative analyses on ESM images. Binarization segmentation is a potential technique for partitioning ESM images because of its computational simplicity and ease of implementation. However, even for some state-of-the-art binarization methods, it remains a challenge to automatically segment ESM images, because the grey-level histograms of ESM images have no obvious external features to guide automatic assessment of appropriate thresholds. Inspired by human visual perceptual functions of structural feature extraction and comparison, we propose a structure similarity-guided image binarization method. The proposed method seeks for the binary image that best approximates the input ESM image in terms of structural features. The proposed method is validated by comparing it with two recently developed automatic binarization techniques as well as a manual binarization method on 20 synthetic noisy images and 30 ESM images. The experimental results show: (1) the proposed method possesses self-adaption ability to cope with different images with same grey-level histogram; (2) compared to two automatic binarization techniques, the proposed method significantly improves average accuracy in segmenting ESM images with an acceptable decrease in computational efficiency; (3) and the proposed method is applicable for segmenting practical EMS images. (Matlab code of the proposed method can be obtained by contacting with the corresponding author.).

  19. Color Image Segmentation in a Quaternion Framework

    PubMed Central

    Subakan, Özlem N.; Vemuri, Baba C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a feature/detail preserving color image segmentation framework using Hamiltonian quaternions. First, we introduce a novel Quaternionic Gabor Filter (QGF) which can combine the color channels and the orientations in the image plane. Using the QGFs, we extract the local orientation information in the color images. Second, in order to model this derived orientation information, we propose a continuous mixture of appropriate hypercomplex exponential basis functions. We derive a closed form solution for this continuous mixture model. This analytic solution is in the form of a spatially varying kernel which, when convolved with the signed distance function of an evolving contour (placed in the color image), yields a detail preserving segmentation. PMID:21243101

  20. Real-Time Adaptive Color Segmentation by Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.

    2004-01-01

    Artificial neural networks that would utilize the cascade error projection (CEP) algorithm have been proposed as means of autonomous, real-time, adaptive color segmentation of images that change with time. In the original intended application, such a neural network would be used to analyze digitized color video images of terrain on a remote planet as viewed from an uninhabited spacecraft approaching the planet. During descent toward the surface of the planet, information on the segmentation of the images into differently colored areas would be updated adaptively in real time to capture changes in contrast, brightness, and resolution, all in an effort to identify a safe and scientifically productive landing site and provide control feedback to steer the spacecraft toward that site. Potential terrestrial applications include monitoring images of crops to detect insect invasions and monitoring of buildings and other facilities to detect intruders. The CEP algorithm is reliable and is well suited to implementation in very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry. It was chosen over other neural-network learning algorithms because it is better suited to realtime learning: It provides a self-evolving neural-network structure, requires fewer iterations to converge and is more tolerant to low resolution (that is, fewer bits) in the quantization of neural-network synaptic weights. Consequently, a CEP neural network learns relatively quickly, and the circuitry needed to implement it is relatively simple. Like other neural networks, a CEP neural network includes an input layer, hidden units, and output units (see figure). As in other neural networks, a CEP network is presented with a succession of input training patterns, giving rise to a set of outputs that are compared with the desired outputs. Also as in other neural networks, the synaptic weights are updated iteratively in an effort to bring the outputs closer to target values. A distinctive feature of the CEP neural

  1. A Survey of Digital Image Segmentation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    features. Thresholding techniques arc also useful in segmenting such binary images as printed documents, line drawings, and multispectral and x-ray...algorithms, pixel labeling and run-length connectivity analysis, arc discussed in the following sections. Therefore, in exammmg g(x, y), pixels that are...edge linking, graph searching, curve fitting, Hough transform, and others arc applicablc to image segmematio~. Difficulties with boundary-based methods

  2. Hepatic lesions segmentation in ultrasound nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissi, Adelaide A.; Cormier, Stephane; Pourcelot, Leandre; Tranquart, Francois

    2005-04-01

    Doppler has been used for many years for cardiovascular exploration in order to visualize the vessels walls and anatomical or functional diseases. The use of ultrasound contrast agents makes it possible to improve ultrasonic information. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging highlights the detection of these agents within an organ and hence is a powerful technique to image perfusion of an organ in real-time. The visualization of flow and perfusion provides important information for the diagnosis of various diseases as well as for the detection of tumors. However, the images are buried in noise, the speckle, inherent in the image formation. Furthermore at portal phase, there is often an absence of clear contrast between lesions and surrounding tissues because the organ is filled with agents. In this context, we propose a new method of automatic liver lesions segmentation in nonlinear imaging sequences for the quantification of perfusion. Our method of segmentation is divided into two stages. Initially, we developed an anisotropic diffusion step which raised the structural characteristics to eliminate the speckle. Then, a fuzzy competitive clustering process allowed us to delineate liver lesions. This method has been used to detect focal hepatic lesions (metastasis, nodular hyperplasia, adenoma). Compared to medical expert"s report obtained on 15 varied lesions, the automatic segmentation allows us to identify and delineate focal liver lesions during the portal phase which high accuracy. Our results show that this method improves markedly the recognition of focal hepatic lesions and opens the way for future precise quantification of contrast enhancement.

  3. Mammographic images segmentation using texture descriptors.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Angelica A; Mello, Carlos A B; Santos, Wellington P; Cavalcanti, George D C

    2009-01-01

    Tissue classification in mammography can help the diagnosis of breast cancer by separating healthy tissue from lesions. We present herein the use of three texture descriptors for breast tissue segmentation purposes: the Sum Histogram, the Gray Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Local Binary Pattern (LBP). A modification of the LBP is also proposed for a better distinction of the tissues. In order to segment the image into its tissues, these descriptors are compared using a fidelity index and two clustering algorithms: k-Means and SOM (Self-Organizing Maps).

  4. Image Segmentation With Cage Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Lluís; Guerrieri, Marité; Igual, Laura

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for image segmentation based on parametrized active contours. The evolving contour is parametrized according to a reduced set of control points that form a closed polygon and have a clear visual interpretation. The parametrization, called mean value coordinates, stems from the techniques used in computer graphics to animate virtual models. Our framework allows to easily formulate region-based energies to segment an image. In particular, we present three different local region-based energy terms: 1) the mean model; 2) the Gaussian model; 3) and the histogram model. We show the behavior of our method on synthetic and real images and compare the performance with state-of-the-art level set methods.

  5. Locally adaptive MR intensity models and MRF-based segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimzianova, Alfiia; Lesjak, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Špiclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Neuroimaging biomarkers are an important paraclinical tool used to characterize a number of neurological diseases, however, their extraction requires accurate and reliable segmentation of normal and pathological brain structures. For MR images of healthy brains the intensity models of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) in combination with Markov random field (MRF) models are known to give reliable and smooth NABT segmentation. However, the presence of pathology, MR intensity bias and natural tissue-dependent intensity variability altogether represent difficult challenges for a reliable estimation of NABT intensity model based on MR images. In this paper, we propose a novel method for segmentation of normal and pathological structures in brain MR images of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that is based on locally-adaptive NABT model, a robust method for the estimation of model parameters and a MRF-based segmentation framework. Experiments on multi-sequence brain MR images of 27 MS patients show that, compared to whole-brain model and compared to the widely used Expectation-Maximization Segmentation (EMS) method, the locally-adaptive NABT model increases the accuracy of MS lesion segmentation.

  6. Multi-focus image fusion using epifluorescence microscopy for robust vascular segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pelapur, Rengarajan; Prasath, V B Surya; Bunyak, Filiz; Glinskii, Olga V; Glinsky, Vladislav V; Huxley, Virginia H; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2014-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of three-dimensional mi-crovascular structures is needed for quantifying morphological changes to blood vessels during development, disease and treatment processes. Single focus two-dimensional epifluorescent imagery lead to unsatisfactory segmentations due to multiple out of focus vessel regions that have blurred edge structures and lack of detail. Additional segmentation challenges include varying contrast levels due to diffusivity of the lectin stain, leakage out of vessels and fine morphological vessel structure. We propose an approach for vessel segmentation that combines multi-focus image fusion with robust adaptive filtering. The robust adaptive filtering scheme handles noise without destroying small structures, while multi-focus image fusion considerably improves segmentation quality by deblurring out-of-focus regions through incorporating 3D structure information from multiple focus steps. Experiments using epifluorescence images of mice dura mater show an average of 30.4% improvement compared to single focus microvasculature segmentation.

  7. Image quality, compression and segmentation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Pam; Frankish, Clive

    2002-12-01

    This review considers image quality in the context of the evolving technology of image compression, and the effects image compression has on perceived quality. The concepts of lossless, perceptually lossless, and diagnostically lossless but lossy compression are described, as well as the possibility of segmented images, combining lossy compression with perceptually lossless regions of interest. The different requirements for diagnostic and training images are also discussed. The lack of established methods for image quality evaluation is highlighted and available methods discussed in the light of the information that may be inferred from them. Confounding variables are also identified. Areas requiring further research are illustrated, including differences in perceptual quality requirements for different image modalities, image regions, diagnostic subtleties, and tasks. It is argued that existing tools for measuring image quality need to be refined and new methods developed. The ultimate aim should be the development of standards for image quality evaluation which take into consideration both the task requirements of the images and the acceptability of the images to the users.

  8. Magnetic resonance image segmentation using multifractal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue-e.; Wang, Fang; Liu, Li-lin

    2015-11-01

    In order to delineate target region for magnetic resonance image (MRI) with diseases, the classical multifractal spectrum (MFS)-segmentation method and latest multifractal detrended fluctuation spectrum (MF-DFS)-based segmentation method are employed in our study. One of our main conclusions from experiments is that both of the two multifractal-based methods are workable for handling MRIs. The best result is obtained by MF-DFS-based method using Lh10 as local characteristic. The anti-noises experiments also suppot the conclusion. This interest finding shows that the features can be better represented by the strong fluctuations instead of the weak fluctuations for the MRIs. By comparing the multifractal nature between lesion and non-lesion area on the basis of the segmentation results, an interest finding is that the gray value's fluctuation in lesion area is much severer than that in non-lesion area.

  9. Use of Model-Segmentation Criteria in Clustering and Segmentation of Time Series and Digital Images.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-05

    DANS LAS REPARTITION? ET LA SEGMENTATION DES SERIES TEMPORELLES ET DES IMAGES NUMtRICALES Cet article traite le d~veloppement et l’utilisation des...multidimensionnelles et du no-bre des classes des segments dans la segmentation des series temporelles et des imaqes numericales. Les criteres comme ceux de Akaike...NATIONAL BURCAU OF STAND)AROS 1963 A USE OF MODEL-SEGMENTATION CRITERIA IN CLUSTERING AND SEGMENTATION OF TIME SERIES AND DIGITAL IMAGES by STANLEY L

  10. Unsupervised texture image segmentation by improved neural network ART2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhiling; Labini, G. Sylos; Mugnuolo, R.; Desario, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We here propose a segmentation algorithm of texture image for a computer vision system on a space robot. An improved adaptive resonance theory (ART2) for analog input patterns is adapted to classify the image based on a set of texture image features extracted by a fast spatial gray level dependence method (SGLDM). The nonlinear thresholding functions in input layer of the neural network have been constructed by two parts: firstly, to reduce the effects of image noises on the features, a set of sigmoid functions is chosen depending on the types of the feature; secondly, to enhance the contrast of the features, we adopt fuzzy mapping functions. The cluster number in output layer can be increased by an autogrowing mechanism constantly when a new pattern happens. Experimental results and original or segmented pictures are shown, including the comparison between this approach and K-means algorithm. The system written in C language is performed on a SUN-4/330 sparc-station with an image board IT-150 and a CCD camera.

  11. Automatic segmentation of mammogram and tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Park, Sun Young

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a one of the most common forms of cancer in terms of new cases and deaths both in the United States and worldwide. However, the survival rate with breast cancer is high if it is detected and treated before it spreads to other parts of the body. The most common screening methods for breast cancer are mammography and digital tomosynthesis, which involve acquiring X-ray images of the breasts that are interpreted by radiologists. The work described in this paper is aimed at optimizing the presentation of mammography and tomosynthesis images to the radiologist, thereby improving the early detection rate of breast cancer and the resulting patient outcomes. Breast cancer tissue has greater density than normal breast tissue, and appears as dense white image regions that are asymmetrical between the breasts. These irregularities are easily seen if the breast images are aligned and viewed side-by-side. However, since the breasts are imaged separately during mammography, the images may be poorly centered and aligned relative to each other, and may not properly focus on the tissue area. Similarly, although a full three dimensional reconstruction can be created from digital tomosynthesis images, the same centering and alignment issues can occur for digital tomosynthesis. Thus, a preprocessing algorithm that aligns the breasts for easy side-by-side comparison has the potential to greatly increase the speed and accuracy of mammogram reading. Likewise, the same preprocessing can improve the results of automatic tissue classification algorithms for mammography. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation algorithm for mammogram and tomosynthesis images that aims to improve the speed and accuracy of breast cancer screening by mitigating the above mentioned problems. Our algorithm uses information in the DICOM header to facilitate preprocessing, and incorporates anatomical region segmentation and contour analysis, along with a hidden Markov model (HMM) for

  12. Image segmentation via motion vector estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Hasekioglu, Orkun; Bloomer, John J.

    1990-07-01

    In the visual world moving edges in the periphery represent vital pieces of information that directs the human foveation mechanism to selectively gather information around these specific locations. This computationally efficient approach of allocating resources at key locations has inspired computer visionists to develop new target detection and hacking algorithms based on motion detection in image sequences. In this study we implemented a recursive algorithm for estimating motion vector fields for each pixel in a sequence of Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images. Velocity information is used to segment the image and perform linear quadratic and acceleration-based frame interpolation to produce an apparent frame rate increase. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of low-rate digital fluoroscopy hence less exposure risks while preserving image quality. Furthermore the technique can be useful in the medical Picture Archival and Communication Systems (PACS) where image data can be compressed by storing and transmiting only the motion fields associated with the moving pixels. 1.

  13. An interactive medical image segmentation framework using iterative refinement.

    PubMed

    Kalshetti, Pratik; Bundele, Manas; Rahangdale, Parag; Jangra, Dinesh; Chattopadhyay, Chiranjoy; Harit, Gaurav; Elhence, Abhay

    2017-02-13

    Segmentation is often performed on medical images for identifying diseases in clinical evaluation. Hence it has become one of the major research areas. Conventional image segmentation techniques are unable to provide satisfactory segmentation results for medical images as they contain irregularities. They need to be pre-processed before segmentation. In order to obtain the most suitable method for medical image segmentation, we propose MIST (Medical Image Segmentation Tool), a two stage algorithm. The first stage automatically generates a binary marker image of the region of interest using mathematical morphology. This marker serves as the mask image for the second stage which uses GrabCut to yield an efficient segmented result. The obtained result can be further refined by user interaction, which can be done using the proposed Graphical User Interface (GUI). Experimental results show that the proposed method is accurate and provides satisfactory segmentation results with minimum user interaction on medical as well as natural images.

  14. Image segmentation with a unified graphical model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Ji, Qiang

    2010-08-01

    We propose a unified graphical model that can represent both the causal and noncausal relationships among random variables and apply it to the image segmentation problem. Specifically, we first propose to employ Conditional Random Field (CRF) to model the spatial relationships among image superpixel regions and their measurements. We then introduce a multilayer Bayesian Network (BN) to model the causal dependencies that naturally exist among different image entities, including image regions, edges, and vertices. The CRF model and the BN model are then systematically and seamlessly combined through the theories of Factor Graph to form a unified probabilistic graphical model that captures the complex relationships among different image entities. Using the unified graphical model, image segmentation can be performed through a principled probabilistic inference. Experimental results on the Weizmann horse data set, on the VOC2006 cow data set, and on the MSRC2 multiclass data set demonstrate that our approach achieves favorable results compared to state-of-the-art approaches as well as those that use either the BN model or CRF model alone.

  15. Infrared active polarimetric imaging system controlled by image segmentation algorithms: application to decamouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Nicolas; Goudail, François; Plassart, Corentin; Boffety, Matthieu; Feneyrou, Patrick; Leviandier, Luc; Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    We describe an active polarimetric imager with laser illumination at 1.5 µm that can generate any illumination and analysis polarization state on the Poincar sphere. Thanks to its full polarization agility and to image analysis of the scene with an ultrafast active-contour based segmentation algorithm, it can perform adaptive polarimetric contrast optimization. We demonstrate the capacity of this imager to detect manufactured objects in different types of environments for such applications as decamouflage and hazardous object detection. We compare two imaging modes having different number of polarimetric degrees of freedom and underline the characteristics that a polarimetric imager aimed at this type of applications should possess.

  16. Automatic Iceball Segmentation With Adapted Shape Priors for MRI-Guided Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an automatic segmentation method that extracts the 3D configuration of the ablation zone, the iceball, from images acquired during the freezing phase of MRI-guided cryoablation. Materials and Methods Intraprocedural images at 63 timepoints from 13 kidney tumor cryoablation procedures were examined retrospectively. The images were obtained using a 3 Tesla wide-bore MRI scanner and axial HASTE sequence. Initialized with semiautomatically localized cryoprobes, the iceball was segmented automatically at each timepoint using the graph cut (GC) technique with adapted shape priors. Results The average Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC), compared with manual segmentations, were 0.88, 0.92, 0.92, 0.93, and 0.93 at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 min time-points, respectively, and the average DSC of the total 63 segmentations was 0.92 ± 0.03. The proposed method improved the accuracy significantly compared with the approach without shape prior adaptation (P = 0.026). The number of probes involved in the procedure had no apparent influence on the segmentation results using our technique. The average computation time was 20 s, which was compatible with an intraprocedural setting. Conclusion Our automatic iceball segmentation method demonstrated high accuracy and robustness for practical use in monitoring the progress of MRI-guided cryoablation. PMID:24338961

  17. Image Segmentation for Improvised Explosive Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    zj, αj) measuring the similarity between adjacent pixels zi and zj . The function V (zi, αi, zj, αj) results 22 in large values when similar pixels... value distribution. The second and the third rows show the histogram for the object and the background after they were segmented...Images B and C show the directly assembled gray- value histograms for the background (B) and the object (C) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Figure

  18. Adaptive thresholding technique for retinal vessel segmentation based on GLCM-energy information.

    PubMed

    Mapayi, Temitope; Viriri, Serestina; Tapamo, Jules-Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Although retinal vessel segmentation has been extensively researched, a robust and time efficient segmentation method is highly needed. This paper presents a local adaptive thresholding technique based on gray level cooccurrence matrix- (GLCM-) energy information for retinal vessel segmentation. Different thresholds were computed using GLCM-energy information. An experimental evaluation on DRIVE database using the grayscale intensity and Green Channel of the retinal image demonstrates the high performance of the proposed local adaptive thresholding technique. The maximum average accuracy rates of 0.9511 and 0.9510 with maximum average sensitivity rates of 0.7650 and 0.7641 were achieved on DRIVE and STARE databases, respectively. When compared to the widely previously used techniques on the databases, the proposed adaptive thresholding technique is time efficient with a higher average sensitivity and average accuracy rates in the same range of very good specificity.

  19. Image segmentation applied to atherosclerotic lesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R. Rodríguez; Martínez, T. E. Alarcón; Cuello, L. Sánchez; Fernández-Britto, J. E.; Taylor, Charles

    2000-10-01

    The results obtained using two techniques: a supervised method and other unsupervised for image segmentation of atherosclerotic lesions of the thoracic aorta, are presented. Segmentation was used both with and without pre-processing. In this paper, the advantages of pre-processing prior to are shown for discriminating among the different atherosclerotic lesions (fatty streaks, fibrous plaque, complicated plaques and calcified plaques) and identifying them. The results using a supervised method were poor when searching vector consisted of two components, the mean and the variance. This digital image processing was done in order to use the automated atherometric system. This methodology has been considered to be suitable for the characterization of the atherosclerotic lesions in any artery and its organ-related damage in any vascular sector or group of patients. Final results were compared with manual segmentation realized by an expert, where difference errors less than 3% were observed. It is demonstrated by extensive experimentation, using real image data, that proposed strategy is fast and robust in the environment of a personal computer.

  20. Cerebral microbleed segmentation from susceptibility weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Jog, Amod; Magrath, Elizabeth; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMB) are a common marker of traumatic brain injury. Accurate detection and quantification of the CMBs are important for better understanding the progression and prognosis of the injury. Previous microbleed detection methods have suffered from a high rate of false positives, which is time consuming to manually correct. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, example-based method to segment CMBs from susceptibility-weighted (SWI) scans, where examples from an already segmented template SWI image are used to detect CMBs in a new image. First, multiple radial symmetry transforms (RST) are performed on the template SWI to detect small ellipsoidal structures, which serve as potential microbleed candidates. Then 3D patches from the SWI and its RSTs are combined to form a feature vector at each voxel of the image. A random forest regression is trained using the feature vectors, where the dependent variable is the binary segmentation voxel of the template. Once the regression is learnt, it is applied to a new SWI scan, whose feature vectors contain patches from SWI and its RSTs. Experiments on 26 subjects with mild to severe brain injury show a CMB detection sensitivity of 85:7%, specificity 99:5%, and a false positive to true positive ratio of 1:73, which is competitive with published methods while providing a significant reduction in computation time.

  1. Color image diffusion using adaptive bilateral filter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Ann Heng, Pheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to diffuse color images based on the bilateral filter. Real image data has a level of uncertainty that is manifested in the variability of measures assigned to pixels. This uncertainty is usually interpreted as noise and considered an undesirable component of the image data. Image diffusion can smooth away small-scale structures and noise while retaining important features, thus improving the performances for many image processing algorithms such as image compression, segmentation and recognition. The bilateral filter is noniterative, simple and fast. It has been shown to give similar and possibly better filtering results than iterative approaches. However, the performance of this filter is greatly affected by the choose of the parameters of filtering kernels. In order to remove noise and maintain the significant features on images, we extend the bilateral filter by introducing an adaptive domain spread into the nonlinear diffusion scheme. For color images, we employ the CIE-Lab color system to describe input images and the filtering process is operated using three channels together. Our analysis shows that the proposed method is more suitable for preserving strong edges on noisy images than the original bilateral filter. Empirical results on both nature images and color medical images confirm the novel method's advantages, and show it can diffuse various kinds of color images correctly and efficiently.

  2. Retinal Imaging: Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. S.; Iroshnikov, N. G.; Larichev, Andrey V.

    This chapter describes several factors influencing the performance of ophthalmic diagnostic systems with adaptive optics compensation of human eye aberration. Particular attention is paid to speckle modulation, temporal behavior of aberrations, and anisoplanatic effects. The implementation of a fundus camera with adaptive optics is considered.

  3. Pulmonary airways tree segmentation from CT examinations using adaptive volume of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Won Pil; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Pu, Jiantao; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2009-02-01

    Airways tree segmentation is an important step in quantitatively assessing the severity of and changes in several lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis. It can also be used in guiding bronchoscopy. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated scheme for segmenting the airways tree structure depicted on chest CT examinations. After lung volume segmentation, the scheme defines the first cylinder-like volume of interest (VOI) using a series of images depicting the trachea. The scheme then iteratively defines and adds subsequent VOIs using a region growing algorithm combined with adaptively determined thresholds in order to trace possible sections of airways located inside the combined VOI in question. The airway tree segmentation process is automatically terminated after the scheme assesses all defined VOIs in the iteratively assembled VOI list. In this preliminary study, ten CT examinations with 1.25mm section thickness and two different CT image reconstruction kernels ("bone" and "standard") were selected and used to test the proposed airways tree segmentation scheme. The experiment results showed that (1) adopting this approach affectively prevented the scheme from infiltrating into the parenchyma, (2) the proposed method reasonably accurately segmented the airways trees with lower false positive identification rate as compared with other previously reported schemes that are based on 2-D image segmentation and data analyses, and (3) the proposed adaptive, iterative threshold selection method for the region growing step in each identified VOI enables the scheme to segment the airways trees reliably to the 4th generation in this limited dataset with successful segmentation up to the 5th generation in a fraction of the airways tree branches.

  4. Perceived visual speed constrained by image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about how or where the visual system parses the visual scene into objects or surfaces. However, it is generally assumed that the segmentation and grouping of pieces of the image into discrete entities is due to 'later' processing stages, after the 'early' processing of the visual image by local mechanisms selective for attributes such as colour, orientation, depth, and motion. Speed perception is also thought to be mediated by early mechanisms tuned for speed. Here we show that manipulating the way in which an image is parsed changes the way in which local speed information is processed. Manipulations that cause multiple stimuli to appear as parts of a single patch degrade speed discrimination, whereas manipulations that perceptually divide a single large stimulus into parts improve discrimination. These results indicate that processes as early as speed perception may be constrained by the parsing of the visual image into discrete entities.

  5. Level set method coupled with Energy Image features for brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Punga, Mirela Visan; Gaurav, Rahul; Moraru, Luminita

    2014-06-01

    Up until now, the noise and intensity inhomogeneity are considered one of the major drawbacks in the field of brain magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. This paper introduces the energy image feature approach for intensity inhomogeneity correction. Our approach of segmentation takes the advantage of image features and preserves the advantages of the level set methods in region-based active contours framework. The energy image feature represents a new image obtained from the original image when the pixels' values are replaced by local energy values computed in the 3×3 mask size. The performance and utility of the energy image features were tested and compared through two different variants of level set methods: one as the encompassed local and global intensity fitting method and the other as the selective binary and Gaussian filtering regularized level set method. The reported results demonstrate the flexibility of the energy image feature to adapt to level set segmentation framework and to perform the challenging task of brain lesion segmentation in a rather robust way.

  6. A Learning-Based Wrapper Method to Correct Systematic Errors in Automatic Image Segmentation: Consistently Improved Performance in Hippocampus, Cortex and Brain Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Suh, Jung Wook; Altinay, Murat; Pluta, John; Craige, Caryne; Avants, Brian; Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple but generally applicable approach to improving the accuracy of automatic image segmentation algorithms relative to manual segmentations. The approach is based on the hypothesis that a large fraction of the errors produced by automatic segmentation are systematic, i.e., occur consistently from subject to subject, and serves as a wrapper method around a given host segmentation method. The wrapper method attempts to learn the intensity, spatial and contextual patterns associated with systematic segmentation errors produced by the host method on training data for which manual segmentations are available. The method then attempts to correct such errors in segmentations produced by the host method on new images. One practical use of the proposed wrapper method is to adapt existing segmentation tools, without explicit modification, to imaging data and segmentation protocols that are different from those on which the tools were trained and tuned. An open-source implementation of the proposed wrapper method is provided, and can be applied to a wide range of image segmentation problems. The wrapper method is evaluated with four host brain MRI segmentation methods: hippocampus segmentation using FreeSurfer (Fischl et al., 2002); hippocampus segmentation using multi-atlas label fusion (Artaechevarria et al., 2009); brain extraction using BET (Smith, 2002); and brain tissue segmentation using FAST (Zhang et al., 2001). The wrapper method generates 72%, 14%, 29% and 21% fewer erroneously segmented voxels than the respective host segmentation methods. In the hippocampus segmentation experiment with multi-atlas label fusion as the host method, the average Dice overlap between reference segmentations and segmentations produced by the wrapper method is 0.908 for normal controls and 0.893 for patients with mild cognitive impairment. Average Dice overlaps of 0.964, 0.905 and 0.951 are obtained for brain extraction, white matter segmentation and gray matter

  7. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage. PMID:27240370

  8. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-05-27

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage.

  9. Patterns of Transfer of Adaptation Among Body Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stelmach, George E.

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in order to determine the patterns of transfer of visuomotor adaptation between arm and head pointing. An altered gain of display of pointing movements was used to induce a conflict between visual and somatosensory representations. Two subject groups participated in Experiment One: group 1 adapted shoulder pointing movements, and group 2 adapted wrist pointing movements to a 0.5 gain of display. Following the adaptation regimen, subjects performed a transfer test in which the shoulder group performed wrist movements and the wrist group performed shoulder movements. The results demonstrated that both groups displayed typical adaptation curves, initially undershooting the target followed by a return to baseline performance. Transfer tests revealed that both groups had high transfer of the acquired adaptation to the other joint. Experiment Two followed a similar design except that group 1 adapted head pointing movements and group 2 adapted arm pointing movements. The arm adaptation had high transfer to head pointing while the head adaptation had very little transfer to arm pointing. These results imply that, while the arm segments may share a common target representation for goal-directed actions, individual but functionally dependent target representations may exist for the control of head and arm movements.

  10. Imaging segmentation along the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Hawley, W. B.; Martin-Short, R.

    2015-12-01

    As we learn more about the Cascadia subduction zone, there is clear evidence for segmentation in the character of the many physical processes along its 1000 km length. There is segmentation in the arc magmas, in the seismicity, episodic tremor and slip, crustal structure and mantle structure all the way down to ~400 km depth. What is striking is the fact that the segment boundaries for these processes at depths of a few kilometers to hundreds of kilometers align. We must determine if this is coincidence, or if not, what the causative process is. The seismic deployments of the Cascadia Initiative onshore and offshore allow us to image the structure of the subduction zone, including the incoming Juan de Fuca plate, with unprecedented resolution. We use data from three one-year deployments of 70 ocean bottom seismometers across the Juan de Fuca plate, along with hundreds of onshore stations from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Earthscope Transportable Array, and smaller temporary seismic deployments. Our 3D tomographic models show significant variation in the structure of the subducting slab along its length. It extends deepest in the south (the Gorda section) where the plate is youngest, and shallows to the north across southern Oregon. There is a gap in the slab beneath northern Oregon, which appears to correlate with the geochemistry of the arc magmas. The slab is then visible again beneath Washington. We also constrain mantle flow paths using shear-wave splitting measurements at the offshore and onshore seismic stations. Beneath the Juan de Fuca plate the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the plate. However, beneath the Gorda section of the Juan de Fuca place the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the Pacific plate, not the Juan de Fuca plate. We are thus beginning to image a complex mantle flow pattern that may also play a role in the observed segmentation.

  11. Segmentation of polycystic kidneys from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racimora, Dimitri; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2010-03-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disorder characterized by the growth of numerous fluid filled cysts in the kidneys. Measuring cystic kidney volume is thus crucial to monitoring the evolution of the disease. While T2-weighted MRI delineates the organ, automatic segmentation is very difficult due to highly variable shape and image contrast. The interactive stereology methods used currently involve a compromise between segmentation accuracy and time. We have investigated semi-automated methods: active contours and a sub-voxel morphology based algorithm. Coronal T2- weighted images of 17 patients were acquired in four breath-holds using the HASTE sequence on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. The segmentation results were compared to ground truth kidney masks obtained as a consensus of experts. Automatic active contour algorithm yielded an average 22% +/- 8.6% volume error. A recently developed method (Bridge Burner) based on thresholding and constrained morphology failed to separate PKD from the spleen, yielding 37.4% +/- 8.7% volume error. Manual post-editing reduced the volume error to 3.2% +/- 0.8% for active contours and 3.2% +/- 0.6% for Bridge Burner. The total time (automated algorithm plus editing) was 15 min +/- 5 min for active contours and 19 min +/- 11 min for Bridge Burner. The average volume errors for stereology method were 5.9%, 6.2%, 5.4% for mesh size 6.6, 11, 16.5 mm. The average processing times were 17, 7, 4 min. These results show that nearly two-fold improvement in PKD segmentation accuracy over stereology technique can be achieved with a combination of active contours and postediting.

  12. Image segmentation for stone-size inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jui-Pin; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    1995-04-01

    Object size inspection is an important task and has various applications in computer vision, for example, automatic control stone-breaking machines. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed for image segmentation on size inspection of almost round stones with strong textures or almost no textures. We use one camera and multiple light sources at difference positions to take one image when each of the light sources is on. Then we compute the image differences and threshold them to extract edges. We will explain, step by step, picture taking, edge extraction, noise removal, and edge gap filling. Experimental results will be presented. Through various experiments, we find our algorithm robust on various stones and under noise.

  13. Underwater color image segmentation method via RGB channel fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Li; Mingjun, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at the problem of low segmentation accuracy and high computation time by applying existing segmentation methods for underwater color images, this paper has proposed an underwater color image segmentation method via RGB color channel fusion. Based on thresholding segmentation methods to conduct fast segmentation, the proposed method relies on dynamic estimation of the optimal weights for RGB channel fusion to obtain the grayscale image with high foreground-background contrast and reaches high segmentation accuracy. To verify the segmentation accuracy of the proposed method, the authors have conducted various underwater comparative experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to illumination, and it is superior to existing methods in terms of both segmentation accuracy and computation time. Moreover, a segmentation technique is proposed for image sequences for real-time autonomous underwater vehicle operations.

  14. Learning Image Context for Segmentation of Prostate in CT-Guided Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of prostate is the key to the success of external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, accurate segmentation of prostate in computer tomography (CT) images remains challenging mainly due to three factors: (1) low image contrast between the prostate and its surrounding tissues, (2) unpredictable prostate motion across different treatment days, and (3) large variations of intensities and shapes of bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online-learning and patient-specific classification method based on the location-adaptive image context is presented to deal with all these challenging issues and achieve the precise segmentation of prostate in CT images. Specifically, two sets of location-adaptive classifiers are placed, respectively, along the two coordinate directions of the planning image space of a patient, and further trained with the planning image and also the previous-segmented treatment images of the same patient to jointly perform prostate segmentation for a new treatment image (of the same patient). In particular, each location-adaptive classifier, which itself consists of a set of sequential sub-classifiers, is recursively trained with both the static image appearance features and the iteratively-updated image context features (extracted at different scales and orientations) for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on 161 images of 11 patients, each with more than 9 daily treatment 3D CT images. Our method achieves the mean Dice value 0.908 and the mean ± SD of average surface distance (ASD) value 1.40 ± 0.57 mm. Its performance is also compared with three prostate segmentation methods, indicating the best segmentation accuracy by the proposed method among all methods under comparison. PMID:22343071

  15. Learning image context for segmentation of the prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-03-07

    Accurate segmentation of the prostate is the key to the success of external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, accurate segmentation of the prostate in computer tomography (CT) images remains challenging mainly due to three factors: (1) low image contrast between the prostate and its surrounding tissues, (2) unpredictable prostate motion across different treatment days and (3) large variations of intensities and shapes of the bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online-learning and patient-specific classification method based on the location-adaptive image context is presented to deal with all these challenging issues and achieve the precise segmentation of the prostate in CT images. Specifically, two sets of location-adaptive classifiers are placed, respectively, along the two coordinate directions of the planning image space of a patient, and further trained with the planning image and also the previous-segmented treatment images of the same patient to jointly perform prostate segmentation for a new treatment image (of the same patient). In particular, each location-adaptive classifier, which itself consists of a set of sequential sub-classifiers, is recursively trained with both the static image appearance features and the iteratively updated image context features (extracted at different scales and orientations) for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on 161 images of 11 patients, each with more than nine daily treatment three-dimensional CT images. Our method achieves the mean Dice value 0.908 and the mean ± SD of average surface distance value 1.40 ± 0.57 mm. Its performance is also compared with three prostate segmentation methods, indicating the best segmentation accuracy by the proposed method among all methods under comparison.

  16. Automatic segmentation of seven retinal layers in SDOCT images congruent with expert manual segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephanie J; Li, Xiao T; Nicholas, Peter; Toth, Cynthia A; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina

    2010-08-30

    Segmentation of anatomical and pathological structures in ophthalmic images is crucial for the diagnosis and study of ocular diseases. However, manual segmentation is often a time-consuming and subjective process. This paper presents an automatic approach for segmenting retinal layers in Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography images using graph theory and dynamic programming. Results show that this method accurately segments eight retinal layer boundaries in normal adult eyes more closely to an expert grader as compared to a second expert grader.

  17. Segmentation of Tracking Sequences Using Dynamically Updated Adaptive Learning

    PubMed Central

    Michailovich, Oleg; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    The problem of segmentation of tracking sequences is of central importance in a multitude of applications. In the current paper, a different approach to the problem is discussed. Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm is implemented in conjunction with estimation of the dynamic parameters of moving objects represented by the tracking sequence. While the information on objects’ motion allows one to transfer some valuable segmentation priors along the tracking sequence, the segmentation allows substantially reducing the complexity of motion estimation, thereby facilitating the computation. Thus, in the proposed methodology, the processes of segmentation and motion estimation work simultaneously, in a sort of “collaborative” manner. The Bayesian estimation framework is used here to perform the segmentation, while Kalman filtering is used to estimate the motion and to convey useful segmentation information along the image sequence. The proposed method is demonstrated on a number of both computed-simulated and real-life examples, and the obtained results indicate its advantages over some alternative approaches. PMID:19004712

  18. Segmentation and Classification of Burn Color Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SEGMENTATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF BURN COLOR IMAGES Begoña Acha1, Carmen Serrano1, Laura Roa2 1Área de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones ...2Grupo de Ingeniería Biomédica. Escuela Superior de Ingenieros. Universidad de Sevilla. Spain. e -mail: bacha@viento.us.es, cserrano@viento.us.es...IEEE Trans. on Biomedical Engineering, vol. 43, no. 10, pp. 1011-1020, Oct. 1996. [10] G. A. Hance, S. E . Umbaugh, R. H. Moss, W. V. Stoecker

  19. Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Harris, Emma J.; Kirby, Anna M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue segmentation

  20. a Minimum Spanning Tree Based Method for Uav Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng; Cui, Weihong; Lin, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Minimum Span Tree (MST) based image segmentation method for UAV images in coastal area. An edge weight based optimal criterion (merging predicate) is defined, which based on statistical learning theory (SLT). And we used a scale control parameter to control the segmentation scale. Experiments based on the high resolution UAV images in coastal area show that the proposed merging predicate can keep the integrity of the objects and prevent results from over segmentation. The segmentation results proves its efficiency in segmenting the rich texture images with good boundary of objects.

  1. Semisupervised synthetic aperture radar image segmentation with multilayer superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Su, Weimin; Gu, Hong; Gong, Dachen

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a significant role in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing. However, SAR image segmentation is challenging due to speckle. We propose a semisupervised bipartite graph method for segmentation of an SAR image. First, the multilayer over-segmentation of the SAR image, referred to as superpixels, is computed using existing segmentation algorithms. Second, an unbalanced bipartite graph is constructed in which the correlation between pixels is replaced by the texture similarity between superpixels, to reduce the dimension of the edge matrix. To also improve efficiency, we define a new method, called the combination of the Manhattan distance and symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence, to measure texture similarity. Third, by the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix and semisupervised learning, we construct an across-affinity matrix. A quantitative evaluation using SAR images shows that the new algorithm produces significantly high-quality segmentations as compared with state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms.

  2. Towards Automatic Image Segmentation Using Optimised Region Growing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazab, Mamoun; Islam, Mofakharul; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    Image analysis is being adopted extensively in many applications such as digital forensics, medical treatment, industrial inspection, etc. primarily for diagnostic purposes. Hence, there is a growing interest among researches in developing new segmentation techniques to aid the diagnosis process. Manual segmentation of images is labour intensive, extremely time consuming and prone to human errors and hence an automated real-time technique is warranted in such applications. There is no universally applicable automated segmentation technique that will work for all images as the image segmentation is quite complex and unique depending upon the domain application. Hence, to fill the gap, this paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm that can segment a digital image of interest into a more meaningful arrangement of regions and objects. Our algorithm combines region growing approach with optimised elimination of false boundaries to arrive at more meaningful segments automatically. We demonstrate this using X-ray teeth images that were taken for real-life dental diagnosis.

  3. Monitoring Change Through Hierarchical Segmentation of Remotely Sensed Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Lawrence, William T.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a fast and effective method for generating image segmentation hierarchies. These segmentation hierarchies organize image data in a manner that makes their information content more accessible for analysis. Image segmentation enables analysis through the examination of image regions rather than individual image pixels. In addition, the segmentation hierarchy provides additional analysis clues through the tracing of the behavior of image region characteristics at several levels of segmentation detail. The potential for extracting the information content from imagery data based on segmentation hierarchies has not been fully explored for the benefit of the Earth and space science communities. This paper explores the potential of exploiting these segmentation hierarchies for the analysis of multi-date data sets, and for the particular application of change monitoring.

  4. Neonatal brain image segmentation in longitudinal MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Fan, Yong; Tang, Songyuan; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2010-01-01

    In the study of early brain development, tissue segmentation of neonatal brain MR images remains challenging because of the insufficient image quality due to the properties of developing tissues. Among various brain tissue segmentation algorithms, atlas-based brain image segmentation can potentially achieve good segmentation results on neonatal brain images. However, their performances rely on both the quality of the atlas and the spatial correspondence between the atlas and the to-be-segmented image. Moreover, it is difficult to build a population atlas for neonates due to the requirement of a large set of tissue-segmented neonatal brain images. To combat these obstacles, we present a longitudinal neonatal brain image segmentation framework by taking advantage of the longitudinal data acquired at late time-point to build a subject-specific tissue probabilistic atlas. Specifically, tissue segmentation of the neonatal brain is formulated as two iterative steps of bias correction and probabilistic-atlas-based tissue segmentation, along with the longitudinal atlas reconstructed by the late time image of the same subject. The proposed method has been evaluated qualitatively through visual inspection and quantitatively by comparing with manual delineations and two population-atlas-based segmentation methods. Experimental results show that the utilization of a subject-specific probabilistic atlas can substantially improve tissue segmentation of neonatal brain images.

  5. A Review on Segmentation of Positron Emission Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brent; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Xu, Ziyue; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a non-invasive functional imaging method at the molecular level, images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity. PET imaging provides detailed quantitative information about many diseases and is often used to evaluate inflammation, infection, and cancer by detecting emitted photons from a radiotracer localized to abnormal cells. In order to differentiate abnormal tissue from surrounding areas in PET images, image segmentation methods play a vital role; therefore, accurate image segmentation is often necessary for proper disease detection, diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-ups. In this review paper, we present state-of-the-art PET image segmentation methods, as well as the recent advances in image segmentation techniques. In order to make this manuscript self-contained, we also briefly explain the fundamentals of PET imaging, the challenges of diagnostic PET image analysis, and the effects of these challenges on the segmentation results. PMID:24845019

  6. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated. PMID:24514529

  7. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  8. Interactive natural image segmentation via spline regression.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shiming; Nie, Feiping; Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Changshui

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an interactive algorithm for segmentation of natural images. The task is formulated as a problem of spline regression, in which the spline is derived in Sobolev space and has a form of a combination of linear and Green's functions. Besides its nonlinear representation capability, one advantage of this spline in usage is that, once it has been constructed, no parameters need to be tuned to data. We define this spline on the user specified foreground and background pixels, and solve its parameters (the combination coefficients of functions) from a group of linear equations. To speed up spline construction, K-means clustering algorithm is employed to cluster the user specified pixels. By taking the cluster centers as representatives, this spline can be easily constructed. The foreground object is finally cut out from its background via spline interpolation. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is linear in the number of the pixels to be segmented. Experiments on diverse natural images, with comparison to existing algorithms, illustrate the validity of our method.

  9. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  10. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Ilya Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-03-15

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  11. Microscopy image segmentation tool: robust image data analysis.

    PubMed

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K

    2014-03-01

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  12. An improved FCM medical image segmentation algorithm based on MMTD.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningning; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Shaobai

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) is one of the popular clustering algorithms for medical image segmentation. But FCM is highly vulnerable to noise due to not considering the spatial information in image segmentation. This paper introduces medium mathematics system which is employed to process fuzzy information for image segmentation. It establishes the medium similarity measure based on the measure of medium truth degree (MMTD) and uses the correlation of the pixel and its neighbors to define the medium membership function. An improved FCM medical image segmentation algorithm based on MMTD which takes some spatial features into account is proposed in this paper. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more antinoise than the standard FCM, with more certainty and less fuzziness. This will lead to its practicable and effective applications in medical image segmentation.

  13. Proximity graphs based multi-scale image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Skurikhin, Alexei N

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel multi-scale image segmentation approach based on irregular triangular and polygonal tessellations produced by proximity graphs. Our approach consists of two separate stages: polygonal seeds generation followed by an iterative bottom-up polygon agglomeration into larger chunks. We employ constrained Delaunay triangulation combined with the principles known from the visual perception to extract an initial ,irregular polygonal tessellation of the image. These initial polygons are built upon a triangular mesh composed of irregular sized triangles and their shapes are ad'apted to the image content. We then represent the image as a graph with vertices corresponding to the polygons and edges reflecting polygon relations. The segmentation problem is then formulated as Minimum Spanning Tree extraction. We build a successive fine-to-coarse hierarchy of irregular polygonal grids by an iterative graph contraction constructing Minimum Spanning Tree. The contraction uses local information and merges the polygons bottom-up based on local region-and edge-based characteristics.

  14. Image segmentation using trainable fuzzy set classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalkoff, Robert J.; Carver, Albrecht E.; Gurbuz, Sabri

    1999-07-01

    A general image analysis and segmentation method using fuzzy set classification and learning is described. The method uses a learned fuzzy representation of pixel region characteristics, based upon the conjunction and disjunction of extracted and derived fuzzy color and texture features. Both positive and negative exemplars of some visually apparent characteristic which forms the basis of the inspection, input by a human operator, are used together with a clustering algorithm to construct positive similarity membership functions and negative similarity membership functions. Using these composite fuzzified images, P and N, are produced using fuzzy union. Classification is accomplished via image defuzzification, whereby linguistic meaning is assigned to each pixel in the fuzzy set using a fuzzy inference operation. The technique permits: (1) strict color and texture discrimination, (2) machine learning of color and texture characteristics of regions, (3) and judicious labeling of each pixel based upon leaned fuzzy representation and fuzzy classification. This approach appears ideal for applications involving visual inspection and allows the development of image-based inspection systems which may be trained and used by relatively unskilled workers. We show three different examples involving the visual inspection of mixed waste drums, lumber and woven fabric.

  15. Image Segmentation for Connectomics Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Tasdizen, Tolga; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Liu, TIng; Jones, Cory; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of neural circuits at the microscopic scale of individual neurons and synapses, also known as connectomics, is an important challenge for neuroscience. While an important motivation of connectomics is providing anatomical ground truth for neural circuit models, the ability to decipher neural wiring maps at the individual cell level is also important in studies of many neurodegenerative diseases. Reconstruction of a neural circuit at the individual neuron level requires the use of electron microscopy images due to their extremely high resolution. Computational challenges include pixel-by-pixel annotation of these images into classes such as cell membrane, mitochondria and synaptic vesicles and the segmentation of individual neurons. State-of-the-art image analysis solutions are still far from the accuracy and robustness of human vision and biologists are still limited to studying small neural circuits using mostly manual analysis. In this chapter, we describe our image analysis pipeline that makes use of novel supervised machine learning techniques to tackle this problem.

  16. Efficient adaptive thresholding with image masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive thresholding is a useful technique for document analysis. In medical image processing, it is also helpful for segmenting structures, such as diaphragms or blood vessels. This technique sets a threshold using local information around a pixel, then binarizes the pixel according to the value. Although this technique is robust to changes in illumination, it takes a significant amount of time to compute thresholds because it requires adding all of the neighboring pixels. Integral images can alleviate this overhead; however, medical images, such as ultrasound, often come with image masks, and ordinary algorithms often cause artifacts. The main problem is that the shape of the summing area is not rectangular near the boundaries of the image mask. For example, the threshold at the boundary of the mask is incorrect because pixels on the mask image are also counted. Our key idea to cope with this problem is computing the integral image for the image mask to count the valid number of pixels. Our method is implemented on a GPU using CUDA, and experimental results show that our algorithm is 164 times faster than a naïve CPU algorithm for averaging.

  17. An Interactive Image Segmentation Method in Hand Gesture Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Disi; Li, Gongfa; Sun, Ying; Kong, Jianyi; Jiang, Guozhang; Tang, Heng; Ju, Zhaojie; Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the recognition rate of hand gestures a new interactive image segmentation method for hand gesture recognition is presented, and popular methods, e.g., Graph cut, Random walker, Interactive image segmentation using geodesic star convexity, are studied in this article. The Gaussian Mixture Model was employed for image modelling and the iteration of Expectation Maximum algorithm learns the parameters of Gaussian Mixture Model. We apply a Gibbs random field to the image segmentation and minimize the Gibbs Energy using Min-cut theorem to find the optimal segmentation. The segmentation result of our method is tested on an image dataset and compared with other methods by estimating the region accuracy and boundary accuracy. Finally five kinds of hand gestures in different backgrounds are tested on our experimental platform, and the sparse representation algorithm is used, proving that the segmentation of hand gesture images helps to improve the recognition accuracy. PMID:28134818

  18. An Interactive Image Segmentation Method in Hand Gesture Recognition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Disi; Li, Gongfa; Sun, Ying; Kong, Jianyi; Jiang, Guozhang; Tang, Heng; Ju, Zhaojie; Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai

    2017-01-27

    In order to improve the recognition rate of hand gestures a new interactive image segmentation method for hand gesture recognition is presented, and popular methods, e.g., Graph cut, Random walker, Interactive image segmentation using geodesic star convexity, are studied in this article. The Gaussian Mixture Model was employed for image modelling and the iteration of Expectation Maximum algorithm learns the parameters of Gaussian Mixture Model. We apply a Gibbs random field to the image segmentation and minimize the Gibbs Energy using Min-cut theorem to find the optimal segmentation. The segmentation result of our method is tested on an image dataset and compared with other methods by estimating the region accuracy and boundary accuracy. Finally five kinds of hand gestures in different backgrounds are tested on our experimental platform, and the sparse representation algorithm is used, proving that the segmentation of hand gesture images helps to improve the recognition accuracy.

  19. An entropy-based objective evaluation method for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Fritts, Jason E.; Goldman, Sally A.

    2003-12-01

    Accurate image segmentation is important for many image, video and computer vision applications. Over the last few decades, many image segmentation methods have been proposed. However, the results of these segmentation methods are usually evaluated only visually, qualitatively, or indirectly by the effectiveness of the segmentation on the subsequent processing steps. Such methods are either subjective or tied to particular applications. They do not judge the performance of a segmentation method objectively, and cannot be used as a means to compare the performance of different segmentation techniques. A few quantitative evaluation methods have been proposed, but these early methods have been based entirely on empirical analysis and have no theoretical grounding. In this paper, we propose a novel objective segmentation evaluation method based on information theory. The new method uses entropy as the basis for measuring the uniformity of pixel characteristics (luminance is used in this paper) within a segmentation region. The evaluation method provides a relative quality score that can be used to compare different segmentations of the same image. This method can be used to compare both various parameterizations of one particular segmentation method as well as fundamentally different segmentation techniques. The results from this preliminary study indicate that the proposed evaluation method is superior to the prior quantitative segmentation evaluation techniques, and identify areas for future research in objective segmentation evaluation.

  20. Segmentation of range images using morphological operations: review and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Linda A.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    1995-10-01

    Image segmentation involves calculating the position of object boundaries. For scene analysis, the intent is to differentiate objects from clutter by means of preprocessing. The object of this paper is to examine and discuss two morphological techniques for preprocessing and segmenting range images. A Morphological Watershed Algorithm has been studied in detail for segmenting range images. This algorithm uses a unique approach for defining the boundaries of objects from a morphological gradient. Several sets of range images are used as input to the algorithm to demonstrate the flexibility of the watershed technique and the experimental results support this approach as an effective method for segmenting range images. Morphological image operators present another means for segmenting range images. In particular, the results from implementing gray-scale morphological techniques indicate that these operators are useful for segmentation. This is made possible by converting a range image of a scene to a gray-scale image representation. The result represents the umbra of the surface of the objects within the scene. By applying morphological operations to the gray values of the image, the operations are applied to the umbra. Each pixel represents a point of the object's umbra, thereby yielding scene segmentation. The techniques that are discussed are found to be useful for preprocessing and segmenting range images which are direct extensions to object recognition, scene analysis, and image understanding.

  1. Segmentation of thermographic images of hands using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Mitchell, Melanie; Gold, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for segmenting thermographic images using a genetic algorithm (GA). The individuals of the GA also known as chromosomes consist of a sequence of parameters of a level set function. Each chromosome represents a unique segmenting contour. An initial population of segmenting contours is generated based on the learned variation of the level set parameters from training images. Each segmenting contour (an individual) is evaluated for its fitness based on the texture of the region it encloses. The fittest individuals are allowed to propagate to future generations of the GA run using selection, crossover and mutation. The dataset consists of thermographic images of hands of patients suffering from upper extremity musculo-skeletal disorders (UEMSD). Thermographic images are acquired to study the skin temperature as a surrogate for the amount of blood flow in the hands of these patients. Since entire hands are not visible on these images, segmentation of the outline of the hands on these images is typically performed by a human. In this paper several different methods have been tried for segmenting thermographic images: Gabor-wavelet-based texture segmentation method, the level set method of segmentation and our GA which we termed LSGA because it combines level sets with genetic algorithms. The results show a comparative evaluation of the segmentation performed by all the methods. We conclude that LSGA successfully segments entire hands on images in which hands are only partially visible.

  2. A general framework for context-specific image segmentation using reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichao; Lekadir, Karim; Lee, Su-Lin; Merrifield, Robert; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an online reinforcement learning framework for medical image segmentation. The concept of context-specific segmentation is introduced such that the model is adaptive not only to a defined objective function but also to the user's intention and prior knowledge. Based on this concept, a general segmentation framework using reinforcement learning is proposed, which can assimilate specific user intention and behavior seamlessly in the background. The method is able to establish an implicit model for a large state-action space and generalizable to different image contents or segmentation requirements based on learning in situ. In order to demonstrate the practical value of the method, example applications of the technique to four different segmentation problems are presented. Detailed validation results have shown that the proposed framework is able to significantly reduce user interaction, while maintaining both segmentation accuracy and consistency.

  3. Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thai, T.Q.

    1991-01-01

    Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Guaranteeing Convergence of Iterative Skewed Voting Algorithms for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Balcan, Doru C.; Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew; Kovačević, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we provide rigorous proof for the convergence of an iterative voting-based image segmentation algorithm called Active Masks. Active Masks (AM) was proposed to solve the challenging task of delineating punctate patterns of cells from fluorescence microscope images. Each iteration of AM consists of a linear convolution composed with a nonlinear thresholding; what makes this process special in our case is the presence of additive terms whose role is to “skew” the voting when prior information is available. In real-world implementation, the AM algorithm always converges to a fixed point. We study the behavior of AM rigorously and present a proof of this convergence. The key idea is to formulate AM as a generalized (parallel) majority cellular automaton, adapting proof techniques from discrete dynamical systems. PMID:22984338

  5. A global/local affinity graph for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Xiaofang Wang; Yuxing Tang; Masnou, Simon; Liming Chen

    2015-04-01

    Construction of a reliable graph capturing perceptual grouping cues of an image is fundamental for graph-cut based image segmentation methods. In this paper, we propose a novel sparse global/local affinity graph over superpixels of an input image to capture both short- and long-range grouping cues, and thereby enabling perceptual grouping laws, including proximity, similarity, continuity, and to enter in action through a suitable graph-cut algorithm. Moreover, we also evaluate three major visual features, namely, color, texture, and shape, for their effectiveness in perceptual segmentation and propose a simple graph fusion scheme to implement some recent findings from psychophysics, which suggest combining these visual features with different emphases for perceptual grouping. In particular, an input image is first oversegmented into superpixels at different scales. We postulate a gravitation law based on empirical observations and divide superpixels adaptively into small-, medium-, and large-sized sets. Global grouping is achieved using medium-sized superpixels through a sparse representation of superpixels' features by solving a ℓ0-minimization problem, and thereby enabling continuity or propagation of local smoothness over long-range connections. Small- and large-sized superpixels are then used to achieve local smoothness through an adjacent graph in a given feature space, and thus implementing perceptual laws, for example, similarity and proximity. Finally, a bipartite graph is also introduced to enable propagation of grouping cues between superpixels of different scales. Extensive experiments are carried out on the Berkeley segmentation database in comparison with several state-of-the-art graph constructions. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach, which outperforms state-of-the-art graphs using four different objective criteria, namely, the probabilistic rand index, the variation of information, the global consistency error, and the

  6. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  7. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  8. Imaging an Adapted Dentoalveolar Complex

    PubMed Central

    Herber, Ralf-Peter; Fong, Justine; Lucas, Seth A.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of a rat dentoalveolar complex was illustrated using various imaging modalities. Micro-X-ray computed tomography for 3D modeling, combined with complementary techniques, including image processing, scanning electron microscopy, fluorochrome labeling, conventional histology (H&E, TRAP), and immunohistochemistry (RANKL, OPN) elucidated the dynamic nature of bone, the periodontal ligament-space, and cementum in the rat periodontium. Tomography and electron microscopy illustrated structural adaptation of calcified tissues at a higher resolution. Ongoing biomineralization was analyzed using fluorochrome labeling, and by evaluating attenuation profiles using virtual sections from 3D tomographies. Osteoclastic distribution as a function of anatomical location was illustrated by combining histology, immunohistochemistry, and tomography. While tomography and SEM provided past resorption-related events, future adaptive changes were deduced by identifying matrix biomolecules using immunohistochemistry. Thus, a dynamic picture of the dentoalveolar complex in rats was illustrated. PMID:22567314

  9. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set.

  10. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set. PMID:27375315

  11. A wrapper-based approach to image segmentation and classification.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Michael E; Jain, Anil K

    2005-12-01

    The traditional processing flow of segmentation followed by classification in computer vision assumes that the segmentation is able to successfully extract the object of interest from the background image. It is extremely difficult to obtain a reliable segmentation without any prior knowledge about the object that is being extracted from the scene. This is further complicated by the lack of any clearly defined metrics for evaluating the quality of segmentation or for comparing segmentation algorithms. We propose a method of segmentation that addresses both of these issues, by using the object classification subsystem as an integral part of the segmentation. This will provide contextual information regarding the objects to be segmented, as well as allow us to use the probability of correct classification as a metric to determine the quality of the segmentation. We view traditional segmentation as a filter operating on the image that is independent of the classifier, much like the filter methods for feature selection. We propose a new paradigm for segmentation and classification that follows the wrapper methods of feature selection. Our method wraps the segmentation and classification together, and uses the classification accuracy as the metric to determine the best segmentation. By using shape as the classification feature, we are able to develop a segmentation algorithm that relaxes the requirement that the object of interest to be segmented must be homogeneous in some low-level image parameter, such as texture, color, or grayscale. This represents an improvement over other segmentation methods that have used classification information only to modify the segmenter parameters, since these algorithms still require an underlying homogeneity in some parameter space. Rather than considering our method as, yet, another segmentation algorithm, we propose that our wrapper method can be considered as an image segmentation framework, within which existing image segmentation

  12. Automatic bone segmentation in knee MR images using a coarse-to-fine strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Soochahn; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of bone and cartilage from a three dimensional knee magnetic resonance (MR) image is a crucial element in monitoring and understanding of development and progress of osteoarthritis. Until now, various segmentation methods have been proposed to separate the bone from other tissues, but it still remains challenging problem due to different modality of MR images, low contrast between bone and tissues, and shape irregularity. In this paper, we present a new fully-automatic segmentation method of bone compartments using relevant bone atlases from a training set. To find the relevant bone atlases and obtain the segmentation, a coarse-to-fine strategy is proposed. In the coarse step, the best atlas among the training set and an initial segmentation are simultaneously detected using branch and bound tree search. Since the best atlas in the coarse step is not accurately aligned, all atlases from the training set are aligned to the initial segmentation, and the best aligned atlas is selected in the middle step. Finally, in the fine step, segmentation is conducted as adaptively integrating shape of the best aligned atlas and appearance prior based on characteristics of local regions. For experiment, femur and tibia bones of forty test MR images are segmented by the proposed method using sixty training MR images. Experimental results show that a performance of the segmentation and the registration becomes better as going near the fine step, and the proposed method obtain the comparable performance with the state-of-the-art methods.

  13. TIN based image segmentation for man-made feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanshou; Xie, Junfeng

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, the splitting and merging algorithm of image segmentation is based on quad tree data structure, which is not convenient to express the topography of regions, the line segments and other information. A new framework is discussed in this paper. It is "TIN based image segmentation and grouping", in which edge information and region information are integrated directly. Firstly, the constrained triangle mesh is constructed with edge segments extracted by EDISON or other algorithm. And then, region growing based on triangles is processed to generate a coarse segmentation. At last, the regions are combined further with perceptual organization rule.

  14. Automatic white matter lesion segmentation using an adaptive outlier detection method.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kok Haur; Ramachandram, Dhanesh; Mandava, Rajeswari; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi

    2012-07-01

    White matter (WM) lesions are diffuse WM abnormalities that appear as hyperintense (bright) regions in cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). WM lesions are often observed in older populations and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other brain-related disorders. In this paper, a new automated method for WM lesions segmentation is presented. In the proposed method, the presence of WM lesions is detected as outliers in the intensity distribution of the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images using an adaptive outlier detection approach. Outliers are detected using a novel adaptive trimmed mean algorithm and box-whisker plot. In addition, pre- and postprocessing steps are implemented to reduce false positives attributed to MRI artifacts commonly observed in FLAIR sequences. The approach is validated using the cranial MRI sequences of 38 subjects. A significant correlation (R=0.9641, P value=3.12×10(-3)) is observed between the automated approach and manual segmentation by radiologist. The accuracy of the proposed approach was further validated by comparing the lesion volumes computed using the automated approach and lesions manually segmented by an expert radiologist. Finally, the proposed approach is compared against leading lesion segmentation algorithms using a benchmark dataset.

  15. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  16. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  17. Joint Lung CT Image Segmentation: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wenjun; Ma, Luyao; Yang, Tiejun; Liang, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lung CT image segmentation is of great clinical value, especially when it comes to delineate pathological regions including lung tumor. In this paper, we present a novel framework that jointly segments multiple lung computed tomography (CT) images via hierarchical Dirichlet process (HDP). In specifics, based on the assumption that lung CT images from different patients share similar image structure (organ sets and relative positioning), we derive a mathematical model to segment them simultaneously so that shared information across patients could be utilized to regularize each individual segmentation. Moreover, compared to many conventional models, the algorithm requires little manual involvement due to the nonparametric nature of Dirichlet process (DP). We validated proposed model upon clinical data consisting of healthy and abnormal (lung cancer) patients. We demonstrate that, because of the joint segmentation fashion, more accurate and consistent segmentations could be obtained. PMID:27611188

  18. A Marker-Based Approach for the Automated Selection of a Single Segmentation from a Hierarchical Set of Image Segmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Y.; Tilton, J. C.; Benediktsson, J. A.; Chanussot, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hierarchical SEGmentation (HSEG) algorithm, which combines region object finding with region object clustering, has given good performances for multi- and hyperspectral image analysis. This technique produces at its output a hierarchical set of image segmentations. The automated selection of a single segmentation level is often necessary. We propose and investigate the use of automatically selected markers for this purpose. In this paper, a novel Marker-based HSEG (M-HSEG) method for spectral-spatial classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. Two classification-based approaches for automatic marker selection are adapted and compared for this purpose. Then, a novel constrained marker-based HSEG algorithm is applied, resulting in a spectral-spatial classification map. Three different implementations of the M-HSEG method are proposed and their performances in terms of classification accuracies are compared. The experimental results, presented for three hyperspectral airborne images, demonstrate that the proposed approach yields accurate segmentation and classification maps, and thus is attractive for remote sensing image analysis.

  19. Segmentation of knee injury swelling on infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, John; Langet, Hélène; Herry, Christophe; Frize, Monique

    2011-03-01

    Interpretation of medical infrared images is complex due to thermal noise, absence of texture, and small temperature differences in pathological zones. Acute inflammatory response is a characteristic symptom of some knee injuries like anterior cruciate ligament sprains, muscle or tendons strains, and meniscus tear. Whereas artificial coloring of the original grey level images may allow to visually assess the extent inflammation in the area, their automated segmentation remains a challenging problem. This paper presents a hybrid segmentation algorithm to evaluate the extent of inflammation after knee injury, in terms of temperature variations and surface shape. It is based on the intersection of rapid color segmentation and homogeneous region segmentation, to which a Laplacian of a Gaussian filter is applied. While rapid color segmentation enables to properly detect the observed core of swollen area, homogeneous region segmentation identifies possible inflammation zones, combining homogeneous grey level and hue area segmentation. The hybrid segmentation algorithm compares the potential inflammation regions partially detected by each method to identify overlapping areas. Noise filtering and edge segmentation are then applied to common zones in order to segment the swelling surfaces of the injury. Experimental results on images of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament sprain show the improved performance of the hybrid algorithm with respect to its separated components. The main contribution of this work is a meaningful automatic segmentation of abnormal skin temperature variations on infrared thermography images of knee injury swelling.

  20. LoAd: A locally adaptive cortical segmentation algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, M. Jorge; Clarkson, Matthew J.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Modat, Marc; Fox, Nick C.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Thickness measurements of the cerebral cortex can aid diagnosis and provide valuable information about the temporal evolution of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and schizophrenia. Methods that measure the thickness of the cerebral cortex from in-vivo magnetic resonance (MR) images rely on an accurate segmentation of the MR data. However, segmenting the cortex in a robust and accurate way still poses a challenge due to the presence of noise, intensity non-uniformity, partial volume effects, the limited resolution of MRI and the highly convoluted shape of the cortical folds. Beginning with a well-established probabilistic segmentation model with anatomical tissue priors, we propose three post-processing refinements: a novel modification of the prior information to reduce segmentation bias; introduction of explicit partial volume classes; and a locally varying MRF-based model for enhancement of sulci and gyri. Experiments performed on a new digital phantom, on BrainWeb data and on data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) show statistically significant improvements in Dice scores and PV estimation (p<10−3) and also increased thickness estimation accuracy when compared to three well established techniques. PMID:21316470

  1. Automated image segmentation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephanie; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2007-03-01

    Neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases demonstrate problems associated with brain maturation and aging. Automated methods to delineate brain structures of interest are required to analyze large amounts of imaging data like that being collected in several on going multi-center studies. We have previously reported on using artificial neural networks (ANN) to define subcortical brain structures including the thalamus (0.88), caudate (0.85) and the putamen (0.81). In this work, apriori probability information was generated using Thirion's demons registration algorithm. The input vector consisted of apriori probability, spherical coordinates, and an iris of surrounding signal intensity values. We have applied the support vector machine (SVM) machine learning algorithm to automatically segment subcortical and cerebellar regions using the same input vector information. SVM architecture was derived from the ANN framework. Training was completed using a radial-basis function kernel with gamma equal to 5.5. Training was performed using 15,000 vectors collected from 15 training images in approximately 10 minutes. The resulting support vectors were applied to delineate 10 images not part of the training set. Relative overlap calculated for the subcortical structures was 0.87 for the thalamus, 0.84 for the caudate, 0.84 for the putamen, and 0.72 for the hippocampus. Relative overlap for the cerebellar lobes ranged from 0.76 to 0.86. The reliability of the SVM based algorithm was similar to the inter-rater reliability between manual raters and can be achieved without rater intervention.

  2. Automatic segmentation of seven retinal layers in SDOCT images congruent with expert manual segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Stephanie J.; Li, Xiao T.; Nicholas, Peter; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2010-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical and pathological structures in ophthalmic images is crucial for the diagnosis and study of ocular diseases. However, manual segmentation is often a time-consuming and subjective process. This paper presents an automatic approach for segmenting retinal layers in Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography images using graph theory and dynamic programming. Results show that this method accurately segments eight retinal layer boundaries in normal adult eyes more closely to an expert grader as compared to a second expert grader. PMID:20940837

  3. Automatic segmentation of canine retinal OCT using adaptive gradient enhancement and region growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yufan; Sun, Yankui; Chen, Min; Zheng, Yuanjie; Liu, Hui; Leon, Cecilia; Beltran, William; Gee, James C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have shown that the canine retina model offers important insight for our understanding of human retinal diseases. Several therapies developed to treat blindness in such models have already moved onto human clinical trials, with more currently under development [1]. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers a high resolution imaging modality for performing in-vivo analysis of the retinal layers. However, existing algorithms for automatically segmenting and analyzing such data have been mostly focused on the human retina. As a result, canine retinal images are often still being analyzed using manual segmentations, which is a slow and laborious task. In this work, we propose a method for automatically segmenting 5 boundaries in canine retinal OCT. The algorithm employs the position relationships between different boundaries to adaptively enhance the gradient map. A region growing algorithm is then used on the enhanced gradient maps to find the five boundaries separately. The automatic segmentation was compared against manual segmentations showing an average absolute error of 5.82 +/- 4.02 microns.

  4. An adaptive window-setting scheme for segmentation of bladder tumor surface via MR cystography.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chaijie; Yuan, Kehong; Liu, Fanghua; Xiao, Ping; Lv, Guoqing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-07-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive window-setting scheme for noninvasive detection and segmentation of bladder tumor surface in T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The inner border of the bladder wall is first covered by a group of ball-shaped detecting windows with different radii. By extracting the candidate tumor windows and excluding the false positive (FP) candidates, the entire bladder tumor surface is detected and segmented by the remaining windows. Different from previous bladder tumor detection methods that are mostly focusing on the existence of a tumor, this paper emphasizes segmenting the entire tumor surface in addition to detecting the presence of the tumor. The presented scheme was validated by ten clinical T(1)-weighted MR image datasets (five volunteers and five patients). The bladder tumor surfaces and the normal bladder wall inner borders in the ten datasets were covered by 223 and 10,491 windows, respectively. Such a large number of the detecting windows makes the validation statistically meaningful. In the FP reduction step, the best feature combination was obtained by using receiver operating characteristics or ROC analysis. The validation results demonstrated the potential of this presented scheme in segmenting the entire tumor surface with high sensitivity and low FP rate. This study inherits our previous results of automatic segmentation of the bladder wall and will be an important element in our MR-based virtual cystoscopy or MR cystography system.

  5. Interactive prostate segmentation using atlas-guided semi-supervised learning and adaptive feature selection

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Hyun; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Yinghuan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate prostate segmentation is necessary for maximizing the effectiveness of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation from 3D CT images is very time-consuming and often causes large intra- and interobserver variations across clinicians. Many segmentation methods have been proposed to automate this labor-intensive process, but tedious manual editing is still required due to the limited performance. In this paper, the authors propose a new interactive segmentation method that can (1) flexibly generate the editing result with a few scribbles or dots provided by a clinician, (2) fast deliver intermediate results to the clinician, and (3) sequentially correct the segmentations from any type of automatic or interactive segmentation methods. Methods: The authors formulate the editing problem as a semisupervised learning problem which can utilize a priori knowledge of training data and also the valuable information from user interactions. Specifically, from a region of interest near the given user interactions, the appropriate training labels, which are well matched with the user interactions, can be locally searched from a training set. With voting from the selected training labels, both confident prostate and background voxels, as well as unconfident voxels can be estimated. To reflect informative relationship between voxels, location-adaptive features are selected from the confident voxels by using regression forest and Fisher separation criterion. Then, the manifold configuration computed in the derived feature space is enforced into the semisupervised learning algorithm. The labels of unconfident voxels are then predicted by regularizing semisupervised learning algorithm. Results: The proposed interactive segmentation method was applied to correct automatic segmentation results of 30 challenging CT images. The correction was conducted three times with different user interactions performed at different time periods, in order to

  6. Inference With Collaborative Model for Interactive Tumor Segmentation in Medical Image Sequences.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Yang, Wei; Li, Chenglong; Tang, Jin; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-10-29

    Segmenting organisms or tumors from medical data (e.g., computed tomography volumetric images, ultrasound, or magnetic resonance imaging images/image sequences) is one of the fundamental tasks in medical image analysis and diagnosis, and has received long-term attentions. This paper studies a novel computational framework of interactive segmentation for extracting liver tumors from image sequences, and it is suitable for different types of medical data. The main contributions are twofold. First, we propose a collaborative model to jointly formulate the tumor segmentation from two aspects: 1) region partition and 2) boundary presence. The two terms are complementary but simultaneously competing: the former extracts the tumor based on its appearance/texture information, while the latter searches for the palpable tumor boundary. Moreover, in order to adapt the data variations, we allow the model to be discriminatively trained based on both the seed pixels traced by the Lucas-Kanade algorithm and the scribbles placed by the user. Second, we present an effective inference algorithm that iterates to: 1) solve tumor segmentation using the augmented Lagrangian method and 2) propagate the segmentation across the image sequence by searching for distinctive matches between images. We keep the collaborative model updated during the inference in order to well capture the tumor variations over time. We have verified our system for segmenting liver tumors from a number of clinical data, and have achieved very promising results. The software developed with this paper can be found at http://vision.sysu.edu.cn/projects/med-interactive-seg/.

  7. Comparison of different automatic threshold algorithms for image segmentation in microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boecker, Wilfried; Muller, W.-U.; Streffer, Christian

    1995-08-01

    Image segmentation is almost always a necessary step in image processing. The employed threshold algorithms are based on the detection of local minima in the gray level histograms of the entire image. In automatic cell recognition equipment, like chromosome analysis or micronuclei counting systems, flexible and adaptive thresholds are required to consider variation in gray level intensities of the background and of the specimen. We have studied three different methods of threshold determination: 1) a statistical procedure, which uses the interclass entropy maximization of the gray level histogram. The iterative algorithm can be used for multithreshold segmentation. The contribution of iteration step 'i' is 2+i-1) number of thresholds; 2) a numerical approach, which detects local minima in the gray level histogram. The algorithm must be tailored and optimized for specific applications like cell recognition with two different thresholds for cell nuclei and cell cytoplasm segmentation; 3) an artificial neural network, which is trained with learning sets of image histograms and the corresponding interactively determined thresholds. We have investigated feed forward networks with one and two layers, respectively. The gray level frequencies are used as inputs for the net. The number of different thresholds per image determines the output channels. We have tested and compared these different threshold algorithms for practical use in fluorescence microscopy as well as in bright field microscopy. The implementation and the results are presented and discussed.

  8. GPU accelerated fuzzy connected image segmentation by using CUDA.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Ying; Cao, Yong; Miller, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Image segmentation techniques using fuzzy connectedness principles have shown their effectiveness in segmenting a variety of objects in several large applications in recent years. However, one problem of these algorithms has been their excessive computational requirements when processing large image datasets. Nowadays commodity graphics hardware provides high parallel computing power. In this paper, we present a parallel fuzzy connected image segmentation algorithm on Nvidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform for segmenting large medical image data sets. Our experiments based on three data sets with small, medium, and large data size demonstrate the efficiency of the parallel algorithm, which achieves a speed-up factor of 7.2x, 7.3x, and 14.4x, correspondingly, for the three data sets over the sequential implementation of fuzzy connected image segmentation algorithm on CPU.

  9. Analysis of image thresholding segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Yang, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Swarm intelligence-based image thresholding segmentation algorithms are playing an important role in the research field of image segmentation. In this paper, we briefly introduce the theories of four existing image segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence including fish swarm algorithm, artificial bee colony, bacteria foraging algorithm and particle swarm optimization. Then some image benchmarks are tested in order to show the differences of the segmentation accuracy, time consumption, convergence and robustness for Salt & Pepper noise and Gaussian noise of these four algorithms. Through these comparisons, this paper gives qualitative analyses for the performance variance of the four algorithms. The conclusions in this paper would give a significant guide for the actual image segmentation.

  10. Segmentation algorithms for ear image data towards biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Gentil, Fernanda; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the segmentation, i.e. the identification, of ear structures in video-otoscopy, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image data, has gained significant importance in the medical imaging area, particularly those in CT and MR imaging. Segmentation is the fundamental step of any automated technique for supporting the medical diagnosis and, in particular, in biomechanics studies, for building realistic geometric models of ear structures. In this paper, a review of the algorithms used in ear segmentation is presented. The review includes an introduction to the usually biomechanical modelling approaches and also to the common imaging modalities. Afterwards, several segmentation algorithms for ear image data are described, and their specificities and difficulties as well as their advantages and disadvantages are identified and analysed using experimental examples. Finally, the conclusions are presented as well as a discussion about possible trends for future research concerning the ear segmentation.

  11. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  12. Ship detection in high spatial resolution remote sensing image based on improved sea-land segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhao, Huijie; Dong, Chao; Meng, Lingjie

    2016-10-01

    A new method to detect ship target at sea based on improved segmentation algorithm is proposed in this paper, in which the improved segmentation algorithm is applied to precisely segment land and sea. Firstly, mean value is replaced instead of average variance value in Otsu method in order to improve the adaptability. Secondly, Mean Shift algorithm is performed to separate the original high spatial resolution remote sensing image into several homogeneous regions. At last, the final sea-land segmentation result can be located combined with the regions in preliminary sea-land segmentation result. The proposed segmentation algorithm performs well on the segment between water and land with affluent texture features and background noise, and produces a result that can be well used in shape and context analyses. Ships are detected with settled shape characteristics, including width, length and its compactness. Mean Shift algorithm can smooth the background noise, utilize the wave's texture features and helps highlight offshore ships. Mean shift algorithm is combined with improved Otsu threshold method in order to maximizes their advantages. Experimental results show that the improved sea-land segmentation algorithm on high spatial resolution remote sensing image with complex texture and background noise performs well in sea-land segmentation, not only enhances the accuracy of land and sea boarder, but also preserves detail characteristic of ships. Compared with traditional methods, this method can achieve accuracy over 90 percent. Experiments on Worldview images show the superior, robustness and precision of the proposed method.

  13. Segmentation of stochastic images with a stochastic random walker method.

    PubMed

    Pätz, Torben; Preusser, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    We present an extension of the random walker segmentation to images with uncertain gray values. Such gray-value uncertainty may result from noise or other imaging artifacts or more general from measurement errors in the image acquisition process. The purpose is to quantify the influence of the gray-value uncertainty onto the result when using random walker segmentation. In random walker segmentation, a weighted graph is built from the image, where the edge weights depend on the image gradient between the pixels. For given seed regions, the probability is evaluated for a random walk on this graph starting at a pixel to end in one of the seed regions. Here, we extend this method to images with uncertain gray values. To this end, we consider the pixel values to be random variables (RVs), thus introducing the notion of stochastic images. We end up with stochastic weights for the graph in random walker segmentation and a stochastic partial differential equation (PDE) that has to be solved. We discretize the RVs and the stochastic PDE by the method of generalized polynomial chaos, combining the recent developments in numerical methods for the discretization of stochastic PDEs and an interactive segmentation algorithm. The resulting algorithm allows for the detection of regions where the segmentation result is highly influenced by the uncertain pixel values. Thus, it gives a reliability estimate for the resulting segmentation, and it furthermore allows determining the probability density function of the segmented object volume.

  14. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  15. A Latent Source Model for Patch-Based Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, George H; Shah, Devavrat; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    Despite the popularity and empirical success of patch-based nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting approaches to medical image segmentation, there has been no theoretical development on when, why, and how well these nonparametric methods work. We bridge this gap by providing a theoretical performance guarantee for nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting segmentation under a new probabilistic model for patch-based image segmentation. Our analysis relies on a new local property for how similar nearby patches are, and fuses existing lines of work on modeling natural imagery patches and theory for nonparametric classification. We use the model to derive a new patch-based segmentation algorithm that iterates between inferring local label patches and merging these local segmentations to produce a globally consistent image segmentation. Many existing patch-based algorithms arise as special cases of the new algorithm.

  16. Anterior segment imaging in glaucoma: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Maslin, Jessica S; Barkana, Yaniv; Dorairaj, Syril K

    2015-01-01

    Anterior segment imaging allows for an objective method of visualizing the anterior segment angle. Two of the most commonly used devices for anterior segment imaging include the anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and the ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). AS-OCT technology has several types, including time-domain, swept-source, and spectral-domain-based configurations. We performed a literature search on PubMed for articles containing the text “anterior segment OCT,” “ultrasound biomicroscopy,” and “anterior segment imaging” since 2004, with some pertinent references before 2004 included for completeness. This review compares the advantages and disadvantages of AS-OCT and UBM, and summarizes the most recent literature regarding the importance of these devices in glaucoma diagnosis and management. These devices not only aid in visualization of the angle, but also have important postsurgical applications in bleb and tube imaging. PMID:26576519

  17. Robust model for segmenting images with/without intensity inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyang; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-08-01

    Intensity inhomogeneities and different types/levels of image noise are the two major obstacles to accurate image segmentation by region-based level set models. To provide a more general solution to these challenges, we propose a novel segmentation model that considers global and local image statistics to eliminate the influence of image noise and to compensate for intensity inhomogeneities. In our model, the global energy derived from a Gaussian model estimates the intensity distribution of the target object and background; the local energy derived from the mutual influences of neighboring pixels can eliminate the impact of image noise and intensity inhomogeneities. The robustness of our method is validated on segmenting synthetic images with/without intensity inhomogeneities, and with different types/levels of noise, including Gaussian noise, speckle noise, and salt and pepper noise, as well as images from different medical imaging modalities. Quantitative experimental comparisons demonstrate that our method is more robust and more accurate in segmenting the images with intensity inhomogeneities than the local binary fitting technique and its more recent systematic model. Our technique also outperformed the region-based Chan–Vese model when dealing with images without intensity inhomogeneities and produce better segmentation results than the graph-based algorithms including graph-cuts and random walker when segmenting noisy images.

  18. A generative model for image segmentation based on label fusion.

    PubMed

    Sabuncu, Mert R; Yeo, B T Thomas; Van Leemput, Koen; Fischl, Bruce; Golland, Polina

    2010-10-01

    We propose a nonparametric, probabilistic model for the automatic segmentation of medical images, given a training set of images and corresponding label maps. The resulting inference algorithms rely on pairwise registrations between the test image and individual training images. The training labels are then transferred to the test image and fused to compute the final segmentation of the test subject. Such label fusion methods have been shown to yield accurate segmentation, since the use of multiple registrations captures greater inter-subject anatomical variability and improves robustness against occasional registration failures. To the best of our knowledge, this manuscript presents the first comprehensive probabilistic framework that rigorously motivates label fusion as a segmentation approach. The proposed framework allows us to compare different label fusion algorithms theoretically and practically. In particular, recent label fusion or multiatlas segmentation algorithms are interpreted as special cases of our framework. We conduct two sets of experiments to validate the proposed methods. In the first set of experiments, we use 39 brain MRI scans-with manually segmented white matter, cerebral cortex, ventricles and subcortical structures-to compare different label fusion algorithms and the widely-used FreeSurfer whole-brain segmentation tool. Our results indicate that the proposed framework yields more accurate segmentation than FreeSurfer and previous label fusion algorithms. In a second experiment, we use brain MRI scans of 282 subjects to demonstrate that the proposed segmentation tool is sufficiently sensitive to robustly detect hippocampal volume changes in a study of aging and Alzheimer's Disease.

  19. On the Performance of Stochastic Model-Based Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Sewchand, Wilfred

    1989-11-01

    A new stochastic model-based image segmentation technique for X-ray CT image has been developed and has been extended to the more general nondiffraction CT images which include MRI, SPELT, and certain type of ultrasound images [1,2]. The nondiffraction CT image is modeled by a Finite Normal Mixture. The technique utilizes the information theoretic criterion to detect the number of the region images, uses the Expectation-Maximization algorithm to estimate the parameters of the image, and uses the Bayesian classifier to segment the observed image. How does this technique over/under-estimate the number of the region images? What is the probability of errors in the segmentation of this technique? This paper addresses these two problems and is a continuation of [1,2].

  20. Improved document image segmentation algorithm using multiresolution morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhari, Syed Saqib; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Page segmentation into text and non-text elements is an essential preprocessing step before optical character recognition (OCR) operation. In case of poor segmentation, an OCR classification engine produces garbage characters due to the presence of non-text elements. This paper describes modifications to the text/non-text segmentation algorithm presented by Bloomberg,1 which is also available in his open-source Leptonica library.2The modifications result in significant improvements and achieved better segmentation accuracy than the original algorithm for UW-III, UNLV, ICDAR 2009 page segmentation competition test images and circuit diagram datasets.

  1. An enhanced segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images using contourlet.

    PubMed

    Rezatofighi, S H; Roodaki, A; Ahmadi Noubari, H

    2008-01-01

    Retinal images acquired using a fundus camera often contain low grey, low level contrast and are of low dynamic range. This may seriously affect the automatic segmentation stage and subsequent results; hence, it is necessary to carry-out preprocessing to improve image contrast results before segmentation. Here we present a new multi-scale method for retinal image contrast enhancement using Contourlet transform. In this paper, a combination of feature extraction approach which utilizes Local Binary Pattern (LBP), morphological method and spatial image processing is proposed for segmenting the retinal blood vessels in optic fundus images. Furthermore, performance of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) is investigated in the classification section. The performance of the proposed algorithm is tested on the publicly available DRIVE database. The results are numerically assessed for different proposed algorithms.

  2. Automatic segmentation and classification of outdoor images using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Campbell, N W; Thomas, B T; Troscianko, T

    1997-02-01

    The paper describes how neural networks may be used to segment and label objects in images. A self-organising feature map is used for the segmentation phase, and we quantify the quality of the segmentations produced as well as the contribution made by colour and texture features. A multi-layer perception is trained to label the regions produced by the segmentation process. It is shown that 91.1% of the image area is correctly classified into one of eleven categories which include cars, houses, fences, roads, vegetation and sky.

  3. Analyzing training information from random forests for improved image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath

    2014-04-01

    Labeled training data are used for challenging medical image segmentation problems to learn different characteristics of the relevant domain. In this paper, we examine random forest (RF) classifiers, their learned knowledge during training and ways to exploit it for improved image segmentation. Apart from learning discriminative features, RFs also quantify their importance in classification. Feature importance is used to design a feature selection strategy critical for high segmentation and classification accuracy, and also to design a smoothness cost in a second-order MRF framework for graph cut segmentation. The cost function combines the contribution of different image features like intensity, texture, and curvature information. Experimental results on medical images show that this strategy leads to better segmentation accuracy than conventional graph cut algorithms that use only intensity information in the smoothness cost.

  4. Fast spectral color image segmentation based on filtering and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Min; Li, Hongyu; Jia, Jinyuan; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a fast approach to spectral image segmentation. In the algorithm, two popular techniques are extended and applied to spectral color images: the mean-shift filtering and the kernel-based clustering. We claim that segmentation should be completed under illuminant F11 rather than directly using the original spectral reflectance, because such illumination can reduce data variability and expedite the following filtering. The modes obtained in the mean-shift filtering represent the local features of spectral images, and will be applied to segmentation in place of pixels. Since the modes are generally small in number, the eigendecomposition of kernel matrices, the crucial step in the kernelbased clustering, becomes much easier. The combination of these two techniques can efficiently enhance the performance of segmentation. Experiments show that the proposed segmentation method is feasible and very promising for spectral color images.

  5. A Segmentation Framework of Pulmonary Nodules in Lung CT Images.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2016-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary nodules is a prerequisite for acceptable performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) system designed for diagnosis of lung cancer from lung CT images. Accurate segmentation helps to improve the quality of machine level features which could improve the performance of the CAD system. The well-circumscribed solid nodules can be segmented using thresholding, but segmentation becomes difficult for part-solid, non-solid, and solid nodules attached with pleura or vessels. We proposed a segmentation framework for all types of pulmonary nodules based on internal texture (solid/part-solid and non-solid) and external attachment (juxta-pleural and juxta-vascular). In the proposed framework, first pulmonary nodules are categorized into solid/part-solid and non-solid category by analyzing intensity distribution in the core of the nodule. Two separate segmentation methods are developed for solid/part-solid and non-solid nodules, respectively. After determining the category of nodule, the particular algorithm is set to remove attached pleural surface and vessels from the nodule body. The result of segmentation is evaluated in terms of four contour-based metrics and six region-based metrics for 891 pulmonary nodules from Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative (LIDC/IDRI) public database. The experimental result shows that the proposed segmentation framework is reliable for segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules with improved accuracy compared to existing segmentation methods.

  6. Segmenting images analytically in shape space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dambreville, Samuel; Niethammer, Marc; Malcolm, James; Levitt, James; Shenton, Martha E.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel analytic technique to perform shape-driven segmentation. In our approach, shapes are represented using binary maps, and linear PCA is utilized to provide shape priors for segmentation. Intensity based probability distributions are then employed to convert a given test volume into a binary map representation, and a novel energy functional is proposed whose minimum can be analytically computed to obtain the desired segmentation in the shape space. We compare the proposed method with the log-likelihood based energy to elucidate some key differences. Our algorithm is applied to the segmentation of brain caudate nucleus and hippocampus from MRI data, which is of interest in the study of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Our validation (we compute the Hausdorff distance and the DICE coefficient between the automatic segmentation and ground-truth) shows that the proposed algorithm is very fast, requires no initialization and outperforms the log-likelihood based energy.

  7. [Research on maize multispectral image accurate segmentation and chlorophyll index estimation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Sun, Hong; Li, Min-zan; Song, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yan-e

    2015-01-01

    In order to rapidly acquire maize growing information in the field, a non-destructive method of maize chlorophyll content index measurement was conducted based on multi-spectral imaging technique and imaging processing technology. The experiment was conducted at Yangling in Shaanxi province of China and the crop was Zheng-dan 958 planted in about 1 000 m X 600 m experiment field. Firstly, a 2-CCD multi-spectral image monitoring system was available to acquire the canopy images. The system was based on a dichroic prism, allowing precise separation of the visible (Blue (B), Green (G), Red (R): 400-700 nm) and near-infrared (NIR, 760-1 000 nm) band. The multispectral images were output as RGB and NIR images via the system vertically fixed to the ground with vertical distance of 2 m and angular field of 50°. SPAD index of each sample was'measured synchronously to show the chlorophyll content index. Secondly, after the image smoothing using adaptive smooth filtering algorithm, the NIR maize image was selected to segment the maize leaves from background, because there was a big difference showed in gray histogram between plant and soil background. The NIR image segmentation algorithm was conducted following steps of preliminary and accuracy segmentation: (1) The results of OTSU image segmentation method and the variable threshold algorithm were discussed. It was revealed that the latter was better one in corn plant and weed segmentation. As a result, the variable threshold algorithm based on local statistics was selected for the preliminary image segmentation. The expansion and corrosion were used to optimize the segmented image. (2) The region labeling algorithm was used to segment corn plants from soil and weed background with an accuracy of 95. 59 %. And then, the multi-spectral image of maize canopy was accurately segmented in R, G and B band separately. Thirdly, the image parameters were abstracted based on the segmented visible and NIR images. The average gray

  8. Automated Tumor Volumetry Using Computer-Aided Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, Michel; Sadaghiani, Mohammed Salehi; Akbari, Hamed; Atthiah, Mark A.; Ali, Zarina S.; Da, Xiao; Zhan, Yiqang; O'Rourke, Donald; Grady, Sean M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accurate segmentation of brain tumors, and quantification of tumor volume, is important for diagnosis, monitoring, and planning therapeutic intervention. Manual segmentation is not widely used because of time constraints. Previous efforts have mainly produced methods that are tailored to a particular type of tumor or acquisition protocol and have mostly failed to produce a method that functions on different tumor types and is robust to changes in scanning parameters, resolution, and image quality, thereby limiting their clinical value. Herein, we present a semiautomatic method for tumor segmentation that is fast, accurate, and robust to a wide variation in image quality and resolution. Materials and Methods A semiautomatic segmentation method based on the geodesic distance transform was developed and validated by using it to segment 54 brain tumors. Glioblastomas, meningiomas, and brain metastases were segmented. Qualitative validation was based on physician ratings provided by three clinical experts. Quantitative validation was based on comparing semiautomatic and manual segmentations. Results Tumor segmentations obtained using manual and automatic methods were compared quantitatively using the Dice measure of overlap. Subjective evaluation was performed by having human experts rate the computerized segmentations on a 0–5 rating scale where 5 indicated perfect segmentation. Conclusions The proposed method addresses a significant, unmet need in the field of neuro-oncology. Specifically, this method enables clinicians to obtain accurate and reproducible tumor volumes without the need for manual segmentation. PMID:25770633

  9. Real-time planar segmentation of depth images: from three-dimensional edges to segmented planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Hemmat, Hani; Bondarev, Egor; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time execution of processing algorithms for handling depth images in a three-dimensional (3-D) data framework is a major challenge. More specifically, considering depth images as point clouds and performing planar segmentation requires heavy computation, because available planar segmentation algorithms are mostly based on surface normals and/or curvatures, and, consequently, do not provide real-time performance. Aiming at the reconstruction of indoor environments, the spaces mainly consist of planar surfaces, so that a possible 3-D application would strongly benefit from a real-time algorithm. We introduce a real-time planar segmentation method for depth images avoiding any surface normal calculation. First, we detect 3-D edges in a depth image and generate line segments between the identified edges. Second, we fuse all the points on each pair of intersecting line segments into a plane candidate. Third and finally, we implement a validation phase to select planes from the candidates. Furthermore, various enhancements are applied to improve the segmentation quality. The GPU implementation of the proposed algorithm segments depth images into planes at the rate of 58 fps. Our pipeline-interleaving technique increases this rate up to 100 fps. With this throughput rate improvement, the application benefit of our algorithm may be further exploited in terms of quality and enhancing the localization.

  10. Live minimal path for interactive segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Gabriel; Tang, An; Chav, Ramnada; Cresson, Thierry; Chantrel, Steeve; De Guise, Jacques A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is nowadays required for medical device development and in a growing number of clinical and research applications. Since dedicated automatic segmentation methods are not always available, generic and efficient interactive tools can alleviate the burden of manual segmentation. In this paper we propose an interactive segmentation tool based on image warping and minimal path segmentation that is efficient for a wide variety of segmentation tasks. While the user roughly delineates the desired organs boundary, a narrow band along the cursors path is straightened, providing an ideal subspace for feature aligned filtering and minimal path algorithm. Once the segmentation is performed on the narrow band, the path is warped back onto the original image, precisely delineating the desired structure. This tool was found to have a highly intuitive dynamic behavior. It is especially efficient against misleading edges and required only coarse interaction from the user to achieve good precision. The proposed segmentation method was tested for 10 difficult liver segmentations on CT and MRI images, and the resulting 2D overlap Dice coefficient was 99% on average..

  11. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature.

  12. Automatic nevi segmentation using adaptive mean shift filters and feature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael A.; Lee, Tim K.; Atkins, M. Stella; McLean, David I.

    2004-05-01

    A novel automatic method of segmenting nevi is explained and analyzed in this paper. The first step in nevi segmentation is to iteratively apply an adaptive mean shift filter to form clusters in the image and to remove noise. The goal of this step is to remove differences in skin intensity and hairs from the image, while still preserving the shape of nevi present on the skin. Each iteration of the mean shift filter changes pixel values to be a weighted average of pixels in its neighborhood. Some new extensions to the mean shift filter are proposed to allow for better segmentation of nevi from the skin. The kernel, that describes how the pixels in its neighborhood will be averaged, is adaptive; the shape of the kernel is a function of the local histogram. After initial clustering, a simple merging of clusters is done. Finally, clusters that are local minima are found and analyzed to determine which clusters are nevi. When this algorithm was compared to an assessment by an expert dermatologist, it showed a sensitivity rate and diagnostic accuracy of over 95% on the test set, for nevi larger than 1.5mm.

  13. Graph run-length matrices for histopathological image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Akif Burak; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2011-03-01

    The histopathological examination of tissue specimens is essential for cancer diagnosis and grading. However, this examination is subject to a considerable amount of observer variability as it mainly relies on visual interpretation of pathologists. To alleviate this problem, it is very important to develop computational quantitative tools, for which image segmentation constitutes the core step. In this paper, we introduce an effective and robust algorithm for the segmentation of histopathological tissue images. This algorithm incorporates the background knowledge of the tissue organization into segmentation. For this purpose, it quantifies spatial relations of cytological tissue components by constructing a graph and uses this graph to define new texture features for image segmentation. This new texture definition makes use of the idea of gray-level run-length matrices. However, it considers the runs of cytological components on a graph to form a matrix, instead of considering the runs of pixel intensities. Working with colon tissue images, our experiments demonstrate that the texture features extracted from "graph run-length matrices" lead to high segmentation accuracies, also providing a reasonable number of segmented regions. Compared with four other segmentation algorithms, the results show that the proposed algorithm is more effective in histopathological image segmentation.

  14. Efficient hyperspectral image segmentation using geometric active contour formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albalooshi, Fatema A.; Sidike, Paheding; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new formulation of geometric active contours that embeds the local hyperspectral image information for an accurate object region and boundary extraction. We exploit self-organizing map (SOM) unsupervised neural network to train our model. The segmentation process is achieved by the construction of a level set cost functional, in which, the dynamic variable is the best matching unit (BMU) coming from SOM map. In addition, we use Gaussian filtering to discipline the deviation of the level set functional from a signed distance function and this actually helps to get rid of the re-initialization step that is computationally expensive. By using the properties of the collective computational ability and energy convergence capability of the active control models (ACM) energy functional, our method optimizes the geometric ACM energy functional with lower computational time and smoother level set function. The proposed algorithm starts with feature extraction from raw hyperspectral images. In this step, the principal component analysis (PCA) transformation is employed, and this actually helps in reducing dimensionality and selecting best sets of the significant spectral bands. Then the modified geometric level set functional based ACM is applied on the optimal number of spectral bands determined by the PCA. By introducing local significant spectral band information, our proposed method is capable to force the level set functional to be close to a signed distance function, and therefore considerably remove the need of the expensive re-initialization procedure. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed technique, we use real-life hyperspectral images and test our algorithm in varying textural regions. This framework can be easily adapted to different applications for object segmentation in aerial hyperspectral imagery.

  15. Unsupervised texture image segmentation using multilayer data condensation spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanqiang; Jiao, Licheng; Zhao, Feng

    2010-07-01

    A novel unsupervised texture image segmentation using a multilayer data condensation spectral clustering algorithm is presented. First, the texture features of each image pixel are extracted by the stationary wavelet transform and a multilayer data condensation method is performed on this texture features data set to obtain a condensation subset. Second, the spectral clustering algorithm based on the manifold similarity measure is used to cluster the condensation subset. Finally, according to the clustering result of the condensation subset, the nearest-neighbor method is adopted to obtain the original image-segmentation result. In the experiments, we apply our method to solve the texture and synthetic aperture radar image segmentation and take self-tuning k-nearest-neighbor spectral clustering and Nyström methods for baseline comparisons. The experimental results show that the proposed method is more robust and effective for texture image segmentation.

  16. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  17. Objective measurements to evaluate glottal space segmentation from laryngeal images.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Arriola, J M; Osma-Ruiz, V; Sáenz-Lechón, N; Godino-Llorente, J I; Fraile, R; Arias-Londoño, J D

    2012-01-01

    Objective evaluation of the results of medical image segmentation is a known problem. Applied to the task of automatically detecting the glottal area from laryngeal images, this paper proposes a new objective measurement to evaluate the quality of a segmentation algorithm by comparing with the results given by a human expert. The new figure of merit is called Area Index, and its effectiveness is compared with one of the most used figures of merit found in the literature: the Pratt Index. Results over 110 laryngeal images presented high correlations between both indexes, demonstrating that the proposed measure is comparable to the Pratt Index and it is a good indicator of the segmentation quality.

  18. Integrating Non-Semantic Knowledge into Image Segmentation Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    D-A149 571 INTEGRATING NON-SEMANTIC KNOWLEDGE INTO IMAGE 1/2 SEGMENTATION PROCESSES(U) MRSSACHUSETTS UNIV AMHERST DEPT OF COMPUTER AND INFORMATION S... IMAGE SEGMENTATION PROCESSES Ralf R. Kohler COINS Technical Report 84-04 SJAN 1 7 1985) This work was supported in part by the Office of Naval Rearch...RR07048-16. DITPI~rN STTM!4 j~pwvq jx public 7le" Dwtnutlfl nlmited . .. Teatn Non-SanatIC Knowledge into Image Segmentation Proces A Dissertation

  19. An improved level set method for vertebra CT image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis and therapy for the lumbar disc herniation requires accurate vertebra segmentation. The complex anatomical structure and the degenerative deformations of the vertebrae makes its segmentation challenging. Methods An improved level set method, namely edge- and region-based level set method (ERBLS), is proposed for vertebra CT images segmentation. By considering the gradient information and local region characteristics of images, the proposed model can efficiently segment images with intensity inhomogeneity and blurry or discontinuous boundaries. To reduce the dependency on manual initialization in many active contour models and for an automatic segmentation, a simple initialization method for the level set function is built, which utilizes the Otsu threshold. In addition, the need of the costly re-initialization procedure is completely eliminated. Results Experimental results on both synthetic and real images demonstrated that the proposed ERBLS model is very robust and efficient. Compared with the well-known local binary fitting (LBF) model, our method is much more computationally efficient and much less sensitive to the initial contour. The proposed method has also applied to 56 patient data sets and produced very promising results. Conclusions An improved level set method suitable for vertebra CT images segmentation is proposed. It has the flexibility of segmenting the vertebra CT images with blurry or discontinuous edges, internal inhomogeneity and no need of re-initialization. PMID:23714300

  20. A Bayesian Approach for Image Segmentation with Shape Priors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hang; Yang, Qing; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-06-20

    Color and texture have been widely used in image segmentation; however, their performance is often hindered by scene ambiguities, overlapping objects, or missingparts. In this paper, we propose an interactive image segmentation approach with shape prior models within a Bayesian framework. Interactive features, through mouse strokes, reduce ambiguities, and the incorporation of shape priors enhances quality of the segmentation where color and/or texture are not solely adequate. The novelties of our approach are in (i) formulating the segmentation problem in a well-de?ned Bayesian framework with multiple shape priors, (ii) ef?ciently estimating parameters of the Bayesian model, and (iii) multi-object segmentation through user-speci?ed priors. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a set of natural and synthetic images.

  1. Interactive medical image segmentation using snake and multiscale curve editing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    Image segmentation is typically applied to locate objects and boundaries, and it is an essential process that supports medical diagnosis, surgical planning, and treatments in medical applications. Generally, this process is done by clinicians manually, which may be accurate but tedious and very time consuming. To facilitate the process, numerous interactive segmentation methods have been proposed that allow the user to intervene in the process of segmentation by incorporating prior knowledge, validating results and correcting errors. The accurate segmentation results can potentially be obtained by such user-interactive process. In this work, we propose a novel framework of interactive medical image segmentation for clinical applications, which combines digital curves and the active contour model to obtain promising results. It allows clinicians to quickly revise or improve contours by simple mouse actions. Meanwhile, the snake model becomes feasible and practical in clinical applications. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for medical images in clinical applications.

  2. Segmentation of tongue muscles from super-resolution magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Prince, Jerry L; Murano, Emi Z; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-02-01

    Imaging and quantification of tongue anatomy is helpful in surgical planning, post-operative rehabilitation of tongue cancer patients, and studying of how humans adapt and learn new strategies for breathing, swallowing and speaking to compensate for changes in function caused by disease, medical interventions or aging. In vivo acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images with clearly visible tongue muscles is currently not feasible because of breathing and involuntary swallowing motions that occur over lengthy imaging times. However, recent advances in image reconstruction now allow the generation of super-resolution 3D MR images from sets of orthogonal images, acquired at a high in-plane resolution and combined using super-resolution techniques. This paper presents, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt towards automatic tongue muscle segmentation from MR images. We devised a database of ten super-resolution 3D MR images, in which the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles were manually segmented and annotated with landmarks. We demonstrate the feasibility of segmenting the muscles of interest automatically by applying the landmark-based game-theoretic framework (GTF), where a landmark detector based on Haar-like features and an optimal assignment-based shape representation were integrated. The obtained segmentation results were validated against an independent manual segmentation performed by a second observer, as well as against B-splines and demons atlasing approaches. The segmentation performance resulted in mean Dice coefficients of 85.3%, 81.8%, 78.8% and 75.8% for the second observer, GTF, B-splines atlasing and demons atlasing, respectively. The obtained level of segmentation accuracy indicates that computerized tongue muscle segmentation may be used in surgical planning and treatment outcome analysis of tongue cancer patients, and in studies of normal subjects and subjects with speech and

  3. Hierarchical layered and semantic-based image segmentation using ergodicity map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2010-04-01

    Image segmentation plays a foundational role in image understanding and computer vision. Although great strides have been made and progress achieved on automatic/semi-automatic image segmentation algorithms, designing a generic, robust, and efficient image segmentation algorithm is still challenging. Human vision is still far superior compared to computer vision, especially in interpreting semantic meanings/objects in images. We present a hierarchical/layered semantic image segmentation algorithm that can automatically and efficiently segment images into hierarchical layered/multi-scaled semantic regions/objects with contextual topological relationships. The proposed algorithm bridges the gap between high-level semantics and low-level visual features/cues (such as color, intensity, edge, etc.) through utilizing a layered/hierarchical ergodicity map, where ergodicity is computed based on a space filling fractal concept and used as a region dissimilarity measurement. The algorithm applies a highly scalable, efficient, and adaptive Peano- Cesaro triangulation/tiling technique to decompose the given image into a set of similar/homogenous regions based on low-level visual cues in a top-down manner. The layered/hierarchical ergodicity map is built through a bottom-up region dissimilarity analysis. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level of detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanisms for contextual topological object/region relationship generation. Experiments have been conducted within the maritime image environment where the segmented layered semantic objects include the basic level objects (i.e. sky/land/water) and deeper level objects in the sky/land/water surfaces. Experimental results demonstrate the proposed algorithm has the capability to robustly and efficiently segment images into layered semantic objects

  4. A translational registration system for LANDSAT image segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Erthal, G. J.; Velasco, F. R. D.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of satellite images obtained from various dates is essential for crop forecast systems. In order to make possible a multitemporal analysis, it is necessary that images belonging to each acquisition have pixel-wise correspondence. A system developed to obtain, register and record image segments from LANDSAT images in computer compatible tapes is described. The translational registration of the segments is performed by correlating image edges in different acquisitions. The system was constructed for the Burroughs B6800 computer in ALGOL language.

  5. A martian case study of segmenting images automatically for granulometry and sedimentology, Part 1: Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunatillake, Suniti; McLennan, Scott M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Husch, Jonathan M.; Hardgrove, Craig; Skok, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    In planetary exploration, delineating individual grains in images via segmentation is a key path to sedimentological comparisons with the extensive terrestrial literature. Samples that contain a substantial fine grain component, common at Meridiani and Gusev at Mars, would involve prohibitive effort if attempted manually. Unavailability of physical samples also precludes standard terrestrial methods such as sieving. Furthermore, planetary scientists have been thwarted by the dearth of segmentation algorithms customized for planetary applications, including Mars, and often rely on sub-optimal solutions adapted from medical software. We address this with an original algorithm optimized to segment whole images from the Microscopic Imager of the Mars Exploration Rovers. While our code operates with minimal human guidance, its default parameters can be modified easily for different geologic settings and imagers on Earth and other planets, such as the Curiosity Rover’s Mars Hand Lens Instrument. We assess the algorithm’s robustness in a companion work.

  6. A novel level set model with automated initialization and controlling parameters for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyi; Jiang, Mingyan; Bai, Peirui; Yang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a level set model without the need of generating initial contour and setting controlling parameters manually is proposed for medical image segmentation. The contribution of this paper is mainly manifested in three points. First, we propose a novel adaptive mean shift clustering method based on global image information to guide the evolution of level set. By simple threshold processing, the results of mean shift clustering can automatically and speedily generate an initial contour of level set evolution. Second, we devise several new functions to estimate the controlling parameters of the level set evolution based on the clustering results and image characteristics. Third, the reaction diffusion method is adopted to supersede the distance regularization term of RSF-level set model, which can improve the accuracy and speed of segmentation effectively with less manual intervention. Experimental results demonstrate the performance and efficiency of the proposed model for medical image segmentation.

  7. Three-dimensional segmentation of bone structures in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Guenther; Knoll, Christian J.; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Albalat, Salvador E.

    1999-05-01

    This work is concerned with the implementation of a fully 3D-consistent, automatic segmentation of bone structures in CT images. The morphological watersheds algorithm has been chosen as the base of the low-level segmentation. The over- segmentation, a phenomenon normally involved with this transformation, has been sorted out successfully by inserting modifying modules that act already within the algorithm. When dealing with a maxillofacial image, this approach also includes the possibility to provide two different divisions of the image: a fine-grained tessellation geared to the following high-level segmentation and a more coarse-grained one for the segmentation of the teeth. In the knowledge-based high-level segmentation, probabilistic considerations make use of specific properties of the 3D low-level regions to find the most probable tissue for each region. Low-level regions that cannot be classified with the necessary certainty are passed to a second stage, where--embedded in their respective environment--they are compared with structural patterns deduced from anatomical knowledge. The tooth segmentation takes the coarse-grained tessellation as its starting point. The few regions making up each tooth are grouped to 3D envelopes--one envelope per tooth. Matched filtering detects the bases of these envelopes. After a refinement they are fitted into the fine- grained, high-level segmented image.

  8. Comparison of automated and manual segmentation of hippocampus MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Christensen, Gary E.; Miller, Michael I.; Joshi, Sarang C.; Gado, Mokhtar; Csernansky, John G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    The precision and accuracy of area estimates from magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and using manual and automated segmentation methods are determined. Areas of the human hippocampus were measured to compare a new automatic method of segmentation with regions of interest drawn by an expert. MR images of nine normal subjects and nine schizophrenic patients were acquired with a 1.5-T unit (Siemens Medical Systems, Inc., Iselin, New Jersey). From each individual MPRAGE 3D volume image a single comparable 2-D slice (matrix equals 256 X 256) was chosen which corresponds to the same coronal slice of the hippocampus. The hippocampus was first manually segmented, then segmented using high dimensional transformations of a digital brain atlas to individual brain MR images. The repeatability of a trained rater was assessed by comparing two measurements from each individual subject. Variability was also compared within and between subject groups of schizophrenics and normal subjects. Finally, the precision and accuracy of automated segmentation of hippocampal areas were determined by comparing automated measurements to manual segmentation measurements made by the trained rater on MR and brain slice images. The results demonstrate the high repeatability of area measurement from MR images of the human hippocampus. Automated segmentation using high dimensional transformations from a digital brain atlas provides repeatability superior to that of manual segmentation. Furthermore, the validity of automated measurements was demonstrated by a high correlation with manual segmentation measurements made by a trained rater. Quantitative morphometry of brain substructures (e.g. hippocampus) is feasible by use of a high dimensional transformation of a digital brain atlas to an individual MR image. This method automates the search for neuromorphological correlates of schizophrenia by a new mathematically robust method with unprecedented sensitivity to small local and regional differences.

  9. Segmentally variable genes: a new perspective on adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Roberts, Richard J; Kasif, Simon

    2004-04-01

    Genomic sequence variation is the hallmark of life and is key to understanding diversity and adaptation among the numerous microorganisms on earth. Analysis of the sequenced microbial genomes suggests that genes are evolving at many different rates. We have attempted to derive a new classification of genes into three broad categories: lineage-specific genes that evolve rapidly and appear unique to individual species or strains; highly conserved genes that frequently perform housekeeping functions; and partially variable genes that contain highly variable regions, at least 70 amino acids long, interspersed among well-conserved regions. The latter we term segmentally variable genes (SVGs), and we suggest that they are especially interesting targets for biochemical studies. Among these genes are ones necessary to deal with the environment, including genes involved in host-pathogen interactions, defense mechanisms, and intracellular responses to internal and environmental changes. For the most part, the detailed function of these variable regions remains unknown. We propose that they are likely to perform important binding functions responsible for protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, or protein-small molecule interactions. Discerning their function and identifying their binding partners may offer biologists new insights into the basic mechanisms of adaptation, context-dependent evolution, and the interaction between microbes and their environment.

  10. A hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we propose a novel hybrid 3D segmentation framework which combines Gibbs models, marching cubes and deformable models. In the framework, first we construct a new Gibbs model whose energy function is defined on a high order clique system. The new model includes both region and boundary information during segmentation. Next we improve the original marching cubes method to construct 3D meshes from Gibbs models' output. The 3D mesh serves as the initial geometry of the deformable model. Then we deform the deformable model using external image forces so that the model converges to the object surface. We run the Gibbs model and the deformable model recursively by updating the Gibbs model's parameters using the region and boundary information in the deformable model segmentation result. In our approach, the hybrid combination of region-based methods and boundary-based methods results in improved segmentations of complex structures. The benefit of the methodology is that it produces high quality segmentations of 3D structures using little prior information and minimal user intervention. The modules in this segmentation methodology are developed within the context of the Insight ToolKit (ITK). We present experimental segmentation results of brain tumors and evaluate our method by comparing experimental results with expert manual segmentations. The evaluation results show that the methodology achieves high quality segmentation results with computational efficiency. We also present segmentation results of other clinical objects to illustrate the strength of the methodology as a generic segmentation framework.

  11. Intelligent Segmentation of Medical Images Using Fuzzy Bitplane Thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z. Faizal; Kannan, A.

    2014-04-01

    The performance of assessment in medical image segmentation is highly correlated with the extraction of anatomic structures from them, and the major task is how to separate the regions of interests from the background and soft tissues successfully. This paper proposes a fuzzy logic based bitplane method to automatically segment the background of images and to locate the region of interest of medical images. This segmentation algorithm consists of three steps, namely identification, rule firing, and inference. In the first step, we begin by identifying the bitplanes that represent the lungs clearly. For this purpose, the intensity value of a pixel is separated into bitplanes. In the second step, the triple signum function assigns an optimum threshold based on the grayscale values for the anatomical structure present in the medical images. Fuzzy rules are formed based on the available bitplanes to form the membership table and are stored in a knowledge base. Finally, rules are fired to assign final segmentation values through the inference process. The proposed new metrics are used to measure the accuracy of the segmentation method. From the analysis, it is observed that the proposed metrics are more suitable for the estimation of segmentation accuracy. The results obtained from this work show that the proposed method performs segmentation effectively for the different classes of medical images.

  12. Spectral segmentation of polygonized images with normalized cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsekh, Anna; Skurikhin, Alexei; Rosten, Edward

    2009-01-01

    We analyze numerical behavior of the eigenvectors corresponding to the lowest eigenvalues of the generalized graph Laplacians arising in the Normalized Cuts formulations of the image segmentation problem on coarse polygonal grids.

  13. Optimized adaptation algorithm for HEVC/H.265 dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP using variable segment duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive video streaming using HTTP has become popular in recent years for commercial video delivery. The recent MPEG-DASH standard allows interoperability and adaptability between servers and clients from different vendors. The delivery of the MPD (Media Presentation Description) files in DASH and the DASH client behaviours are beyond the scope of the DASH standard. However, the different adaptation algorithms employed by the clients do affect the overall performance of the system and users' QoE (Quality of Experience), hence the need for research in this field. Moreover, standard DASH delivery is based on fixed segments of the video. However, there is no standard segment duration for DASH where various fixed segment durations have been employed by different commercial solutions and researchers with their own individual merits. Most recently, the use of variable segment duration in DASH has emerged but only a few preliminary studies without practical implementation exist. In addition, such a technique requires a DASH client to be aware of segment duration variations, and this requirement and the corresponding implications on the DASH system design have not been investigated. This paper proposes a segment-duration-aware bandwidth estimation and next-segment selection adaptation strategy for DASH. Firstly, an MPD file extension scheme to support variable segment duration is proposed and implemented in a realistic hardware testbed. The scheme is tested on a DASH client, and the tests and analysis have led to an insight on the time to download next segment and the buffer behaviour when fetching and switching between segments of different playback durations. Issues like sustained buffering when switching between segments of different durations and slow response to changing network conditions are highlighted and investigated. An enhanced adaptation algorithm is then proposed to accurately estimate the bandwidth and precisely determine the time to download the next

  14. A new method of cardiographic image segmentation based on grammar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Salah; Ben Abdallah, Asma; Bedoui, Mohamed H.; Alimi, Adel M.

    2011-10-01

    The measurement of the most common ultrasound parameters, such as aortic area, mitral area and left ventricle (LV) volume, requires the delineation of the organ in order to estimate the area. In terms of medical image processing this translates into the need to segment the image and define the contours as accurately as possible. The aim of this work is to segment an image and make an automated area estimation based on grammar. The entity "language" will be projected to the entity "image" to perform structural analysis and parsing of the image. We will show how the idea of segmentation and grammar-based area estimation is applied to real problems of cardio-graphic image processing.

  15. 3D ultrasound image segmentation using multiple incomplete feature sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liexiang; Herrington, David M.; Santago, Peter, II

    1999-05-01

    We use three features, the intensity, texture and motion to obtain robust results for segmentation of intracoronary ultrasound images. Using a parameterized equation to describe the lumen-plaque and media-adventitia boundaries, we formulate the segmentation as a parameter estimation through a cost functional based on the posterior probability, which can handle the incompleteness of the features in ultrasound images by employing outlier detection.

  16. Robust Retinal Vessel Segmentation via Locally Adaptive Derivative Frames in Orientation Scores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiong; Dashtbozorg, Behdad; Bekkers, Erik; Pluim, Josien P W; Duits, Remco; Ter Haar Romeny, Bart M

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a robust and fully automatic filter-based approach for retinal vessel segmentation. We propose new filters based on 3D rotating frames in so-called orientation scores, which are functions on the Lie-group domain of positions and orientations [Formula: see text]. By means of a wavelet-type transform, a 2D image is lifted to a 3D orientation score, where elongated structures are disentangled into their corresponding orientation planes. In the lifted domain [Formula: see text], vessels are enhanced by means of multi-scale second-order Gaussian derivatives perpendicular to the line structures. More precisely, we use a left-invariant rotating derivative (LID) frame, and a locally adaptive derivative (LAD) frame. The LAD is adaptive to the local line structures and is found by eigensystem analysis of the left-invariant Hessian matrix (computed with the LID). After multi-scale filtering via the LID or LAD in the orientation score domain, the results are projected back to the 2D image plane giving us the enhanced vessels. Then a binary segmentation is obtained through thresholding. The proposed methods are validated on six retinal image datasets with different image types, on which competitive segmentation performances are achieved. In particular, the proposed algorithm of applying the LAD filter on orientation scores (LAD-OS) outperforms most of the state-of-the-art methods. The LAD-OS is capable of dealing with typically difficult cases like crossings, central arterial reflex, closely parallel and tiny vessels. The high computational speed of the proposed methods allows processing of large datasets in a screening setting.

  17. Medical image segmentation using level set and watershed transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuping; Tian, Jie

    2003-07-01

    One of the most popular level set algorithms is the so-called fast marching method. In this paper, a medical image segmentation algorithm is proposed based on the combination of fast marching method and watershed transformation. First, the original image is smoothed using nonlinear diffusion filter, then the smoothed image is over-segmented by the watershed algorithm. Last, the image is segmented automatically using the modified fast marching method. Due to introducing over-segmentation, the arrival time the seeded point to the boundary of region should be calculated. For other pixels inside the region of the seeded point, the arrival time is not calculated because of the region homogeneity. So the algorithm"s speed improves greatly. Moreover, the speed function is redefined based on the statistical similarity degree of the nearby regions. We also extend our algorithm to 3D circumstance and segment medical image series. Experiments show that the algorithm can fast and accurately obtain segmentation results of medical images.

  18. Fuzzy local Gaussian mixture model for brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zexuan; Xia, Yong; Sun, Quansen; Chen, Qiang; Xia, Deshen; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-05-01

    Accurate brain tissue segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an essential step in quantitative brain image analysis. However, due to the existence of noise and intensity inhomogeneity in brain MR images, many segmentation algorithms suffer from limited accuracy. In this paper, we assume that the local image data within each voxel's neighborhood satisfy the Gaussian mixture model (GMM), and thus propose the fuzzy local GMM (FLGMM) algorithm for automated brain MR image segmentation. This algorithm estimates the segmentation result that maximizes the posterior probability by minimizing an objective energy function, in which a truncated Gaussian kernel function is used to impose the spatial constraint and fuzzy memberships are employed to balance the contribution of each GMM. We compared our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and clinical data. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can largely overcome the difficulties raised by noise, low contrast, and bias field, and substantially improve the accuracy of brain MR image segmentation.

  19. Image segmentation based on kernel PCA and shape prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoping; Boukerroui, Djamal; Cocquerez, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    The introduction of shape priori in the segmentation model ameliorates effectively the poor segmentation result due to the using of the image information alone to segment the image including noise, occlusion, or missing parts. But the presentation of shape via Principal Component Analysis (PCA) brings on the limitation of the similarity between the objet and the prior shape. In this paper, we proposed using Kernel PCA (KPCA) to capture the shape information - the variability. KPCA can present better shape prior knowledge. The model based on KPCA allows segmenting the object with nonlinear transformation or a quite difference with the priori shape. Moreover, since the shape model is incorporated into the deformable model, our segmentation model includes the image term and the shape term to balance the influence of the global image information and the shape prior knowledge in proceed of segmentation. Our model and the model based on PCA both are applied to synthetic images and CT medical images. The comparative results show that KPCA can more accurately identify the object with large deformation or from the noised seriously background.

  20. Gaussian mixtures on tensor fields for segmentation: applications to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    de Luis-García, Rodrigo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for tensor field segmentation based on the definition of mixtures of Gaussians on tensors as a statistical model. Working over the well-known Geodesic Active Regions segmentation framework, this scheme presents several interesting advantages. First, it yields a more flexible model than the use of a single Gaussian distribution, which enables the method to better adapt to the complexity of the data. Second, it can work directly on tensor-valued images or, through a parallel scheme that processes independently the intensity and the local structure tensor, on scalar textured images. Two different applications have been considered to show the suitability of the proposed method for medical imaging segmentation. First, we address DT-MRI segmentation on a dataset of 32 volumes, showing a successful segmentation of the corpus callosum and favourable comparisons with related approaches in the literature. Second, the segmentation of bones from hand radiographs is studied, and a complete automatic-semiautomatic approach has been developed that makes use of anatomical prior knowledge to produce accurate segmentation results.

  1. Three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging segmentation via knowledge-driven decision theory.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nishant; Muralidhar, Gautam S; Bovik, Alan C; Cowperthwaite, Matthew C; Burnett, Mark G; Markey, Mia K

    2014-10-01

    Brain tissue segmentation on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a difficult task because of significant intensity overlap between the tissue classes. We present a new knowledge-driven decision theory (KDT) approach that incorporates prior information of the relative extents of intensity overlap between tissue class pairs for volumetric MR tissue segmentation. The proposed approach better handles intensity overlap between tissues without explicitly employing methods for removal of MR image corruptions (such as bias field). Adaptive tissue class priors are employed that combine probabilistic atlas maps with spatial contextual information obtained from Markov random fields to guide tissue segmentation. The energy function is minimized using a variational level-set-based framework, which has shown great promise for MR image analysis. We evaluate the proposed method on two well-established real MR datasets with expert ground-truth segmentations and compare our approach against existing segmentation methods. KDT has low-computational complexity and shows better segmentation performance than other segmentation methods evaluated using these MR datasets.

  2. Three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging segmentation via knowledge-driven decision theory

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Nishant; Muralidhar, Gautam S.; Bovik, Alan C.; Cowperthwaite, Matthew C.; Burnett, Mark G.; Markey, Mia K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Brain tissue segmentation on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a difficult task because of significant intensity overlap between the tissue classes. We present a new knowledge-driven decision theory (KDT) approach that incorporates prior information of the relative extents of intensity overlap between tissue class pairs for volumetric MR tissue segmentation. The proposed approach better handles intensity overlap between tissues without explicitly employing methods for removal of MR image corruptions (such as bias field). Adaptive tissue class priors are employed that combine probabilistic atlas maps with spatial contextual information obtained from Markov random fields to guide tissue segmentation. The energy function is minimized using a variational level-set-based framework, which has shown great promise for MR image analysis. We evaluate the proposed method on two well-established real MR datasets with expert ground-truth segmentations and compare our approach against existing segmentation methods. KDT has low-computational complexity and shows better segmentation performance than other segmentation methods evaluated using these MR datasets. PMID:26158060

  3. Gaussian Mixtures on Tensor Fields for Segmentation: Applications to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Luis-García, Rodrigo; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for tensor field segmentation based on the definition of mixtures of Gaussians on tensors as a statistical model. Working over the well-known Geodesic Active Regions segmentation framework, this scheme presents several interesting advantages. First, it yields a more flexible model than the use of a single Gaussian distribution, which enables the method to better adapt to the complexity of the data. Second, it can work directly on tensor-valued images or, through a parallel scheme that processes independently the intensity and the local structure tensor, on scalar textured images. Two different applications have been considered to show the suitability of the proposed method for medical imaging segmentation. First, we address DT-MRI segmentation on a dataset of 32 volumes, showing a successful segmentation of the corpus callosum and favourable comparisons with related approaches in the literature. Second, the segmentation of bones from hand radiographs is studied, and a complete automatic-semiautomatic approach has been developed that makes use of anatomical prior knowledge to produce accurate segmentation results. PMID:20932717

  4. Watershed Merge Tree Classification for Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, TIng; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2012-11-11

    Automated segmentation of electron microscopy (EM) images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes a hierarchical structure and boundary classification for 2D neuron segmentation. With a membrane detection probability map, a watershed merge tree is built for the representation of hierarchical region merging from the watershed algorithm. A boundary classifier is learned with non-local image features to predict each potential merge in the tree, upon which merge decisions are made with consistency constraints in the sense of optimization to acquire the final segmentation. Independent of classifiers and decision strategies, our approach proposes a general framework for efficient hierarchical segmentation with statistical learning. We demonstrate that our method leads to a substantial improvement in segmentation accuracy.

  5. Unsupervised fuzzy segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velthuizen, Robert P.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Arrington, J. A.; Silbiger, Martin L.

    1993-07-01

    Unsupervised fuzzy methods are proposed for segmentation of 3D Magnetic Resonance images of the brain. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) has shown promising results for segmentation of single slices. FCM has been investigated for volume segmentations, both by combining results of single slices and by segmenting the full volume. Different strategies and initializations have been tried. In particular, two approaches have been used: (1) a method by which, iteratively, the furthest sample is split off to form a new cluster center, and (2) the traditional FCM in which the membership grade matrix is initialized in some way. Results have been compared with volume segmentations by k-means and with two supervised methods, k-nearest neighbors and region growing. Results of individual segmentations are presented as well as comparisons on the application of the different methods to a number of tumor patient data sets.

  6. Biomedical image segmentation using geometric deformable models and metaheuristics.

    PubMed

    Mesejo, Pablo; Valsecchi, Andrea; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Cagnoni, Stefano; Damas, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes a hybrid level set approach for medical image segmentation. This new geometric deformable model combines region- and edge-based information with the prior shape knowledge introduced using deformable registration. Our proposal consists of two phases: training and test. The former implies the learning of the level set parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm, while the latter is the proper segmentation, where another metaheuristic, in this case Scatter Search, derives the shape prior. In an experimental comparison, this approach has shown a better performance than a number of state-of-the-art methods when segmenting anatomical structures from different biomedical image modalities.

  7. Segmentation and image navigation in digitized spine x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2000-06-01

    The National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-rays of the cervical and lumbar spines. Extensive health information has been collected on the subjects of these x-rays, but no information has been derived from the image contents themselves. We are researching algorithms to segment anatomy in these images and to derive from the segmented data measurements useful for indexing this image set for characteristics important to researchers in rheumatology, bone morphometry, and related areas. Active Shape Modeling is currently being investigated for use in location and boundary definition for the vertebrae in these images.

  8. Image Segmentation Using Parametric Contours With Free Endpoints.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Heike; Garcke, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for active contours with free endpoints. A scheme for image segmentation is presented based on a discrete version of the Mumford-Shah functional where the contours can be both closed and open curves. Additional to a flow of the curves in normal direction, evolution laws for the tangential flow of the endpoints are derived. Using a parametric approach to describe the evolving contours together with an edge-preserving denoising, we obtain a fast method for image segmentation and restoration. The analytical and numerical schemes are presented followed by numerical experiments with artificial test images and with a real medical image.

  9. Image Segmentation Using Parametric Contours With Free Endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninghoff, Heike; Garcke, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach for active contours with free endpoints. A scheme is presented for image segmentation and restoration based on a discrete version of the Mumford-Shah functional where the contours can be both closed and open curves. Additional to a flow of the curves in normal direction, evolution laws for the tangential flow of the endpoints are derived. Using a parametric approach to describe the evolving contours together with an edge-preserving denoising, we obtain a fast method for image segmentation and restoration. The analytical and numerical schemes are presented followed by numerical experiments with artificial test images and with a real medical image.

  10. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Riazi, A. H.; Bennamoun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  11. Object density-based image segmentation and its applications in biomedical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinhua; Tan, Jinglu

    2009-12-01

    In many applications of medical image analysis, the density of an object is the most important feature for isolating an area of interest (image segmentation). In this research, an object density-based image segmentation methodology is developed, which incorporates intensity-based, edge-based and texture-based segmentation techniques. The proposed method consists of three main stages: preprocessing, object segmentation and final segmentation. Image enhancement, noise reduction and layer-of-interest extraction are several subtasks of preprocessing. Object segmentation utilizes a marker-controlled watershed technique to identify each object of interest (OI) from the background. A marker estimation method is proposed to minimize over-segmentation resulting from the watershed algorithm. Object segmentation provides an accurate density estimation of OI which is used to guide the subsequent segmentation steps. The final stage converts the distribution of OI into textural energy by using fractal dimension analysis. An energy-driven active contour procedure is designed to delineate the area with desired object density. Experimental results show that the proposed method is 98% accurate in segmenting synthetic images. Segmentation of microscopic images and ultrasound images shows the potential utility of the proposed method in different applications of medical image processing.

  12. Robust Cell Segmentation for Histological Images of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Zhang, Pengyue; Liang, Yanhui; Teodoro, George; Brat, Daniel J.; Wang, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor with uniformly dismal prognosis. Quantitative analysis of GBM cells is an important avenue to extract latent histologic disease signatures to correlate with molecular underpinnings and clinical outcomes. As a prerequisite, a robust and accurate cell segmentation is required. In this paper, we present an automated cell segmentation method that can satisfactorily address segmentation of overlapped cells commonly seen in GBM histology specimens. This method first detects cells with seed connectivity, distance constraints, image edge map, and a shape-based voting image. Initialized by identified seeds, cell boundaries are deformed with an improved variational level set method that can handle clumped cells. We test our method on 40 histological images of GBM with human annotations. The validation results suggest that our cell segmentation method is promising and represents an advance in quantitative cancer research.

  13. SAR image segmentation using skeleton-based fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yun Yi; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2003-06-01

    SAR image segmentation can be converted to a clustering problem in which pixels or small patches are grouped together based on local feature information. In this paper, we present a novel framework for segmentation. The segmentation goal is achieved by unsupervised clustering upon characteristic descriptors extracted from local patches. The mixture model of characteristic descriptor, which combines intensity and texture feature, is investigated. The unsupervised algorithm is derived from the recently proposed Skeleton-Based Data Labeling method. Skeletons are constructed as prototypes of clusters to represent arbitrary latent structures in image data. Segmentation using Skeleton-Based Fuzzy Clustering is able to detect the types of surfaces appeared in SAR images automatically without any user input.

  14. SEGMENTATION OF MITOCHONDRIA IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES USING ALGEBRAIC CURVES

    PubMed Central

    Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark H.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been used to generate large volumes of data with enough details for understanding the complex structure of the nervous system. However, automatic techniques are required to segment cells and intracellular structures in these multi-terabyte datasets and make anatomical analysis possible on a large scale. We propose a fully automated method that exploits both shape information and regional statistics to segment irregularly shaped intracellular structures such as mitochondria in electron microscopy (EM) images. The main idea is to use algebraic curves to extract shape features together with texture features from image patches. Then, these powerful features are used to learn a random forest classifier, which can predict mitochondria locations precisely. Finally, the algebraic curves together with regional information are used to segment the mitochondria at the predicted locations. We demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in segmentation of mitochondria in EM images. PMID:25132915

  15. A Multiple Object Geometric Deformable Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, John A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Deformable models are widely used for image segmentation, most commonly to find single objects within an image. Although several methods have been proposed to segment multiple objects using deformable models, substantial limitations in their utility remain. This paper presents a multiple object segmentation method using a novel and efficient object representation for both two and three dimensions. The new framework guarantees object relationships and topology, prevents overlaps and gaps, enables boundary-specific speeds, and has a computationally efficient evolution scheme that is largely independent of the number of objects. Maintaining object relationships and straightforward use of object-specific and boundary-specific smoothing and advection forces enables the segmentation of objects with multiple compartments, a critical capability in the parcellation of organs in medical imaging. Comparing the new framework with previous approaches shows its superior performance and scalability. PMID:23316110

  16. Superresolution border segmentation and measurement in remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipolletti, Marina P.; Delrieux, Claudio A.; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Cintia Piccolo, M.

    2012-03-01

    Segmentation and measurement of linear characteristics in remote sensing imagery are among the first stages in several geomorphologic studies, including the length estimation of geographic features such as perimeters, coastal lines, and borders. However, unlike area measurement algorithms, widely used methods for perimeter estimation in digital images have high systematic errors. No precision improvement can be achieved with finer spatial resolution images because of the inherent geometrical inaccuracies they commit. In this work, a superresolution border segmentation and measurement algorithm is presented. The method is based on minimum distance segmentation over the initial image, followed by contour tracking using a superresolution enhancement of the marching squares algorithm. Thorough testing with synthetic and validated field images shows that this algorithm outperforms traditional border measuring methods, regardless of the image resolution or the orientation, size, and shape of the object to be analyzed.

  17. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  18. Automatic labeling and segmentation of vertebrae in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Labeling and segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image- guided interventions. State-of-the art techniques have focused either on image feature extraction or template matching for labeling of the vertebrae followed by segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi- object models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics among several anatomies. In particular, we have created models for segmentation of the lumbar spine which are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae pose+shape model and utilize it in a novel framework for labeling and segmentation of the vertebra in a CT image. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the labeling and segmentation of CT images acquired from 56 subjects. The method correctly labels all vertebrae in 70% of patients and is only one level off for the remaining 30%. The mean distance error achieved for the segmentation is 2.1 +/- 0.7 mm.

  19. An efficient neural network based method for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Nima; Ayatollahi, Ahmad; Kermani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a new neural network based method for medical image segmentation. Firstly, a modified self-organizing map (SOM) network, named moving average SOM (MA-SOM), is utilized to segment medical images. After the initial segmentation stage, a merging process is designed to connect the objects of a joint cluster together. A two-dimensional (2D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is used to build the input feature space of the network. The experimental results show that MA-SOM is robust to noise and it determines the input image pattern properly. The segmentation results of breast ultrasound images (BUS) demonstrate that there is a significant correlation between the tumor region selected by a physician and the tumor region segmented by our proposed method. In addition, the proposed method segments X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) head images much better than the incremental supervised neural network (ISNN) and SOM-based methods.

  20. An entropy-based approach to automatic image segmentation of satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Andre L.; de Arruda, G. F.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Bruno, Odemir M.; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2011-02-01

    An entropy-based image segmentation approach is introduced and applied to color images obtained from Google Earth. Segmentation refers to the process of partitioning a digital image in order to locate different objects and regions of interest. The application to satellite images paves the way to automated monitoring of ecological catastrophes, urban growth, agricultural activity, maritime pollution, climate changing and general surveillance. Regions representing aquatic, rural and urban areas are identified and the accuracy of the proposed segmentation methodology is evaluated. The comparison with gray level images revealed that the color information is fundamental to obtain an accurate segmentation.

  1. Vectorized image segmentation via trixel agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Lakshman; Skourikhine, Alexei N.

    2006-10-24

    A computer implemented method transforms an image comprised of pixels into a vectorized image specified by a plurality of polygons that can be subsequently used to aid in image processing and understanding. The pixelated image is processed to extract edge pixels that separate different colors and a constrained Delaunay triangulation of the edge pixels forms a plurality of triangles having edges that cover the pixelated image. A color for each one of the plurality of triangles is determined from the color pixels within each triangle. A filter is formed with a set of grouping rules related to features of the pixelated image and applied to the plurality of triangle edges to merge adjacent triangles consistent with the filter into polygons having a plurality of vertices. The pixelated image may be then reformed into an array of the polygons, that can be represented collectively and efficiently by standard vector image.

  2. Liver Ultrasound Image Segmentation Using Region-Difference Filters.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishant; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-12-26

    In this paper, region-difference filters for the segmentation of liver ultrasound (US) images are proposed. Region-difference filters evaluate maximum difference of the average of two regions of the window around the center pixel. Implementing the filters on the whole image gives region-difference image. This image is then converted into binary image and morphologically operated for segmenting the desired lesion from the ultrasound image. The proposed method is compared with the maximum a posteriori-Markov random field (MAP-MRF), Chan-Vese active contour method (CV-ACM), and active contour region-scalable fitting energy (RSFE) methods. MATLAB code available online for the RSFE method is used for comparison whereas MAP-MRF and CV-ACM methods are coded in MATLAB by authors. Since no comparison is available on common database for the performance of the three methods, therefore, performance comparison of the three methods and proposed method was done on liver US images obtained from PGIMER, Chandigarh, India and from online resource. A radiologist blindly analyzed segmentation results of the 4 methods implemented on 56 images and had selected the segmentation result obtained from the proposed method as best for 46 test US images. For the remaining 10 US images, the proposed method performance was very near to the other three segmentation methods. The proposed segmentation method obtained the overall accuracy of 99.32% in comparison to the overall accuracy of 85.9, 98.71, and 68.21% obtained by MAP-MRF, CV-ACM, and RSFE methods, respectively. Computational time taken by the proposed method is 5.05 s compared to the time of 26.44, 24.82, and 28.36 s taken by MAP-MRF, CV-ACM, and RSFE methods, respectively.

  3. Monochrome Image Presentation and Segmentation Based on the Pseudo-Color and PCT Transformations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    image classification and pattern recognition, and has received extensive attention in medical image such as MRI brain image segmentation [6]. FCM is...in pseudo color image segmentation, and comparisons were made using mammograph and MRI brain images. Finally, an image edge detection has also been...methods. (a) MRI T1 image; (b) MRI T2 image; (c) PCT- guided segmentation; (d) FCM -based segmentation (NK=4, NC=2). D. Edge detection in MRI image It

  4. Automatic segmentation of the striatum and globus pallidus using MIST: Multimodal Image Segmentation Tool.

    PubMed

    Visser, Eelke; Keuken, Max C; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Gaura, Veronique; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Remy, Philippe; Forstmann, Birte U; Jenkinson, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Accurate segmentation of the subcortical structures is frequently required in neuroimaging studies. Most existing methods use only a T1-weighted MRI volume to segment all supported structures and usually rely on a database of training data. We propose a new method that can use multiple image modalities simultaneously and a single reference segmentation for initialisation, without the need for a manually labelled training set. The method models intensity profiles in multiple images around the boundaries of the structure after nonlinear registration. It is trained using a set of unlabelled training data, which may be the same images that are to be segmented, and it can automatically infer the location of the physical boundary using user-specified priors. We show that the method produces high-quality segmentations of the striatum, which is clearly visible on T1-weighted scans, and the globus pallidus, which has poor contrast on such scans. The method compares favourably to existing methods, showing greater overlap with manual segmentations and better consistency.

  5. Colony image acquisition and genetic segmentation algorithm and colony analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2012-01-01

    Colony anaysis is used in a large number of engineerings such as food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing. In order to reduce laboring and increase analysis acuracy, many researchers and developers have made efforts for image analysis systems. The main problems in the systems are image acquisition, image segmentation and image analysis. In this paper, to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed. In the box, the distances between lights and dishe, camra lens and lights, and camera lens and dishe are adjusted optimally. In image segmentation, It is based on a genetic approach that allow one to consider the segmentation problem as a global optimization,. After image pre-processing and image segmentation, the colony analyses are perfomed. The colony image analysis consists of (1) basic colony parameter measurements; (2) colony size analysis; (3) colony shape analysis; and (4) colony surface measurements. All the above visual colony parameters can be selected and combined together, used to make a new engineeing parameters. The colony analysis can be applied into different applications.

  6. Laplacian forests: semantic image segmentation by guided bagging.

    PubMed

    Lombaert, Herve; Zikic, Darko; Criminisi, Antonio; Ayache, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new, efficient and accurate technique for the semantic segmentation of medical images. The paper builds upon the successful random decision forests model and improves on it by modifying the way in which randomness is injected into the tree training process. The contribution of this paper is two-fold. First, we replace the conventional bagging procedure (the uniform sampling of training images) with a guided bagging approach, which exploits the inherent structure and organization of the training image set. This allows the creation of decision trees that are specialized to a specific sub-type of images in the training set. Second, the segmentation of a previously unseen image happens via selection and application of only the trees that are relevant to the given test image. Tree selection is done automatically, via the learned image embedding, with more precisely a Laplacian eigenmap. We, therefore, call the proposed approach Laplacian Forests. We validate Laplacian Forests on a dataset of 256, manually segmented 3D CT scans of patients showing high variability in scanning protocols, resolution, body shape and anomalies. Compared with conventional decision forests, Laplacian Forests yield both higher training efficiency, due to the local analysis of the training image space, as well as higher segmentation accuracy, due to the specialization of the forest to image sub-types.

  7. Image segmentation for automated dental identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj Said, Eyad; Nassar, Diaa Eldin M.; Ammar, Hany H.

    2006-02-01

    Dental features are one of few biometric identifiers that qualify for postmortem identification; therefore, creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS) with goals and objectives similar to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) has received increased attention. As a part of ADIS, teeth segmentation from dental radiographs films is an essential step in the identification process. In this paper, we introduce a fully automated approach for teeth segmentation with goal to extract at least one tooth from the dental radiograph film. We evaluate our approach based on theoretical and empirical basis, and we compare its performance with the performance of other approaches introduced in the literature. The results show that our approach exhibits the lowest failure rate and the highest optimality among all full automated approaches introduced in the literature.

  8. Learning evaluation of ultrasound image segmentation using combined measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Mengjie; Luo, Yongkang; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-03-01

    Objective evaluation of medical image segmentation is one of the important steps for proving its validity and clinical applicability. Although there are many researches presenting segmentation methods on medical image, while with few studying the evaluation methods on their results, this paper presents a learning evaluation method with combined measures to make it as close as possible to the clinicians' judgment. This evaluation method is more quantitative and precise for the clinical diagnose. In our experiment, the same data sets include 120 segmentation results of lumen-intima boundary (LIB) and media-adventitia boundary (MAB) of carotid ultrasound images respectively. And the 15 measures of goodness method and discrepancy method are used to evaluate the different segmentation results alone. Furthermore, the experimental results showed that compared with the discrepancy method, the accuracy with the measures of goodness method is poor. Then, by combining with the measures of two methods, the average accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 2 segmentation groups are higher than 93% and 0.9 respectively. And the results of MAB are better than LIB, which proved that this novel method can effectively evaluate the segmentation results. Moreover, it lays the foundation for the non-supervised segmentation evaluation system.

  9. Image segmentation by hierarchial agglomeration of polygons using ecological statistics

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Lakshman; Swaminarayan, Sriram

    2013-04-23

    A method for rapid hierarchical image segmentation based on perceptually driven contour completion and scene statistics is disclosed. The method begins with an initial fine-scale segmentation of an image, such as obtained by perceptual completion of partial contours into polygonal regions using region-contour correspondences established by Delaunay triangulation of edge pixels as implemented in VISTA. The resulting polygons are analyzed with respect to their size and color/intensity distributions and the structural properties of their boundaries. Statistical estimates of granularity of size, similarity of color, texture, and saliency of intervening boundaries are computed and formulated into logical (Boolean) predicates. The combined satisfiability of these Boolean predicates by a pair of adjacent polygons at a given segmentation level qualifies them for merging into a larger polygon representing a coarser, larger-scale feature of the pixel image and collectively obtains the next level of polygonal segments in a hierarchy of fine-to-coarse segmentations. The iterative application of this process precipitates textured regions as polygons with highly convolved boundaries and helps distinguish them from objects which typically have more regular boundaries. The method yields a multiscale decomposition of an image into constituent features that enjoy a hierarchical relationship with features at finer and coarser scales. This provides a traversable graph structure from which feature content and context in terms of other features can be derived, aiding in automated image understanding tasks. The method disclosed is highly efficient and can be used to decompose and analyze large images.

  10. Robust Prostate Segmentation Using Intrinsic Properties of TRUS Images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Yiguang; Li, Yongzhong; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-06-01

    Accurate segmentation is usually crucial in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) image based prostate diagnosis; however, it is always hampered by heavy speckles. Contrary to the traditional view that speckles are adverse to segmentation, we exploit intrinsic properties induced by speckles to facilitate the task, based on the observations that sizes and orientations of speckles provide salient cues to determine the prostate boundary. Since the speckle orientation changes in accordance with a statistical prior rule, rotation-invariant texture feature is extracted along the orientations revealed by the rule. To address the problem of feature changes due to different speckle sizes, TRUS images are split into several arc-like strips. In each strip, every individual feature vector is sparsely represented, and representation residuals are obtained. The residuals, along with the spatial coherence inherited from biological tissues, are combined to segment the prostate preliminarily via graph cuts. After that, the segmentation is fine-tuned by a novel level sets model, which integrates (1) the prostate shape prior, (2) dark-to-light intensity transition near the prostate boundary, and (3) the texture feature just obtained. The proposed method is validated on two 2-D image datasets obtained from two different sonographic imaging systems, with the mean absolute distance on the mid gland images only 1.06±0.53 mm and 1.25±0.77 mm, respectively. The method is also extended to segment apex and base images, producing competitive results over the state of the art.

  11. A Rough Set Bounded Spatially Constrained Asymmetric Gaussian Mixture Model for Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zexuan; Huang, Yubo; Sun, Quansen; Cao, Guo; Zheng, Yuhui

    2017-01-01

    Accurate image segmentation is an important issue in image processing, where Gaussian mixture models play an important part and have been proven effective. However, most Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based methods suffer from one or more limitations, such as limited noise robustness, over-smoothness for segmentations, and lack of flexibility to fit data. In order to address these issues, in this paper, we propose a rough set bounded asymmetric Gaussian mixture model with spatial constraint for image segmentation. First, based on our previous work where each cluster is characterized by three automatically determined rough-fuzzy regions, we partition the target image into three rough regions with two adaptively computed thresholds. Second, a new bounded indicator function is proposed to determine the bounded support regions of the observed data. The bounded indicator and posterior probability of a pixel that belongs to each sub-region is estimated with respect to the rough region where the pixel lies. Third, to further reduce over-smoothness for segmentations, two novel prior factors are proposed that incorporate the spatial information among neighborhood pixels, which are constructed based on the prior and posterior probabilities of the within- and between-clusters, and considers the spatial direction. We compare our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and real images to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:28045950

  12. Automatic bone segmentation and alignment from MR knee images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Zach, Christopher; Styner, Martin; Charles, Cecil; Niethammer, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Automatic image analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee is simplified by bringing the knee into a reference position. While the knee is typically put into a reference position during image acquisition, this alignment will generally not be perfect. To correct for imperfections, we propose a two-step process of bone segmentation followed by elastic tissue deformation. The approach makes use of a fully-automatic segmentation of femur and tibia from T1 and T2* images. The segmentation algorithm is based on a continuous convex optimization problem, incorporating regional, and shape information. The regional terms are included from a probabilistic viewpoint, which readily allows the inclusion of shape information. Segmentation of the outer boundary of the cortical bone is encouraged by adding simple appearance-based information to the optimization problem. The resulting segmentation without the shape alignment step is globally optimal. Standard registration is problematic for knee alignment due to the distinct physical properties of the tissues constituting the knee (bone, muscle, etc.). We therefore develop an alternative alignment approach based on a simple elastic deformation model combined with strict enforcement of similarity transforms for femur and tibia based on the obtained segmentations.

  13. Segmentation of MR Image Based on Maximum A Posterior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The application of competitive Hopfield neural network to medical image segmentation,” IEEE Trans. Med. Imag., vol.15, no.4, pp.560-567, 1996 [11...found in many literatures recently. Various techniques have been adopted, including fuzzy [9], neural networks , genetic methods [10][11], statistical

  14. Weakly supervised histopathology cancer image segmentation and classification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-Yan; Chang, Eric I-Chao; Lai, Maode; Tu, Zhuowen

    2014-04-01

    Labeling a histopathology image as having cancerous regions or not is a critical task in cancer diagnosis; it is also clinically important to segment the cancer tissues and cluster them into various classes. Existing supervised approaches for image classification and segmentation require detailed manual annotations for the cancer pixels, which are time-consuming to obtain. In this paper, we propose a new learning method, multiple clustered instance learning (MCIL) (along the line of weakly supervised learning) for histopathology image segmentation. The proposed MCIL method simultaneously performs image-level classification (cancer vs. non-cancer image), medical image segmentation (cancer vs. non-cancer tissue), and patch-level clustering (different classes). We embed the clustering concept into the multiple instance learning (MIL) setting and derive a principled solution to performing the above three tasks in an integrated framework. In addition, we introduce contextual constraints as a prior for MCIL, which further reduces the ambiguity in MIL. Experimental results on histopathology colon cancer images and cytology images demonstrate the great advantage of MCIL over the competing methods.

  15. A watershed approach for improving medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zanaty, E A; Afifi, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel watershed approach based on seed region growing and image entropy is presented which could improve the medical image segmentation. The proposed algorithm enables the prior information of seed region growing and image entropy in its calculation. The algorithm starts by partitioning the image into several levels of intensity using watershed multi-degree immersion process. The levels of intensity are the input to a computationally efficient seed region segmentation process which produces the initial partitioning of the image regions. These regions are fed to entropy procedure to carry out a suitable merging which produces the final segmentation. The latter process uses a region-based similarity representation of the image regions to decide whether regions can be merged. The region is isolated from the level and the residual pixels are uploaded to the next level and so on, we recall this process as multi-level process and the watershed is called multi-level watershed. The proposed algorithm is applied to challenging applications: grey matter-white matter segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The established methods and the proposed approach are experimented by these applications to a variety of simulating immersion, multi-degree, multi-level seed region growing and multi-level seed region growing with entropy. It is shown that the proposed method achieves more accurate results for medical image oversegmentation.

  16. Infrared digital imaging of the equine anterior segment.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Richard J; Clode, Alison B; Gilger, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    Ocular photographs are an increasingly important method of documenting lesions for inclusion in medical records, teaching purposes, and research. Availability of affordable high-quality digital imaging equipment has allowed for enhanced capture of desired images because of immediate on-camera viewing and editing. Conversion of the standard digital camera sensor to one that is sensitive to infrared light (i.e. > 760 nm < 1 mm wavelength) can be done inexpensively. In the equine eye, advantages of infrared digital photography include increased contrast of anterior segment images, identification and monitoring of pigmentary changes, and increased visualization of the anterior segment through a cloudy or edematous cornea.

  17. Interactive image segmentation by constrained spectral graph partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; He, Jin; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Zhanhua

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposed an interactive image segmentation algorithm that can tolerate slightly incorrect user constraints. Interactive image segmentation was formulated as a constrained spectral graph partitioning problem. Furthermore, it was proven to equal to a supervised classification problem, where the feature space was formed by rows of the eigenvector matrix that was computed by spectral graph analysis. ν-SVM (support vector machine) was preferred as the classifier. Some incorrect labels in user constraints were tolerated by being identified as margin errors in ν-SVM. Comparison with other algorithms on real color images was reported.

  18. Segmentation and artifact removal in microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Nan, Hao; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Arbabian, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the soft-tissue dielectric contrast of microwave excitation with the resolution of ultrasound for the goal of a safe, high resolution, and possibly portable imaging technique. However, the hybrid nature of this method introduces new image-reconstruction challenges in enabling sufficient accuracy and segmentation. In this paper, we propose a segmentation technique based on the polarity characteristic of TA signals. A wavelet analysis based method is proposed to identify reflection artifacts as well. The time-frequency feature of the signal is used to assist differentiating artifacts. Ex vivo verification with experimental data is also provided.

  19. A flexible image segmentation prior to parametric estimation.

    PubMed

    Bentourkia, M

    2001-01-01

    A flexible method based on spatial and temporal pixel variance to compute parametric images in positron emission tomography (PET) is reported. For [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [(15)O]water brain studies, images were segmented based on coefficients of variation and correlation coefficients of neighboring pixels, and kinetic parameters were estimated by dynamic (DYN) and autoradiographic (ARG) fitting. For comparison, regional glucose metabolism (rCMRGlc) and blood flow (rCBF) in both DYN and ARG were estimated from segmented and usual images. The maximal relative error was found to be 4, 10 and 17% for ARG and DYN rCMRGlc and DYN rCBF, respectively.

  20. The use of the Kalman filter in the automated segmentation of EIT lung images.

    PubMed

    Zifan, A; Liatsis, P; Chapman, B E

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new pipeline for the fast and accurate segmentation of impedance images of the lungs using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). EIT is an emerging, promising, non-invasive imaging modality that produces real-time, low spatial but high temporal resolution images of impedance inside a body. Recovering impedance itself constitutes a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem, therefore the problem is usually linearized, which produces impedance-change images, rather than static impedance ones. Such images are highly blurry and fuzzy along object boundaries. We provide a mathematical reasoning behind the high suitability of the Kalman filter when it comes to segmenting and tracking conductivity changes in EIT lung images. Next, we use a two-fold approach to tackle the segmentation problem. First, we construct a global lung shape to restrict the search region of the Kalman filter. Next, we proceed with augmenting the Kalman filter by incorporating an adaptive foreground detection system to provide the boundary contours for the Kalman filter to carry out the tracking of the conductivity changes as the lungs undergo deformation in a respiratory cycle. The proposed method has been validated by using performance statistics such as misclassified area, and false positive rate, and compared to previous approaches. The results show that the proposed automated method can be a fast and reliable segmentation tool for EIT imaging.

  1. Segmentation of Concealed Objects in Passive Millimeter-Wave Images Based on the Gaussian Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wangyang; Chen, Xiangguang; Wu, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Passive millimeter wave (PMMW) imaging has become one of the most effective means to detect the objects concealed under clothing. Due to the limitations of the available hardware and the inherent physical properties of PMMW imaging systems, images often exhibit poor contrast and low signal-to-noise ratios. Thus, it is difficult to achieve ideal results by using a general segmentation algorithm. In this paper, an advanced Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) algorithm for the segmentation of concealed objects in PMMW images is presented. Our work is concerned with the fact that the GMM is a parametric statistical model, which is often used to characterize the statistical behavior of images. Our approach is three-fold: First, we remove the noise from the image using both a notch reject filter and a total variation filter. Next, we use an adaptive parameter initialization GMM algorithm (APIGMM) for simulating the histogram of images. The APIGMM provides an initial number of Gaussian components and start with more appropriate parameter. Bayesian decision is employed to separate the pixels of concealed objects from other areas. At last, the confidence interval (CI) method, alongside local gradient information, is used to extract the concealed objects. The proposed hybrid segmentation approach detects the concealed objects more accurately, even compared to two other state-of-the-art segmentation methods.

  2. Bacterial foraging based edge detection for cell image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongsheng; Zhou, Tao; Xia, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection is the most popular and common choices for cell image segmentation, in which local searching strategies are commonly used. In spite of their computational efficiency, traditional edge detectors, however, may either produce discontinued edges or rely heavily on initializations. In this paper, we propose a bacterial foraging based edge detection (BFED) algorithm for cell image segmentation. We model the gradients of intensities as the nutrient concentration and propel bacteria to forage along nutrient-rich locations via mimicking the behavior of Escherichia coli, including the chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction, elimination and dispersal. As a nature-inspired evolutionary technique, this algorithm can identify the desired edges and mark them as the tracks of bacteria. We have evaluated the proposed algorithm against the Canny, SUSAN, Verma's and an active contour model (ACM) based edge detectors on both synthetic and real cell images. Our results suggest that the BFED algorithm can identify boundaries more effectively and provide more accurate cell image segmentation.

  3. Automated segmentation of breast lesions in ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Huo, Zhimin; Zhang, Jiwu

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women. As a convenient and safe diagnosis method, ultrasound is most commonly used second to mammography for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Here we proposed an automatic method to segment lesions in ultrasound images. The images are first filtered with anisotropic diffusion algorithm to remove speckle noise. The edge is enhanced to emphasize the lesion regions. Normalized cut is a graph theoretic that admits combination of different features for image segmentation, and has been successfully used in object parsing and grouping. In this paper we combine normalized cut with region merging method for the segmentation. The merging criteria are derived from the empirical rules used by radiologists when they interpret breast images. In the performance evaluation, we compared the computer-detected lesion boundaries with manually delineated borders. The experimental results show that the algorithm has efficient and robust performance for different kinds of lesions.

  4. Shape-based interactive three-dimensional medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1997-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation continues to be one of the biggest challenges in medical image analysis. Simple, low- level vision techniques have had limited success in this domain because of the visual complexity of medical images. This paper presents a 3-D shape model that uses prior knowledge of an object's structure to guide the search for its boundaries. The shape model has been incorporated into scanner, an interactive software package for image segmentation. We describe a graphical user interface that was developed for finding the surface of the brain and explain how the 3-D model assists with the segmentation process. Preliminary experiments show that with this shape- based approach, a low-resolution boundary for a surface can be found with two-thirds less work for the user than with a comparable manual method.

  5. Dynamic Programming Based Segmentation in Biomedical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ungru, Kathrin; Jiang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Many applications in biomedical imaging have a demand on automatic detection of lines, contours, or boundaries of bones, organs, vessels, and cells. Aim is to support expert decisions in interactive applications or to include it as part of a processing pipeline for automatic image analysis. Biomedical images often suffer from noisy data and fuzzy edges. Therefore, there is a need for robust methods for contour and line detection. Dynamic programming is a popular technique that satisfies these requirements in many ways. This work gives a brief overview over approaches and applications that utilize dynamic programming to solve problems in the challenging field of biomedical imaging.

  6. A location-to-segmentation strategy for automatic exudate segmentation in colour retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zou, Beiji; Chen, Jie; Ke, Wei; Yue, Kejuan; Chen, Zailiang; Zhao, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    The automatic exudate segmentation in colour retinal fundus images is an important task in computer aided diagnosis and screening systems for diabetic retinopathy. In this paper, we present a location-to-segmentation strategy for automatic exudate segmentation in colour retinal fundus images, which includes three stages: anatomic structure removal, exudate location and exudate segmentation. In anatomic structure removal stage, matched filters based main vessels segmentation method and a saliency based optic disk segmentation method are proposed. The main vessel and optic disk are then removed to eliminate the adverse affects that they bring to the second stage. In the location stage, we learn a random forest classifier to classify patches into two classes: exudate patches and exudate-free patches, in which the histograms of completed local binary patterns are extracted to describe the texture structures of the patches. Finally, the local variance, the size prior about the exudate regions and the local contrast prior are used to segment the exudate regions out from patches which are classified as exudate patches in the location stage. We evaluate our method both at exudate-level and image-level. For exudate-level evaluation, we test our method on e-ophtha EX dataset, which provides pixel level annotation from the specialists. The experimental results show that our method achieves 76% in sensitivity and 75% in positive prediction value (PPV), which both outperform the state of the art methods significantly. For image-level evaluation, we test our method on DiaRetDB1, and achieve competitive performance compared to the state of the art methods.

  7. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  8. From MIP image to MRA segmentation using fuzzy set theory.

    PubMed

    Vermandel, Maximilien; Betrouni, Nacim; Taschner, Christian; Vasseur, Christian; Rousseau, Jean

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a semi-automatic method of segmentation in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). This method, based on fuzzy set theory, uses the information (gray levels) contained in the maximum intensity projection (MIP) image to segment the 3D vascular structure from slices. Tests have been carried out on vascular phantom and on clinical MRA images. This 3D segmentation method has proved to be satisfactory for the detection of vascular structures even for very complex shapes. Finally, this MIP-based approach is semi-automatic and produces a robust segmentation thanks to the contrast-to-noise ratio and to the slice profile which are taken into account to determine the membership of a voxel to the vascular structure.

  9. Sparse representation-based spectral clustering for SAR image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Wei, Zhengli; Feng, Jie; Jiao, Licheng

    2011-12-01

    A new method, sparse representation based spectral clustering (SC) with Nyström method, is proposed for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation. Different from the conventional SC, this proposed technique is developed by using the sparse coefficients which obtained by solving l1 minimization problem to construct the affinity matrix and the Nyström method is applied to alleviate the segmentation process. The advantage of our proposed method is that we do not need to select the scaling parameter in the Gaussian kernel function artificially. We apply the proposed method, k-means and the classic spectral clustering algorithm with Nyström method to SAR image segmentation. The results show that compared with the other two methods, the proposed method can obtain much better segmentation results.

  10. Locally adaptive bilateral clustering for universal image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, K. K. V.; Mat Isa, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel and efficient locally adaptive denoising method based on clustering of pixels into regions of similar geometric and radiometric structures. Clustering is performed by adaptively segmenting pixels in the local kernel based on their augmented variational series. Then, noise pixels are restored by selectively considering the radiometric and spatial properties of every pixel in the formed clusters. The proposed method is exceedingly robust in conveying reliable local structural information even in the presence of noise. As a result, the proposed method substantially outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of image restoration and computational cost. We support our claims with ample simulated and real data experiments. The relatively fast runtime from extensive simulations also suggests that the proposed method is suitable for a variety of image-based products — either embedded in image capturing devices or applied as image enhancement software.

  11. MASCG: Multi-Atlas Segmentation Constrained Graph method for accurate segmentation of hip CT images.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Bai, Junjie; Wu, Xiaodong; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the issue of fully automatic segmentation of a hip CT image with the goal to preserve the joint structure for clinical applications in hip disease diagnosis and treatment. For this purpose, we propose a Multi-Atlas Segmentation Constrained Graph (MASCG) method. The MASCG method uses multi-atlas based mesh fusion results to initialize a bone sheetness based multi-label graph cut for an accurate hip CT segmentation which has the inherent advantage of automatic separation of the pelvic region from the bilateral proximal femoral regions. We then introduce a graph cut constrained graph search algorithm to further improve the segmentation accuracy around the bilateral hip joint regions. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth, we evaluated the present approach on 30 hip CT images (60 hips) with a 15-fold cross validation. When the present approach was compared to manual segmentation, an average surface distance error of 0.30 mm, 0.29 mm, and 0.30 mm was found for the pelvis, the left proximal femur, and the right proximal femur, respectively. A further look at the bilateral hip joint regions demonstrated an average surface distance error of 0.16 mm, 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for the acetabulum, the left femoral head, and the right femoral head, respectively.

  12. Segmentation Based Fuzzy Classification of High Resolution Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mukund; Rao, Suryaprakash; Masser, Ian; Kasturirangan, K.

    Information extraction from satellite images is the process of delineation of entities in the image which pertain to some feature on the earth and to which on associating an attribute, a classification of the image is obtained. Classification is a common technique to extract information from remote sensing data and, by and large, the common classification techniques mainly exploit the spectral characteristics of remote sensing images and attempt to detect patterns in spectral information to classify images. These are based on a per-pixel analysis of the spectral information, "clustering" or "grouping" of pixels is done to generate meaningful thematic information. Most of the classification techniques apply statistical pattern recognition of image spectral vectors to "label" each pixel with appropriate class information from a set of training information. On the other hand, Segmentation is not new, but it is yet seldom used in image processing of remotely sensed data. Although there has been a lot of development in segmentation of grey tone images in this field and other fields, like robotic vision, there has been little progress in segmentation of colour or multi-band imagery. Especially within the last two years many new segmentation algorithms as well as applications were developed, but not all of them lead to qualitatively convincing results while being robust and operational. One reason is that the segmentation of an image into a given number of regions is a problem with a huge number of possible solutions. Newer algorithms based on fractal approach could eventually revolutionize image processing of remotely sensed data. The paper looks at applying spatial concepts to image processing, paving the way to algorithmically formulate some more advanced aspects of cognition and inference. In GIS-based spatial analysis, vector-based tools already have been able to support advanced tasks generating new knowledge. By identifying objects (as segmentation results) from

  13. Breast image pre-processing for mammographic tissue segmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Wenda; Hogg, Peter; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R E; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2015-12-01

    During mammographic image acquisition, a compression paddle is used to even the breast thickness in order to obtain optimal image quality. Clinical observation has indicated that some mammograms may exhibit abrupt intensity change and low visibility of tissue structures in the breast peripheral areas. Such appearance discrepancies can affect image interpretation and may not be desirable for computer aided mammography, leading to incorrect diagnosis and/or detection which can have a negative impact on sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography. This paper describes a novel mammographic image pre-processing method to improve image quality for analysis. An image selection process is incorporated to better target problematic images. The processed images show improved mammographic appearances not only in the breast periphery but also across the mammograms. Mammographic segmentation and risk/density classification were performed to facilitate a quantitative and qualitative evaluation. When using the processed images, the results indicated more anatomically correct segmentation in tissue specific areas, and subsequently better classification accuracies were achieved. Visual assessments were conducted in a clinical environment to determine the quality of the processed images and the resultant segmentation. The developed method has shown promising results. It is expected to be useful in early breast cancer detection, risk-stratified screening, and aiding radiologists in the process of decision making prior to surgery and/or treatment.

  14. A simple shape prior model for iris image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Daniel A.; Yezzi, Anthony, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    In order to make biometric systems faster and more user-friendly, lower-quality images must be accepted. A major hurdle in this task is accurate segmentation of the boundaries of the iris in these images. Quite commonly, circle-fitting is used to approximate the boundaries of the inner (pupil) and outer (limbic) boundaries of the iris, but this assumption does not hold for off-axis or otherwise non-circular boundaries. In this paper we present a novel, foundational method for elliptical segmentation of off-axis iris images. This method uses active contours with constrained flow to achieve a simplified form of shape prior active contours. This is done by calculating a region-based contour evolution and projecting it upon a properly chosen set of vectors to confine it to a class of shapes. In this case, that class of shapes is ellipses. This serves to regularize the contour, simplifying the curve evolution and preventing the development of irregularities that present challenges in iris segmentation. The proposed method is tested using images from the UBIRIS v.1 and CASIA-IrisV3 image data sets, with both near-ideal and off-axis images. Additional testing has been performed using the WVU Off Axis/Angle Iris Dataset, Release 1. By avoiding many of the assumptions commonly used in iris segmentation methods, the proposed method is able to accurately fit elliptical boundaries to off-axis images.

  15. Dynamic Programming Using Polar Variance for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Toro, Jose A; Altbach, Maria I; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J

    2016-10-06

    When using polar dynamic programming (PDP) for image segmentation, the object size is one of the main features used. This is because if size is left unconstrained the final segmentation may include high-gradient regions that are not associated with the object. In this paper, we propose a new feature, polar variance, which allows the algorithm to segment objects of different sizes without the need for training data. The polar variance is the variance in a polar region between a user-selected origin and a pixel we want to analyze. We also incorporate a new technique that allows PDP to segment complex shapes by finding low-gradient regions and growing them. The experimental analysis consisted on comparing our technique with different active contour segmentation techniques on a series of tests. The tests consisted on robustness to additive Gaussian noise, segmentation accuracy with different grayscale images and finally robustness to algorithm-specific parameters. Experimental results show that our technique performs favorably when compared to other segmentation techniques.

  16. Interactive Image Segmentation Framework Based On Control Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-02-21

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design and analyze an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  17. Interactive image segmentation framework based on control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Ratner, Vadim; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  18. Medical image segmentation on GPUs--a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Falch, Thomas L; Bozorgi, Mohammadmehdi; Elster, Anne C; Lindseth, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures, from modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound, is a key enabling technology for medical applications such as diagnostics, planning and guidance. More efficient implementations are necessary, as most segmentation methods are computationally expensive, and the amount of medical imaging data is growing. The increased programmability of graphic processing units (GPUs) in recent years have enabled their use in several areas. GPUs can solve large data parallel problems at a higher speed than the traditional CPU, while being more affordable and energy efficient than distributed systems. Furthermore, using a GPU enables concurrent visualization and interactive segmentation, where the user can help the algorithm to achieve a satisfactory result. This review investigates the use of GPUs to accelerate medical image segmentation methods. A set of criteria for efficient use of GPUs are defined and each segmentation method is rated accordingly. In addition, references to relevant GPU implementations and insight into GPU optimization are provided and discussed. The review concludes that most segmentation methods may benefit from GPU processing due to the methods' data parallel structure and high thread count. However, factors such as synchronization, branch divergence and memory usage can limit the speedup.

  19. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saris, Anne E. C. M.; Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2013-03-01

    Automated segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images in patients with congenital heart disease is challenging, because the boundary between blood and cardiac tissue is poorly defined in some regions. Cardiologists mentally incorporate movement of the heart, using temporal coherence of structures to resolve ambiguities. Therefore, we investigated the merit of temporal cross-correlation for automated segmentation over the entire cardiac cycle. Optimal settings for maximum cross-correlation (MCC) calculation, based on a 3D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm, were determined to obtain the best contrast between blood and myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Resulting envelope-based as well as RF-based MCC values were used as additional external force in a deformable model approach, to segment the left-ventricular cavity in entire systolic phase. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data. Segmentation results were compared with manually segmented volumes using a 3D Dice Similarity Index (3DSI). Results in 3D pediatric echocardiographic images sequences (n = 4) demonstrate that incorporation of temporal information improves segmentation. The use of MCC values, either alone or in combination with adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data, resulted in an increase of the 3DSI in 75% of the cases (average 3DSI increase: 0.71 to 0.82). Results might be further improved by optimizing MCC-contrast locally, in regions with low blood-tissue contrast. Reducing underestimation of the endocardial volume due to MCC processing scheme (choice of window size) and consequential border-misalignment, could also lead to more accurate segmentations. Furthermore, increasing the frame rate will also increase MCC-contrast and thus improve segmentation.

  20. Methods for 2-D and 3-D Endobronchial Ultrasound Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Gilbert, Christopher; Toth, Jennifer; Higgins, William

    2016-07-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now commonly used for cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, EBUS is challenging to use and interpreting EBUS video sequences is difficult. Other ultrasound imaging domains, hampered by related difficulties, have benefited from computer-based image-segmentation methods. Yet, so far, no such methods have been proposed for EBUS. We propose image-segmentation methods for 2-D EBUS frames and 3-D EBUS sequences. Our 2-D method adapts the fast-marching level-set process, anisotropic diffusion, and region growing to the problem of segmenting 2-D EBUS frames. Our 3-D method builds upon the 2-D method while also incorporating the geodesic level-set process for segmenting EBUS sequences. Tests with lung-cancer patient data showed that the methods ran fully automatically for nearly 80% of test cases. For the remaining cases, the only user-interaction required was the selection of a seed point. When compared to ground-truth segmentations, the 2-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 90.0% ±4.9%, while the 3-D method achieved an overall Dice index = 83.9 ± 6.0%. In addition, the computation time (2-D, 0.070 s/frame; 3-D, 0.088 s/frame) was two orders of magnitude faster than interactive contour definition. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the methods for EBUS localization in a multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy system.

  1. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  2. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  3. Classifying and segmenting microscopy images with deep multiple instance learning

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Oren Z.; Ba, Jimmy Lei; Frey, Brendan J.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: High-content screening (HCS) technologies have enabled large scale imaging experiments for studying cell biology and for drug screening. These systems produce hundreds of thousands of microscopy images per day and their utility depends on automated image analysis. Recently, deep learning approaches that learn feature representations directly from pixel intensity values have dominated object recognition challenges. These tasks typically have a single centered object per image and existing models are not directly applicable to microscopy datasets. Here we develop an approach that combines deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) with multiple instance learning (MIL) in order to classify and segment microscopy images using only whole image level annotations. Results: We introduce a new neural network architecture that uses MIL to simultaneously classify and segment microscopy images with populations of cells. We base our approach on the similarity between the aggregation function used in MIL and pooling layers used in CNNs. To facilitate aggregating across large numbers of instances in CNN feature maps we present the Noisy-AND pooling function, a new MIL operator that is robust to outliers. Combining CNNs with MIL enables training CNNs using whole microscopy images with image level labels. We show that training end-to-end MIL CNNs outperforms several previous methods on both mammalian and yeast datasets without requiring any segmentation steps. Availability and implementation: Torch7 implementation available upon request. Contact: oren.kraus@mail.utoronto.ca PMID:27307644

  4. Bladder segmentation in MR images with watershed segmentation and graph cut algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaffert, Thomas; Renisch, Steffen; Schadewaldt, Nicole; Schulz, Heinrich; Wiemker, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Prostate and cervix cancer diagnosis and treatment planning that is based on MR images benefit from superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT images. For these images an automatic delineation of the prostate or cervix and the organs at risk such as the bladder is highly desirable. This paper describes a method for bladder segmentation that is based on a watershed transform on high image gradient values and gray value valleys together with the classification of watershed regions into bladder contents and tissue by a graph cut algorithm. The obtained results are superior if compared to a simple region-after-region classification.

  5. Sub-Markov Random Walk for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xingping; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling; Van Gool, Luc

    2016-02-01

    A novel sub-Markov random walk (subRW) algorithm with label prior is proposed for seeded image segmentation, which can be interpreted as a traditional random walker on a graph with added auxiliary nodes. Under this explanation, we unify the proposed subRW and other popular random walk (RW) algorithms. This unifying view will make it possible for transferring intrinsic findings between different RW algorithms, and offer new ideas for designing novel RW algorithms by adding or changing auxiliary nodes. To verify the second benefit, we design a new subRW algorithm with label prior to solve the segmentation problem of objects with thin and elongated parts. The experimental results on both synthetic and natural images with twigs demonstrate that the proposed subRW method outperforms previous RW algorithms for seeded image segmentation.

  6. Segmentation of the mouse hippocampal formation in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kay; Watson, Charles; Buckley, Rachel F; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Keller, Marianne D; Beare, Richard; Bartlett, Perry F; Egan, Gary F; Galloway, Graham J; Paxinos, George; Petrou, Steven; Reutens, David C

    2011-10-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in cognition, spatial navigation, learning, and memory. High resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging makes it possible to study in vivo changes in the hippocampus over time and is useful for comparing hippocampal volume and structure in wild type and mutant mice. Such comparisons demand a reliable way to segment the hippocampal formation. We have developed a method for the systematic segmentation of the hippocampal formation using the perfusion-fixed C57BL/6 mouse brain for application in longitudinal and comparative studies. Our aim was to develop a guide for segmenting over 40 structures in an adult mouse brain using 30 μm isotropic resolution images acquired with a 16.4 T MR imaging system and combined using super-resolution reconstruction.

  7. Anterior Segment Imaging in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Gargi K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anterior segment imaging have transformed the way ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) is diagnosed and monitored. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) has been reported to be useful primarily in the assessment of intraocular invasion and metastasis. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) shows enlarged and irregular nuclei with hyperreflective cells in OSSN lesions and this has been found to correlate with histopathology findings. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) demonstrates thickened hyperreflective epithelium with an abrupt transition between abnormal and normal epithelium in OSSN lesions and this has also been shown to mimic histopathology findings. Although there are limitations to each of these imaging modalities, they can be useful adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of OSSN and could greatly assist the clinician in the management of OSSN patients. Nevertheless, anterior segment imaging has not replaced histopathology's role as the gold standard in confirming diagnosis. PMID:27800176

  8. Image Segmentation of Historical Handwriting from Palm Leaf Manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surinta, Olarik; Chamchong, Rapeeporn

    Palm leaf manuscripts were one of the earliest forms of written media and were used in Southeast Asia to store early written knowledge about subjects such as medicine, Buddhist doctrine and astrology. Therefore, historical handwritten palm leaf manuscripts are important for people who like to learn about historical documents, because we can learn more experience from them. This paper presents an image segmentation of historical handwriting from palm leaf manuscripts. The process is composed of three steps: 1) background elimination to separate text and background by Otsu's algorithm 2) line segmentation and 3) character segmentation by histogram of image. The end result is the character's image. The results from this research may be applied to optical character recognition (OCR) in the future.

  9. Novel technique in the segmentation of magnetic resonance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwok-Leung

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation, automatic image segmentation is carried out on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A novel technique based on the maximum minimum measure is devised. The measure is improved by combining the smoothing and counting processes, and then normalizing the number of maximum and minimum positions over the region of interest (ROI). Two parameters (MM_H and MM_V) are generated and used for the segmentation. The technique is tested on some brain MRIs of a human male from the Visible Human Project of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the maximum minimum measure can provide effective parameters for human tissue characterization and image segmentation with an added advantage of faster computation.

  10. An efficient two-objective automatic SAR image segmentation framework using artificial immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongdong; Niu, Ruican; Fei, Rong; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye; Cao, Zijian

    2015-12-01

    Here, an efficient multi-objective automatic segmentation framework (MASF) is formulated and applied to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image unsupervised classification. In the framework, three important issues are presented: 1) two reasonable image preprocessing techniques, including spatial filtering and watershed operator, are discussed at the initial stage of the framework; 2)then, an efficient immune multi-objective optimization algorithm with uniform clone, adaptive selection by online nondominated solutions, and dynamic deletion in diversity maintenance is proposed; 3 two very simple, but very efficient conflicting clustering validity indices are incorporated into the framework and simultaneously optimized. Two simulated SAR data and two complicated real images are used to quantitatively validate its effectiveness. In addition, four other state-of-the-art image segmentation methods are employed for comparison.

  11. Texture descriptor approaches to level set segmentation in medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olveres, Jimena; Nava, Rodrigo; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Brieva, Jorge; Cristóbal, Gabriel; Vallejo, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    Medical image analysis has become an important tool for improving medical diagnosis and planning treatments. It involves volume or still image segmentation that plays a critical role in understanding image content by facilitating extraction of the anatomical organ or region-of-interest. It also may help towards the construction of reliable computer-aided diagnosis systems. Specifically, level set methods have emerged as a general framework for image segmentation; such methods are mainly based on gradient information and provide satisfactory results. However, the noise inherent to images and the lack of contrast information between adjacent regions hamper the performance of the algorithms, thus, others proposals have been suggested in the literature. For instance, characterization of regions as statistical parametric models to handle level set evolution. In this paper, we study the influence of texture on a level-set-based segmentation and propose the use of Hermite features that are incorporated into the level set model to improve organ segmentation that may be useful for quantifying left ventricular blood flow. The proposal was also compared against other texture descriptors such as local binary patterns, Image derivatives, and Hounsfield low attenuation values.

  12. SAR image segmentation using MSER and improved spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Yang; Zhang, Xiaohu; Shang, Yang

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach is presented for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation. By incorporating the advantages of maximally stable extremal regions (MSER) algorithm and spectral clustering (SC) method, the proposed approach provides effective and robust segmentation. First, the input image is transformed from a pixel-based to a region-based model by using the MSER algorithm. The input image after MSER procedure is composed of some disjoint regions. Then the regions are treated as nodes in the image plane, and a graph structure is applied to represent them. Finally, the improved SC is used to perform globally optimal clustering, by which the result of image segmentation can be generated. To avoid some incorrect partitioning when considering each region as one graph node, we assign different numbers of nodes to represent the regions according to area ratios among the regions. In addition, K-harmonic means instead of K-means is applied in the improved SC procedure in order to raise its stability and performance. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective on SAR image segmentation and has the advantage of calculating quickly.

  13. Refinement of ground reference data with segmented image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jon W.; Tilton, James C.

    1991-01-01

    One of the ways to determine ground reference data (GRD) for satellite remote sensing data is to photo-interpret low altitude aerial photographs and then digitize the cover types on a digitized tablet and register them to 7.5 minute U.S.G.S. maps (that were themselves digitized). The resulting GRD can be registered to the satellite image or, vice versa. Unfortunately, there are many opportunities for error when using digitizing tablet and the resolution of the edges for the GRD depends on the spacing of the points selected on the digitizing tablet. One of the consequences of this is that when overlaid on the image, errors and missed detail in the GRD become evident. An approach is discussed for correcting these errors and adding detail to the GRD through the use of a highly interactive, visually oriented process. This process involves the use of overlaid visual displays of the satellite image data, the GRD, and a segmentation of the satellite image data. Several prototype programs were implemented which provide means of taking a segmented image and using the edges from the reference data to mask out these segment edges that are beyond a certain distance from the reference data edges. Then using the reference data edges as a guide, those segment edges that remain and that are judged not to be image versions of the reference edges are manually marked and removed. The prototype programs that were developed and the algorithmic refinements that facilitate execution of this task are described.

  14. Residual Deconvolutional Networks for Brain Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, Ahmed; Zeng, Tao; Ji, Shuiwang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of anatomical connections between neurons in the brain using electron microscopy (EM) images is considered to be the gold standard for circuit mapping. A key step in obtaining the reconstruction is the ability to automatically segment neurons with a precision close to human-level performance. Despite the recent technical advances in EM image segmentation, most of them rely on hand-crafted features to some extent that are specific to the data, limiting their ability to generalize. Here, we propose a simple yet powerful technique for EM image segmentation that is trained end-to-end and does not rely on prior knowledge of the data. Our proposed residual deconvolutional network consists of two information pathways that capture full-resolution features and contextual information, respectively. We showed that the proposed model is very effective in achieving the conflicting goals in dense output prediction; namely preserving full-resolution predictions and including sufficient contextual information. We applied our method to the ongoing open challenge of 3D neurite segmentation in EM images. Our method achieved one of the top results on this open challenge. We demonstrated the generality of our technique by evaluating it on the 2D neurite segmentation challenge dataset where consistently high performance was obtained. We thus expect our method to generalize well to other dense output prediction problems.

  15. A dendritic lattice neural network for color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Lara-Rodríguez, Luis David; López-Meléndez, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    A two-layer dendritic lattice neural network is proposed to segment color images in the Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color space. The two layer neural network is a fully interconnected feed forward net consisting of an input layer that receives color pixel values, an intermediate layer that computes pixel interdistances, and an output layer used to classify colors by hetero-association. The two-layer net is first initialized with a finite small subset of the colors present in the input image. These colors are obtained by means of an automatic clustering procedure such as k-means or fuzzy c-means. In the second stage, the color image is scanned on a pixel by pixel basis where each picture element is treated as a vector and feeded into the network. For illustration purposes we use public domain color images to show the performance of our proposed image segmentation technique.

  16. Optimal feature extraction for segmentation of Diesel spray images.

    PubMed

    Payri, Francisco; Pastor, José V; Palomares, Alberto; Juliá, J Enrique

    2004-04-01

    A one-dimensional simplification, based on optimal feature extraction, of the algorithm based on the likelihood-ratio test method (LRT) for segmentation in colored Diesel spray images is presented. If the pixel values of the Diesel spray and the combustion images are represented in RGB space, in most cases they are distributed in an area with a given so-called privileged direction. It is demonstrated that this direction permits optimal feature extraction for one-dimensional segmentation in the Diesel spray images, and some of its advantages compared with more-conventional one-dimensional simplification methods, including considerably reduced computational cost while accuracy is maintained within more than reasonable limits, are presented. The method has been successfully applied to images of Diesel sprays injected at room temperature as well as to images of sprays with evaporation and combustion. It has proved to be valid for several cameras and experimental arrangements.

  17. Image mosaicking using SURF features of line segments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel image mosaicking method that is based on Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) of line segments, aiming to achieve robustness to incident scaling, rotation, change in illumination, and significant affine distortion between images in a panoramic series. Our method involves 1) using a SURF detection operator to locate feature points; 2) rough matching using SURF features of directed line segments constructed via the feature points; and 3) eliminating incorrectly matched pairs using RANSAC (RANdom SAmple Consensus). Experimental results confirm that our method results in high-quality panoramic mosaics that are superior to state-of-the-art methods. PMID:28296919

  18. Semi-Huber potential function for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Osvaldo; de la Rosa, Ismael; Villa, Jesús; González, Efrén; Escalante, Nivia

    2012-03-12

    In this work, a novel model of Markov Random Field (MRF) is introduced. Such a model is based on a proposed Semi-Huber potential function and it is applied successfully to image segmentation in presence of noise. The main difference with respect to other half-quadratic models that have been taken as a reference is, that the number of parameters to be tuned in the proposed model is smaller and simpler. The idea is then, to choose adequate parameter values heuristically for a good segmentation of the image. In that sense, some experimental results show that the proposed model allows an easier parameter adjustment with reasonable computation times.

  19. Segmentation of virus particle candidates in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kylberg, G; Uppström, M; Hedlund, K-O; Borgefors, G; Sintorn, I-M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation method that detects virus particles of various shapes in transmission electron microscopy images. The method is based on a statistical analysis of local neighbourhoods of all the pixels in the image followed by an object width discrimination and finally, for elongated objects, a border refinement step. It requires only one input parameter, the approximate width of the virus particles searched for. The proposed method is evaluated on a large number of viruses. It successfully segments viruses regardless of shape, from polyhedral to highly pleomorphic.

  20. A Wavelet Neural Network for SAR Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xian-Bin; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Fa-Yu

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a wavelet neural network (WNN) for SAR image segmentation by combining the wavelet transform and an artificial neural network. The WNN combines the multiscale analysis ability of the wavelet transform and the classification capability of the artificial neural network by setting the wavelet function as the transfer function of the neural network. Several SAR images are segmented by the network whose transfer functions are the Morlet and Mexihat functions, respectively. The experimental results show the proposed method is very effective and accurate. PMID:22400005

  1. Prioritization of brain MRI volumes using medical image perception model and tumor region segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Irfan; Ejaz, Naveed; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore prioritization methods in diagnostic imaging modalities to automatically determine the contents of medical images. In this paper, we propose an efficient prioritization of brain MRI. First, the visual perception of the radiologists is adapted to identify salient regions. Then this saliency information is used as an automatic label for accurate segmentation of brain lesion to determine the scientific value of that image. The qualitative and quantitative results prove that the rankings generated by the proposed method are closer to the rankings created by radiologists.

  2. Automatic segmentation applied to obstetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuwong, Vanee; Hiller, John B.; Jin, Jesse S.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents a shape-based approach for searching and extracting fetal skull boundaries from an obstetric image. The proposed method relies on two major steps. Firstly, we apply the reference axes to scan the image for all potential skull boundaries. The possible skull boundaries are determined whether they are candidates. The candidate with the highest confident value will be selected as the expected head boundary. Then, the position of the expected head boundary is initialized. Secondly, we refine the initial skull boundary using the fuzzy contour model modified from the active contour basis. This results the continuous and smooth fetal skull boundary that we can use for the medical parameter measurement.

  3. Enhancement dark channel algorithm of color fog image based on the local segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Lijun; Gao, Yin; Shi, Jun-sheng; Xu, Ling-zhang

    2015-04-01

    The classical dark channel theory algorithm has yielded good results in the processing of single fog image, but in some larger contrast regions, it appears image hue, brightness and saturation distortion problems to a certain degree, and also produces halo phenomenon. In the view of the above situation, through a lot of experiments, this paper has found some factors causing the halo phenomenon. The enhancement dark channel algorithm of color fog image based on the local segmentation is proposed. On the basis of the dark channel theory, first of all, the classic dark channel theory of mathematical model is modified, which is mainly to correct the brightness and saturation of image. Then, according to the local adaptive segmentation theory, it process the block of image, and overlap the local image. On the basis of the statistical rules, it obtains each pixel value from the segmentation processing, so as to obtain the local image. At last, using the dark channel theory, it achieves the enhanced fog image. Through the subjective observation and objective evaluation, the algorithm is better than the classic dark channel algorithm in the overall and details.

  4. Segmentation and feature extraction of cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    1999-05-01

    As part of an R&D project in mixed text/image database design, the National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-ray images of the cervical and lumbar spine which were collected as part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). To make this image data available and usable to a wide audience, we are investigating techniques for indexing the image content by automated or semi-automated means. Indexing of the images by features of interest to researchers in spine disease and structure requires effective segmentation of the vertebral anatomy. This paper describes work in progress toward this segmentation of the cervical spine images into anatomical components of interest, including anatomical landmarks for vertebral location, and segmentation and identification of individual vertebrae. Our work includes developing a reliable method for automatically fixing an anatomy-based coordinate system in the images, and work to adaptively threshold the images, using methods previously applied by researchers in cardioangiography. We describe the motivation for our work and present our current results in both areas.

  5. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods-Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets.

  6. Automated Segmentation of Nuclei in Breast Cancer Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Paramanandam, Maqlin; O’Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Mammen, Joy John; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Thamburaj, Robinson; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    The process of Nuclei detection in high-grade breast cancer images is quite challenging in the case of image processing techniques due to certain heterogeneous characteristics of cancer nuclei such as enlarged and irregularly shaped nuclei, highly coarse chromatin marginalized to the nuclei periphery and visible nucleoli. Recent reviews state that existing techniques show appreciable segmentation accuracy on breast histopathology images whose nuclei are dispersed and regular in texture and shape; however, typical cancer nuclei are often clustered and have irregular texture and shape properties. This paper proposes a novel segmentation algorithm for detecting individual nuclei from Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained breast histopathology images. This detection framework estimates a nuclei saliency map using tensor voting followed by boundary extraction of the nuclei on the saliency map using a Loopy Back Propagation (LBP) algorithm on a Markov Random Field (MRF). The method was tested on both whole-slide images and frames of breast cancer histopathology images. Experimental results demonstrate high segmentation performance with efficient precision, recall and dice-coefficient rates, upon testing high-grade breast cancer images containing several thousand nuclei. In addition to the optimal performance on the highly complex images presented in this paper, this method also gave appreciable results in comparison with two recently published methods—Wienert et al. (2012) and Veta et al. (2013), which were tested using their own datasets. PMID:27649496

  7. Image Segmentation Analysis for NASA Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    2010-01-01

    NASA collects large volumes of imagery data from satellite-based Earth remote sensing sensors. Nearly all of the computerized image analysis of this data is performed pixel-by-pixel, in which an algorithm is applied directly to individual image pixels. While this analysis approach is satisfactory in many cases, it is usually not fully effective in extracting the full information content from the high spatial resolution image data that s now becoming increasingly available from these sensors. The field of object-based image analysis (OBIA) has arisen in recent years to address the need to move beyond pixel-based analysis. The Recursive Hierarchical Segmentation (RHSEG) software developed by the author is being used to facilitate moving from pixel-based image analysis to OBIA. The key unique aspect of RHSEG is that it tightly intertwines region growing segmentation, which produces spatially connected region objects, with region object classification, which groups sets of region objects together into region classes. No other practical, operational image segmentation approach has this tight integration of region growing object finding with region classification This integration is made possible by the recursive, divide-and-conquer implementation utilized by RHSEG, in which the input image data is recursively subdivided until the image data sections are small enough to successfully mitigat the combinatorial explosion caused by the need to compute the dissimilarity between each pair of image pixels. RHSEG's tight integration of region growing object finding and region classification is what enables the high spatial fidelity of the image segmentations produced by RHSEG. This presentation will provide an overview of the RHSEG algorithm and describe how it is currently being used to support OBIA or Earth Science applications such as snow/ice mapping and finding archaeological sites from remotely sensed data.

  8. Deploying swarm intelligence in medical imaging identifying metastasis, micro-calcifications and brain image segmentation.

    PubMed

    al-Rifaie, Mohammad Majid; Aber, Ahmed; Hemanth, Duraiswamy Jude

    2015-12-01

    This study proposes an umbrella deployment of swarm intelligence algorithm, such as stochastic diffusion search for medical imaging applications. After summarising the results of some previous works which shows how the algorithm assists in the identification of metastasis in bone scans and microcalcifications on mammographs, for the first time, the use of the algorithm in assessing the CT images of the aorta is demonstrated along with its performance in detecting the nasogastric tube in chest X-ray. The swarm intelligence algorithm presented in this study is adapted to address these particular tasks and its functionality is investigated by running the swarms on sample CT images and X-rays whose status have been determined by senior radiologists. In addition, a hybrid swarm intelligence-learning vector quantisation (LVQ) approach is proposed in the context of magnetic resonance (MR) brain image segmentation. The particle swarm optimisation is used to train the LVQ which eliminates the iteration-dependent nature of LVQ. The proposed methodology is used to detect the tumour regions in the abnormal MR brain images.

  9. Image processing techniques for noise removal, enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images.

    PubMed

    Rogowska, Jadwiga; Brezinski, Mark E

    2002-02-21

    Osteoarthritis, whose hallmark is the progressive loss of joint cartilage, is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. Recently, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has demonstrated considerable promise for the assessment of articular cartilage. Among the most important parameters to be assessed is cartilage width. However, detection of the bone cartilage interface is critical for the assessment of cartilage width. At present, the quantitative evaluations of cartilage thickness are being done using manual tracing of cartilage-bone borders. Since data is being obtained near video rate with OCT, automated identification of the bone-cartilage interface is critical. In order to automate the process of boundary detection on OCT images, there is a need for developing new image processing techniques. In this paper we describe the image processing techniques for speckle removal, image enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images. In particular, this paper focuses on rabbit cartilage since this is an important animal model for testing both chondroprotective agents and cartilage repair techniques. In this study, a variety of techniques were examined. Ultimately, by combining an adaptive filtering technique with edge detection (vertical gradient, Sobel edge detection), cartilage edges can be detected. The procedure requires several steps and can be automated. Once the cartilage edges are outlined, the cartilage thickness can be measured.

  10. On a methodology for robust segmentation of nonideal iris images.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Natalia A; Zuo, Jinyu

    2010-06-01

    Iris biometric is one of the most reliable biometrics with respect to performance. However, this reliability is a function of the ideality of the data. One of the most important steps in processing nonideal data is reliable and precise segmentation of the iris pattern from remaining background. In this paper, a segmentation methodology that aims at compensating various nonidealities contained in iris images during segmentation is proposed. The virtue of this methodology lies in its capability to reliably segment nonideal imagery that is simultaneously affected with such factors as specular reflection, blur, lighting variation, occlusion, and off-angle images. We demonstrate the robustness of our segmentation methodology by evaluating ideal and nonideal data sets, namely, the Chinese Academy of Sciences iris data version 3 interval subdirectory, the iris challenge evaluation data, the West Virginia University (WVU) data, and the WVU off-angle data. Furthermore, we compare our performance to that of our implementation of Camus and Wildes's algorithm and Masek's algorithm. We demonstrate considerable improvement in segmentation performance over the formerly mentioned algorithms.

  11. Automatic layer segmentation of H&E microscopic images of mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Saif; Selway, Joanne; Jassim, Sabah; Al-Assam, Hisham

    2016-05-01

    Mammalian skin is a complex organ composed of a variety of cells and tissue types. The automatic detection and quantification of changes in skin structures has a wide range of applications for biological research. To accurately segment and quantify nuclei, sebaceous gland, hair follicles, and other skin structures, there is a need for a reliable segmentation of different skin layers. This paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm to segment the three main layers of mice skin, namely epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous layers. It also segments the epidermis layer into two sub layers, basal and cornified layers. The proposed algorithm uses adaptive colour deconvolution technique on H&E stain images to separate different tissue structures, inter-modes and Otsu thresholding techniques were effectively combined to segment the layers. It then uses a set of morphological and logical operations on each layer to removing unwanted objects. A dataset of 7000 H&E microscopic images of mutant and wild type mice were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm. Experimental results examined by domain experts have confirmed the viability of the proposed algorithms.

  12. Image segmentation using hidden Markov Gauss mixture models.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Kyungsuk; Lim, Johan; Won, Chee Sun; Gray, Robert M

    2007-07-01

    Image segmentation is an important tool in image processing and can serve as an efficient front end to sophisticated algorithms and thereby simplify subsequent processing. We develop a multiclass image segmentation method using hidden Markov Gauss mixture models (HMGMMs) and provide examples of segmentation of aerial images and textures. HMGMMs incorporate supervised learning, fitting the observation probability distribution given each class by a Gauss mixture estimated using vector quantization with a minimum discrimination information (MDI) distortion. We formulate the image segmentation problem using a maximum a posteriori criteria and find the hidden states that maximize the posterior density given the observation. We estimate both the hidden Markov parameter and hidden states using a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm. Our results demonstrate that HMGMM provides better classification in terms of Bayes risk and spatial homogeneity of the classified objects than do several popular methods, including classification and regression trees, learning vector quantization, causal hidden Markov models (HMMs), and multiresolution HMMs. The computational load of HMGMM is similar to that of the causal HMM.

  13. Evaluation of segmentation using lung nodule phantom CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Philip F.; Jacobson, Francine L.

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation of chest CT images has several purposes. In lung-cancer screening programs, for nodules below 5mm, growth measured from sequential CT scans is the primary indication of malignancy. Automatic segmentation procedures have been used as a means to insure a reliable measurement of lung nodule size. A lung nodule phantom was developed to evaluate the validity and reliability of size measurements using CT images. Thirty acrylic spheres and cubes (2-8 mm) were placed in a 15cm diameter disk of uniform-material that simulated the lung. To demonstrate the use of the phantom, it was scanned using out hospital's lung-cancer screening protocol. A simple, yet objective threshold technique was used to segment all of the images in which the objects were visible. All the pixels above a common threshold (the mean of the lung material and the acrylic CT numbers) were considered within the nodule. The relative bias did not depend on the shape of the objects and ranged from -18% for the 2 mm objects to -2.5% for 8-mm objects. DICOM image files of the phantom are available for investigators with an interest in using the images to evaluate and compare segmentation procedures.

  14. Automatic comic page image understanding based on edge segment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yongtao; Tang, Zhi; Li, Luyuan; Gao, Liangcai

    2013-12-01

    Comic page image understanding aims to analyse the layout of the comic page images by detecting the storyboards and identifying the reading order automatically. It is the key technique to produce the digital comic documents suitable for reading on mobile devices. In this paper, we propose a novel comic page image understanding method based on edge segment analysis. First, we propose an efficient edge point chaining method to extract Canny edge segments (i.e., contiguous chains of Canny edge points) from the input comic page image; second, we propose a top-down scheme to detect line segments within each obtained edge segment; third, we develop a novel method to detect the storyboards by selecting the border lines and further identify the reading order of these storyboards. The proposed method is performed on a data set consisting of 2000 comic page images from ten printed comic series. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves satisfactory results on different comics and outperforms the existing methods.

  15. Remote sensing images segmentation by Deriche's filter and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Raphael K.; Solaiman, Basel; Mouchot, Marie-Catherine

    1994-12-01

    An image segmentation method for remote sensing data using hybride techniques is proposed. Edge detection approach for segmentation is considered in our study. Our aim is to integrate segmentation results in further processing namely classification. Images of the land from satellite are often corrupted by noise. On one hand, optimal edge detectors insure good noise immunity. On the other hand, the multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network has been found to be suited for classification. So we propose to combine these two techniques to improve segmentation process. Satellites for remote sensing provide several images for the same area, coded differently according to spectral bands. In order to bear in mind spectral and spatial information, neighborhood relation of pixels and different bands are taken into consideration during the classification realized by the neural network. Samples which constituate the training set for the MLP are selected from the third, fourth and fifth band and represent edge and non-edge patterns. Each sample vector is composed of the value of a current pixel in the local maxima image (enhancement image obtained by Deriche's filter) and its 8 nearest neighbors. The proposed method provides satisfactory results for our application and compared to other similar methods.

  16. Fabric Pilling Image Segmentation Based on Mean Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Junfeng; Kang, Xuejuan

    Fabric appearance is always considered to be one of the most important aspects of fabric quality. Testing for fabric appearance is the process of inspecting, measuring and evaluating characteristics and properties of a fabric surface. Fabric Pilling is a key step in fabric pilling objective evaluation,which is the important component of textile performance test digitization.Image analysis has been widely accepted as an objetive mothod for evaluating fabric appearance.This study presents the principles of new method of fabric pilling image segmenttation based on mean shift.The principle of mean shift was demonstrated, and the extend principle of mean shift was educed. The extended mean shift algorithm was used to try to solve the segmentation of fabric pilling image.In this issue, two main steps were introduced: the filting of image and the segmentation of image. The influences of three parameters to the segmentation effect were analysised. The laboratory result shows that the proposed algorithm can get excellent segmentation after chosen three better parameters.

  17. An improved differential box-counting method of image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cancan; Cheng, Longfei; He, Tao; Chen, Lang; Yu, Fei; Yang, Liangen

    2016-01-01

    Fractal dimension is an important quantitative characteristic of a image, which can be widely used in image analysis. Differential box-counting method which is one of many calculation methods of a fractal dimension has been frequently used due to its simple calculation . In differential box-counting method, a window size M is limited in the integer power of 2. It leads to inaccurate calculation results of a fractal dimension. Aiming at solving the issues , in this paper, an improved algorithm is discussed that the window size M has been improved to be able to accommodate non-integer power of 2, and making the calculated fractal dimension error smaller. In order to verify superiority of the improved algorithm, the values of fractal dimension are regarded as parameters, and are applied for image segmentation combined with Ostu algorithm . Both traditional and improved differential box-counting methods are respectively used to estimate fractal dimensions and do threshold segmentation for a thread image . The experimental results show that image segmentation details by improved differential box-counting method are more obvious than that by traditional differential box-counting method, with less impurities, clearer target outline and better segmentation effect.

  18. Automatic segmentation of MR brain images in multiple sclerosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avula, Ramesh T. V.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    1996-04-01

    A totally automatic scheme for segmenting brain from extracranial tissues and to classify all intracranial voxels as CSF, gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), or abnormality such as multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is presented in this paper. It is observed that in MR head images, if a tissue's intensity values are normalized, its relationship to the other tissues is essentially constant for a given type of image. Based on this approach, the subcutaneous fat surrounding the head is normalized to classify other tissues. Spatially registered 3 mm MR head image slices of T1 weighted, fast spin echo [dual echo T2 weighted and proton density (PD) weighted images] and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are used for segmentation. Subcutaneous fat surrounding the skull was identified based on intensity thresholding from T1 weighted images. A multiparametric space map was developed for CSF, GM and WM by normalizing each tissue with respect to the mean value of corresponding subcutaneous fat on each pulse sequence. To reduce the low frequency noise without blurring the fine morphological high frequency details an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to all images before segmentation. An initial slice by slice classification was followed by morphological operations to delete any brides connecting extracranial segments. Finally 3-dimensional region growing of the segmented brain extracts GM, WM and pathology. The algorithm was tested on sequential scans of 10 patients with MS lesions. For well registered sequences, tissues and pathology have been accurately classified. This procedure does not require user input or image training data sets, and shows promise for automatic classification of brain and pathology.

  19. Quantitative measure in image segmentation for skin lesion images: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Nurulhuda Firdaus Mohd; Ibrahim, Mohd Hakimi Aiman; Keng, Lau Hui; Ibrahim, Nuzulha Khilwani; Sarkan, Haslina Md

    2014-12-01

    Automatic Skin Lesion Diagnosis (ASLD) allows skin lesion diagnosis by using a computer or mobile devices. The idea of using a computer to assist in diagnosis of skin lesions was first proposed in the literature around 1985. Images of skin lesions are analyzed by the computer to capture certain features thought to be characteristic of skin diseases. These features (expressed as numeric values) are then used to classify the image and report a diagnosis. Image segmentation is often a critical step in image analysis and it may use statistical classification, thresholding, edge detection, region detection, or any combination of these techniques. Nevertheless, image segmentation of skin lesion images is yet limited to superficial evaluations which merely display images of the segmentation results and appeal to the reader's intuition for evaluation. There is a consistent lack of quantitative measure, thus, it is difficult to know which segmentation present useful results and in which situations they do so. If segmentation is done well, then, all other stages in image analysis are made simpler. If significant features (that are crucial for diagnosis) are not extracted from images, it will affect the accuracy of the automated diagnosis. This paper explore the existing quantitative measure in image segmentation ranging in the application of pattern recognition for example hand writing, plat number, and colour. Selecting the most suitable segmentation measure is highly important so that as much relevant features can be identified and extracted.

  20. Segmented images and 3D images for studying the anatomical structures in MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Sook; Chung, Min Suk; Cho, Jae Hyun

    2004-05-01

    For identifying the pathological findings in MRIs, the anatomical structures in MRIs should be identified in advance. For studying the anatomical structures in MRIs, an education al tool that includes the horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is necessary. Such an educational tool, however, is hard to obtain. Therefore, in this research, such an educational tool which helps medical students and doctors study the anatomical structures in MRIs was made as follows. A healthy, young Korean male adult with standard body shape was selected. Six hundred thirteen horizontal MRIs of the entire body were scanned and inputted to the personal computer. Sixty anatomical structures in the horizontal MRIs were segmented to make horizontal segmented images. Coronal, sagittal MRIs and coronal, sagittal segmented images were made. 3D images of anatomical structures in the segmented images were reconstructed by surface rendering method. Browsing software of the MRIs, segmented images, and 3D images was composed. This educational tool that includes horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is expected to help medical students and doctors study anatomical structures in MRIs.

  1. Atlas-based automatic mouse brain image segmentation revisited: model complexity vs. image registration.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jordan; Trinh, Thi Lan Huong; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Qiu, Anqi

    2012-07-01

    Although many atlas-based segmentation methods have been developed and validated for the human brain, limited work has been done for the mouse brain. This paper investigated roles of image registration and segmentation model complexity in the mouse brain segmentation. We employed four segmentation models [single atlas, multiatlas, simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) and Markov random field (MRF) via four different image registration algorithms (affine, B-spline free-form deformation (FFD), Demons and large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM)] for delineating 19 structures from in vivo magnetic resonance microscopy images. We validated their accuracies against manual segmentation. Our results revealed that LDDMM outperformed Demons, FFD and affine in any of the segmentation models. Under the same registration, increasing segmentation model complexity from single atlas to multiatlas, STAPLE or MRF significantly improved the segmentation accuracy. Interestingly, the multiatlas-based segmentation using nonlinear registrations (FFD, Demons and LDDMM) had similar performance to their STAPLE counterparts, while they both outperformed their MRF counterparts. Furthermore, when the single-atlas affine segmentation was used as reference, the improvement due to nonlinear registrations (FFD, Demons and LDDMM) in the single-atlas segmentation model was greater than that due to increasing model complexity (multiatlas, STAPLE and MRF affine segmentation). Hence, we concluded that image registration plays a more crucial role in the atlas-based automatic mouse brain segmentation as compared to model complexity. Multiple atlases with LDDMM can best improve the segmentation accuracy in the mouse brain among all segmentation models tested in this study.

  2. Interactive medical image segmentation using PDE control of active contours.

    PubMed

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Fritscher, Karl; Vela, Patricio; Mitchell, Phillip; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-11-01

    Segmentation of injured or unusual anatomic structures in medical imagery is a problem that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. In this paper, the goal of easy-to-use and consistent interactive segmentation is transformed into a control synthesis problem. A nominal level set partial differential equation (PDE) is assumed to be given; this open-loop system achieves correct segmentation under ideal conditions, but does not agree with a human expert's ideal boundary for real image data. Perturbing the state and dynamics of a level set PDE via the accumulated user input and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. The input structure is designed such that a user can stabilize the boundary in some desired state without needing to understand any mathematical parameters. Effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with applications to the challenging segmentations of a patellar tendon in magnetic resonance and a shattered femur in computed tomography.

  3. Interactive Medical Image Segmentation using PDE Control of Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Fritscher, Karl; Vela, Patricio; Mitchell, Phillip; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of injured or unusual anatomic structures in medical imagery is a problem that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. In this paper, the goal of easy-to-use and consistent interactive segmentation is transformed into a control synthesis problem. A nominal level set PDE is assumed to be given; this open-loop system achieves correct segmentation under ideal conditions, but does not agree with a human expert's ideal boundary for real image data. Perturbing the state and dynamics of a level set PDE via the accumulated user input and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. The input structure is designed such that a user can stabilize the boundary in some desired state without needing to understand any mathematical parameters. Effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with applications to the challenging segmentations of a patellar tendon in MR and a shattered femur in CT. PMID:23893712

  4. Filter Design and Performance Evaluation for Fingerprint Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Duy Hoang; Huckemann, Stephan; Gottschlich, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Fingerprint recognition plays an important role in many commercial applications and is used by millions of people every day, e.g. for unlocking mobile phones. Fingerprint image segmentation is typically the first processing step of most fingerprint algorithms and it divides an image into foreground, the region of interest, and background. Two types of error can occur during this step which both have a negative impact on the recognition performance: ‘true’ foreground can be labeled as background and features like minutiae can be lost, or conversely ‘true’ background can be misclassified as foreground and spurious features can be introduced. The contribution of this paper is threefold: firstly, we propose a novel factorized directional bandpass (FDB) segmentation method for texture extraction based on the directional Hilbert transform of a Butterworth bandpass (DHBB) filter interwoven with soft-thresholding. Secondly, we provide a manually marked ground truth segmentation for 10560 images as an evaluation benchmark. Thirdly, we conduct a systematic performance comparison between the FDB method and four of the most often cited fingerprint segmentation algorithms showing that the FDB segmentation method clearly outperforms these four widely used methods. The benchmark and the implementation of the FDB method are made publicly available. PMID:27171150

  5. Automatic segmentation and classification of seven-segment display digits on auroral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savolainen, Tuomas; Whiter, Daniel Keith; Partamies, Noora

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we describe a new and fully automatic method for segmenting and classifying digits in seven-segment displays. The method is applied to a dataset consisting of about 7 million auroral all-sky images taken during the time period of 1973-1997 at camera stations centred around Sodankylä observatory in northern Finland. In each image there is a clock display for the date and time together with the reflection of the whole night sky through a spherical mirror. The digitised film images of the night sky contain valuable scientific information but are impractical to use without an automatic method for extracting the date-time from the display. We describe the implementation and the results of such a method in detail in this paper.

  6. Adaptive optics control system for segmented MEMS deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Carl J.; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Besse, Marc

    2010-02-01

    Iris AO has developed a full closed-loop control system for control of segmented MEMS deformable mirrors. It is based on a combination of matched wavefront sensing, modal wavefront estimation, and well-calibrated open-loop characteristics. This assures closed-loop operation free of problems related to co-phasing segments or undetectable waffle patterns. This controller strategy results in relatively simple on-line computations which are suitable for implementation on low cost digital signal processors. It has been successfully implemented on Iris AO's 111 actuator (37 segment) deformable mirrors used in test-beds and research systems.

  7. Effect of image scaling and segmentation in digital rock characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. D.; Feng, Y. T.

    2016-04-01

    Digital material characterisation from microstructural geometry is an emerging field in computer simulation. For permeability characterisation, a variety of studies exist where the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) imaging to simulate fluid flow through microscopic rock pores. While these previous works show that the technique is applicable, the use of binary image segmentation and the bounceback boundary condition results in a loss of grain surface definition when the modelled geometry is compared to the original CT image. We apply the immersed moving boundary (IMB) condition of Noble and Torczynski as a partial bounceback boundary condition which may be used to better represent the geometric definition provided by a CT image. The IMB condition is validated against published work on idealised porous geometries in both 2D and 3D. Following this, greyscale image segmentation is applied to a CT image of Diemelstadt sandstone. By varying the mapping of CT voxel densities to lattice sites, it is shown that binary image segmentation may underestimate the true permeability of the sample. A CUDA-C-based code, LBM-C, was developed specifically for this work and leverages GPU hardware in order to carry out computations.

  8. Generalized method for partial volume estimation and tissue segmentation in cerebral magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, April; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios; Moody, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. An artifact found in magnetic resonance images (MRI) called partial volume averaging (PVA) has received much attention since accurate segmentation of cerebral anatomy and pathology is impeded by this artifact. Traditional neurological segmentation techniques rely on Gaussian mixture models to handle noise and PVA, or high-dimensional feature sets that exploit redundancy in multispectral datasets. Unfortunately, model-based techniques may not be optimal for images with non-Gaussian noise distributions and/or pathology, and multispectral techniques model probabilities instead of the partial volume (PV) fraction. For robust segmentation, a PV fraction estimation approach is developed for cerebral MRI that does not depend on predetermined intensity distribution models or multispectral scans. Instead, the PV fraction is estimated directly from each image using an adaptively defined global edge map constructed by exploiting a relationship between edge content and PVA. The final PVA map is used to segment anatomy and pathology with subvoxel accuracy. Validation on simulated and real, pathology-free T1 MRI (Gaussian noise), as well as pathological fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI (non-Gaussian noise), demonstrate that the PV fraction is accurately estimated and the resultant segmentation is robust. Comparison to model-based methods further highlight the benefits of the current approach. PMID:26158022

  9. Automatic tissue segmentation of neonate brain MR Images with subject-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherel, Marie; Budin, Francois; Prastawa, Marcel; Gerig, Guido; Lee, Kevin; Buss, Claudia; Lyall, Amanda; Zaldarriaga Consing, Kirsten; Styner, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Automatic tissue segmentation of the neonate brain using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) is extremely important to study brain development and perform early diagnostics but is challenging due to high variability and inhomogeneity in contrast throughout the image due to incomplete myelination of the white matter tracts. For these reasons, current methods often totally fail or give unsatisfying results. Furthermore, most of the subcortical midbrain structures are misclassified due to a lack of contrast in these regions. We have developed a novel method that creates a probabilistic subject-specific atlas based on a population atlas currently containing a number of manually segmented cases. The generated subject-specific atlas is sharp and adapted to the subject that is being processed. We then segment brain tissue classes using the newly created atlas with a single-atlas expectation maximization based method. Our proposed method leads to a much lower failure rate in our experiments. The overall segmentation results are considerably improved when compared to using a non-subject-specific, population average atlas. Additionally, we have incorporated diffusion information obtained from Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) to improve the detection of white matter that is not visible at this early age in structural MRI (sMRI) due to a lack of myelination. Although this necessitates the acquisition of an additional sequence, the diffusion information improves the white matter segmentation throughout the brain, especially for the mid-brain structures such as the corpus callosum and the internal capsule.

  10. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 3 ×3 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0.88, 0.83, 0.77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0.78, 0.65, and 0.75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  11. Brain Tumor Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-03-04

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 33 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0:88, 0:83, 0:77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0:78, 0:65, and 0:75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  12. Segmentation and separation of venous vasculatures in liver CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Hansen, Christian; Zidowitz, Stephan; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided analysis of venous vasculatures including hepatic veins and portal veins is important in liver surgery planning. The analysis normally consists of two important pre-processing tasks: segmenting both vasculatures and separating them from each other by assigning different labels. During the acquisition of multi-phase CT images, both of the venous vessels are enhanced by injected contrast agent and acquired either in a common phase or in two individual phases. The enhanced signals established by contrast agent are often not stably acquired due to non-optimal acquisition time. Inadequate contrast and the presence of large lesions in oncological patients, make the segmentation task quite challenging. To overcome these diffculties, we propose a framework with minimal user interactions to analyze venous vasculatures in multi-phase CT images. Firstly, presented vasculatures are automatically segmented adopting an efficient multi-scale Hessian-based vesselness filter. The initially segmented vessel trees are then converted to a graph representation, on which a series of graph filters are applied in post-processing steps to rule out irrelevant structures. Eventually, we develop a semi-automatic workow to refine the segmentation in the areas of inferior vena cava and entrance of portal veins, and to simultaneously separate hepatic veins from portal veins. Segmentation quality was evaluated with intensive tests enclosing 60 CT images from both healthy liver donors and oncological patients. To quantitatively measure the similarities between segmented and reference vessel trees, we propose three additional metrics: skeleton distance, branch coverage, and boundary surface distance, which are dedicated to quantifying the misalignment induced by both branching patterns and radii of two vessel trees.

  13. Segmentation of MR images using multiple-feature vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Orlean I. B.; Daemi, Mohammad F.

    1996-04-01

    Segmentation is an important step in the analysis of MR images (MRI). Considerable progress has been made in this area, and numerous reports on 3D segmentation, volume measurement and visualization have been published in recent years. The main purpose of our study is to investigate the power and use of fractal techniques in extraction of features from MR images of the human brain. These features which are supplemented by other features are used for segmentation, and ultimately for the extraction of a known pathology, in our case multiple- sclerosis (MS) lesions. We are particularly interested in the progress of the lesions and occurrence of new lesions which in a typical case are scattered within the image and are sometimes difficult to identify visually. We propose a technique for multi-channel segmentation of MR images using multiple feature vectors. The channels are proton density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted images containing multiple-sclerosis (MS) lesions at various stages of development. We first represent each image as a set of feature vectors which are estimated using fractal techniques, and supplemented by micro-texture features and features from the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). These feature vectors are then used in a feature selection algorithm to reduce the dimension of the feature space. The next stage is segmentation and clustering. The selected feature vectors now form the input to the segmentation and clustering routines and are used as the initial clustering parameters. For this purpose, we have used the classical K-means as the initial clustering method. The clustered image is then passed into a probabilistic classifier to further classify and validate each region, taking into account the spatial properties of the image. Initially, segmentation results were obtained using the fractal dimension features alone. Subsequently, a combination of the fractal dimension features and the supplementary features mentioned above were also obtained

  14. Joint image reconstruction and segmentation using the Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storath, Martin; Weinmann, Andreas; Frikel, Jürgen; Unser, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new algorithmic approach to the non-smooth and non-convex Potts problem (also called piecewise-constant Mumford-Shah problem) for inverse imaging problems. We derive a suitable splitting into specific subproblems that can all be solved efficiently. Our method does not require a priori knowledge on the gray levels nor on the number of segments of the reconstruction. Further, it avoids anisotropic artifacts such as geometric staircasing. We demonstrate the suitability of our method for joint image reconstruction and segmentation. We focus on Radon data, where we in particular consider limited data situations. For instance, our method is able to recover all segments of the Shepp-Logan phantom from seven angular views only. We illustrate the practical applicability on a real positron emission tomography dataset. As further applications, we consider spherical Radon data as well as blurred data.

  15. Automatic segmentation of cerebral MR images using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Alirezaie, J.; Jernigan, M.E.; Nahmias, C.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present an unsupervised clustering technique for multispectral segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. Our scheme utilizes the Self Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) artificial neural network for feature mapping and generates a set of codebook vectors. By extending the network with an additional layer the map will be classified and each tissue class will be labelled. An algorithm has been developed for extracting the cerebrum from the head scan prior to the segmentation. Extracting the cerebrum is performed by stripping away the skull pixels from the T2 image. Three tissue types of the brain: white matter, gray matter and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are segmented accurately. To compare the results with other conventional approaches we applied the c-means algorithm to the problem.

  16. Medical image segmentation using object atlas versus object cloud models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phellan, Renzo; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is crucial for quantitative organ analysis and surgical planning. Since interactive segmentation is not practical in a production-mode clinical setting, automatic methods based on 3D object appearance models have been proposed. Among them, approaches based on object atlas are the most actively investigated. A key drawback of these approaches is that they require a time-costly image registration process to build and deploy the atlas. Object cloud models (OCM) have been introduced to avoid registration, considerably speeding up the whole process, but they have not been compared to object atlas models (OAM). The present paper fills this gap by presenting a comparative analysis of the two approaches in the task of individually segmenting nine anatomical structures of the human body. Our results indicate that OCM achieve a statistically significant better accuracy for seven anatomical structures, in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient and Average Symmetric Surface Distance.

  17. Blood vessel segmentation methodologies in retinal images--a survey.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Remagnino, P; Hoppe, A; Uyyanonvara, B; Rudnicka, A R; Owen, C G; Barman, S A

    2012-10-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation algorithms are a fundamental component of automatic retinal disease screening systems. This work examines the blood vessel segmentation methodologies in two dimensional retinal images acquired from a fundus camera and a survey of techniques is presented. The aim of this paper is to review, analyze and categorize the retinal vessel extraction algorithms, techniques and methodologies, giving a brief description, highlighting the key points and the performance measures. We intend to give the reader a framework for the existing research; to introduce the range of retinal vessel segmentation algorithms; to discuss the current trends and future directions and summarize the open problems. The performance of algorithms is compared and analyzed on two publicly available databases (DRIVE and STARE) of retinal images using a number of measures which include accuracy, true positive rate, false positive rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.

  18. Model-controlled flooding with applications to image reconstruction and segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanli; West, Mike

    2012-01-01

    We discuss improved image reconstruction and segmentation in a framework we term model-controlled flooding (MCF). This extends the watershed transform for segmentation by allowing the integration of a priori information about image objects into flooding simulation processes. Modeling the initial seeding, region growing, and stopping rules of the watershed flooding process allows users to customize the simulation with user-defined or default model functions incorporating prior information. It also extends a more general class of transforms based on connected attribute filters by allowing the modification of connected components of a grayscale image, thus providing more flexibility in image reconstruction. MCF reconstruction defines images with desirable features for further segmentation using existing methods and can lead to substantial improvements. We demonstrate the MCF framework using a size transform that extends grayscale area opening and attribute thickening/thinning, and give examples from several areas: concealed object detection, speckle counting in biological single cell studies, and analyses of benchmark microscopic image data sets. MCF achieves benchmark error rates well below those reported in the recent literature and in comparison with other algorithms, while being easily adapted to new imaging contexts. PMID:23049229

  19. Model-controlled flooding with applications to image reconstruction and segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanli; West, Mike

    2012-06-22

    We discuss improved image reconstruction and segmentation in a framework we term model-controlled flooding (MCF). This extends the watershed transform for segmentation by allowing the integration of a priori information about image objects into flooding simulation processes. Modeling the initial seeding, region growing, and stopping rules of the watershed flooding process allows users to customize the simulation with user-defined or default model functions incorporating prior information. It also extends a more general class of transforms based on connected attribute filters by allowing the modification of connected components of a grayscale image, thus providing more flexibility in image reconstruction. MCF reconstruction defines images with desirable features for further segmentation using existing methods and can lead to substantial improvements. We demonstrate the MCF framework using a size transform that extends grayscale area opening and attribute thickening/thinning, and give examples from several areas: concealed object detection, speckle counting in biological single cell studies, and analyses of benchmark microscopic image data sets. MCF achieves benchmark error rates well below those reported in the recent literature and in comparison with other algorithms, while being easily adapted to new imaging contexts.

  20. Statistical Characterization and Segmentation of Drusen in Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Aykac, Deniz; Giancardo, Luca; Li, Yaquin; Nichols, Trent L; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the retina associated with aging. AMD progression in patients is characterized by drusen, pigmentation changes, and geographic atrophy, which can be seen using fundus imagery. The level of AMD is characterized by standard scaling methods, which can be somewhat subjective in practice. In this work we propose a statistical image processing approach to segment drusen with the ultimate goal of characterizing the AMD progression in a data set of longitudinal images. The method characterizes retinal structures with a statistical model of the colors in the retina image. When comparing the segmentation results of the method between longitudinal images with known AMD progression and those without, the method detects progression in our longitudinal data set with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.99.

  1. Segmentation of mosaicism in cervicographic images using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer; Jeronimo, Jose; Thoma, George R.

    2009-02-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM), in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is creating a large digital repository of cervicographic images for the study of uterine cervix cancer prevention. One of the research goals is to automatically detect diagnostic bio-markers in these images. Reliable bio-marker segmentation in large biomedical image collections is a challenging task due to the large variation in image appearance. Methods described in this paper focus on segmenting mosaicism, which is an important vascular feature used to visually assess the degree of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The proposed approach uses support vector machines (SVM) trained on a ground truth dataset annotated by medical experts (which circumvents the need for vascular structure extraction). We have evaluated the performance of the proposed algorithm and experimentally demonstrated its feasibility.

  2. Statistical characterization and segmentation of drusen in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Santos-Villalobos, H; Karnowski, T P; Aykac, D; Giancardo, L; Li, Y; Nichols, T; Tobin, K W; Chaum, E

    2011-01-01

    Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the retina associated with aging. AMD progression in patients is characterized by drusen, pigmentation changes, and geographic atrophy, which can be seen using fundus imagery. The level of AMD is characterized by standard scaling methods, which can be somewhat subjective in practice. In this work we propose a statistical image processing approach to segment drusen with the ultimate goal of characterizing the AMD progression in a data set of longitudinal images. The method characterizes retinal structures with a statistical model of the colors in the retina image. When comparing the segmentation results of the method between longitudinal images with known AMD progression and those without, the method detects progression in our longitudinal data set with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.99.

  3. An Investigation of Implicit Active Contours for Scientific Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K; Kamath, C

    2003-10-29

    The use of partial differential equations in image processing has become an active area of research in the last few years. In particular, active contours are being used for image segmentation, either explicitly as snakes, or implicitly through the level set approach. In this paper, we consider the use of the implicit active contour approach for segmenting scientific images of pollen grains obtained using a scanning electron microscope. Our goal is to better understand the pros and cons of these techniques and to compare them with the traditional approaches such as the Canny and SUSAN edge detectors. The preliminary results of our study show that the level set method is computationally expensive and requires the setting of several different parameters. However, it results in closed contours, which may be useful in separating objects from the background in an image.

  4. Optic Disc Boundary and Vessel Origin Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Kuchinka, Sam N; Parhi, Keshab K

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel classification-based optic disc (OD) segmentation algorithm that detects the OD boundary and the location of vessel origin (VO) pixel. First, the green plane of each fundus image is resized and morphologically reconstructed using a circular structuring element. Bright regions are then extracted from the morphologically reconstructed image that lie in close vicinity of the major blood vessels. Next, the bright regions are classified as bright probable OD regions and non-OD regions using six region-based features and a Gaussian mixture model classifier. The classified bright probable OD region with maximum Vessel-Sum and Solidity is detected as the best candidate region for the OD. Other bright probable OD regions within 1-disc diameter from the centroid of the best candidate OD region are then detected as remaining candidate regions for the OD. A convex hull containing all the candidate OD regions is then estimated, and a best-fit ellipse across the convex hull becomes the segmented OD boundary. Finally, the centroid of major blood vessels within the segmented OD boundary is detected as the VO pixel location. The proposed algorithm has low computation time complexity and it is robust to variations in image illumination, imaging angles, and retinal abnormalities. This algorithm achieves 98.8%-100% OD segmentation success and OD segmentation overlap score in the range of 72%-84% on images from the six public datasets of DRIVE, DIARETDB1, DIARETDB0, CHASE_DB1, MESSIDOR, and STARE in less than 2.14 s per image. Thus, the proposed algorithm can be used for automated detection of retinal pathologies, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and maculopathy.

  5. Automatic tissue segmentation of breast biopsies imaged by QPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Nguyen, Tan; Kandel, Mikhail; Marcias, Virgilia; Do, Minh; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The current tissue evaluation method for breast cancer would greatly benefit from higher throughput and less inter-observer variation. Since quantitative phase imaging (QPI) measures physical parameters of tissue, it can be used to find quantitative markers, eliminating observer subjectivity. Furthermore, since the pixel values in QPI remain the same regardless of the instrument used, classifiers can be built to segment various tissue components without need for color calibration. In this work we use a texton-based approach to segment QPI images of breast tissue into various tissue components (epithelium, stroma or lumen). A tissue microarray comprising of 900 unstained cores from 400 different patients was imaged using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy. The training data were generated by manually segmenting the images for 36 cores and labelling each pixel (epithelium, stroma or lumen.). For each pixel in the data, a response vector was generated by the Leung-Malik (LM) filter bank and these responses were clustered using the k-means algorithm to find the centers (called textons). A random forest classifier was then trained to find the relationship between a pixel's label and the histogram of these textons in that pixel's neighborhood. The segmentation was carried out on the validation set by calculating the texton histogram in a pixel's neighborhood and generating a label based on the model learnt during training. Segmentation of the tissue into various components is an important step toward efficiently computing parameters that are markers of disease. Automated segmentation, followed by diagnosis, can improve the accuracy and speed of analysis leading to better health outcomes.

  6. Segmentation and interpretation of 3D protein images

    SciTech Connect

    Leherte, L.; Baxter, K.; Glasgow, J.; Fortier, S.

    1994-12-31

    The segmentation and interpretation of three-dimensional images of proteins is considered. A topological approach is used to represent a protein structure as a spanning tree of critical points, where each critical point corresponds to a residue or the connectivity between residues. The critical points are subsequently analyzed to recognize secondary structure motifs within the protein. Results of applying the approach to ideal and experimental images of proteins at medium resolution are presented.

  7. A geometric deformable model for echocardiographic image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hang, X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF), an elegant external force for parametric deformable models, can capture object boundaries from both sides. A new geometric deformable model is proposed that combines GVF and the geodesic active contour model. The level set method is used as the numerical method of this model. The model is applied for echocardiographic image segmentation.

  8. Liver segmentation for CT images using GVF snake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fan; Zhao Binsheng; Kijewski, Peter K.; Wang Liang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2005-12-15

    Accurate liver segmentation on computed tomography (CT) images is a challenging task especially at sites where surrounding tissues (e.g., stomach, kidney) have densities similar to that of the liver and lesions reside at the liver edges. We have developed a method for semiautomatic delineation of the liver contours on contrast-enhanced CT images. The method utilizes a snake algorithm with a gradient vector flow (GVF) field as its external force. To improve the performance of the GVF snake in the segmentation of the liver contour, an edge map was obtained with a Canny edge detector, followed by modifications using a liver template and a concavity removal algorithm. With the modified edge map, for which unwanted edges inside the liver were eliminated, the GVF field was computed and an initial liver contour was formed. The snake algorithm was then applied to obtain the actual liver contour. This algorithm was extended to segment the liver volume in a slice-by-slice fashion, where the result of the preceding slice constrained the segmentation of the adjacent slice. 551 two-dimensional liver images from 20 volumetric images with colorectal metastases spreading throughout the livers were delineated using this method, and also manually by a radiologist for evaluation. The difference ratio, which is defined as the percentage ratio of mismatching volume between the computer and the radiologist's results, ranged from 2.9% to 7.6% with a median value of 5.3%.

  9. A Scalable Framework For Segmenting Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Hore, Prodip; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gu, Yuhua; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Darkazanli, Ammar

    2009-01-01

    A fast, accurate and fully automatic method of segmenting magnetic resonance images of the human brain is introduced. The approach scales well allowing fast segmentations of fine resolution images. The approach is based on modifications of the soft clustering algorithm, fuzzy c-means, that enable it to scale to large data sets. Two types of modifications to create incremental versions of fuzzy c-means are discussed. They are much faster when compared to fuzzy c-means for medium to extremely large data sets because they work on successive subsets of the data. They are comparable in quality to application of fuzzy c-means to all of the data. The clustering algorithms coupled with inhomogeneity correction and smoothing are used to create a framework for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the human brain. The framework is applied to a set of normal human brain volumes acquired from different magnetic resonance scanners using different head coils, acquisition parameters and field strengths. Results are compared to those from two widely used magnetic resonance image segmentation programs, Statistical Parametric Mapping and the FMRIB Software Library (FSL). The results are comparable to FSL while providing significant speed-up and better scalability to larger volumes of data. PMID:20046893

  10. Segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive model.

    PubMed

    Comer, M L; Delp, E J

    1999-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for segmentation of textured images using a multiresolution Bayesian approach. The new algorithm uses a multiresolution Gaussian autoregressive (MGAR) model for the pyramid representation of the observed image, and assumes a multiscale Markov random field model for the class label pyramid. The models used in this paper incorporate correlations between different levels of both the observed image pyramid and the class label pyramid. The criterion used for segmentation is the minimization of the expected value of the number of misclassified nodes in the multiresolution lattice. The estimate which satisfies this criterion is referred to as the "multiresolution maximization of the posterior marginals" (MMPM) estimate, and is a natural extension of the single-resolution "maximization of the posterior marginals" (MPM) estimate. Previous multiresolution segmentation techniques have been based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation criterion, which has been shown to be less appropriate for segmentation than the MPM criterion. It is assumed that the number of distinct textures in the observed image is known. The parameters of the MGAR model-the means, prediction coefficients, and prediction error variances of the different textures-are unknown. A modified version of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used to estimate these parameters. The parameters of the Gibbs distribution for the label pyramid are assumed to be known. Experimental results demonstrating the performance of the algorithm are presented.

  11. Segmentation of prostate boundaries from ultrasound images using statistical shape model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dinggang; Zhan, Yiqiang; Davatzikos, Christos

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a statistical shape model for the automatic prostate segmentation in transrectal ultrasound images. A Gabor filter bank is first used to characterize the prostate boundaries in ultrasound images in both multiple scales and multiple orientations. The Gabor features are further reconstructed to be invariant to the rotation of the ultrasound probe and incorporated in the prostate model as image attributes for guiding the deformable segmentation. A hierarchical deformation strategy is then employed, in which the model adaptively focuses on the similarity of different Gabor features at different deformation stages using a multiresolution technique, i.e., coarse features first and fine features later. A number of successful experiments validate the algorithm.

  12. Robust entropy-guided image segmentation for ground detection in GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Shkolnikov, Y.; Varsanik, J.; Chevalier, T.

    2013-06-01

    Identifying the ground within a ground penetrating radar (GPR) image is a critical component of automatic and assisted target detection systems. As these systems are deployed to more challenging environments they encounter rougher terrain and less-ideal data, both of which can cause standard ground detection methods to fail. This paper presents a means of improving the robustness of ground detection by adapting a technique from image processing in which images are segmented by local entropy. This segmentation provides the rough location of the air-ground interface, which can then act as a "guide" for more precise but fragile techniques. The effectiveness of this two-step "coarse/fine" entropyguided detection strategy is demonstrated on GPR data from very rough terrain, and its application beyond the realm of GPR data processing is discussed.

  13. Hierarchical stochastic image grammars for classification and segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wiley; Pollak, Ilya; Wong, Tak-Shing; Bouman, Charles A; Harper, Mary P; Siskind, Jeffrey M

    2006-10-01

    We develop a new class of hierarchical stochastic image models called spatial random trees (SRTs) which admit polynomial-complexity exact inference algorithms. Our framework of multitree dictionaries is the starting point for this construction. SRTs are stochastic hidden tree models whose leaves are associated with image data. The states at the tree nodes are random variables, and, in addition, the structure of the tree is random and is generated by a probabilistic grammar. We describe an efficient recursive algorithm for obtaining the maximum a posteriori estimate of both the tree structure and the tree states given an image. We also develop an efficient procedure for performing one iteration of the expectation-maximization algorithm and use it to estimate the model parameters from a set of training images. We address other inference problems arising in applications such as maximization of posterior marginals and hypothesis testing. Our models and algorithms are illustrated through several image classification and segmentation experiments, ranging from the segmentation of synthetic images to the classification of natural photographs and the segmentation of scanned documents. In each case, we show that our method substantially improves accuracy over a variety of existing methods.

  14. Patch-based image segmentation of satellite imagery using minimum spanning tree construction

    SciTech Connect

    Skurikhin, Alexei N

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for hierarchical image segmentation and feature extraction. This method builds upon the combination of the detection of image spectral discontinuities using Canny edge detection and the image Laplacian, followed by the construction of a hierarchy of segmented images of successively reduced levels of details. These images are represented as sets of polygonized pixel patches (polygons) attributed with spectral and structural characteristics. This hierarchy forms the basis for object-oriented image analysis. To build fine level-of-detail representation of the original image, seed partitions (polygons) are built upon a triangular mesh composed of irregular sized triangles, whose spatial arrangement is adapted to the image content. This is achieved by building the triangular mesh on the top of the detected spectral discontinuities that form a network of constraints for the Delaunay triangulation. A polygonized image is represented as a spatial network in the form of a graph with vertices which correspond to the polygonal partitions and graph edges reflecting pairwise partitions relations. Image graph partitioning is based on the iterative graph oontraction using Boruvka's Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. An important characteristic of the approach is that the agglomeration of partitions is constrained by the detected spectral discontinuities; thus the shapes of agglomerated partitions are more likely to correspond to the outlines of real-world objects.

  15. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  16. A fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian segmentation approach for volume determination in PET.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze le Rest, Catherine; Turzo, Alexandre; Roux, Christian; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2009-06-01

    Accurate volume estimation in positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for different oncology applications. The objective of our study was to develop a new fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB) segmentation for automatic lesion volume delineation. FLAB was compared with a threshold approach as well as the previously proposed fuzzy hidden Markov chains (FHMC) and the fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithms. The performance of the algorithms was assessed on acquired datasets of the IEC phantom, covering a range of spherical lesion sizes (10-37 mm), contrast ratios (4:1 and 8:1), noise levels (1, 2, and 5 min acquisitions), and voxel sizes (8 and 64 mm(3)). In addition, the performance of the FLAB model was assessed on realistic nonuniform and nonspherical volumes simulated from patient lesions. Results show that FLAB performs better than the other methodologies, particularly for smaller objects. The volume error was 5%-15% for the different sphere sizes (down to 13 mm), contrast and image qualities considered, with a high reproducibility (variation < 4%). By comparison, the thresholding results were greatly dependent on image contrast and noise, whereas FCM results were less dependent on noise but consistently failed to segment lesions < 2 cm. In addition, FLAB performed consistently better for lesions < 2 cm in comparison to the FHMC algorithm. Finally the FLAB model provided errors less than 10% for nonspherical lesions with inhomogeneous activity distributions. Future developments will concentrate on an extension of FLAB in order to allow the segmentation of separate activity distribution regions within the same functional volume as well as a robustness study with respect to different scanners and reconstruction algorithms.

  17. Segmentation of Skin Tumors in High-Frequency 3-D Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Sciolla, Bruno; Cowell, Lester; Dambry, Thibaut; Guibert, Benoît; Delachartre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    High-frequency 3-D ultrasound imaging is an informative tool for diagnosis, surgery planning and skin lesion examination. The purpose of this article was to describe a semi-automated segmentation tool providing easy access to the extent, shape and volume of a lesion. We propose an adaptive log-likelihood level-set segmentation procedure using non-parametric estimates of the intensity distribution. The algorithm has a single parameter to control the smoothness of the contour, and we describe how a fixed value yields satisfactory segmentation results with an average Dice coefficient of D = 0.76. The algorithm is implemented on a grid, which increases the speed by a factor of 100 compared with a standard pixelwise segmentation. We compare the method with parametric methods making the hypothesis of Rayleigh or Nakagami distributed signals, and illustrate that our method has greater robustness with similar computational speed. Benchmarks are made on realistic synthetic ultrasound images and a data set of nine clinical 3-D images acquired with a 50-MHz imaging system. The proposed algorithm is suitable for use in a clinical context as a post-processing tool.

  18. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  19. A general approach to liver lesion segmentation in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Huang, Lidong; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Lesion segmentation has remained a challenge in different body regions. Generalizability is lacking in published methods as variability in results is common, even for a given organ and modality, such that it becomes difficult to establish standardized methods of disease quantification and reporting. This paper makes an attempt at a generalizable method based on classifying lesions along with their background into groups using clinically used visual attributes. Using an Iterative Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (IRFC) delineation engine, the ideas are implemented for the task of liver lesion segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images. For lesion groups with the same background properties, a few subjects are chosen as the training set to obtain the optimal IRFC parameters for the background tissue components. For lesion groups with similar foreground properties, optimal foreground parameters for IRFC are set as the median intensity value of the training lesion subset. To segment liver lesions belonging to a certain group, the devised method requires manual loading of the corresponding parameters, and correct setting of the foreground and background seeds. The segmentation is then completed in seconds. Segmentation accuracy and repeatability with respect to seed specification are evaluated. Accuracy is assessed by the assignment of a delineation quality score (DQS) to each case. Inter-operator repeatability is assessed by the difference between segmentations carried out independently by two operators. Experiments on 80 liver lesion cases show that the proposed method achieves a mean DQS score of 4.03 and inter-operator repeatability of 92.3%.

  20. Automated 3D renal segmentation based on image partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazaryan, Varduhi; Voiculescu, Irina D.

    2016-03-01

    Despite several decades of research into segmentation techniques, automated medical image segmentation is barely usable in a clinical context, and still at vast user time expense. This paper illustrates unsupervised organ segmentation through the use of a novel automated labelling approximation algorithm followed by a hypersurface front propagation method. The approximation stage relies on a pre-computed image partition forest obtained directly from CT scan data. We have implemented all procedures to operate directly on 3D volumes, rather than slice-by-slice, because our algorithms are dimensionality-independent. The results picture segmentations which identify kidneys, but can easily be extrapolated to other body parts. Quantitative analysis of our automated segmentation compared against hand-segmented gold standards indicates an average Dice similarity coefficient of 90%. Results were obtained over volumes of CT data with 9 kidneys, computing both volume-based similarity measures (such as the Dice and Jaccard coefficients, true positive volume fraction) and size-based measures (such as the relative volume difference). The analysis considered both healthy and diseased kidneys, although extreme pathological cases were excluded from the overall count. Such cases are difficult to segment both manually and automatically due to the large amplitude of Hounsfield unit distribution in the scan, and the wide spread of the tumorous tissue inside the abdomen. In the case of kidneys that have maintained their shape, the similarity range lies around the values obtained for inter-operator variability. Whilst the procedure is fully automated, our tools also provide a light level of manual editing.

  1. Level Set Based Hippocampus Segmentation in MR Images with Improved Initialization Using Region Growing

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaozhong; Ding, Xiaokang; Deng, Xiaolei; Zou, Ling; Li, Bailin

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus has been known as one of the most important structures referred to as Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. However, segmentation of the hippocampus from MR images is still a challenging task due to its small size, complex shape, low contrast, and discontinuous boundaries. For the accurate and efficient detection of the hippocampus, a new image segmentation method based on adaptive region growing and level set algorithm is proposed. Firstly, adaptive region growing and morphological operations are performed in the target regions and its output is used for the initial contour of level set evolution method. Then, an improved edge-based level set method utilizing global Gaussian distributions with different means and variances is developed to implement the accurate segmentation. Finally, gradient descent method is adopted to get the minimization of the energy equation. As proved by experiment results, the proposed method can ideally extract the contours of the hippocampus that are very close to manual segmentation drawn by specialists. PMID:28191031

  2. Syntactic Algorithms for Image Segmentation and a Special Computer Architecture for Image Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Experimental Results of image Segmentation from FLIR ( Forword Looking Infrared) Images . ...... . . . . . . . 1115 4.3.1 Data Acquisition System of...of a picture. Concerning the computer processing time in- volved In image segmentation, the grey level histogram thresholding approach is quite fast ...computer storage and the CPU time for each matching operation. The syntax- controlled method has the advantage of fast computer processing time for

  3. Adaptive energy selective active contour with shape priors for nuclear segmentation and gleason grading of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan I; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all 3 terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images. Morphological features extracted from these segmentations were found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 84% via a Support Vector Machine classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 100% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid AC model involving a shape prior.

  4. Superpixel Cut for Figure-Ground Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Michael Ying; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-06-01

    Figure-ground image segmentation has been a challenging problem in computer vision. Apart from the difficulties in establishing an effective framework to divide the image pixels into meaningful groups, the notions of figure and ground often need to be properly defined by providing either user inputs or object models. In this paper, we propose a novel graph-based segmentation framework, called superpixel cut. The key idea is to formulate foreground segmentation as finding a subset of superpixels that partitions a graph over superpixels. The problem is formulated as Min-Cut. Therefore, we propose a novel cost function that simultaneously minimizes the inter-class similarity while maximizing the intra-class similarity. This cost function is optimized using parametric programming. After a small learning step, our approach is fully automatic and fully bottom-up, which requires no high-level knowledge such as shape priors and scene content. It recovers coherent components of images, providing a set of multiscale hypotheses for high-level reasoning. We evaluate our proposed framework by comparing it to other generic figure-ground segmentation approaches. Our method achieves improved performance on state-of-the-art benchmark databases.

  5. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  6. Segmentation of color images based on the gravitational clustering concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Andrew H.; Yung, H. C.

    1998-03-01

    A new clustering algorithm derived from the Markovian model of the gravitational clustering concept is proposed that works in the RGB measurement space for color image. To enable the model to be applicable in image segmentation, the new algorithm imposes a clustering constraint at each clustering iteration to control and determine the formation of multiple clusters. Using such constraint to limit the attraction between clusters, a termination condition can be easily defined. The new clustering algorithm is evaluated objectively and subjectively on three different images against the K-means clustering algorithm, the recursive histogram clustering algorithm for color, the Hedley-Yan algorithm, and the widely used seed-based region growing algorithm. From the evaluation, it is observed that the new algorithm exhibits the following characteristics: (1) its objective measurement figures are comparable with the best in this group of segmentation algorithms; (2) it generates smoother region boundaries; (3) the segmented boundaries align closely with the original boundaries; and (4) it forms a meaningful number of segmented regions.

  7. Comparison of perceptual color spaces for natural image segmentation tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa-Tome, Fernando E.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ayala-Ramirez, Victor

    2011-11-01

    Color image segmentation largely depends on the color space chosen. Furthermore, spaces that show perceptual uniformity seem to outperform others due to their emulation of the human perception of color. We evaluate three perceptual color spaces, CIELAB, CIELUV, and RLAB, in order to determine their contribution to natural image segmentation and to identify the space that obtains the best results over a test set of images. The nonperceptual color space RGB is also included for reference purposes. In order to quantify the quality of resulting segmentations, an empirical discrepancy evaluation methodology is discussed. The Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and Benchmark is used in test series, and two approaches are taken to perform the experiments: supervised pixelwise classification using reference colors, and unsupervised clustering using k-means. A majority filter is used as a postprocessing stage, in order to determine its contribution to the result. Furthermore, a comparison of elapsed times taken by the required transformations is included. The main finding of our study is that the CIELUV color space outperforms the other color spaces in both discriminatory performance and computational speed, for the average case.

  8. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B.; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D. Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J.; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R.; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M.; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José António; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J.; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A.; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K.; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J.; Thomas, Owen M.; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients—manually annotated by up to four raters—and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%–85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource. PMID:25494501

  9. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12-21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of pathological images still remains an unsolved problem. In this paper we leverage the watershed transform and generalized non-linear gradient operators for interactive segmentation and present an intuitive and simple approach for geographic atrophy segmentation. We compare our approach with the state of the art random walker [5] algorithm for interactive segmentation using ROC statistics. Quantitative evaluation experiments on 100 FAF images show a mean sensitivity/specificity of 98.3/97.7% for our approach and a mean sensitivity/specificity of 88.2/96.6% for the random walker algorithm.

  10. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS).

    PubMed

    Menze, Bjoern H; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José Antonió; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M S; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J; Thomas, Owen M; Tustison, Nicholas J; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients-manually annotated by up to four raters-and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%-85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource.

  11. Object Segmentation and Ground Truth in 3D Embryonic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Bhavna; Uriu, Koichiro; Valentin, Guillaume; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Oates, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Many questions in developmental biology depend on measuring the position and movement of individual cells within developing embryos. Yet, tools that provide this data are often challenged by high cell density and their accuracy is difficult to measure. Here, we present a three-step procedure to address this problem. Step one is a novel segmentation algorithm based on image derivatives that, in combination with selective post-processing, reliably and automatically segments cell nuclei from images of densely packed tissue. Step two is a quantitative validation using synthetic images to ascertain the efficiency of the algorithm with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and object density. Finally, we propose an original method to generate reliable and experimentally faithful ground truth datasets: Sparse-dense dual-labeled embryo chimeras are used to unambiguously measure segmentation errors within experimental data. Together, the three steps outlined here establish a robust, iterative procedure to fine-tune image analysis algorithms and microscopy settings associated with embryonic 3D image data sets. PMID:27332860

  12. Sequence-independent segmentation of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Bruce; Salat, David H; van der Kouwe, André J W; Makris, Nikos; Ségonne, Florent; Quinn, Brian T; Dale, Anders M

    2004-01-01

    We present a set of techniques for embedding the physics of the imaging process that generates a class of magnetic resonance images (MRIs) into a segmentation or registration algorithm. This results in substantial invariance to acquisition parameters, as the effect of these parameters on the contrast properties of various brain structures is explicitly modeled in the segmentation. In addition, the integration of image acquisition with tissue classification allows the derivation of sequences that are optimal for segmentation purposes. Another benefit of these procedures is the generation of probabilistic models of the intrinsic tissue parameters that cause MR contrast (e.g., T1, proton density, T2*), allowing access to these physiologically relevant parameters that may change with disease or demographic, resulting in nonmorphometric alterations in MR images that are otherwise difficult to detect. Finally, we also present a high band width multiecho FLASH pulse sequence that results in high signal-to-noise ratio with minimal image distortion due to B0 effects. This sequence has the added benefit of allowing the explicit estimation of T2* and of reducing test-retest intensity variability.

  13. Object Segmentation and Ground Truth in 3D Embryonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Bhavna; Uriu, Koichiro; Valentin, Guillaume; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Oates, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Many questions in developmental biology depend on measuring the position and movement of individual cells within developing embryos. Yet, tools that provide this data are often challenged by high cell density and their accuracy is difficult to measure. Here, we present a three-step procedure to address this problem. Step one is a novel segmentation algorithm based on image derivatives that, in combination with selective post-processing, reliably and automatically segments cell nuclei from images of densely packed tissue. Step two is a quantitative validation using synthetic images to ascertain the efficiency of the algorithm with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and object density. Finally, we propose an original method to generate reliable and experimentally faithful ground truth datasets: Sparse-dense dual-labeled embryo chimeras are used to unambiguously measure segmentation errors within experimental data. Together, the three steps outlined here establish a robust, iterative procedure to fine-tune image analysis algorithms and microscopy settings associated with embryonic 3D image data sets.

  14. Minimum description length synthetic aperture radar image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Galland, Frédéric; Bertaux, Nicolas; Réfrégier, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    We present a new minimum description length (MDL) approach based on a deformable partition--a polygonal grid--for automatic segmentation of a speckled image composed of several homogeneous regions. The image segmentation thus consists in the estimation of the polygonal grid, or, more precisely, its number of regions, its number of nodes and the location of its nodes. These estimations are performed by minimizing a unique MDL criterion which takes into account the probabilistic properties of speckle fluctuations and a measure of the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid. This approach then leads to a global MDL criterion without an undetermined parameter since no other regularization term than the stochastic complexity of the polygonal grid is necessary and noise parameters can be estimated with maximum likelihood-like approaches. The performance of this technique is illustrated on synthetic and real synthetic aperture radar images of agricultural regions and the influence of different terms of the model is analyzed.

  15. Bounded Rayleigh mixture model for ultrasound image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, H.; Tang, H.; Shu, H. Z.; Dillenseger, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    The finite mixture model based on the Gaussian distribution is a flexible and powerful tool to address image segmentation. However, in the case of ultrasound images, the intensity distributions are non-symmetric whereas the Gaussian distribution is symmetric. In this study, a new finite bounded Rayleigh distribution is proposed. One advantage of the proposed model is that Rayleigh distribution is non-symmetric which has ability to fit the shape of medical ultrasound data. Another advantage is that each component of the proposed model is suitable for the ultrasound image segmentation. We also apply the bounded Rayleigh mixture model in order to improve the accuracy and to reduce the computational time. Experiments show that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-art methods on time consumption and accuracy.

  16. Adaptive segmentation of nuclei in H&S stained tendon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Bo-I.; Wu, Po-Ting; Hsu, Jian-Han; Jou, I.-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2015-12-01

    Tendiopathy is a popular clinical issue in recent years. In most cases like trigger finger or tennis elbow, the pathology change can be observed under H and E stained tendon microscopy. However, the qualitative analysis is too subjective and thus the results heavily depend on the observers. We develop an automatic segmentation procedure which segments and counts the nuclei in H and E stained tendon microscopy fast and precisely. This procedure first determines the complexity of images and then segments the nuclei from the image. For the complex images, the proposed method adopts sampling-based thresholding to segment the nuclei. While for the simple images, the Laplacian-based thresholding is employed to re-segment the nuclei more accurately. In the experiments, the proposed method is compared with the experts outlined results. The nuclei number of proposed method is closed to the experts counted, and the processing time of proposed method is much faster than the experts'.

  17. An image segmentation method for apple sorting and grading using support vector machine and Otsu's method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Segmentation is the first step in image analysis to subdivide an image into meaningful regions. The segmentation result directly affects the subsequent image analysis. The objective of the research was to develop an automatic adjustable algorithm for segmentation of color images, using linear suppor...

  18. Colour image segmentation using unsupervised clustering technique for acute leukemia images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, N. H. Abd; Mashor, M. Y.; Nasir, A. S. Abdul; Mustafa, N.; Hassan, R.

    2015-05-01

    Colour image segmentation has becoming more popular for computer vision due to its important process in most medical analysis tasks. This paper proposes comparison between different colour components of RGB(red, green, blue) and HSI (hue, saturation, intensity) colour models that will be used in order to segment the acute leukemia images. First, partial contrast stretching is applied on leukemia images to increase the visual aspect of the blast cells. Then, an unsupervised moving k-means clustering algorithm is applied on the various colour components of RGB and HSI colour models for the purpose of segmentation of blast cells from the red blood cells and background regions in leukemia image. Different colour components of RGB and HSI colour models have been analyzed in order to identify the colour component that can give the good segmentation performance. The segmented images are then processed using median filter and region growing technique to reduce noise and smooth the images. The results show that segmentation using saturation component of HSI colour model has proven to be the best in segmenting nucleus of the blast cells in acute leukemia image as compared to the other colour components of RGB and HSI colour models.

  19. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images.

  20. Adaptive SVD-Based Digital Image Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvanian, Maliheh; Torkamani Azar, Farah

    Digital data utilization along with the increase popularity of the Internet has facilitated information sharing and distribution. However, such applications have also raised concern about copyright issues and unauthorized modification and distribution of digital data. Digital watermarking techniques which are proposed to solve these problems hide some information in digital media and extract it whenever needed to indicate the data owner. In this paper a new method of image watermarking based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of images is proposed which considers human visual system prior to embedding watermark by segmenting the original image into several blocks of different sizes, with more density in the edges of the image. In this way the original image quality is preserved in the watermarked image. Additional advantages of the proposed technique are large capacity of watermark embedding and robustness of the method against different types of image manipulation techniques.

  1. Survey of contemporary trends in color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Saber, Eli

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the acquisition of image and video information for processing, analysis, understanding, and exploitation of the underlying content in various applications, ranging from remote sensing to biomedical imaging, has grown at an unprecedented rate. Analysis by human observers is quite laborious, tiresome, and time consuming, if not infeasible, given the large and continuously rising volume of data. Hence the need for systems capable of automatically and effectively analyzing the aforementioned imagery for a variety of uses that span the spectrum from homeland security to elderly care. In order to achieve the above, tools such as image segmentation provide the appropriate foundation for expediting and improving the effectiveness of subsequent high-level tasks by providing a condensed and pertinent representation of image information. We provide a comprehensive survey of color image segmentation strategies adopted over the last decade, though notable contributions in the gray scale domain will also be discussed. Our taxonomy of segmentation techniques is sampled from a wide spectrum of spatially blind (or feature-based) approaches such as clustering and histogram thresholding as well as spatially guided (or spatial domain-based) methods such as region growing/splitting/merging, energy-driven parametric/geometric active contours, supervised/unsupervised graph cuts, and watersheds, to name a few. In addition, qualitative and quantitative results of prominent algorithms on several images from the Berkeley segmentation dataset are shown in order to furnish a fair indication of the current quality of the state of the art. Finally, we provide a brief discussion on our current perspective of the field as well as its associated future trends.

  2. Control of multiple excited image states around segmented carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Knörzer, J. Fey, C.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-11-28

    Electronic image states around segmented carbon nanotubes can be confined and shaped along the nanotube axis by engineering the image potential. We show how several such image states can be prepared simultaneously along the same nanotube. The inter-electronic distance can be controlled a priori by engineering tubes of specific geometries. High sensitivity to external electric and magnetic fields can be exploited to manipulate these states and their mutual long-range interactions. These building blocks provide access to a new kind of tailored interacting quantum systems.

  3. Texture-based forest segmentation in satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, S. V.; Mikhailov, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    NDVI images are often used to segment vegetation areas in satellite images. Unfortunately, NDVI lack information to effectively separate forest regions from grass regions, as it is computed basing solely on spectral characteristics of red and infrared bands, and both forest and grass display similar spectral characteristics. On the other hand, forest areas are visually distinguishable, as they contain a lot of small shadows or dark spots in satellite images, while grass areas look flat. In the paper, we use this observation by extracting simple texture features from the panchromatic band. In our case, it was enough to compute standard deviation for a sliding window to separate forest from grass.

  4. Learning a cost function for microscope image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nilufar, Sharmin; Perkins, Theodore J

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of microscopy images is increasingly important in clinical researchers' efforts to unravel the cellular and molecular determinants of disease, and for pathological analysis of tissue samples. Yet, manual segmentation and measurement of cells or other features in images remains the norm in many fields. We report on a new system that aims for robust and accurate semi-automated analysis of microscope images. A user interactively outlines one or more examples of a target object in a training image. We then learn a cost function for detecting more objects of the same type, either in the same or different images. The cost function is incorporated into an active contour model, which can efficiently determine optimal boundaries by dynamic programming. We validate our approach and compare it to some standard alternatives on three different types of microscopic images: light microscopy of blood cells, light microscopy of muscle tissue sections, and electron microscopy cross-sections of axons and their myelin sheaths.

  5. ALISA: adaptive learning image and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ALISA (Adaptive Learning Image and Signal Analysis) is an adaptive statistical learning engine that may be used to detect and classify the surfaces and boundaries of objects in images. The engine has been designed, implemented, and tested at both the George Washington University and the Research Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing in Ulm, Germany over the last nine years with major funding from Robert Bosch GmbH and Lockheed-Martin Corporation. The design of ALISA was inspired by the multi-path cortical- column architecture and adaptive functions of the mammalian visual cortex.

  6. Automatic segmentation of trophectoderm in microscopic images of human blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjot; Au, Jason; Saeedi, Parvaneh; Havelock, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of embryos viability is an extremely important task in the optimization of in vitro fertilization treatment outcome. One of the common ways of assessing the quality of a human embryo is grading it on its fifth day of development based on morphological quality of its three main components (Trophectoderm, Inner Cell Mass, and the level of expansion or the thickness of its Zona Pellucida). In this study, we propose a fully automatic method for segmentation and measurement of TE region of blastocysts (day-5 human embryos). Here, we eliminate the inhomogeneities of the blastocysts surface using the Retinex theory and further apply a level-set algorithm to segment the TE regions. We have tested our method on a dataset of 85 images and have been able to achieve a segmentation accuracy of 84.6% for grade A, 89.0% for grade B, and 91.7% for grade C embryos.

  7. Optimal segmentation of pupillometric images for estimating pupil shape parameters.

    PubMed

    De Santis, A; Iacoviello, D

    2006-12-01

    The problem of determining the pupil morphological parameters from pupillometric data is considered. These characteristics are of great interest for non-invasive early diagnosis of the central nervous system response to environmental stimuli of different nature, in subjects suffering some typical diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, drug and alcohol addiction. Pupil geometrical features such as diameter, area, centroid coordinates, are estimated by a procedure based on an image segmentation algorithm. It exploits the level set formulation of the variational problem related to the segmentation. A discrete set up of this problem that admits a unique optimal solution is proposed: an arbitrary initial curve is evolved towards the optimal segmentation boundary by a difference equation; therefore no numerical approximation schemes are needed, as required in the equivalent continuum formulation usually adopted in the relevant literature.

  8. Unsupervised boundary delineation of spinal neural foramina using a multi-feature and adaptive spectral segmentation.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Heye; Landis, Mark; Sharma, Manas; Warrington, James; Li, Shuo

    2017-02-01

    As a common disease in the elderly, neural foramina stenosis (NFS) brings a significantly negative impact on the quality of life due to its symptoms including pain, disability, fall risk and depression. Accurate boundary delineation is essential to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of NFS. However, existing clinical routine is extremely tedious and inefficient due to the requirement of physicians' intensively manual delineation. Automated delineation is highly needed but faces big challenges from the complexity and variability in neural foramina images. In this paper, we propose a pure image-driven unsupervised boundary delineation framework for the automated neural foramina boundary delineation. This framework is based on a novel multi-feature and adaptive spectral segmentation (MFASS) algorithm. MFASS firstly utilizes the combination of region and edge features to generate reliable spectral features with a good separation between neural foramina and its surroundings, then estimates an optimal separation threshold for each individual image to separate neural foramina from its surroundings. This self-adjusted optimal separation threshold, estimated from spectral features, successfully overcome the diverse appearance and shape variations. With the robustness from the multi-feature fusion and the flexibility from the adaptively optimal separation threshold estimation, the proposed framework, based on MFASS, provides an automated and accurate boundary delineation. Validation was performed in 280 neural foramina MR images from 56 clinical subjects. Our method was benchmarked with manual boundary obtained by experienced physicians. Results demonstrate that the proposed method enjoys a high and stable consistency with experienced physicians (Dice: 90.58% ± 2.79%; SMAD: 0.5657 ± 0.1544 mm). Therefore, the proposed framework enables an efficient and accurate clinical tool in the diagnosis of neural foramina stenosis.

  9. An Expert Vision System for Medical Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiuh-Yung J.; Lin, Wei-Chung; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, an expert vision system is proposed which integrates knowledge from diverse sources for tomographic image segmentation. The system miinicks the reasoning process of an expert to divide a tomographic brain image into semantically meaningful entities. These entities can then be related to the fundamental biomedical processes, both in health and in disease, that are of interest or of importance to health care research. The images under study include those acquired from x-ray CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and PET (Positron Emission Tomography). Given a set of three (correlated) images acquired from these three different modalities at the same slicing level and angle of a human brain, the proposed system performs image segmentation based on (1) knowledge about the characteristics of the three different sensors, (2) knowledge about the anatomic structures of human brains, (3) knowledge about brain diseases, and (4) knowledge about image processing and analysis tools. Since the problem domain is characterized by incomplete and uncertain information, the blackboard architecture which is an opportunistic reasoning model is adopted as the framework of the proposed system.

  10. Adaptive directional lifting-based wavelet transform for image coding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenpeng; Wu, Feng; Wu, Xiaolin; Li, Shipeng; Li, Houqiang

    2007-02-01

    We present a novel 2-D wavelet transform scheme of adaptive directional lifting (ADL) in image coding. Instead of alternately applying horizontal and vertical lifting, as in present practice, ADL performs lifting-based prediction in local windows in the direction of high pixel correlation. Hence, it adapts far better to the image orientation features in local windows. The ADL transform is achieved by existing 1-D wavelets and is seamlessly integrated into the global wavelet transform. The predicting and updating signals of ADL can be derived even at the fractional pixel precision level to achieve high directional resolution, while still maintaining perfect reconstruction. To enhance the ADL performance, a rate-distortion optimized directional segmentation scheme is also proposed to form and code a hierarchical image partition adapting to local features. Experimental results show that the proposed ADL-based image coding technique outperforms JPEG 2000 in both PSNR and visual quality, with the improvement up to 2.0 dB on images with rich orientation features.

  11. Crowdsourcing the creation of image segmentation algorithms for connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Turaga, Srinivas C.; Berger, Daniel R.; Cireşan, Dan; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Laptev, Dmitry; Dwivedi, Sarvesh; Buhmann, Joachim M.; Liu, Ting; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Tasdizen, Tolga; Kamentsky, Lee; Burget, Radim; Uher, Vaclav; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Changming; Pham, Tuan D.; Bas, Erhan; Uzunbas, Mustafa G.; Cardona, Albert; Schindelin, Johannes; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    To stimulate progress in automating the reconstruction of neural circuits, we organized the first international challenge on 2D segmentation of electron microscopic (EM) images of the brain. Participants submitted boundary maps predicted for a test set of images, and were scored based on their agreement with a consensus of human expert annotations. The winning team had no prior experience with EM images, and employed a convolutional network. This “deep learning” approach has since become accepted as a standard for segmentation of EM images. The challenge has continued to accept submissions, and the best so far has resulted from cooperation between two teams. The challenge has probably saturated, as algorithms cannot progress beyond limits set by ambiguities inherent in 2D scoring and the size of the test dataset. Retrospective evaluation of the challenge scoring system reveals that it was not sufficiently robust to variations in the widths of neurite borders. We propose a solution to this problem, which should be useful for a future 3D segmentation challenge. PMID:26594156

  12. Joint graph cut and relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris; Miranda, Paulo A V; Falcão, Alexandre X; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2013-12-01

    We introduce an image segmentation algorithm, called GC(sum)(max), which combines, in novel manner, the strengths of two popular algorithms: Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (RFC) and (standard) Graph Cut (GC). We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that GC(sum)(max) preserves robustness of RFC with respect to the seed choice (thus, avoiding "shrinking problem" of GC), while keeping GC's stronger control over the problem of "leaking though poorly defined boundary segments." The analysis of GC(sum)(max) is greatly facilitated by our recent theoretical results that RFC can be described within the framework of Generalized GC (GGC) segmentation algorithms. In our implementation of GC(sum)(max) we use, as a subroutine, a version of RFC algorithm (based on Image Forest Transform) that runs (provably) in linear time with respect to the image size. This results in GC(sum)(max) running in a time close to linear. Experimental comparison of GC(sum)(max) to GC, an iterative version of RFC (IRFC), and power watershed (PW), based on a variety medical and non-medical images, indicates superior accuracy performance of GC(sum)(max) over these other methods, resulting in a rank ordering of GC(sum)(max)>PW∼IRFC>GC.

  13. Crowdsourcing the creation of image segmentation algorithms for connectomics.

    PubMed

    Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Turaga, Srinivas C; Berger, Daniel R; Cireşan, Dan; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Laptev, Dmitry; Dwivedi, Sarvesh; Buhmann, Joachim M; Liu, Ting; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Tasdizen, Tolga; Kamentsky, Lee; Burget, Radim; Uher, Vaclav; Tan, Xiao; Sun, Changming; Pham, Tuan D; Bas, Erhan; Uzunbas, Mustafa G; Cardona, Albert; Schindelin, Johannes; Seung, H Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    To stimulate progress in automating the reconstruction of neural circuits, we organized the first international challenge on 2D segmentation of electron microscopic (EM) images of the brain. Participants submitted boundary maps predicted for a test set of images, and were scored based on their agreement with a consensus of human expert annotations. The winning team had no prior experience with EM images, and employed a convolutional network. This "deep learning" approach has since become accepted as a standard for segmentation of EM images. The challenge has continued to accept submissions, and the best so far has resulted from cooperation between two teams. The challenge has probably saturated, as algorithms cannot progress beyond limits set by ambiguities inherent in 2D scoring and the size of the test dataset. Retrospective evaluation of the challenge scoring system reveals that it was not sufficiently robust to variations in the widths of neurite borders. We propose a solution to this problem, which should be useful for a future 3D segmentation challenge.

  14. A region-appearance-based adaptive variational model for 3D liver segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jialin; Dong, Fangfang; Chen, Yunmei; Kong, Dexing

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Liver segmentation from computed tomography images is a challenging task owing to pixel intensity overlapping, ambiguous edges, and complex backgrounds. The authors address this problem with a novel active surface scheme, which minimizes an energy functional combining both edge- and region-based information. Methods: In this semiautomatic method, the evolving surface is principally attracted to strong edges but is facilitated by the region-based information where edge information is missing. As avoiding oversegmentation is the primary challenge, the authors take into account multiple features and appearance context information. Discriminative cues, such as multilayer consecutiveness and local organ deformation are also implicitly incorporated. Case-specific intensity and appearance constraints are included to cope with the typically large appearance variations over multiple images. Spatially adaptive balancing weights are employed to handle the nonuniformity of image features. Results: Comparisons and validations on difficult cases showed that the authors’ model can effectively discriminate the liver from adhering background tissues. Boundaries weak in gradient or with no local evidence (e.g., small edge gaps or parts with similar intensity to the background) were delineated without additional user constraint. With an average surface distance of 0.9 mm and an average volume overlap of 93.9% on the MICCAI data set, the authors’ model outperformed most state-of-the-art methods. Validations on eight volumes with different initial conditions had segmentation score variances mostly less than unity. Conclusions: The proposed model can efficiently delineate ambiguous liver edges from complex tissue backgrounds with reproducibility. Quantitative validations and comparative results demonstrate the accuracy and efficacy of the model.

  15. GPU-based relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuge Ying; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Miller, Robert W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose:Recently, clinical radiological research and practice are becoming increasingly quantitative. Further, images continue to increase in size and volume. For quantitative radiology to become practical, it is crucial that image segmentation algorithms and their implementations are rapid and yield practical run time on very large data sets. The purpose of this paper is to present a parallel version of an algorithm that belongs to the family of fuzzy connectedness (FC) algorithms, to achieve an interactive speed for segmenting large medical image data sets. Methods: The most common FC segmentations, optimizing an Script-Small-L {sub {infinity}}-based energy, are known as relative fuzzy connectedness (RFC) and iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC). Both RFC and IRFC objects (of which IRFC contains RFC) can be found via linear time algorithms, linear with respect to the image size. The new algorithm, P-ORFC (for parallel optimal RFC), which is implemented by using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) platform, considerably improves the computational speed of the above mentioned CPU based IRFC algorithm. Results: Experiments based on four data sets of small, medium, large, and super data size, achieved speedup factors of 32.8 Multiplication-Sign , 22.9 Multiplication-Sign , 20.9 Multiplication-Sign , and 17.5 Multiplication-Sign , correspondingly, on the NVIDIA Tesla C1060 platform. Although the output of P-ORFC need not precisely match that of IRFC output, it is very close to it and, as the authors prove, always lies between the RFC and IRFC objects. Conclusions: A parallel version of a top-of-the-line algorithm in the family of FC has been developed on the NVIDIA GPUs. An interactive speed of segmentation has been achieved, even for the largest medical image data set. Such GPU implementations may play a crucial role in automatic anatomy recognition in clinical radiology.

  16. An active contour model for medical image segmentation with application to brain CT image

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaohua; Wang, Jiahui; Guo, Shuxu; Li, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) segmentation in computed tomography (CT) is a key step in computer-aided detection (CAD) of acute ischemic stroke. Because of image noise, low contrast and intensity inhomogeneity, CSF segmentation has been a challenging task. A region-based active contour model, which is insensitive to contour initialization and robust to intensity inhomogeneity, was developed for segmenting CSF in brain CT images. Methods: The energy function of the region-based active contour model is composed of a range domain kernel function, a space domain kernel function, and an edge indicator function. By minimizing the energy function, the region of edge elements of the target could be automatically identified in images with less dependence on initial contours. The energy function was optimized by means of the deepest descent method with a level set framework. An overlap rate between segmentation results and the reference standard was used to assess the segmentation accuracy. The authors evaluated the performance of the proposed method on both synthetic data and real brain CT images. They also compared the performance level of our method to those of region-scalable fitting (RSF) and global convex segment (GCS) models. Results: For the experiment of CSF segmentation in 67 brain CT images, their method achieved an average overlap rate of 66% compared to the average overlap rates of 16% and 46% from the RSF model and the GCS model, respectively. Conclusions: Their region-based active contour model has the ability to achieve accurate segmentation results in images with high noise level and intensity inhomogeneity. Therefore, their method has great potential in the segmentation of medical images and would be useful for developing CAD schemes for acute ischemic stroke in brain CT images. PMID:23387759

  17. Study and Realization of Image Segmentation on the Cotton Foreign Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxiu; Wang, Jinxing; Liu, Shuangxi; Wei, Xinhua

    A method of foreign fibers image segmentation based on Mean shift, dilation and filtering algorithm is presented. For the representative gray images of hair, chicken feather and mixed foreign fibers, the Mean shift algorithm is used to carry on image segmentation; then dilation and filtering process is carried on to the divided image element. In this way the precise image segmentation of foreign fibers is realized. It’s proved by experiments that the image segmentation method proposed by this article can suppress the noise well, and the segmentation results are satisfied for all kinds of foreign fibers image.

  18. Study and Realization of Image Segmentation on the Cotton Foreign Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxiu; Wang, Jinxing; Liu, Shuangxi; Wei, Xinhua

    A method of foreign fibers image segmentation based on Mean shift, dilation and filtering algorithm is presented. For the representative gray images of hair, chicken feather and mixed foreign fibers, the Mean shift algorithm is used to carry on image segmentation; then dilation and filtering process is carried on to the divided image element. In this way the precise image segmentation of foreign fibers is realized. It's proved by experiments that the image segmentation method proposed by this article can suppress the noise well, and the segmentation results are satisfied for all kinds of foreign fibers image.

  19. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  20. Image segmentation for integrated multiphoton microscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of human skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guannan; Lui, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive cellular imaging of the skin in vivo can be achieved in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) modalities to yield complementary images of the skin based on different optical properties. One of the challenges of in vivo microscopy is the delineation (i.e., segmentation) of cellular and subcellular architectural features. Methods In this work we present a method for combining watershed and level-set models for segmentation of multimodality images obtained by an integrated MPM and RCM imaging system from human skin in vivo. Results Firstly, a segmentation model based on watershed is introduced for obtaining the accurate structure of cell borders from the RCM image. Secondly,, a global region based energy level-set model is constructed for extracting the nucleus of each cell from the MPM image. Thirdly, a local region-based Lagrange Continuous level-set approach is used for segmenting cytoplasm from the MPM image. Conclusions Experimental results demonstrated that cell borders from RCM image and boundaries of cytoplasm and nucleus from MPM image can be obtained by our segmentation method with better accuracy and effectiveness. We are planning to use this method to perform quantitative analysis of MPM and RCM images of in vivo human skin to study the variations of cellular parameters such as cell size, nucleus size and other mophormetric features with skin pathologies. PMID:25694949

  1. Three-dimensional segmentation of the heart muscle using image statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Gerrits, Inge H.; Kapusta, Livia; Huisman, Henkjan H.; Thijssen, Johan M.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2006-03-01

    Segmentation of the heart muscle in 3D echocardiographic images provides a tool for visualization of cardiac anatomy and assessment of heart function, and serves as an important pre-processing step for cardiac strain imaging. By incorporating spatial and temporal information of 3D ultrasound image sequences (4D), a fully automated method using image statistics was developed to perform 3D segmentation of the heart muscle. 3D rf-data were acquired with a Philips SONOS 7500 live 3D ultrasound system, and an X4 matrix array transducer (2-4 MHz). Left ventricular images of five healthy children were taken in transthoracial short/long axis view. As a first step, image statistics of blood and heart muscle were investigated. Next, based on these statistics, an adaptive mean squares filter was selected and applied to the images. Window size was related to speckle size (5x2 speckles). The degree of adaptive filtering was automatically steered by the local homogeneity of tissue. As a result, discrimination of heart muscle and blood was optimized, while sharpness of edges was preserved. After this pre-processing stage, homomorphic filtering and automatic thresholding were performed to obtain the inner borders of the heart muscle. Finally, a deformable contour algorithm was used to yield a closed contour of the left ventricular cavity in each elevational plane. Each contour was optimized using contours of the surrounding planes (spatial and temporal) as limiting condition to ensure spatial and temporal continuity. Better segmentation of the ventricle was obtained using 4D information than using information of each plane separately.

  2. Binary image segmentation based on optimized parallel K-means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiao-bing; Zhou, Yong; Lin, Li

    2015-07-01

    K-means is a classic unsupervised learning clustering algorithm. In theory, it can work well in the field of image segmentation. But compared with other segmentation algorithms, this algorithm needs much more computation, and segmentation speed is slow. This limits its application. With the emergence of general-purpose computing on the GPU and the release of CUDA, some scholars try to implement K-means algorithm in parallel on the GPU, and applied to image segmentation at the same time. They have achieved some results, but the approach they use is not completely parallel, not take full advantage of GPU's super computing power. K-means algorithm has two core steps: label and update, in current parallel realization of K-means, only labeling is parallel, update operation is still serial. In this paper, both of the two steps in K-means will be parallel to improve the degree of parallelism and accelerate this algorithm. Experimental results show that this improvement has reached a much quicker speed than the previous research.

  3. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, B.; Graham, J. R.; Ghez, A.; Kalas, P.; Lloyd, J.; Makidon, R.; Olivier, S.; Patience, J.; Perrin, M.; Poyneer, L.; Severson, S.; Sheinis, A.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Troy, M.; Wallace, J.; Wilhelmsen, J.

    2002-12-01

    Direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets is the next major step in extrasolar planet studies. Current adaptive optics (AO) systems, with <300 subapertures and Strehl ratio 0.4-0.7, can achieve contrast levels of 106 at 2" separations; this is sufficient to see very young planets in wide orbits but insufficient to detect solar systems more like our own. Contrast levels of 107 - 108 in the near-IR are needed to probe a significant part of the extrasolar planet phase space. The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics is carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast "Extreme" adaptive optics system for an 8-10m telescope. With 3000 controlled subapertures it should achieve Strehl ratios > 0.9 in the near-IR. Using a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 107-108 around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. The system will be capable of a variety of high-contrast science including studying circumstellar dust disks at densities a factor of 10-100 lower than currently feasible and a systematic inventory of other solar systems on 10-100 AU scale. This work was supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by UC Santa Cruz under AST-9876783. Portions of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Segmentation of volumetric tissue images using constrained active contour models.

    PubMed

    Adiga, P S Umesh

    2003-06-01

    In this article we describe an application of active contour model for the segmentation of 3D histo-pathological images. The 3D images of a thick tissue specimen are obtained as a stack of optical sections using confocal laser beam scanning microscope (CLSM). We have applied noise reduction and feature enhancement methods so that a smooth and slowly varying potential surface is obtained for proper convergence. To increase the capture range of the potential surface, we use a combination of distance potential and the diffused gradient potential as external forces. It has been shown that the region-based information obtained from low-level segmentation can be applied to reduce the adverse influence of the neighbouring nucleus having a strong boundary feature. We have also shown that, by increasing the axial resolution of the image stack, we can automatically propagate the optimum active contour of one image slice to its neighbouring image slices as an appropriate initial model. Results on images of prostate tissue section are presented.

  5. Parametric kernel-driven active contours for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiongzhi; Fang, Jiangxiong

    2012-10-01

    We investigated a parametric kernel-driven active contour (PKAC) model, which implicitly transfers kernel mapping and piecewise constant to modeling the image data via kernel function. The proposed model consists of curve evolution functional with three terms: global kernel-driven and local kernel-driven terms, which evaluate the deviation of the mapped image data within each region from the piecewise constant model, and a regularization term expressed as the length of the evolution curves. In the local kernel-driven term, the proposed model can effectively segment images with intensity inhomogeneity by incorporating the local image information. By balancing the weight between the global kernel-driven term and the local kernel-driven term, the proposed model can segment the images with either intensity homogeneity or intensity inhomogeneity. To ensure the smoothness of the level set function and reduce the computational cost, the distance regularizing term is applied to penalize the deviation of the level set function and eliminate the requirement of re-initialization. Compared with the local image fitting model and local binary fitting model, experimental results show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of computational efficiency and accuracy.

  6. Multi-Atlas Segmentation of Biomedical Images: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Sabuncu, Mert R.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS), first introduced and popularized by the pioneering work of Rohlfing, Brandt, Menzel and Maurer Jr (2004), Klein, Mensh, Ghosh, Tourville and Hirsch (2005), and Heckemann, Hajnal, Aljabar, Rueckert and Hammers (2006), is becoming one of the most widely-used and successful image segmentation techniques in biomedical applications. By manipulating and utilizing the entire dataset of “atlases” (training images that have been previously labeled, e.g., manually by an expert), rather than some model-based average representation, MAS has the flexibility to better capture anatomical variation, thus offering superior segmentation accuracy. This benefit, however, typically comes at a high computational cost. Recent advancements in computer hardware and image processing software have been instrumental in addressing this challenge and facilitated the wide adoption of MAS. Today, MAS has come a long way and the approach includes a wide array of sophisticated algorithms that employ ideas from machine learning, probabilistic modeling, optimization, and computer vision, among other fields. This paper presents a survey of published MAS algorithms and studies that have applied these methods to various biomedical problems. In writing this survey, we have three distinct aims. Our primary goal is to document how MAS was originally conceived, later evolved, and now relates to alternative methods. Second, this paper is intended to be a detailed reference of past research activity in MAS, which now spans over a decade (2003 – 2014) and entails novel methodological developments and application-specific solutions. Finally, our goal is to also present a perspective on the future of MAS, which, we believe, will be one of the dominant approaches in biomedical image segmentation. PMID:26201875

  7. Multi-atlas segmentation of biomedical images: A survey.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Sabuncu, Mert R

    2015-08-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS), first introduced and popularized by the pioneering work of Rohlfing, et al. (2004), Klein, et al. (2005), and Heckemann, et al. (2006), is becoming one of the most widely-used and successful image segmentation techniques in biomedical applications. By manipulating and utilizing the entire dataset of "atlases" (training images that have been previously labeled, e.g., manually by an expert), rather than some model-based average representation, MAS has the flexibility to better capture anatomical variation, thus offering superior segmentation accuracy. This benefit, however, typically comes at a high computational cost. Recent advancements in computer hardware and image processing software have been instrumental in addressing this challenge and facilitated the wide adoption of MAS. Today, MAS has come a long way and the approach includes a wide array of sophisticated algorithms that employ ideas from machine learning, probabilistic modeling, optimization, and computer vision, among other fields. This paper presents a survey of published MAS algorithms and studies that have applied these methods to various biomedical problems. In writing this survey, we have three distinct aims. Our primary goal is to document how MAS was originally conceived, later evolved, and now relates to alternative methods. Second, this paper is intended to be a detailed reference of past research activity in MAS, which now spans over a decade (2003-2014) and entails novel methodological developments and application-specific solutions. Finally, our goal is to also present a perspective on the future of MAS, which, we believe, will be one of the dominant approaches in biomedical image segmentation.

  8. An automatic fractional coefficient setting method of FODPSO for hyperspectral image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, an automatic fractional coefficient setting method of fractional-order Darwinian particle swarm optimization (FODPSO) is proposed for hyperspectral image segmentation. The spectrum has been already taken into consideration by integrating various types of band selection algorithms, firstly. We provide a short overview of the hyperspectral image to select an appropriate set of bands by combining supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised band selection algorithms. Some approaches are not limited in regards to their spectral dimension, but are limited with respect to their spatial dimension owing to low spatial resolution. The addition of spatial information will be focused on improving the performance of hyperspectral image segmentation for later fusion or classification. Many researchers have advocated that a large fractional coefficient should be in the exploration state while a small fractional coefficient should be in the exploitation, which does not mean the coefficient purely decrease with time. Due to such reasons, we propose an adaptive FODPSO by setting the fractional coefficient adaptively for the application of final hyperspectral image segmentation. In fact, the paper introduces an evolutionary factor to automatically control the fractional coefficient by using a sigmoid function. Therefore, fractional coefficient with large value will benefit the global search in the exploration state. Conversely, when the fractional coefficient has a small value, the exploitation state is detected. Hence, it can avoid optimization process get trapped into the local optima. Ultimately, the experimental segmentation results prove the validity and efficiency of our proposed automatic fractional coefficient setting method of FODPSO compared with traditional PSO, DPSO and FODPSO.

  9. Image-Specific Prior Adaptation for Denoising.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Lin, Zhe; Jin, Hailin; Yang, Jianchao; Wang, James Z

    2015-12-01

    Image priors are essential to many image restoration applications, including denoising, deblurring, and inpainting. Existing methods use either priors from the given image (internal) or priors from a separate collection of images (external). We find through statistical analysis that unifying the internal and external patch priors may yield a better patch prior. We propose a novel prior learning algorithm that combines the strength of both internal and external priors. In particular, we first learn a generic Gaussian mixture model from a collection of training images and then adapt the model to the given image by simultaneously adding additional components and refining the component parameters. We apply this image-specific prior to image denoising. The experimental results show that our approach yields better or competitive denoising results in terms of both the peak signal-to-noise ratio and structural similarity.

  10. Medical image segmentation by a constraint satisfaction neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T. . Dept. of Radiology); Tsao, E.C.K.; Lin, W.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1991-04-01

    This paper proposes a class of Constraint Satisfaction Neural Networks (CSNNs) for solving the problem of medical image segmentation which can be formulated as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP). A CSNN consists of a set of objects, a set of labels for each object, a collection of constraint relations linking the labels of neighboring objects, and a topological constraint describing the neighborhood relationship among various objects. Each label for a particular object indicates one possible interpretation for that object. The CSNN can be viewed as a collection of neurons that interconnect with each other. The connections and the topology of a CSNN are used to represent the constraints in a CSP. The mechanism of the neural network is to find a solution that satisfies all the constraints in order to achieve a global consistency. The final solution outlines segmented areas and simultaneously satisfies all the constraints. This technique has been applied to medical images and the results show that this CSNN method is a very promising approach for image segmentation.

  11. IFCM Based Segmentation Method for Liver Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishant; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we have proposed an iterative Fuzzy C-Mean (IFCM) method which divides the pixels present in the image into a set of clusters. This set of clusters is then used to segment a focal liver lesion from a liver ultrasound image. Advantage of IFCM methods is that n-clusters FCM method may lead to non-uniform distribution of centroids, whereas in IFCM method centroids will always be uniformly distributed. Proposed method is compared with the edge based Active contour Chan-Vese (CV) method, and MAP-MRF method by implementing the methods on MATLAB. Proposed method is also compared with region based active contour region-scalable fitting energy (RSFE) method whose MATLAB code is available in author's website. Since no comparison is available on a common database, the performance of three methods and the proposed method have been compared on liver ultrasound (US) images available with us. Proposed method gives the best accuracy of 99.8 % as compared to accuracy of 99.46 %, 95.81 % and 90.08 % given by CV, MAP-MRF and RSFE methods respectively. Computation time taken by the proposed segmentation method for segmentation is 14.25 s as compared to 44.71, 41.27 and 49.02 s taken by CV, MAP-MRF and RSFE methods respectively.

  12. Nucleus segmentation in histology images with hierarchical multilevel thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmady Phoulady, Hady; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Mouton, Peter R.

    2016-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of histological images is an important step for increasing throughput while maintaining high accuracy, avoiding variation from subjective bias, and reducing the costs for diagnosing human illnesses such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we present a novel method for unsupervised segmentation of cell nuclei in stained histology tissue. Following an initial preprocessing step involving color deconvolution and image reconstruction, the segmentation step consists of multilevel thresholding and a series of morphological operations. The only parameter required for the method is the minimum region size, which is set according to the resolution of the image. Hence, the proposed method requires no training sets or parameter learning. Because the algorithm requires no assumptions or a priori information with regard to cell morphology, the automatic approach is generalizable across a wide range of tissues. Evaluation across a dataset consisting of diverse tissues, including breast, liver, gastric mucosa and bone marrow, shows superior performance over four other recent methods on the same dataset in terms of F-measure with precision and recall of 0.929 and 0.886, respectively.

  13. Southeast Asian palm leaf manuscript images: a review of handwritten text line segmentation methods and new challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesiman, Made Windu Antara; Valy, Dona; Burie, Jean-Christophe; Paulus, Erick; Sunarya, I. Made Gede; Hadi, Setiawan; Sok, Kim Heng; Ogier, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Due to their specific characteristics, palm leaf manuscripts provide new challenges for text line segmentation tasks in document analysis. We investigated the performance of six text line segmentation methods by conducting comparative experimental studies for the collection of palm leaf manuscript images. The image corpus used in this study comes from the sample images of palm leaf manuscripts of three different Southeast Asian scripts: Balinese script from Bali and Sundanese script from West Java, both from Indonesia, and Khmer script from Cambodia. For the experiments, four text line segmentation methods that work on binary images are tested: the adaptive partial projection line segmentation approach, the A* path planning approach, the shredding method, and our proposed energy function for shredding method. Two other methods that can be directly applied on grayscale images are also investigated: the adaptive local connectivity map method and the seam carving-based method. The evaluation criteria and tool provided by ICDAR2013 Handwriting Segmentation Contest were used in this experiment.

  14. Imaging and clinical findings in segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM).

    PubMed

    Alhalabi, Kinan; Menias, Christine; Hines, Robert; Mamoun, Ihsan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-02-01

    Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is an uncommon, non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory arteriopathy that tends to affect the medium-sized splanchnic branches of the aorta along with renal, carotid, cerebral, and coronary arteries. The clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic to severe, life-threatening intra-abdominal hemorrhage and shock. SAM overlaps clinically and radiologically with other inflammatory vasculitides. This article describes the pathologic-radiologic correlation, imaging findings, and the management of the disease. Radiologists should be familiar with this disease entity as imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis.

  15. Kinetic modeling based probabilistic segmentation for molecular images.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Möller, Torsten; Smith, Ben

    2008-01-01

    We propose a semi-supervised, kinetic modeling based segmentation technique for molecular imaging applications. It is an iterative, self-learning algorithm based on uncertainty principles, designed to alleviate low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and partial volume effect (PVE) problems. Synthetic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and simulated Raclopride dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) brain images with excessive noise levels are used to validate our algorithm. We show, qualitatively and quantitatively, that our algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in identifying different functional regions and recovering the kinetic parameters.

  16. FPGA Implementation of Discrete-Time Neuronal Network for Dynamic Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Musashi, Mio; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    We have developed a discrete-time dynamical system for dynamic image segmentation. It consists of a global inhibitor and modified chaotic neurons that can generate oscillatory responses. Dynamic image segmentation is performed using its oscillatory responses. This letter presents an implementation of our system in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and a successful result of dynamic image segmentation.

  17. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified. PMID:24492503

  18. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  19. Correlation based 3-D segmentation of the left ventricle in pediatric echocardiographic images using radio-frequency data.

    PubMed

    Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; Huisman, H J; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia; de Korte, Chris L

    2011-09-01

    Clinical diagnosis of heart disease might be substantially supported by automated segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3-D) echographic images. Because of the poor echogenicity contrast between blood and myocardial tissue in some regions and the inherent speckle noise, automated analysis of these images is challenging. A priori knowledge on the shape of the heart cannot always be relied on, e.g., in children with congenital heart disease, segmentation should be based on the echo features solely. The objective of this study was to investigate the merit of using temporal cross-correlation of radio-frequency (RF) data for automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images. Maximum temporal cross-correlation (MCC) values were determined locally from the RF-data using an iterative 3-D technique. MCC values as well as a combination of MCC values and adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data were used as an additional, external force in a deformable model approach to segment the endocardial surface and were tested against manually segmented surfaces. Results on 3-D full volume images (Philips, iE33) of 10 healthy children demonstrate that MCC values derived from the RF signal yield a useful parameter to distinguish between blood and myocardium in regions with low echogenicity contrast and incorporation of MCC improves the segmentation results significantly. Further investigation of the MCC over the whole cardiac cycle is required to exploit the full benefit of it for automated segmentation.

  20. Interacting with image hierarchies for fast and accurate object segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, David V.; Eberly, David H.; Hemminger, Bradley M.; Pizer, Stephen M.; Faith, R. E.; Kurak, Charles; Livingston, Mark

    1994-05-01

    Object definition is an increasingly important area of medical image research. Accurate and fairly rapid object definition is essential for measuring the size and, perhaps more importantly, the change in size of anatomical objects such as kidneys and tumors. Rapid and fairly accurate object definition is essential for 3D real-time visualization including both surgery planning and Radiation oncology treatment planning. One approach to object definition involves the use of 3D image hierarchies, such as Eberly's Ridge Flow. However, the image hierarchy segmentation approach requires user interaction in selecting regions and subtrees. Further, visualizing and comprehending the anatomy and the selected portions of the hierarchy can be problematic. In this paper we will describe the Magic Crayon tool which allows a user to define rapidly and accurately various anatomical objects by interacting with image hierarchies such as those generated with Eberly's Ridge Flow algorithm as well as other 3D image hierarchies. Preliminary results suggest that fairly complex anatomical objects can be segmented in under a minute with sufficient accuracy for 3D surgery planning, 3D radiation oncology treatment planning, and similar applications. Potential modifications to the approach for improved accuracy are summarized.

  1. Automatic segmentation of medical images using image registration: diagnostic and simulation applications.

    PubMed

    Barber, D C; Hose, D R

    2005-01-01

    Automatic identification of the boundaries of significant structure (segmentation) within a medical image is an are of ongoing research. Various approaches have been proposed but only two methods have achieved widespread use: manual delineation of boundaries and segmentation using intensity values. In this paper we describe an approach based on image registration. A reference image is prepared and segmented, by hand or otherwise. A patient image is registered to the reference image and the mapping then applied to ther reference segmentation to map it back to the patient image. In general a high-resolution nonlinear mapping is required to achieve accurate segmentation. This paper describes an algorithm that can efficiently generate such mappings, and outlines the uses of this tool in two relevant applications. An important feature of the approach described in this paper is that the algorithm is independent of the segmentation problem being addresses. All knowledge about the problem at hand is contained in files of reference data. A secondary benefit is that the continuous three-dimensional mapping generated is well suited to the generation of patient-specific numerical models (e.g. finite element meshes) from the library models. Smoothness constraints in the morphing algorithm tend to maintain the geometric quality of the reference mesh.

  2. Medical image segmentation based on SLIC superpixels model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang-ting; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Ruo-ya

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging has been widely used in clinical practice. It is an important basis for medical experts to diagnose the disease. However, medical images have many unstable factors such as complex imaging mechanism, the target displacement will cause constructed defect and the partial volume effect will lead to error and equipment wear, which increases the complexity of subsequent image processing greatly. The segmentation algorithm which based on SLIC (Simple Linear Iterative Clustering, SLIC) superpixels is used to eliminate the influence of constructed defect and noise by means of the feature similarity in the preprocessing stage. At the same time, excellent clustering effect can reduce the complexity of the algorithm extremely, which provides an effective basis for the rapid diagnosis of experts.

  3. A new iterative triclass thresholding technique in image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongmin; Yang, Zhong; Cao, Xinhua; Xia, Weiming; Xu, Xiaoyin

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method in image segmentation that is based on Otsu's method but iteratively searches for subregions of the image for segmentation, instead of treating the full image as a whole region for processing. The iterative method starts with Otsu's threshold and computes the mean values of the two classes as separated by the threshold. Based on the Otsu's threshold and the two mean values, the method separates the image into three classes instead of two as the standard Otsu's method does. The first two classes are determined as the foreground and background and they will not be processed further. The third class is denoted as a to-be-determined (TBD) region that is processed at next iteration. At the succeeding iteration, Otsu's method is applied on the TBD region to calculate a new threshold and two class means and the TBD region is again separated into three classes, namely, foreground, background, and a new TBD region, which by definition is smaller than the previous TBD regions. Then, the new TBD region is processed in the similar manner. The process stops when the Otsu's thresholds calculated between two iterations is less than a preset threshold. Then, all the intermediate foreground and background regions are, respectively, combined to create the final segmentation result. Tests on synthetic and real images showed that the new iterative method can achieve better performance than the standard Otsu's method in many challenging cases, such as identifying weak objects and revealing fine structures of complex objects while the added computational cost is minimal.

  4. Computerized segmentation and measurement of chronic wound images.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Fauzi, Mohammad Faizal; Khansa, Ibrahim; Catignani, Karen; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K; Gurcan, Metin N

    2015-05-01

    An estimated 6.5 million patients in the United States are affected by chronic wounds, with more than US$25 billion and countless hours spent annually for all aspects of chronic wound care. There is a need for an intelligent software tool to analyze wound images, characterize wound tissue composition, measure wound size, and monitor changes in wound in between visits. Performed manually, this process is very time-consuming and subject to intra- and inter-reader variability. In this work, our objective is to develop methods to segment, measure and characterize clinically presented chronic wounds from photographic images. The first step of our method is to generate a Red-Yellow-Black-White (RYKW) probability map, which then guides the segmentation process using either optimal thresholding or region growing. The red, yellow and black probability maps are designed to handle the granulation, slough and eschar tissues, respectively; while the white probability map is to detect the white label card for measurement calibration purposes. The innovative aspects of this work include defining a four-dimensional probability map specific to wound characteristics, a computationally efficient method to segment wound images utilizing the probability map, and auto-calibration of wound measurements using the content of the image. These methods were applied to 80 wound images, captured in a clinical setting at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, with the ground truth independently generated by the consensus of at least two clinicians. While the mean inter-reader agreement between the readers varied between 67.4% and 84.3%, the computer achieved an average accuracy of 75.1%.

  5. Placental fetal stem segmentation in a sequence of histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athavale, Prashant; Vese, Luminita A.

    2012-02-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental fetal stems. Analysis of the fetal stems in a placenta could be useful in the study and diagnosis of some diseases like autism. To study the fetal stem structure effectively, we need to automatically and accurately track fetal stems through a sequence of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histology slides. There are many problems in successfully achieving this goal. A few of the problems are: large size of images, misalignment of the consecutive H&E slides, unpredictable inaccuracies of manual tracing, very complicated texture patterns of various tissue types without clear characteristics, just to name a few. In this paper we propose a novel algorithm to achieve automatic tracing of the fetal stem in a sequence of H&E images, based on an inaccurate manual segmentation of a fetal stem in one of the images. This algorithm combines global affine registration, local non-affine registration and a novel 'dynamic' version of the active contours model without edges. We first use global affine image registration of all the images based on displacement, scaling and rotation. This gives us approximate location of the corresponding fetal stem in the image that needs to be traced. We then use the affine registration algorithm "locally" near this location. At this point, we use a fast non-affine registration based on L2-similarity measure and diffusion regularization to get a better location of the fetal stem. Finally, we have to take into account inaccuracies in the initial tracing. This is achieved through a novel dynamic version of the active contours model without edges where the coefficients of the fitting terms are computed iteratively to ensure that we obtain a unique stem in the segmentation. The segmentation thus obtained can then be used as an

  6. Automatic segmentation algorithm for the extraction of lumen region and boundary from endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; Srikanthan, T; Vijayan Asari, K

    2001-01-01

    A new segmentation algorithm for lumen region detection and boundary extraction from gastro-intestinal (GI) images is presented. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps. First, a preliminary region of interest (ROI) representing the GI lumen is segmented by an adaptive progressive thresholding (APT) technique. Then, an adaptive filter, the Iris filter, is applied to the ROI to determine the actual region. It has been observed that the combined APT-Iris filter technique can enhance and detect the unclear boundaries in the lumen region of GI images and thus produces a more accurate lumen region, compared with the existing techniques. Experiments are carried out to determine the maximum error on the extracted boundary with respect to an expert-annotated boundary technique. Investigations show that, based on the experimental results obtained from 50 endoscopic images, the maximum error is reduced by up to 72 pixels for a 256 x 256 image representation compared with other existing techniques. In addition, a new boundary extraction algorithm, based on a heuristic search on the neighbourhood pixels, is employed to obtain a connected single pixel width outer boundary using two preferential sequence windows. Experimental results are also presented to justify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Local image registration by adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Caner, Gulcin; Tekalp, A Murat; Sharma, Gaurav; Heinzelman, Wendi

    2006-10-01

    We propose a new adaptive filtering framework for local image registration, which compensates for the effect of local distortions/displacements without explicitly estimating a distortion/displacement field. To this effect, we formulate local image registration as a two-dimensional (2-D) system identification problem with spatially varying system parameters. We utilize a 2-D adaptive filtering framework to identify the locally varying system parameters, where a new block adaptive filtering scheme is introduced. We discuss the conditions under which the adaptive filter coefficients conform to a local displacement vector at each pixel. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed 2-D adaptive filtering framework is very successful in modeling and compensation of both local distortions, such as Stirmark attacks, and local motion, such as in the presence of a parallax field. In particular, we show that the proposed method can provide image registration to: a) enable reliable detection of watermarks following a Stirmark attack in nonblind detection scenarios, b) compensate for lens distortions, and c) align multiview images with nonparametric local motion.

  8. Segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac CT images.

    PubMed

    Avila-Montes, Olga C; Kurkure, Uday; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that aortic calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease. In this study, a method for localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac-computed tomography (CT) images, toward the detection of aortic calcification, is presented. The localization of the right coronary artery ostium slice is formulated as a regression problem whose input variables are obtained from simple intensity features computed from a pyramid representation of the slice. The localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the aorta are formulated as optimal path detection problems. Dynamic programming is applied in the Hough space for localizing key center points in the aorta which guide the centerline tracing using a fast marching-based minimal path extraction framework. The input volume is then resampled into a stack of 2-D cross-sectional planes orthogonal to the obtained centerline. Dynamic programming is again applied for the segmentation of the aorta in each slice of the resampled volume. The obtained segmentation is finally mapped back to its original volume space. The performance of the proposed method was assessed on cardiac noncontrast CT scans and promising results were obtained.

  9. Semi-automated segmentation and classification of digital breast tomosynthesis reconstructed images.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2011-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited-angle tomographic x-ray imaging technique that reduces the effect of tissue superposition observed in planar mammography. An integrated imaging platform that combines DBT with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to provide co-registered anatomical and functional imaging is under development. Incorporation of anatomic priors can benefit NIRS reconstruction. In this work, we provide a segmentation and classification method to extract potential lesions, as well as adipose, fibroglandular, muscle and skin tissue in reconstructed DBT images that serve as anatomic priors during NIRS reconstruction. The method may also be adaptable for estimating tumor volume, breast glandular content, and for extracting lesion features for potential application to computer aided detection and diagnosis.

  10. 3D Kidney Segmentation from Abdominal Images Using Spatial-Appearance Models

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Fahmi; Soliman, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    Kidney segmentation is an essential step in developing any noninvasive computer-assisted diagnostic system for renal function assessment. This paper introduces an automated framework for 3D kidney segmentation from dynamic computed tomography (CT) images that integrates discriminative features from the current and prior CT appearances into a random forest classification approach. To account for CT images' inhomogeneities, we employ discriminate features that are extracted from a higher-order spatial model and an adaptive shape model in addition to the first-order CT appearance. To model the interactions between CT data voxels, we employed a higher-order spatial model, which adds the triple and quad clique families to the traditional pairwise clique family. The kidney shape prior model is built using a set of training CT data and is updated during segmentation using not only region labels but also voxels' appearances in neighboring spatial voxel locations. Our framework performance has been evaluated on in vivo dynamic CT data collected from 20 subjects and comprises multiple 3D scans acquired before and after contrast medium administration. Quantitative evaluation between manually and automatically segmented kidney contours using Dice similarity, percentage volume differences, and 95th-percentile bidirectional Hausdorff distances confirms the high accuracy of our approach. PMID:28280519

  11. An adaptive approach to centerline extraction for CT colonography using MAP-EM segmentation and distance field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Li, Lihong C.; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Hao; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive approach for fully automatic centerline extraction and small intestine removal based on partial volume (PV) image segmentation and distance field modeling. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) volume image is first segmented for the colon wall mucosa layer, which represents the PV effect around the colon wall. Then centerline extraction is performed in the presence of colon collapse and small intestine touch by the use of distance field within the segmented PV mucosa layer, where centerline breakings due to collapse are recovered and centerline branches due to small intestine tough are removed. Experimental results from 24 patient CTC scans with small intestine touch rendered 100% removal of the touch, while only 16 out of the 24 could be done by the well-known isolated component method. Our voxel-by-voxel marking strategy in the automated procedure preserves the topology and validity of the colon structure. The marked inner and outer boundaries on cleansed colon are very close to those labeled by the experts. Experimental results demonstrated the robustness and efficiency of the presented adaptive approach for CTC utility.

  12. Replica inference approach to unsupervised multiscale image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dandan; Ronhovde, Peter; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    We apply a replica-inference-based Potts model method to unsupervised image segmentation on multiple scales. This approach was inspired by the statistical mechanics problem of "community detection" and its phase diagram. Specifically, the problem is cast as identifying tightly bound clusters ("communities" or "solutes") against a background or "solvent." Within our multiresolution approach, we compute information-theory-based correlations among multiple solutions ("replicas") of the same graph over a range of resolutions. Significant multiresolution structures are identified by replica correlations manifest by information theory overlaps. We further employ such information theory measures (such as normalized mutual information and variation of information), thermodynamic quantities such as the system entropy and energy, and dynamic measures monitoring the convergence time to viable solutions as metrics for transitions between various solvable and unsolvable phases. Within the solvable phase, transitions between contending solutions (such as those corresponding to segmentations on different scales) may also appear. With the aid of these correlations as well as thermodynamic measures, the phase diagram of the corresponding Potts model is analyzed at both zero and finite temperatures. Optimal parameters corresponding to a sensible unsupervised segmentations appear within the "easy phase" of the Potts model. Our algorithm is fast and shown to be at least as accurate as the best algorithms to date and to be especially suited to the detection of camouflaged images.

  13. Fuzzy Markov random fields versus chains for multispectral image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Salzenstein, Fabien; Collet, Christophe

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with a comparison of recent statistical models based on fuzzy Markov random fields and chains for multispectral image segmentation. The fuzzy scheme takes into account discrete and continuous classes which model the imprecision of the hidden data. In this framework, we assume the dependence between bands and we express the general model for the covariance matrix. A fuzzy Markov chain model is developed in an unsupervised way. This method is compared with the fuzzy Markovian field model previously proposed by one of the authors. The segmentation task is processed with Bayesian tools, such as the well-known MPM (Mode of Posterior Marginals) criterion. Our goal is to compare the robustness and rapidity for both methods (fuzzy Markov fields versus fuzzy Markov chains). Indeed, such fuzzy-based procedures seem to be a good answer, e.g., for astronomical observations when the patterns present diffuse structures. Moreover, these approaches allow us to process missing data in one or several spectral bands which correspond to specific situations in astronomy. To validate both models, we perform and compare the segmentation on synthetic images and raw multispectral astronomical data.

  14. Character segmentation and thresholding in low-contrast scene images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winger, Lowell L.; Jernigan, M. Ed; Robinson, John A.

    1996-03-01

    We are developing a portable text-to-speech system for the vision impaired. The input image is acquired with a lightweight CCD camera that may be poorly focused and aimed, and perhaps taken under inadequate and uneven illumination. We therefore require efficient and effective thresholding and segmentation methods which are robust with respect to character contrast, font, size, and format. In this paper, we present a fast thresholding scheme which combines a local variance measure with a logical stroke-width method. An efficient post- thresholding segmentation scheme utilizing Fisher's linear discriminant to distinguish noise and character components functions as an effective pre-processing step for the application of commercial segmentation and character recognition methods. The performance of this fast new method compared favorably with other methods for the extraction of characters from uncontrolled illumination, omnifont scene images. We demonstrate the suitability of this method for use in an automated portable reader through a software implementation running on a laptop 486 computer in our prototype device.

  15. Effect of the Keck telescope`s segmented primary on the performance on the Keck adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.

    1997-06-01

    The 349 degree of freedom Keck adaptive optics system will be mapped on to the 36 segment Keck primary mirror. Each telescope segment is independently controlled in piston and tilt by an active control system and each segment also has its own set of aberrations. This presents a unique set of problems for the Keck adaptive optics system, not encountered with continuous primaries. To a certain extent the low order segment aberrations, beginning with focus, can be corrected statically by the adaptive optic system. However, the discontinuous surface at the segment edges present special problems in sensing and correcting wavefront with laser guide stars or natural guide stars.

  16. Block adaptive rate controlled image data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Hilbert, E.; Lee, J.-J.; Schlutsmeyer, A.

    1979-01-01

    A block adaptive rate controlled (BARC) image data compression algorithm is described. It is noted that in the algorithm's principal rate controlled mode, image lines can be coded at selected rates by combining practical universal noiseless coding techniques with block adaptive adjustments in linear quantization. Compression of any source data at chosen rates of 3.0 bits/sample and above can be expected to yield visual image quality with imperceptible degradation. Exact reconstruction will be obtained if the one-dimensional difference entropy is below the selected compression rate. It is noted that the compressor can also be operated as a floating rate noiseless coder by simply not altering the input data quantization. Here, the universal noiseless coder ensures that the code rate is always close to the entropy. Application of BARC image data compression to the Galileo orbiter mi