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Sample records for adaptive immune inflammation

  1. The adaptive immune system as a fundamental regulator of adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2012-09-01

    Over the past decade, chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has gained acceptance as a lead promoter of insulin resistance in obesity. A great deal of evidence has pointed to the role of adipokines and innate immune cells, in particular, adipose tissue macrophages, in the regulation of fat inflammation and glucose homeostasis. However, more recently, cells of the adaptive immune system, specifically B and T lymphocytes, have emerged as unexpected promoters and controllers of insulin resistance. These adaptive immune cells infiltrate obesity expanded VAT and through cytokine secretion and macrophage modulation dictate the extent of the local inflammatory response, thereby directly impacting insulin resistance. The remarkable ability of our adaptive immune system to regulate insulin sensitivity and metabolism has unmasked a novel physiological function of this system, and promises new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to manage the disease. This review highlights critical roles of adipose tissue lymphocytes in governing glucose homeostasis.

  2. Innate and Adaptive Immunity Synergize to Trigger Inflammation in the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Rainard, Pascal; Cunha, Patricia; Gilbert, Florence B.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is able to detect and react to bacterial intrusion through innate immunity mechanisms, but mammary inflammation can also result from antigen-specific adaptive immunity. We postulated that innate and adaptive immune responses could synergize to trigger inflammation in the mammary gland. To test this hypothesis, we immunized cows with the model antigen ovalbumin and challenged the sensitized animals with either Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as innate immunity agonist, ovalbumin as adaptive immunity agonist, or both agonists in three different udder quarters of lactating cows. There was a significant amplification of the initial milk leukocytosis in the quarters challenged with the two agonists compared to leukocytosis in quarters challenged with LPS or ovalbumin alone. This synergistic response occurred only with the cows that developed the ovalbumin-specific inflammatory response, and there were significant correlations between milk leukocytosis and production of IL-17A and IFN-γ in a whole-blood ovalbumin stimulation assay. The antigen-specific response induced substantial concentrations of IL-17A and IFN-γ in milk contrary to the response to LPS. Such a synergy at the onset of the reaction of the mammary gland suggests that induction of antigen-specific immune response with bacterial antigens could improve the initial immune response to infection, hence reducing the bacterial load and contributing to protection. PMID:27100324

  3. Inflammation and breast cancer. Balancing immune response: crosstalk between adaptive and innate immune cells during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    DeNardo, David G; Coussens, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Recent insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cancer development have revealed that immune cells functionally regulate epithelial cancer development and progression. Moreover, accumulated clinical and experimental data indicate that the outcome of an immune response toward an evolving breast neoplasm is largely determined by the type of immune response elicited. Acute tumor-directed immune responses involving cytolytic T lymphocytes appear to protect against tumor development, whereas immune responses involving chronic activation of humoral immunity, infiltration by Th2 cells, and protumor-polarized innate inflammatory cells result in the promotion of tumor development and disease progression. Herein we review this body of literature and summarize important new findings revealing the paradoxical role of innate and adaptive leukocytes as regulators of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:17705880

  4. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity. PMID:26999194

  5. Quercetin, Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Yao, Jiaying; Han, Chunyan; Yang, Jiaxin; Chaudhry, Maria Tabassum; Wang, Shengnan; Liu, Hongnan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-15

    In vitro and some animal models have shown that quercetin, a polyphenol derived from plants, has a wide range of biological actions including anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral activities; as well as attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability. This review focuses on the physicochemical properties, dietary sources, absorption, bioavailability and metabolism of quercetin, especially main effects of quercetin on inflammation and immune function. According to the results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, good perspectives have been opened for quercetin. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better characterize the mechanisms of action underlying the beneficial effects of quercetin on inflammation and immunity.

  6. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-07-07

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases.

  7. Adaptive immunity against gut microbiota enhances apoE-mediated immune regulation and reduces atherosclerosis and western-diet-related inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Diego; Ferrarese, Roberto; Foglieni, Chiara; Esposito, Antonio; Canu, Tamara; Perani, Laura; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Visconti, Laura; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Common features of immune-metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are an altered gut microbiota composition and a systemic pro-inflammatory state. We demonstrate that active immunization against the outer membrane protein of bacteria present in the gut enhances local and systemic immune control via apoE-mediated immune-modulation. Reduction of western-diet-associated inflammation was obtained for more than eighteen weeks after immunization. Immunized mice had reduced serum cytokine levels, reduced insulin and fasting glucose concentrations; and gene expression in both liver and visceral adipose tissue confirmed a reduced inflammatory steady-state after immunization. Moreover, both gut and atherosclerotic plaques of immunized mice showed reduced inflammatory cells and an increased M2 macrophage fraction. These results suggest that adaptive responses directed against microbes present in our microbiota have systemic beneficial consequences and demonstrate the key role of apoE in this mechanism that could be exploited to treat immune-metabolic diseases. PMID:27383250

  8. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill.

  9. Adaptive Immunity, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Complications in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pedicino, Daniela; Liuzzo, Giovanna; Trotta, Francesco; Giglio, Ada Francesca; Giubilato, Simona; Martini, Francesca; Zaccardi, Francesco; Scavone, Giuseppe; Previtero, Marco; Massaro, Gianluca; Cialdella, Pio; Cardillo, Maria Teresa; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Crea, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a pandemics that affects more than 170 million people worldwide, associated with increased mortality and morbidity due to coronary artery disease (CAD). In type 1 (T1) DM, the main pathogenic mechanism seems to be the destruction of pancreatic β-cells mediated by autoreactive T-cells resulting in chronic insulitis, while in type 2 (T2) DM primary insulin resistance, rather than defective insulin production due to β-cell destruction, seems to be the triggering alteration. In our study, we investigated the role of systemic inflammation and T-cell subsets in T1- and T2DM and the possible mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular risk associated with these diseases. PMID:23762872

  10. Adaptive immunity, inflammation, and cardiovascular complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pedicino, Daniela; Liuzzo, Giovanna; Trotta, Francesco; Giglio, Ada Francesca; Giubilato, Simona; Martini, Francesca; Zaccardi, Francesco; Scavone, Giuseppe; Previtero, Marco; Massaro, Gianluca; Cialdella, Pio; Cardillo, Maria Teresa; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Crea, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a pandemics that affects more than 170 million people worldwide, associated with increased mortality and morbidity due to coronary artery disease (CAD). In type 1 (T1) DM, the main pathogenic mechanism seems to be the destruction of pancreatic β -cells mediated by autoreactive T-cells resulting in chronic insulitis, while in type 2 (T2) DM primary insulin resistance, rather than defective insulin production due to β -cell destruction, seems to be the triggering alteration. In our study, we investigated the role of systemic inflammation and T-cell subsets in T1- and T2DM and the possible mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular risk associated with these diseases.

  11. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammation and immunity.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Andrew N J; Spits, Hergen; Eberl, Gerard

    2014-09-18

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were first described as playing important roles in the development of lymphoid tissues and more recently in the initiation of inflammation at barrier surfaces in response to infection or tissue damage. It has now become apparent that ILCs play more complex roles throughout the duration of immune responses, participating in the transition from innate to adaptive immunity and contributing to chronic inflammation. The proximity of ILCs to epithelial surfaces and their constitutive strategic positioning in other tissues throughout the body ensures that, in spite of their rarity, ILCs are able to regulate immune homeostasis effectively. Dysregulation of ILC function might result in chronic pathologies such as allergies, autoimmunity, and inflammation. A new role for ILCs in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis has started to emerge, underlining their importance in fundamental physiological processes beyond infection and immunity.

  12. HIF transcription factors, inflammation, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda W; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S

    2014-10-16

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors; these play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity.

  13. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  14. IL-33-mediated innate response and adaptive immune cells contribute to maximum responses of protease allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Takeda, Haruna; Tokura, Tomoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Inui, Kyoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Hironori; Matsuda, Akira; Oboki, Keisuke; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Sudo, Katsuko; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    How the innate and adaptive immune systems cooperate in the natural history of allergic diseases has been largely unknown. Plant-derived allergen, papain, and mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, belong to the same family of cysteine proteases. We examined the role of protease allergens in the induction of Ab production and airway inflammation after repeated intranasal administration without adjuvants and that in basophil/mast cell stimulation in vitro. Papain induced papain-specific IgE/IgG1 and lung eosinophilia. Der f 1 induced Der f 1-specific IgG1 and eosinophilia. Although papain-, Der f 1-, and Der p 1-stimulated basophils expressed allergy-inducing cytokines, including IL-4 in vitro, basophil-depleting Ab and mast cell deficiency did not suppress the papain-induced in vivo responses. Protease inhibitor-treated allergens and a catalytic site mutant did not induce the responses. These results indicate that protease activity is essential to Ab production and eosinophilia in vivo and basophil activation in vitro. IL-33-deficient mice lacked eosinophilia and had reduced papain-specific IgE/IgG1. Coadministration of OVA with papain induced OVA-specific IgE/IgG1, which was reduced in IL-33-deficient mice. We demonstrated IL-33 release, subsequent IL-33-dependent IL-5/IL-13 release, and activation of T1/ST2-expressing lineage(-)CD25(+)CD44(+) innate lymphoid cells in the lung after papain inhalation, suggesting the contribution of the IL-33-type 2 innate lymphoid cell-IL-5/IL-13 axis to the papain-induced airway eosinophilia. Rag2-deficient mice, which lack adaptive immune cells, showed significant, but less severe, eosinophilia. Collectively, these results suggest cooperation of adaptive immune cells and IL-33-responsive innate cells in protease-dependent allergic airway inflammation.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  16. Environmental immune disruptors, inflammation and cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A.; Khatami, Mahin; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Sun, Jun; Harris, Shelley; Moon, Eun-Yi; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Brown, Dustin; Colacci, Annamaria; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Hamid, Roslida A.; Lowe, Leroy; Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    An emerging area in environmental toxicology is the role that chemicals and chemical mixtures have on the cells of the human immune system. This is an important area of research that has been most widely pursued in relation to autoimmune diseases and allergy/asthma as opposed to cancer causation. This is despite the well-recognized role that innate and adaptive immunity play as essential factors in tumorigenesis. Here, we review the role that the innate immune cells of inflammatory responses play in tumorigenesis. Focus is placed on the molecules and pathways that have been mechanistically linked with tumor-associated inflammation. Within the context of chemically induced disturbances in immune function as co-factors in carcinogenesis, the evidence linking environmental toxicant exposures with perturbation in the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is reviewed. Reported effects of bisphenol A, atrazine, phthalates and other common toxicants on molecular and cellular targets involved in tumor-associated inflammation (e.g. cyclooxygenase/prostaglandin E2, nuclear factor kappa B, nitric oxide synthesis, cytokines and chemokines) are presented as example chemically mediated target molecule perturbations relevant to cancer. Commentary on areas of additional research including the need for innovation and integration of systems biology approaches to the study of environmental exposures and cancer causation are presented. PMID:26106141

  17. Environmental immune disruptors, inflammation and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Patricia A; Khatami, Mahin; Baglole, Carolyn J; Sun, Jun; Harris, Shelley A; Moon, Eun-Yi; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Brown, Dustin G; Colacci, Annamaria; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Woodrick, Jordan; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Roy, Rabindra; Forte, Stefano; Memeo, Lorenzo; Salem, Hosni K; Amedei, Amedeo; Hamid, Roslida A; Lowe, Leroy; Guarnieri, Tiziana; Bisson, William H

    2015-06-01

    An emerging area in environmental toxicology is the role that chemicals and chemical mixtures have on the cells of the human immune system. This is an important area of research that has been most widely pursued in relation to autoimmune diseases and allergy/asthma as opposed to cancer causation. This is despite the well-recognized role that innate and adaptive immunity play as essential factors in tumorigenesis. Here, we review the role that the innate immune cells of inflammatory responses play in tumorigenesis. Focus is placed on the molecules and pathways that have been mechanistically linked with tumor-associated inflammation. Within the context of chemically induced disturbances in immune function as co-factors in carcinogenesis, the evidence linking environmental toxicant exposures with perturbation in the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses is reviewed. Reported effects of bisphenol A, atrazine, phthalates and other common toxicants on molecular and cellular targets involved in tumor-associated inflammation (e.g. cyclooxygenase/prostaglandin E2, nuclear factor kappa B, nitric oxide synthesis, cytokines and chemokines) are presented as example chemically mediated target molecule perturbations relevant to cancer. Commentary on areas of additional research including the need for innovation and integration of systems biology approaches to the study of environmental exposures and cancer causation are presented.

  18. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Youri; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Soojin; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A) induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease. PMID:26468884

  19. Microbiota, Immune Subversion, and Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Carolyn D.; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2017-01-01

    Several host-adapted pathogens and commensals have evolved mechanisms to evade the host innate immune system inducing a state of low-grade inflammation. Epidemiological studies have also documented the association of a subset of these microorganisms with chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we summarize recent studies demonstrating the role of the microbiota in chronic inflammatory diseases and discuss how specific microorganisms subvert or inhibit protective signaling normally induced by toll-like receptors (TLRs). We highlight our work on the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and discuss the role of microbial modulation of lipid A structures in evasion of TLR4 signaling and resulting systemic immunopathology associated with atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis intrinsically expresses underacylated lipid A moieties and can modify the phosphorylation of lipid A, leading to altered TLR4 signaling. Using P. gingivalis mutant strains expressing distinct lipid A moieties, we demonstrated that expression of antagonist lipid A was associated with P. gingivalis-mediated systemic inflammation and immunopathology, whereas strains expressing agonist lipid A exhibited modest systemic inflammation. Likewise, mice deficient in TLR4 were more susceptible to vascular inflammation after oral infection with P. gingivalis wild-type strain compared to mice possessing functional TLR4. Collectively, our studies support a role for P. gingivalis-mediated dysregulation of innate and adaptive responses resulting in immunopathology and systemic inflammation. We propose that anti-TLR4 interventions must be designed with caution, given the balance between the protective and destructive roles of TLR signaling in response to microbiota and associated immunopathologies. PMID:28348558

  20. Autophagy in infection, inflammation, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo

    2017-01-01

    Preface Autophagy is a fundamental cell biological pathway affecting immunity. Whereas autophagy is an antimicrobial effector of conventional pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), autophagic adaptors termed SLRs represent a new subset of PRRs and provide the mechanistic basis for autophagic elimination of intracellular microbes. Autophagy controls inflammation via regulatory interactions with innate immunity signalling, by removing endogenous inflammasome agonists, and thorough effects on secretion of immune mediators. Autophagy contributes to antigen presentation, T cell homeostasis, and affects T cell repertories and polarization including Th17 inflammation. Here, we review the above relationships organized into four principal roles of autophagy in infection, inflammation, and immunity. PMID:24064518

  1. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    González-Gallego, Javier; García-Mediavilla, M Victoria; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Tuñón, María J

    2010-10-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds widely present in fruits, vegetables and beverages derived from plants. These molecules have been reported to possess a wide range of activities in the prevention of common diseases, including CHD, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, gastrointestinal disorders and others. The effects appear to be related to the various biological/pharmacological activities of flavonoids. A large number of publications suggest immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds. However, almost all studies are in vitro studies with limited research on animal models and scarce data from human studies. The majority of in vitro research has been carried out with single flavonoids, generally aglycones, at rather supraphysiological concentrations. Few studies have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of physiologically attainable flavonoid concentrations in healthy subjects, and more epidemiological studies and prospective randomised trials are still required. This review summarises evidence for the effects of fruit and tea flavonoids and their metabolites in inflammation and immunity. Mechanisms of effect are discussed, including those on enzyme function and regulation of gene and protein expression. Animal work is included, and evidence from epidemiological studies and human intervention trials is reviewed. Biological relevance and functional benefits of the reported effects, such as resistance to infection or exercise performance, are also discussed.

  2. Immune Suppression and Inflammation in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    population of inflammation-induced MDSC . Reducing inflammation by blocking the IL-1 signaling pathway (IL-1R-/-) reduces tumor growth and metastatic...Suppressor Cells ( MDSC ). These cells have potent immunosuppressive activity and inhibit both innate and adaptive immunity by inhibiting T cell activation... MDSC by inducing a phenotypically and functionally distinct population of MDSC , which are more potent suppressors of CD8+ T cells. Using mice

  3. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases. PMID:25377140

  4. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Velin, Dominique; Straubinger, Kathrin; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The tight control of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the stomach mucosa during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is of prime importance for the bacteria to persist and for the host to prevent inflammation-driven diseases. This review summarizes recent data on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses during H. pylori/host interactions. In addition, the latest preclinical developments of H. pylori vaccines are discussed with a special focus on the clinical trial reported by Zeng et al., who provided evidence that oral vaccination significantly reduces the acquisition of natural H. pylori infection in children.

  5. Adaptive immunity in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Zongwen; Leung, Miranda WY; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guoxiang; Leung, Patrick SC; Eric Gershwin, M

    2016-01-01

    The anatomical architecture of the human liver and the diversity of its immune components endow the liver with its physiological function of immune competence. Adaptive immunity is a major arm of the immune system that is organized in a highly specialized and systematic manner, thus providing long-lasting protection with immunological memory. Adaptive immunity consists of humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Cellular immunity is known to have a crucial role in controlling infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders in the liver. In this article, we will focus on hepatic virus infections, hepatocellular carcinoma and autoimmune disorders as examples to illustrate the current understanding of the contribution of T cells to cellular immunity in these maladies. Cellular immune suppression is primarily responsible for chronic viral infections and cancer. However, an uncontrolled auto-reactive immune response accounts for autoimmunity. Consequently, these immune abnormalities are ascribed to the quantitative and functional changes in adaptive immune cells and their subsets, innate immunocytes, chemokines, cytokines and various surface receptors on immune cells. A greater understanding of the complex orchestration of the hepatic adaptive immune regulators during homeostasis and immune competence are much needed to identify relevant targets for clinical intervention to treat immunological disorders in the liver. PMID:26996069

  6. Bridging innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Paul, William E

    2011-12-09

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2011 to Jules Hoffmann, Bruce Beutler, and the late Ralph Steinman recognizes accomplishments in understanding and unifying the two strands of immunology, the evolutionarily ancient innate immune response and modern adaptive immunity.

  7. Immunity and inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Carecchio, Miryam; Fleetwood, Thomas; Magistrelli, Luca; Cantello, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2013-01-01

    Immune reactions inside the central nervous system are finely regulated, thanks to the presence of several checkpoints that have the fundamental purpose to preserve this fragile tissue form harmful events. The current knowledge on the role of neuroinflammation and neuro-immune interactions in the fields of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease is reviewed. Moreover, a focus on the potential role of both active and passive immunotherapy is provided. Finally, we propose a common perspective, which implies that, under pathological conditions, inflammation may exert both detrimental and protective functions, depending on local factors and the timing of immune activation and shutting-off systems. PMID:23844334

  8. The linkage between inflammation and immune tolerance: interfering with inflammation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogovskii, Vladimir Stanislavovich

    2017-01-09

    Inflammation is linked to immune tolerance. In pregnancy and in immune privileged organs constitutive low-grade inflammation is required for maintaining immunological tolerance. Apart from immune tolerance in normality, there is the phenomenon of immune tolerance in cancer which mediates tumor escape from the immune system. It is widely accepted that, in many situations, chronic inflammation critically contributes to cancer. Like other types of immune tolerance, tumor-induced tolerance is also mediated by inflammation. In this review, the main mechanisms that link inflammation and tolerance are considered. We discuss drug targets that are in use to interfere with inflammation in cancer.

  9. Brucella evasion of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Anna; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The complex immune system of mammals is the result of evolutionary forces that include battles against pathogens, as sensing and defeating intruders is a prerequisite to host survival. On the other hand, microorganisms have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade both arms of immunity: the innate and the adaptive immune systems. The successful pathogenic intracellular bacterium Brucella is not an exception to the rule: Brucella displays mechanisms that allow evasion of immune surveillance in order to establish persistent infections in mammals. In this review, we highlight some key mechanisms that pathogenic Brucella use to evade the adaptive immune system.

  10. Inflammation and immune response in COPD: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Rovina, Nikoletta; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Koulouris, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that chronic inflammatory and immune responses play key roles in the development and progression of COPD. Recent data provide evidence for a role in the NLRP3 inflammasome in the airway inflammation observed in COPD. Cigarette smoke activates innate immune cells by triggering pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to release "danger signal". These signals act as ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), triggering the production of cytokines and inducing innate inflammation. In smokers who develop COPD there appears to be a specific pattern of inflammation in the airways and parenchyma as a result of both innate and adaptive immune responses, with the predominance of CD8+ and CD4+ cells, and in the more severe disease, with the presence of lymphoid follicles containing B lymphocytes and T cells. Furthermore, viral and bacterial infections interfere with the chronic inflammation seen in stable COPD and exacerbations via pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Finally, autoimmunity is another novel aspect that may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of COPD. This review is un update of the currently discussed roles of inflammatory and immune responses in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  11. Adaptive Immunity Against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Datta, Sandip K

    2016-02-27

    A complex interplay between host and bacterial factors allows Staphylococcus aureus to occupy its niche as a human commensal and a major human pathogen. The role of neutrophils as a critical component of the innate immune response against S. aureus, particularly for control of systemic infection, has been established in both animal models and in humans with acquired and congenital neutrophil dysfunction. The role of the adaptive immune system is less clear. Although deficiencies in adaptive immunity do not result in the marked susceptibility to S. aureus infection that neutrophil dysfunction imparts, emerging evidence suggests both T cell- and B cell-mediated adaptive immunity can influence host susceptibility and control of S. aureus. The contribution of adaptive immunity depends on the context and site of infection and can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Furthermore, S. aureus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate adaptive immune responses to its advantage. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for the role of adaptive immunity during S. aureus infections. Further elucidation of this role will be important to understand how it influences susceptibility to infection and to appropriately design vaccines that elicit adaptive immune responses to protect against subsequent infections.

  12. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of infection and sterile injury. Knowledge of homeostatic mechanisms by which the nervous system controls organ function was originally applied to the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and other body systems. Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals. Such reflexes are evolutionarily ancient, dating back to invertebrate nematode worms that possess primitive immune and nervous systems. Failure of these reflex mechanisms in mammals contributes to nonresolving inflammation and disease. It is also possible to target these neural pathways using electrical nerve stimulators and pharmacological agents to hasten the resolution of inflammation and provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:22665702

  13. Obesity, inflammation and the immune system.

    PubMed

    de Heredia, Fátima Pérez; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Marcos, Ascensión

    2012-05-01

    Obesity shares with most chronic diseases the presence of an inflammatory component, which accounts for the development of metabolic disease and other associated health alterations. This inflammatory state is reflected in increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory proteins, and it occurs not only in adults but also in adolescents and children. The chronic inflammatory response has its origin in the links existing between the adipose tissue and the immune system. Obesity, like other states of malnutrition, is known to impair the immune function, altering leucocyte counts as well as cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, evidence has arisen that an altered immune function contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. This review attempts to briefly comment on the various plausible explanations that have been proposed for the phenomenon: (1) the obesity-associated increase in the production of leptin (pro-inflammatory) and the reduction in adiponectin (anti-inflammatory) seem to affect the activation of immune cells; (2) NEFA can induce inflammation through various mechanisms (such as modulation of adipokine production or activation of Toll-like receptors); (3) nutrient excess and adipocyte expansion trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress; and (4) hypoxia occurring in hypertrophied adipose tissue stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes and activates immune cells. Interestingly, data suggest a greater impact of visceral adipose tissue and central obesity, rather than total body fat, on the inflammatory process. In summary, there is a positive feedback loop between local inflammation in adipose tissue and altered immune response in obesity, both contributing to the development of related metabolic complications.

  14. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prosthetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion, and hemorrhage. The plasma scavenger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavenge heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce reactive oxygen species generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases. PMID:24904418

  15. Inflammation, Immunity, and Vaccines for Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Walduck, Anna; Andersen, Leif P; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2015-09-01

    During the last year, a variety of studies have been published that increases our understanding of the basic mechanisms of immunity and inflammation in Helicobacter pylori infection and progression to gastric cancer. Innate immune regulation and epithelial cell response were covered by several studies that contribute with new insights in the host response to H. pylori infection. Also, the adaptive immune response to H. pylori and particularly the role of IL-22 have been addressed in some studies. These advances may improve vaccine development where new strategies have been published. Two major studies analyzed H. pylori genomes of 39 worldwide strains and looked at the protein profiles. In addition, multi-epitope vaccines for therapeutic use have been investigated. Studies on different adjuvants and delivery systems have also given us new insights. This review presents articles from the last year that reveal detailed insight into immunity and regulation of inflammation, the contribution of immune cells to the development of gastric cancer, and understanding mechanisms of vaccine-induced protection.

  16. Inflammation and immunity in schizophrenia: implications for pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Julia; Lennox, Belinda R; Yolken, Robert; Jones, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between the immune system and the brain might have important aetiological and therapeutic implications for neuropsychiatric brain disorders. A possible association between schizophrenia and the immune system was postulated over a century ago, and is supported by epidemiological and genetic studies pointing to links with infection and inflammation. Contrary to the traditional view that the brain is an immunologically privileged site shielded behind the blood–brain barrier, studies in the past 20 years have noted complex interactions between the immune system, systemic inflammation, and the brain, which can lead to changes in mood, cognition, and behaviour. In this Review, we describe some of the important areas of research regarding innate and adaptive immune response in schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders that, we think, will be of interest to psychiatric clinicians and researchers. We discuss potential mechanisms and therapeutic implications of these findings, including studies of anti-inflammatory drugs in schizophrenia, describe areas for development, and offer testable hypotheses for future investigations. PMID:26359903

  17. Autophagy, Immunity, and Microbial Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Deretic, Vojo; Levine, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy adjusts cellular biomass and function in response to diverse stimuli, including infection. Autophagy plays specific roles in shaping immune system development, fueling host innate and adaptive immune responses, and directly controlling intracellular microbes as a cell-autonomous innate defense. As an evolutionary counterpoint, intracellular pathogens have evolved to block autophagic microbicidal defense and subvert host autophagic responses for their survival or growth. The ability of eukaryotic pathogens to deploy their own autophagic machinery may also contribute to microbial pathogenesis. Thus, a complex interplay between autophagy and microbial adaptations against autophagy governs the net outcome of host-microbe encounters. PMID:19527881

  18. Radiation triggering immune response and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hekim, Nezih; Cetin, Zafer; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Cort, Aysegul; Saygili, Eyup Ilker

    2015-11-28

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a well-established but still under optimization branch of Cancer Therapy (CT). RT uses electromagnetic waves or charged particles in order to kill malignant cells, by accumulating the energy onto these cells. The issue at stake for RT, as well as for any other Cancer Therapy technique, is always to kill only cancer cells, without affecting the surrounding healthy ones. This perspective of CT is usually described under the terms "specificity" and "selectivity". Specificity and selectivity are the ideal goal, but the ideal is never entirely achieved. Thus, in addition to killing healthy cells, changes and effects are observed in the immune system after irradiation. In this review, we mainly focus on the effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system and its components like bone marrow. Additionally, we are interested in the effects and benefits of low-dose ionizing radiation on the hematopoiesis and immune response. Low dose radiation has been shown to induce biological responses like inflammatory responses, innate immune system activation and DNA repair (adaptive response). This review reveals the fact that there are many unanswered questions regarding the role of radiation as either an immune-activating (low dose) or immunosuppressive (high dose) agent.

  19. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients. PMID:24409051

  20. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients.

  1. The TIPE (TNFAIP8) family in inflammation, immunity, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yunwei; Liu, Suxia

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) family are recently identified proteins which are important for maintaining immune homeostasis. The mammalian TNFAIP8 family consists of four members: TNFAIP8, the first identified member of this family, TNFAIP8L1 (TNF-alpha-induced protein 8-like 1, TIPE1), TIPE2, and TIPE3, which share high degrees of sequence homology and involve in proliferation, inflammation, and cell death. Among the members, TNFAIP8 is considered to be associated with carcinogenesis, TIPE2 is an essential negative regulator of both innate and adaptive immunity and the depletion of TIPE2 would cause serve inflammatory disease. Whereas, little is known about TIPE1 and TIPE3.

  2. Innate immunity and inflammation: a transcriptional paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hawiger, J

    2001-01-01

    The innate immune response and the process of inflammation are interwoven. Excessive and continuing cytokine production in response to bacterial lipopolysacharides (LPS) or superantigens is a hallmark of the systemic inflammatory response (IR), which can be life-threatening. Dissemination of these bacterial products induces waves of proinflammatory cytokines that cause vascular injury and multiple organ dysfunction. Both LPS and superantigens induce signaling to the nucleus in mononuclear phagocytes and T cells, respectively. These signaling pathways are mediated by NF-kappaB and other stress-responsive transcription factors (SRTFs), which play a critical role in reprogramming gene expression. The nuclear import of NF-kappaB allows transcriptional activation of over 100 genes that encode mediators of inflammatory and immune responses. We have developed a novel method to block nuclear import of NF-kappaB through cell-permeable peptide transduction in monocytes, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. Strikingly, a cell-permeable peptide that antagonizes nuclear import of NF-kappaB and other SRTFs, suppressed the systemic production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha and interferon gamma) in mice challenged with a lethal dose of LPS, and increased their survival by at least 90%. Thus, systemic inflammatory responses are critically dependent on the transcriptional activation ofcytokine genes that are controlled by NF-kappaB and other SRTFs.

  3. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  4. The Interplay between NLRs and Autophagy in Immunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Leticia A. M.; Travassos, Leonardo H.

    2013-01-01

    Since they were first described as cytosolic sensors of microbial molecules a decade ago, the Nod-like receptors (NLRs) have been shown to have many different and important roles in various aspects of immune and inflammatory responses, ranging from antimicrobial mechanisms to control of adaptive responses. In this review, we focus on the interplay between NLRs and autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that is crucial for homeostasis and has recently been shown to be involved in the protective response against infections. Furthermore, the association between mutations of NLRs as well as proteins that form the autophagic machinery and inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s disease highlight the importance of these proteins and their interactions in the regulation of inflammation. PMID:24273538

  5. Immune checkpoint and inflammation as therapeutic targets in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimbara, Shiro; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is one of the most deadly malignant neoplasms, and the efficacy of conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is far from satisfactory. Recent research studies have revealed that immunosuppression and inflammation are associated with oncogenesis, as well as tumor development, invasion, and metastasis in PAC. Thus, immunosuppression-related signaling, especially that involving immune checkpoint and inflammation, has emerged as novel treatment targets for PAC. However, PAC is an immune-resistant tumor, and it is still unclear whether immune checkpoint or anti-inflammation therapies would be an ideal strategy. In this article, we will review immune checkpoint and inflammation as potential targets, as well as clinical trials and the prospects for immunotherapy in PAC. PMID:27672267

  6. Adaptive immune resistance: How cancer protects from immune attack

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immune resistance is a process where the cancer changes its phenotype in response to a cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory immune response, thereby evading it. This adaptive process is triggered by the specific recognition of cancer cells by T cells, which leads to the production of immune-activating cytokines. Cancers then hijack mechanisms developed to limit inflammatory and immune responses and protect themselves from the T cell attack. Inhibiting adaptive immune resistance is the mechanistic basis of responses to PD-1 or PD-L1 blocking antibodies, and may be of relevance for the development of other cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26272491

  7. Regulation of the adaptive immune system by innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a group of lymphocytes that promote rapid cytokine-dependent innate immunity, inflammation and tissue repair. In addition, a growing body of evidence suggests ILCs can influence adaptive immune cell responses. During fetal development a subset of ILCs orchestrate the generation and maturation of secondary lymphoid tissues. Following birth, ILCs continue to modulate adaptive immune cell responses indirectly through interactions with stromal cells in lymphoid tissues and epithelial cells at barrier surfaces. In this review we summarize the current understanding of how ILCs modulate the magnitude and quality of adaptive immune cell responses, and in particular focus on recent evidence suggesting that ILCs can also directly regulate CD4+ T cells. Further, we discuss the implications that these pathways may have on human health and disease. PMID:24594491

  8. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-03

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  9. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-01-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms. PMID:27808112

  10. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  11. Immune aging, dysmetabolism, and inflammation in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deleidi, Michela; Jäggle, Madeline; Rubino, Graziella

    2015-01-01

    As we age, the immune system undergoes a process of senescence accompanied by the increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, a chronic subclinical condition named as “inflammaging”. Emerging evidence from human and experimental models suggest that immune senescence also affects the central nervous system and promotes neuronal dysfunction, especially within susceptible neuronal populations. In this review we discuss the potential role of immune aging, inflammation and metabolic derangement in neurological diseases. The discovery of novel therapeutic strategies targeting age-linked inflammation may promote healthy brain aging and the treatment of neurodegenerative as well as neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26089771

  12. Immunity, inflammation, and cancer: an eternal fight between good and evil

    PubMed Central

    Shalapour, Shabnam; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development and its response to therapy are strongly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which either promote or attenuate tumorigenesis and can have opposing effects on therapeutic outcome. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor development, progression, and metastatic dissemination, as well as treatment resistance. However, cancer development and malignant progression are also associated with accumulation of genetic alterations and loss of normal regulatory processes, which cause expression of tumor-specific antigens and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that can activate antitumor immune responses. Although signals that trigger acute inflammatory reactions often stimulate dendritic cell maturation and antigen presentation, chronic inflammation can be immunosuppressive. This antagonism between inflammation and immunity also affects the outcome of cancer treatment and needs to be considered when designing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26325032

  13. Immunity, inflammation, and cancer: an eternal fight between good and evil.

    PubMed

    Shalapour, Shabnam; Karin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cancer development and its response to therapy are strongly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which either promote or attenuate tumorigenesis and can have opposing effects on therapeutic outcome. Chronic inflammation promotes tumor development, progression, and metastatic dissemination, as well as treatment resistance. However, cancer development and malignant progression are also associated with accumulation of genetic alterations and loss of normal regulatory processes, which cause expression of tumor-specific antigens and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that can activate antitumor immune responses. Although signals that trigger acute inflammatory reactions often stimulate dendritic cell maturation and antigen presentation, chronic inflammation can be immunosuppressive. This antagonism between inflammation and immunity also affects the outcome of cancer treatment and needs to be considered when designing new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  15. Leptin in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Faggioni, R

    2000-10-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, is a pleiotropic molecule that regulates food intake as well as metabolic and endocrine functions. Leptin also plays a regulatory role in immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. Alterations in immune and inflammatory responses are present in leptin- or leptin-receptor-deficient animals, as well as during starvation and malnutrition, two conditions characterized by low levels of circulating leptin. Both leptin and its receptor share structural and functional similarities with the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. Leptin exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic activities in a variety of cell types, including T lymphocytes, leukemia cells, and hematopoietic progenitors. Leptin also affects cytokine production, the activation of monocytes/macrophages, wound healing, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. Moreover, leptin production is acutely increased during infection and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of leptin in the modulation of the innate immune response, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

  16. The unfolded protein response in immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Grootjans, Joep; Kaser, Arthur; Kaufman, Randal J.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly conserved pathway that allows the cell to manage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that is imposed by the secretory demands associated with environmental forces. In this role, the UPR has increasingly been shown to have crucial functions in immunity and inflammation. In this Review, we discuss the importance of the UPR in the development, differentiation, function and survival of immune cells in meeting the needs of an immune response. In addition, we review current insights into how the UPR is involved in complex chronic inflammatory diseases and, through its role in immune regulation, antitumour responses. PMID:27346803

  17. Immune Suppression and Inflammation in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    420:860. 5. Kusmartsev , S., and D. I. Gabrilovich. 2002. Immature myeloid cells and cancer- associated immune suppression. Cancer Immunol Immunother 51...166:5398. 20. Kusmartsev , S. A., Y. Li, and S. H. Chen. 2000. Gr-1+ myeloid cells derived from tumor-bearing mice inhibit primary T cell activation...Chronic inflammation and cancer. On- cology 16: 217–226. 4. Coussens, L. M., and Z. Werb. 2002. Inflammation and cancer. Nature 420: 860–867. 5. Kusmartsev

  18. Radiation, Inflammation, and Immune Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has emerged as one of the hallmarks of cancer. Inflammation also plays a pivotal role in modulating radiation responsiveness of tumors. As discussed in this review, ionizing radiation (IR) leads to activation of several transcription factors modulating the expression of numerous mediators in tumor cells and cells of the microenvironment promoting cancer development. Novel therapeutic approaches thus aim to interfere with the activity or expression of these factors, either in single-agent or combinatorial treatment or as supplements of the existing therapeutic concepts. Among them, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. A great variety of classical or novel drugs including nutraceuticals such as plant phytochemicals have the capacity to interfere with the inflammatory network in cancer and are considered as putative radiosensitizers. Thus, targeting the inflammatory signaling pathways induced by IR offers the opportunity to improve the clinical outcome of radiation therapy by enhancing radiosensitivity and decreasing putative metabolic effects. Since inflammation and sex steroids also impact tumorigenesis, a therapeutic approach targeting glucocorticoid receptors and radiation-induced production of tumorigenic factors might be effective in sensitizing certain tumors to IR. PMID:22675673

  19. Readapting the adaptive immune response - therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Andrew P; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-04

    Cardiovascular diseases remain a major global health issue, with the development of atherosclerosis as a major underlying cause. Our treatment of cardiovascular disease has improved greatly over the past three decades, but much remains to be done reduce disease burden. Current priorities include reducing atherosclerosis advancement to clinically significant stages and preventing plaque rupture or erosion. Inflammation and involvement of the adaptive immune system influences all these aspects and therefore is one focus for future therapeutic development. The atherosclerotic vascular wall is now recognized to be invaded from both sides (arterial lumen and adventitia), for better or worse, by the adaptive immune system. Atherosclerosis is also affected at several stages by adaptive immune responses, overall providing many opportunities to target these responses and to reduce disease progression. Protective influences that may be defective in diseased individuals include humoral responses to modified LDL and regulatory T cell responses. There are many strategies in development to boost these pathways in humans, including vaccine-based therapies. The effects of various existing adaptive immune targeting therapies, such as blocking critical co-stimulatory pathways or B cell depletion, on cardiovascular disease are beginning to emerge with important consequences for both autoimmune disease patients and the potential for wider use of such therapies. Entering the translation phase for adaptive immune targeting therapies is an exciting and promising prospect.

  20. Exercise in Regulation of Inflammation-Immune Axis Function in Cancer Initiation and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Wennerberg, Erik; Demaria, Sandra; Jones, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacologic manipulation of the immune system is emerging as a viable and robust treatment for some cancer patients. Exercise-induced modulation of the immune system may be another adjunctive strategy for inhibiting tumor initiation and progression. In healthy individuals, exercise has been shown to modulate a number of cell subsets involved in innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge pertaining to exercise modulation of the inflammation-immune axis in cancer. The current evidence suggests that exercise may be a promising adjunctive strategy that can favorably alter numerous components of the immune system, which, in turn, may modulate tumorigenesis. However, many important knowledge gaps are evident. To this end, we propose a framework to guide future research efforts investigating the immune effects of exercise in cancer. PMID:26676894

  1. Immune tolerance induction by integrating innate and adaptive immune regulators

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Ricordi, Camillo; Chen, Zhibin

    2009-01-01

    A diversity of immune tolerance mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from immune damage. Immune regulatory cells are critical contributors to peripheral tolerance. These regulatory cells, exemplified by the CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and a recently identified population named myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulate immune responses and limiting immune-mediated pathology. In a chronic inflammatory setting, such as allograft-directed immunity, there may be a dynamic “crosstalk” between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage. CTLA4-B7-based interaction between the two branches may function as a molecular “bridge” to facilitate such “crosstalk”. Understanding the interplays among Treg cells, innate suppressors and pathogenic effector T (Teff) cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immunosuppressive elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. Successful development of localized strategies of regulatory cell therapies could circumvent the requirement for very high number of cells and decrease the risks associated with systemic immunosuppression. To realize the potential of innate and adaptive immune regulators for the still-elusive goal of immune tolerance induction, adoptive cell therapies may also need to be coupled with agents enhancing endogenous tolerance mechanisms. PMID:19919733

  2. Immune Suppression and Inflammation in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    and cancer: back to Virchow? Lancet 2001;357:539-45. 4. Coussens LM, Werb Z. Inflammation and cancer. Nature 2002;420:860-7. 5. Kusmartsev S...Sotomayor EM, Kast WM. Mechanism of immune dysfunction in cancer mediated by immature Gr-1+ myeloid cells. J Immunol 2001;166:5398-406. 40. Kusmartsev S...cancer. Nature 420:860- 867. 5. Kusmartsev , S., and D. I. Gabrilovich. 2002. Immature myeloid cells and cancer- associated immune suppression. Cancer

  3. Control of adaptive immunity by the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections are recognized by the innate immune system both to elicit immediate defense and to generate long-lasting adaptive immunity. To detect and respond to vastly different groups of pathogens, the innate immune system uses several recognition systems that rely on sensing common structural and functional features associated with different classes of microorganisms. These recognition systems determine microbial location, viability, replication and pathogenicity. Detection of these features by recognition pathways of the innate immune system is translated into different classes of effector responses though specialized populations of dendritic cells. Multiple mechanisms for the induction of immune responses are variations on a common design principle wherein the cells that sense infections produce one set of cytokines to induce lymphocytes to produce another set of cytokines, which in turn activate effector responses. Here we discuss these emerging principles of innate control of adaptive immunity. PMID:25789684

  4. Inflammation, immune activation, and cardiovascular disease in HIV.

    PubMed

    Nou, Eric; Lo, Janet; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-06-19

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV. Several epidemiological studies have shown an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke compared to uninfected controls. Although traditional risk factors contribute to this increased risk of cardiovascular disease, HIV-specific mechanisms likely also play a role. Systemic inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease in several populations suffering from chronic inflammation, including people living with HIV. Although antiretroviral therapy reduces immune activation, levels of inflammatory markers remain elevated compared to uninfected controls. The causes of this sustained immune response are likely multifactorial and incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the evidence describing the relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular disease and discuss potential anti-inflammatory treatment options for cardiometabolic disease in people living with HIV.

  5. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways.

  6. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  7. Endocannabinoid signalling in innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Battistini, Luca; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The immune system can be modulated and regulated not only by foreign antigens but also by other humoral factors and metabolic products, which are able to affect several quantitative and qualitative aspects of immunity. Among these, endocannabinoids are a group of bioactive lipids that might serve as secondary modulators, which when mobilized coincident with or shortly after first-line immune modulators, increase or decrease many immune functions. Most immune cells express these bioactive lipids, together with their set of receptors and of enzymes regulating their synthesis and degradation. In this review, a synopsis of the manifold immunomodulatory effects of endocannabinoids and their signalling in the different cell populations of innate and adaptive immunity is appointed, with a particular distinction between mice and human immune system compartments. PMID:25585882

  8. The origins of vertebrate adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Litman, Gary W.; Rast, Jonathan P.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is mediated through numerous genetic and cellular processes that generate favourable somatic variants of antigen-binding receptors under evolutionary selection pressure by pathogens and other factors. Advances in our understanding of immunity in mammals and other model organisms are revealing the underlying basis and complexity of this remarkable system. Although the evolution of adaptive immunity has been considered to occur by acquisition of novel molecular capabilities, an increasing amount of information from new model systems suggest that co-option and redirection of preexisting systems are the major source of innovation. We combine evidence from a wide range of organisms to obtain an integrated view of the origins and patterns of divergence in adaptive immunity. PMID:20651744

  9. Ion Channels in Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Feske, Stefan; Wulff, Heike; Skolnik, Edward Y.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters mediate the transport of charged ions across hydrophobic lipid membranes. In immune cells, divalent cations such as calcium, magnesium, and zinc have important roles as second messengers to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. By contrast, monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium mainly regulate the membrane potential, which indirectly controls the influx of calcium and immune cell signaling. Studies investigating human patients with mutations in ion channels and transporters, analysis of gene-targeted mice, or pharmacological experiments with ion channel inhibitors have revealed important roles of ionic signals in lymphocyte development and in innate and adaptive immune responses. We here review the mechanisms underlying the function of ion channels and transporters in lymphocytes and innate immune cells and discuss their roles in lymphocyte development, adaptive and innate immune responses, and autoimmunity, as well as recent efforts to develop pharmacological inhibitors of ion channels for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25861976

  10. Ion channels in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Feske, Stefan; Wulff, Heike; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters mediate the transport of charged ions across hydrophobic lipid membranes. In immune cells, divalent cations such as calcium, magnesium, and zinc have important roles as second messengers to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. By contrast, monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium mainly regulate the membrane potential, which indirectly controls the influx of calcium and immune cell signaling. Studies investigating human patients with mutations in ion channels and transporters, analysis of gene-targeted mice, or pharmacological experiments with ion channel inhibitors have revealed important roles of ionic signals in lymphocyte development and in innate and adaptive immune responses. We here review the mechanisms underlying the function of ion channels and transporters in lymphocytes and innate immune cells and discuss their roles in lymphocyte development, adaptive and innate immune responses, and autoimmunity, as well as recent efforts to develop pharmacological inhibitors of ion channels for immunomodulatory therapy.

  11. Tumors STING adaptive antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-11-20

    Immunotherapy is revolutionizing the treatment of cancer patients, but the molecular basis for tumor immunogenicity is unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Deng et al. (2014) and Woo et al. (2014) provide evidence suggesting that dendritic cells detect DNA from tumor cells via the STING-mediated, cytosolic DNA sensing pathway.

  12. Cigarette smoke exposure exacerbates lung inflammation and compromises immunity to bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Amit A; Bogner, Paul N; Thatcher, Thomas H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P; Thanavala, Yasmin

    2014-06-01

    The detrimental impact of tobacco on human health is clearly recognized, and despite aggressive efforts to prevent smoking, close to one billion individuals worldwide continue to smoke. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are susceptible to recurrent respiratory infections with pathogens, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), yet the reasons for this increased susceptibility are poorly understood. Because mortality rapidly increases with multiple exacerbations, development of protective immunity is critical to improving patient survival. Acute NTHI infection has been studied in the context of cigarette smoke exposure, but this is the first study, to our knowledge, to investigate chronic infection and the generation of adaptive immune responses to NTHI after chronic smoke exposure. After chronic NTHI infection, mice that had previously been exposed to cigarette smoke developed increased lung inflammation and compromised adaptive immunity relative to air-exposed controls. Importantly, NTHI-specific T cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke produced lower levels of IFN-γ and IL-4, and B cells produced reduced levels of Abs against outer-membrane lipoprotein P6, with impaired IgG1, IgG2a, and IgA class switching. However, production of IL-17, which is associated with neutrophilic inflammation, was enhanced. Interestingly, cigarette smoke-exposed mice exhibited a similar defect in the generation of adaptive immunity after immunization with P6. Our study has conclusively demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure has a profound suppressive effect on the generation of adaptive immune responses to NTHI and suggests the mechanism by which prior cigarette smoke exposure predisposes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to recurrent infections, leading to exacerbations and contributing to mortality.

  13. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life.

  14. Prognostic value of innate and adaptive immunity in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Malesci, Alberto; Laghi, Luigi

    2013-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major public health problems throughout the world. Originally depicted as a multi-step dynamical disease, CRC develops slowly over several years and progresses through cytologically distinct benign and malignant states, from single crypt lesions through adenoma, to malignant carcinoma with the potential for invasion and metastasis. Moving from histological observations since a long time, it has been recognized that inflammation and immunity actively participate in the pathogenesis, surveillance and progression of CRC. The advent of immunohistochemical techniques and of animal models has improved our understanding of the immune dynamical system in CRC. It is well known that immune cells have variable behavior controlled by complex interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Advances in immunology and molecular biology have shown that CRC is immunogenic and that host immune responses influence survival. Several lines of evidence support the concept that tumor stromal cells, are not merely a scaffold, but rather they influence growth, survival, and invasiveness of cancer cells, dynamically contributing to the tumor microenvironment, together with immune cells. Different types of immune cells infiltrate CRC, comprising cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. A relevant issue is to unravel the discrepancy between the inhibitory effects on cancer growth exerted by the local immune response and the promoting effects on cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination induced by some types of inflammatory cells. Here, we sought to discuss the role played by innate and adaptive immune system in the local progression and metastasis of CRC, and the prognostic information that we can currently understand and exploit.

  15. How metabolism generates signals during innate immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Anne F; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2013-08-09

    The interplay between immunity, inflammation, and metabolic changes is a growing field of research. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors are families of innate immune receptors, and their role in the human immune response is well documented. Exciting new evidence is emerging with regard to their role in the regulation of metabolism and the activation of inflammatory pathways during the progression of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β appears to play a central role in these disorders. There is also evidence that metabolites such as NAD(+) (acting via deacetylases such as SIRT1 and SIRT2) and succinate (which regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) are signals that regulate innate immunity. In addition, the extracellular overproduction of metabolites such as uric acid and cholesterol crystals acts as a signal sensed by NLRP3, leading to the production of IL-1β. These observations cast new light on the role of metabolism during host defense and inflammation.

  16. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections. PMID:25607781

  17. The paradox of the immune response in HIV infection: when inflammation becomes harmful.

    PubMed

    Ipp, Hayley; Zemlin, Annalise

    2013-02-01

    HIV-infection is associated with ongoing activation of the immune system and persistent inflammation. These are key driving forces in the loss of CD4+ T cells, progression to AIDS and development of non-HIV-related complications such as cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Diseases associated with accelerated aging are increasing in incidence despite good anti-retroviral therapy (ART). The common underlying mechanism appears to be chronic inflammation. HIV-specific mechanisms as well as non-specific generalized responses to infection contribute to the chronic and aberrant activation of the immune system. An early loss of gut mucosal integrity, the pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu, co-infections and later, marked destruction of lymph node architecture are all factors contributing to the ongoing activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. These factors paradoxically promote CD4+ T cell loss, both by providing additional substrate for viral infection in the form of activated CD4+ T cells, as well as by priming non-infected 'bystander' CD4+ T cells for death by apoptosis. However, the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to ongoing immune activation remain to be determined. Cost-effective markers of inflammation and selective anti-inflammatory agents are important fields of current and future research.

  18. Fusobacterium nucleatum, inflammation, and immunity: the fire within human gut.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Yousuf; Hazari, Younis Mohammad; Asrafuzzaman, Syed; Fazili, Khalid Majid

    2016-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an identified proinflammatory autochthonous bacterium implicated in human colorectal cancer. It is also abundantly found in patients suffering from chronic gut inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease), consequently contributing to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Majority of the studies have reported that colorectal tumors/colorectal adenocarcinomas are highly enriched with F. nucleatum compared to noninvolved adjacent colonic tissue. During the course of multistep development of colorectal cancer, tumors have evolved many mechanisms to resist the antitumor immune response. One of such favorite ploy is providing access to pathogenic bacteria, especially F. nucleatum in the colorectal tumor microenvironment, wherein both (colorectal tumors and F. nucleatum) exert profound effect on each other, consequently attracting tumor-permissive myeloid-derived suppressor cells, suppressing cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and inhibiting NK cell-mediated cancer cell killing. In this review, we have primarily focused on how this bug modulates the immune response, consequently rendering the antitumor immune cells inactive.

  19. Natural innate and adaptive immunity to cancer.

    PubMed

    Vesely, Matthew D; Kershaw, Michael H; Schreiber, Robert D; Smyth, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The immune system can identify and destroy nascent tumor cells in a process termed cancer immunosurveillance, which functions as an important defense against cancer. Recently, data obtained from numerous investigations in mouse models of cancer and in humans with cancer offer compelling evidence that particular innate and adaptive immune cell types, effector molecules, and pathways can sometimes collectively function as extrinsic tumor-suppressor mechanisms. However, the immune system can also promote tumor progression. Together, the dual host-protective and tumor-promoting actions of immunity are referred to as cancer immunoediting. In this review, we discuss the current experimental and human clinical data supporting a cancer immunoediting process that provide the fundamental basis for further study of immunity to cancer and for the rational design of immunotherapies against cancer.

  20. Gastrointestinal inflammation and associated immune activation in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G.; Alaedini, Armin; Yang, Shuojia; Halling, Meredith; Gressitt, Kristin L.; Stallings, Cassie R.; Origoni, Andrea E.; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Leweke, F. Markus; Dickerson, Faith B.; Yolken, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Immune factors are implicated in normal brain development and in brain disorder pathogenesis. Pathogen infection and food antigen penetration across gastrointestinal barriers are means by which environmental factors might affect immune-related neurodevelopment. Here, we test if gastrointestinal inflammation is associated with schizophrenia and therefore, might contribute to bloodstream entry of potentially neurotropic milk and gluten exorphins and/or immune activation by food antigens. IgG antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA, a marker of intestinal inflammation), bovine milk casein, wheat-derived gluten, and 6 infectious agents were assayed. Cohort 1 included 193 with non-recent onset schizophrenia, 67 with recent onset schizophrenia and 207 non-psychiatric controls. Cohort 2 included 103 with first episode schizophrenia, 40 of whom were antipsychotic-naïve. ASCA markers were significantly elevated and correlated with food antigen antibodies in recent onset and non-recent onset schizophrenia compared to controls (p ≤ 0.00001–0.004) and in unmedicated individuals with first episode schizophrenia compared to those receiving antipsychotics (p ≤ 0.05–0.01). Elevated ASCA levels were especially evident in non-recent onset females (p ≤ 0.009), recent onset males (p ≤ 0.01) and in antipsychotic-naïve males (p ≤ 0.03). Anti-food antigen antibodies were correlated to antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii, an intestinally-infectious pathogen, particularly in males with recent onset schizophrenia (p ≤ 0.002). In conclusion, gastrointestinal inflammation is a relevant pathology in schizophrenia, appears to occur in the absence of but may be modified by antipsychotics, and may link food antigen sensitivity and microbial infection as sources of immune activation in mental illness. PMID:22446142

  1. Epithelial NEMO links innate immunity to chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nenci, Arianna; Becker, Christoph; Wullaert, Andy; Gareus, Ralph; van Loo, Geert; Danese, Silvio; Huth, Marion; Nikolaev, Alexei; Neufert, Clemens; Madison, Blair; Gumucio, Deborah; Neurath, Markus F; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2007-03-29

    Deregulation of intestinal immune responses seems to have a principal function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The gut epithelium is critically involved in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis-acting as a physical barrier separating luminal bacteria and immune cells, and also expressing antimicrobial peptides. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this function of gut epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory responses, functions in gut epithelial cells to control epithelial integrity and the interaction between the mucosal immune system and gut microflora. Intestinal epithelial-cell-specific inhibition of NF-kappaB through conditional ablation of NEMO (also called IkappaB kinase-gamma (IKKgamma)) or both IKK1 (IKKalpha) and IKK2 (IKKbeta)-IKK subunits essential for NF-kappaB activation-spontaneously caused severe chronic intestinal inflammation in mice. NF-kappaB deficiency led to apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides and translocation of bacteria into the mucosa. Concurrently, this epithelial defect triggered a chronic inflammatory response in the colon, initially dominated by innate immune cells but later also involving T lymphocytes. Deficiency of the gene encoding the adaptor protein MyD88 prevented the development of intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that Toll-like receptor activation by intestinal bacteria is essential for disease pathogenesis in this mouse model. Furthermore, NEMO deficiency sensitized epithelial cells to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, whereas TNF receptor-1 inactivation inhibited intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that TNF receptor-1 signalling is crucial for disease induction. These findings demonstrate that a primary NF-kappaB signalling defect in intestinal epithelial cells disrupts immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract

  2. Immune Regulation by Pericytes: Modulating Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rocío; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Sanz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been credited with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, an accumulating body of evidence suggests that PC also display immune properties. They can respond to a series of pro-inflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger due to their expression of functional pattern-recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines but also overexpress adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, PC are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, which is attributed, at least in part, to the expression of PD-L1. As components of the tumor microenvironment, PC can also modulate the antitumor immune response. However, their role is complex, and further studies will be required to better understand the crosstalk of PC with immune cells in order to consider them as potential therapeutic targets. In any case, PC will be looked at with new eyes by immunologists from now on. PMID:27867386

  3. Innate Immunity and Inflammation in NAFLD/NASH.

    PubMed

    Arrese, Marco; Cabrera, Daniel; Kalergis, Alexis M; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation and hepatocyte injury and death are the hallmarks of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the progressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is a currently burgeoning public health problem. Innate immune activation is a key factor in triggering and amplifying hepatic inflammation in NAFLD/NASH. Thus, identification of the underlying mechanisms by which immune cells in the liver recognize cell damage signals or the presence of pathogens or pathogen-derived factors that activate them is relevant from a therapeutic perspective. In this review, we present new insights into the factors promoting the inflammatory response in NASH including sterile cell death processes resulting from lipotoxicity in hepatocytes as well as into the altered gut-liver axis function, which involves translocation of bacterial products into portal circulation as a result of gut leakiness. We further delineate the key immune cell types involved and how they recognize both damage-associated molecular patterns or pathogen-associated molecular patterns through binding of surface-expressed pattern recognition receptors, which initiate signaling cascades leading to injury amplification. The relevance of modulating these inflammatory signaling pathways as potential novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of NASH is summarized.

  4. Host adaptive immunity alters gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Husen; Sparks, Joshua B; Karyala, Saikumar V; Settlage, Robert; Luo, Xin M

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the mammalian gut microbiota has a role in the development and activation of the host immune system. Much less is known on how host immunity regulates the gut microbiota. Here we investigated the role of adaptive immunity on the mouse distal gut microbial composition by sequencing 16 S rRNA genes from microbiota of immunodeficient Rag1(-/-) mice, versus wild-type mice, under the same housing environment. To detect possible interactions among immunological status, age and variability from anatomical sites, we analyzed samples from the cecum, colon, colonic mucus and feces before and after weaning. High-throughput sequencing showed that Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia dominated mouse gut bacterial communities. Rag1(-) mice had a distinct microbiota that was phylogenetically different from wild-type mice. In particular, the bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila was highly enriched in Rag1(-/-) mice compared with the wild type. This enrichment was suppressed when Rag1(-/-) mice received bone marrows from wild-type mice. The microbial community diversity increased with age, albeit the magnitude depended on Rag1 status. In addition, Rag1(-/-) mice had a higher gain in microbiota richness and evenness with increase in age compared with wild-type mice, possibly due to the lack of pressure from the adaptive immune system. Our results suggest that adaptive immunity has a pervasive role in regulating gut microbiota's composition and diversity.

  5. Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Packard, René R. S.; Lichtman, Andrew H.; Libby, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder, involves both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response that mediate the initiation, progression, and ultimate thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. Most fatal thromboses, which may manifest as acute myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, result from frank rupture or superficial erosion of the fibrous cap overlying the atheroma, processes that occur in inflammatorily active, rupture-prone plaques. Appreciation of the inflammatory character of atherosclerosis has led to the application of C-reactive protein as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk, and the characterization of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions of the statin class of drugs. An improved understanding of the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and further studies of its immune mechanisms provide avenues for the development of future strategies directed toward better risk stratification of patients as well as the identification of novel anti-inflammatory therapies. This review retraces leukocyte subsets involved in innate and adaptive immunity and their contributions to atherogenesis. PMID:19449008

  6. Adaptive immune responses to Acanthamoeba cysts.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Kathy; Howard, Kevin; Mayhew, Elizabeth; Niederkorn, Jerry; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2002-09-01

    Acanthamoeba cysts are not eliminated from the corneas of human subjects or experimentally infected animals. The persistence of Acanthamoeba cysts in the cornea indicates that either the cysts escape immunological elimination or are not recognized by the host's immunological elements. The aim of this study was to determine the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the Acanthamoeba cyst. Mice were immunized intraperitoneally and serum anti-Acanthamoeba IgG was measured by ELISA. Lymphoproliferative assay and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to Acanthamoeba castellanii cyst and trophozoite antigens were used to determine the cell mediated immune responses against Acanthamoeba cysts. A. castellanii cysts were both immunogenic and antigenic, producing anti-Acanthamoeba serum IgG, T lymphocyte proliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity responses. These results indicate that Acanthamoeba cysts are recognized by the immune system. The persistence of the organism in the human cornea means that these adaptive immune responses fail to kill Acanthamoeba cysts.

  7. Adipocytes Properties and Crosstalk with Immune System in Obesity-related Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maurizi, Giulia; Della Guardia, Lucio; Maurizi, Angela; Poloni, Antonella

    2017-02-09

    Obesity is a condition likely associated with several dysmetabolic conditions or worsening of cardiovascular and other chronic disturbances. A key role in this mechanism seem to be played by the onset of low-grade systemic inflammation, highlighting the importance of the interplay between adipocytes and immune system cells. Adipocytes express a complex and highly adaptive biological profile being capable to selectively activate different metabolic pathways in order to respond to environmental stimuli. It has been demonstrated how adipocytes, under appropriate stimulation, can easily differentiate and de-differentiate thereby converting themselves into different phenotypes according to metabolic necessities. Although underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, growing in adipocyte size and the inability of storing triglycerides under overfeeding conditions seem to be crucial for the switching to a dysfunctional metabolic profile, which is characterized by inflammatory and apoptotic pathways activation and by the shifting to pro-inflammatory adipokines secretion. In obesity, changes in adipokines secretion along with adipocyte deregulation and fatty acids release into circulation contribute to maintain immune cells activation as well as their infiltration into regulatory organs. Over the well-established role of macrophages, recent findings suggest the involvement of new classes of immune cells such as T regulatory lymphocytes and neutrophils in the development inflammation and multi systemic worsening. Deeply understanding the pathways of adipocyte regulation and the de-differentiation process could be extremely useful for developing novel strategies aimed at curbing obesity-related inflammation and related metabolic disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Depression and immunity: inflammation and depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Stefan M; Irwin, Michael R

    2006-08-01

    There is strong evidence that depression involves alterations in multiple aspects of immunity that may contribute to the development or exacerbation of a number of medical disorders and also may play a role in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. Accordingly, aggressive management of depressive disorders in medically ill populations or individuals at risk for disease may improve disease outcome or prevent disease development. On the other hand, in light of data suggesting that immune processes may interact with the pathophysiologic pathways known to contribute to depression, novel approaches to the treatment of depression may target relevant aspects of the immune response. Taken together, the data provide compelling evidence that a psychoimmunologic frame of reference may have profound implications regarding the consequences and treatment of depression. In addition, this approach may be used to investigate the possibility that peripheral and central production of cytokines may account for neuropsychiatric symptoms in inflammatory diseases. This article summarizes evidence for a cytokine-mediated pathogenesis of depression and fatigue in MS. The effects of central inflammatory processes may account for some of the behavioral symptoms seen in patients who have MS that cannot be explained by psychosocial factors or CNS damage. This immune-mediated hypothesis is supported by indirect evidence from experimental and clinical studies of the effect of cytokines on behavior, which have found that both peripheral and central cytokines may cause depressive symptoms. Emerging clinical data from patients who have MS support an association of central inflammation (as measured by MRI) and inflammatory markers with depressive symptoms and fatigue. Based on the literature reviewed in this article, subtypes of MS fatigue and depression may exist that are caused by different pathogenetic mechanisms, including inflammation and CNS damage as well as psychosocial factors or

  9. Immune escape of γ-herpesviruses from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhuting; Usherwood, Edward J

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are two γ-herpesviruses identified in humans and are strongly associated with the development of malignancies. Murine γ-herpesvirus (MHV-68) is a naturally occurring rodent pathogen, representing a unique experimental model for dissecting γ-herpesvirus infection and the immune response. These γ-herpesviruses actively antagonize the innate and adaptive antiviral responses, thereby efficiently establishing latent or persistent infections and even promoting development of malignancies. In this review, we summarize immune evasion strategies of γ-herpesviruses. These include suppression of MHC-I-restricted and MHC-II-restricted antigen presentation, impairment of dendritic cell functions, downregulation of costimulatory molecules, activation of virus-specific regulatory T cells, and induction of inhibitory cytokines. There is a focus on how both γ-herpesvirus-derived and host-derived immunomodulators interfere with adaptive antiviral immunity. Understanding immune-evasive mechanisms is essential for developing future immunotherapies against EBV-driven and KSHV-driven tumors.

  10. Are the innate and adaptive immune systems setting hypertension on fire?

    PubMed

    Bomfim, Gisele F; Rodrigues, Fernanda Luciano; Carneiro, Fernando S

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic cardiovascular disease and is associated with several pathological states, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Low-grade inflammation plays a key role in hypertension and the innate and adaptive immune systems seem to contribute to hypertension development and maintenance. Hypertension is associated with vascular inflammation, increased vascular cytokines levels and infiltration of immune cells in the vasculature, kidneys and heart. However, the mechanisms that trigger inflammation and immune system activation in hypertension are completely unknown. Cells from the innate immune system express pattern recognition receptors (PRR), which detect conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that induce innate effector mechanisms to produce endogenous signals, such as inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, to alert the host about danger. Additionally, antigen-presenting cells (APC) act as sentinels that are activated by PAMPs and DAMPs to sense the presence of the antigen/neoantigen, which ensues the adaptive immune system activation. In this context, different lymphocyte types are activated and contribute to inflammation and end-organ damage in hypertension. This review will focus on experimental and clinical evidence demonstrating the contribution of the innate and adaptive immune systems to the development of hypertension.

  11. Chronic immune activation and inflammation as the cause of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Dalgleish, A G

    2001-01-01

    Several chronic infections known to be associated with malignancy have established oncogenic properties. However the existence of chronic inflammatory conditions that do not have an established infective cause and are associated with the development of tumours strongly suggests that the inflammatory process itself provides the prerequisite environment for the development of malignancy. This environment includes upregulation of mediators of the inflammatory response such as cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins which themselves may suppress cell mediated immune responses and promote angiogenesis. These factors may also impact on cell growth and survival signalling pathways resulting in induction of cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, chronic inflammation may lead to the production of reactive oxygen species and metabolites such as malondialdehyde within the affected cells that may in turn induce DNA damage and mutations and, as a result, be carcinogenic. Here it is proposed that the conditions provided by a chronic inflammatory environment are so essential for the progression of the neoplastic process that therapeutic intervention aimed at inhibiting inflammation, reducing angiogenesis and stimulating cell mediated immune responses may have a major role in reducing the incidence of common cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506482

  12. Long QT Syndrome: An Emerging Role for Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Laghi-Pasini, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The long QT syndrome (LQTS), classified as congenital or acquired, is a multi-factorial disorder of myocardial repolarization predisposing to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, particularly torsades de pointes. In the latest years, inflammation and immunity have been increasingly recognized as novel factors crucially involved in modulating ventricular repolarization. In the present paper, we critically review the available information on this topic, also analyzing putative mechanisms and potential interplays with the other etiologic factors, either acquired or inherited. Accumulating data indicate inflammatory activation as a potential cause of acquired LQTS. The putative underlying mechanisms are complex but essentially cytokine-mediated, including both direct actions on cardiomyocyte ion channels expression and function, and indirect effects resulting from an increased central nervous system sympathetic drive on the heart. Autoimmunity represents another recently arising cause of acquired LQTS. Indeed, increasing evidence demonstrates that autoantibodies may affect myocardial electric properties by directly cross-reacting with the cardiomyocyte and interfering with specific ion currents as a result of molecular mimicry mechanisms. Intriguingly, recent data suggest that inflammation and immunity may be also involved in modulating the clinical expression of congenital forms of LQTS, possibly triggering or enhancing electrical instability in patients who already are genetically predisposed to arrhythmias. In this view, targeting immuno-inflammatory pathways may in the future represent an attractive therapeutic approach in a number of LQTS patients, thus opening new exciting avenues in antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:26798623

  13. Inflammation on the Mind: Visualizing Immunity in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Silvia S.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a remarkably complex structure that utilizes electrochemical signaling to coordinate activities throughout the entire body. Because the nervous system contains nonreplicative cells, it is postulated that, through evolutionary pressures, this compartment has acquired specialized mechanisms to limit damage. One potential source of damage comes from our immune system, which has the capacity to survey the CNS and periphery for the presence of foreign material. The immune system is equipped with numerous effector mechanisms and can greatly alter the homeostasis and function of the CNS. Degeneration, autoimmunity, and pathogen infection can all result in acute, and sometimes chronic, inflammation within the CNS. Understanding the specialized functionality of innate and adaptive immune cells within the CNS is critical to the design of more efficacious treatments to mitigate CNS inflammatory conditions. Much of our knowledge of CNS-immune interactions stems from seminal studies that have used static and dynamic imaging approaches to visualize inflammatory cells responding to different CNS conditions. This review will focus on how imaging techniques have elevated our understanding of CNS inflammation as well as the exciting prospects that lie ahead as we begin to pursue investigation of the inflamed CNS in real time. PMID:19521688

  14. Wakayama symposium: interface between innate and adaptive immunity in dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Na, Kyung-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Chung, So-Hyang; Mok, Jee Won; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2015-12-17

    Although the mechanism of dry eye disease is not clearly understood, it is certain that inflammation and the immune response play a major role in determining the health of the ocular surface in dry eye patients. Accurate ocular surface characterization during the early stages of dry eye disease is critical for successful treatment, because there exists no single standard, objective test to diagnose the early phase of dry eye disease. The treatment target should be direct to prevent the perpetuation of chronic inflammation and immune responses. Numerous studies have categorized dry eye disease as an autoimmune-related inflammatory disease. However, relatively little is known about how innate immune mechanisms act following a local insult, why some patients are particularly vulnerable, and why local inflammation fails to resolve in these patients. Within this review, particular attention will be given to the very early events and corresponding defense mechanism in dry eye disease. The transition from innate to adaptive immunity will also be discussed.

  15. Disruption of immune regulation by microbial pathogens and resulting chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth; Remick, Daniel G; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-07-01

    Activation of the immune response is a tightly regulated, coordinated effort that functions to control and eradicate exogenous microorganisms, while also responding to endogenous ligands. Determining the proper balance of inflammation is essential, as chronic inflammation leads to a wide array of host pathologies. Bacterial pathogens can instigate chronic inflammation via an extensive repertoire of evolved evasion strategies that perturb immune regulation. In this review, we discuss two model pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which efficiently escape various aspects of the immune system within professional and non-professional immune cell types to establish chronic inflammation.

  16. Protecting genome integrity during CRISPR immune adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Addison V; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems include genomic arrays of short repeats flanking foreign DNA sequences and provide adaptive immunity against viruses. Integration of foreign DNA must occur specifically to avoid damaging the genome or the CRISPR array, but surprisingly promiscuous activity occurs in vitro. Here we reconstituted full-site DNA integration and show that the Streptococcus pyogenes type II-A Cas1-Cas2 integrase maintains specificity in part through limitations on the second integration step. At non-CRISPR sites, integration stalls at the half-site intermediate, thereby enabling reaction reversal. S. pyogenes Cas1-Cas2 is highly specific for the leader-proximal repeat and recognizes the repeat's palindromic ends, thus fitting a model of independent recognition by distal Cas1 active sites. These findings suggest that DNA-insertion sites are less common than suggested by previous work, thereby preventing toxicity during CRISPR immune adaptation and maintaining host genome integrity.

  17. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells1–4. Lymphocytedeficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1–deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25−Foxp3− or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses. PMID:17891146

  18. Adaptive immune cells temper initial innate responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Dong; Zhao, Jie; Auh, Sogyong; Yang, Xuanming; Du, Peishuang; Tang, Hong; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2007-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize conserved microbial structures called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Signaling from TLRs leads to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules for better priming of T cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells. Lymphocyte-deficient hosts often die of acute infection, presumably owing to their lack of an adaptive immune response to effectively clear pathogens. However, we show here that an unleashed innate immune response due to the absence of residential T cells can also be a direct cause of death. Viral infection or administration of poly(I:C), a ligand for TLR3, led to cytokine storm in T-cell- or lymphocyte-deficient mice in a fashion dependent on NK cells and tumor necrosis factor. We have further shown, through the depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in wild-type mice and the transfer of T lymphocytes into Rag-1-deficient mice, respectively, that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to temper the early innate response. In addition to the effects of natural regulatory T cells, close contact of resting CD4+CD25-Foxp3- or CD8+ T cells with innate cells could also suppress the cytokine surge by various innate cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Therefore, adaptive immune cells have an unexpected role in tempering initial innate responses.

  19. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  20. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define “slow” or “rapid” disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression. PMID:27159038

  1. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo; Cosio, Manuel G; Saetta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define "slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression.

  2. Rethinking inflammation: neural circuits in the regulation of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Peder S.; Rosas-Ballina, Mauricio; Levine, Yaakov A.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neural reflex circuits regulate cytokine release to prevent potentially damaging inflammation and maintain homeostasis. In the inflammatory reflex, sensory input elicited by infection or injury travels through the afferent vagus nerve to integrative regions in the brainstem, and efferent nerves carry outbound signals that terminate in the spleen and other tissues. Neurotransmitters from peripheral autonomic nerves subsequently promote acetylcholine-release from a subset of CD4+ T cells that relay the neural signal to other immune cells, e.g. through activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on macrophages. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of the inflammatory reflex and discuss potential therapeutic implications of current findings in this evolving field. PMID:22725962

  3. Fat-Associated Lymphoid Clusters in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Migoni, Sara; Caamaño, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Fat-associated lymphoid clusters (FALCs) are atypical lymphoid tissues that were originally identified in mouse and human mesenteries due to that they contain a high number of type 2 innate lymphoid cells/nuocytes/natural helper cells. FALCs are located on adipose tissues in mucosal surfaces such as the mediastinum, pericardium, and gonadal fat. Importantly, these clusters contain B1, B2 and T lymphocytes as well as myeloid and other innate immune cell populations. The developmental cues of FALC formation have started to emerge, showing that these clusters depend on a different set of molecules and cells than secondary lymphoid tissues for their formation. Here, we review the current knowledge on FALC formation, and we compare FALCs and omental milky spots and their responses to inflammation. PMID:28066422

  4. Immune activation by histones: plusses and minuses in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-12-01

    Histones are highly cationic proteins that are essential components of the cell nucleus, interacting with DNA to form the nucleosome and regulating transcription. Histones, however, can transit from the cell nucleus during cell death and, once in an extracellular location, can serve as danger signals and activate immune cells. An article in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2013. 43: 3336-3342] reports that histones can activate monocyte-derived DCs via the NRLP3 inflammasome to induce the production of IL-1β. As such, histones, which can also stimulate TLRs, may drive events in the immunopathogenesis of a wide range of acute and chronic diseases marked by sterile inflammation. While the mechanism of this stimulation is not known, the positive charge of histones may provide a structural element to promote interaction with cells and activation of downstream signaling systems.

  5. The adaptive immune response in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Iversen, Rasmus; Ráki, Melinda; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2012-07-01

    Compared to other human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, fundamental aspects of the pathogenesis in celiac disease are relatively well understood. This is mostly because the causative antigen in celiac disease-cereal gluten proteins-is known and the culprit HLA molecules are well defined. This has facilitated the dissection of the disease-relevant CD4+ T cells interacting with the disease-associated HLA molecules. In addition, celiac disease has distinct antibody responses to gluten and the autoantigen transglutaminase 2, which give strong handles to understand all sides of the adaptive immune response leading to disease. Here we review recent developments in the understanding of the role of T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells in the pathogenic immune response of this instructive disorder.

  6. Therapies targeting innate immunity for fighting inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Harats, Dror; Breitbart, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a smoldering disease of the vasculature that can lead to the occlusion of the arteries, resulting in ischemia of the heart and brain. For many years, the asserted underlying mechanism of atherosclerosis, supported by its epidemiology, was based on the "cholesterol hypothesis" that people with high blood cholesterol are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This hypothesis instigated a vigorous search for treatment that yielded the generation of statins, which specifically reduce LDL cholesterol. Since then, statins have revolutionized the way people are treated for the prevention of atherosclerosis. Nonetheless, despite this potent class of drugs, cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in many parts of the world, suggesting that additional mechanisms are involved in disease pathogenesis. Intensive research has revealed that the atherosclerotic plaque is enriched with leukocytes, and that macrophages constitute the majority of immune cells in the lesion. Monocytes/macrophages are now recognized as the prime immune cells involved in the development of atherosclerosis and are implicated to affect the size, composition and vulnerability of the atherosclerotic plaque. While many of the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherogenesis have been characterized, such as cell adhesion, cytokine production and protease secretion, there is a dearth of drugs that specifically target innate immunity for treating patients with atherosclerosis. This review presents pre-clinical studies, and in most cases following clinical trials with antagonists and agonists that have been designed to counteract inflammation in atherosclerosis and associated diseases, highlighting targets expressed predominantly in monocytes.

  7. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  8. Integration of the immune system: a complex adaptive supersystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisman, Mark V.

    2001-10-01

    Immunity to pathogenic organisms is a complex process involving interacting factors within the immune system including circulating cells, tissues and soluble chemical mediators. Both the efficiency and adaptive responses of the immune system in a dynamic, often hostile, environment are essential for maintaining our health and homeostasis. This paper will present a brief review of one of nature's most elegant, complex adaptive systems.

  9. Innate and adaptive antifungal immune responses: partners on an equal footing.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mawieh

    2012-05-01

    Adaptive immunity has long been regarded as the major player in protection against most fungal infections. Mounting evidence suggest however, that both innate and adaptive responses intricately collaborate to produce effective antifungal protection. Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in initiating and orchestrating antifungal immunity; neutrophils, macrophages and other phagocytes also participate in recognising and eliminating fungal pathogens. Adaptive immunity provides a wide range of effector and regulatory responses against fungal infections. Th1 responses protect against most forms of mycoses but they associate with significant inflammation and limited pathogen persistence. By contrast, Th2 responses enhance persistence of and tolerance to fungal infections thus permitting the generation of long-lasting immunological memory. Although the role of Th17 cytokines in fungal immunity is not fully understood, they can enhance proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses or play a regulatory role in fungal immunity all depending on the pathogen, site/phase of infection and host immunostatus. T regulatory cells balance the activities of various Th cell subsets thereby permitting inflammation and protection on the one hand and allowing for tolerance and memory on the other. Here, recent developments in fungal immunity research are reviewed as means of tracing the emergence of a refined paradigm where innate and adaptive responses are viewed in the same light.

  10. Intercellular Communication in the Adaptive Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup

    2004-03-01

    Higher organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that can respond to pathogens that have not been encountered before. T lymphocytes (T cells) are the orchestrators of the adaptive immune response. They interact with cells, called antigen presenting cells (APC), that display molecular signatures of pathogens. Recently, video microscopy experiments have revealed that when T cells detect antigen on APC surfaces, a spatially patterned supramolecular assembly of different types of molecules forms in the junction between cell membranes. This recognition motif is implicated in information transfer between APC and T cells, and so, is labeled the immunological synapse. The observation of synapse formation sparked two broad questions: How does the synapse form? Why does the synapse form? I will describe progress made in answering these fundamental questions in biology by synergistic use of statistical mechanical theory/computation, chemical engineering principles, and genetic and biochemical experiments. The talk will also touch upon mechanisms that may underlie the extreme sensitivity with which T cells discriminate between self and non-self.

  11. The role of selenium in inflammation and immunity: from molecular mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Rose, Aaron H; Hoffmann, Peter R

    2012-04-01

    Dietary selenium (]Se), mainly through its incorporation into selenoproteins, plays an important role in inflammation and immunity. Adequate levels of Se are important for initiating immunity, but they are also involved in regulating excessive immune responses and chronic inflammation. Evidence has emerged regarding roles for individual selenoproteins in regulating inflammation and immunity, and this has provided important insight into mechanisms by which Se influences these processes. Se deficiency has long been recognized to negatively impact immune cells during activation, differentiation, and proliferation. This is related to increased oxidative stress, but additional functions such as protein folding and calcium flux may also be impaired in immune cells under Se deficient conditions. Supplementing diets with above-adequate levels of Se can also impinge on immune cell function, with some types of inflammation and immunity particularly affected and sexually dimorphic effects of Se levels in some cases. In this comprehensive article, the roles of Se and individual selenoproteins in regulating immune cell signaling and function are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to how Se and selenoproteins are linked to redox signaling, oxidative burst, calcium flux, and the subsequent effector functions of immune cells. Data obtained from cell culture and animal models are reviewed and compared with those involving human physiology and pathophysiology, including the effects of Se levels on inflammatory or immune-related diseases including anti-viral immunity, autoimmunity, sepsis, allergic asthma, and chronic inflammatory disorders. Finally, the benefits and potential adverse effects of intervention with Se supplementation for various inflammatory or immune disorders are discussed.

  12. Type II NKT Cells in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, Microbial Immunity, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Idania; Ware, Randle; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR) with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity, and cancer. PMID:26136748

  13. Complement receptor immunoglobulin: a control point in infection and immunity, inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Small, Annabelle Grace; Al-Baghdadi, Marwah; Quach, Alex; Hii, Charles; Ferrante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The B7 family-related protein, V-set and Ig domain (VSIG4) / Z39Ig / complement receptor immunoglobulin (CRIg), is a new player in the regulation of immunity to infection and inflammation. The unique features of this receptor as compared with classical complement receptors, CR3 and CR4, have heralded the emergence of new concepts in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Its selective expression in tissue macrophages and dendritic cells has been considered of importance in host defence and in maintaining tolerance against self-antigens. Although a major receptor for phagocytosis of complement opsonised bacteria, its array of emerging functions which incorporates the immune suppressive and anti-inflammatory action of the receptor have now been realised. Accumulating evidence from mouse experimental models indicates a potential role for CRIg in protection against bacterial infection and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus, and also in promotion of tumour growth. CRIg expression can be considered as a control point in these diseases, through which inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, act. The ability of CRIg to suppress cytotoxic T cell proliferation and function may underlie its promotion of cancer growth. Thus, the unique properties of this receptor open up new avenues for understanding of the pathways that regulate inflammation during infection, autoimmunity and cancer with the potential for new drug targets to be identified. While some complement receptors may be differently expressed in mice and humans, as well as displaying different properties, mouse CRIg has a structure and function similar to the human receptor, suggesting that extrapolation to human diseases is appropriate. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence in human conditions that CRIg may be a valuable biomarker in infection and immunity, inflammatory conditions and cancer prognosis.

  14. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  15. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  16. Runx3 at the interface of immunity, inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lotem, Joseph; Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Bauer, Omri; Hantisteanu, Shay; Dicken, Joseph; Groner, Yoram

    2015-04-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) in normal cells provides a viability/growth advantage that contributes cell-autonomously to cancer. More than a decade ago claims arose that the RUNX3 member of the RUNX transcription factor family is a major TSG inactivated in gastric cancer, a postulate extended later to other cancers. However, evidence that Runx3 is not expressed in normal gastric and other epithelia has challenged the RUNX3-TSG paradigm. Here we critically re-appraise this paradigm in light of recent high-throughput, quantitative genome-wide studies on thousands of human samples of various tumors and new investigations of the role of Runx3 in mouse cancer models. Collectively, these studies unequivocally demonstrate that RUNX3 is not a bona fide cell-autonomous TSG. Accordingly, RUNX3 is not recognized as a TSG and is not included among the 2000 cancer genes listed in the "Cancer Gene Census" or "Network for Cancer Genes" repositories. In contrast, RUNX3 does play important functions in immunity and inflammation and may thereby indirectly influence epithelial tumor development.

  17. STATs in cancer inflammation and immunity: a leading role for STAT3.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Pardoll, Drew; Jove, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Commensurate with their roles in regulating cytokine-dependent inflammation and immunity, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are central in determining whether immune responses in the tumour microenvironment promote or inhibit cancer. Persistently activated STAT3 and, to some extent, STAT5 increase tumour cell proliferation, survival and invasion while suppressing anti-tumour immunity. The persistent activation of STAT3 also mediates tumour-promoting inflammation. STAT3 has this dual role in tumour inflammation and immunity by promoting pro-oncogenic inflammatory pathways, including nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)-GP130-Janus kinase (JAK) pathways, and by opposing STAT1- and NF-kappaB-mediated T helper 1 anti-tumour immune responses. Consequently, STAT3 is a promising target to redirect inflammation for cancer therapy.

  18. STATs in cancer inflammation and immunity: a leading role for STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Pardoll, Drew; Jove, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Commensurate with their roles in regulating cytokine-dependent inflammation and immunity, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are central in determining whether immune responses in the tumour microenvironment promote or inhibit cancer. Persistently activated STAT3 and, to some extent, STAT5 increase tumour cell proliferation, survival and invasion while suppressing anti-tumour immunity. The persistent activation of STAT3 also mediates tumour-promoting inflammation. STAT3 has this dual role in tumour inflammation and immunity by promoting pro-oncogenic inflammatory pathways, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)–GP130–Janus kinase (JAK) pathways, and by opposing STAT1- and NF-κB-mediated T helper 1 anti-tumour immune responses. Consequently, STAT3 is a promising target to redirect inflammation for cancer therapy. PMID:19851315

  19. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    The field of nanotechnology is continually advancing, and increasing amounts of consumer goods are being produced using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The health risks of occupational and/or consumer exposure to ENMs are not completely understood, although significant research indicates that pulmonary exposure to nanomaterials induces toxic effects in the lungs of exposed animals. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are a specific category of ENMs and consist of sheets of graphene rolled into cylinders that are multiple layers thick in order to strengthen their rigidity. MWCNTs have a fiber-like shape, similar to that of asbestos, which allows for a high aspect ratio and makes them difficult to clear from the lung. Studies with rodent models have demonstrated that pulmonary exposure to ENMs, in particular MWCNTs, results in acute lung inflammation and the subsequent development of chronic fibrosis, suggesting a potential human health risk to individuals involved in the manufacturing of products utilizing these nanomaterials. Induction of IL-1beta secretion via activation of the inflammasome is a prime mechanism of MWCNT-induced inflammation. The inflammasome is a multi-protein scaffold found in a variety of cell types that forms in response to a variety of immune signals, including particulates. Sensitization with allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), increases levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in mice and in humans, and there is particular cause for concern in cases of MWCNT exposure in individuals with pre-existing allergic airway disease, such as asthma. MWCNT exposure exacerbates airway inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of pre-existing allergic asthma, suggesting that individuals suffering from asthma are more susceptible to the toxic pulmonary effects of MWCNT exposure. Asthma is an exceptionally prominent human disease, and therefore the goal of this research was to better understand how pre-existing allergic airway

  20. The evolution of adaptive immunity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masayuki; Das, Sabyasachi; Guo, Peng; Cooper, Max D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 500 million years ago, two types of recombinatorial adaptive immune systems (AISs) arose in vertebrates. The jawed vertebrates diversify their repertoire of immunoglobulin domain-based T and B cell antigen receptors mainly through the rearrangement of V(D)J gene segments and somatic hypermutation, but none of the fundamental AIS recognition elements in jawed vertebrates have been found in jawless vertebrates. Instead, the AIS of jawless vertebrates is based on variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that are generated through recombinatorial usage of a large panel of highly diverse leucine-rich-repeat (LRR) sequences. Whereas the appearance of transposon-like, recombination-activating genes contributed uniquely to the origin of the AIS in jawed vertebrates, the use of activation-induced cytidine deaminase for receptor diversification is common to both the jawed and jawless vertebrates. Despite these differences in anticipatory receptor construction, the basic AIS design featuring two interactive T and B lymphocyte arms apparently evolved in an ancestor of jawed and jawless vertebrates within the context of preexisting innate immunity and has been maintained since as a consequence of powerful and enduring selection, most probably for pathogen defense purposes.

  1. Manipulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity through Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Duane A.

    2017-01-01

    Although cancer immunotherapy has shown significant promise in mediating efficacious responses, it remains encumbered by tumor heterogeneity, loss of tumor-specific antigen targets, and the regulatory milieu both regionally and systemically. Cross talk between the innate and adaptive immune response may be requisite to polarize sustained antigen specific immunity. Cancer vaccines can serve as an essential fulcrum in initiating innate immunity while molding and sustaining adaptive immunity. Although peptide vaccines have shown tepid responses in a therapeutic setting with poor correlates for immune activity, RNA vaccines activate innate immune responses and have shown promising effects in preclinical and clinical studies based on enhanced DC migration. While the mechanistic insights behind the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity may be unique to the immunotherapeutic being investigated, understanding this dynamic is important to coordinate the different arms of the immune response in a focused response against cancer antigens. PMID:28265580

  2. Chronic infection and the origin of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Usharauli, David

    2010-08-01

    It has been speculated that the rise of the adaptive immune system in jawed vertebrates some 400 million years ago gave them a superior protection to detect and defend against pathogens that became more elusive and/or virulent to the host that had only innate immune system. First, this line of thought implies that adaptive immune system was a new, more sophisticated layer of host defense that operated independently of the innate immune system. Second, the natural consequence of this scenario would be that pathogens would have exercised so strong an evolutionary pressure that eventually no host could have afforded not to have an adaptive immune system. Neither of these arguments is supported by the facts. First, new experimental evidence has firmly established that operation of adaptive immune system is critically dependent on the ability of the innate immune system to detect invader-pathogens and second, the absolute majority of animal kingdom survives just fine with only an innate immune system. Thus, these data raise the dilemma: If innate immune system was sufficient to detect and protect against pathogens, why then did adaptive immune system develop in the first place? In contrast to the innate immune system, the adaptive immune system has one important advantage, precision. By precision I mean the ability of the defense system to detect and remove the target, for example, infected cells, without causing unwanted bystander damage of surrounding tissue. While the target precision per se is not important for short-term immune response, it becomes a critical factor when the immune response is long-lasting, as during chronic infection. In this paper I would like to propose new, "toxic index" hypothesis where I argue that the need to reduce the collateral damage to the tissue during chronic infection(s) was the evolutionary pressure that led to the development of the adaptive immune system.

  3. Did the molecules of adaptive immunity evolve from the innate immune system?

    PubMed

    Bartl, Simona; Baish, Meredith; Weissman, Irving L; Diaz, Marilyn

    2003-04-01

    The antigen receptors on cells of innate immune systems recognize broadly expressed markers on non-host cells while the receptors on lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system display a higher level of specificity. Adaptive immunity, with its exquisite specificity and immunological memory, has only been found in the jawed vertebrates, which also display innate immunity. Jawless fishes and invertebrates only have innate immunity. In the adaptive immune response, T and B-lymphocytes detect foreign agents or antigens using T cell receptors (TCR) or immunoglobulins (Ig), respectively. While Ig can bind free intact antigens, TCR only binds processed antigenic fragments that are presented on molecules encoded in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). MHC molecules display variation through allelic polymorphism. A diverse repertoire of Ig and TCR molecules is generated by gene rearrangement and junctional diversity, processes carried out by the recombinase activating gene (RAG) products and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). Thus, the molecules that define adaptive immunity are TCR, Ig, MHC molecules, RAG products and TdT. No direct predecessors of these molecules have been found in the jawless fishes or invertebrates. In contrast, the complement cascade can be activated by either adaptive or innate immune systems and contains examples of molecules that gradually evolved from non-immune functions to being part of the innate and then adaptive immune system. In this paper we examine the molecules of the adaptive immune system and speculate on the existence of direct predecessors that were part of innate immunity.

  4. PPARγ and the Innate Immune System Mediate the Resolution of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Croasdell, Amanda; Duffney, Parker F; Kim, Nina; Lacy, Shannon H; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process, mediated in large part by the innate immune system. Resolution represents not only an increase in anti-inflammatory actions, but also a paradigm shift in immune cell function to restore homeostasis. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has long been studied for its anti-inflammatory actions, but an emerging body of literature is investigating the role of PPARγ and its ligands (including thiazolidinediones, prostaglandins, and oleanolic acids) in all phases of resolution. PPARγ can shift production from pro- to anti-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils, platelets, and macrophages. PPARγ and its ligands further modulate platelet and neutrophil function, decreasing trafficking, promoting neutrophil apoptosis, and preventing platelet-leukocyte interactions. PPARγ alters macrophage trafficking, increases efferocytosis and phagocytosis, and promotes alternative M2 macrophage activation. There are also roles for this receptor in the adaptive immune response, particularly regarding B cells. These effects contribute towards the attenuation of multiple disease states, including COPD, colitis, Alzheimer's disease, and obesity in animal models. Finally, novel specialized proresolving mediators-eicosanoids with critical roles in resolution-may act through PPARγ modulation to promote resolution, providing another exciting area of therapeutic potential for this receptor.

  5. R4 Regulator of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins in Inflammation and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C; Druey, Kirk M

    2016-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important functions in both innate and adaptive immunity, with the capacity to bridge interactions between the two arms of the host responses to pathogens through direct recognition of secreted microbial products or the by-products of host cells damaged by pathogen exposure. In the mid-1990s, a large group of intracellular proteins was discovered, the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family, whose main, but not exclusive, function appears to be to constrain the intensity and duration of GPCR signaling. The R4/B subfamily--the focus of this review--includes RGS1-5, 8, 13, 16, 18, and 21, which are the smallest RGS proteins in size, with the exception of RGS3. Prominent roles in the trafficking of B and T lymphocytes and macrophages have been described for RGS1, RGS13, and RGS16, while RGS18 appears to control platelet and osteoclast functions. Additional G protein independent functions of RGS13 have been uncovered in gene expression in B lymphocytes and mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. In this review, we discuss potential physiological roles of this RGS protein subfamily, primarily in leukocytes having central roles in immune and inflammatory responses. We also discuss approaches to target RGS proteins therapeutically, which represents a virtually untapped strategy to combat exaggerated immune responses leading to inflammation.

  6. PPARγ and the Innate Immune System Mediate the Resolution of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Croasdell, Amanda; Duffney, Parker F.; Kim, Nina; Lacy, Shannon H.; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process, mediated in large part by the innate immune system. Resolution represents not only an increase in anti-inflammatory actions, but also a paradigm shift in immune cell function to restore homeostasis. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has long been studied for its anti-inflammatory actions, but an emerging body of literature is investigating the role of PPARγ and its ligands (including thiazolidinediones, prostaglandins, and oleanolic acids) in all phases of resolution. PPARγ can shift production from pro- to anti-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils, platelets, and macrophages. PPARγ and its ligands further modulate platelet and neutrophil function, decreasing trafficking, promoting neutrophil apoptosis, and preventing platelet-leukocyte interactions. PPARγ alters macrophage trafficking, increases efferocytosis and phagocytosis, and promotes alternative M2 macrophage activation. There are also roles for this receptor in the adaptive immune response, particularly regarding B cells. These effects contribute towards the attenuation of multiple disease states, including COPD, colitis, Alzheimer's disease, and obesity in animal models. Finally, novel specialized proresolving mediators—eicosanoids with critical roles in resolution—may act through PPARγ modulation to promote resolution, providing another exciting area of therapeutic potential for this receptor. PMID:26713087

  7. Immunometabolism of obesity and diabetes: microbiota link compartmentalized immunity in the gut to metabolic tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Joseph B; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    The bacteria that inhabit us have emerged as factors linking immunity and metabolism. Changes in our microbiota can modify obesity and the immune underpinnings of metabolic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes. Obesity coincides with a low-level systemic inflammation, which also manifests within metabolic tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. This metabolic inflammation can promote insulin resistance and dysglycaemia. However, the obesity and metabolic disease-related immune responses that are compartmentalized in the intestinal environment do not necessarily parallel the inflammatory status of metabolic tissues that control blood glucose. In fact, a permissive immune environment in the gut can exacerbate metabolic tissue inflammation. Unravelling these discordant immune responses in different parts of the body and establishing a connection between nutrients, immunity and the microbiota in the gut is a complex challenge. Recent evidence positions the relationship between host gut barrier function, intestinal T cell responses and specific microbes at the crossroads of obesity and inflammation in metabolic disease. A key problem to be addressed is understanding how metabolite, immune or bacterial signals from the gut are relayed and transferred into systemic or metabolic tissue inflammation that can impair insulin action preceding Type 2 diabetes.

  8. SY 17-2 INFLAMMATION, IMMUNITY AND HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension remains an enormous health care burden that affects one third of the population. Despite its prevalence the cause of most cases of hypertension remains unknown. Our laboratory has defined a novel mechanism for hypertension involving adaptive immunity. We found that mice lacking lymphocytes (RAG-1 mice) develop blunted hypertensive responses to a variety of stimuli including chronic angiotensin II infusion, DOCA-salt challenge and norepinephrine infusion. Adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells, restores the hypertensive responses to these stimuli. Hypertension is associated with the infiltration of T cells into the kidney and vasculature, where they release cytokines, including IFN-g, IL-17A, and TNFa, which promote sodium retention, vasoconstriction and oxidative injury. Recently, we have found that angiotensin II has striking effects on dendritic cells (DCs), promoting their propensity to activate T cells. Our data indicate that angiotensin II infusion increases DC superoxide production by 5-fold and causes a striking accumulation isoketals, oxidized products of arachidonic acid in these cells. These form covalent bonds to lysines of proteins and these modified proteins become immunogenic. Several isoketal scavengers, including 2-hydroxybenzylamine (2-HOBA) prevent DC activation, the ability of DCs to stimulate T cell proliferation and prevent hypertension. This is most prevalent in monocyte-derived DCs that are CD11c/CD11b/MHCII positive. The precise mechanism for formation of these cells is under investigation. A major impetus for immune cell activation seems to be increased sympathetic outflow, stimulated by the central actions of angiotensin II. By lesioning the AV3 V region of the forebrain of mice or inactivating the NADPH oxidase in the subfornical organ using Cre Lox technology, we have prevented the central actions of angiotensin II and found that this inhibits both T cell activation and hypertension. Renal denervation likewise

  9. Sympathetic neural-immune interactions regulate hematopoiesis, thermoregulation and inflammation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kelley S

    2017-01-01

    This review will highlight recently discovered mechanisms underlying sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of the immune system in hematopoiesis, thermogenesis, and inflammation. This work in mammals illuminates potential mechanisms by which the nervous and immune systems may interact in invertebrate and early vertebrate species and allow diverse organisms to thrive under varying and extreme conditions and ultimately improve survival.

  10. The Jeremiah Metzger Lecture: Inflammation, Immune Modulators, and Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Raymond N

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for many different diseases. It is clear that inflammation is associated with degenerative brain diseases, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Throughout the past 100 years, changes in the causes of death in the US have been dramatic. The most recent data indicate that cardiovascular disease and cancer are now responsible for 63% of mortality in the US population. Although progression of these diseases is related to diet, lifestyle, and genetic factors, a common but often unrecognized link is the presence of underlying chronic inflammation. As of 2014, 83.6 million people were living with some form of cardiovascular disease, 29.1 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes, 14 million people carried the diagnosis of cancer, and 5.2 million people were living with Alzheimer disease. These diseases are a huge burden on our health care system and all have been associated with chronic inflammation.

  11. Autophagy, Inflammation, and Immunity: A Troika Governing Cancer and Its Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhenyu; Sanchez-Lopez, Elsa; Karin, Michael

    2016-07-14

    Autophagy, a cellular waste disposal process, has well-established tumor-suppressive properties. New studies indicate that, in addition to its cell-autonomous anti-tumorigenic functions, autophagy inhibits cancer development by orchestrating inflammation and immunity. While attenuating tumor-promoting inflammation, autophagy enhances the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and thereby stimulates anti-tumor immunity. Although cancer cells can escape immunosurveillance by tuning down autophagy, certain chemotherapeutic agents with immunogenic properties may enhance anti-tumor immunity by inducing autophagic cell death. Understanding the intricate and complex relationships within this troika and how they are affected by autophagy enhancing drugs should improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  12. COPD and squamous cell lung cancer: aberrant inflammation and immunity is the common link.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Anthony, Desiree; McQualter, Jonathan; Anderson, Gary; Irving, Louis; Steinfort, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Cigarette smoking has reached epidemic proportions within many regions of the world and remains the highest risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Squamous cell lung cancer is commonly detected in heavy smokers, where the risk of developing lung cancer is not solely defined by tobacco consumption. Although therapies that target common driver mutations in adenocarcinomas are showing some promise, they are proving ineffective in smoking-related squamous cell lung cancer. Since COPD is characterized by an excessive inflammatory and oxidative stress response, this review details how aberrant innate, adaptive and systemic inflammatory processes can contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in COPD. Activated leukocytes release increasing levels of proteases and free radicals as COPD progresses and tertiary lymphoid aggregates accumulate with increasing severity. Reactive oxygen species promote formation of reactive carbonyls that are not only tumourigenic through initiating DNA damage, but can directly alter the function of regulatory proteins involved in host immunity and tumour suppressor functions. Systemic inflammation is also markedly increased during infective exacerbations in COPD and the interplay between tumour-promoting serum amyloid A (SAA) and IL-17A is discussed. SAA is also an endogenous allosteric modifier of FPR2 expressed on immune and epithelial cells, and the therapeutic potential of targeting this receptor is proposed as a novel strategy for COPD-lung cancer overlap.

  13. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) regulates sepsis but not the adaptive immune response

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, Birgit; Weigand, Markus A.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nicklas, Werner; Kasper, Michael; Hofer, Stefan; Plachky, Jens; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Kurschus, Florian C.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Martin, Eike; Schleicher, Erwin; Stern, David M.; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Arnold, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    While the initiation of the adaptive and innate immune response is well understood, less is known about cellular mechanisms propagating inflammation. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, leads to perpetuated cell activation. Using novel animal models with defective or tissue-specific RAGE expression, we show that in these animal models RAGE does not play a role in the adaptive immune response. However, deletion of RAGE provides protection from the lethal effects of septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Such protection is reversed by reconstitution of RAGE in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. These results indicate that the innate immune response is controlled by pattern-recognition receptors not only at the initiating steps but also at the phase of perpetuation. PMID:15173891

  14. IL-17A in Human Respiratory Diseases: Innate or Adaptive Immunity? Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bullens, Dominique M. A.; Decraene, Ann; Seys, Sven; Dupont, Lieven J.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of IL-17 in 1995 as a T-cell cytokine, inducing IL-6 and IL-8 production by fibroblasts, and the report of a separate T-cell lineage producing IL-17(A), called Th17 cells, in 2005, the role of IL-17 has been studied in several inflammatory diseases. By inducing IL-8 production and subsequent neutrophil attraction towards the site of inflammation, IL-17A can link adaptive and innate immune responses. More specifically, its role in respiratory diseases has intensively been investigated. We here review its role in human respiratory diseases and try to unravel the question whether IL-17A only provides a link between the adaptive and innate respiratory immunity or whether this cytokine might also be locally produced by innate immune cells. We furthermore briefly discuss the possibility to reduce local IL-17A production as a treatment option for respiratory diseases. PMID:23401702

  15. Evolution of adaptive immune recognition in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Saha, Nil Ratan; Smith, Jeramiah; Amemiya, Chris T

    2010-02-01

    All extant vertebrates possess an adaptive immune system wherein diverse immune receptors are created and deployed in specialized blood cell lineages. Recent advances in DNA sequencing and developmental resources for basal vertebrates have facilitated numerous comparative analyses that have shed new light on the molecular and cellular bases of immune defense and the mechanisms of immune receptor diversification in the "jawless" vertebrates. With data from these key species in hand, it is becoming possible to infer some general aspects of the early evolution of vertebrate adaptive immunity. All jawed vertebrates assemble their antigen-receptor genes through combinatorial recombination of different "diversity" segments into immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor genes. However, the jawless vertebrates employ an analogous, but independently derived set of immune receptors in order to recognize and bind antigens: the variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs). The means by which this locus generates receptor diversity and achieves antigen specificity is of considerable interest because these mechanisms represent a completely independent strategy for building a large immune repertoire. Therefore, studies of the VLR system are providing insight into the fundamental principles and evolutionary potential of adaptive immune recognition systems. Here we review and synthesize the wealth of data that have been generated towards understanding the evolution of the adaptive immune system in the jawless vertebrates.

  16. Depression and immunity: inflammation and depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Stefan M; Irwin, Michael R

    2009-05-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that patients who have major depressive disorder show alterations in immunologic markers including increases in proinflammatory cytokine activity and inflammation. Inflammation of the central nervous system is a pathologic hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients affected by this disease also show a high incidence of depression. Accumulating evidence from animal studies suggests that some aspects of depression and fatigue in MS may be linked to inflammatory markers. This article reviews the current knowledge in the field and illustrates how the sickness behavior model may be applied to investigate depressive symptoms in inflammatory neurologic diseases.

  17. Adaptive immunity in cancer immunology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Spurrell, Emma L; Lockley, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The vast genetic alterations characteristic of tumours produce a number of tumour antigens that enable the immune system to differentiate tumour cells from normal cells. Counter to this, tumour cells have developed mechanisms by which to evade host immunity in their constant quest for growth and survival. Tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) are one of the fundamental triggers of the immune response. They are important because they activate, via major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the T cell response, an important line of defense against tumourigenesis. However, the persistence of tumours despite host immunity implies that tumour cells develop immune avoidance. An example of this is the up-regulation of inhibitory immune checkpoint proteins, by tumours, which induces a form of self-tolerance. The majority of monoclonal antibodies in clinical practice have been developed to target tumour-specific antigens. More recently there has been research in the down-regulation of immune checkpoint proteins as a way of increasing anti-tumour immunity.

  18. Diversity of immune strategies explained by adaptation to pathogen statistics

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Andreas; Mora, Thierry; Rivoire, Olivier; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological organisms have evolved a wide range of immune mechanisms to defend themselves against pathogens. Beyond molecular details, these mechanisms differ in how protection is acquired, processed, and passed on to subsequent generations—differences that may be essential to long-term survival. Here, we introduce a mathematical framework to compare the long-term adaptation of populations as a function of the pathogen dynamics that they experience and of the immune strategy that they adopt. We find that the two key determinants of an optimal immune strategy are the frequency and the characteristic timescale of the pathogens. Depending on these two parameters, our framework identifies distinct modes of immunity, including adaptive, innate, bet-hedging, and CRISPR-like immunities, which recapitulate the diversity of natural immune systems. PMID:27432970

  19. Role of the Microbiota in Immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Belkaid, Yasmine; Hand, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota plays a fundamental role on the induction, training and function of the host immune system. In return, the immune system has largely evolved as a means to maintain the symbiotic relationship of the host with these highly diverse and evolving microbes. When operating optimally this immune system–microbiota alliance allows the induction of protective responses to pathogens and the maintenance of regulatory pathways involved in the maintenance of tolerance to innocuous antigens. However, in high-income countries overuse of antibiotics, changes in diet, and elimination of constitutive partners such as nematodes has selected for a microbiota that lack the resilience and diversity required to establish balanced immune responses. This phenomenon is proposed to account for some of the dramatic rise in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders in parts of the world where our symbiotic relationship with the microbiota has been the most affected. PMID:24679531

  20. Immune inflammation indicators and implication for immune modulation strategies in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Andrea Casadei; Scarpi, Emanuela; Faloppi, Luca; Scartozzi, Mario; Silvestris, Nicola; Santini, Daniele; de Stefano, Giorgio; Marisi, Giorgia; Negri, Francesca V.; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Valgiusti, Martina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-01-01

    We evalueted a systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with the aim to explored their prognostic value in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with sorafenib. 56 advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib were available for our analysis. Lymphocyte, neutrophil and platelet were measured before beginning of treatment and after one month. Patient with SII ≥ 360 showed lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.9 months, P < 0.026) and OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.027) with respect to patients with SII < 360. NLR ≥ 3 had a lower median PFS (2.6 vs. 3.3 months, P < 0.049) but not OS (5.6 vs. 13.9 months, P = 0.062) than those with NLR < 3. After adjusting for clinical covariates SII and NLR remained an independent prognostic factor for OS. The SII and NLR represent potential prognostic indicator in patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib. PMID:27613839

  1. Inflammation and Bone Destruction in Arthritis: Synergistic Activity of Immune and Mesenchymal Cells in Joints

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease of the joints that is characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia that eventually lead to cartilage and bone destruction. Synovial fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells recognized as a key cell population in RA due to their hyperproliferative and hypersensitive properties in the inflammatory milieu and hyperproduction of both inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading enzymes. On the immune cell side, a wealth of evidence has shown that CD4+T-cells, especially IL-17 producing helper T (Th17) cells, play a prominent role, particularly in the initiation of systemic immune response in RA. However, it is still unclear how the local chronic inflammation in the joint is elicited by a systemic immune response. Recent studies have shed light on the importance of the interaction between immune and mesenchymal cells in joints including synovial fibroblasts. In particular, mesenchymal cells contribute to the Th17-mediated chronic inflammation in RA by promoting the migration of Th17 cells to the inflamed site and then the homeostatic proliferation and concomitant increase in IL-17 production. In addition, recent progress in osteoimmunology has provided new insight into the pathogenesis of the bone destruction which takes place in RA. Th17-related cytokines have been shown to enhance osteoclastogenesis, mainly via synovial fibroblasts. Thus, mesenchymal cells are a determinant of the development of RA that links the systemic immune response and the local disorder in the joints. In addition, the interaction of immune and mesenchymal cells plays a key role in both the chronic inflammation and bone destruction seen in RA. Elucidation of the precise events involved in this interaction will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which chronic inflammation and bone destruction in joint results from a systemic immune response, and also will help provide a molecular basis for novel therapeutic

  2. Metal-Based Nanoparticles and the Immune System: Activation, Inflammation, and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chang, Louis W.; Lin, Pinpin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials, including metal-based nanoparticles, are used for various biological and medical applications. However, metals affect immune functions in many animal species including humans. Different physical and chemical properties induce different cellular responses, such as cellular uptake and intracellular biodistribution, leading to the different immune responses. The goals of this review are to summarize and discuss the innate and adaptive immune responses triggered by metal-based nanoparticles in a variety of immune system models. PMID:26125021

  3. Odor Signals of Immune Activation and CNS Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    injury. Using an animal model, we first trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from lipopolysaccharide-treated and control mice...Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a general elicitor of inflammation. Trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated and control...injury (LFPI) or surgery without brain injury were employed as urine donors. Biosensors trained to discriminate LPS-treated mouse odors from

  4. [Association of ocular inflammation and innate immune response].

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2008-03-01

    Immune response has been divided into innate immunity and acquired immunity. We focused on the role of innate immunity during the formation of uveitis and choroidal neovascularization (CNV)-related diseases. To carry out a comprehensive analysis of ocular inflammatory responses in patients with uveitis, vitreous fluid was analyzed using a microbead-based multiplex ELIZA system. We found that cytokines which were related with innate immunity were elevated, but cytokines which were related with acquired immunity were not. We also found that the role of IL-17 was to produce Th17 cells in the chronic phase of experimental uveitis. Next, we investigated the role of the natural killer (NK) T cells which restrict CD1 and participate in the innate immune response in laser-induced experimental CNV. We studied the CNV formation in two independent NK T cell-deficient strains of mice, CD1 knockout (KO) mice and Jalpha18 KO mice, and found that both KO mice showed significant reduction of the effects of experimental CNV. After laser treatment, both CD1 KO mice and Jalpha18 KO mice showed a decrease in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in retina and choroid. Interestingly, intravitreous inoculation of a galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer), which is the ligand of NK Tcells, inhibited CNV in C57BL6 mice. Collectively, we conclude that NK T cells play an important role in forming CNV as one of the inducers of VEGS. Because NK T cells bear the potential to regulate immune response, alphaGalCer might activate NK T cells differently to produce angiostatic factors and have a therapeutic potential in vivo. During the clinical process of CNV-related diseases, not only CNV formation, but also subretinal scarring is thought to be another important step. We thus established the experimental model of subretinal scaring by injecting peritoneal exudating macrophases into the subretinal space. This scaring was inhibited by inoculation of anti-IL-6 antibody and

  5. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Albert, Matthew L.; Ingersoll, Molly A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder. PMID:26182347

  6. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Albert, Matthew L; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder.

  7. Evolution of innate and adaptive immune systems in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Because jawless vertebrates are the most primitive vertebrates, they have been studied to gain understanding of the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the innate and adaptive immune systems in vertebrates. Jawless vertebrates have developed lymphocyte-like cells that morphologically resemble the T and B cells of jawed vertebrates, but they express variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) instead of the T and B cell receptors that specifically recognize antigens in jawed vertebrates. These VLRs act as antigen receptors, diversity being generated in their antigen-binding sites by assembly of highly diverse leucine-rich repeat modules. Therefore, jawless vertebrates have developed adaptive immune systems based on the VLRs. Although pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Rig-like receptors (RLRs), and their adaptor genes are conserved in jawless vertebrates, some transcription factor and inflammatory cytokine genes in the TLR and RLR pathways are not present. However, like jawed vertebrates, the initiation of adaptive immune responses in jawless vertebrates appears to require prior activation of the innate immune system. These observations imply that the innate immune systems of jawless vertebrates have a unique molecular basis that is distinct from that of jawed vertebrates. Altogether, although the molecular details of the innate and adaptive immune systems differ between jawless and jawed vertebrates, jawless vertebrates have developed versions of these immune systems that are similar to those of jawed vertebrates.

  8. CD98 at the crossroads of adaptive immunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Joseph M; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2012-03-15

    Adaptive immunity, a vertebrate specialization, adds memory and exquisite specificity to the basic innate immune responses present in invertebrates while conserving metabolic resources. In adaptive immunity, antigenic challenge requires extremely rapid proliferation of rare antigen-specific lymphocytes to produce large, clonally expanded effector populations that neutralize pathogens. Rapid proliferation and resulting clonal expansion are dependent on CD98, a protein whose well-conserved orthologs appear restricted to vertebrates. Thus, CD98 supports lymphocyte clonal expansion to enable protective adaptive immunity, an advantage that could account for the presence of CD98 in vertebrates. CD98 supports lymphocyte clonal expansion by amplifying integrin signals that enable proliferation and prevent apoptosis. These integrin-dependent signals can also provoke cancer development and invasion, anchorage-independence and the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. CD98 is highly expressed in many cancers and contributes to formation of tumors in experimental models. Strikingly, vertebrates, which possess highly conserved CD98 proteins, CD98-binding integrins and adaptive immunity, also display propensity towards invasive and metastatic tumors. In this Commentary, we review the roles of CD98 in lymphocyte biology and cancer. We suggest that the CD98 amplification of integrin signaling in adaptive immunity provides survival benefits to vertebrates, which, in turn, bear the price of increased susceptibility to cancer.

  9. The role of the innate and adaptive immune responses in Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y

    2002-01-01

    Infections of the corneal surface are an important cause of blindness. Protozoal, viral, bacterial, and helminthic infections of the cornea account for up to 9 million cases of corneal blindness. Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba produce a progressive infection of the cornea called Acanthamoeba keratitis. Disease is usually transmitted by Acanthamoeba trophozoites bound to soft contact lenses. Infection of the cornea is initiated when the parasite binds to the corneal epithelial surface. Recrudescence can occur and suggests that the adaptive immune response is not aroused by corneal Acanthamoeba infections. Systemic immunization with Acanthamoeba antigens elicits robust Th1 cell-mediated immunity and serum IgG antibody, yet fails to prevent the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. However, immunization via mucosal surfaces induces anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies in the tears and provides solid protection against the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Unlike other immune effector mechanisms that rely on cytolysis, inflammation, release of toxic molecules, or the induction of host cell death, the adaptive immune apparatus prevents Acanthamoeba infections of the cornea by simply preventing the attachment of the parasite to the epithelial surface. The beauty of this mechanism lies in its exquisite simplicity and efficacy.

  10. Role of Redox Signaling and Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle Adaptations to Training

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cabrera, Maria Carmen; Viña, Jose; Ji, Li Li

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response to exercise-induced muscle damage has been extensively described. Exercise has important modulatory effects on immune function. These effects are mediated by diverse factors including pro-inflammatory cytokines, classical stress hormones, and hemodynamic effects leading to cell redistribution. As has been reported regarding oxidative stress, inflammation can have both detrimental and beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. In this review we will address the role of inflammation on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. Specifically, we will review studies showing that treatment with cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs modulate the protein synthesis response to one bout of resistance exercise and to training. Understanding how these drugs work is important for the millions of individuals worldwide that consume them regularly. We will also discuss the importance of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines in muscle adaptations to exercise and the Janus faced of the use of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs by athletes for optimizing their performance, especially during the periods in which muscle hypertrophy is expected. PMID:27983587

  11. Immune and stress responses in oysters with insights on adaptation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ximing; He, Yan; Zhang, Linlin; Lelong, Christophe; Jouaux, Aude

    2015-09-01

    Oysters are representative bivalve molluscs that are widely distributed in world oceans. As successful colonizers of estuaries and intertidal zones, oysters are remarkably resilient against harsh environmental conditions including wide fluctuations in temperature and salinity as well as prolonged air exposure. Oysters have no adaptive immunity but can thrive in microbe-rich estuaries as filter-feeders. These unique adaptations make oysters interesting models to study the evolution of host-defense systems. Recent advances in genomic studies including sequencing of the oyster genome have provided insights into oyster's immune and stress responses underlying their amazing resilience. Studies show that the oyster genomes are highly polymorphic and complex, which may be key to their resilience. The oyster genome has a large gene repertoire that is enriched for immune and stress response genes. Thousands of genes are involved in oyster's immune and stress responses, through complex interactions, with many gene families expanded showing high sequence, structural and functional diversity. The high diversity of immune receptors and effectors may provide oysters with enhanced specificity in immune recognition and response to cope with diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Some members of expanded immune gene families have diverged to function at different temperatures and salinities or assumed new roles in abiotic stress response. Most canonical innate immunity pathways are conserved in oysters and supported by a large number of diverse and often novel genes. The great diversity in immune and stress response genes exhibited by expanded gene families as well as high sequence and structural polymorphisms may be central to oyster's adaptation to highly stressful and widely changing environments.

  12. Zinc in innate and adaptive tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is important. It is the second most abundant trace metal with 2-4 grams in humans. It is an essential trace element, critical for cell growth, development and differentiation, DNA synthesis, RNA transcription, cell division, and cell activation. Zinc deficiency has adverse consequences during embryogenesis and early childhood development, particularly on immune functioning. It is essential in members of all enzyme classes, including over 300 signaling molecules and transcription factors. Free zinc in immune and tumor cells is regulated by 14 distinct zinc importers (ZIP) and transporters (ZNT1-8). Zinc depletion induces cell death via apoptosis (or necrosis if apoptotic pathways are blocked) while sufficient zinc levels allows maintenance of autophagy. Cancer cells have upregulated zinc importers, and frequently increased zinc levels, which allow them to survive. Based on this novel synthesis, approaches which locally regulate zinc levels to promote survival of immune cells and/or induce tumor apoptosis are in order. PMID:21087493

  13. Adaptive Immune Regulation of Glial Homeostasis as an Immunization Strategy for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kosloski, Lisa M.; Ha, Duy M.; Stone, David K.; Hutter, Jessica A. L.; Pichler, Michael R.; Reynolds, Ashley D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Mosley, R. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, are amongst the most devastating disorders afflicting the elderly. Currently, no curative treatments or treatments that interdict disease progression exist. Over the past decade, immunization strategies have been proposed to combat disease progression. Such strategies induce humoral immune responses against misfolded protein aggregates to facilitate their clearance. Robust adaptive immunity against misfolded proteins, however, accelerates disease progression, precipitated by induced effector T cell responses that lead to encephalitis and neuronal death. Since then, mechanisms that attenuate such adaptive neurotoxic immune responses have been sought. We propose that shifting the balance between effector and regulatory T cell activity can attenuate neurotoxic inflammatory events. This review summarizes advances in immune regulation to achieve a homeostatic glial response for therapeutic gain. Promising new ways to optimize immunization schemes and measure their clinical efficacy are also discussed. PMID:20524958

  14. Resolution of Acute Inflammation and the Role of Resolvins in Immunity, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

    PubMed

    Sansbury, Brian E; Spite, Matthew

    2016-06-24

    Acute inflammation is a host-protective response that is mounted in response to tissue injury and infection. Initiated and perpetuated by exogenous and endogenous mediators, acute inflammation must be resolved for tissue repair to proceed and for homeostasis to be restored. Resolution of inflammation is an actively regulated process governed by an array of mediators as diverse as those that initiate inflammation. Among these, resolvins have emerged as a genus of evolutionarily conserved proresolving mediators that act on specific cellular receptors to regulate leukocyte trafficking and blunt production of inflammatory mediators, while also promoting clearance of dead cells and tissue repair. Given that chronic unresolved inflammation is emerging as a central causative factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, an understanding of the endogenous processes that govern normal resolution of acute inflammation is critical for determining why sterile maladaptive cardiovascular inflammation perpetuates. Here, we provide an overview of the process of resolution with a focus on the enzymatic biosynthesis and receptor-dependent actions of resolvins and related proresolving mediators in immunity, thrombosis, and vascular biology. We discuss how nutritional and current therapeutic approaches modulate resolution and propose that harnessing resolution concepts could potentially lead to the development of new approaches for treating chronic cardiovascular inflammation in a manner that is not host disruptive.

  15. Avian Influenza Viruses, Inflammation, and CD8+ T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongfang; Loh, Liyen; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulate naturally in wild aquatic birds, infect domestic poultry, and are capable of causing sporadic bird-to-human transmissions. AIVs capable of infecting humans include a highly pathogenic AIV H5N1, first detected in humans in 1997, and a low pathogenic AIV H7N9, reported in humans in 2013. Both H5N1 and H7N9 cause severe influenza disease in humans, manifested by acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and high mortality rates of 60% and 35%, respectively. Ongoing circulation of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses in wild birds and poultry, and their ability to infect humans emphasizes their epidemic and pandemic potential and poses a public health threat. It is, thus, imperative to understand the host immune responses to the AIVs so we can control severe influenza disease caused by H5N1 or H7N9 and rationally design new immunotherapies and vaccines. This review summarizes our current knowledge on AIV epidemiology, disease symptoms, inflammatory processes underlying the AIV infection in humans, and recent studies on universal pre-existing CD8+ T cell immunity to AIVs. Immune responses driving the host recovery from AIV infection in patients hospitalized with severe influenza disease are also discussed. PMID:26973644

  16. Innate and adaptive immune responses in neurodegeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sandra; Woodroofe, M Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests important roles of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) in neurodegenerative diseases. In this special review issue, five leading researchers discuss the evidence for the beneficial as well as the detrimental impact of the immune system in the CNS in disorders including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Several common pathological mechanisms emerge indicating that these pathways could provide important targets for manipulating the immune reposes in neurodegenerative disorders. The articles highlight the role of the traditional resident immune cell of the CNS - the microglia - as well as the role of other glia astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in immune responses and their interplay with other immune cells including, mast cells, T cells and B cells. Future research should lead to new discoveries which highlight targets for therapeutic interventions which may be applicable to a range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. An Overview of the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Choy, Matthew C; Visvanathan, Kumar; De Cruz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are thought to develop as a result of complex interactions between host genetics, the immune system and the environment including the gut microbiome. Although an improved knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBDs has led to great advances in therapy such as the highly effective anti-tumor necrosis factor class of medications, a significant proportion of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis do not respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies. Further understanding of the different immune pathways involved in the genesis of chronic intestinal inflammation is required to help find effective treatments for IBDs. In this review, the role of the mucosal innate and adaptive immune system in IBD is summarized, highlighting new areas of discovery which may hold the key to identifying novel predictive or prognostic biomarkers and new avenues of therapeutic discovery.

  18. The Host Immune Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae: Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-06

    caused by penicillin -resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in rabbits. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 46: 1760- 1765. Takeuchi, O., Hoshino, K., and...2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae ...host immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae : bridging innate and adaptive immunity Katherine Shi-Hui Lee Thesis directed by: Clifford M

  19. Cancer immunoediting by the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy; Saddawi-Konefka, Robert; Vermi, William; Koebel, Catherine M; Arthur, Cora; White, J Michael; Uppaluri, Ravi; Andrews, Daniel M; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Schreiber, Robert D; Bui, Jack D

    2012-09-24

    Cancer immunoediting is the process whereby immune cells protect against cancer formation by sculpting the immunogenicity of developing tumors. Although the full process depends on innate and adaptive immunity, it remains unclear whether innate immunity alone is capable of immunoediting. To determine whether the innate immune system can edit tumor cells in the absence of adaptive immunity, we compared the incidence and immunogenicity of 3'methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas in syngeneic wild-type, RAG2(-/-), and RAG2(-/-)x γc(-/-) mice. We found that innate immune cells could manifest cancer immunoediting activity in the absence of adaptive immunity. This activity required natural killer (NK) cells and interferon γ (IFN-γ), which mediated the induction of M1 macrophages. M1 macrophages could be elicited by administration of CD40 agonists, thereby restoring editing activity in RAG2(-/-)x γc(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that in the absence of adaptive immunity, NK cell production of IFN-γ induces M1 macrophages, which act as important effectors during cancer immunoediting.

  20. Increase of oxidation and inflammation in nervous and immune systems with aging and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vida, Carmen; González, Eva M; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    According to the oxidation-inflammation theory of aging, chronic oxidative stress and inflammatory stress situations (with higher levels of oxidant and inflammatory compounds and lower antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses) are the basis of the agerelated impairment of organism functions, including those of the nervous and immune systems, as well as of the neuroimmune communication, which explains the altered homeostasis and the resulting increase of morbidity and mortality. Overproduction of oxidant compounds can induce an inflammatory response, since oxidants are inflammation effectors. Thus, oxidation and inflammation are interlinked processes and have many feedback loops. However, the nature of their potential interactions, mainly in the brain and immune cells, and their key involvement in aging remain unclear. Moreover, in the context of the neuroimmune communication, it has been described that an oxidative-inflammatory situation occurs in subjects with anxiety, and this situation contributes to an immunosenescence, alteration of survival responses and shorter life span. As an example of this, a model of premature aging in mice, in which animals show a poor response to stress and high levels of anxiety, an oxidative stress in their immune cells and tissues, as well as a premature immunosenescence and a shorter life expectancy, will be commented in the present review. This model supports the hypothesis that anxiety can be a situation of chronic oxidative stress and inflammation, especially in brain and immune cells, and this accelerates the rate of aging.

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  2. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control.

  3. Osteopontin Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Raineri, Davide; Boggio, Elena; Favero, Francesco; Soluri, Maria Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) regulates the immune response at multiple levels. Physiologically, it regulates the host response to infections by driving T helper (Th) polarization and acting on both innate and adaptive immunity; pathologically, it contributes to the development of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. In some cases, the mechanisms of these effects have been described, but many aspects of the OPN function remain elusive. This is in part ascribable to the fact that OPN is a complex molecule with several posttranslational modifications and it may act as either an immobilized protein of the extracellular matrix or a soluble cytokine or an intracytoplasmic molecule by binding to a wide variety of molecules including crystals of calcium phosphate, several cell surface receptors, and intracytoplasmic molecules. This review describes the OPN structure, isoforms, and functions and its role in regulating the crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity in autoimmune diseases. PMID:28097158

  4. CCN1: a novel inflammation-regulated biphasic immune cell migration modulator.

    PubMed

    Löbel, Madlen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Eisenreich, Andreas; Kudernatsch, Robert; Tank, Juliane; Rauch, Ursula; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Poller, Wolfgang; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of CCN1 on the migration of human immune cells. The molecule CCN1, produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells, is considered as an important matrix protein promoting tissue repair and immune cell adhesion by binding various integrins. We recently reported that CCN1 therapy is able to suppress acute inflammation in vivo. Here, we show that CCN1 binds to various immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and monocytes. The addition of CCN1 in vitro enhances both actin polymerization and transwell migration. Prolonged incubation with CCN1, however, results in the inhibition of migration of immune cells by a mechanism that involves downregulation of PI3Kγ, p38, and Akt activation. Furthermore, we observed that immune cells themselves produce constitutively CCN1 and secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In line with this finding, patients suffering from acute inflammation had enhanced serum levels of CCN1. These findings extend the classical concept of CCN1 as a locally produced cell matrix adhesion molecule and suggest that CCN1 plays an important role in regulating immune cell trafficking by attracting and locally immobilizing immune cells.

  5. IL-25 promotes Th2 immunity responses in airway inflammation of asthmatic mice via activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Caiqing, Zhang; Degan, Lu; Fen, Liu; Chao, Wang; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma occurs as a consequence of inappropriate immunologic inflammation to allergens and characterized by Th2 adaptive immune response. Recent studies indicated that interleukin (IL)-25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, had been implicated in inducing Th2 cell-dependent inflammation in airway epithelium and IL-25-deficient mice exhibit impaired Th2 immunity responses; however, how these cytokines influence innate immune responses remains poorly understood. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge to induce the murine asthmatic model and confirmed by histological analysis of lung tissues and serum levels of total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-E. The expression of IL-25 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and the dendritic cells (DCs) activation was detected by levels of CD80 and CD86 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by flow cytometry. The mice sensitized and challenged with OVA showed high expression of IL-25 in both mRNA and protein levels in lungs. We detected the expression of CD80 and CD86 in BALF was also increased. A tight correlation between IL-25 mRNA and other Th2 cells producing cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF was identified. Furthermore, when the asthmatic mice were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, the inflammatory cells infiltration and the inflammatory cytokines secretion were significantly decreased. In this study, we show that IL-25 promoted the accumulation of co-stimulatory molecules of CD80 and CD86 on DCs and then induced the differentiation of prime naive CD4(+) T cells to become proinflammatory Th2 cells and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in OVA-induced airway inflammation. The ability of IL-25 to promote the activation and differentiation of DCs population was identified as a link between the IL-17 cytokine family and the innate immune response and suggested a previously unrecognized innate immune pathway that promotes Th2

  6. Innate Immunity and Inflammation Post-Stroke: An α7-Nicotinic Agonist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Silke; Shields, Nicholas J.; Balle, Thomas; Chebib, Mary; Clarkson, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability, with limited treatment options available. Inflammation contributes to damage tissue in the central nervous system across a broad range of neuropathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease, pain, Schizophrenia, and stroke. While the immune system plays an important role in contributing to brain damage produced by ischemia, the damaged brain, in turn, can exert a powerful immune-suppressive effect that promotes infections and threatens the survival of stroke patients. Recently the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in particular its modulation using α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) ligands, has shown potential as a strategy to dampen the inflammatory response and facilitate functional recovery in stroke patients. Here we discuss the current literature on stroke-induced inflammation and the effects of α7-nAChR modulators on innate immune cells. PMID:26690125

  7. Inflammation and Immunity in Diseases of the Arterial Tree: Players and Layers

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Hansson, Göran K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that immunity and inflammation participate in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases has now gained widespread recognition and stimulated work around the globe. Broadening knowledge has extended the recognition of the role of immune and inflammatory mechanisms to all of the layers of the artery, to all levels of the arterial tree, and implicated virtually all arms, cellular “players,” and effector molecules and pathways involved in these crucial host defenses, that turn against us in disease. We provide here a guide to a compendium series of papers that aimed to look forward, and broaden the traditional focus of immunopathogenesis of arterial disease, with the goal of integrating the “players” and the “layers” involved. While the field has advanced remarkably, much remains to be done, and this commentary also aims to highlight some of the gaps that future research should strive to close regarding the participation of inflammation and immunity in arterial diseases. PMID:25593275

  8. Quantifying Adaptive Evolution in the Drosophila Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J.; Welch, John J.; Kim, Kang-Wook; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host–parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host–parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution. PMID:19851448

  9. Human Adaptive Immunity Rescues an Inborn Error of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Israel, Laura; Wang, Ying; Bulek, Katarzyna; Della Mina, Erika; Zhang, Zhao; Pedergnana, Vincent; Chrabieh, Maya; Lemmens, Nicole A; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Descatoire, Marc; Lasseau, Théo; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Yun, Ling; Belkadi, Aziz; Moran, Andrew; Weisman, Leonard E; Vandenesch, François; Batteux, Frederic; Weller, Sandra; Levin, Michael; Herberg, Jethro; Abhyankar, Avinash; Prando, Carolina; Itan, Yuval; van Wamel, Willem J B; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Li, Xiaoxia; Beutler, Bruce; Arkwright, Peter D; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2017-02-23

    The molecular basis of the incomplete penetrance of monogenic disorders is unclear. We describe here eight related individuals with autosomal recessive TIRAP deficiency. Life-threatening staphylococcal disease occurred during childhood in the proband, but not in the other seven homozygotes. Responses to all Toll-like receptor 1/2 (TLR1/2), TLR2/6, and TLR4 agonists were impaired in the fibroblasts and leukocytes of all TIRAP-deficient individuals. However, the whole-blood response to the TLR2/6 agonist staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid (LTA) was abolished only in the index case individual, the only family member lacking LTA-specific antibodies (Abs). This defective response was reversed in the patient, but not in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4)-deficient individuals, by anti-LTA monoclonal antibody (mAb). Anti-LTA mAb also rescued the macrophage response in mice lacking TIRAP, but not TLR2 or MyD88. Thus, acquired anti-LTA Abs rescue TLR2-dependent immunity to staphylococcal LTA in individuals with inherited TIRAP deficiency, accounting for incomplete penetrance. Combined TIRAP and anti-LTA Ab deficiencies underlie staphylococcal disease in this patient.

  10. Negative regulatory responses to metabolically triggered inflammation impair renal epithelial immunity in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nelson K F; Chong, Tsung Wen; Loh, Hwai-Liang; Lim, Kiat Hon; Gan, Valerie H L; Wang, Marian; Kon, Oi Lian

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by chronic inflammation and increased risk of infections, particularly of tissues exposed to the external environment. However, the causal molecular mechanisms that affect immune cells and their functions in diabetes are unclear. Here we show, by transcript and protein analyses, signatures of glucose-induced tissue damage, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and dysregulated expression of multiple inflammation- and immunity-related molecules in diabetic kidneys compared with non-diabetic controls. Abnormal signaling involving cytokines, G-protein coupled receptors, protein kinase C isoforms, mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), and Toll-like receptors (TLR) were evident. These were accompanied by overexpression of negative regulators of NFκB, TLR, and other proinflammatory pathways, e.g., A20, SOCS1, IRAK-M, IκBα, Triad3A, Tollip, SIGIRR, and ST2L. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules, e.g., IL-10, IL-4, and TSLP that favor TH2 responses were strongly induced. These molecular indicators of immune dysfunction led us to detect the cryptic presence of bacteria and human cytomegalovirus in more than one third of kidneys of diabetic subjects but none in non-diabetic kidneys. Similar signaling abnormalities could be induced in primary human renal tubular epithelial (but not mesangial) cell cultures exposed to high glucose, proinflammatory cytokines and methylglyoxal, and were reversed by combined pharmacological treatment with an antioxidant and a PKC inhibitor. Our results suggest that diabetes impairs epithelial immunity as a consequence of chronic and inappropriate activation of counter-regulatory immune responses, which are otherwise physiological protective mechanisms against inflammation. The immune abnormalities and cryptic renal infections described here may contribute to progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  11. The Influence of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Witztum, Joseph L.; Lichtman, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Both the chronic development of atherosclerotic lesions and the acute changes in lesion phenotype that lead to clinical cardiovascular events are significantly influenced by the innate and adaptive immune responses to lipoprotein deposition and oxidation in the arterial wall. The rapid pace of discovery of mechanisms of immunologic recognition, effector functions, and regulation has significantly influenced the study of atherosclerosis, and our new knowledge is beginning to affect how we treat this ubiquitous disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how innate and adaptive immunity contribute to atherosclerosis, as well as therapeutic opportunities that arise from this knowledge. PMID:23937439

  12. Autophagy, inflammation and innate immunity in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Cristina; Galbardi, Barbara; Kapetis, Dimos; Vattemi, Gaetano; Guglielmi, Valeria; Tonin, Paola; Salerno, Franco; Morandi, Lucia; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Mantegazza, Renato; Bernasconi, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy has a large range of physiological functions and its dysregulation contributes to several human disorders, including autoinflammatory/autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). In order to better understand the pathogenetic mechanisms of these muscular disorders, we sought to define the role of autophagic processes and their relation with the innate immune system in the three main subtypes of IIM, specifically sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). We found that although the mRNA transcript levels of the autophagy-related genes BECN1, ATG5 and FBXO32 were similar in IIM and controls, autophagy activation in all IIM subgroups was suggested by immunoblotting results and confirmed by immunofluorescence. TLR4 and TLR3, two potent inducers of autophagy, were highly increased in IIM, with TLR4 transcripts significantly more expressed in PM and DM than in JDM, sIBM and controls, and TLR3 transcripts highly up-regulated in all IIM subgroups compared to controls. Co-localization between autophagic marker, LC3, and TLR4 and TLR3 was observed not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM muscle tissues. Furthermore, a highly association with the autophagic processes was observed in all IIM subgroups also for some TLR4 ligands, endogenous and bacterial HSP60, other than the high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). These findings indicate that autophagic processes are active not only in sIBM but also in PM, DM and JDM, probably in response to an exogenous or endogenous 'danger signal'. However, autophagic activation and regulation, and also interaction with the innate immune system, differ in each type of IIM. Better understanding of these differences may lead to new therapies for the different IIM types.

  13. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  14. Arginine Metabolism in Myeloid Cells Shapes Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Arginine metabolism has been a key catabolic and anabolic process throughout the evolution of the immune response. Accruing evidence indicates that arginine-catabolizing enzymes, mainly nitric oxide synthases and arginases, are closely integrated with the control of immune response under physiological and pathological conditions. Myeloid cells are major players that exploit the regulators of arginine metabolism to mediate diverse, although often opposing, immunological and functional consequences. In this article, we focus on the importance of arginine catabolism by myeloid cells in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Revisiting this matter could result in novel therapeutic approaches by which the immunoregulatory nodes instructed by arginine metabolism can be targeted. PMID:28223985

  15. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  16. Mitochondria in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Samuel E; Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2015-03-17

    Mitochondria are well appreciated for their role as biosynthetic and bioenergetic organelles. In the past two decades, mitochondria have emerged as signaling organelles that contribute critical decisions about cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. Mitochondria not only sustain immune cell phenotypes but also are necessary for establishing immune cell phenotype and their function. Mitochondria can rapidly switch from primarily being catabolic organelles generating ATP to anabolic organelles that generate both ATP and building blocks for macromolecule synthesis. This enables them to fulfill appropriate metabolic demands of different immune cells. Mitochondria have multiple mechanisms that allow them to activate signaling pathways in the cytosol including altering in AMP/ATP ratio, the release of ROS and TCA cycle metabolites, as well as the localization of immune regulatory proteins on the outer mitochondrial membrane. In this Review, we discuss the evidence and mechanisms that mitochondrial dependent signaling controls innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Multiple sclerosis and fatigue: A review on the contribution of inflammation and immune-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Patejdl, Robert; Penner, Iris K; Noack, Thomas K; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and the leading cause of non-traumatic disability among young and middle-aged adults in the western world. One of its most prevalent and debilitating symptoms is fatigue. Despite the general acceptance of the idea of an immune pathogenesis of MS itself, the role of autoimmunity in the course of MS-fatigue is a matter of debate. Both immune-related processes (acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, immune-mediated neurodegeneration, immune-mediated alterations of endocrine functions related to fatigue) and presumably non-immune-mediated disturbances and factors (sleep disturbances, depression, cognitive alterations, chronic infections, adverse effects of medications) contribute to the clinical picture. Data from in vitro and animal experiments has provided evidence for a role of cytokines as IL-1 and TNF-alpha. This association could not be verified directly in blood samples from humans whereas whole blood stimulation protocols gave some indirect evidence for a role of cytokines in MS-fatigue. MRI being able to detect acute and chronic immune mediated damage to the CNS could depict that global atrophy of gray or white matter does not correlate with fatigue. Rather, distinctive clusters of lesions and atrophy at different locations, mostly bifrontal or in subcortical structures, correlate specifically with fatigue. Regardless of the difficulties in pinpointing the immunogenesis of MS-fatigue, an important role of autoimmunity is strongly supported by an indirect route: A growing amount of data shows that the highly effective immunotherapeutics which have been introduced to MS-treatment over the last years effectively and sustainably stabilize and ameliorate fatigue in parallel to their dampening effects on the neuroinflammatory process. This review summarizes the existing data on the relation between inflammation, patterns of CNS-lesions and the effects of immunotherapeutics

  18. Impaired SNX9 Expression in Immune Cells during Chronic Inflammation: Prognostic and Diagnostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Ish-Shalom, Eliran; Meirow, Yaron; Sade-Feldman, Moshe; Kanterman, Julia; Wang, Lynn; Mizrahi, Olga; Klieger, Yair; Baniyash, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with immunosuppression and downregulated expression of the TCR CD247. In searching for new biomarkers that could validate the impaired host immune status under chronic inflammatory conditions, we discovered that sorting nexin 9 (SNX9), a protein that participates in early stages of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is downregulated as well under such conditions. SNX9 expression was affected earlier than CD247 by the generated harmful environment, suggesting that it is a potential marker sensing the generated immunosuppressive condition. We found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are elevated in the course of chronic inflammation, are responsible for the observed SNX9 reduced expression. Moreover, SNX9 downregulation is reversible, as its expression levels return to normal and immune functions are restored when the inflammatory response and/or myeloid-derived suppressor cells are neutralized. SNX9 downregulation was detected in numerous mouse models for pathologies characterized by chronic inflammation such as chronic infection (Leishmania donovani), cancer (melanoma and colorectal carcinoma), and an autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis). Interestingly, reduced levels of SNX9 were also observed in blood samples from colorectal cancer patients, emphasizing the feasibility of its use as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker sensing the host's immune status and inflammatory stage. Our new discovery of SNX9 as being regulated by chronic inflammation and its association with immunosuppression, in addition to the CD247 regulation under such conditions, show the global impact of chronic inflammation and the generated immune environment on different cellular pathways in a diverse spectrum of diseases.

  19. The Immune System in Tissue Environments Regaining Homeostasis after Injury: Is “Inflammation” Always Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a response to infections or tissue injuries. Inflammation was once defined by clinical signs, later by the presence of leukocytes, and nowadays by expression of “proinflammatory” cytokines and chemokines. But leukocytes and cytokines often have rather anti-inflammatory, proregenerative, and homeostatic effects. Is there a need to redefine “inflammation”? In this review, we discuss the functions of “inflammatory” mediators/regulators of the innate immune system that determine tissue environments to fulfill the need of the tissue while regaining homeostasis after injury. PMID:27597803

  20. Senescent Remodeling of the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in the Elderly Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taverna, Gianluigi; Seveso, Mauro; Giusti, Guido; Hurle, Rodolfo; Graziotti, Pierpaolo; Štifter, Sanja; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Grizzi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Despite years of intensive investigation that has been made in understanding prostate cancer, it remains a major cause of death in men worldwide. Prostate cancer emerges from multiple alterations that induce changes in expression patterns of genes and proteins that function in networks controlling critical cellular events. Based on the exponential aging of the population and the increasing life expectancy in industrialized Western countries, prostate cancer in the elderly men is becoming a disease of increasing significance. Aging is a progressive degenerative process strictly integrated with inflammation. Several theories have been proposed that attempt to define the role of chronic inflammation in aging including redox stress, mitochondrial damage, immunosenescence, and epigenetic modifications. Here, we review the innate and adaptive immune systems and their senescent remodeling in elderly men with prostate cancer. PMID:24772169

  1. A role of the adaptive immune system in glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bronsart, Laura L; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The immune system, including the adaptive immune response, has recently been recognized as having a significant role in diet-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to determine if the adaptive immune system also functions in maintaining physiological glucose homeostasis in the absence of diet-induced disease. Research design and methods SCID mice and immunocompetent control animals were phenotypically assessed for variations in metabolic parameters and cytokine profiles. Additionally, the glucose tolerance of SCID and immunocompetent control animals was assessed following introduction of a high-fat diet. Results SCID mice on a normal chow diet were significantly insulin resistant relative to control animals despite having less fat mass. This was associated with a significant increase in the innate immunity-stimulating cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), and MCP3. Additionally, the SCID mouse phenotype was exacerbated in response to a high-fat diet as evidenced by the further significant progression of glucose intolerance. Conclusions These results support the notion that the adaptive immune system plays a fundamental biological role in glucose homeostasis, and that the absence of functional B and T cells results in disruption in the concentrations of various cytokines associated with macrophage proliferation and recruitment. Additionally, the absence of functional B and T cells is not protective against diet-induced pathology. PMID:27026807

  2. Meeting the demand for innate and adaptive immunities during evolution.

    PubMed

    Du Pasquier, L

    2005-07-01

    An ideal immune system should provide each individual with rapid and efficient responses, a diverse repertoire of recognition and effector molecules and a certain flexibility to match the changing internal and external environment. It should be economic in cells and genes. Specific memory would be useful. It should not be autoreactive. These requirements, a mixture of innate and adaptive immunity features, are modulated in function of the dominant mode of selection for each species of metazoa during evolution (K or r). From sponges to man, a great diversity of receptors and effector mechanisms, some of them shared with plants, are articulated around conserved signalling cascades. Multiple attempts at combining innate and adaptive immunity somatic features can be observed as new somatic mechanisms provide individualized repertoires of receptors throughout metazoa, in agnathans, prochordates, echinoderms and mollusks. The adaptive immunity of vertebrates with lymphocytes and their specific receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily, the major histocompatibility complex, developed from innate immunity evolutionary lines that can be traced back in earlier deuterostomes.

  3. An Adaptive Immune Genetic Algorithm for Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Bai, Bendu; Zhang, Yanning

    An adaptive immune genetic algorithm (AIGA) based on cost minimization technique method for edge detection is proposed. The proposed AIGA recommends the use of adaptive probabilities of crossover, mutation and immune operation, and a geometric annealing schedule in immune operator to realize the twin goals of maintaining diversity in the population and sustaining the fast convergence rate in solving the complex problems such as edge detection. Furthermore, AIGA can effectively exploit some prior knowledge and information of the local edge structure in the edge image to make vaccines, which results in much better local search ability of AIGA than that of the canonical genetic algorithm. Experimental results on gray-scale images show the proposed algorithm perform well in terms of quality of the final edge image, rate of convergence and robustness to noise.

  4. Innate immunity and inflammation in ageing: a key for understanding age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Licastro, Federico; Candore, Giuseppina; Lio, Domenico; Porcellini, Elisa; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Franceschi, Claudio; Caruso, Calogero

    2005-01-01

    The process of maintaining life for the individual is a constant struggle to preserve his/her integrity. This can come at a price when immunity is involved, namely systemic inflammation. Inflammation is not per se a negative phenomenon: it is the response of the immune system to the invasion of viruses or bacteria and other pathogens. During evolution the human organism was set to live 40 or 50 years; today, however, the immune system must remain active for much a longer time. This very long activity leads to a chronic inflammation that slowly but inexorably damages one or several organs: this is a typical phenomenon linked to ageing and it is considered the major risk factor for age-related chronic diseases. Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes and even sarcopenia and cancer, just to mention a few – have an important inflammatory component, though disease progression seems also dependent on the genetic background of individuals. Emerging evidence suggests that pro-inflammatory genotypes are related to unsuccessful ageing, and, reciprocally, controlling inflammatory status may allow a better chance of successful ageing. In other words, age-related diseases are "the price we pay" for a life-long active immune system: this system has also the potential to harm us later, as its fine tuning becomes compromised. Our immune system has evolved to control pathogens, so pro-inflammatory responses are likely to be evolutionarily programmed to resist fatal infections with pathogens aggressively. Thus, inflammatory genotypes are an important and necessary part of the normal host responses to pathogens in early life, but the overproduction of inflammatory molecules might also cause immune-related inflammatory diseases and eventually death later. Therefore, low responder genotypes involved in regulation of innate defence mechanisms, might better control inflammatory responses and age-related disease development, resulting in an increased chance of long life survival

  5. Immune adjuvants in early life: targeting the innate immune system to overcome impaired adaptive response.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Cyro Alves; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2009-09-01

    The neonatal phase is a transitory period characterized by an absence of memory cells, favoring a slow adaptive response prone to tolerance effects and the development of Th2-type responses. However, when appropriately stimulated, neonates may achieve an immune response comparable with adult counterparts. One strategy to stimulate the immunological response of neonates or children in early infancy has been to explore natural or synthetic ligands of cell receptors to stimulate innate immunity. The use of adjuvants for activating different cell receptors may be the key to enhancing neonatal adaptive immunity. This review highlights recent advances in the emerging field of molecular adjuvants of innate immune response and their implications for the development of immunotherapies, with particular focus on the neonatal period.

  6. Role of α-synuclein in inducing innate and adaptive immunity in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Allen Reish, Heather E; Standaert, David G

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-syn) is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Gene duplications, triplications and point mutations in SNCA1, the gene encoding α-syn, cause autosomal dominant forms of PD. Aggregated and post-translationally modified forms of α-syn are present in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in both sporadic and familial PD, and recent work has emphasized the prion-like ability of aggregated α-syn to produce spreading pathology. Accumulation of abnormal forms of α-syn is a trigger for PD, but recent evidence suggests that much of the downstream neurodegeneration may result from inflammatory responses. Components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems are activated in PD, and influencing interactions between innate and adaptive immune components has been shown to modify the pathological process in animal models of PD. Understanding the relationship between α-syn and subsequent inflammation may reveal novel targets for neuroprotective interventions. In this review, we examine the role of α-syn and modified forms of this protein in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  7. Subverting the adaptive immune resistance mechanism to improve clinical responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young J

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and clinical responsiveness to the PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab implicates adaptive immune evasion mechanisms in cancer. We review our findings that tumor cell PD-L1 expression is induced by interferon γ (IFNγ) producing TILs. We provide a mechanistic rationale for combining IFNγ+ T helper type 1 (Th1)-inducing cancer vaccines with PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:25964860

  8. Targeting MALT1 Proteolytic Activity in Immunity, Inflammation and Disease: Good or Bad?

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Annelies; Staal, Jens; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-02-01

    MALT1 is a signaling protein that plays a key role in immunity, inflammation, and lymphoid malignancies. For a long time MALT1 was believed to function as a scaffold protein, providing an assembly platform for other signaling proteins. This view changed dramatically when MALT1 was also found to have proteolytic activity and a capacity to fine-tune immune responses. Preclinical studies have fostered the belief that MALT1 is a promising therapeutic target in autoimmunity and B cell lymphomas. However, recent studies have shown that mice expressing catalytically-inactive MALT1 develop multi-organ inflammation and autoimmunity, and thus have tempered this initial enthusiasm. We discuss recent findings, highlighting the urgent need for a better mechanistic and functional understanding of MALT1 in host defense and disease.

  9. Bile acids in regulation of inflammation and immunity: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ci; Fuchs, Claudia D; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their pivotal role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as important signalling molecules in the regulation of systemic endocrine functions. As such BAs are natural ligands for several nuclear hormone receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Through activating various signalling pathways, BAs not only regulate their own synthesis, enterohepatic recirculation and metabolism, but also immune homeostasis. This makes BAs attractive therapeutic agents for managing metabolic and inflammatory liver disorders. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicates that BAs exert beneficial effects in cholestatic and metabolically driven inflammatory diseases. This review elucidates how different BAs function as pathogenetic factors and potential therapeutic agents for inflammation-driven liver diseases, focusing on their role in regulation of inflammation and immunity.

  10. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-16

    To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable-the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated). Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I-III) and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA) maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  11. An overview of the role of neutrophils in innate immunity, inflammation and host-biomaterial integration

    PubMed Central

    Selders, Gretchen S.; Fetz, Allison E.; Radic, Marko Z.; Bowlin, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable recent progress in defining neutrophil functions and behaviors in tissue repair, much remains to be determined with regards to its overall role in the tissue integration of biomaterials. This article provides an overview of the neutrophil’s numerous, important roles in both inflammation and resolution, and subsequently, their role in biomaterial integration. Neutrophils function in three primary capacities: generation of oxidative bursts, release of granules and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs); these combined functions enable neutrophil involvement in inflammation, macrophage recruitment, M2 macrophage differentiation, resolution of inflammation, angiogenesis, tumor formation and immune system activation. Neutrophils exhibit great flexibility to adjust to the prevalent microenvironmental conditions in the tissue; thus, the biomaterial composition and fabrication will potentially influence neutrophil behavior following confrontation. This review serves to highlight the neutrophil’s plasticity, reiterating that neutrophils are not just simple suicidal killers, but the true maestros of resolution and regeneration. PMID:28149530

  12. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  13. Metainflammation in Diabetic Coronary Artery Disease: Emerging Role of Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Madhumitha, Haridoss

    2016-01-01

    Globally, noncommunicable chronic diseases such as Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) are posing a major threat to the world. T2DM is known to potentiate CAD which had led to the coining of a new clinical entity named diabetic CAD (DM-CAD), leading to excessive morbidity and mortality. The synergistic interaction between these two comorbidities is through sterile inflammation which is now being addressed as metabolic inflammation or metainflammation, which plays a pivotal role during both early and late stages of T2DM and also serves as a link between T2DM and CAD. This review summarises the current concepts on the role played by both innate and adaptive immune responses in setting up metainflammation in DM-CAD. More specifically, the role played by innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) like Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD1-like receptors (NLRs), Rig-1-like receptors (RLRs), and C-type lectin like receptors (CLRs) and metabolic endotoxemia in fuelling metainflammation in DM-CAD would be discussed. Further, the role played by adaptive immune cells (Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 cells) in fuelling metainflammation in DM-CAD will also be discussed. PMID:27610390

  14. Association of the innate immunity and inflammation pathway with advanced prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kazma, Rémi; Mefford, Joel A; Cheng, Iona; Plummer, Sarah J; Levin, Albert M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Casey, Graham; Witte, John S

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent and second most lethal cancer in men in the United States. Innate immunity and inflammation may increase the risk of prostate cancer. To determine the role of innate immunity and inflammation in advanced prostate cancer, we investigated the association of 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms, located in 46 genes involved in this pathway, with disease risk using 494 cases with advanced disease and 536 controls from Cleveland, Ohio. Taken together, the whole pathway was associated with advanced prostate cancer risk (P = 0.02). Two sub-pathways (intracellular antiviral molecules and extracellular pattern recognition) and four genes in these sub-pathways (TLR1, TLR6, OAS1, and OAS2) were nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk and harbor several SNPs nominally associated with advanced prostate cancer risk. Our results suggest that the innate immunity and inflammation pathway may play a modest role in the etiology of advanced prostate cancer through multiple small effects.

  15. miR-125b controls monocyte adaptation to inflammation through mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Roubert, Christine; Ammari, Meryem; Présumey, Jessy; Grün, Joachim R.; Häupl, Thomas; Grützkau, Andreas; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Boitez, Valérie; Codogno, Patrice; Escoubet, Johanna; Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes drive monocyte differentiation and fate. Although abnormal mitochondria metabolism and innate immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory disorders, molecular events regulating mitochondrial activity to control life and death in monocytes remain poorly understood. We show here that, in human monocytes, microRNA-125b (miR-125b) attenuates the mitochondrial respiration through the silencing of the BH3-only proapoptotic protein BIK and promotes the elongation of the mitochondrial network through the targeting of the mitochondrial fission process 1 protein MTP18, leading to apoptosis. Proinflammatory activation of monocyte-derived macrophages is associated with a concomitant increase in miR-125b expression and decrease in BIK and MTP18 expression, which lead to reduced oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial fusion. In a chronic inflammatory systemic disorder, CD14+ blood monocytes display reduced miR-125b expression as compared with healthy controls, inversely correlated with BIK and MTP18 messenger RNA expression. Our findings not only identify BIK and MTP18 as novel targets for miR-125b that control mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics, respectively, but also reveal a novel function for miR-125b in regulating metabolic adaptation of monocytes to inflammation. Together, these data unravel new molecular mechanisms for a proapoptotic role of miR-125b in monocytes and identify potential targets for interfering with excessive inflammatory activation of monocytes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27702798

  16. Modular Activating Receptors in Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard; Call, Matthew E

    2017-03-14

    Triggering of cell-mediated immunity is largely dependent on the recognition of foreign or abnormal molecules by a myriad of cell surface-bound receptors. Many activating immune receptors do not possess any intrinsic signaling capacity but instead form noncovalent complexes with one or more dimeric signaling modules that communicate with a common set of kinases to initiate intracellular information-transfer pathways. This modular architecture, where the ligand binding and signaling functions are detached from one another, is a common theme that is widely employed throughout the innate and adaptive arms of immune systems. The evolutionary advantages of this highly adaptable platform for molecular recognition are visible in the variety of ligand-receptor interactions that can be linked to common signaling pathways, the diversification of receptor modules in response to pathogen challenges, and the amplification of cellular responses through incorporation of multiple signaling motifs. Here we provide an overview of the major classes of modular activating immune receptors and outline the current state of knowledge regarding how these receptors assemble, recognize their ligands, and ultimately trigger intracellular signal transduction pathways that activate immune cell effector functions.

  17. Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Calcific Aortic Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patrick; Bouchareb, Rihab; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disorder. CAVD is a chronic process characterized by a pathologic mineralization of valve leaflets. Ectopic mineralization of the aortic valve involves complex relationships with immunity. Studies have highlighted that both innate and adaptive immunity play a role in the development of CAVD. In this regard, accumulating evidence indicates that fibrocalcific remodelling of the aortic valve is associated with activation of the NF-κB pathway. The expression of TNF-α and IL-6 is increased in human mineralized aortic valves and promotes an osteogenic program as well as the mineralization of valve interstitial cells (VICs), the main cellular component of the aortic valve. Different factors, including oxidized lipid species, activate the innate immune response through the Toll-like receptors. Moreover, VICs express 5-lipoxygenase and therefore produce leukotrienes, which may amplify the inflammatory response in the aortic valve. More recently, studies have emphasized that an adaptive immune response is triggered during CAVD. Herein, we are reviewing the link between the immune response and the development of CAVD and we have tried, whenever possible, to keep a translational approach.

  18. Ectonucleotidases as regulators of purinergic signaling in thrombosis, inflammation, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Deaglio, Silvia; Robson, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Evolving studies in models of transplant rejection, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer, among others, have implicated purinergic signaling in clinical manifestations of vascular injury and thrombophilia, inflammation, and immune disturbance. Within the vasculature, spatial and temporal expression of CD39 nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) family members together with CD73 ecto-5'-nucleotidase control platelet activation, thrombus size, and stability. This is achieved by closely regulated phosphohydrolytic activities to scavenge extracellular nucleotides, maintain P2-receptor integrity, and coordinate adenosinergic signaling responses. The CD38/CD157 family of extracellular NADases degrades NAD(+) and generates Ca(2+)-active metabolites, including cyclic ADP ribose and ADP ribose. These mediators regulate leukocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. These mechanisms are crucial in vascular homeostasis, hemostasis, thrombogenesis, and during inflammation. There has been recent interest in ectonucleotidase expression by immune cells. CD39 expression identifies Langerhans-type dendritic cells and efficiently distinguishes T regulatory cells from other resting or activated T cells. CD39, together with CD73 in mice, serves as an integral component of the suppressive machinery of T cells. Purinergic responses also impact generation of T helper-type 17 cells. Further, CD38 and changes in NAD(+) availability modulate ADP ribosylation of the cytolytic P2X7 receptor that deletes T regulatory cells. Expression of CD39, CD73, and CD38 ectonucleotidases on either endothelial or immune cells allows for homeostatic integration and control of vascular inflammatory and immune cell reactions at sites of injury. Ongoing development of therapeutic strategies targeting these and other ectonucleotidases offers promise for the management of vascular thrombosis, disordered inflammation, and aberrant immune reactivity.

  19. Insights on adaptive and innate immunity in canine leishmaniosis.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Shazia; Blake, Damer P; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is caused by the parasite Leishmania infantum and is a systemic disease, which can present with variable clinical signs, and clinicopathological abnormalities. Clinical manifestations can range from subclinical infection to very severe systemic disease. Leishmaniosis is categorized as a neglected tropical disease and the complex immune responses associated with Leishmania species makes therapeutic treatments and vaccine development challenging for both dogs and humans. In this review, we summarize innate and adaptive immune responses associated with L. infantum infection in dogs, and we discuss the problems associated with the disease as well as potential solutions and the future direction of required research to help control the parasite.

  20. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin N.; Das, Sai K.; Pieper, Carl F.; Lewis, Michael R.; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Gupta, Alok K.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J.; Roberts, Susan B.; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  1. Live-attenuated lentivirus immunization modulates innate immunity and inflammation while protecting rhesus macaques from vaginal simian immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Genescà, Meritxell; Ma, Zhong-Min; Wang, Yichuan; Assaf, Basel; Qureshi, Huma; Fritts, Linda; Huang, Ying; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J

    2012-09-01

    Immunization with attenuated lentiviruses is the only reliable method of protecting rhesus macaques (RM) from vaginal challenge with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). CD8(+) lymphocyte depletion prior to SIVmac239 vaginal challenge demonstrated that a modest, Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell response induced by immunization with simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6 (SHIV89.6) protects RM. Although CD8(+) T cells are required for protection, there is no anamnestic expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in any tissues except the vagina after challenge. Further, SHIV immunization increased the number of viral target cells in the vagina and cervix, suggesting that the ratio of target cells to antiviral CD8(+) T cells was not a determinant of protection. We hypothesized that persistent replication of the attenuated vaccine virus modulates inflammatory responses and limits T cell activation and expansion by inducing immunoregulatory T cell populations. We found that attenuated SHIV infection decreased the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suppressed T cell activation, decreased mRNA levels of proinflammatory mediators, and increased mRNA levels of immunoregulatory molecules. Three days after SIV vaginal challenge, SHIV-immunized RM had significantly more T regulatory cells in the vagina than the unimmunized RM. By day 14 postchallenge, immune activation and inflammation were characteristic of unimmunized RM but were minimal in SHIV-immunized RM. Thus, a modest vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell response in the context of immunoregulatory suppression of T cell activation may protect against vaginal HIV transmission.

  2. Two forms of adaptive immunity in vertebrates: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masanori; Sutoh, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike jawed vertebrates that use T-cell and B-cell receptors for antigen recognition, jawless vertebrates represented by lampreys and hagfish use variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) as antigen receptors. VLRs generate diversity comparable to that of gnathostome antigen receptors by assembling variable leucine-rich repeat modules. The discovery of VLR has revolutionized our understanding of how adaptive immunity emerged and highlighted the differences between the adaptive immune systems (AISs) of jawed and jawless vertebrates. However, emerging evidence also indicates that their AISs have much in common. Particularly striking is the conservation of lymphocyte lineages. The basic architecture of the AIS including the dichotomy of lymphocytes appears to have been established in a common ancestor of jawed and jawless vertebrates. We review here the current knowledge on the AIS of jawless vertebrates, emphasizing both the similarities to and differences from the AIS of jawed vertebrates.

  3. Bridging Innate and Adaptive Antitumor Immunity Targeting Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Bejatolah; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Effective immunotherapy for cancer depends on cellular responses to tumor antigens. The role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in T-cell recognition and T-cell receptor repertoire selection has become a central tenet in immunology. Structurally, this does not contradict earlier findings that T-cells can differentiate between small hapten structures like simple glycans. Understanding T-cell recognition of antigens as defined genetically by MHC and combinatorially by T cell receptors led to the “altered self” hypothesis. This notion reflects a more fundamental principle underlying immune surveillance and integrating evolutionarily and mechanistically diverse elements of the immune system. Danger associated molecular patterns, including those generated by glycan remodeling, represent an instance of altered self. A prominent example is the modification of the tumor-associated antigen MUC1. Similar examples emphasize glycan reactivity patterns of antigen receptors as a phenomenon bridging innate and adaptive but also humoral and cellular immunity and providing templates for immunotherapies. PMID:20617150

  4. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  5. Modulation of dendritic cell innate and adaptive immune functions by oral and sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, Pamela A; Keet, Corinne A; Guerrerio, Anthony L; Chichester, Kristin L; Bieneman, Anja P; Hamilton, Robert G; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T

    2014-11-01

    Sublingual (SLIT) and oral immunotherapy (OIT) are promising treatments for food allergy, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) induce and maintain Th2-type allergen-specific T cells, and also regulate innate immunity through their expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We examined how SLIT and OIT influenced DC innate and adaptive immune responses in children with IgE-mediated cow's milk (CM) allergy. SLIT, but not OIT, decreased TLR-induced IL-6 secretion by myeloid DCs (mDCs). SLIT and OIT altered mDC IL-10 secretion, a potent inhibitor of FcεRI-dependent pro-inflammatory responses. OIT uniquely augmented IFN-α and decreased IL-6 secretion by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which was associated with reduced TLR-induced IL-13 release in pDC-T cell co-cultures. Both SLIT and OIT decreased Th2 cytokine secretion to CM in pDC-T, but not mDC-T, co-cultures. Therefore, SLIT and OIT exert unique effects on DC-driven innate and adaptive immune responses, which may inhibit allergic inflammation and promote tolerance.

  6. Autophagy and Crohn's disease: at the crossroads of infection, inflammation, immunity, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Brest, P; Corcelle, E A; Cesaro, A; Chargui, A; Belaïd, A; Klionsky, D J; Vouret-Craviari, V; Hebuterne, X; Hofman, P; Mograbi, B

    2010-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are common inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that include ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The incidences of IBD are high in North America and Europe, affecting as many as one in 500 people. These diseases are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Colorectal cancer risk is also increased in IBD, correlating with inflammation severity and duration. IBD are now recognized as complex multigenetic disorders involving at least 32 different risk loci. In 2007, two different autophagy-related genes, ATG16L1 (autophagy-related gene 16-like 1) and IRGM (immunity-related GTPase M) were shown to be specifically involved in CD susceptibility by three independent genome-wide association studies. Soon afterwards, more than forty studies confirmed the involvement of ATG16L1 and IRGM variants in CD susceptibility and gave new information on the importance of macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) in the control of infection, inflammation, immunity and cancer. In this review, we discuss how such findings have undoubtedly changed our understanding of CD pathogenesis. A unifying autophagy model then emerges that may help in understanding the development of CD from bacterial infection, to inflammation and finally cancer. The Pandora's box is now open, releasing a wave of hope for new therapeutic strategies in treating Crohn's disease.

  7. Boosting Adaptive Immunity: A New Role for PAFR Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Marianna M.; Bizzarro, Bruna; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Rios, Francisco J.; Jancar, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR) engagement in murine macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) promotes a tolerogenic phenotype reversed by PAFR-antagonists treatment in vitro. Here, we investigated whether a PAFR antagonist would modulate the immune response in vivo. Mice were subcutaneously injected with OVA or OVA with PAFR-antagonist WEB2170 on days 0 and 7. On day 14, OVA–specific IgG2a and IgG1 were measured in the serum. The presence of WEB2170 during immunization significantly increased IgG2a without affecting IgG1 levels. When WEB2170 was added to OVA in complete Freund’s adjuvant, enhanced IgG2a but not IgG1 production was also observed, and CD4+ FoxP3+ T cell frequency in the spleen was reduced compared to mice immunized without the antagonist. Similar results were observed in PAFR-deficient mice, along with increased Tbet mRNA expression in the spleen. Additionally, bone marrow-derived DCs loaded with OVA were transferred into naïve mice and their splenocytes were co-cultured with fresh OVA-loaded DCs. CD4+ T cell proliferation was higher in the group transferred with DCs treated with the PAFR-antagonist. We propose that the activation of PAFR by ligands present in the site of immunization is able to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. PMID:27966635

  8. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  9. Evasion of Innate and Adaptive Immunity by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Michael F; Saini, Neeraj K; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-10-01

    Through thousands of years of reciprocal coevolution, Mycobacterium tuberculosis has become one of humanity's most successful pathogens, acquiring the ability to establish latent or progressive infection and persist even in the presence of a fully functioning immune system. The ability of M. tuberculosis to avoid immune-mediated clearance is likely to reflect a highly evolved and coordinated program of immune evasion strategies that interfere with both innate and adaptive immunity. These include the manipulation of their phagosomal environment within host macrophages, the selective avoidance or engagement of pattern recognition receptors, modulation of host cytokine production, and the manipulation of antigen presentation to prevent or alter the quality of T-cell responses. In this article we review an extensive array of published studies that have begun to unravel the sophisticated program of specific mechanisms that enable M. tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria to persist and replicate in the face of considerable immunological pressure from their hosts. Unraveling the mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis evades or modulates host immune function is likely to be of major importance for the development of more effective new vaccines and targeted immunotherapy against tuberculosis.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi Manipulates Innate and Adaptive Immunity to Establish Persistence in Rodent Reservoir Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Karen E.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species complex is capable of establishing persistent infections in a wide variety of species, particularly rodents. Infection is asymptomatic or mild in most reservoir host species, indicating successful co-evolution of the pathogen with its natural hosts. However, infected humans and other incidental hosts can develop Lyme disease, a serious inflammatory syndrome characterized by tissue inflammation of joints, heart, muscles, skin, and CNS. Although B. burgdorferi infection induces both innate and adaptive immune responses, they are ultimately ineffective in clearing the infection from reservoir hosts, leading to bacterial persistence. Here, we review some mechanisms by which B. burgdorferi evades the immune system of the rodent host, focusing in particular on the effects of innate immune mechanisms and recent findings suggesting that T-dependent B cell responses are subverted during infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms causing persistence in rodents may help to increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of Lyme disease and ultimately aid in the development of therapies that support effective clearance of the bacterial infection by the host’s immune system. PMID:28265270

  11. Inflammation and Immune Regulation as Potential Drug Targets in Antidepressant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Frank M.; Kirkby, Kenneth C.; Lichtblau, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a mutual relationship between inflammation and major depression. A variety of mechanisms are outlined, indicating how inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis, course and treatment of major depression. In particular, this review addresses 1) inflammatory cytokines as markers of depression and potential predictors of treatment response, 2) findings that cytokines interact with antidepressants and non-pharmacological antidepressive therapies, such as electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation and physical activity, 3) the influence of cytokines on the cytochrome (CYP) p450-system and drug efflux transporters, and 4) how cascades of inflammation might serve as antidepressant drug targets. A number of clinical trials have focused on agents with immunmodulatory properties in the treatment of depression, of which this review covers nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cytokine inhibitors, ketamine, polyunsaturated fatty acids, statins and curcumin. A perspective is also provided on possible future immune targets for antidepressant therapy, such as toll-like receptor-inhibitors, glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, oleanolic acid analogs and minocycline. Concluding from the available data, markers of inflammation may become relevant factors for more personalised planning and prediction of response of antidepressant treatment strategies. Agents with anti-inflammatory properties have the potential to serve as clinically relevant antidepressants. Further studies are required to better define and identify subgroups of patients responsive to inflammatory agents as well as to define optimal time points for treatment onset and duration. PMID:26769225

  12. Linking immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Freigang, Stefan; Jäggi, Martin; Kurrer, Michael O.; Pei, Yao-Chang; Vlk, Lenka; Odermatt, Bernhard; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Arterial inflammatory responses are thought to be a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. We describe here, using a transgenic approach, the mutual perpetuation of immune-mediated arterial inflammation and cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Mice expressing the bacterial transgene β-galactosidase exclusively in cardiomyocytes and in smooth muscle cells in lung arteries and the aorta (SM-LacZ), and hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient SM-LacZ mice (SM-LacZ/apoE−/−) developed myocarditis and arteritis after immunization with dendritic cells presenting a β-galactosidase-derived immunogenic peptide. Hypercholesterolemia amplified acute arteritis and perpetuated chronic arterial inflammation in SM-LacZ/apoE−/− mice, but had no major impact on acute myocarditis or the subsequent development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conversely, arteritis significantly accelerated cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the linkage of immune-mediated arteritis and hypercholesterolemia favors initiation and maintenance of atherosclerotic lesion formation. Therapeutic strategies to prevent or disrupt such self-perpetuating vicious circles may be crucial for the successful treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:11050173

  13. Immunoregulatory molecules are master regulators of inflammation during the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signalling is critical to maintain the immune homeostasis under physiological conditions as well as for the control of inflammation in different pathological settings. Recent progress in the signalling pathways that control this balance has led to the development of novel therapeutic agents for diseases characterized by alterations in the activation/suppression of the immune response. Different molecules have a key role in the regulation of the immune system, including the receptors PD-1 (Programmed cell Death 1), CTLA-4 (Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4) and galectins; or the intracellular enzyme IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase). In addition, other molecules as CD69, AhR (Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor), and GADD45 (Growth Arrest and DNA Damage-inducible 45) family members, have emerged as potential targets for the regulation of the activation/suppression balance of immune cells. This review offers a perspective on well-characterized as well as emergent negative immune regulatory molecules in the context of autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:22819828

  14. Respiratory Antiviral Immunity and Immunobiotics: Beneficial Effects on Inflammation-Coagulation Interaction during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Hortensia; Alvarez, Susana; Kitazawa, Haruki; Villena, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) is a major respiratory pathogen of global importance, and the cause of a high degree of morbidity and mortality, especially in high-risk populations such as infants, elderly, and immunocompromised hosts. Given its high capacity to change antigenically, acquired immunity is often not effective to limit IFV infection and therefore vaccination must be constantly redesigned to achieve effective protection. Improvement of respiratory and systemic innate immune mechanisms has been proposed to reduce the incidence and severity of IFV disease. In the last decade, several research works have demonstrated that microbes with the capacity to modulate the mucosal immune system (immunobiotics) are a potential alternative to beneficially modulate the outcome of IFV infection. This review provides an update of the current status on the modulation of respiratory immunity by orally and nasally administered immunobiotics, and their beneficial impact on IFV clearance and inflammatory-mediated lung tissue damage. In particular, we describe the research of our group that investigated the influence of immunobiotics on inflammation–coagulation interactions during IFV infection. Studies have clearly demonstrated that hostile inflammation is accompanied by dysfunctional coagulation in respiratory IFV disease, and our investigations have proved that some immunobiotic strains are able to reduce viral disease severity through their capacity to modulate the immune-coagulative responses in the respiratory tract. PMID:28066442

  15. Leptin in the interplay of inflammation, metabolism and immune system disorders.

    PubMed

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Pino, Jesús; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel Angel; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Mera, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gualillo, Oreste

    2017-02-01

    Leptin is one of the most relevant factors secreted by adipose tissue and the forerunner of a class of molecules collectively called adipokines. Initially discovered in 1994, its crucial role as a central regulator in energy homeostasis has been largely described during the past 20 years. Once secreted into the circulation, leptin reaches the central and peripheral nervous systems and acts by binding and activating the long form of leptin receptor (LEPR), regulating appetite and food intake, bone mass, basal metabolism, reproductive function and insulin secretion, among other processes. Research on the regulation of different adipose tissues has provided important insights into the intricate network that links nutrition, metabolism and immune homeostasis. The neuroendocrine and immune systems communicate bi-directionally through common ligands and receptors during stress responses and inflammation, and control cellular immune responses in several pathological situations including immune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases. This Review discusses the latest findings regarding the role of leptin in the immune system and metabolism, with particular emphasis on its effect on autoimmune and/or inflammatory rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  16. Limbic Encephalitis: Potential Impact of Adaptive Autoimmune Inflammation on Neuronal Circuits of the Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Nico; Budde, Thomas; Stork, Oliver; Meuth, Sven G

    2015-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is characterized by adaptive autoimmune inflammation of the gray matter structures of the limbic system. It has recently been identified as a major cause of temporal lobe epilepsy accompanied by progressive declarative - mainly episodic - -memory disturbance as well as a variety of rather poorly defined emotional and behavioral changes. While autoimmune inflammation of the hippocampus is likely to be responsible for declarative memory disturbance, consequences of autoimmune inflammation of the amygdala are largely unknown. The amygdala is central for the generation of adequate homoeostatic behavioral responses to emotionally significant external stimuli following processing in a variety of parallel neuronal circuits. Here, we hypothesize that adaptive cellular and humoral autoimmunity may target and modulate distinct inhibitory or excitatory neuronal networks within the amygdala, and thereby strongly impact processing of emotional stimuli and corresponding behavioral responses. This may explain some of the rather poorly understood neuropsychiatric symptoms in limbic encephalitis.

  17. Inflammation enhances resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in IL-10 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Karen E.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Rigby, Rachael J.; von Allmen, Doug C.; Lund, P. Kay; Helmrath, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical resection of the ileum, cecum and proximal right colon (ICR) is common in the management of Crohn’s disease, yet little is known about the effect of active inflammation on the adaptive response following intestinal loss. We recently developed a surgical model of ICR in germ-free (GF) IL-10 null mice that develop small intestinal inflammation only when mice undergo conventionalization with normal fecal microflora (CONV) before surgical intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of post-surgical small bowel inflammation on adaptive growth after ICR. Methods 8-10 week old GF 129SvEv IL-10 null mice were allocated to GF or CONV groups. Non-operated GF and CONV mice provided baseline controls. Two weeks later GF and CONV mice were further allocated to ICR or sham operation. Small intestine and colon were harvested 7d after surgery for histological analysis. Results All mice within the gnotobiotic facility maintained GF status and did not develop small intestinal or colonic inflammation. CONV resulted in colitis in all groups, whereas small intestinal inflammation was only observed following ICR. Resection-induced small intestinal inflammation in CONV mice was associated with increases in proliferation, crypt depth and villus height when compared to GF mice after ICR. Resection-induced increases in crypt fission only occurred in CONV mice. Conclusion ICR-dependent small intestinal inflammation in CONV IL-10 null mice dramatically enhances early adaptive growth of the small intestine. Additional studies utilizing our model may provide clinical insight leading to optimal therapies in managing IBD patients after surgical resection. PMID:20074747

  18. Adaptive immune response during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Larrubia, Juan Ramón; Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Lokhande, Megha Uttam; García-Garzón, Silvia; Lázaro, Alicia; Miquel, Joaquín; Perna, Cristian; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2014-04-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects about 170 million people worldwide and it is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is a hepatotropic non-cytopathic virus able to persist in a great percentage of infected hosts due to its ability to escape from the immune control. Liver damage and disease progression during HCV infection are driven by both viral and host factors. Specifically, adaptive immune response carries out an essential task in controlling non-cytopathic viruses because of its ability to recognize infected cells and to destroy them by cytopathic mechanisms and to eliminate the virus by non-cytolytic machinery. HCV is able to impair this response by several means such as developing escape mutations in neutralizing antibodies and in T cell receptor viral epitope recognition sites and inducing HCV-specific cytotoxic T cell anergy and deletion. To impair HCV-specific T cell reactivity, HCV affects effector T cell regulation by modulating T helper and Treg response and by impairing the balance between positive and negative co-stimulatory molecules and between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. In this review, the role of adaptive immune response in controlling HCV infection and the HCV mechanisms to evade this response are reviewed.

  19. HIV Infection and Compromised Mucosal Immunity: Oral Manifestations and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Samantha E.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces account for the vast majority of HIV transmission. In adults, HIV transmission occurs mainly by vaginal and rectal routes but rarely via oral route. By contrast, pediatric HIV infections could be as the result of oral route by breastfeeding. As such mucosal surfaces play a crucial role in HIV acquisition, and spread of the virus depends on its ability to cross a mucosal barrier. HIV selectively infects, depletes, and/or dysregulates multiple arms of the human immune system particularly at the mucosal sites and causes substantial irreversible damage to the mucosal barriers. This leads to microbial products translocation and subsequently hyper-immune activation. Although introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to significant reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients, viral replication persists. As a result, antigen presence and immune activation are linked to “inflammaging” that attributes to a pro-inflammatory environment and the accelerated aging process in HIV patients. HIV infection is also associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal infections and dysregulation of oral microbiota, both of which may compromise the oral mucosal immunity of HIV-infected individuals. In addition, impaired oral immunity in HIV infection may predispose the patients to periodontal diseases that are associated with systemic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to examine existing evidence regarding the role of innate and cellular components of the oral cavity in HIV infection and how HIV infection may drive systemic hyper-immune activation in these patients. We will also discuss current knowledge on HIV oral transmission, HIV immunosenescence in relation to the oral mucosal alterations during the course of HIV infection and periodontal disease. Finally, we discuss oral manifestations associated with HIV infection and how HIV infection and ART influence the oral microbiome

  20. Astaxanthin decreased oxidative stress and inflammation and enhanced immune response in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Astaxanthin modulates immune response, inhibits cancer cell growth, reduces bacterial load and gastric inflammation, and protects against UVA-induced oxidative stress in in vitro and rodent models. Similar clinical studies in humans are unavailable. Our objective is to study the action of dietary astaxanthin in modulating immune response, oxidative status and inflammation in young healthy adult female human subjects. Methods Participants (averaged 21.5 yr) received 0, 2, or 8 mg astaxanthin (n = 14/diet) daily for 8 wk in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Immune response was assessed on wk 0, 4 and 8, and tuberculin test performed on wk 8. Results Plasma astaxanthin increased (P < 0.01) dose-dependently after 4 or 8 wk of supplementation. Astaxanthin decreased a DNA damage biomarker after 4 wk but did not affect lipid peroxidation. Plasma C-reactive protein concentration was lower (P < 0.05) on wk 8 in subjects given 2 mg astaxanthin. Dietary astaxanthin stimulated mitogen-induced lymphoproliferation, increased natural killer cell cytotoxic activity, and increased total T and B cell subpopulations, but did not influence populations of Thelper, Tcytotoxic or natural killer cells. A higher percentage of leukocytes expressed the LFA-1 marker in subjects given 2 mg astaxanthin on wk 8. Subjects fed 2 mg astaxanthin had a higher tuberculin response than unsupplemented subjects. There was no difference in TNF and IL-2 concentrations, but plasma IFN-γ and IL-6 increased on wk 8 in subjects given 8 mg astaxanthin. Conclusion Therefore, dietary astaxanthin decreases a DNA damage biomarker and acute phase protein, and enhances immune response in young healthy females. PMID:20205737

  1. Immune complex–FcγR interaction modulates monocyte/macrophage molecules involved in inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    BARRIONUEVO, P; BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; FERNANDEZ, G C; GOMEZ, S; ALVES-ROSA, M F; PALERMO, M S; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcγRs) from monocytes/macrophages and immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Recently, we have demonstrated that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. Taking into account that the regulation of MHC class II molecules is a crucial event in the immune response, in this report we extend our previous studies analysing the effect of STAT-1 phosphorylation in the down-regulatory process, the fate of the intracellular pool of MHC class II molecules and the effect of complement on MHC class II down-regulation induced by IC. We also studied the effect of IC on the expression of MHC class II (I-Ad) in macrophages using a mouse model of chronic inflammation. We demonstrate that IC induce a depletion not only on surface expressed but also on intracellular MHC class II content and that IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is not mediated by the inhibition of STAT-1 phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effect of IC is not specific for the down-regulation of MHC class II, for it could be restricted to other molecules involved in inflammatory processes. Our experiments also show that the activation of the complement system could be a crucial step on the regulation of the effect of IC on MHC class II expression. In agreement with our in vitro experiments using human monocytes, IC treatment reduces the expression of MHC class II in a mouse model of chronic inflammation. PMID:12869025

  2. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed.

  3. Long non-coding RNAs in innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Aune, Thomas M.; Spurlock, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a newly discovered class of regulatory molecules that impact a variety of biological processes in cells and organ systems. In humans, it is estimated that there may be more than twice as many lncRNA genes than protein-coding genes. However, only a handful of lncRNAs have been analyzed in detail. In this review, we describe expression and functions of lncRNAs that have been demonstrated to impact innate and adaptive immunity. These emerging paradigms illustrate remarkably diverse mechanisms that lncRNAs utilize to impact the transcriptional programs of immune cells required to fight against pathogens and maintain normal health and homeostasis. PMID:26166759

  4. Unique Features of Fish Immune Repertoires: Particularities of Adaptive Immunity Within the Largest Group of Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Magadan, Susana; Sunyer, Oriol J; Boudinot, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Fishes (i.e., teleost fishes) are the largest group of vertebrates. Although their immune system is based on the fundamental receptors, pathways, and cell types found in all groups of vertebrates, fishes show a diversity of particular features that challenge some classical concepts of immunology. In this chapter, we discuss the particularities of fish immune repertoires from a comparative perspective. We examine how allelic exclusion can be achieved when multiple Ig loci are present, how isotypic diversity and functional specificity impact clonal complexity, how loss of the MHC class II molecules affects the cooperation between T and B cells, and how deep sequencing technologies bring new insights about somatic hypermutation in the absence of germinal centers. The unique coexistence of two distinct B-cell lineages respectively specialized in systemic and mucosal responses is also discussed. Finally, we try to show that the diverse adaptations of immune repertoires in teleosts can help in understanding how somatic adaptive mechanisms of immunity evolved in parallel in different lineages across vertebrates.

  5. Unique Features of Fish Immune Repertoires: Particularities of Adaptive Immunity Within the Largest Group of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, Oriol J.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes (i.e., teleost fishes) are the largest group of vertebrates. Although their immune system is based on the fundamental receptors, pathways, and cell types found in all groups of vertebrates, fishes show a diversity of particular features that challenge some classical concepts of immunology. In this chapter, we discuss the particularities of fish immune repertoires from a comparative perspective. We examine how allelic exclusion can be achieved when multiple Ig loci are present, how isotypic diversity and functional specificity impact clonal complexity, how loss of the MHC class II molecules affects the cooperation between T and B cells, and how deep sequencing technologies bring new insights about somatic hypermutation in the absence of germinal centers. The unique coexistence of two distinct B-cell lineages respectively specialized in systemic and mucosal responses is also discussed. Finally, we try to show that the diverse adaptations of immune repertoires in teleosts can help in understanding how somatic adaptive mechanisms of immunity evolved in parallel in different lineages across vertebrates. PMID:26537384

  6. Basal inflammation and innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Macfarlane, Gary J; Geenen, Rinie; Smit, Johannes H; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-08-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in chronic pain, although study findings are inconsistent. This cross-sectional study examined whether basal inflammatory markers and the innate immune response are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Data were used on 1632 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire was used to determine the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Subjects were categorized in a chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain group (n=754) and a control group (n=878). Blood levels of the basal inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined. To obtain a measure of the innate immune response, 13 inflammatory markers were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in a subsample (n=707). Subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain showed elevated levels of basal inflammatory markers compared with controls, but statistical significance was lost after adjustment for lifestyle and disease variables. For some LPS-stimulated inflammatory markers, we did find elevated levels in subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain both before and after adjustment for covariates. Pain severity was not associated with inflammation within chronic pain subjects. An enhanced innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain may be examined as a potential biomarker for the onset or perpetuation of chronic pain.

  7. Does the Gut Microbiota Influence Immunity and Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis Pathophysiology?

    PubMed

    Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Medrek, Aldona; Madej, Paulina; Michlicka, Wirginia; Dobrakowski, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Evaluation of the impact of gut microflora on the pathophysiology of MS. Results. The etiopathogenesis of MS is not fully known. Gut microbiota may be of a great importance in the pathogenesis of MS, since recent findings suggest that substitutions of certain microbial population in the gut can lead to proinflammatory state, which can lead to MS in humans. In contrast, other commensal bacteria and their antigenic products may protect against inflammation within the central nervous system. The type of intestinal flora is affected by antibiotics, stress, or diet. The effects on MS through the intestinal microflora can also be achieved by antibiotic therapy and Lactobacillus. EAE, as an animal model of MS, indicates a strong influence of the gut microbiota on the immune system and shows that disturbances in gut physiology may contribute to the development of MS. Conclusions. The relationship between the central nervous system, the immune system, and the gut microbiota relates to the influence of microorganisms in the development of MS. A possible interaction between gut microbiota and the immune system can be perceived through regulation by the endocannabinoid system. It may offer an opportunity to understand the interaction comprised in the gut-immune-brain axis.

  8. Does the Gut Microbiota Influence Immunity and Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis Pathophysiology?

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Madej, Paulina; Michlicka, Wirginia; Dobrakowski, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Evaluation of the impact of gut microflora on the pathophysiology of MS. Results. The etiopathogenesis of MS is not fully known. Gut microbiota may be of a great importance in the pathogenesis of MS, since recent findings suggest that substitutions of certain microbial population in the gut can lead to proinflammatory state, which can lead to MS in humans. In contrast, other commensal bacteria and their antigenic products may protect against inflammation within the central nervous system. The type of intestinal flora is affected by antibiotics, stress, or diet. The effects on MS through the intestinal microflora can also be achieved by antibiotic therapy and Lactobacillus. EAE, as an animal model of MS, indicates a strong influence of the gut microbiota on the immune system and shows that disturbances in gut physiology may contribute to the development of MS. Conclusions. The relationship between the central nervous system, the immune system, and the gut microbiota relates to the influence of microorganisms in the development of MS. A possible interaction between gut microbiota and the immune system can be perceived through regulation by the endocannabinoid system. It may offer an opportunity to understand the interaction comprised in the gut-immune-brain axis. PMID:28316999

  9. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Harview, Christina L.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Shintaku, I. Peter; Taylor, Emma J. M.; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N.; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grogan, Tristan R.; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H.; Elashoff, David A.; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types.1–5 One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8 T-cells (termed adaptive immune resistance).6,7 Here we show that pre-existing CD8 T-cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analyzed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next generation sequencing for T-cell receptors (TCR). In serially sampled tumours, responding patients showed proliferation of intratumoural CD8+ T-cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8, PD1, and PD-L1 expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression following therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1 mediated adaptive immune resistance. PMID:25428505

  10. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  11. Deciphering the Adaptive Immune Response to Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Weinstein JN, Collisson EA, Mills GB, Shaw KR, Ozenberger BA, Ellrott K, Shmulevich I, Sander C, Stuart JM. The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis...Holt, Ph.D., John Webb Ph.D., Peter Watson, M.D. Title of Project: Deciphering the Adaptive Immune Response to Ovarian Cancer INTRODUCTION...Cherniack AD, Akbani R, Liu Y, Shen H, Robertson AG, Pashtan I, Shen R, Benz CC, Yau C, Laird PW, Ding L, Zhang W, Mills GB, Kucherlapati R, Mardis ER

  12. An update of the oxidation-inflammation theory of aging: the involvement of the immune system in oxi-inflamm-aging.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Mónica; Miquel, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aging process is one of the best examples of the effects of a deterioration of homeostasis, since aging is accompanied by an impairment of the physiological systems including the homeostatic systems such as the immune system. We propose an integrative theory of aging providing answers to the how (oxidation), where first (mitochondria of differentiated cells) and why (pleiotropic genes) this process occurs. In agreement with this oxidation-mitochondrial theory of aging, we have observed that the age-related changes of immune functions have as their basis an oxidative and inflammatory stress situation, which has among its intracellular mechanisms the activation of NFkappaB in immune cells. Moreover, we have also observed that several functions of immune cells are good markers of biological age and predictors of longevity. Based on the above we have proposed the theory of oxidation-inflammation as the main cause of aging. Accordingly, the chronic oxidative stress that appears with age affects all cells and especially those of the regulatory systems, such as the nervous, endocrine and immune systems and the communication between them. This fact prevents an adequate homeostasis and, therefore, the preservation of health. We have also proposed a key involvement of the immune system in the aging process of the organism, concretely in the rate of aging, since there is a relation between the redox state and functional capacity of the immune cells and the longevity of individuals. Moreover, the role of the immune system in senescence could be of universal application. A confirmation of the central role of the immune system in oxi-inflamm-aging is that the administration of adequate amounts of antioxidants in the diet, improves the immune functions, decreasing their oxidative stress, and consequently increases the longevity of the subjects.

  13. Regulation of inflammation, autoimmunity, and infection immunity by HVEM-BTLA signaling.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Steinberg, Marcos W; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-04-01

    The HVEM, or TNFRSF14, is a membrane-bound receptor known to activate the NF-κB pathway, leading to the induction of proinflammatory and cell survival-promoting genes. HVEM binds several ligands that are capable of mediating costimulatory pathways, predominantly through its interaction with LIGHT (TNFSF14). However, it can also mediate coinhibitory effects, predominantly by interacting with IGSF members, BTLA or CD160. Therefore, it can function like a "molecular switch" for various activating or inhibitory functions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the existence of bidirectional signaling with HVEM acting as a ligand for signaling through BTLA, which may act as a ligand in other contexts. Bidirectional signaling, together with new information indicating signaling in cis by cells that coexpress HVEM and its ligands, makes signaling within a HVEM-mediated network complicated, although potentially rich in biology. Accumulating in vivo evidence has shown that HVEM-mediated, coinhibitory signaling may be dominant over HVEM-mediated costimulatory signaling. In several disease models the absence of HVEM-BTLA signaling predominantly resulted in severe mucosal inflammation in the gut and lung, autoimmune-like disease, and impaired immunity during bacterial infection. Here, we will summarize the current view about how HVEM-BTLA signaling is involved in the regulation of mucosal inflammation, autoimmunity, and infection immunity.

  14. Border patrol: regulation of immunity, inflammation and tissue homeostasis at barrier surfaces by IL-22.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Fouser, Lynette A; Artis, David

    2011-05-01

    The maintenance of barrier function at exposed surfaces of the mammalian body is essential for limiting exposure to environmental stimuli, preventing systemic dissemination of commensal and pathogenic microbes and retaining normal homeostasis of the entire body. Indeed, dysregulated barrier function is associated with many infectious and inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, influenza, inflammatory bowel disease and human immunodeficiency virus, which collectively afflict millions of people worldwide. Studies have shown that interleukin 22 (IL-22) is expressed at barrier surfaces and that its expression is dysregulated in certain human diseases, which suggests a critical role in the maintenance of normal barrier homeostasis. Consistent with that, studies of mouse model systems have identified a critical role for signaling by IL-22 through its receptor (IL-22R) in the promotion of antimicrobial immunity, inflammation and tissue repair at barrier surfaces. In this review we will discuss how the expression of IL-22 and IL-22R is regulated, the functions of the IL-22-IL-22R pathway in regulating immunity, inflammation and tissue homeostasis, and the therapeutic potential of targeting this pathway in human disease.

  15. Different impairment of immune and inflammation functions in short and long-term after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Xing; Qi, Fei; Liu, Jia-Qian; Li, Gong-Hua; Dai, Shao-Xing; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Fei; Liu, Dahai; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke therapy and prognosis outcomes largely depend on the time periods after symptom onset. This study aims to explore the difference of global gene expression profiles and impairment of biological functions between short-term and long-term after stroke onset. We compared three short-term (3 h, 5 h and 24 h) and a long-term (6-month) gene expression levels by a multi-platform microarray data integration method. RankProd was used to calculate the differentially expressed genes between stroke patients and controls. DAVID Bioinformatics Resources was utilized to determine affected biological functions. Consensus cluster and hierarchical cluster methods were employed to compare the gene expression patterns of the commonly biological functions among these four time course groups. The results showed that severe impairment of inflammation and immune related functions in 5 h and 24 h after symptom onset. However, these functions were less affected in the 3 h and the 6-month groups. In addition, several key genes (CCL20, THBS1, EREG, and IL6 et al.) were dramatically down-regulated in 5 h and 24 h groups, whereas these genes showed no change or even a slight contrary expression in 3 h or 6-month groups. This study has identified the large differences of altered immune and inflammation functions based on gene levels between short and long-term after stroke onset. The findings provide valuable insight into the clinical practice and prognosis evaluation of ischemic stroke. PMID:28337302

  16. The role of inflammation in intravenous immune globulin-mediated hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergrast, Jacob; Willie-Ramharack, Kezia; Sampson, Lorna; Laroche, Vincent; Branch, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) therapy has shown great success in a number of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions and its use continues to increase worldwide. There is growing awareness of significant side effects of high-dose IVIG: however, particularly severe hemolysis in patients that are non-group O. It has been proposed that IVIG-associated hemolysis may be heralded by an existing inflammatory condition. In the work presented herein, we have provided a review of the pathophysiology of inflammation, particularly as it applies in immune-mediated red blood cell hemolysis, and a summary of previous publications that suggest an association between IVIG-mediated hemolysis and a state of existing inflammation. In addition, preliminary results from a prospective study to address the mechanism of IVIG-associated hemolysis are provided. These preliminary data support the idea of an existing inflammatory condition preceding overt hemolysis after high-dose IVIG therapy that: 1) is restricted to non-group O patients, 2) is seen when using IVIG doses of more than 2 g/kg, 3) involves an activated mononuclear phagocyte system, 4) may be presaged by a significant increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 receptor agonist, and 5) is independent of secretor status.

  17. Olfactomedin 4 expression and functions in innate immunity, inflammation, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenli; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2016-06-01

    Olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) is an olfactomedin domain-containing glycoprotein. Multiple signaling pathways and factors, including NF-κB, Wnt, Notch, PU.1, retinoic acids, estrogen receptor, and miR-486, regulate its expression. OLFM4 interacts with several other proteins, such as gene associated with retinoic-interferon-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19), cadherins, lectins, nucleotide oligomerization domain-1 (NOD1) and nucleotide oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2), and cathepsins C and D, known to regulate important cellular functions. Recent investigations using Olfm4-deficient mouse models have provided important clues about its in vivo biological functions. Olfm4 inhibited Helicobacter pylori-induced NF-κB pathway activity and inflammation and facilitated H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach. Olfm4-deficient mice exhibited enhanced immunity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus infection. Olfm4 deletion in a chronic granulomatous disease mouse model rescued them from S. aureus infection. Olfm4 deletion in mice treated with azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate led to robust intestinal inflammation and intestinal crypt hyperplasia. Olfm4 deletion in Apc (Min/+) mice promoted intestinal polyp formation as well as adenocarcinoma development in the distal colon. Further, Olfm4-deficient mice spontaneously developed prostatic epithelial lesions as they age. OLFM4 expression is correlated with cancer differentiation, stage, metastasis, and prognosis in a variety of cancers, suggesting its potential clinical value as an early-stage cancer marker or a therapeutic target. Collectively, these data suggest that OLFM4 plays important roles in innate immunity against bacterial infection, gastrointestinal inflammation, and cancer. In this review, we have summarized OLFM4's initial characterization, expression, regulation, protein interactions, and biological functions.

  18. Analysis of differential immune responses induced by innate and adaptive immunity following transplantation

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongzhen; Stone, James R; Perkins, David L

    2003-01-01

    The roles of innate and adaptive immunity in allograft rejection remain incompletely understood. Previous studies analysing lymphocyte deficient or syngeneic graft recipients have identified subsets of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines induced by antigen independent mechanisms. In the current study, we analysed a panel of 60 inflammatory parameters including serum cytokines, intragraft chemokines and cytokines, receptors, and cellular markers. Our results confirmed the up-regulation of a subset of markers by innate mechanisms and also identified a subset of parameters up-regulated only in the context of an adaptive response. Thus, we successfully differentiated markers of the innate and adaptive phases of rejection. Current paradigms emphasize that innate signals can promote a subsequent adaptive response. Interestingly, in our studies, expression of the markers induced by innate mechanisms was markedly amplified in the allogeneic, but not syngeneic or lymphocyte deficient, recipients. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators can have functional overlap between the innate and adaptive responses, and that the adaptive component of the rejection process amplifies the innate response by positive feedback regulation. PMID:12757613

  19. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Fungal Products and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock; Barnes, Charles S; Portnoy, Jay M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fungi and their products is practically ubiquitous, yet most of this is of little consequence to most healthy individuals. This is because there are a number of elaborate mechanisms to deal with these exposures. Most of these mechanisms are designed to recognize and neutralize such exposures. However, in understanding these mechanisms it has become clear that many of them overlap with our ability to respond to disruptions in tissue function caused by trauma or deterioration. These responses involve the innate and adaptive immune systems usually through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and the production of cytokines that are considered inflammatory accompanied by other factors that can moderate these reactivities. Depending on different genetic backgrounds and the extent of activation of these mechanisms, various pathologies with resulting symptoms can ensue. Complicating this is the fact that these mechanisms can bias toward type 2 innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, to understand what we refer to as allergens from fungal sources, we must first understand how they influence these innate mechanisms. In doing so it has become clear that many of the proteins that are described as fungal allergens are essentially homologues of our own proteins that signal or cause tissue disruptions.

  20. Liver restores immune homeostasis after local inflammation despite the presence of autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Béland, Kathie; Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The liver must keep equilibrium between immune tolerance and immunity in order to protect itself from pathogens while maintaining tolerance to food antigens. An imbalance between these two states could result in an inflammatory liver disease. The aims of this study were to identify factors responsible for a break of tolerance and characterize the subsequent restoration of liver immune homeostasis. A pro-inflammatory environment was created in the liver by the co-administration of TLR ligands CpG and Poly(I:C) in presence or absence of activated liver-specific autoreactive CD8(+) T cells. Regardless of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, mice injected with CpG and Poly(I:C) showed elevated serum ALT levels and a transient liver inflammation. Both CpG/Poly(I:C) and autoreactive CD8(+)T cells induced expression of TLR9 and INF-γ by the liver, and an up-regulation of homing and adhesion molecules CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL16, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Transferred CFSE-labeled autoreactive CD8(+) T cells, in presence of TLR3 and 9 ligands, were recruited by the liver and spleen and proliferated. This population then contracted by apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Up-regulation of FasL and PD-L1 in the liver was observed. In conclusion, TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune system results in a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the recruitment of lymphocytes resulting in bystander hepatitis. Despite this pro-inflammatory environment, the presence of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells is not sufficient to sustain an autoimmune response against the liver and immune homeostasis is rapidly restored through the apoptosis of T cells.

  1. The innate and adaptive immune response to avian influenza virus infections and vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against viruses is mediated by the early innate immune responses and later on by the adaptive immune responses. The early innate immunity is designed to contain and limit virus replication in the host, primarily through cytokine and interferon production. Most all cells are cap...

  2. Sec13 Regulates Expression of Specific Immune Factors Involved in Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Thais G.; Zhang, Liang; Shaulov, Lihi; Harel, Amnon; Kuss, Sharon K.; Williams, Jessica; Shelton, John; Somatilaka, Bandarigoda; Seemann, Joachim; Yang, Jue; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Nussenzveig, Daniel R.; Faria, Ana M. C.; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Sec13 protein functions in various intracellular compartments including the nuclear pore complex, COPII-coated vesicles, and inside the nucleus as a transcription regulator. Here we developed a mouse model that expresses low levels of Sec13 (Sec13H/−) to assess its functions in vivo, as Sec13 knockout is lethal. These Sec13 mutant mice did not present gross defects in anatomy and physiology. However, the reduced levels of Sec13 in vivo yielded specific immunological defects. In particular, these Sec13 mutant mice showed low levels of MHC I and II expressed by macrophages, low levels of INF-γ and IL-6 expressed by stimulated T cells, and low frequencies of splenic IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells. In contrast, the levels of soluble and membrane-bound TGF-β as well as serum immunoglobulin production are high in these mice. Furthermore, frequencies of CD19+CD5-CD95+ and CD19+CD5-IL-4+ B cells were diminished in Sec13H/− mice. Upon stimulation or immunization, some of the defects observed in the naïve mutant mice were compensated. However, TGF-β expression remained high suggesting that Sec13 is a negative modulator of TGF-β expression and of its immunosuppressive functions on certain immune cells. In sum, Sec13 regulates specific expression of immune factors with key functions in inflammation. PMID:26631972

  3. Mucosal innate immune cells regulate both gut homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Continuous exposure of intestinal mucosal surfaces to diverse microorganisms and their metabolites reflects the biological necessity for a multifaceted, integrated epithelial and immune cell-mediated regulatory system. The development and function of the host cells responsible for the barrier function of the intestinal surface (e.g., M cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and columnar epithelial cells) are strictly regulated through both positive and negative stimulation by the luminal microbiota. Stimulation by damage-associated molecular patterns and commensal bacteria-derived microbe-associated molecular patterns provokes the assembly of inflammasomes, which are involved in maintaining the integrity of the intestinal epithelium. Mucosal immune cells located beneath the epithelium play critical roles in regulating both the mucosal barrier and the relative composition of the luminal microbiota. Innate lymphoid cells and mast cells, in particular, orchestrate the mucosal regulatory system to create a mutually beneficial environment for both the host and the microbiota. Disruption of mucosal homeostasis causes intestinal inflammation such as that seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we review the recent research on the biological interplay among the luminal microbiota, epithelial cells, and mucosal innate immune cells in both healthy and pathological conditions.

  4. Evidence of a Redox-Dependent Regulation of Immune Responses to Exercise-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sakelliou, Alexandra; Athanailidis, Ioannis; Tsoukas, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Draganidis, Dimitris; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Liacos, Christina; Mandalidis, Dimitrios; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Mitrakou, Asimina

    2016-01-01

    We used thiol-based antioxidant supplementation (n-acetylcysteine, NAC) to determine whether immune mobilisation following skeletal muscle microtrauma induced by exercise is redox-sensitive in healthy humans. According to a two-trial, double-blind, crossover, repeated measures design, 10 young men received either placebo or NAC (20 mg/kg/day) immediately after a muscle-damaging exercise protocol (300 eccentric contractions) and for eight consecutive days. Blood sampling and performance assessments were performed before exercise, after exercise, and daily throughout recovery. NAC reduced the decline of reduced glutathione in erythrocytes and the increase of plasma protein carbonyls, serum TAC and erythrocyte oxidized glutathione, and TBARS and catalase activity during recovery thereby altering postexercise redox status. The rise of muscle damage and inflammatory markers (muscle strength, creatine kinase activity, CRP, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules) was less pronounced in NAC during the first phase of recovery. The rise of leukocyte and neutrophil count was decreased by NAC after exercise. Results on immune cell subpopulations obtained by flow cytometry indicated that NAC ingestion reduced the exercise-induced rise of total macrophages, HLA+ macrophages, and 11B+ macrophages and abolished the exercise-induced upregulation of B lymphocytes. Natural killer cells declined only in PLA immediately after exercise. These results indicate that thiol-based antioxidant supplementation blunts immune cell mobilisation in response to exercise-induced inflammation suggesting that leukocyte mobilization may be under redox-dependent regulation. PMID:27974950

  5. Innate and adaptive immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus skin infections.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sheila; Miller, Lloyd S

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that is responsible for the vast majority of bacterial skin and soft tissue infections in humans. S. aureus can also become more invasive and cause life-threatening infections such as bacteremia, pneumonia, abscesses of various organs, meningitis, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and sepsis. These infections represent a major public health threat due to the enormous numbers of these infections and the widespread emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains. MSRA is endemic in hospitals worldwide and is rapidly spreading throughout the normal human population in the community. The increasing frequency of MRSA infections has complicated treatment as these strains are more virulent and are increasingly becoming resistant to multiple different classes of antibiotics. The important role of the immune response against S. aureus infections cannot be overemphasized as humans with certain genetic and acquired immunodeficiency disorders are at an increased risk for infection. Understanding the cutaneous immune responses against S. aureus is essential as most of these infections occur or originate from a site of infection or colonization of the skin and mucosa. This review will summarize the innate immune responses against S. aureus skin infections, including antimicrobial peptides that have direct antimicrobial activity against S. aureus as well as pattern recognition receptors and proinflammatory cytokines that promote neutrophil abscess formation in the skin, which is required for bacterial clearance. Finally, we will discuss the recent discoveries involving IL-17-mediated responses, which provide a key link between cutaneous innate and adaptive immune responses against S. aureus skin infections.

  6. The role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Kato, Lucia M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Maruya, Mikako; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2014-07-01

    The gut nourishes rich bacterial communities that affect profoundly the functions of the immune system. The relationship between gut microbiota and the immune system is one of reciprocity. The microbiota contributes to nutrient processing and the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. Conversely, the immune system, particularly the adaptive immune system, plays a key role in shaping the repertoire of gut microbiota. The fitness of host immune system is reflected in the gut microbiota, and deficiencies in either innate or adaptive immunity impact on diversity and structures of bacterial communities in the gut. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that underlie this reciprocity and emphasize how the adaptive immune system via immunoglobulins (i.e. IgA) contributes to diversification and balance of gut microbiota required for immune homeostasis.

  7. Insulin-like growth factor-1 endues monocytes with immune suppressive ability to inhibit inflammation in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rong-Ti; Mo, Li-Hua; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of some chronic inflammation such as inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) has active immune regulatory capability. This study aims to investigate into the mechanism by which IGF1 modulates the monocyte (Mo) properties to inhibit immune inflammation in the intestine. In this study, the production of IGF1 by intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Mos were analyzed by flow cytometry. A mouse colitis model was created with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. The results showed that mouse IECs produced IGF1, which could be up regulated by exposure to CpG-ODN (CpG-oligodeoxynueleotides) in the culture. Culture the CpG-ODN-primed IEC cells and Mos or exposure of Mos to IGF1 in the culture induced the Mos to express IL-10. The IGF1-primed Mos showed the immune suppressive effect on inhibiting the immune inflammation in the mouse colon. In conclusion, the IGF1-primed Mos are capable of suppressing immune inflammation in the intestine. PMID:25588622

  8. Pathogenesis of innate immunity and adaptive immunity in the mouse model of experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hong-Sheng; Liu, Zheng-Feng; Cui, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveitis, a well-established model for human uveitis, is similar to human uveitis in many pathological features. Studies concerning the mechanisms of experimental autoimmune uveitis would cast a light on the pathogenesis of human uveitis as well as the search for more effective therapeutic agents. The cellular components of innate immunity include natural killer cells, gamma delta T lymphocytes, antigen-presenting dendritic cells, phagocytic macrophages, and granulocytes. It is believed that T cells are central in the generation of human uveitis. It has already become clear that CD4(+) effecter cells that predominantly produce interleukin-17 (the so-called Th17 cells) may play an important role in uveitis. In addition, the occurrence and recurrence of uveitis depends on a complex interplay between the elements of innate and adaptive immunity.

  9. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathways of pathgenic inflammation and immune escape in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, George C.; Smith, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa; Metz, Richard; Muller, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and pharmacological studies of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) have established this tryptophan catabolic enzyme as a central driver of malignant development and progression. IDO acts in tumor, stromal and immune cells to support pathogenic inflammatory processes that engender immune tolerance to tumor antigens. The multifaceted effects of IDO activation in cancer include the suppression of T and NK cells, the generation and activation of T regulatory cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and the promotion of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistic investigations have defined the aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR, the master metabolic regulator mTORC1 and the stress kinase Gcn2 as key effector signaling elements for IDO, which also exerts a non-catalytic role in TGF-β signaling. Small molecule inhibitors of IDO exhibit anticancer activity and cooperate with immunotherapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy to trigger rapid regression of aggressive tumors otherwise resistant to treatment. Notably, the dramatic antitumor activity of certain targeted therapeutics such as imatinib (Gleevec) in GIST has been traced in part to IDO downregulation. Further, antitumor responses to immune checkpoint inhibitors can be heightened safely by a clinical lead inhibitor of the IDO pathway that relieves IDO-mediated suppression of mTORC1 in T cells. In this personal perspective on IDO as a nodal mediator of pathogenic inflammation and immune escape in cancer, we provide a conceptual foundation for the clinical development of IDO inhibitors as a novel class of immunomodulators with broad application in the treatment of advanced human cancer. PMID:24711084

  10. Platelets: versatile modifiers of innate and adaptive immune responses to transplants

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, William M; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Morrell, Craig N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the last decade, there has been mounting experimental data demonstrating that platelets contribute to acute vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on recent findings that link platelets to inflammatory responses of relevance to transplants. Recent findings Although it has been known that platelets modify vascular inflammation by secretion of soluble mediators and release of microparticles, new aspects of these mechanisms are being defined. For example, platelet-derived RANTES (CCL5) not only functions in homomers, but also forms more potent heteromers with Platelet Factor 4 (CXCL4). This heteromer formation can be inhibited with small molecules. New findings also demonstrate heterologous interactions of platelet microparticles with leukocytes that may increase their range of impact. By attaching to neutrophils, platelet microparticles appear to migrate out of blood vessels and into other compartments where they stimulate secretion of cytokines. Contact of platelets with extracellular matrix also can result in cleavage of hyaluronan into fragments that serve as an endogenous danger signal. Summary Recent findings have expanded the range of interactions by which platelets can modify innate and adaptive immune responses to transplants. PMID:21157344

  11. Immunity and inflammation in status epilepticus and its sequelae: possibilities for therapeutic application

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, Annamaria; Dingledine, Raymond; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening neurological emergency often refractory to available treatment options. It is a very heterogeneous condition in terms of clinical presentation and causes, which besides genetic, vascular and other structural causes also include CNS or severe systemic infections, sudden withdrawal from benzodiazepines or anticonvulsants and rare autoimmune etiologies. Treatment of SE is essentially based on expert opinions and antiepileptic drug treatment per se seems to have no major impact on prognosis. There is, therefore, urgent need of novel therapies that rely upon a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying this clinical condition. Accumulating evidence in animal models highlights that inflammation ensuing in the brain during SE may play a determinant role in ongoing seizures and their long-term detrimental consequences, independent of an infection or auto-immune cause; this evidence encourages reconsideration of the treatment flow in SE patients. PMID:26312647

  12. Inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Bulati, Matteo; Caruso, Calogero; Castiglia, Laura; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Di Bona, Danilo; Duro, Giovanni; Lio, Domenico; Matranga, Domenica; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; Rizzo, Claudia; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Vasto, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and progressive neurodegenerative disease, which in Western society mainly accounts for senile dementia. Today many countries have rising aging populations and are facing an increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as AD, with increasing health-care costs. Understanding the pathophysiology process of AD plays a prominent role in new strategies for extending the health of the elderly population. Considering the future epidemic of AD, prevention and treatment are important goals of ongoing research. However, a better understanding of AD pathophysiology must be accomplished to make this objective feasible. In this paper, we review some hot topics concerning AD pathophysiology that have an important impact on therapeutic perspectives. Hence, we have focused our attention on inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E (APOE), cholesterol, oxidative stress, as well as exploring the related therapeutic possibilities, i.e., nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, cytokine blocking antibodies, immunotherapy, diet, and curcumin.

  13. IL-33: an alarmin cytokine with crucial roles in innate immunity, inflammation and allergy.

    PubMed

    Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-12-01

    IL-33 is a nuclear cytokine from the IL-1 family constitutively expressed in epithelial barrier tissues and lymphoid organs, which plays important roles in type-2 innate immunity and human asthma. Recent studies indicate that IL-33 induces production of large amounts of IL-5 and IL-13 by group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), for initiation of allergic inflammation shortly after exposure to allergens or infection with parasites or viruses. IL-33 appears to function as an alarmin (alarm signal) rapidly released from producing cells upon cellular damage or cellular stress. In this review, we discuss the cellular sources, mode of action and regulation of IL-33, and we highlight its crucial roles in vivo with particular emphasis on results obtained using IL33-deficient mice.

  14. Phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma associates with proteins linked to immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Vaisar, Tomás; Han, Xianlin; Heinecke, Jay W; Albers, John J

    2010-08-31

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which associates with apolipoprotein A-I (the major HDL protein), plays a key role in lipoprotein remodeling. Because its level in plasma increases during acute inflammation, it may also play previously unsuspected roles in the innate immune system. To gain further insight into its potential physiological functions, we isolated complexes containing PLTP from plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography and determined their composition. Shotgun proteomics revealed that only 6 of the 24 proteins detected in the complexes were apolipoproteins. The most abundant proteins were clusterin (apoJ), PLTP itself, coagulation factors, complement factors, and apoA-I. Remarkably, 20 of the 24 proteins had known protein-protein interactions. Biochemical studies confirmed two previously established interactions and identified five new ones between PLTP and proteins. Moreover, clusterin, apoA-I, and apoE preserved the lipid-transfer activity of recombinant PLTP in the absence of lipid, indicating that these interactions may have functional significance. Unexpectedly, lipids accounted for only 3% of the mass of the PLTP complexes. Collectively, our observations indicate that PLTP in human plasma resides on lipid-poor complexes dominated by clusterin and proteins implicated in host defense and inflammation. They further suggest that protein-protein interactions drive the formation of PLTP complexes in plasma.

  15. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells: Key Regulators of Immune Homeostasis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-07-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function.

  16. The Fungal Quorum-Sensing Molecule Farnesol Activates Innate Immune Cells but Suppresses Cellular Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. PMID:25784697

  17. Selective CD28 Antagonist Blunts Memory Immune Responses and Promotes Long-Term Control of Skin Inflammation in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Nicolas; Chevalier, Melanie; Mary, Caroline; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Baker, Paul; Ville, Simon; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Dilek, Nahzli; Belarif, Lyssia; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Scobie, Linda; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapies that specifically target activation and expansion of pathogenic immune cell subsets responsible for autoimmune attacks are needed to confer long-term remission. Pathogenic cells in autoimmunity include memory T lymphocytes that are long-lived and present rapid recall effector functions with reduced activation requirements. Whereas the CD28 costimulation pathway predominantly controls priming of naive T cells and hence generation of adaptive memory cells, the roles of CD28 costimulation on established memory T lymphocytes and the recall of memory responses remain controversial. In contrast to CD80/86 antagonists (CTLA4-Ig), selective CD28 antagonists blunt T cell costimulation while sparing CTLA-4 and PD-L1-dependent coinhibitory signals. Using a new selective CD28 antagonist, we showed that Ag-specific reactivation of human memory T lymphocytes was prevented. Selective CD28 blockade controlled both cellular and humoral memory recall in nonhuman primates and induced long-term Ag-specific unresponsiveness in a memory T cell-mediated inflammatory skin model. No modification of memory T lymphocytes subsets or numbers was observed in the periphery, and importantly no significant reactivation of quiescent viruses was noticed. These findings indicate that pathogenic memory T cell responses are controlled by both CD28 and CTLA-4/PD-L1 cosignals in vivo and that selectively targeting CD28 would help to promote remission of autoimmune diseases and control chronic inflammation.

  18. Adaptive immunity and histopathology in frog virus 3-infected Xenopus

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Jacques . E-mail: robert@mail.rochester.edu; Morales, Heidi; Buck, Wayne; Cohen, Nicholas; Marr, Shauna; Gantress, Jennifer

    2005-02-20

    Xenopus has been used as an experimental model to evaluate the contribution of adaptive cellular immunity in amphibian host susceptibility to the emerging ranavirus FV3. Conventional histology and immunohistochemistry reveal that FV3 has a strong tropism for the proximal tubular epithelium of the kidney and is rarely disseminated elsewhere in Xenopus hosts unless their immune defenses are impaired or developmentally immature as in larvae. In such cases, virus is found widespread in most tissues. Adults, immunocompromised by depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells or by sub-lethal {gamma}-irradiation, show increased susceptibility to FV3 infection. Larvae and irradiated (but not normal) adults can be cross-infected through water by infected adult conspecifics (irradiated or not). The natural MHC class I deficiency and the absence of effect of anti-CD8 treatment on both larval CD8{sup +} T cells and larval susceptibility to FV3 are consistent with an inefficient CD8{sup +} T cell effector function during this developmental period.

  19. Dynamics of adaptive immunity against phage in bacterial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, Serena; Vucelja, Marija; Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) mechanism allows bacteria to adaptively defend against phages by acquiring short genomic sequences (spacers) that target specific sequences in the viral genome. We propose a population dynamical model where immunity can be both acquired and lost. The model predicts regimes where bacterial and phage populations can co-exist, others where the populations oscillate, and still others where one population is driven to extinction. Our model considers two key parameters: (1) ease of acquisition and (2) spacer effectiveness in conferring immunity. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations show that if spacers differ mainly in ease of acquisition, or if the probability of acquiring them is sufficiently high, bacteria develop a diverse population of spacers. On the other hand, if spacers differ mainly in their effectiveness, their final distribution will be highly peaked, akin to a ``winner-take-all'' scenario, leading to a specialized spacer distribution. Bacteria can interpolate between these limiting behaviors by actively tuning their overall acquisition rate.

  20. GATA-3 function in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Tindemans, Irma; Serafini, Nicolas; Di Santo, James P; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2014-08-21

    The zinc-finger transcription factor GATA-3 has received much attention as a master regulator of T helper 2 (Th2) cell differentiation, during which it controls interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-13 expression. More recently, GATA-3 was shown to contribute to type 2 immunity through regulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cell (ILC2) development and function. Furthermore, during thymopoiesis, GATA-3 represses B cell potential in early T cell precursors, activates TCR signaling in pre-T cells, and promotes the CD4(+) T cell lineage after positive selection. GATA-3 also functions outside the thymus in hematopoietic stem cells, regulatory T cells, CD8(+) T cells, thymic natural killer cells, and ILC precursors. Here we discuss the varied functions of GATA-3 in innate and adaptive immune cells, with emphasis on its activity in T cells and ILCs, and examine the mechanistic basis for the dose-dependent, developmental-stage- and cell-lineage-specific activity of this transcription factor.

  1. Cell-mediated immune response to unrelated proteins and unspecific inflammation blocked by orally tolerated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gustavo C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Azevedo, Geraldo M; Pinho, Vanessa; Carvalho, Cláudia R; Vaz, Nelson M

    2009-03-01

    Oral tolerance promotes a generalized decrease in specific immune responsiveness to proteins previously encountered via the oral route. In addition, parenteral immunization with a tolerated protein also triggers a significant reduction in the primary responsiveness to a second unrelated antigen. This is generally explained by 'innocent bystander suppression', suggesting that the transient and episodic effects of inhibitory cytokines released by contact with the tolerated antigen would block responses to the second antigen. In disagreement with this view, we have previously shown that: (i) these inhibitory effects do not require concomitance or contiguity of the injections of the two proteins; (ii) that intravenous or intragastric exposures to the tolerated antigen are not inhibitory; and (iii) that the inhibitory effect, once triggered, persists in the absence of further contact with the tolerated protein, possibly by inhibition of secondary responsiveness (immunological memory). The present work confirms that immunological memory of the second unrelated antigen is hindered by exposure to the tolerated antigen and, in addition, shows that this exposure: (i) inhibits the inflammation triggered by an unrelated antigen through the double effect of inhibiting production of leucocytes in the bone marrow and blocking their migration to inflammed sites; and (ii) significantly blocks footpaw swelling triggered by carrageenan. Taken together, these results conclusively demonstrate that inhibitory effects of parenteral injection of tolerated antigens are much more general than suggested by the 'innocent bystander suppression' hypothesis.

  2. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  3. The Impact of Inflammation and Immune Activation on B Cell Differentiation during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells. PMID:22566879

  4. Corticosterone, inflammation, immune status and telomere length in frigatebird nestlings facing a severe herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sebastiano, Manrico; Eens, Marcel; Angelier, Frederic; Pineau, Kévin; Chastel, Olivier; Costantini, David

    2017-01-01

    Herpesvirus outbreaks are common in natural animal populations, but little is known about factors that favour the infection and its consequences for the organism. In this study, we examined the pathophysiological consequences of a disease probably attributable to herpesvirus infection for several markers of immune function, corticosterone, telomere length and inflammation. In addition, we assessed whether any markers used in this study might be associated with the occurrence of visible clinical signs of the disease and its impact on short-term survival perspectives. To address our questions, in spring 2015, we collected blood samples from nestlings of the magnificent frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) that were free of any clinical signs or showed visible signs of the disease. We found that the plasma concentration of haptoglobin was strongly associated with the infection status and could predict probabilities of survival. We also found that nestlings with clinical signs had lower baseline corticosterone concentrations and similar telomere length compared with healthy nestlings, whereas we did not find any association of the infection status with innate immune defenses or with nitric oxide concentration. Overall, our results suggest that the plasma concentration of haptoglobin might be a valuable tool to assess survival probabilities of frigatebird nestlings facing a herpesvirus outbreak. PMID:28070333

  5. The yin-yang of long pentraxin PTX3 in inflammation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Daigo, Kenji; Mantovani, Alberto; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Pentraxins are a family of multimeric proteins characterized by the presence of a pentraxin signature in their C-terminus region. Based on the primary structure, pentraxins are divided into short and long pentraxin: C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototype of the short pentraxin subfamily while pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the prototypic long pentraxin. Despite these two molecules exert similar fundamental actions in the regulation of innate immune and inflammatory responses, several differences exist between CRP and PTX3, including gene organization, protein oligomerization and expression pattern. The pathophysiological roles of PTX3 have been investigated using genetically modified mice since PTX3 gene organization and regulation are well conserved between mouse and human. Such in vivo studies figured out that PTX3 mainly have host-protective effects, even if it could also exert negative effects under certain pathophysiologic conditions. Here we will review the general properties of CRP and PTX3, emphasizing the differences between the two molecules and the regulatory functions exerted by PTX3 in innate immunity and inflammation.

  6. Enhanced 15-lipoxygenase activity and elevated eicosanoid production in kidney tumor microenvironment contribute to the inflammation and immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration is a hallmark in the majority of solid tumors. Our studies demonstrated that macrophages that infiltrate human renal cells carcinoma (RCC) display markedly enhanced expression and activity of 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX2). Obtained data suggest that enhanced lipoxygenase activity in tumor-associated macrophages stimulates cancer inflammation and causes immune dysfunction. PMID:22720260

  7. Enhanced 15-lipoxygenase activity and elevated eicosanoid production in kidney tumor microenvironment contribute to the inflammation and immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Macrophage infiltration is a hallmark in the majority of solid tumors. Our studies demonstrated that macrophages that infiltrate human renal cells carcinoma (RCC) display markedly enhanced expression and activity of 15-lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX2). Obtained data suggest that enhanced lipoxygenase activity in tumor-associated macrophages stimulates cancer inflammation and causes immune dysfunction.

  8. Adaptations in responsiveness of brainstem pain-modulating neurons in acute compared with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Daniel R; Heinricher, Mary M

    2013-06-01

    Despite similar behavioral hypersensitivity, acute and chronic pain have distinct neural bases. We used intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant to directly compare activity of pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in acute vs chronic inflammation. Heat-evoked and von Frey-evoked withdrawal reflexes and corresponding RVM neuronal activity were recorded in lightly anesthetized animals either during the first hour after complete Freund's adjuvant injection (acute) or 3 to 10 days later (chronic). Thermal and modest mechanical hyperalgesia during acute inflammation were associated with increases in the spontaneous activity of pain-facilitating ON-cells and suppression of pain-inhibiting OFF-cells. Acute hyperalgesia was reversed by RVM block, showing that the increased activity of RVM ON-cells is necessary for acute behavioral hypersensitivity. In chronic inflammation, thermal hyperalgesia had resolved but mechanical hyperalgesia had become pronounced. The spontaneous discharges of ON- and OFF-cells were not different from those in control subjects, but the mechanical response thresholds for both cell classes were reduced into the innocuous range. RVM block in the chronic condition worsened mechanical hyperalgesia. These studies identify distinct contributions of RVM ON- and OFF-cells to acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. During early immune-mediated inflammation, ON-cell spontaneous activity promotes hyperalgesia. After inflammation is established, the antinociceptive influence of OFF-cells is dominant, yet the lowered threshold for the OFF-cell pause allows behavioral responses to stimuli that would normally be considered innocuous. The efficacy of OFF-cells in counteracting sensitization of ascending transmission pathways could therefore be an important determining factor in development of chronic inflammatory pain.

  9. Crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Zou, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-12-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. HBV is not directly cytotoxic to infected hepatocytes; the clinical outcome of infection results from complicated interactions between the virus and the host immune system. In acute HBV infection, initiation of a broad, vigorous immune response is responsible for viral clearance and self-limited inflammatory liver disease. Effective and coordinated innate and adaptive immune responses are critical for viral clearance and the development of long-lasting immunity. Chronic hepatitis B patients fail to mount efficient innate and adaptive immune responses to the virus. In particular, HBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, which are crucial for HBV clearance, are hyporesponsiveness to HBV infection. Accumulating experimental evidence obtained from the development of animal and cell line models has highlighted the importance of innate immunity in the early control of HBV spread. The virus has evolved immune escape strategies, with higher HBV loads and HBV protein concentrations associated with increasing impairment of immune function. Therefore, treatment of HBV infection requires inhibition of HBV replication and protein expression to restore the suppressed host immunity. Complicated interactions exist not only between innate and adaptive responses, but also among innate immune cells and different components of adaptive responses. Improved insight into these complex interactions are important in designing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment HBV infection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the cross-talk between the innate and adaptive immune responses and among different immunocytes in HBV infection.

  10. Crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity in hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Zou, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. HBV is not directly cytotoxic to infected hepatocytes; the clinical outcome of infection results from complicated interactions between the virus and the host immune system. In acute HBV infection, initiation of a broad, vigorous immune response is responsible for viral clearance and self-limited inflammatory liver disease. Effective and coordinated innate and adaptive immune responses are critical for viral clearance and the development of long-lasting immunity. Chronic hepatitis B patients fail to mount efficient innate and adaptive immune responses to the virus. In particular, HBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, which are crucial for HBV clearance, are hyporesponsiveness to HBV infection. Accumulating experimental evidence obtained from the development of animal and cell line models has highlighted the importance of innate immunity in the early control of HBV spread. The virus has evolved immune escape strategies, with higher HBV loads and HBV protein concentrations associated with increasing impairment of immune function. Therefore, treatment of HBV infection requires inhibition of HBV replication and protein expression to restore the suppressed host immunity. Complicated interactions exist not only between innate and adaptive responses, but also among innate immune cells and different components of adaptive responses. Improved insight into these complex interactions are important in designing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment HBV infection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the cross-talk between the innate and adaptive immune responses and among different immunocytes in HBV infection. PMID:26730277

  11. The Memories of NK Cells: Innate-Adaptive Immune Intrinsic Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Ortolani, Claudio; del Zotto, Genny; Luchetti, Francesca; Canonico, Barbara; Artico, Marco; Papa, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Although NK cells are considered part of the innate immune system, a series of evidences has demonstrated that they possess characteristics typical of the adaptive immune system. These NK adaptive features, in particular their memory-like functions, are discussed from an ontogenetic and evolutionary point of view. PMID:28078307

  12. Adaptive immunity increases the pace and predictability of evolutionary change in commensal gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-Batista, João; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Gordo, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Co-evolution between the mammalian immune system and the gut microbiota is believed to have shaped the microbiota's astonishing diversity. Here we test the corollary hypothesis that the adaptive immune system, directly or indirectly, influences the evolution of commensal species. We compare the evolution of Escherichia coli upon colonization of the gut of wild-type and Rag2−/− mice, which lack lymphocytes. We show that bacterial adaptation is slower in immune-compromised animals, a phenomenon explained by differences in the action of natural selection within each host. Emerging mutations exhibit strong beneficial effects in healthy hosts but substantial antagonistic pleiotropy in immune-deficient mice. This feature is due to changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, which differs according to the immune status of the host. Our results indicate that the adaptive immune system influences the tempo and predictability of E. coli adaptation to the mouse gut. PMID:26615893

  13. Molecular interaction between natural IgG and ficolin - mechanistic insights on adaptive-innate immune crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Saswati; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Lifeng; Anand, Ganesh S.; Ding, Jeak L.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we found that natural IgG (nIgG; a non-specific immunoglobulin of adaptive immunity) is not quiescent, but plays a crucial role in immediate immune defense by collaborating with ficolin (an innate immune protein). However, how the nIgG and ficolin interplay and what factors control the complex formation during infection is unknown. Here, we found that mild acidosis and hypocalcaemia induced by infection- inflammation condition increased the nIgG:ficolin complex formation. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry delineated the binding interfaces to the CH2-CH3 region of nIgG Fc and P-subdomain of ficolin FBG domain. Infection condition exposes novel binding sites. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance analyses of peptides, derived from nIgG and ficolin, defined the interacting residues between the proteins. These results provide mechanistic insights on the interaction between two molecules representing the adaptive and innate immune pathways, prompting potential development of immunomodulatory/prophylactic peptides tunable to prevailing infection conditions.

  14. Immune evasion by cytomegalovirus--survival strategies of a highly adapted opportunist.

    PubMed

    Hengel, H; Brune, W; Koszinowski, U H

    1998-05-01

    Slowly replicating, species-specific and complex DNA viruses, such as cytomegaloviruses (CMVs), which code for > 200 antigenic proteins, should be easy prey to the host's immune system. Yet, CMVs are amazingly adapted opportunists that cope with multiple immune responses. Frequently, CMVs exploit immune mechanisms generated by the host. These strategies secure the persistence of CMVs and provide opportunities to spread to naive individuals.

  15. [Connective tissue and inflammation].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2014-03-23

    The author summarizes the structure of the connective tissues, the increasing motion of the constituents, which determine the role in establishing the structure and function of that. The structure and function of the connective tissue are related to each other in the resting as well as inflammatory states. It is emphasized that cellular events in the connective tissue are part of the defence of the organism, the localisation of the damage and, if possible, the maintenance of restitutio ad integrum. The organism responds to damage with inflammation, the non specific immune response, as well as specific, adaptive immunity. These processes are located in the connective tissue. Sterile and pathogenic inflammation are relatively similar processes, but inevitable differences are present, too. Sialic acids and glycoproteins containing sialic acids have important roles, and the role of Siglecs is also highlighted. Also, similarities and differences in damages caused by pathogens and sterile agents are briefly summarized. In addition, the roles of adhesion molecules linked to each other, and the whole event of inflammatory processes are presented. When considering practical consequences it is stressed that the structure (building up) of the organism and the defending function of inflammation both have fundamental importance. Inflammation has a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and the unimpaired somato-psychological state of the organism. Thus, inflammation serves as a tool of organism identical with the natural immune response, inseparably connected with the specific, adaptive immune response. The main events of the inflammatory processes take place in the connective tissue.

  16. Circulating Mediators of Inflammation and Immune Activation in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Brian M.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Bream, Jay H.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-related malignancy in developed countries. An elevated risk of developing NHL persists among HIV-infected individuals in comparison to the general population despite the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms underlying the development of AIDS-related NHL (A-NHL) are not fully understood, but likely involve persistent B-cell activation and inflammation. Methods This was a nested case-control study within the ongoing prospective Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Cases included 47 HIV-positive male subjects diagnosed with high-grade B-cell NHL. Controls were matched to each case from among participating HIV-positive males who did not develop any malignancy. Matching criteria included time HIV+ or since AIDS diagnosis, age, race and CD4+ cell count. Sera were tested for 161 serum biomarkers using multiplexed bead-based immunoassays. Results A subset of 17 biomarkers, including cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, tissue remodeling agents and bone metabolic mediators was identified to be significantly altered in A-NHL cases in comparison to controls. Many of the biomarkers included in this subset were positively correlated with HIV viral load. A pathway analysis of our results revealed an extensive network of interactions between current and previously identified biomarkers. Conclusions These findings support the current hypothesis that A-NHL develops in the context of persistent immune stimulation and inflammation. Further analysis of the biomarkers identified in this report should enhance our ability to diagnose, monitor and treat this disease. PMID:24922518

  17. MODEL OF COLONIC INFLAMMATION: IMMUNE MODULATORY MECHANISMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel; Eubank, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an immunoinflammatory illness of the gut initiated by an immune response to bacteria in the microflora. The resulting immunopathogenesis leads to lesions in epithelial lining of the colon through which bacteria may infiltrate the tissue causing recurring bouts of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and mal-nutrition. In healthy individuals such immunopathogenesis is avoided by the presence of regulatory cells that inhibit the inflammatory pathway. Highly relevant to the search for treatment strategies is the identification of components of the inflammatory pathway that allow regulatory mechanisms to be overridden and immunopathogenesis to proceed. In vitro techniques have identified cellular interactions involved in inflammation-regulation crosstalk. However, tracing immunological mechanisms discovered at the cellular level confidently back to an in vivo context of multiple, simultaneous interactions has met limited success. To explore the impact of specific interactions, we have constructed a system of 29 ordinary differential equations representing different phenotypes of T-cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and epithelial cells as they move and interact with bacteria in the lumen, lamina propria, and lymphoid tissue of the colon. Simulations revealed the positive inflammatory feedback loop formed by inflammatory M1 macrophage activation of T-cells as a driving force underlying the immunopathology of IBD. Furthermore, strategies that remove M1 from the site of infection, by either i) increasing its potential to switch to a regulatory M2 phenotype or ii) increasing the rate of reversion (for M1 and M2 alike) to a resting state, cease immunopathogenesis even as bacteria are eliminated by other inflammatory cells. Based on these results, we identify macrophages and their mechanisms of plasticity as key targets for mucosal inflammation intervention strategies. In addition, we propose that the primary mechanism behind the association of

  18. Chronic immune activation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of AIDS and cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G; O'Byrne, Ken J

    2002-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) invariably leads to the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in most infected humans, yet does so rarely, if at all, in HIV-infected chimpanzees. The differences between the two species are not due to differences in cellular receptors or an inability of the chimpanzee to be infected, but rather to the lack of pan-immune activation in the infected primate. This results in reduced apoptotic death in CD4+ T-helper lymphocytes and a lower viral load. In humans the degree of chronic immune activation correlates with virus load and clinical outcome with high immune activation leading to high viral loads and the more rapid progression to AIDS and death. The type of immune perturbation seen in HIV-associated AIDS is similar to that of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) where reduced cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses occur early in the course of the disease and where humoral responses (HI) predominate. A reduced CMI response occurs in a number of chronic infectious diseases, including tuberculosis and leishmaniasis. More recently, it has become increasingly apparent that the CMI response is suppressed in virtually all malignant diseases, including melanoma and colorectal and prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that, as the malignant process develops, the cancer cells evolve to subvert the CMI response. Moreover, the reduced CMI response seen in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is completely reversed following curative surgery strongly supporting the hypothesis that CRC can suppress the systemic immune response. Wound healing, ovulation, embryo implantation, and fetal growth are all associated with suppressed CMI and neovascularization (the formation of new blood vessels) or angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature). If unresolved, wound healing results in chronic inflammation, which can give rise to the phenomenon of "scar cancers." Indeed all the

  19. Trained immunity: A program of innate immune memory in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; Latz, Eicke; Mills, Kingston H G; Natoli, Gioacchino; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; O'Neill, Luke A J; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-04-22

    The general view that only adaptive immunity can build immunological memory has recently been challenged. In organisms lacking adaptive immunity, as well as in mammals, the innate immune system can mount resistance to reinfection, a phenomenon termed "trained immunity" or "innate immune memory." Trained immunity is orchestrated by epigenetic reprogramming, broadly defined as sustained changes in gene expression and cell physiology that do not involve permanent genetic changes such as mutations and recombination, which are essential for adaptive immunity. The discovery of trained immunity may open the door for novel vaccine approaches, new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of immune deficiency states, and modulation of exaggerated inflammation in autoinflammatory diseases.

  20. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous Treg deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B.; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H.; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D.; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD) immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially-fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. To test whether Treg-deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV-infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3KO) mice, which completely lack FoxP3+ Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8+ effector T cells and interferon-γ producing CD8+ T cells than controls, had higher viral loads and exhibited abnormal Th2 polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4KO FoxP3KO bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3KO mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared to controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II interferons and IL-12, were reduced whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a non-cutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV. PMID:20548030

  1. Skin inflammation arising from cutaneous regulatory T cell deficiency leads to impaired viral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Mathias, Clinton B; Diaz, Natalia; MacArthur, Daniel H; Laouar, Amale; Manjunath, Narasimhaswamy; Hofer, Matthias D; Wurbel, Marc-Andre; Campbell, James J; Chatila, Talal A; Oettgen, Hans C

    2010-07-15

    Individuals with atopic dermatitis immunized with the small pox vaccine, vaccinia virus (VV), are susceptible to eczema vaccinatum (EV), a potentially fatal disseminated infection. Dysfunction of Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Treg) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. To test whether Treg deficiency predisposes to EV, we percutaneously VV infected FoxP3-deficient (FoxP3(KO)) mice, which completely lack FoxP3(+) Treg. These animals generated both fewer VV-specific CD8(+) effector T cells and IFN-gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells than controls, had higher viral loads, and exhibited abnormal Th2-polarized responses to the virus. To focus on the consequences of Treg deficiency confined to the skin, we generated mixed CCR4(KO) FoxP3(KO) bone marrow (CCR4/FoxP3) chimeras in which skin, but not other tissues or central lymphoid organs, lack Treg. Like FoxP3(KO) mice, the chimeras had impaired VV-specific effector T cell responses and higher viral loads. Skin cytokine expression was significantly altered in infected chimeras compared with controls. Levels of the antiviral cytokines, type I and II IFNs and IL-12, were reduced, whereas expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-beta, and IL-23, was increased. Importantly, infection of CCR4/FoxP3 chimeras by a noncutaneous route (i.p.) induced immune responses comparable to controls. Our findings implicate allergic skin inflammation resulting from local Treg deficiency in the pathogenesis of EV.

  2. Immune-Mediated Inflammation May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.; Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Schwartz, Philip H.; Dickson, Patricia I.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease, a progressive manifestation of α-L-iduronidase deficiency or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, continues in patients both untreated and treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intravenous enzyme replacement. Few studies have examined the effects of α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent glycosaminoglycan storage upon arterial gene expression to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Methods Gene expression in carotid artery, ascending, and descending aortas from four non-tolerized, non-enzyme treated 19 month-old mucopolysaccharidosis type I dogs was compared with expression in corresponding vascular segments from three normal, age-matched dogs. Data were analyzed using R and whole genome network correlation analysis, a bias-free method of categorizing expression level and significance into discrete modules. Genes were further categorized based on module-trait relationships. Expression of clusterin, a protein implicated in other etiologies of cardiovascular disease, was assessed in canine and murine mucopolysaccharidosis type I aortas via Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry. Results Gene families with more than two-fold, significant increased expression involved lysosomal function, proteasome function, and immune regulation. Significantly downregulated genes were related to cellular adhesion, cytoskeletal elements, and calcium regulation. Clusterin gene overexpression (9-fold) and protein overexpression (1.3 to 1.62-fold) was confirmed and located specifically in arterial plaques of mucopolysaccharidosis-affected dogs and mice. Conclusions Overexpression of lysosomal and proteasomal-related genes are expected responses to cellular stress induced by lysosomal storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Upregulation of immunity-related genes implicates the potential involvement of glycosaminoglycan-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of mucopolysaccharidosis-related arterial disease, for

  3. Bacterial Vaginosis and Subclinical Markers of Genital Tract Inflammation and Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kimble, Thomas; Herold, Betsy; Mesquita, Pedro M.M.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Dawood, Hassan Y.; Fashemi, Titilayo; Chandra, Neelima; Rabe, Lorna; Cunningham, Tina D.; Anderson, Sharon; Schwartz, Jill; Doncel, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been linked to an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition and transmission in observational studies, but the underlying biological mechanisms are unknown. We measured biomarkers of subclinical vaginal inflammation, endogenous antimicrobial activity, and vaginal flora in women with BV and repeated sampling 1 week and 1 month after completion of metronidazole therapy. We also compared this cohort of women with BV to a healthy control cohort without BV. A longitudinal, open label study of 33 women with a Nugent score of 4 or higher was conducted. All women had genital swabs, cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) fluid, and cervicovaginal biopsies obtained at enrollment and received 7 days of metronidazole treatment. Repeat sampling was performed approximately 1 week and 1 month after completion of therapy. Participant's baseline samples were compared to a healthy, racially matched control group (n=13) without BV. The CVL from women with resolved BV (Nugent 0–3) had significantly higher anti-HIV activity, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and growth-related oncogene alpha (GRO-α) levels and their ectocervical tissues had significantly more CD8 cells in the epithelium. Women with persistent BV after treatment had significantly higher levels of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in the CVL. At study entry, participants had significantly greater numbers of CCR5+ immune cells and a higher CD4/CD8 ratio in ectocervical tissues prior to metronidazole treatment, compared to a racially matched cohort of women with a Nugent score of 0–3. These data indicate that BV is associated with changes in select soluble immune mediators, an increase in HIV target cells, and a reduction in endogenous antimicrobial activity, which may contribute to the increased risk of HIV acquisition. PMID:26204200

  4. gammadelta T cells link innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    While most T cells use a CD3-associated alpha/beta T cell receptor as antigen recognition structure, a second population of T cells expresses the alternative gamma/delta T cell receptor. gamma/delta T cells are a minor population in the peripheral blood but constitute a major population among intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Most gamma/delta T cells recognize ligands which are fundamentally different from the short peptides that are seen by alpha/beta T cells in the context of MHC class I or class II molecules. Thus, human Vdelta2 T cells recognize small bacterial phosphoantigens, alkylamines and synthetic aminobisphosphonates, whereas Vdelta1 T cells recognize stress-inducible MHC-related molecules MICA/B as well as several other ligands. At the functional level, gamma/delta T cells rapidly produce a variety of cytokines and usually exert potent cytotoxic activity, also towards many tumor cells. In this article, we discuss the role of gamma/delta T cells as a bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune system, based on the interpretation that gamma/delta T cells use their T cell receptor as a pattern recognition receptor. Our increasing understanding of the ligand recognition and activation mechanisms of gamma/delta T cells also opens new perspectives for the development of gamma/delta T cell-based immunotherapies.

  5. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, James K.; Harrington, Lucas B.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Engelman, Alan N.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30–40 base pair (bp) lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments1–6. The universally conserved Cas1–Cas2 integrase complex catalyzes spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases7–13. How the Cas1–Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33 nucleotide (nt) protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3′–OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo2–4. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1–Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci. PMID:26503043

  6. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Harrington, Lucas B; Kranzusch, Philip J; Engelman, Alan N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-11-26

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30-40-base-pair lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments. The universally conserved Cas1-Cas2 integrase complex catalyses spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases. How the Cas1-Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1-Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33-nucleotide protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3'-OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci.

  7. Histological Architecture Underlying Brain-Immune Cell-Cell Interactions and the Cerebral Response to Systemic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is now known to actively interact with the immune system under non-inflammatory conditions, the site of cell-cell interactions between brain parenchymal cells and immune cells has been an open question until recently. Studies by our and other groups have indicated that brain structures such as the leptomeninges, choroid plexus stroma and epithelium, attachments of choroid plexus, vascular endothelial cells, cells of the perivascular space, circumventricular organs, and astrocytic endfeet construct the histological architecture that provides a location for intercellular interactions between bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage cells and brain parenchymal cells under non-inflammatory conditions. This architecture also functions as the interface between the brain and the immune system, through which systemic inflammation-induced molecular events can be relayed to the brain parenchyma at early stages of systemic inflammation during which the blood-brain barrier is relatively preserved. Although brain microglia are well known to be activated by systemic inflammation, the mechanism by which systemic inflammatory challenge and microglial activation are connected has not been well documented. Perturbed brain-immune interaction underlies a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including ischemic brain injury, status epilepticus, repeated social defeat, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Proinflammatory status associated with cytokine imbalance is involved in autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and depression. In this article, we propose a mechanism connecting systemic inflammation, brain-immune interface cells, and brain parenchymal cells and discuss the relevance of basic studies of the mechanism to neurological disorders with a special emphasis on sepsis-associated encephalopathy and preterm brain injury.

  8. Histological Architecture Underlying Brain–Immune Cell–Cell Interactions and the Cerebral Response to Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is now known to actively interact with the immune system under non-inflammatory conditions, the site of cell–cell interactions between brain parenchymal cells and immune cells has been an open question until recently. Studies by our and other groups have indicated that brain structures such as the leptomeninges, choroid plexus stroma and epithelium, attachments of choroid plexus, vascular endothelial cells, cells of the perivascular space, circumventricular organs, and astrocytic endfeet construct the histological architecture that provides a location for intercellular interactions between bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage cells and brain parenchymal cells under non-inflammatory conditions. This architecture also functions as the interface between the brain and the immune system, through which systemic inflammation-induced molecular events can be relayed to the brain parenchyma at early stages of systemic inflammation during which the blood–brain barrier is relatively preserved. Although brain microglia are well known to be activated by systemic inflammation, the mechanism by which systemic inflammatory challenge and microglial activation are connected has not been well documented. Perturbed brain–immune interaction underlies a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including ischemic brain injury, status epilepticus, repeated social defeat, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Proinflammatory status associated with cytokine imbalance is involved in autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and depression. In this article, we propose a mechanism connecting systemic inflammation, brain–immune interface cells, and brain parenchymal cells and discuss the relevance of basic studies of the mechanism to neurological disorders with a special emphasis on sepsis-associated encephalopathy and preterm brain injury. PMID:28154566

  9. The role of tissue adaptation and graft size in immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hauben, Ehud; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Draghici, Elena; Nevo, Uri

    2007-11-01

    Understanding how immune tolerance is induced and maintained is critical for our approach to immune-related diseases. Ecoimmunity is a new theory that views the immune system-tissue interaction as a co-adapting predator-prey system. Ecoimmunity suggests that tissues adapt to the selective immune pressure during ontogeny and throughout life. Therefore, immune tolerance towards 'self' represents a symmetric balance between the propensity of the immune system to prey on 'self' cells, and the tissue's specific capacity to undergo phenotypic adaptations in order to avoid destructive immune interaction. According to this theory, we hypothesized that tissues of adult immune-deficient mice, which are not exposed to selective immune pressure, will not withstand immune activity and will therefore display higher susceptibility to graft rejection. To test this prediction, C57Bl/6 wild type female mice were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin and transplanted with syngeneic pancreatic islets isolated from either immune-deficient C57Bl/6 SCID or wild type females. Remarkably, recipients of islet grafts from immune-deficient syngeneic donors displayed significantly impaired glucose homeostasis compared to mice transplanted with islets of wild type donors (p<0.001, two way repeated measures ANOVA). The severity of this impairment was correlated with islet graft size, suggesting a capacity of transplanted islets to gradually acquire a tolerogenic phenotype. These findings support the view of graft survival that is based on 'natural selection' of tissue cells. In addition, we describe a new experimental system for molecular characterization of self-tolerance.

  10. Molecular visualizing and quantifying immune-associated peroxynitrite fluxes in phagocytes and mouse inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Zan; Yan, Shi-Hai; Chen, Chen; Geng, Zhi-Rong; Chang, Jia-Yin; Chen, Chun-Xia; Huang, Bing-Huan; Wang, Zhi-Lin

    2017-04-15

    Reactions of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) with biomolecules can lead to cytotoxic and cytoprotective events. Due to the difficulty of directly and unambiguously measuring its levels, most of the beneficial effects associated with ONOO(-) in vivo remain controversial or poorly characterized. Recently, optical imaging has served as a powerful noninvasive approach to studying ONOO(-) in living systems. However, ratiometric probes for ONOO(-) are currently lacking. Herein, we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of F482, a novel fluorescence indicator that relies on ONOO(-)-induced diene oxidation. The remarkable sensitivity, selectivity, and photostability of F482 enabled us to visualize basal ONOO(-) in immune-stimulated phagocyte cells and quantify its generation in phagosomes by high-throughput flow cytometry analysis. With the aid of in vivo ONOO(-) imaging in a mouse inflammation model assisted by F482, we envision that F482 will find widespread applications in the study of the ONOO(-) biology associated with physiological and pathological processes in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Circulating Biomarkers of Immune Activation, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Characterize Severe Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Manuela S.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Abbehusen, Melissa Moura Costa; Teixeira, Clarissa R.; Khouri, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Kamhawi, Shaden; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Borges, Valeria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Brodskyn, Claudia Ida

    2016-01-01

    Clinical manifestations in canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) have not been clearly associated with immunological status or disease progression. We simultaneously assessed biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, oxidative stress, and anti-sand fly saliva IgG concentrations in dog sera with different clinical manifestations to characterize a biosignature associated with CVL severity. In a cross-sectional exploratory study, a random population of 70 dogs from an endemic area in Brazil was classified according to CVL clinical severity and parasitological evaluation. A panel of biomarkers and anti–sand fly saliva IgG were measured in canine sera. Assessment of protein expression of profile biomarkers identified a distinct biosignature that could cluster separately animal groups with different clinical scores. Increasing severity scores were associated with a gradual decrease of LTB4 and PGE2, and a gradual increase in CXCL1 and CCL2. Discriminant analyses revealed that combined assessment of LTB4, PGE2 and CXCL1 was able to distinguish dogs with different clinical scores. Dogs with the highest clinical score values also exhibited high parasite loads and higher concentrations of anti-saliva antibodies. Our findings suggest CVL clinical severity is tightly associated with a distinct inflammatory profile hallmarked by a differential expression of circulating eicosanoids and chemokines. PMID:27595802

  12. Neutrophil heterogeneity in health and disease: a revitalized avenue in inflammation and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beyrau, Martina; Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2012-01-01

    Leucocytes form the principal cellular components of immunity and inflammation, existing as multiple subsets defined by distinct phenotypic and functional profiles. To date, this has most notably been documented for lymphocytes and monocytes. In contrast, as neutrophils are traditionally considered, to be short-lived, terminally differentiated cells that do not re-circulate, the potential existence of distinct neutrophil subsets with functional and phenotypic heterogeneity has not been widely considered or explored. A growing body of evidence is now challenging this scenario, and there is significant evidence for the existence of different neutrophil subsets under both physiological and pathological conditions. This review will summarize the key findings that have triggered a renewed interest in neutrophil phenotypic changes, both in terms of functional implications and consequences within disease models. Special emphasis will be placed on the potential pro- and anti-inflammatory roles of neutrophil subsets, as indicated by the recent works in models of ischaemia–reperfusion injury, trauma, cancer and sepsis. PMID:23226600

  13. Circulating Biomarkers of Immune Activation, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Characterize Severe Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Manuela S; Andrade, Bruno B; Abbehusen, Melissa Moura Costa; Teixeira, Clarissa R; Khouri, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Borges, Valeria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Brodskyn, Claudia Ida

    2016-09-06

    Clinical manifestations in canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) have not been clearly associated with immunological status or disease progression. We simultaneously assessed biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, oxidative stress, and anti-sand fly saliva IgG concentrations in dog sera with different clinical manifestations to characterize a biosignature associated with CVL severity. In a cross-sectional exploratory study, a random population of 70 dogs from an endemic area in Brazil was classified according to CVL clinical severity and parasitological evaluation. A panel of biomarkers and anti-sand fly saliva IgG were measured in canine sera. Assessment of protein expression of profile biomarkers identified a distinct biosignature that could cluster separately animal groups with different clinical scores. Increasing severity scores were associated with a gradual decrease of LTB4 and PGE2, and a gradual increase in CXCL1 and CCL2. Discriminant analyses revealed that combined assessment of LTB4, PGE2 and CXCL1 was able to distinguish dogs with different clinical scores. Dogs with the highest clinical score values also exhibited high parasite loads and higher concentrations of anti-saliva antibodies. Our findings suggest CVL clinical severity is tightly associated with a distinct inflammatory profile hallmarked by a differential expression of circulating eicosanoids and chemokines.

  14. An immune-inflammation gene expression signature in prostate tumors of smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ming; Tang, Wei; Luo, Jun; Dorsey, Tiffany H.; Stagliano, Katherine E.; Gillespie, John W.; Hudson, Robert S.; Terunuma, Atsushi; Shoe, Jennifer L.; Haines, Diana C.; Yfantis, Harris G.; Han, Misop; Martin, Damali N.; Jordan, Symone V.; Borin, James F.; Naslund, Michael J.; Alexander, Richard B.; Stephens, Robert M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Lee, Dong H.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Ambs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Smokers develop metastatic prostate cancer more frequently than nonsmokers, suggesting that a tobacco-derived factor is driving metastatic progression. To identify smoking-induced alterations in human prostate cancer, we analyzed gene and protein expression patterns in tumors collected from current, past, and never smokers. By this route, we elucidated a distinct pattern of molecular alterations characterized by an immune and inflammation signature in tumors from current smokers that were either attenuated or absent in past and never smokers. Specifically, this signature included elevated immunoglobulin expression by tumor-infiltrating B cells, NF-κB activation, and increased chemokine expression. In an alternate approach to characterize smoking-induced oncogenic alterations, we also explored the effects of nicotine in human prostate cancer cells and prostate cancer-prone TRAMP mice. These investigations showed that nicotine increased glutamine consumption and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro and accelerated metastatic progression in tumor-bearing TRAMP mice. Overall, our findings suggested that nicotine was sufficient to induce a phenotype resembling the epidemiology of smoking-associated prostate cancer progression, illuminating a novel candidate driver underlying metastatic prostate cancer in current smokers. PMID:26719530

  15. Basic biology and role of interleukin-17 in immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zenobia, Camille; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17, also known as IL-17A) is a key cytokine that links T cell activation to neutrophil mobilization and activation. As such, IL-17 can mediate protective innate immunity to pathogens or contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes the basic biology of IL-17 and discusses its emerging role in periodontal disease. The current burden of evidence from human and animal model studies suggests that the net effect of IL-17 signaling promotes disease development. In addition to promoting neutrophilic inflammation, IL-17 has potent pro-osteoclastogenic effects that are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases involving bone immunopathology. Systemic treatments with anti-IL-17 biologics have shown promising results in clinical trials for psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, although their impact on the highly prevalent periodontal disease has not been investigated or reported. Future clinical trials, preferably using locally administered IL-17 blockers, are required to conclusively implicate IL-17 in periodontitis and, more importantly, to establish an effective adjunctive treatment for this oral inflammatory disease. PMID:26252407

  16. "Inflamm-aging" influences immune cell survival factors in human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Pangrazzi, Luca; Meryk, Andreas; Naismith, Erin; Koziel, Rafal; Lair, Julian; Krismer, Martin; Trieb, Klemens; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2017-03-01

    The bone marrow (BM) plays a key role in the long-term maintenance of immunological memory. However, the impact of aging on the production of survival factors for effector/memory T cells and plasma cells in the human BM has not been studied. We now show that the expression of molecules involved in the maintenance of immunological memory in the human BM changes with age. While IL-15, which protects potentially harmful CD8(+) CD28(-) senescent T cells, increases, IL-7 decreases. IL-6, which may synergize with IL-15, is also overexpressed. In contrast, a proliferation-inducing ligand, a plasma cell survival factor, is reduced. IFN-y, TNF, and ROS accumulate in the BM in old age. IL-15 and IL-6 expression are stimulated by IFN-y and correlate with ROS levels in BM mononuclear cells. Both cytokines are reduced by incubation with the ROS scavengers N-acetylcysteine and vitamin C. IL-15 and IL-6 are also overexpressed in the BM of superoxide dismutase 1 knockout mice compared to their WT counterparts. In summary, our results demonstrate the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in age-related changes of immune cell survival factors in the BM, suggesting that antioxidants may be beneficial in counteracting immunosenescence by improving immunological memory in old age.

  17. Immunology and Homeopathy. 2. Cells of the Immune System and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Conforti, Anita; Pontarollo, Francesco; Ortolani, Riccardo

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe the results of some experimental laboratory studies aimed at verifying the efficacy of high dilutions of substances and of homeopathic medicines in models of inflammation and immunity. Studies carried out on basophils, lymphocytes, granulocytes and fibroblasts are reviewed. This approach may help to test under controlled conditions the main principles of homeopathy such as ‘similarity’ of drug action at the cellular level and the effects of dilution/dynamization on the drug activity. The current situation is that few and rather small groups are working on laboratory models for homeopathy. Regarding the interpretation of data in view of the simile principle, we observe that there are different levels of similarity and that the laboratory data give support to this principle, but have not yet yielded the ultimate answer to the action mechanism of homeopathy. Evidence of the biological activity in vitro of highly diluted-dynamized solutions is slowly accumulating, with some conflicting reports. It is our hope that this review of literature unknown to most people will give an original and useful insight into the ‘state-of-the-art’ of homeopathy, without final conclusions ‘for’ or ‘against’ this modality. This kind of uncertainty may be difficult to accept, but is conceivably the most open-minded position now. PMID:16550219

  18. Mouse model of intrauterine inflammation: sex-specific differences in long-term neurologic and immune sequelae.

    PubMed

    Dada, Tahani; Rosenzweig, Jason M; Al Shammary, Mofeedah; Firdaus, Wance; Al Rebh, Shorouq; Borbiev, Talaibek; Tekes, Aylin; Zhang, Jiangyang; Alqahtani, Eman; Mori, Susumu; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Johnston, Michael V; Burd, Irina

    2014-05-01

    Preterm infants, especially those that are exposed to prenatal intrauterine infection or inflammation, are at a major risk for adverse neurological outcomes, including cognitive, motor and behavioral disabilities. We have previously shown in a mouse model that there is an acute fetal brain insult associated with intrauterine inflammation. The objectives of this study were: (1) to elucidate long-term (into adolescence and adulthood) neurological outcomes by assessing neurobehavioral development, MRI, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry of cells of immune origin and (2) to determine whether there are any sex-specific differences in brain development associated with intrauterine inflammation. Our results have shown that prenatal exposure appeared to lead to changes in MRI and behavior patterns throughout the neonatal period and during adulthood. Furthermore, we observed chronic brain inflammation in the offspring, with persistence of microglial activation and increased numbers of macrophages in the brain, ultimately resulting in neuronal loss. Moreover, our study highlights the sex-specific differences in long-term sequelae. This study, while extending the growing literature of adverse neurologic outcomes following exposure to inflammation during early development, presents novel findings in the context of intrauterine inflammation.

  19. The role of adaptive immunity as an ecological filter on the gut microbiota in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stagaman, Keaton; Burns, Adam R; Guillemin, Karen; Bohannan, Brendan Jm

    2017-03-17

    All animals live in intimate association with communities of microbes, collectively referred to as their microbiota. Certain host traits can influence which microbial taxa comprise the microbiota. One potentially important trait in vertebrate animals is the adaptive immune system, which has been hypothesized to act as an ecological filter, promoting the presence of some microbial taxa over others. Here we surveyed the intestinal microbiota of 68 wild-type zebrafish, with functional adaptive immunity, and 61 rag1(-) zebrafish, lacking functional B- and T-cell receptors, to test the role of adaptive immunity as an ecological filter on the intestinal microbiota. In addition, we tested the robustness of adaptive immunity's filtering effects to host-host interaction by comparing the microbiota of fish populations segregated by genotype to those containing both genotypes. The presence of adaptive immunity individualized the gut microbiota and decreased the contributions of neutral processes to gut microbiota assembly. Although mixing genotypes led to increased phylogenetic diversity in each, there was no significant effect of adaptive immunity on gut microbiota composition in either housing condition. Interestingly, the most robust effect on microbiota composition was co-housing within a tank. In all, these results suggest that adaptive immunity has a role as an ecological filter of the zebrafish gut microbiota, but it can be overwhelmed by other factors, including transmission of microbes among hosts.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 17 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.28.

  20. Liver Fibrosis and Mechanisms of the Protective Action of Medicinal Plants Targeting Inflammation and the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.; González-Garza, María Teresa; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a central feature of liver fibrosis as suggested by its role in the activation of hepatic stellate cells leading to extracellular matrix deposition. During liver injury, inflammatory cells are recruited in the injurious site through chemokines attraction. Thus, inflammation could be a target to reduce liver fibrosis. The pandemic trend of obesity, combined with the high incidence of alcohol intake and viral hepatitis infections, highlights the urgent need to find accessible antifibrotic therapies. Medicinal plants are achieving popularity as antifibrotic agents, supported by their safety, cost-effectiveness, and versatility. The aim of this review is to describe the role of inflammation and the immune response in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and detail the mechanisms of inhibition of both events by medicinal plants in order to reduce liver fibrosis. PMID:25954568

  1. Role of Vanadium in Cellular and Molecular Immunology: Association with Immune-Related Inflammation and Pharmacotoxicology Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tsave, Olga; Petanidis, Savvas; Kioseoglou, Efrosini; Yavropoulou, Maria P.; Yovos, John G.; Anestakis, Doxakis; Tsepa, Androniki; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, a diverse spectrum of vanadium compounds has arisen as anti-inflammatory therapeutic metallodrugs targeting various diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that select well-defined vanadium species are involved in many immune-driven molecular mechanisms that regulate and influence immune responses. In addition, advances in cell immunotherapy have relied on the use of metallodrugs to create a “safe,” highly regulated, environment for optimal control of immune response. Emerging findings include optimal regulation of B/T cell signaling and expression of immune suppressive or anti-inflammatory cytokines, critical for immune cell effector functions. Furthermore, in-depth perusals have explored NF-κB and Toll-like receptor signaling mechanisms in order to enhance adaptive immune responses and promote recruitment or conversion of inflammatory cells to immunodeficient tissues. Consequently, well-defined vanadium metallodrugs, poised to access and resensitize the immune microenvironment, interact with various biomolecular targets, such as B cells, T cells, interleukin markers, and transcription factors, thereby influencing and affecting immune signaling. A synthetically formulated and structure-based (bio)chemical reactivity account of vanadoforms emerges as a plausible strategy for designing drugs characterized by selectivity and specificity, with respect to the cellular molecular targets intimately linked to immune responses, thereby giving rise to a challenging field linked to the development of immune system vanadodrugs. PMID:27190573

  2. Role of Vanadium in Cellular and Molecular Immunology: Association with Immune-Related Inflammation and Pharmacotoxicology Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tsave, Olga; Petanidis, Savvas; Kioseoglou, Efrosini; Yavropoulou, Maria P; Yovos, John G; Anestakis, Doxakis; Tsepa, Androniki; Salifoglou, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, a diverse spectrum of vanadium compounds has arisen as anti-inflammatory therapeutic metallodrugs targeting various diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that select well-defined vanadium species are involved in many immune-driven molecular mechanisms that regulate and influence immune responses. In addition, advances in cell immunotherapy have relied on the use of metallodrugs to create a "safe," highly regulated, environment for optimal control of immune response. Emerging findings include optimal regulation of B/T cell signaling and expression of immune suppressive or anti-inflammatory cytokines, critical for immune cell effector functions. Furthermore, in-depth perusals have explored NF-κB and Toll-like receptor signaling mechanisms in order to enhance adaptive immune responses and promote recruitment or conversion of inflammatory cells to immunodeficient tissues. Consequently, well-defined vanadium metallodrugs, poised to access and resensitize the immune microenvironment, interact with various biomolecular targets, such as B cells, T cells, interleukin markers, and transcription factors, thereby influencing and affecting immune signaling. A synthetically formulated and structure-based (bio)chemical reactivity account of vanadoforms emerges as a plausible strategy for designing drugs characterized by selectivity and specificity, with respect to the cellular molecular targets intimately linked to immune responses, thereby giving rise to a challenging field linked to the development of immune system vanadodrugs.

  3. Coordinate actions of innate immune responses oppose those of the adaptive immune system during Salmonella infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Hotson, Andrew N; Gopinath, Smita; Nicolau, Monica; Khasanova, Anna; Finck, Rachel; Monack, Denise; Nolan, Garry P

    2016-01-12

    The immune system enacts a coordinated response when faced with complex environmental and pathogenic perturbations. We used the heterogeneous responses of mice to persistent Salmonella infection to model system-wide coordination of the immune response to bacterial burden. We hypothesized that the variability in outcomes of bacterial growth and immune response across genetically identical mice could be used to identify immune elements that serve as integrators enabling co-regulation and interconnectedness of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Correlation analysis of immune response variation to Salmonella infection linked bacterial load with at least four discrete, interacting functional immune response "cassettes." One of these, the innate cassette, in the chronically infected mice included features of the innate immune system, systemic neutrophilia, and high serum concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. Compared with mice with a moderate bacterial load, mice with the highest bacterial burden exhibited high activity of this innate cassette, which was associated with a dampened activity of the adaptive T cell cassette-with fewer plasma cells and CD4(+) T helper 1 cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells-and with a dampened activity of the cytokine signaling cassette. System-wide manipulation of neutrophil numbers revealed that neutrophils regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling in B cells during infection. Thus, a network-level approach demonstrated unappreciated interconnections that balanced innate and adaptive immune responses during the dynamic course of disease and identified signals associated with pathogen transmission status, as well as a regulatory role for neutrophils in cytokine signaling.

  4. Monocyte and plasma expression of TAM ligand and receptor in renal failure: Links to unregulated immunity and chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Iris J; Hilliard, Brendan A; Ulas, Mehriban; Yu, Daohai; Vangala, Chandan; Rao, Swati; Lee, Jean; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Cohen, Philip L

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Specific immune mechanisms and pathways that drive and maintain chronic inflammation in CKD are not well described. The TAM ligands (Gas6 and protein S) and receptors (Axl and Mer) have been recently recognized as playing a prominent role in immune regulation. The receptors exist in both soluble and cell-bound forms; the soluble receptors (sAxl and sMer) are believed to compete with the bound receptors and thus inhibit their function. In this study, we determined the expression of cell-bound and soluble TAM proteins in patients with CKD. CKD patients had significantly lower expression of Mer in monocytes, yet increased expression of soluble TAM receptors sAxl and sMer in plasma compared to controls. The metalloproteinase ADAM 17, responsible for cleavage of Mer to its soluble form, was increased in patient monocytes. Elevated levels of soluble TAM receptors were more evident in patients with progressive renal failure. These observations suggest that functional deficiency of TAM receptor-mediated regulation of inflammation may contribute to chronic inflammation in patients with CKD.

  5. Innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Thomas F; Schreiber, Hans; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Most tumor cells express antigens that can mediate recognition by host CD8+ T cells. Cancers that are detected clinically must have evaded antitumor immune responses to grow progressively. Recent work has suggested two broad categories of tumor escape based on cellular and molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. One major subset shows a T cell–inflamed phenotype consisting of infiltrating T cells, a broad chemokine profile and a type I interferon signature indicative of innate immune activation. These tumors appear to resist immune attack through the dominant inhibitory effects of immune system–suppressive pathways. The other major phenotype lacks this T cell–inflamed phenotype and appears to resist immune attack through immune system exclusion or ignorance. These two major phenotypes of tumor microenvironment may require distinct immunotherapeutic interventions for maximal therapeutic effect. PMID:24048123

  6. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Reveals a Novel Regulatory Role for Galectin-3 in the Interface of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Silva, Neide M.; Ruas, Luciana Pereira; Mineo, Jose Roberto; Loyola, Adriano Motta; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Chammas, Roger; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    In attempts to investigate the role of galectin-3 in innate immunity, we studied galectin-3-deficient (gal3−/−) mice with regard to their response to Toxoplasma gondii infection, which is characterized by inflammation in affected organs, Th-1-polarized immune response, and accumulation of cysts in the central nervous system. In wild-type (gal3+/+) mice, infected orally, galectin-3 was highly expressed in the leukocytes infiltrating the intestines, liver, lungs, and brain. Compared with gal3+/+, infected gal3−/− mice developed reduced inflammatory response in all of these organs but the lungs. Brain of gal3−/− mice displayed a significantly reduced number of infiltrating monocytes/macrophages and CD8+ cells and a higher parasite burden. Furthermore, gal3−/− mice mounted a higher Th1-polarized response and had comparable survival rates on peroral T. gondii infection, even though they were more susceptible to intraperitoneal infection. Interestingly, splenic cells and purified CD11c+ dendritic cells from gal3−/− mice produced higher amounts of interleukin-12 than cells from gal3+/+ mice, possibly explaining the higher Th1 response verified in the gal3−/− mice. We conclude that galectin-3 exerts an important role in innate immunity, including not only a pro-inflammatory effect but also a regulatory role on dendritic cells, capable of interfering in the adaptive immune response. PMID:16723706

  8. Malnutrition and inflammation-"burning down the house": inflammation as an adaptive physiologic response versus self-destruction?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gordon L

    2015-01-01

    A summary of my 2014 Rhoads Lecture is presented that explores our progress in understanding the complex interplay of malnutrition and inflammation. A historical perspective is provided that highlights the contributions of some of the key pioneers in the nutrition assessment field. Advances in agriculture, education, public health, healthcare, and living standards have affected traditional settings for malnutrition. The chronic disease, surgery, and injury conditions that are associated with modern healthcare are becoming prevalent settings for malnutrition. One consequence has been a growing appreciation for the contributions of inflammation to malnutrition in these clinical conditions. This recognition has driven a fresh look at how we define and think about malnutrition syndromes. An inflammatory component is included in the definitions suggested by the recent Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition consensus report that also describes characteristics recommended for the identification and documentation of malnutrition. Efforts are currently underway to evaluate the feasibility and validity of this approach. Recent advances in research highlight the profound impact of inflammation-mediated erosion of muscle mass on clinical outcomes. Research to identify better biomarkers of inflammation and malnutrition must be a leading priority. New "omics" approaches are an especially promising avenue of biomarker investigation. Inflammation can be a good thing; let's try to keep it that way.

  9. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  10. Neonatal Immune Adaptation of the Gut and Its Role during Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal tract is engaged in a relationship with a dense and complex microbial ecosystem, the microbiota. The establishment of this symbiosis is essential for host physiology, metabolism, and immune homeostasis. Because newborns are essentially sterile, the first exposure to microorganisms and environmental endotoxins during the neonatal period is followed by a crucial sequence of active events leading to immune tolerance and homeostasis. Contact with potent immunostimulatory molecules starts immediately at birth, and the discrimination between commensal bacteria and invading pathogens is essential to avoid an inappropriate immune stimulation and/or host infection. The dysregulation of these tight interactions between host and microbiota can be responsible for important health disorders, including inflammation and sepsis. This review summarizes the molecular events leading to the establishment of postnatal immune tolerance and how pathogens can avoid host immunity and induce neonatal infections and sepsis. PMID:23737810

  11. Impact of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins on immune modulation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sachin; Kaufmann, Thomas; Biswas, Subhrajit

    2016-11-08

    The routes leading to programmed cell death are as tightly regulated as those of cellular growth and proliferation, and a finely synchronized balance between the life and death of cells ensures proper organ size and function. Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) proteins were initially characterized by their ability to directly bind and inhibit apoptotic caspases. However, recent studies have clarified that IAPs are much more functionally versatile, modulating a vast range of signaling pathways that have an impact on antimicrobial responses, tumorigenesis, metastasis and cellular migration. A significant contribution of IAPs in tumorigenesis is their inherent function as E3 ubiquitin ligases to modulate cellular signaling downstream of death receptors or certain pattern recognition receptors. In this review, we focus on modulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, macrophage plasticity and inflammatory responses by IAP family members. We also explore the rationale to target IAPs pharmacologically for the treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases and cancer.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 8 November 2016; doi:10.1038/icb.2016.101.

  12. The adaptive immune system restrains Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis by modulating microglial function.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Samuel E; Abud, Edsel M; Lakatos, Anita; Karimzadeh, Alborz; Yeung, Stephen T; Davtyan, Hayk; Fote, Gianna M; Lau, Lydia; Weinger, Jason G; Lane, Thomas E; Inlay, Matthew A; Poon, Wayne W; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2016-03-01

    The innate immune system is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast, the role of adaptive immunity in AD remains largely unknown. However, numerous clinical trials are testing vaccination strategies for AD, suggesting that T and B cells play a pivotal role in this disease. To test the hypothesis that adaptive immunity influences AD pathogenesis, we generated an immune-deficient AD mouse model that lacks T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells. The resulting "Rag-5xfAD" mice exhibit a greater than twofold increase in β-amyloid (Aβ) pathology. Gene expression analysis of the brain implicates altered innate and adaptive immune pathways, including changes in cytokine/chemokine signaling and decreased Ig-mediated processes. Neuroinflammation is also greatly exacerbated in Rag-5xfAD mice as indicated by a shift in microglial phenotype, increased cytokine production, and reduced phagocytic capacity. In contrast, immune-intact 5xfAD mice exhibit elevated levels of nonamyloid reactive IgGs in association with microglia, and treatment of Rag-5xfAD mice or microglial cells with preimmune IgG enhances Aβ clearance. Last, we performed bone marrow transplantation studies in Rag-5xfAD mice, revealing that replacement of these missing adaptive immune populations can dramatically reduce AD pathology. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that adaptive immune cell populations play an important role in restraining AD pathology. In contrast, depletion of B cells and their appropriate activation by T cells leads to a loss of adaptive-innate immunity cross talk and accelerated disease progression.

  13. The Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Chronic Inflammation, Immune Activation, and Comorbidities Associated with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki; Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Chini, Maria; Lazanas, Marios C.; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular disease has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among people with treated HIV-1, but the pathogenesis is unclear. Platelet-activating factor is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that has immunomodulatory effects and a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular disease. Limited scientific evidence suggests that the platelet-activating factor pathway may be a mechanistic link between HIV-1 infection, systemic inflammation, and immune activation that contribute to pathogenesis of chronic HIV-related comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which the cross-talk between HIV-1, immune dysregulation, inflammation, and perturbations in the platelet-activating factor pathway may directly affect HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. Understanding the role of platelet-activating factor in HIV-1 infection may pave the way for further studies to explore therapeutic interventions, such as diet, that can modify platelet-activating factor activity and use of platelet-activating factor inhibitors that might improve the prognosis of HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:26616844

  14. CXCL10-Mediates Macrophage, but not Other Innate Immune Cells-Associated Inflammation in Murine Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Kyoko; Freeman, Brittany L.; Bronk, Steven F.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; White, Thomas A.; Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an inflammatory lipotoxic disorder, but how inflammatory cells are recruited and activated within the liver is still unclear. We previously reported that lipotoxic hepatocytes release CXCL10-enriched extracellular vesicles, which are potently chemotactic for cells of the innate immune system. In the present study, we sought to determine the innate immune cell involved in the inflammatory response in murine NASH and the extent to which inhibition of the chemotactic ligand CXCL10 and its cognate receptor CXCR3 could attenuate liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. C57BL/6J CXCL10−/−, CXCR3−/− and wild type (WT) mice were fed chow or high saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (FFC) diet. FFC-fed CXCL10−/− and WT mice displayed similar weight gain, metabolic profile, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. In contrast, compared to the WT mice, FFC-fed CXCL10−/− mice had significantly attenuated liver inflammation, injury and fibrosis. Genetic deletion of CXCL10 reduced FFC-induced proinflammatory hepatic macrophage infiltration, while natural killer cells, natural killer T cells, neutrophils and dendritic cells hepatic infiltration were not significantly affected. Our results suggest that CXCL10−/− mice are protected against diet-induced NASH, in an obesity-independent manner. Macrophage-associated inflammation appears to be the key player in the CXCL10-mediated sterile inflammatory response in murine NASH. PMID:27349927

  15. Daily cholecalciferol supplementation during pregnancy alters markers of regulatory immunity, inflammation, and clinical outcomes in a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in pregnancy and has been associated with adverse health conditions for mothers and infants. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy may support maintenance of pregnancy by its effects on adaptive and innate immunity. We assessed the effects of vitamin D supplement...

  16. Prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of innate and adaptive immunity against mucosal infection of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Eo, Seong Kug

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common cause of genital ulceration in humans worldwide. Typically, HSV-1 and 2 infections via mucosal route result in a lifelong latent infection after peripheral replication in mucosal tissues, thereby providing potential transmission to neighbor hosts in response to reactivation. To break the transmission cycle, immunoprophylactics and therapeutic strategies must be focused on prevention of infection or reduction of infectivity at mucosal sites. Currently, our understanding of the immune responses against mucosal infection of HSV remains intricate and involves a balance between innate signaling pathways and the adaptive immune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HSV mucosal infection induces type I interferons (IFN) via recognition of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and activates multiple immune cell populations, including NK cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs. This innate immune response is required not only for the early control of viral replication at mucosal sites, but also for establishing adaptive immune responses against HSV antigens. Although the contribution of humoral immune response is controversial, CD4(+) Th1 T cells producing IFN-γ are believed to play an important role in eradicating virus from the hosts. In addition, the recent experimental successes of immunoprophylactic and therapeutic compounds that enhance resistance and/or reduce viral burden at mucosal sites have accumulated. This review focuses on attempts to modulate innate and adaptive immunity against HSV mucosal infection for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses. Thus, we summarized the current evidence of various immune mediators in response to mucosal HSV infection, focusing on the importance of innate immune responses.

  17. Ebola Virus Altered Innate and Adaptive Immune Response Signalling Pathways: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) arise attention for their impressive lethality by the poor immune response and high inflammatory reaction in the patients. It causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%. The mechanism underlying this lethal outcome is poorly understood. In 2014, a major outbreak of Ebola virus spread amongst several African countries, including Leone, Sierra, and Guinea. Although infections only occur frequently in Central Africa, but the virus has the potential to spread globally. Presently, there is no vaccine or treatment is available to counteract Ebola virus infections due to poor understanding of its interaction with the immune system. Accumulating evidence indicates that the virus actively alters both innate and adaptive immune responses and triggers harmful inflammatory responses. In the literature, some reports have shown that alteration of immune signaling pathways could be due to the ability of EBOV to interfere with dendritic cells (DCs), which link innate and adaptive immune responses. On the other hand, some reports have demonstrated that EBOV, VP35 proteins act as interferon antagonists. So, how the Ebola virus altered the innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways is still an open question for the researcher to be explored. Thus, in this review, I try to summarize the mechanisms of the alteration of innate and adaptive immune response signaling pathways by Ebola virus which will be helpful for designing effective drugs or vaccines against this lethal infection. Further, potential targets, current treatment and novel therapeutic approaches have also been discussed.

  18. Isoliquiritigenin Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation in vitro and Adipose Tissue Fibrosis through Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuharu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroe; Okamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Seiji; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Tanaka, Miyako; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILG) is a flavonoid derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and potently suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation resulting in the improvement of diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation. However, whether ILG affects other pathways besides the inflammasome in adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. We here show that ILG suppresses adipose tissue inflammation by affecting the paracrine loop containing saturated fatty acids and TNF-α by using a co-culture composed of adipocytes and macrophages. ILG suppressed inflammatory changes induced by the co-culture through inhibition of NF-κB activation. This effect was independent of either inhibition of inflammasome activation or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Moreover, ILG suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of adipocytes, coincident with inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Additionally, TNF-α-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation under insulin signaling was alleviated by ILG in adipocytes. ILG suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of macrophages, with decreasing the level of phosphorylated Jnk expression. Intriguingly, ILG improved high fat diet-induced fibrosis in adipose tissue in vivo. Finally, ILG inhibited TLR4- or Mincle-stimulated expression of fibrosis-related genes in stromal vascular fraction from obese adipose tissue and macrophages in vitro. Thus, ILG can suppress adipose tissue inflammation by both inflammasome-dependent and -independent manners and attenuate adipose tissue fibrosis by targeting innate immune sensors. PMID:26975571

  19. Immune Response to Tissue Restricted Self-Antigens Induces Airway Inflammation and Fibrosis Following Murine Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, V.; Ramachandran, S.; Banan, B.; Bharat, A.; Wang, X.; Benshoff, N.; Kreisel, D.; Gelman, A. E.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses against lung-associated self-antigens (self-Ags) are hypothesized to play a role in the development of chronic lung graft rejection. We determined whether immune responses to lung self-Ags, K-alpha-1-tubulin (Kα1T) and Collagen V (Col-V) in the absence of alloimmunity, could promote airway inflammation and fibrosis. Following syngeneic murine orthotopic lung transplantation (LTx) we administered antibodies (Abs) to either Kα1T or Col-V or in combination to both of these self-Ags. As compared to recipients of isotype control Abs Kα1T Abs and/or Col-V Abs-treated recipients had marked lung graft cellular infiltration and bronchiolar fibrosis, This inflammation was also associated the accumulation of Kα1T and Col-V specific IFN-γ+ and IL-17+ T cells. Notably, the administration of Abs to Kα1T led to cellular and humoral immune responses to Col-V prior to development of fibrosis, and vice versa, indicating that epitope spreading can occur rapidly in an alloantigen independent manner. Collectively, these data support a model of chronic lung transplant rejection where the progressive loss of self-tolerance through epitope spreading promotes airway fibrosis. Strategies that target autoreactive Abs may be useful to inhibit chronic rejection of lung grafts. PMID:25220332

  20. Clec4A4 is a regulatory receptor for dendritic cells that impairs inflammation and T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uto, Tomofumi; Fukaya, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hideaki; Arimura, Keiichi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kojima, Naoya; Malissen, Bernard; Sato, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise several subsets that are critically involved in the initiation and regulation of immunity. Clec4A4/DC immunoreceptor 2 (DCIR2) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) exclusively expressed on CD8α− conventional DCs (cDCs). However, how Clec4A4 controls immune responses through regulation of the function of CD8α− cDCs remains unclear. Here we show that Clec4A4 is a regulatory receptor for the activation of CD8α− cDCs that impairs inflammation and T-cell immunity. Clec4a4−/−CD8α− cDCs show enhanced cytokine production and T-cell priming following Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated activation. Furthermore, Clec4a4−/− mice exhibit TLR-mediated hyperinflammation. On antigenic immunization, Clec4a4−/− mice show not only augmented T-cell responses but also progressive autoimmune pathogenesis. Conversely, Clec4a4−/− mice exhibit resistance to microbial infection, accompanied by enhanced T-cell responses against microbes. Thus, our findings highlight roles of Clec4A4 in regulation of the function of CD8α− cDCs for control of the magnitude and quality of immune response. PMID:27068492

  1. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non obese humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-cen...

  2. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  3. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, YuFeng; Martin, David A; Kenkel, Justin; Zhang, Kang; Ogden, Carol Anne; Elkon, Keith B.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system is constantly exposed to dying cells, most of which arise during central tolerance and from effete circulating immune cells. Under homeostatic conditions, phagocytes (predominantly macrophages and dendritic cells) belonging to the innate immune system, rapidly ingest cells and their debris. Apoptotic cell removal requires recognition of altered self on the apoptotic membrane, a process which is facilitated by natural antibodies and serum opsonins. Recognition, may be site and context specific. Uptake and ingestion of apoptotic cells promotes an immunosuppressive environment that avoids inflammatory responses to self antigens. However, it does not preclude a T cell response and it is likely that constant exposure to self antigen, particularly by immature dendritic cells, leads to T cell tolerance. Tolerance occurs by several different mechanisms including anergy and deletion (for CD8+ T cells) and induction of T regulatory cells (for CD4+ T cells). Failed apoptotic cell clearance promotes immune responses to self antigens, especially when the cellular contents are leaked from the cell (necrosis). Inflammatory responses may be induced by nucleic acid stimulation of toll like receptors and other immune sensors, specific intracellular proteins and non protein (uric acid) stimulation of inflammasomes. PMID:17888627

  4. The adaptive immune system restrains Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis by modulating microglial function

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Edsel M.; Lakatos, Anita; Karimzadeh, Alborz; Yeung, Stephen T.; Davtyan, Hayk; Fote, Gianna M.; Lau, Lydia; Weinger, Jason G.; Lane, Thomas E.; Inlay, Matthew A.; Poon, Wayne W.; Blurton-Jones, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In contrast, the role of adaptive immunity in AD remains largely unknown. However, numerous clinical trials are testing vaccination strategies for AD, suggesting that T and B cells play a pivotal role in this disease. To test the hypothesis that adaptive immunity influences AD pathogenesis, we generated an immune-deficient AD mouse model that lacks T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells. The resulting “Rag-5xfAD” mice exhibit a greater than twofold increase in β-amyloid (Aβ) pathology. Gene expression analysis of the brain implicates altered innate and adaptive immune pathways, including changes in cytokine/chemokine signaling and decreased Ig-mediated processes. Neuroinflammation is also greatly exacerbated in Rag-5xfAD mice as indicated by a shift in microglial phenotype, increased cytokine production, and reduced phagocytic capacity. In contrast, immune-intact 5xfAD mice exhibit elevated levels of nonamyloid reactive IgGs in association with microglia, and treatment of Rag-5xfAD mice or microglial cells with preimmune IgG enhances Aβ clearance. Last, we performed bone marrow transplantation studies in Rag-5xfAD mice, revealing that replacement of these missing adaptive immune populations can dramatically reduce AD pathology. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that adaptive immune cell populations play an important role in restraining AD pathology. In contrast, depletion of B cells and their appropriate activation by T cells leads to a loss of adaptive–innate immunity cross talk and accelerated disease progression. PMID:26884167

  5. The microbiota in adaptive immune homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kenya; Littman, Dan R

    2016-07-07

    In the mucosa, the immune system's T cells and B cells have position-specific phenotypes and functions that are influenced by the microbiota. These cells play pivotal parts in the maintenance of immune homeostasis by suppressing responses to harmless antigens and by enforcing the integrity of the barrier functions of the gut mucosa. Imbalances in the gut microbiota, known as dysbiosis, can trigger several immune disorders through the activity of T cells that are both near to and distant from the site of their induction. Elucidation of the mechanisms that distinguish between homeostatic and pathogenic microbiota-host interactions could identify therapeutic targets for preventing or modulating inflammatory diseases and for boosting the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Modulation of host adaptive immunity by hRSV proteins

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants and children younger than 2 years old. Furthermore, the number of hospitalizations due to LRTIs has shown a sustained increase every year due to the lack of effective vaccines against hRSV. Thus, this virus remains as a major public health and economic burden worldwide. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected humans is characterized by an exacerbated inflammatory and Th2 immune response. In order to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus, several studies have focused in elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system. Here, we discuss the main features of hRSV biology, the processes involved in virus recognition by the immune system and the most relevant mechanisms used by this pathogen to avoid the antiviral host response. PMID:25513775

  7. Stochastic stage-structured modeling of the adaptive immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, D. L.; Davenport, M. P.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, Alan S.,

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a computer model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to antigen and the maintenance of immunological memory. Because immune responses often begin with small numbers of cells and there is great variation among individual immune systems, we have chosen to implement a stochastic model that captures the life cycle of T cells more faithfully than deterministic models. Past models of the immune response have been differential equation based, which do not capture stochastic effects, or agent-based, which are computationally expensive. We use a stochastic stage-structured approach that has many of the advantages of agent-based modeling but is more efficient. Our model can provide insights into the effect infections have on the CTL repertoire and the response to subsequent infections.

  8. Associations between the degree of early lactation inflammation and performance, metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M M; Yasui, T; Felippe, M J B; Overton, T R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine associations between the severity of systemic inflammation during the early postpartum period and performance, energy metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows. Cows were assigned to categorical quartiles (Q; Q1=0.18-0.59, Q2=0.60-1.14, Q3=1.15-2.05, and Q4=2.06-2.50 g of haptoglobin/L) based on the highest plasma haptoglobin (Hp) concentration measured during wk 1 postpartum. Although cows were assigned to different categories of inflammation during the postpartum period, we detected a quadratic relationship of inflammation on prepartum dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight (BW) such that cows in Q2 had lower prepartum DMI and cows in Q2 and Q3 had lower prepartum BW compared with cows in the other quartiles. We also detected a quadratic association of inflammation with postpartum DMI and BW such that cows in Q2 and Q3 also had generally lower postpartum DMI and BW compared with cows in Q1. There was a tendency for a Q × time interaction for milk yield and Q × time interactions for 3.5% fat-corrected milk and energy-corrected milk yields; quadratic relationships suggested decreased milk yield for Q2 and Q3 cows. We also found Q × parity and Q × time interactions for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, suggesting alterations with differing degrees of inflammation. There was also a Q × time interaction for plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration. In addition, alterations in liver triglyceride and glycogen contents for cows with inflammation as well as alterations in [1-(14)C]propionate oxidation in vitro were observed. Although we observed limited effects of inflammation on neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis at d 7 postpartum, inflammation appeared to alter neutrophil and monocyte oxidative burst. Overall, cows with any degree of elevated haptoglobin in the first week after calving had alterations in both pre- and postpartum intake and postpartum metabolism.

  9. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity.

    PubMed

    Shanely, R Andrew; Nieman, David C; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A; Meaney, Mary P; Knab, Amy M; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-08-22

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  10. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shanely, R. Andrew; Nieman, David C.; Perkins-Veazie, Penelope; Henson, Dru A.; Meaney, Mary P.; Knab, Amy M.; Cialdell-Kam, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125). Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05), however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05). WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05), but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine), antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function. PMID:27556488

  11. Markers of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Germolec, Dori R; Frawley, Rachel P; Evans, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and necessary component of an organism's response to biological, chemical or physical stimuli. In the acute phase, cells of the immune system migrate to the site of injury in a carefully orchestrated sequence of events that is mediated by cytokines and acute phase proteins. Depending upon the degree of injury, this acute phase may be sufficient to resolve the damage and initiate healing. Persistent inflammation as a result of prolonged exposure to stimulus or an inappropriate reaction to self molecules can lead to the chronic phase, in which tissue damage and fibrosis can occur. Chronic inflammation is reported to contribute to numerous diseases including allergy, arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, and cancer, and to conditions of aging. Hematology and clinical chemistry data from standard toxicology studies can provide an initial indication of the presence and sometimes location of inflammation in the absence of specific data on the immune tissues. These data may suggest more specific immune function assays are necessary to determine the existence or mechanism(s) of -immunomodulation. Although changes in hematology dynamics, acute phase proteins, complement factors and cytokines are common to virtually all inflammatory conditions and can be measured by a variety of techniques, individual biomarkers have yet to be strongly associated with specific pathologic events. The specific profile in a given inflammatory condition is dependent upon species, mechanisms, severity, chronicity, and capacity of the immune system to respond and adapt.

  12. Innate and adaptive immune traits are differentially affected by genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Roederer, Mario; Beddall, Margaret H.; Nestle, Frank O.; Spector, Tim D.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and activity of leukocytes is controlled by genetic and environmental influences to maintain balanced immune responses. However, the relative contribution of environmental compared with genetic factors that affect variations in immune traits is unknown. Here we analyse 23,394 immune phenotypes in 497 adult female twins. 76% of these traits show a predominantly heritable influence, whereas 24% are mostly influenced by environment. These data highlight the importance of shared childhood environmental influences such as diet, infections or microbes in shaping immune homeostasis for monocytes, B1 cells, γδ T cells and NKT cells, whereas dendritic cells, B2 cells, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells are more influenced by genetics. Although leukocyte subsets are influenced by genetics and environment, adaptive immune traits are more affected by genetics, whereas innate immune traits are more affected by environment. PMID:28054551

  13. On the evolutionary origin of the adaptive immune system--the adipocyte hypothesis.

    PubMed

    van Niekerk, Gustav; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-04-01

    Jawless vertebrates utilize a form of adaptive immunity that is functionally based on molecular effectors that are completely different from those of vertebrates. This observation raises an intriguing question: why did vertebrates, representing only 5% of all animals, twice evolve a system as complex as adaptive immunity? Theories aimed at identifying a selective pressure that would 'drive' the development of an adaptive immune system (AIS) fail to explain why invertebrates would not similarly develop an AIS. We argue that an AIS can only be implemented in a certain physiological context, i.e., that an AIS represents an unevolvable trait for invertebrates. The immune system is functionally integrated with other systems; therefore a preexisting physiological innovation unique to vertebrates may have acted as the prerequisite infrastructure that allowed the development of an AIS. We propose that future efforts should be directed toward identifying the evolutionary release that allowed the development of an adaptive immune system in vertebrates. In particular, the advent of specialized adipocytes might have expanded the metabolic scope of vertebrates, allowing the opportunistic incorporation of an AIS. However, physiological innovations, unique to (or more developed in) vertebrates, support the implementation of an AIS. Thus, understanding the interaction between systems (e.g. neural-immune-adipose connection) may illuminate our understanding regarding the perplexing immunological dimorphism within the animal kingdom.

  14. Osteopontin Expression in Acute Immune Response Mediates Hippocampal Synaptogenesis and Adaptive Outcome Following Cortical Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Julie L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces axotomy, deafferentation and reactive synaptogenesis. Inflammation influences synaptic repair, and the novel brain cytokine osteopontin (OPN) has potential to support axon regeneration through exposure of its integrin receptor binding sites. This study explored whether OPN secretion and proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the initial degenerative phase of synaptogenesis, targeting reactive neuroglia to affect successful repair. Adult rats received unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion (UEC) modeling adaptive synaptic plasticity. Over the first week postinjury, hippocampal OPN protein and mRNA were assayed and histology performed. At 1–2d, OPN protein increased up to 51 fold, and was localized within activated, mobilized glia. OPN transcript also increased over 50 fold, predominantly within reactive microglia. OPN fragments known to be derived from MMP proteolysis were elevated at 1d, consistent with prior reports of UEC glial activation and enzyme production. Postinjury minocycline immunosuppression attenuated MMP-9 gelatinase activity, which was correlated with reduction of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2) expression, and reduced OPN fragment generation. The antibiotic also attenuated removal of synapsin-1 positive axons from the deafferented zone. OPN KO mice subjected to UEC had similar reduction of hippocampal MMP-9 activity, as well as lower synapsin-1 breakdown over the deafferented zone. MAP1B and N-cadherin, surrogates of cytoarchitecture and synaptic adhesion, were not affected. OPN KO mice with UEC exhibited time dependent cognitive deficits during the synaptogenic phase of recovery. This study demonstrates that OPN can mediate immune response during TBI synaptic repair, positively influencing synapse reorganization and functional recovery. PMID:25151457

  15. Seminal fluid and immune adaptation for pregnancy--comparative biology in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Schjenken, J E; Robertson, S A

    2014-09-01

    Seminal fluid delivered to the female reproductive tract at coitus not only promotes the survival and fertilizing capacity of spermatozoa, but also contains potent signalling agents that influence female reproductive physiology to improve the chances of conception and reproductive success. Male to female seminal fluid signalling occurs in rodents, domestic and livestock animals, and all other mammals examined to date. Seminal plasma is instrumental in eliciting the female response, by provision of cytokines and prostaglandins synthesized in the male accessory glands. These agents bind to receptors on target cells in the cervix and uterus, activating changes in gene expression leading to functional adaptations in the female tissues. Sperm also interact with female tract cells, although the molecular basis of this interaction is not yet defined. The consequences are increased sperm survival and fertilization rates, conditioning of the female immune response to tolerate semen and the conceptus, and molecular and cellular changes in the endometrium that facilitate embryo development and implantation. Studies in porcine, equine, bovine, ovine and canine species all show evidence of male-female signalling function for seminal fluid. There are variations between species that relate to their different reproductive strategies and behaviours, particularly the site of seminal fluid deposition and female reproductive tract anatomy. Although the details of the molecular mechanisms require more study, the available data are consistent with both the sperm and plasma fractions of seminal fluid acting in a synergistic fashion to activate inflammation-like responses and downstream female tract changes in each of these species. Insight into the biological function and molecular basis of seminal fluid signalling in the female will inform new interventions and management practices to support optimal reproductive outcomes in domestic, livestock and endangered animal species.

  16. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  17. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  18. Adapting to new threats: the generation of memory by CRISPR-Cas immune systems.

    PubMed

    Heler, Robert; Marraffini, Luciano A; Bikard, David

    2014-07-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci and their associated genes (cas) confer bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against phages and other invading genetic elements. A fundamental requirement of any immune system is the ability to build a memory of past infections in order to deal more efficiently with recurrent infections. The adaptive feature of CRISPR-Cas immune systems relies on their ability to memorize DNA sequences of invading molecules and integrate them in between the repetitive sequences of the CRISPR array in the form of 'spacers'. The transcription of a spacer generates a small antisense RNA that is used by RNA-guided Cas nucleases to cleave the invading nucleic acid in order to protect the cell from infection. The acquisition of new spacers allows the CRISPR-Cas immune system to rapidly adapt against new threats and is therefore termed 'adaptation'. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the genetic requirements for adaptation and have demonstrated that rather than being a stochastic process, the selection of new spacers is influenced by several factors. We review here our current knowledge of the CRISPR adaptation mechanism.

  19. The immune system as a biomonitor: explorations in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Niclas; Heather, James; Pollara, Gabriel; Simpson, Nandi; Matjeka, Theres; Shawe-Taylor, John; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Chain, Benjamin

    2013-04-06

    The human immune system has a highly complex, multi-layered structure which has evolved to detect and respond to changes in the internal microenvironment of the body. Recognition occurs at the molecular or submolecular scale, via classical reversible receptor-ligand interactions, and can lead to a response with great sensitivity and speed. Remarkably, recognition is coupled to memory, such that responses are modulated by events which occurred years or even decades before. Although the immune system in general responds differently and more vigorously to stimuli entering the body from the outside (e.g. infections), this is an emergent property of the system: many of the recognition molecules themselves have no inherent bias towards external stimuli (non-self) but also bind targets found within the body (self). It is quite clear that the immune response registers pathophysiological changes in general. Cancer, wounding and chronic tissue injury are some obvious examples. Against this background, the immune system 'state' tracks the internal processes of the body, and is likely to encode information regarding both current and past disease processes. Moreover, the distributed nature of most immune responses (e.g. typically involving lymphoid tissue, non-lymphoid tissue, bone marrow, blood, extracellular interstitial spaces, etc.) means that many of the changes associated with immune responses are manifested systemically, and specifically can be detected in blood. This provides a very convenient route to sampling immune cells. We consider two different and complementary ways of querying the human immune 'state' using high-dimensional genomic screening methodologies, and discuss the potentials of these approaches and some of the technological and computational challenges to be overcome.

  20. Resident memory CD8 T cells trigger protective innate and adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Jason M.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Beura, Lalit K.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2015-01-01

    The pathogen recognition theory dictates that upon viral infection, the innate immune system first detects microbial products, and then responds by providing instructions to adaptive CD8 T cells. Here, we show in mice that resident memory CD8 T cells (TRM), non-recirculating cells located at common sites of infection, can achieve near sterilizing immunity against viral infections by reversing this flow of information. Upon antigen re-sensitization within the mouse female reproductive mucosae, CD8+ TRM secrete cytokines that trigger rapid adaptive and innate immune responses including local humoral responses, maturation of local dendritic cells, and activation of natural killer cells. This provided near sterilizing immunity against an antigenically unrelated viral infection. Thus, CD8+ TRM rapidly trigger an antiviral state by amplifying receptor-derived signals from previously encountered pathogens. PMID:25170049

  1. Ontogeny of innate and adaptive immune defense components in free-living tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Maria G; Cunnick, Joan E; Vleck, David; Vleck, Carol M

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the development of immune function in wild animals. We investigated the ontogeny of immune defense in a free-living bird, the tree swallow. We assessed total and differential leukocyte counts, natural antibodies, complement activity, in vivo skin swelling response, and in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and compared the levels of development between nestlings and young adults. We also assessed whether body condition explained variation in these immune components. We found some support for the prediction that innate defenses, which do not need to generate a broad repertoire of specific receptors, would reach adult levels earlier than adaptive defenses. In contrast, we found limited support for the prediction that adaptive defenses, which are thought to be more costly to develop, would be more related to body condition than innate defenses. We discuss our findings in the context of other studies on the ontogeny of immune function.

  2. Innate and adaptive immunity in bacteria: mechanisms of programmed genetic variation to fight bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant microorganism on earth. Bacteria have evolved a variety of immunity mechanisms to resist bacteriophage infection. In response, bacteriophages can evolve counter-resistance mechanisms and launch a 'virus versus host' evolutionary arms race. In this context, rapid evolution is fundamental for the survival of the bacterial cell. Programmed genetic variation mechanisms at loci involved in immunity against bacteriophages generate diversity at a much faster rate than random point mutation and enable bacteria to quickly adapt and repel infection. Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) and phase variation mechanisms enhance the generic (innate) immune response against bacteriophages. On the other hand, the integration of small bacteriophage sequences in CRISPR loci provide bacteria with a virus-specific and sequence-specific adaptive immune response. Therefore, although using different molecular mechanisms, both prokaryotes and higher organisms rely on programmed genetic variation to increase genetic diversity and fight rapidly evolving infectious agents.

  3. Deregulated tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, and immune activation pathway in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiongxin; Liu, Danxia; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The kynurenine (Kyn) pathway is the major route for tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, and it contributes to several fundamental biological processes. Trp is constitutively oxidized by tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase in liver cells. In other cell types, it is catalyzed by an alternative inducible indoleamine-pyrrole 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) under certain pathophysiological conditions, which consequently increases the formation of Kyn metabolites. IDO is up-regulated in response to inflammatory conditions as a novel marker of immune activation in early atherosclerosis. Besides, IDO and the IDO-related pathway are important mediators of the immunoinflammatory responses in advanced atherosclerosis. In particular, Kyn, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and quinolinic acid are positively associated with inflammation, oxidative stress (SOX), endothelial dysfunction, and carotid artery intima-media thickness values in end-stage renal disease patients. Moreover, IDO is a potential novel contributor to vessel relaxation and metabolism in systemic infections, which is also activated in acute severe heart attacks. The Kyn pathway plays a key role in the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease by regulating inflammation, SOX, and immune activation. PMID:25961549

  4. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has a primitive yet effective blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modeling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection and wounding. The application of recently developed and sophisticated genetic tools to the relatively simple genome of Drosophila has made the fly a popular system for modeling human tumorigensis and metastasis. Drosophila is now used for screening and investigation of genes implicated in human leukemia and also in modeling development of solid tumors. This second line of research offers promising opportunities to determine the seemingly conflicting roles of blood cells in tumor progression and invasion. This review provides an overview of the signaling pathways conserved in Drosophila during haematopoiesis, haemostasis, innate immunity, wound healing and inflammation. We also review the most recent progress in the use of Drosophila as a cancer research model with an emphasis on the roles haemocytes can play in various cancer models and in the links between inflammation and cancer. PMID:24409421

  5. Drosophila as a model to study the role of blood cells in inflammation, innate immunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2014-01-09

    Drosophila has a primitive yet effective blood system with three types of haemocytes which function throughout different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Haemocytes play essential roles in tissue modeling during embryogenesis and morphogenesis, and also in innate immunity. The open circulatory system of Drosophila makes haemocytes ideal signal mediators to cells and tissues in response to events such as infection and wounding. The application of recently developed and sophisticated genetic tools to the relatively simple genome of Drosophila has made the fly a popular system for modeling human tumorigensis and metastasis. Drosophila is now used for screening and investigation of genes implicated in human leukemia and also in modeling development of solid tumors. This second line of research offers promising opportunities to determine the seemingly conflicting roles of blood cells in tumor progression and invasion. This review provides an overview of the signaling pathways conserved in Drosophila during haematopoiesis, haemostasis, innate immunity, wound healing and inflammation. We also review the most recent progress in the use of Drosophila as a cancer research model with an emphasis on the roles haemocytes can play in various cancer models and in the links between inflammation and cancer.

  6. Toward a molecular understanding of adaptive immunity: a chronology, part I

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kendall A.

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has been the core of immunology for the past century, as immunologists have been primarily focused on understanding the basis for adaptive immunity for the better part of this time. Immunological thought has undergone an evolution with regard to our understanding as the complexity of the cells and the molecules of the system became elucidated. The original immunologists performed their experiments with whole animals (or humans), and for the most part they were focused on observing what happens when a foreign substance is introduced into the body. However, since Burnet formulated his clonal selection theory we have witnessed reductionist science focused first on cell populations, then individual cells and finally on molecules, in our quests to learn how the system works. This review is the first part of a chronology of our evolution toward a molecular understanding of adaptive immunity. PMID:23230443

  7. Decreased collagen-induced arthritis severity and adaptive immunity in mitogen activated protein kinase kinase 6 -deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hammaker, Deepa; Topolewski, Katharyn; Edgar, Meghan; Yoshizawa, Toshio; Fukushima, Akihisa; Boyle, David L.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective MAPK kinases MKK3 and MKK6 regulate p38 MAPK activation in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Previous studies demonstrated that MKK3- or MKK6-deficiency inhibits K/BxN serum-induced arthritis. However, the role of these kinases in adaptive immunity-dependent models of chronic arthritis is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate MKK3- and MKK6-deficiency in the collagen induced arthritis model. Methods Wildtype, MKK3−/−, and MKK6−/− mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII). Disease activity was evaluated by semiquantitative scoring, histology, and microcomputed tomography. Serum anti-collagen antibody levels were quantified by ELISA. In-vitro T cell cytokine response was measured by flow cytometry and multiplex analysis. Expression of joint cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase was determined by qPCR. Results MKK6-deficiency markedly reduced arthritis severity compared with WT mice, while absence of MKK3 had an intermediate effect. Joint damage was minimal in arthritic MKK6−/− mice and intermediate in MKK3−/− mice compared with wild type mice. MKK6−/− mice had modestly lower levels of pathogenic anti-collagen antibodies than WT or MKK3−/− mice. In vitro T cell assays showed reduced proliferation and IL-17 production by MKK6−/− cells in response to type II collagen. Gene expression of synovial IL-6, matrix metalloproteinases MMP3, and MMP13 was significantly inhibited in MKK6-deficient mice. Conclusion Reduced disease severity in MKK6−/− mice correlated with decreased anti-collagen responses indicating that MKK6 is a crucial regulator of inflammation joint destruction in CIA. MKK6 is a potential therapeutic target in complex diseases involving adaptive immune responses like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21953132

  8. 99th Dahlem Conference on Infection, Inflammation and Chronic Inflammatory Disorders: Innate immune responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Lefert, P

    2010-01-01

    Plants rely exclusively upon mechanisms of innate immunity. Current concepts of the plant innate immune system are based largely on two forms of immunity that engage distinct classes of immune receptors. These receptors enable the recognition of non-self structures that are either conserved between members of a microbial class or specific to individual strains of a microbe. One type of receptor comprises membrane-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that detect widely conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) on the cell surface. A second type of mainly intracellular immune sensors, designated resistance (R) proteins, recognizes either the structure or function of strain-specific pathogen effectors that are delivered inside host cells. Phytopathogenic microorganisms have evolved a repertoire of effectors, some of which are delivered into plant cells to sabotage MAMP-triggered immune responses. Plants appear to have also evolved receptors that sense cellular injury by the release and perception of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). It is possible that the integration of MAMP and DAMP responses is critical to mount robust MAMP-triggered immunity. This signal integration might help to explain why plants are colonized in nature by remarkably diverse and seemingly asymptomatic microbial communities. PMID:20415853

  9. Lung dendritic cells at the innate-adaptive immune interface

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Tracy Voss; Sawyer, Richard T.; Fenton, Matthew J.; Riches, David W. H.

    2011-01-01

    This review updates the basic biology of lung DCs and their functions. Lung DCs have taken center stage as cellular therapeutic targets in new vaccine strategies for the treatment of diverse human disorders, including asthma, allergic lung inflammation, lung cancer, and infectious lung disease. The anatomical distribution of lung DCs, as well as the division of labor between their subsets, aids their ability to recognize and endocytose foreign substances and to process antigens. DCs can induce tolerance in or activate naïve T cells, making lung DCs well-suited to their role as lung sentinels. Lung DCs serve as a functional signaling/sensing unit to maintain lung homeostasis and orchestrate host responses to benign and harmful foreign substances. PMID:21807741

  10. Progesterone-based contraceptives reduce adaptive immune responses and protection against sequential influenza A virus infections.

    PubMed

    Hall, Olivia J; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Vermillion, Meghan S; Fink, Ashley L; Phuong, Vanessa; Krammer, Florian; Klein, Sabra L

    2017-02-08

    model, we have made the novel observation that treatment with either progesterone or a synthetic analog found in hormonal contraceptives, levonorgestrel, impacts sequential influenza A virus infection, by modulating antibody responses and decreasing memory CD8+ T cells. Progestins reduced antibody responses during primary H1N1 virus infection, but increased antibody titers following a sequential infection with either a H1N1 drift variant or a H3N2 virus. Following challenge with a H3N2 virus, female mice treated with progestins experienced greater mortality with increased pulmonary inflammation and reduced numbers and activity of CD8+ T cell. This study suggests that progestins significantly affect adaptive immune responses to influenza A virus infection, with their effect on influence outcome depending on exposure history.

  11. Size does not matter: commensal microorganisms forge tumor-promoting inflammation and anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the commensal microbiota are indispensable for the maintenance of immune homeostasis, orchestration of immune responses against pathogens and most recently during cancer immunotherapy and malignant progression of extraintestinal tumors. Here we discuss the recent findings that a common genetic variation in TLR5 influences the progression and outcome of ovarian, sarcoma, and luminal breast tumors and the implications of these findings in light of recent publications describing the role of the commensal microbiota in control of the systemic immune system. PMID:25897427

  12. Targeting the TLR9-MyD88 pathway in the regulation of adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2010-01-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune receptors critical in the innate immune defense against invading pathogens. Recent advances also reveal a crucial role for TLRs in shaping adaptive immune responses, conferring a potential therapeutic value to their modulation in the treatment of diseases. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW The aim of this review is to discuss TLR9, the TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathway and its role in regulation of adaptive immune responses, as well as potential therapeutic implications by targeting this pathway. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN This review shows that the TLR9-MyD88 signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting adaptive immune responses and that modulation of this pathway may have enormous therapeutic potential in enhancing vaccine potency, controlling autoimmunity, as well as improving the outcome of viral vector-mediated gene therapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE Although TLR9 agonists have been used as adjuvants for enhancing vaccine potency, further exploitation of the TLR9-MyD88 pathway and its dynamic interaction with the immune system in vivo is needed to provide more effective therapeutic inventions in the design of vaccines for infectious diseases, allergies and cancer, in the control of autoimmunity, as well as in the improvement of viral vector-mediated gene therapy. PMID:20560798

  13. Modulatory Effects of Antidepressant Classes on the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Depression.

    PubMed

    Eyre, H A; Lavretsky, H; Kartika, J; Qassim, A; Baune, B T

    2016-05-01

    Current reviews exploring for unique immune-modulatory profiles of antidepressant classes are limited by focusing mainly on cytokine modulation only and neglecting other aspects of the innate and adaptive immune system. These reviews also do not include recent comparative clinical trials, immune-genetic studies and therapeutics with unique neurotransmitter profiles (e. g., agomelatine). This systematic review extends the established literature by comprehensively reviewing the effects of antidepressants classes on both the innate and adaptive immune system. Antidepressants appear, in general, to reduce pro-inflammatory factor levels, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. We caution against conclusions as to which antidepressant possesses the greater anti-inflammatory effect, given the methodological heterogeneity among studies and the small number of comparative studies. The effects of antidepressant classes on adaptive immune factors are complex and poorly understood, and few studies have been conducted. Methodological heterogeneity is high among these studies (e. g., length of study, cohort characteristics, dosage used and immune marker analysis). We recommend larger, comparative studies - in clinical and pre-clinical populations.

  14. Platelet CD40L at the interface of adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Elzey, Bennett D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Sowa, Jennifer M.; Crist, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Initiated by the finding that platelets express functional CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154), many new roles for platelets have been discovered in unanticipated areas, including the immune response. When current literature is considered as a whole, the picture that is emerging begins to show that platelets are able to significantly affect, for better or worse, the overall health and condition of the mammalian host. Animal models have made significant contributions to our expanding knowledge of platelet function, much of which is anticipated to be clinically relevant. While still mostly circumstantial, the evidence supports a critical role for CD40L in many normal and disease processes. PMID:21075431

  15. The interaction between gut microbiota and age-related changes in immune function and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota and gut immune systems interact each other, maintaining a condition of homeostasis in the context of the intestinal habitat. However, both systems undergo modifications in elderly, thus accounting for a low grade inflammatory status which, in turn, may evolve toward more severe pathological conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon rectal cancer. In addition, in western societies dietary habits may negatively influence the microbiota composition, also altering gut immune response which is per se impaired in elderly. In order to prevent the outcome of aged-related disease, supplementation of nutraceuticals able to correct abnormalities of both immune system and microbiota has become more frequent than in the past. In this respect, a better identification of components of the aged microbiota as well as a deeper analysis of gut mucosal immunity function should be pursued. PMID:23915308

  16. Age-related Dysregulation of Inflammation and Innate Immunity: Lessons Learned from Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Aleah L.; Palmer, Jessica L.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    In the elderly patient population, it has become increasingly evident that immune dysregulation is a contributing factor to age-related pathologies and their associated morbidity and mortality. In particular, elderly subjects are plagued by poor responses to infectious challenge and immunization and are at heightened risk for the development of autoimmune, neuroinflammatory and tumor-associated pathologies. Rodent models of aging and age-related disorders have been utilized to better describe how innate immune cell dysfunction contributes to these clinical scenarios. As the elderly population continues to increase in size, use of these aging rodent models to study immune dysregulation may translate into increased healthy living years for these individuals. PMID:22396887

  17. Topical Cathelicidin (LL-37) an Innate Immune Peptide Induces Acute Olfactory Epithelium Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jeremiah A.; Qin, Xuan; Pulsipher, Abigail; Orb, Quinn; Orlandi, Richard R.; Zhang, Jianxing; Schults, Austin; Jia, Wanjian; Presson, Angela P.; Prestwich, Glenn; Oottamasathien, Siam

    2017-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an endogenous innate immune peptide that is elevated in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The role of LL-37 in olfactory epithelium (OE) inflammation remains unknown. We hypothesized that 1) LL-37 topically delivered would elicit profound OE inflammation, and 2) LL-37 induced inflammation is associated with increased infiltration of neutrophils and mast cells. Methods To test our hypothesis we challenged C57BL/6 mice intranasally with increasing concentrations of LL-37. At 24 hours tissues were examined histologically and scored for inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory hyperplasia. In separate experiments, fluorescently conjugated LL-37 was instilled and tissues were examined at 0.5 and 24 hours. To test our last hypothesis, we performed tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) assays for neutrophil activity and immunohistochemistry for tryptase to determine the mean number of mast cells per mm2. Results LL-37 caused increased inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory cell hyperplasia of the sinonasal mucosa with higher LL-37 concentrations yielding significantly more inflammatory changes (p < 0.01). Fluorescent LL-37 demonstrated global sinonasal epithelial binding and tissue distribution. Further, higher concentrations of LL-37 led to significantly greater MPO levels with dose-dependent increases in mast cell infiltration (p < 0.01). Conclusions LL-37 has dramatic inflammatory effects in the OE mucosa that is dose-dependent. The observed inflammatory changes in the olfactory mucosa were associated with the infiltration of both neutrophils and mast cells. Our biologic model represents a new model to further investigate the role of LL-37 in OE inflammation. PMID:26346056

  18. Evasion of innate and adaptive immune responses by influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Schmolke, Mirco; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-07-01

    Host organisms have developed sophisticated antiviral responses in order to defeat emerging influenza A viruses (IAVs). At the same time IAVs have evolved immune evasion strategies. The immune system of mammals provides several lines of defence to neutralize invading pathogens or limit their replication. Here, we summarize the mammalian innate and adaptive immune mechanisms involved in host defence against viral infection and review strategies by which IAVs avoid, circumvent or subvert these mechanisms. We highlight well-characterized, as well as recently described features of this intriguing virus-host molecular battle.

  19. No Compensatory Relationship between the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Wild-Living European Badgers

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Yung Wa; Newman, Chris; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Buesching, Christina; Mannarelli, Maria-Elena; Annavi, Geetha; Burke, Terry; Macdonald, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system provides the primary vertebrate defence system against pathogen invasion, but it is energetically costly and can have immune pathological effects. A previous study in sticklebacks found that intermediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity correlated with a lower leukocyte coping capacity (LCC), compared to individuals with fewer, or many, MHC alleles. The organization of the MHC genes in mammals, however, differs to the highly duplicated MHC genes in sticklebacks by having far fewer loci. Using European badgers (Meles meles), we therefore investigated whether innate immune activity, estimated functionally as the ability of an individual’s leukocytes to produce a respiratory burst, was influenced by MHC diversity. We also investigated whether LCC was influenced by factors such as age-class, sex, body condition, season, year, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, and intensity of infection with five different pathogens. We found that LCC was not associated with specific MHC haplotypes, MHC alleles, or MHC diversity, indicating that the innate immune system did not compensate for the adaptive immune system even when there were susceptible MHC alleles/haplotypes, or when the MHC diversity was low. We also identified a seasonal and annual variation of LCC. This temporal variation of innate immunity was potentially due to physiological trade-offs or temporal variation in pathogen infections. The innate immunity, estimated as LCC, does not compensate for MHC diversity suggests that the immune system may function differently between vertebrates with different MHC organizations, with implications for the evolution of immune systems in different taxa. PMID:27695089

  20. No Compensatory Relationship between the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Wild-Living European Badgers.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yung Wa; Newman, Chris; Dugdale, Hannah L; Buesching, Christina; Mannarelli, Maria-Elena; Annavi, Geetha; Burke, Terry; Macdonald, David W

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system provides the primary vertebrate defence system against pathogen invasion, but it is energetically costly and can have immune pathological effects. A previous study in sticklebacks found that intermediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity correlated with a lower leukocyte coping capacity (LCC), compared to individuals with fewer, or many, MHC alleles. The organization of the MHC genes in mammals, however, differs to the highly duplicated MHC genes in sticklebacks by having far fewer loci. Using European badgers (Meles meles), we therefore investigated whether innate immune activity, estimated functionally as the ability of an individual's leukocytes to produce a respiratory burst, was influenced by MHC diversity. We also investigated whether LCC was influenced by factors such as age-class, sex, body condition, season, year, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, and intensity of infection with five different pathogens. We found that LCC was not associated with specific MHC haplotypes, MHC alleles, or MHC diversity, indicating that the innate immune system did not compensate for the adaptive immune system even when there were susceptible MHC alleles/haplotypes, or when the MHC diversity was low. We also identified a seasonal and annual variation of LCC. This temporal variation of innate immunity was potentially due to physiological trade-offs or temporal variation in pathogen infections. The innate immunity, estimated as LCC, does not compensate for MHC diversity suggests that the immune system may function differently between vertebrates with different MHC organizations, with implications for the evolution of immune systems in different taxa.

  1. The interplay between the microbiome and the adaptive immune response in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Edda; Taddei, Antonio; Ringressi, Maria Novella; Ricci, Federica; Amedei, Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    The data from different studies suggest a bacterial role in cancer genesis/progression, often modulating the local immune response. This is particularly so at the mucosal level where the bacterial presence is strong and the immune system is highly reactive. The epithelial surfaces of the body, such as the skin and mucosa, are colonized by a vast number of microorganisms, which represent the so-called normal microbiome. Normally the microbiome does not cause a proinflammatory response because the immune system has developed different strategies for the tolerance of commensal bacteria, but when these mechanisms are impaired or new pathogenic bacteria are introduced into this balanced system, the immune system reacts to the microbiome and can trigger tumor growth in the intestine. In this review, we discuss the potential role of the bacterial microbiome in carcinogenesis, focusing on the direct and indirect immune adaptive mechanisms, that the bacteria can modulate in different ways. PMID:27366226

  2. ZAP70: a master regulator of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Chemin, Karine; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; le Deist, Françoise; Hivroz, Claire

    2010-06-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70 became the subject of intense scrutiny in the early nineties, when ZAP70 mutations were characterized in several young patients presenting with severe T cell immunodeficiencies. The association of a lack of expression of ZAP70 with an immunodeficiency consisting in a markedly reduced T lymphocyte-mediated immunity highlighted the crucial role of this tyrosine kinase in T cell development and function. This discovery was soon accompanied by the characterization of the substrates of ZAP70 and the signalling cascades that depend on ZAP70 activity. These studies demonstrated that ZAP70 was indeed at the crossroad of several signalling pathways that control T lymphocyte development and function. Recently, a revival of interest for this protein came again from studies associating abnormal ZAP70 expression with pathological conditions. Some chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells were shown to express ZAP70, and this expression was correlated with bad prognosis. Mouse models also revealed that partial defects in ZAP70 activity can be associated with autoimmunity. These last results suggested that ZAP70 is involved in the fine balance between immunity and tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the role of ZAP70 in T cell activation and focus on what we learnt from pathological conditions associated with defective expression or activity of the ZAP70 kinase.

  3. Let’s Tie the Knot: Marriage of Complement and Adaptive Immunity in Pathogen Evasion, for Better or Worse

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kaila M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Gorham, Ronald D.

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is typically regarded as an effector arm of innate immunity, leading to recognition and killing of microbial invaders in body fluids. Consequently, pathogens have engaged in an arms race, evolving molecules that can interfere with proper complement responses. However, complement is no longer viewed as an isolated system, and links with other immune mechanisms are continually being discovered. Complement forms an important bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. While its roles in innate immunity are well-documented, its function in adaptive immunity is less characterized. Therefore, it is no surprise that the field of pathogenic complement evasion has focused on blockade of innate effector functions, while potential inhibition of adaptive immune responses (via complement) has been overlooked to a certain extent. In this review, we highlight past and recent developments on the involvement of complement in the adaptive immune response. We discuss the mechanisms by which complement aids in lymphocyte stimulation and regulation, as well as in antigen presentation. In addition, we discuss microbial complement evasion strategies, and highlight specific examples in the context of adaptive immune responses. These emerging ties between complement and adaptive immunity provide a catalyst for future discovery in not only the field of adaptive immune evasion but in elucidating new roles of complement. PMID:28197139

  4. Let's Tie the Knot: Marriage of Complement and Adaptive Immunity in Pathogen Evasion, for Better or Worse.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kaila M; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Gorham, Ronald D

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is typically regarded as an effector arm of innate immunity, leading to recognition and killing of microbial invaders in body fluids. Consequently, pathogens have engaged in an arms race, evolving molecules that can interfere with proper complement responses. However, complement is no longer viewed as an isolated system, and links with other immune mechanisms are continually being discovered. Complement forms an important bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. While its roles in innate immunity are well-documented, its function in adaptive immunity is less characterized. Therefore, it is no surprise that the field of pathogenic complement evasion has focused on blockade of innate effector functions, while potential inhibition of adaptive immune responses (via complement) has been overlooked to a certain extent. In this review, we highlight past and recent developments on the involvement of complement in the adaptive immune response. We discuss the mechanisms by which complement aids in lymphocyte stimulation and regulation, as well as in antigen presentation. In addition, we discuss microbial complement evasion strategies, and highlight specific examples in the context of adaptive immune responses. These emerging ties between complement and adaptive immunity provide a catalyst for future discovery in not only the field of adaptive immune evasion but in elucidating new roles of complement.

  5. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    PubMed

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination.

  6. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children

    PubMed Central

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3–5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination. PMID:27195118

  7. Canonical and Non-Canonical Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome at the Crossroad between Immune Tolerance and Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Carolina; Antonioli, Luca; Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence point out the relevance of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome as a pivotal player in regulating the integrity of intestinal homeostasis and shaping innate immune responses during bowel inflammation. Intensive research efforts are being made to achieve an integrated view about the protective/detrimental role of canonical and non-canonical NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the maintenance of intestinal microenvironment integrity. Evidence is also emerging that the pharmacological modulation of NLRP3 inflammasome could represent a promising molecular target for the therapeutic management of inflammatory immune-mediated gut diseases. The present review has been intended to provide a critical appraisal of the available knowledge about the role of canonical and non-canonical NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the dynamic interplay between microbiota, intestinal epithelium, and innate immune system, taken together as a whole integrated network regulating the maintenance/breakdown of intestinal homeostasis. Moreover, special attention has been paid to the pharmacological modulation of NLRP3 inflammasome, emphasizing the concept that this multiprotein complex could represent a suitable target for the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:28179906

  8. CP-25, a novel compound, protects against autoimmune arthritis by modulating immune mediators of inflammation and bone damage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan; Jia, Xiaoyi; Wei, Fang; Wang, Chun; Sun, Xiaojing; Xu, Shu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Huaxun; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-17

    Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25), a novel ester derivative of paeoniflorin (Pae), was evaluated in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) to study its potential anti-arthritic activity. AA rats were treated with CP-25 (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) from days 17 to 29 after immunization. CP-25 effectively reduced clinical and histopathological scores compared with the AA groups. CP-25-treated rats exhibited decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α) coupled with an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 in the serum. CP-25 treatment inhibited M1 macrophage activation and enhanced M2 macrophage activation by influencing cytokine production. Decreases in Th17-IL-17 and the Th17-associated transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γt) dramatically demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of CP-25 on abnormal immune dysfunction. In addition, CP-25 suppressed the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9, which supported its anti-osteoclastic effects. The data presented here demonstrated that CP-25 significantly inhibited the progression of rat AA by reducing inflammation, immunity and bone damage. The protective effects of CP-25 in AA highlight its potential as an ideal new anti-arthritic agent for human RA.

  9. MiR-146 and miR-125 in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Tae Sung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune responses are primary, relatively limited, and specific responses to numerous pathogens and toxic molecules. Protein expression involved in these innate responses must be tightly regulated at both transcriptional level and post-transcriptional level to avoid the development of excessive inflammation that can be potentially harmful to the host. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs (∼22 nucleotides [nts]) that participate in the regulation of numerous physiological responses by targeting specific messenger RNAs to suppress their translation. Recent work has shown that several negative regulators of transcription including microRNAs play important roles in inhibiting the exacerbation of inflammatory responses and in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. This emerging research area will provide new insights on how microRNAs regulate innate immune signaling. It might show that dysregulation of microRNA synthesis is associated with the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious diseases. In this review, we focused on miR-146 and miR-125 and described the roles these miRNAs in modulating innate immune signaling. These microRNAs can control inflammatory responses and the outcomes of pathogenic infections. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 311-318] PMID:26996343

  10. Micronutrient-gene interactions related to inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity in ageing and inflammation. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Piacenza, Francesco; Ostan, Rita; Cevenini, Elisa; Gonos, Efstathios S; Monti, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Recent longitudinal studies in dietary daily intake in human centenarians have shown that a satisfactory content of some micronutrients within the cells maintain several immune functions, a low grade of inflammation and preserve antioxidant activity. Micronutrients (zinc, copper, selenium) play a pivotal role in maintaining and reinforcing the performances of the immune and antioxidant systems as well as in affecting the complex network of the genes (nutrigenomic) with anti- and pro-inflammatory tasks. Genes of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and some key regulators of trace elements homeostasis, such as Metallothioneins (MT), are involved in the susceptibility to major geriatric disease/disorders. Moreover, the genetic inter-individual variability may affect the nutrients' absorption (nutrigenetic) with altered effects on inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity. The interaction between genetic factors and micronutrients (nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic approaches) may influence ageing and longevity because the micronutrients may become also toxic. This review reports the micronutrient-gene interactions in ageing and their impact on the healthy state with a focus on the method of protein-metal speciation analysis. The association between micronutrient-gene interactions and the protein-metal speciation analysis can give a complete picture for a personalized nutrient supplementation or chelation in order to reach healthy ageing and longevity.

  11. Retinol binding protein 4 in relation to diet, inflammation, immunity, and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine.

  12. Retinol Binding Protein 4 in Relation to Diet, Inflammation, Immunity, and Cardiovascular Diseases12

    PubMed Central

    Zabetian-Targhi, Fateme; Mahmoudi, Mohammad J; Rezaei, Nima; Mahmoudi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), previously called retinol binding protein (RBP), is considered a specific carrier of retinol in the blood. It is also an adipokine that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance. RBP4 seems to be correlated with cardiometabolic markers in inflammatory chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). It has recently been suggested that inflammation produced by RBP4 induces insulin resistance and CVD. The clinical relevance of this hypothesis is discussed in this review. Knowledge concerning the association of RBP4 with inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and CVDs as well as concerning the role of diet and antioxidants in decreasing RBP4 concentrations are discussed. Special attention is given to methodologies used in previously published studies and covariates that should be controlled when planning new studies on this adipokine. PMID:26567199

  13. Fibrocyte-like cells recruited to the spleen support innate and adaptive immune responses to acute injury or infection

    PubMed Central

    von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Reichart, Donna; McGillvray, Shauna M.; Wingender, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Glass, Christopher K.; Nizet, Victor; Brenner, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived fibrocytes are a population of CD45+ and collagen Type I-expressing cells that migrate to the spleen and to target injured organs, such as skin, lungs, kidneys, and liver. While CD45+Col+ fibrocytes contribute to collagen deposition at the site of injury, the role of CD45+Col+ cells in spleen has not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatotoxic injury (CCl4), TGF-β1, lipopolysaccharide, or infection with Listeria monocytogenes induce rapid recruitment of CD45+Col+ fibrocyte-like cells to the spleen. These cells have a gene expression pattern that includes antimicrobial factors (myleoperoxidase, cathelicidin, and defensins) and MHC II at higher levels than found on quiescent or activated macrophages. The immune functions of these splenic CD45+Col+ fibrocyte-like cells include entrapment of bacteria into extracellular DNA-based structures containing cathelicidin and presentation of antigens to naïve CD8+ T cells to induce their proliferation. Stimulation of these splenic fibrocyte-like cells with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor or macrophage-colony stimulating factor induces downregulation of collagen expression and terminal differentiation into the dendritic cells or macrophage. Thus, splenic CD45+Col+ cells are a population of rapidly mobilized BM-derived fibrocyte-like cells that respond to inflammation or infection to participate in innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:21499735

  14. Inflammation, Innate Immunity, and the Intestinal Stromal Cell Niche: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Benjamin M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal cells of multiple tissues contribute to immune-mediated protective responses and, conversely, the pathological tissue changes associated with chronic inflammatory disease. However, unlike hematopoietic immune cells, tissue stromal cell populations remain poorly characterized with respect to specific surface marker expression, their ontogeny, self-renewal, and proliferative capacity within tissues and the extent to which they undergo phenotypic immunological changes during the course of an infectious or inflammatory insult. Extending our knowledge of the immunological features of stromal cells provides an exciting opportunity to further dissect the underlying biology of many important immune-mediated diseases, although several challenges remain in bringing the emerging field of stromal immunology to equivalence with the study of the hematopoietic immune cell compartment. This review highlights recent studies that have begun unraveling the complexity of tissue stromal cell function in immune responses, with a focus on the intestine, and proposes strategies for the development of the field to uncover the great potential for stromal immunology to contribute to our understanding of the fundamental pathophysiology of disease, and the opening of new therapeutic avenues in multiple chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26150817

  15. Inflammation Mediated Metastasis: Immune Induced Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Evan N; Gao, Hui; Anfossi, Simone; Mego, Michal; Reddy, Neelima G; Debeb, Bisrat; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Wu, Qiong; Garza, Raul J; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mani, Sendurai A; Croix, Denise A; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Luthra, Raja; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most insidious form of locally advanced breast cancer; about a third of patients have distant metastasis at initial staging. Emerging evidence suggests that host factors in the tumor microenvironment may interact with underlying IBC cells to make them aggressive. It is unknown whether immune cells associated to the IBC microenvironment play a role in this scenario to transiently promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in these cells. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by activated immune cells can induce an EMT in IBC and thus promote metastasis. In a pilot study of 16 breast cancer patients, TNF-α production by peripheral blood T cells was correlated with the detection of circulating tumor cells expressing EMT markers. In a variety of IBC model cell lines, soluble factors from activated T cells induced expression of EMT-related genes, including FN1, VIM, TGM2, ZEB1. Interestingly, although IBC cells exhibited increased invasion and migration following exposure to immune factors, the expression of E-cadherin (CDH1), a cell adhesion molecule, increased uniquely in IBC cell lines but not in non-IBC cell lines. A combination of TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β was able to recapitulate EMT induction in IBC, and conditioned media preloaded with neutralizing antibodies against these factors exhibited decreased EMT. These data suggest that release of cytokines by activated immune cells may contribute to the aggressiveness of IBC and highlight these factors as potential target mediators of immune-IBC interaction.

  16. Immune suppression via glucocorticoid-stimulated monocytes: a novel mechanism to cope with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Varga, Georg; Ehrchen, Jan; Brockhausen, Anne; Weinhage, Toni; Nippe, Nadine; Belz, Michael; Tsianakas, Athanasios; Ross, Matthias; Bettenworth, Dominik; Spieker, Tilmann; Wolf, Marc; Lippe, Ralph; Tenbrock, Klaus; Leenen, Pieter J M; Roth, Johannes; Sunderkötter, Cord

    2014-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used as first-line therapies for generalized suppression of inflammation (e.g., allergies or autoimmune diseases), but their long-term use is limited by severe side effects. Our previous work revealed that GCs induced a stable anti-inflammatory phenotype in monocytes, the GC-stimulated monocytes (GCsMs) that we exploited for targeted GC-mediated therapeutic effects. We demonstrate that GCsMs interact with T cells in suppressing proliferation, as well as cytokine release of CD8(+) and, especially, CD4(+) T cells in vitro, and that they support generation of Foxp3(+) cells. Therefore, we tested their immunosuppressive potential in CD4(+) T cell-induced colitis in vivo. We found that injection of GCsMs into mice with severe colitis abolished the inflammation and resulted in significant clinical improvement within a few days. T cells recovered from GCsM-treated mice exhibited reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17. Furthermore, clusters of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells were detectable at local sites of inflammation in the colon. Thus, GCsMs are able to modify T cell responses in vitro and in vivo, as well as to downregulate and clinically cure severe T cell-mediated colitis.

  17. Interplay between inflammation, immune system and neuronal pathways: effect on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Benedicte-Y; De Man, Joris-G

    2010-11-28

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response representing the leading cause of death in critically ill patients, mostly due to multiple organ failure. The gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced multiple organ failure through intestinal barrier dysfunction, bacterial translocation and ileus. In this review we address the role of the gastrointestinal tract, the mediators, cell types and transduction pathways involved, based on experimental data obtained from models of inflammation-induced ileus and (preliminary) clinical data. The complex interplay within the gastrointestinal wall between mast cells, residential macrophages and glial cells on the one hand, and neurons and smooth muscle cells on the other hand, involves intracellular signaling pathways, Toll-like receptors and a plethora of neuroactive substances such as nitric oxide, prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, tryptases and hormones. Multidirectional signaling between the different components in the gastrointestinal wall, the spinal cord and central nervous system impacts inflammation and its consequences. We propose that novel therapeutic strategies should target inflammation on the one hand and gastrointestinal motility, gastrointestinal sensitivity and even pain signaling on the other hand, for instance by impeding afferent neuronal signaling, by activation of the vagal anti-inflammatory pathway or by the use of pharmacological agents such as ghrelin and ghrelin agonists or drugs interfering with the endocannabinoid system.

  18. Immune modulation by ER stress and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rodvold, Jeffrey J; Mahadevan, Navin R; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2016-09-28

    It is now increasingly evident that the immune system represents a barrier to tumor emergence, growth, and recurrence. Although this idea was originally proposed almost 50 years ago as the "immune surveillance hypothesis", it is commonly recognized that, with few rare exceptions, tumor cells always prevail. Thus, one of the central unsolved paradoxes of tumor immunology is how a tumor escapes immune control, which is reflected in the lack of effective autochthonous or vaccine-induced anti-tumor T cell responses. In this review, we discuss the role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response/unfolded protein response (UPR) in the immunomodulation of myeloid cells and T cells. Specifically, we will discuss how the tumor cell UPR polarizes myeloid cells in a cell-extrinsic manner, and how in turn, thus polarized myeloid cells negatively affect T cell activation and clonal expansion.

  19. Antiviral immune responses and lung inflammation after respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the commonest and most troublesome viruses of infancy. It causes most cases of bronchiolitis, which is associated with wheezing in later childhood. In primary infection, the peak of disease coincides not with the peak of viral replication but with the development of specific T and B cell responses. This immune response is apparently responsible for much of the disease. Animal models clearly show that a range of immune responses can enhance disease severity, particularly after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV. Prior immune sensitization leads to exuberant chemokine production, an excessive cellular influx, and an overabundance of cytokines during RSV challenge. The inflammatory host response to viral infection may be relevant not only to childhood bronchiolitis, but also to obstructive lung diseases in adults.

  20. Gut inflammation and immunity: what is the role of the human gut virome?

    PubMed

    Focà, Alfredo; Liberto, Maria Carla; Quirino, Angela; Marascio, Nadia; Zicca, Emilia; Pavia, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    The human virome comprises viruses that infect host cells, virus-derived elements in our chromosomes, and viruses that infect other organisms, including bacteriophages and plant viruses. The development of high-throughput sequencing techniques has shown that the human gut microbiome is a complex community in which the virome plays a crucial role into regulation of intestinal immunity and homeostasis. Nevertheless, the size of the human virome is still poorly understood. Indeed the enteric virome is in a continuous and dynamic equilibrium with other components of the gut microbiome and the gut immune system, an interaction that may influence the health and disease of the host. We review recent evidence on the viruses found in the gastrointestinal tract, discussing their interactions with the resident bacterial microbiota and the host immune system, in order to explore the potential impact of the virome on human health.

  1. Immune Regulation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Disis, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune system cells play a major role in regulating the growth of cancer. Although it is commonly thought that an immune response localized to the tumor will inhibit cancer growth, it is clear that some types of inflammation induced in a tumor may also lead to cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination. Recent evidence suggests, however, that some patients with cancer can mount an antitumor immune response that has the potential to control or eliminate cancer. Indeed, a so-called “immune response” signature has been described in malignancy that is associated with improved outcomes in several tumor types. Moreover, the presence of specific subsets of T cells, which have the capability to penetrate tumor stroma and infiltrate deep into the parenchyma, identifies patients with an improved prognosis. Immune-based therapies have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment by eliciting immune system cells that will initiate acute inflammation that leads to tissue destruction. PMID:20516428

  2. Rim Pathway-Mediated Alterations in the Fungal Cell Wall Influence Immune Recognition and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Kyla S.; Esher, Shannon K.; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Munro, Carol; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compared to other fungal pathogens, Cryptococcus neoformans is particularly adept at avoiding detection by innate immune cells. To explore fungal cellular features involved in immune avoidance, we characterized cell surface changes of the C. neoformans rim101Δ mutant, a strain that fails to organize and shield immunogenic epitopes from host detection. These cell surface changes are associated with an exaggerated, detrimental inflammatory response in mouse models of infection. We determined that the disorganized strain rim101Δ cell wall increases macrophage detection in a contact-dependent manner. Using biochemical and microscopy methods, we demonstrated that the rim101Δ strain shows a modest increase in the levels of both cell wall chitin and chitosan but that it shows a more dramatic increase in chito-oligomer exposure, as measured by wheat germ agglutinin staining. We also created a series of mutants with various levels of cell wall wheat germ agglutinin staining, and we demonstrated that the staining intensity correlates with the degree of macrophage activation in response to each strain. To explore the host receptors responsible for recognizing the rim101Δ mutant, we determined that both the MyD88 and CARD9 innate immune signaling proteins are involved. Finally, we characterized the immune response to the rim101Δ mutant in vivo, documenting a dramatic and sustained increase in Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses. These results suggest that the Rim101 transcription factor actively regulates the C. neoformans cell wall to prevent the exposure of immune stimulatory molecules within the host. These studies further explored the ways in which immune cells detect C. neoformans and other fungal pathogens by mechanisms that include sensing N-acetylglucosamine-containing structures, such as chitin and chitosan. PMID:28143983

  3. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R.; Ho, Chia Chi M.; Kauke, Monique J.; Almo, Steven C.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47–SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:27091975

  4. The innate and adaptive infiltrating immune systems as targets for breast cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Law, Andrew M K; Lim, Elgene; Ormandy, Christopher J; Gallego-Ortega, David

    2017-04-01

    A cancer cell-centric view has long dominated the field of cancer biology. Research efforts have focussed on aberrant cancer cell signalling pathways and on changes to cancer cell DNA. Mounting evidence demonstrates that many cancer-associated cell types within the tumour stroma co-evolve and support tumour growth and development, greatly modifying cancer cell behaviour, facilitating invasion and metastasis and controlling dormancy and sensitivity to drug therapy. Thus, these stromal cells represent potential targets for cancer therapy. Among these cell types, immune cells have emerged as a promising target for therapy. The adaptive and the innate immune system play an important role in normal mammary development and breast cancer. The number of infiltrating adaptive immune system cells with tumour-rejecting capacity, primarily, T lymphocytes, is lower in breast cancer compared with other cancer types, but infiltration occurs in a large proportion of cases. There is strong evidence demonstrating the importance of the immunosuppressive role of the innate immune system during breast cancer progression. A consideration of components of both the innate and the adaptive immune system is essential for the design and development of immunotherapies in breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the importance of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as potential targets for breast cancer therapy.

  5. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R; Ho, Chia Chi M; Kauke, Monique J; Almo, Steven C; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2016-05-10

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47-SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy.

  6. Generation of Individual Diversity: A Too Neglected Fundamental Property of Adaptive Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Muraille, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fitness gains resulting from development of the adaptive immune system (AIS) during evolution are still the subject of hot debate. A large random repertoire of antigenic receptors is costly to develop and could be the source of autoimmune reactions. And yet, despite their drawbacks, AIS-like systems seem to have been independently acquired in several phyla of metazoans with very different anatomies, longevities, and lifestyles. This article is a speculative attempt to explore the selective pressures, which favored this striking convergent evolution. It is well known that the AIS enables an organism to produce a specific immune response against all natural or artificial antigenic structures. However, it is frequently neglected that this response is highly variable among individuals. In practice, each individual possesses a “private” adaptive immune repertoire. This individualization of immune defenses implies that invasion and escape immune mechanisms developed by pathogens will certainly not always be successful as the specific targets and organization of the immune response are somewhat unpredictable. In a population, where individuals display heterogeneous immune responses to infection, the probability that a pathogen is able to infect all individuals could be reduced compared to a homogeneous population. This suggests that the individual diversity of the immune repertoire is not a by-product of the AIS but of its fundamental properties and could be in part responsible for repeated selection and conservation of the AIS during metazoan evolution. The capacity of the AIS to improve the management of cooperative or parasitic symbiotic relationships at the individual level could be a secondary development due to its progressive integration into the innate immune system. This hypothesis constitutes a new scenario for AIS emergence and explains the selection of MHC restriction and MHC diversification. PMID:24860570

  7. Generation of individual diversity: a too neglected fundamental property of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Muraille, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fitness gains resulting from development of the adaptive immune system (AIS) during evolution are still the subject of hot debate. A large random repertoire of antigenic receptors is costly to develop and could be the source of autoimmune reactions. And yet, despite their drawbacks, AIS-like systems seem to have been independently acquired in several phyla of metazoans with very different anatomies, longevities, and lifestyles. This article is a speculative attempt to explore the selective pressures, which favored this striking convergent evolution. It is well known that the AIS enables an organism to produce a specific immune response against all natural or artificial antigenic structures. However, it is frequently neglected that this response is highly variable among individuals. In practice, each individual possesses a "private" adaptive immune repertoire. This individualization of immune defenses implies that invasion and escape immune mechanisms developed by pathogens will certainly not always be successful as the specific targets and organization of the immune response are somewhat unpredictable. In a population, where individuals display heterogeneous immune responses to infection, the probability that a pathogen is able to infect all individuals could be reduced compared to a homogeneous population. This suggests that the individual diversity of the immune repertoire is not a by-product of the AIS but of its fundamental properties and could be in part responsible for repeated selection and conservation of the AIS during metazoan evolution. The capacity of the AIS to improve the management of cooperative or parasitic symbiotic relationships at the individual level could be a secondary development due to its progressive integration into the innate immune system. This hypothesis constitutes a new scenario for AIS emergence and explains the selection of MHC restriction and MHC diversification.

  8. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) BVDV induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent ...

  9. Type B coxsackieviruses and their interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems

    PubMed Central

    Kemball, Christopher C; Alirezaei, Mehrdad; Whitton, J Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Coxsackieviruses are important human pathogens, and their interactions with the innate and adaptive immune systems are of particular interest. Many viruses evade some aspects of the innate response, but coxsackieviruses go a step further by actively inducing, and then exploiting, some features of the host cell response. Furthermore, while most viruses encode proteins that hinder the effector functions of adaptive immunity, coxsackieviruses and their cousins demonstrate a unique capacity to almost completely evade the attention of naive CD8+ T cells. In this article, we discuss the above phenomena, describe the current status of research in the field, and present several testable hypotheses regarding possible links between virus infection, innate immune sensing and disease. PMID:20860480

  10. Regulation of Adaptive Immunity in Health and Disease by Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Four decades ago, it was observed that stimulation of T cells induces rapid changes in cellular cholesterol that are required before proliferation can commence. Investigators returning to this phenomenon have finally revealed its molecular underpinnings. Cholesterol trafficking and its dysregulation are now also recognized to strongly influence dendritic cell function, T cell polarization, and antibody responses. In this review, the state of the literature is reviewed on how cholesterol and its trafficking regulate the cells of the adaptive immune response and in vivo disease phenotypes of dysregulated adaptive immunity, including allergy, asthma, and autoimmune disease. Emerging evidence supporting a potential role for statins and other lipid-targeted therapies in the treatment of these diseases is presented. Just as vascular biologists have embraced immunity in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis, so should basic and clinical immunologists in allergy, pulmonology, and other disciplines seek to encompass a basic understanding of lipid science. PMID:26149587

  11. hnRNP I regulates neonatal immune adaptation and prevents colitis and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium plays a critical role in host-microbe homeostasis by sensing gut microbes and subsequently initiating proper immune responses. During the neonatal stage, the intestinal epithelium is under immune repression, allowing the transition for newborns from a relatively sterile intra-uterine environment to one that is rich in foreign antigens. The mechanism underlying such immune repression remains largely unclear, but involves downregulation of IRAK1 (interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase), an essential component of toll-like receptor-mediated NF-κB signaling. We report here that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein I (hnRNPI), an RNA binding protein, is essential for regulating neonatal immune adaptation. We generated a mouse model in which hnRNPI is ablated specifically in the intestinal epithelial cells, and characterized intestinal defects in the knockout mice. We found that loss of hnRNPI function in mouse intestinal epithelial cells results in early onset of spontaneous colitis followed by development of invasive colorectal cancer. Strikingly, the epithelium-specific hnRNPI knockout neonates contain aberrantly high IRAK1 protein levels in the colons and fail to develop immune tolerance to environmental microbes. Our results demonstrate that hnRNPI plays a critical role in establishing neonatal immune adaptation and preventing colitis and colorectal cancer. PMID:28296893

  12. Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Artur; McCullough, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are major players in both innate and adaptive immune responses against influenza virus. These immune responses, as well as the important interface between the innate and adaptive systems, are orchestrated by specialized subsets of DC, including conventional steady-state DC, migratory DC and plasmacytoid DC. The characteristics and efficacy of the responses are dependent on the relative activity of these DC subsets, rendering DC crucial for the development of both naïve and memory immune responses. However, due to their critical role, DC also contribute to the immunopathological processes observed during acute influenza, such as that caused by the pathogenic H5N1 viruses. Therein, the role of different DC subsets in the induction of interferon type I, pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses is important for the outcome of interaction between the virus and host immune defences. The present review will present current knowledge on this area, relating to the importance of DC activity for the induction of efficacious humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. This will include the main viral elements associated with the triggering or inhibition of DC activation. Finally, the current knowledge on understanding how differences in various vaccines influence the manner of immune defence induction will be presented. PMID:21994580

  13. Mucopolysaccharide diseases: a complex interplay between neuroinflammation, microglial activation and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Archer, Louise D; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Bigger, Brian W; Fildes, James E

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) diseases are lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) caused by deficiencies in enzymes required for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) catabolism. Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), MPS IIIA, MPS IIIB and MPS VII are deficient in the enzymes α-L-Iduronidase, Heparan-N-Sulphatase, N-Acetylglucosaminidase and Beta-Glucuronidase, respectively. Enzyme deficiency leads to the progressive multi-systemic build-up of heparan sulphate (HS) and dermatan sulphate (DS) within cellular lysosomes, followed by cell, tissue and organ damage and in particular neurodegeneration. Clinical manifestations of MPS are well established; however as lysosomes represent vital components of immune cells, it follows that lysosomal accumulation of GAGs could affect diverse immune functions and therefore influence disease pathogenesis. Theoretically, MPS neurodegeneration and GAGs could be substantiating a threat of danger and damage to alert the immune system for cellular clearance, which due to the progressive nature of MPS storage would propagate disease pathogenesis. Innate immunity appears to have a key role in MPS; however the extent of adaptive immune involvement remains to be elucidated. The current literature suggests a complex interplay between neuroinflammation, microglial activation and adaptive immunity in MPS disease.

  14. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Durango, N.; Vecchiola, A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, L. M.; Simon, F.; Riedel, C. A.; Fardella, C. E.; Kalergis, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models. PMID:26448944

  15. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Durango, N; Vecchiola, A; Gonzalez-Gomez, L M; Simon, F; Riedel, C A; Fardella, C E; Kalergis, A M

    2015-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models.

  16. Mammalian N-glycan branching protects against innate immune self-recognition and inflammation in autoimmune disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Green, Ryan S; Stone, Erica L; Tenno, Mari; Lehtonen, Eero; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases are prevalent and often life-threatening syndromes, yet the pathogenic triggers and mechanisms involved remain mostly unresolved. Protein asparagine linked- (N-) glycosylation produces glycan structures that substantially differ among the extracellular compartments of evolutionarily divergent organisms. Alpha-mannosidase-II (alphaM-II) deficiency diminishes complex-type N-glycan branching in vertebrates and induces an autoimmune disease in mice similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. We found that disease pathogenesis provoking glomerulonephritis and kidney failure was nonhematopoietic in origin, independent of complement C3 and the adaptive immune system, mitigated by intravenous administration of immunoglobulin-G, and linked to chronic activation of the innate immune system. N-glycans produced in alphaM-II deficiency bear immune-stimulatory mannose-dependent ligands for innate immune lectin receptors, disrupting the phylogenic basis of this glycomic recognition mechanism. Thus, mammalian N-glycan branching safeguards against the formation of an endogenous immunologic signal of nonself that can provoke a sterile inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

  17. Cutting edge: impairment of dendritic cells and adaptive immunity by Ebola and Lassa viruses.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Hutchinson, Karen; Agarwal, Sudhanshu; McRae, Michael; Rollin, Pierre E; Pulendran, Bali

    2003-03-15

    Acute infection of humans with Ebola and Lassa viruses, two principal etiologic agents of hemorrhagic fevers, often results in a paradoxical pattern of immune responses: early infection, characterized by an outpouring of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6, vs late stage infections, which are associated with poor immune responses. The mechanisms underlying these diverse outcomes are poorly understood. In particular, the role played by cells of the innate immune system, such as dendritic cells (DC), is not known. In this study, we show that Ebola and Lassa viruses infect human monocyte-derived DC and impair their function. Monocyte-derived DC exposed to either virus fail to secrete proinflammatory cytokines, do not up-regulate costimulatory molecules, and are poor stimulators of T cells. These data represent the first evidence for a mechanism by which Ebola and Lassa viruses target DC to impair adaptive immunity.

  18. Systemic Immune-Inflammation Index Predicts Prognosis of Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Propensity Score-matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yiting; Shao, Yingjie; Zhu, Danxia; Zheng, Xiao; Zhou, Qi; Zhou, Wenjie; Ni, Xuefeng; Wu, Changping; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    Systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), based on peripheral lymphocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts, was recently investigated as a prognostic marker in several tumors. However, SII has not been reported in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We evaluated the prognostic value of the SII in 916 patients with ESCC who underwent radical surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were calculated by the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The time-dependent receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to compare the discrimination ability for OS. PSM (propensity score matching) was carried out to imbalance the baseline characteristics. Our results showed that SII, PLR, NLR and MLR were all associated with OS in ESCC patients in the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. However, only SII was an independent risk factor for OS (HR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.01–1.53, P = 0.042) among these systemic inflammation scores. The AUC for SII was bigger than PLR, NLR and MLR. In the PSM analysis, SII still remained an independent predictor for OS (HR = 1.30, CI 1.05–1.60, P = 0.018). SII is a novel, simple and inexpensive prognostic predictor for patients with ESCC undergoing radical esophagectomy. The prognostic value of SII is superior to PLR, NLR and MLR. PMID:28000729

  19. Graphene Oxides Decorated with Carnosine as an Adjuvant To Modulate Innate Immune and Improve Adaptive Immunity in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chunchun; Zhi, Xiao; Li, Chao; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Qiu, Xusheng; Ding, Chan; Ma, Lijun; Lu, Hongmin; Chen, Di; Liu, Guangqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-23

    Current studies have revealed the immune effects of graphene oxide (GO) and have utilized them as vaccine carriers and adjuvants. However, GO easily induces strong oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction at the site of injection. It is very necessary to develop an alternative adjuvant based on graphene oxide derivatives for improving immune responses and decreasing side effects. Carnosine (Car) is an outstanding and safe antioxidant. Herein, the feasibility and efficiency of ultrasmall graphene oxide decorated with carnosine as an alternative immune adjuvant were explored. OVA@GO-Car was prepared by simply mixing ovalbumin (OVA, a model antigen) with ultrasmall GO covalently modified with carnosine (GO-Car). We investigated the immunological properties of the GO-Car adjuvant in model mice. Results show that OVA@GO-Car can promote robust and durable OVA-specific antibody response, increase lymphocyte proliferation efficiency, and enhance CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell activation. The presence of Car in GO also probably contributes to enhancing the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through modulating the expression of some cytokines, including IL-6, CXCL1, CCL2, and CSF3. In addition, the safety of GO-Car as an adjuvant was evaluated comprehensively. No symptoms such as allergic response, inflammatory redness swelling, raised surface temperatures, physiological anomalies of blood, and remarkable weight changes were observed. Besides, after modification with carnosine, histological damages caused by GO-Car in lung, muscle, kidney, and spleen became weaken significantly. This study sufficiently suggest that GO-Car as a safe adjuvant can effectively enhance humoral and innate immune responses against antigens in vivo.

  20. Soluble metals in residual oil fly ash alter innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses to bacterial infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jenny R. . E-mail: jur6@cdc.gov; Young, Shih-Houng; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.

    2007-06-15

    The soluble metals of the pollutant, residual oil fly ash (ROFA), have been shown to alter pulmonary bacterial clearance in rats. The goal of this study was to determine the potential effects on both the innate and adaptive lung immune responses after bacterial infection in rats pre-exposed to the soluble metals in ROFA. Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally dosed (i.t.) at day 0 with ROFA (R-Total) (1.0 mg/100 g body weight), the soluble fraction of ROFA (R-Soluble), the soluble sample subject to a chelator (R-Chelex), or phosphate-buffered saline (Saline). On day 3, rats were administered an i.t. dose of 5 x 10{sup 4} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, bacterial pulmonary clearance was monitored and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on days 3 (pre-infection), 6, 8, and 10. A concentrated first fraction of lavage fluid was retained for analysis of lactate dehydrogenase and albumin to assess lung injury. BAL cell number, phenotype, and production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) were assessed, and a variety of cytokines were measured in the BAL fluid. Rats pre-treated with R-Soluble showed elevated lung injury/cytotoxicity and increased cellular influx into the lungs. R-Soluble-treatment also altered ROS, RNS, and cytokine levels, and caused a degree of macrophage and T cell inhibition. These effects of R-Soluble result in increased pulmonary bacterial burden after infection. The results suggest that soluble metals in ROFA increase lung injury and inflammation, and alter both innate and adaptive pulmonary immune responses.

  1. Rhinovirus-induced IL-25 in asthma exacerbation drives type 2 immunity and allergic pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Beale, Janine; Jayaraman, Annabelle; Jackson, David J; Macintyre, Jonathan D R; Edwards, Michael R; Walton, Ross P; Zhu, Jie; Ching, Yee Man; Shamji, Betty; Edwards, Matt; Westwick, John; Cousins, David J; Hwang, You Yi; McKenzie, Andrew; Johnston, Sebastian L; Bartlett, Nathan W

    2014-10-01

    Rhinoviruses (RVs), which are the most common cause of virally induced asthma exacerbations, account for much of the burden of asthma in terms of morbidity, mortality, and associated cost. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) activates type 2-driven inflammation and is therefore potentially important in virally induced asthma exacerbations. To investigate this, we examined whether RV-induced IL-25 could contribute to asthma exacerbations. RV-infected cultured asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells exhibited a heightened intrinsic capacity for IL-25 expression, which correlated with donor atopic status. In vivo human IL-25 expression was greater in asthmatics at baseline and during experimental RV infection. In addition, in mice, RV infection induced IL-25 expression and augmented allergen-induced IL-25. Blockade of the IL-25 receptor reduced many RV-induced exacerbation-specific responses including type 2 cytokine expression, mucus production, and recruitment of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, and T and non-T type 2 cells. Therefore, asthmatic epithelial cells have an increased intrinsic capacity for expression of a pro-type 2 cytokine in response to a viral infection, and IL-25 is a key mediator of RV-induced exacerbations of pulmonary inflammation.

  2. A multiplex panel of plasma markers of immunity and inflammation in classical kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Aka, Peter V; Kemp, Troy J; Rabkin, Charles S; Shiels, Meredith S; Polizzotto, Mark N; Lauria, Carmela; Vitale, Francesco; Pinto, Ligia A; Goedert, James J

    2015-01-15

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) risk is affected by perturbed immunity. Herein, we compared plasma from 15 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative classic KS cases to plasma from 29 matched controls, using a multiplex panel of immunity markers. Of 70 markers, CXCL10 (IP-10), sIL-1RII, sIL-2RA, and CCL3 (MIP-1A) were strongly and significantly associated with KS, after adjustment for age and smoking status. These and previous observations are consistent with a tumor-promoting role for these cytokines, particularly CXCL10, but the small sample size and case-control design preclude firm conclusions on KS risk or pathogenesis. Larger, well-designed prospective studies are needed to better assess the association of these markers with KS.

  3. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  4. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  5. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  6. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases.

  7. T-cell immune response cDNA 7 in allograft rejection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Utku, Nalân; Heinemann, Thomas; Milford, Edgar L

    2007-05-01

    The membrane protein T-cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) is transiently expressed in subsets of lymphocytes following antigen stimulation. The importance of TIRC7 in immune activation is demonstrated by the effect of antibodies directed against extracellular domains of TIRC7. In vitro targeting of TIRC7 inhibits proliferation and cytokine expression in human, mouse and rat lymphocytes, and these inhibitory effects have been associated with induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA and protein in the presence of TIRC7 antibodies. In vivo, anti-TIRC7 antibodies prevent kidney transplant rejection in rats and heart allograft rejection in mice. Treatment with an anti-TIRC7 antibody as monotherapy or in combination with TNFalpha blockade inhibits disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis. TIRC7 expression decreases in the peripheral blood of humans who have undergone cardiac transplant prior to clinical rejection, and is therefore a promising noninvasive tool for the prediction of rejection. Thus, targeting of TIRC7 may lead to the development of specific and effective therapeutic and diagnostic approaches by unifying relevant cellular and molecular responses in T- and B-cell subsets, and represents a promising new pathway for immune regulation in transplantation and autoimmune disease.

  8. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Richards, William G; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J; Rodig, Scott J; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E; Johnson, Bruce E; Janne, Pasi A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Costa, Daniel B; Freeman, Gordon J; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S

    2016-02-17

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade.

  9. Cryptococcal meningitis accompanying lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter: a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hiroya; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Zen; Inaba, Akira; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2014-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is rarely complicated by immune-mediated leukoencephalopathy, but the precise pathomechanism is uncertain. A 72-year-old Japanese man treated with prednisolone for Sweet disease developed a subacute progression of meningitis, which was considered as neuro-Sweet disease. A treatment by methylprednisolone rapidly improved CSF findings with a remarkable decrease in lymphocyte numbers in the blood, but the patient's consciousness still worsened after the cessation of the treatment. The patient developed cryptococcal meningitis and MRI showed abnormal intensities predominantly in the cerebral deep white matter along with the recovery of lymphocyte numbers in the blood, which resulted in death. A postmortem examination of the brain revealed degenerative lesions, especially at the cerebral white matter and cortex adjacent to the leptomeninges abundantly infiltrated by Cryptococcus neoformans. In the affected cerebral deep white matter, perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes was prominent in coexistence with reactive astrocytes and vascular proliferation, but these findings were not observed in the subcortical and cortical lesions. Cryptococcus neoformans was not present within the brain parenchyma. This is the first report of a case suggesting that cryptococcal meningitis can accompany lymphocytic inflammation predominantly in cerebral deep white matter as a possible manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  10. Attenuation fluctuations and local dermal reflectivity are indicators of immune cell infiltrate and epidermal hyperplasia in skin inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Choudhury, Niloy; Levitz, David; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses responsible for skin homeostasis. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of psoriasis remains under investigated. To elucidate the spatial-temporal morphological evolution of psoriasis we undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to non-invasively document dermal alterations due to immune cell infiltration and epidermal hyperplasia in an Imiquimod (IMQ) induced model of psoriasis-like inflammation in DBA2/C57Bl6 hybrid mice. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a three parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(z) = ρ exp(-mu;z +ɛ(z)). Ensemble averaging of the fit parameters over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed that the local dermal reflectivity ρ, decreased significantly in response to 6 day IMQ treatment (p = 0.0001), as did the standard deviation of the attenuation fluctuation std(ɛ(z)), (p = 0.04), in comparison to cream controls and day 1 treatments. No significant changes were observed in the average dermal attenuation rate, μ. Our results suggest these label-free OCT-based metrics can be deployed to investigate new therapeutic targets in animal models as well as aid in clinical staging of psoriasis in conjunction with the psoriasis area and severity index.

  11. Role of IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in modulating T-helper cell immune responses during silica-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangwei; Dai, Wujing; Li, Chao; Lu, Xiaowei; Chen, Ying; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis, which are seriously harmful to human health. Previous research demonstrated that uncontrolled T-helper (Th) cell immune responses were involved in the pathogenesis of silicosis. Lymphocytes also are reported to have important roles. Existing studies on lymphocyte regulation of Th immune responses were limited to T cells, such as the regulatory T (Treg) cell, which could negatively regulate inflammation and promote the process of silicosis. However, other regulatory subsets in silicosis have not been investigated in detail, and the mechanism of immune homeostasis modulation needs further exploration. Another regulatory lymphocyte, the regulatory B cell, has recently drawn increasing attention. In this study, we comprehensively showed the role of IL-10-producing regulatory B cell (B10) in a silicosis model of mice. B10 was inducible by silica instillation. Insufficient B10 amplified inflammation and attenuated lung fibrosis by promoting the Th1 immune response. Insufficient B10 clearly inhibited Treg and decreased the level of IL-10. Our study indicated that B10 could control lung inflammation and exacerbate lung fibrosis by inhibiting Th1 response and modulating the Th balance. The regulatory function of B10 could be associated with Treg induction and IL-10 secretion. PMID:27354007

  12. Gene expression profiling by mRNA sequencing reveals increased expression of immune/inflammation-related genes in the hippocampus of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y; Kim, J; Shin, J Y; Kim, J Ii; Seo, J S; Webster, M J; Lee, D; Kim, S

    2013-10-29

    Whole-genome expression profiling in postmortem brain tissue has recently provided insight into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Previous microarray and RNA-Seq studies identified several biological processes including synaptic function, mitochondrial function and immune/inflammation response as altered in the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Now using RNA-Seq data from the hippocampus, we have identified 144 differentially expressed genes in schizophrenia cases as compared with unaffected controls. Immune/inflammation response was the main biological process over-represented in these genes. The upregulation of several of these genes, IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, APOL1 (Apolipoprotein L1), ADORA2A (adenosine receptor 2A), IGFBP4 and CD163 were validated in the schizophrenia subjects using data from the SNCID database and with quantitative RT-PCR. We identified a co-expression module associated with schizophrenia that includes the majority of differentially expressed genes related to immune/inflammation response as well as with the density of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the hippocampus. The results indicate that abnormal immune/inflammation response in the hippocampus may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and may be associated with abnormalities in the parvalbumin-containing neurons that lead to the cognitive deficits of the disease.

  13. Epileptic encephalitis: the role of the innate and adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Vezzani, Annamaria; Bien, Christian G

    2012-05-01

    Seizures are a prominent clinical feature of encephalitis. Recent data suggest the adaptive as well as innate immune system to be involved directly in the pathomechanism of epileptogenesis. Cytotoxic T-cells and antibody-mediated complement activation are major components of the adaptive immune system, which can induce neurodegeneration, thereby probably contributing to epileptic encephalitis. The innate immune system operates via interleukin-1 and toll-like receptor-associated mechanisms and was shown to play a direct role in epileptogenesis. Here, we review neuropathology hallmarks of various encephalitis conditions such as Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) but also introduce the more recently discovered antibody-associated voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 encephalitides. Neuropathological investigations are used to determine specific cellular components and molecular mechanisms used by the immune system to provoke neurodegeneration and to promote epileptogenesis. Based on recent findings, we propose concepts for the stratification of epileptic encephalitis. Knowledge of the role of the innate immunity has already translated into clinical treatment strategies and may help to discover novel drug targets for these epileptic disorders.

  14. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F.; Kauffman, Kevin J.; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E.; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE−/− mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)–targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  15. Prostate cancer stem cells are targets of both innate and adaptive immunity and elicit tumor-specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Jachetti, Elena; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Grioni, Matteo; Ricupito, Alessia; Brambillasca, Chiara; Generoso, Luca; Calcinotto, Arianna; Freschi, Massimo; Mondino, Anna; Galli, Rossella; Bellone, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, therapies that do not target the CSC compartment have limited, if any, chances to eradicate established tumors. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have the potential to recognize and kill single neoplastic cells within a tissue, whether CSCs can be targeted by the immune system during spontaneous or vaccination-elicited responses is poorly defined. Here, we provide experimental evidence showing that CSC lines established from the prostate of transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice expressed prostate cancer-associated antigens, MHC Class I and II molecules as well as ligands for natural killer (NK) cell receptors. Indeed, CSC were targets for both NK cell- and CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. The administration of dendritic cells pulsed with irradiated CSCs induced a tumor-specific immune response that was more robust than that induced by dendritic cells pulsed with differentiated tumor cells, delayed tumor growth in mice challenged with prostate CSCs and caused tumor regression in TRAMP mice. Thus, CSC are targeted by both innate and adaptive immune responses and might be exploited for the design of novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. PMID:23762811

  16. The immune response in the CNS in Theiler's virus induced demyelinating disease switches from an early adaptive response to a chronic innate-like response.

    PubMed

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Pachner, Andrew R

    2016-02-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is an important model of the progressive disability caused by irreversible CNS tissue injury, and provides an example of how a CNS pathogen can cause inflammation, demyelination, and neuronal damage. We were interested in which molecules, especially inflammatory mediators, might be upregulated in the CNS throughout TMEV-IDD. We quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR multi-gene system the expression of a pathway-focused panel of genes at 30 and 165 days post infection, characterizing both the early inflammatory and the late neurodegenerative stages of TMEV-IDD. Also, we measured 32 cytokines/chemokines by multiplex Luminex analysis in CSF specimens from early and late TMEV-IDD as well as sham-treated mice. Results indicate that, in the later stage of TMEV-IDD, activation of the innate immune response is most prominent: TLRs, type I IFN response genes, and innate immunity-associated cytokines were highly expressed in late TMEV-IDD compared to sham (p ≤ 0.0001) and early TMEV-IDD (p < 0.05). Conversely, several molecular mediators of adaptive immune response were highly expressed in early TMEV-IDD (all p ≤ 0.001). Protein detection in the CSF was broadly concordant with mRNA abundance of the corresponding gene measured by real-time RT-PCR in the spinal cord, since several cytokines/chemokines were increased in the CSF of TMEV-IDD mice. Results show a clear shift from adaptive to innate immunity from early to late TMEV-IDD, indicating that adaptive and innate immune pathways are likely involved in the development and progression of the disease to different extents. CSF provides an optimal source of biomarkers of CNS neuroinflammation.

  17. Synthesizing within-host and population-level selective pressures on viral populations: the impact of adaptive immunity on viral immune escape

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Igor; Pepin, Kim M.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of viruses to escape prevailing host immunity involves selection at multiple integrative scales, from within-host viral and immune kinetics to the host population level. In order to understand how viral immune escape occurs, we develop an analytical framework that links the dynamical nature of immunity and viral variation across these scales. Our epidemiological model incorporates within-host viral evolutionary dynamics for a virus that causes acute infections (e.g. influenza and norovirus) with changes in host immunity in response to genetic changes in the virus population. We use a deterministic description of the within-host replication dynamics of the virus, the pool of susceptible host cells and the host adaptive immune response. We find that viral immune escape is most effective at intermediate values of immune strength. At very low levels of immunity, selection is too weak to drive immune escape in recovered hosts, while very high levels of immunity impose such strong selection that viral subpopulations go extinct before acquiring enough genetic diversity to escape host immunity. This result echoes the predictions of simpler models, but our formulation allows us to dissect the combination of within-host and transmission-level processes that drive immune escape. PMID:20335194

  18. Silencing nociceptor neurons reduces allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sébastien; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E.; Burkett, Patrick R.; Lee, Seungkyu; Cronin, Shane J.F.; Pascal, Maud A.; Laedermann, Cedric; Foster, Simmie L.; Tran, Johnathan V.; Lai, Nicole; Chiu, Isaac M.; Ghasemlou, Nader; DiBiase, Matthew; Roberson, David; Von Hehn, Christian; Agac, Busranour; Haworth, Oliver; Seki, Hiroyuki; Penninger, Josef M.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Bean, Bruce P.; Levy, Bruce D.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lung nociceptors initiate cough and bronchoconstriction. To elucidate if these fibers also contribute to allergic airway inflammation we stimulated lung nociceptors with capsaicin and observed increased neuropeptide release and immune cell infiltration. In contrast, ablating Nav1.8+ sensory neurons or silencing them with QX-314, a charged sodium channel inhibitor that enters via large pore ion channels to specifically block nociceptors, substantially reduced ovalbumin or house dust mite-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We also discovered that IL-5, a cytokine produced by activated immune cells, acts directly on nociceptors to induce release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP then stimulates CD4+ and resident innate lymphoid type 2 cells, creating an inflammatory signaling loop that promotes allergic inflammation. Our results indicate that nociceptors amplify pathological adaptive immune responses and that silencing these neurons with QX-314 interrupts this neuro-immune interplay, revealing a potential new therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:26119026

  19. The Transcriptomic Response of Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells to Endotoxin: Implications for Hepatic Inflammation and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2013-01-01

    With their location in the perisinusoidal space of Disse, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) communicate with all of the liver cell types both by physical association (cell body as well as cytosolic processes penetrating into sinusoids through the endothelial fenestrations) and by producing several cytokines and chemokines. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), circulating levels of which are elevated in liver diseases and transplantation, stimulates HSCs to produce increased amounts of cytokines and chemokines. Although recent research provides strong evidence for the role of HSCs in hepatic inflammation and immune regulation, the number of HSC-elaborated inflammatory and immune regulatory molecules may be much greater then known at the present time. Here we report time-dependent changes in the gene expression profile of inflammatory and immune-regulatory molecules in LPS-stimulated rat HSCs, and their validation by biochemical analyses. LPS strongly up-regulated LPS-response elements (TLR2 and TLR7) but did not affect TLR4 and down-regulated TLR9. LPS also up-regulated genes in the MAPK, NFκB, STAT, SOCS, IRAK and interferon signaling pathways, numerous CC and CXC chemokines and IL17F. Interestingly, LPS modulated genes related to TGFβ and HSC activation in a manner that would limit their activation and fibrogenic activity. The data indicate that LPS-stimulated HSCs become a major cell type in regulating hepatic inflammatory and immunological responses by altering expression of numerous relevant genes, and thus play a prominent role in hepatic pathophysiology including liver diseases and transplantation. PMID:24349206

  20. The Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM62 Regulates CARD9-Mediated Anti-Fungal Immunity and Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhifang; Conway, Kara L.; Heath, Robert J.; Rush, Jason S.; Leshchiner, Elizaveta S.; Ramirez-Ortez, Zaida G.; Nedelsky, Natalia B.; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Aylwin; Gardet, Agnès; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Rioux, John D.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.; Means, Terry K.; Daly, Mark J.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary CARD9 is a central component of anti-fungal innate immune signaling via C-type lectin receptors, and several immune-related disorders are associated with CARD9 mutations. Here we used a rare CARD9 variant that confers protection against inflammatory bowel disease as an entry point to investigate CARD9 regulation. We showed that the C-terminal truncated CARD9 protective variant acted in a dominant negative manner for CARD9-mediated cytokine production, indicating an important role for the C terminus in CARD9 signaling. We identified TRIM62 as a CARD9 binding partner and showed that TRIM62 facilitated K27-linked poly-ubiquitination of CARD9. We identified K125 as the ubiquitinated residue on CARD9 and demonstrated that this ubiquitination was essential for CARD9 activity. Furthermore, we showed that Trim62-deficient mice have increased susceptibility to fungal infection, similar to Card9-deficient mice. This study utilizes a rare protective allele to uncover a TRIM62-mediated mechanism for regulation of CARD9 activation. PMID:26488816

  1. Innate and adaptive immune responses in migrating spring-run adult chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Brian P.; Fisher, Kathleen M.; Colvin, Michael E.; Benda, Susan E.; Peterson, James T.; Kent, Michael L.; Schreck, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from salt water to freshwater streams to spawn. Immune responses in migrating adult salmon are thought to diminish in the run up to spawning, though the exact mechanisms for diminished immune responses remain unknown. Here we examine both adaptive and innate immune responses as well as pathogen burdens in migrating adult Chinook salmon in the Upper Willamette River basin. Messenger RNA transcripts encoding antibody heavy chain molecules slightly diminish as a function of time, but are still present even after fish have successfully spawned. In contrast, the innate anti-bacterial effector proteins present in fish plasma rapidly decrease as spawning approaches. Fish also were examined for the presence and severity of eight different pathogens in different organs. While pathogen burden tended to increase during the migration, no specific pathogen signature was associated with diminished immune responses. Transcript levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF beta were measured and did not change during the migration. These results suggest that loss of immune functions in adult migrating salmon are not due to pathogen infection or cytokine-mediated immune suppression, but is rather part of the life history of Chinook salmon likely induced by diminished energy reserves or hormonal changes which accompany spawning.

  2. Adaptive innate immunity? Responsive-mode prophylaxis in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Yannick; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2003-01-01

    A primary infection by a parasite may indicate a higher risk of being reinfected in the near future (since infection may indicate that enemies are becoming more abundant). Acquired immunity does not exist in invertebrates despite the fact that they also face increased risks of reinfection following primary exposure. However, when subjected to immune insult, insects can produce immune responses that persist for long enough to provide prophylaxis. Because these immune responses are costly, persistence must be maintained through a selective advantage. We tested for the possibility that these long-lasting immune responses provided increased resistance to later infections by experimentally mimicking a primary immune insult (pre-challenge) in larvae of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) prior to early or late exposure to spores of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. We found that pre-challenged larvae produced a long-lasting antimicrobial response, which provided a survival benefit when the larvae were exposed to fungal infection. These results suggest that the observed response is functionally "adaptive". PMID:14667338

  3. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD. PMID:26900473

  4. Oral immune therapy: targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an altered systemic immune response leading to inflammation-mediated damage to the gut and other organs. Oral immune therapy is a method of systemic immune modulation via alteration of the gut immune system. It uses the inherit ability of the innate system of the gut to redirect the systemic innate and adaptive immune responses. Oral immune therapy is an attractive clinical approach to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. It can induce immune modulation without immune suppression, has minimal toxicity and is easily administered. Targeting the systemic immune system via the gut immune system can serve as an attractive novel therapeutic method for IBD. This review summarizes the current data and discusses several examples of oral immune therapeutic methods for using the gut immune system to generate signals to reset systemic immunity as a treatment for IBD.

  5. Uncomplicated Diverticular Disease: Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Human Gut Mucosa before and after Rifaximin

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Paola; Petruzziello, Lucio; Casciano, Fabio; Costamagna, Guido; Pandolfi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Uncomplicated diverticular disease (UDD) is a frequent condition in adults. The pathogenesis of symptoms remains unknown. Bacteria are able to interact with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and to induce inflammation through both innate immunity and T-cell recruitment. We investigated the pattern of TLRs 2 and 4 and the intestinal homing in patients with UDD before and after a course of Rifaximin. Methods. Forty consecutive patients with UDD and 20 healthy asymptomatic subjects were enrolled. Among UDD patients, 20 were assigned to a 2-month course of treatment with Rifaximin 1.2 g/day for 15 days/month and 20 received placebo. Blood sample and colonic biopsies were obtained from patients and controls. The samples were collected and analyzed at baseline and at the end of treatment. Flow cytometry was performed using monoclonal antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD103, TCR-gamma/delta, CD14, TLR2, and TLR4). Results. In UDD, TLR2 and TLR4 expression on immune cell subpopulations from blood and mucosa of the affected colon are altered as compared with controls. Rifaximin treatment induced significant modifications of altered conditions. Conclusions. Our data show the role of TLRs in the development of inflammation in UDD. TLRs distribution is altered in UDD and these alterations are reversed after antibiotic treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02068482. PMID:25133198

  6. Modulatory Effect of an Urera Aurantiaca Extract on Immune and Tumoral Cells During Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marrassini, Carla; Anesini, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    There is a well known link between inflammation and cancer during initiation, propagation and metastasis. Urera aurantiaca (UA) Wedd. (Urticaceae) is a medicinal plant used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory processes with proven in vivo antiinflammatory and antinociceptive effects. The effects of a methanolic extract (UA) and a purified fraction (PF) on the proliferation of normal and tumoral lymphocytes under the effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and on nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages was evaluated. Both UA and PF stimulated normal lymphocytes but, in presence of PGE2, a modulatory effect was observed. The normal lymphocyte proliferation induced by PGE2 was driven by pathways involving both PKC and H2 O2 . In macrophages, UA and PF did not modify cell viability and abrogated the synthesis of nitric oxide induced by lipopolysaccharide. In tumoral lymphocytes, the UA exerted a biphasic effect: at low concentrations it increased cell proliferation, while at high concentrations, it displayed an antiproliferative effect. UA and PF were capable of reverting the proliferative action of PGE2 . The tumoral cell proliferation induced by PGE2 is related to PKC, ERK 1/2 and MAP Kinase P38 pathways. The observed effects could be attributed to polyphenols, flavonoids and tannins. This work demonstrates the modulatory effects of the UA on different cell types during inflammatory conditions, which reinforces its antiinflammatory action. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of adaptive immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information-processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS that we call an adaptive immune response simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system that responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner that is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate AIS, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices.

  8. Environmental Enrichment Stimulates Immune Cell Secretion of Exosomes That Promote CNS Myelination and May Regulate Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kraig, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) consists of increased physical, intellectual and social activity, and has wide-ranging effects, including enhancing cognition, learning and memory, and motor coordination. Animal studies have demonstrated that EE improves outcome of brain trauma and neurodegenerative disorders, including demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis, making it a promising therapeutic option. However, the complexity of applying a robust EE paradigm makes clinical use difficult. A better understanding of the signaling involved in EE-based neuroprotection may allow for development of effective mimetics as an alternative. In prior work, we found that exosomes isolated from the serum of rats exposed to EE impact CNS myelination. Exosomes are naturally occurring nanovesicles containing mRNA, miRNA, and protein, which play important roles in cell function, disease, and immunomodulation. When applied to hippocampal slice cultures or nasally administered to naïve rats, EE serum exosomes significantly increase myelin content, oligodendrocyte precursor (OPC) and neural stem cell levels, and reduce oxidative stress. We found that rat EE exosomes were enriched in miR-219, which is necessary and sufficient for OPC differentiation into myelinating cells. Thus, peripherally produced exosomes may be a useful therapy for remyelination. Here, we aim to better characterize the impact of EE on CNS health and to determine the cellular source of nutritive exosomes found in serum. We found that exosomes isolated from various circulating immune cell types all increased slice culture myelin content, contained miR-219, and reduced oxidative stress, suggesting that EE globally alters immune function in a way that supports brain health. PMID:26993508

  9. Living in an adaptive world: Genomic dissection of the genus Homo and its immune response.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hélène; Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2017-04-03

    More than a decade after the sequencing of the human genome, a deluge of genome-wide population data are generating a portrait of human genetic diversity at an unprecedented level of resolution. Genomic studies have provided new insight into the demographic and adaptive history of our species, Homo sapiens, including its interbreeding with other hominins, such as Neanderthals, and the ways in which natural selection, in its various guises, has shaped genome diversity. These studies, combined with functional genomic approaches, such as the mapping of expression quantitative trait loci, have helped to identify genes, functions, and mechanisms of prime importance for host survival and involved in phenotypic variation and differences in disease risk. This review summarizes new findings in this rapidly developing field, focusing on the human immune response. We discuss the importance of defining the genetic and evolutionary determinants driving immune response variation, and highlight the added value of population genomic approaches in settings relevant to immunity and infection.

  10. A Perspective on Roles Played by Innate and Adaptive Immunity in the Pathobiology of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Mosley, R. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses are neurodegenerative disease effectors. Disease is heralded by a generalized but subtle immune activation orchestrated by the release of extracellular prion-like aggregated and oxidized or otherwise modified proteins. These are responsible for an inflammatory neurotoxic cascade. The perpetrators of such events include effector T cells and activated microglia. What ensues are Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke with changed frequencies of effector T cell and reduced numbers or function of regulatory lymphocytes. The control of such immune responses could lead to new therapeutic strategies and the means to effectively combat a composite of diseases that have quite limited therapeutic options. PMID:26520433

  11. Pathogenesis of NEC: Role of the innate and adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Denning, Timothy W; Bhatia, Amina M; Kane, Andrea F; Patel, Ravi M; Denning, Patricia W

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease in premature infants with high case fatality and significant morbidity among survivors. Immaturity of intestinal host defenses predisposes the premature infant gut to injury. An abnormal bacterial colonization pattern with a deficiency of commensal bacteria may lead to a further breakdown of these host defense mechanisms, predisposing the infant to NEC. Here, we review the role of the innate and adaptive immune system in the pathophysiology of NEC.

  12. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  13. CRISPR-Cas: evolution of an RNA-based adaptive immunity system in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Makarova, Kira S

    2013-05-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, CRISPR-associated genes) is an adaptive immunity system in bacteria and archaea that functions via a distinct self-non-self recognition mechanism that is partially analogous to the mechanism of eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi). The CRISPR-Cas system incorporates fragments of virus or plasmid DNA into the CRISPR repeat cassettes and employs the processed transcripts of these spacers as guide RNAs to cleave the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. The Cas proteins, however, are not homologous to the proteins involved in RNAi and comprise numerous, highly diverged families. The majority of the Cas proteins contain diverse variants of the RNA recognition motif (RRM), a widespread RNA-binding domain. Despite the fast evolution that is typical of the cas genes, the presence of diverse versions of the RRM in most Cas proteins provides for a simple scenario for the evolution of the three distinct types of CRISPR-cas systems. In addition to several proteins that are directly implicated in the immune response, the cas genes encode a variety of proteins that are homologous to prokaryotic toxins that typically possess nuclease activity. The predicted toxins associated with CRISPR-Cas systems include the essential Cas2 protein, proteins of COG1517 that, in addition to a ligand-binding domain and a helix-turn-helix domain, typically contain different nuclease domains and several other predicted nucleases. The tight association of the CRISPR-Cas immunity systems with predicted toxins that, upon activation, would induce dormancy or cell death suggests that adaptive immunity and dormancy/suicide response are functionally coupled. Such coupling could manifest in the persistence state being induced and potentially providing conditions for more effective action of the immune system or in cell death being triggered when immunity fails.

  14. Quantitative proteomics and terminomics to elucidate the role of ubiquitination and proteolysis in adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theo; Viner, Rosa I.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is the specialized defence mechanism in vertebrates that evolved to eliminate pathogens. Specialized lymphocytes recognize specific protein epitopes through antigen receptors to mount potent immune responses, many of which are initiated by nuclear factor-kappa B activation and gene transcription. Most, if not all, pathways in adaptive immunity are further regulated by post-translational modification (PTM) of signalling proteins, e.g. phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination and proteolytic processing. The importance of PTMs is reflected by genetic or acquired defects in these pathways that lead to a dysfunctional immune response. Here we discuss the state of the art in targeted proteomics and systems biology approaches to dissect the PTM landscape specifically regarding ubiquitination and proteolysis in B- and T-cell activation. Recent advances have occurred in methods for specific enrichment and targeted quantitation. Together with improved instrument sensitivity, these advances enable the accurate analysis of often rare PTM events that are opaque to conventional proteomics approaches, now rendering in-depth analysis and pathway dissection possible. We discuss published approaches, including as a case study the profiling of the N-terminome of lymphocytes of a rare patient with a genetic defect in the paracaspase protease MALT1, a key regulator protease in antigen-driven signalling, which was manifested by elevated linear ubiquitination. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644975

  15. Effects of stress associated with weaning on the adaptive immune system in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kick, A R; Tompkins, M B; Flowers, W L; Whisnant, C S; Almond, G W

    2012-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of weaning age on specific components of the adaptive immune system in pigs. Twenty-three crossbred pigs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: weaning at 14 (14D, n = 8), 21 (21D, n = 7), or 28 (28D, n = 8) d of age. Peripheral blood samples, obtained when pigs were 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, and 35 d of age, were analyzed for peripheral blood cell percentages and concentrations of neutrophils, lymphocytes, T cell subsets, mature B cells, and plasma cortisol concentrations. For each of the 3 groups, weaning increased plasma cortisol concentrations (P < 0.001) and reduced BW percentage change (P < 0.017). Lymphocyte concentrations displayed a treatment effect for the 14D (P = 0.074) and 28D (P = 0.014) groups. Albeit inconsistent, lymphocyte concentrations were less in weaned pigs on the day after weaning than in pigs remaining on the sow or weaned at a younger age. Specifically, mature B cells (CD21(+)) and CD4(+)CD8(+) cells decreased (P < 0.05) after weaning at 28 d of age. Other differences occurred among treatments; however, the differences apparently were not associated with weaning. Based upon the immunological measures used in the present study, there was not an explicit benefit to the adaptive immune system for any weaning age. Early weaning did not negatively affect the adaptive immunological competence of pigs as determined by changes in populations of immune cells.

  16. The adaptive immune response does not influence hantavirus disease or persistence in the Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; Robertson, Shelly; Scott, Dana; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic New World hantaviruses cause severe disease in humans characterized by a vascular leak syndrome, leading to pulmonary oedema and respiratory distress with case fatality rates approaching 40%. Hantaviruses infect microvascular endothelial cells without conspicuous cytopathic effects, indicating that destruction of the endothelium is not a mechanism of disease. In humans, high levels of inflammatory cytokines are present in the lungs of patients that succumb to infection. This, along with other observations, suggests that disease has an immunopathogenic component. Currently the only animal model available to study hantavirus disease is the Syrian hamster, where infection with Andes virus (ANDV), the primary agent of disease in South America, results in disease that closely mimics that seen in humans. Conversely, inoculation of hamsters with a passaged Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the virus responsible for most cases of disease in North America, results in persistent infection with high levels of viral replication. We found that ANDV elicited a stronger innate immune response, whereas SNV elicited a more robust adaptive response in the lung. Additionally, ANDV infection resulted in significant changes in the blood lymphocyte populations. To determine whether the adaptive immune response influences infection outcome, we depleted hamsters of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells before infection with hantaviruses. Depletion resulted in inhibition of virus-specific antibody responses, although the pathogenesis and replication of these viruses were unaltered. These data show that neither hantavirus replication, nor pathogenesis caused by these viruses, is influenced by the adaptive immune response in the Syrian hamster.

  17. CD147 (EMMPRIN/Basigin) in kidney diseases: from an inflammation and immune system viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Tomoki; Maeda, Kayaho; Sato, Waichi; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    The glycosylated transmembrane protein CD147/basigin, also known as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (EMMPRIN), contributes to cell survival, migration and cancer invasion. In normal kidneys, high expression of CD147 is detected only in the basolateral side of tubular epithelial cells (TECs). The pathophysiological roles of CD147 in the kidneys are diverse, ranging from involvement in the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) that is frequently accompanied by ischemia, inflammation and a loss of self-tolerance to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is caused by an imbalance in extracellular matrix protein turnover. In AKI induced by ischemia, it is the CD147 on neutrophils, rather than that on TECs, that coordinately participates in massive neutrophil recruitment via acting as a physiological ligand for E-selectin, which is specifically enhanced in the endothelium upon inflammatory stimulation. In the CKD that follows AKI, a molecular circuit involving CD147, MMPs and transforming growth factor-β may be involved in the pathogenesis of progressive fibrosis through hyaluronan production and macrophage infiltration. Whereas CD147 thus plays deleterious roles in ischemic and fibrotic kidney injuries, CD147 expression on lymphocytes might decrease the disease activity of lupus nephritis (LN) by functioning as a potential negative regulator of the extraordinary proliferation of lymphocytes that occurs in this disease. In line with these basic studies, our clinical data indicate the potential of plasma CD147 to function as a critical biomarker for both ischemic AKI and LN. CD147 is also involved in crosstalk between the kidneys and distant organs, which may be mediated by chemotactic cytokines that are derived from circulating inflammatory cells and damaged organs. Disruption of such a vicious chain reaction involving CD147 would therefore be required in order to overcome kidney diseases. Multidisciplinary research regarding CD147

  18. Physical model of the immune response of bacteria against bacteriophage through the adaptive CRISPR-Cas immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Pu; Niestemski, Liang Ren; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Deem, Michael W.

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved an adaptive, heritable immune system that recognizes and protects against viruses or plasmids. This system, known as the CRISPR-Cas system, allows the host to recognize and incorporate short foreign DNA or RNA sequences, called ‘spacers’ into its CRISPR system. Spacers in the CRISPR system provide a record of the history of bacteria and phage coevolution. We use a physical model to study the dynamics of this coevolution as it evolves stochastically over time. We focus on the impact of mutation and recombination on bacteria and phage evolution and evasion. We discuss the effect of different spacer deletion mechanisms on the coevolutionary dynamics. We make predictions about bacteria and phage population growth, spacer diversity within the CRISPR locus, and spacer protection against the phage population.

  19. AIM2 inflammasome in infection, cancer and autoimmunity: role in DNA sensing, inflammation and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Man, Si Ming; Karki, Rajendra; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of DNA by the cell is an important immunological signature that marks the initiation of an innate immune response. AIM2 is a cytoplasmic sensor that recognizes dsDNA of microbial or host origin. Upon binding to DNA, AIM2 assembles a multi-protein complex called the inflammasome, which drives pyroptosis and proteolytic cleavage of the pro-inflammatory cytokines pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18. Release of microbial DNA into the cytoplasm during infection by Francisella, Listeria, Mycobacterium, mouse cytomegalovirus, vaccinia virus, Aspergillus and Plasmodium species leads to activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. In contrast, inappropriate recognition of cytoplasmic self-DNA by AIM2 contributes to the development of psoriasis, dermatitis, arthritis and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammasome-independent functions of AIM2 have also been described, including the regulation of the intestinal stem cell proliferation and the gut microbiota ecology in the control of colorectal cancer. In this review we provide an overview of the latest research on AIM2 inflammasome and its role in infection, cancer and autoimmunity. PMID:26626159

  20. Melatonin Modulates the Immune System Response and Inflammation in Diabetic Rats Experimentally-Induced by Alloxan.

    PubMed

    Ozkanlar, S; Kara, A; Sengul, E; Simsek, N; Karadeniz, A; Kurt, N

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease, which causes an increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and also proliferation of monocyte chemotactic protein. In the present study, the potential effects of melatonin on proinflammatory cytokines, hematological values, and lymphoid tissues were investigated in diabetic rats. In the study, 36 male rats were randomly divided into 4 groups as follows: Control, Mel (melatonin), DM, and DM-Mel. For 15 days, an isotonic saline solution was given to the Control and DM groups; melatonin was administered to the Mel and DM-Mel groups intraperitoneally. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed by drawing the blood from their hearts under deep anesthesia. Samples of the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes were fixed in 10% formaldehyde for histologic analysis. Increases in proinflammatory serum cytokine concentrations, mast cells, and total white blood cell counts as well as tissue destruction in the lymphoid organs were determined in the DM group via biochemical, hematological, and histologic analyses. However, the findings for the DM-Mel group revealed decreases in serum IL-1β concentration and mast cell densities, and destructions in lymphoid tissues by the melatonin administration. The present study suggests that melatonin treatment may control immune system regulation and inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue mast cell accumulation by preventing the destruction of lymphoid organs in the diabetic process.

  1. AIM2 inflammasome in infection, cancer, and autoimmunity: Role in DNA sensing, inflammation, and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Karki, Rajendra; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-02-01

    Recognition of DNA by the cell is an important immunological signature that marks the initiation of an innate immune response. AIM2 is a cytoplasmic sensor that recognizes dsDNA of microbial or host origin. Upon binding to DNA, AIM2 assembles a multiprotein complex called the inflammasome, which drives pyroptosis and proteolytic cleavage of the proinflammatory cytokines pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18. Release of microbial DNA into the cytoplasm during infection by Francisella, Listeria, Mycobacterium, mouse cytomegalovirus, vaccinia virus, Aspergillus, and Plasmodium species leads to activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. In contrast, inappropriate recognition of cytoplasmic self-DNA by AIM2 contributes to the development of psoriasis, dermatitis, arthritis, and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammasome-independent functions of AIM2 have also been described, including the regulation of the intestinal stem cell proliferation and the gut microbiota ecology in the control of colorectal cancer. In this review we provide an overview of the latest research on AIM2 inflammasome and its role in infection, cancer, and autoimmunity.

  2. Adaptive immune response to viral infections in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    LIBBEY, JANE E.; FUJINAMI, ROBERT S.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the central nervous system (CNS) has been considered to be an immunologically privileged site within the body (Bailey et al., 2006; Galea et al. 2007; Engelhardt, 2008; Prendergast and Anderton, 2009). By definition, immunologically privileged sites, to include the brain, cornea, testis, and pregnant uterus, have a reduced/delayed ability to reject foreign tissue grafts compared to conventional sites within the body, such as skin (Streilein, 2003; Bailey et al., 2006; Carson et al., 2006; Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). In addition and conversely, tissue grafts prepared from immunologically privileged sites have increased survival, compared to tissue grafts prepared from conventional sites, when implanted at conventional sites (Streilein, 2003). The imune privilege of the CNS has been shown to be confined to the parenchyma, whereas the immune reactivity of the meninges and the ventricles, containing the choroid plexus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the circumventricular organs, is similar to conventionalsites (Carson et al., 2006; Engelhardt, 2006; Galea et al., 2007). This confinement of the imm une privilege to the parenchyma has also been demonstrated for experimental influenza virus infection in which confinement of the infection to the brain parenchyma did not result in efficient immune system priming whereas infection of the CSF elicited a virus-specific immune response comparable to that of intranasal infection (Stevenson et al. 1997). An important functional aspect of immune privilege is that damage due to the immune response and inflammation is limited within sensitive organs containing cell types that regenerate poorly, such as neurons within the brain (Mrass and Weninger, 2006; Galea et al.. 2007; Kaplan and Niederkorn, 2007). PMID:25015488

  3. Development of Protective Inflammation and Cell-Mediated Immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans after Exposure to Hyphal Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Bing; Wozniak, Karen L.; Masso-Silva, Jorge; Upadhyay, Srijana; Hole, Camaron; Rivera, Amariliz; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morphological switch is tightly coupled with the pathogenesis of many dimorphic fungal pathogens. Cryptococcus neoformans, the major causative agent of cryptococcal meningitis, mostly presents as the yeast form but is capable of switching to the hyphal form. The filamentous form has long been associated with attenuated virulence, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously identified the master regulator Znf2 that controls the yeast-to-hypha transition in Cryptococcus. Activation of Znf2 promotes hyphal formation and abolishes fungal virulence in vivo. Here we demonstrated that the cryptococcal strain overexpressing ZNF2 elicited strong and yet temporally confined proinflammatory responses in the early stage of infection. In contrast, exacerbated inflammation in mice infected with the wild-type (WT) strain showed that they were unable to control the infection. Animals inoculated with this filamentous Cryptococcus strain had fewer pulmonary eosinophils and CD11c+ CD11b+ cells than animals inoculated with WT yeast. Moreover, mice infected with this strain developed protective Th1- or Th17-type T cell responses. These findings suggest that the virulence attenuation of the filamentous form is likely due to its elicitation of protective host responses. The antivirulence effect of Znf2 was independent of two previously identified factors downstream of Znf2. Interestingly, mucosal immunizations with high doses of ZNF2-overexpressing cells, either in the live or heat-killed form, offered 100% protection to the host from a subsequent challenge with the otherwise lethal clinical strain H99. Our results demonstrate that heat-resistant cellular components presented in cryptococcal cells with activated ZNF2 elicit protective host immune responses. These findings could facilitate future research on novel immunological therapies. PMID:26443458

  4. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIAOJUAN; MA, XIUMIN; MA, ZHIXING; WANG, JING; SUN, ZHAN; YU, WENYAN; LI, FENGSEN; DING, JIANBING

    2014-01-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation. PMID:25289025

  5. Effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on inhibiting airway inflammation and immune regulation in a chronic asthmatic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xiumin; Ma, Zhixing; Wang, Jing; Sun, Zhan; Yu, Wenyan; Li, Fengsen; Ding, Jianbing

    2014-11-01

    The Uygur herb, Hyssopus officinalis L., has been demonstrated to affect the levels of a number of cytokines in asthmatic mice, including interleukin-4, -6 and -17 and interferon-γ. In the present study, the effect of Hyssopus officinalis L. on airway immune regulation and airway inflammation was investigated in a mouse model of chronic asthma. A total of 32 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups, which included the normal, chronic asthmatic, dexamethasone treatment and Hyssopus officinalis L.treatment groups. Mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to establish an asthma model and the ratio of eosinophils (EOS) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was determined. In addition, the levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The degree of airway mucus secretion was observed using the periodic acid-Schiff stain method. The results demonstrated that the ratio of EOS in the BALF and the level of serum IgE in the chronic asthmatic and dexamethasone treatment groups increased, while the level of serum IgG decreased, when compared with the normal group. In addition, excessive secretion of airway mucus was observed in these two groups. However, the EOS ratio in the BALF and the levels of serum IgE and IgG in the Hyssopus officinalis L. treatment group were similar to the results observed in the normal group. In conclusion, Hyssopus officinalis L. not only plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting the invasion of EOS and decreasing the levels of IgE, but also affects immune regulation.

  6. Shigella's ways of manipulating the host intestinal innate and adaptive immune system: a tool box for survival?

    PubMed

    Phalipon, Armelle; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2007-01-01

    Shigella, a Gram-negative invasive enteropathogenic bacterium, causes the rupture, invasion and inflammatory destruction of the human colonic epithelium. This complex and aggressive process accounts for the symptoms of bacillary dysentery. The so-called invasive phenotype of Shigella is linked to expression of a type III secretory system (TTSS) injecting effector proteins into the epithelial cell membrane and cytoplasm, thereby inducing local but massive changes in the cell cytoskeleton that lead to bacterial internalization into non-phagocytic intestinal epithelial cells. The invasive phenotype also accounts for the potent pro-inflammatory capacity of the microorganism. Recent evidence indicates that a large part of the mucosal inflammation is initiated by intracellular sensing of bacterial peptidoglycan by cytosolic leucine-rich receptors of the NOD family, particularly NOD1, in epithelial cells. This causes activation of the nuclear factor kappa B and c-JunNH(2)-terminal-kinase pathways, with interleukin-8 appearing as a major chemokine mediating the inflammatory burst that is dominated by massive infiltration of the mucosa by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Not unexpectedly, this inflammatory response, which is likely to be very harmful for the invading microbe, is regulated by the bacterium itself. A group of proteins encoded by Shigella, which are injected into target cells by the TTSS, has been recently recognized as a family of potent regulators of the innate immune response. These enzymes target key cellular functions that are essential in triggering the inflammatory response, and more generally defense responses of the intestinal mucosa. This review focuses on the mechanisms employed by Shigella to manipulate the host innate response in order to escape early bacterial killing, thus ensuring establishment of its infectious process. The escape strategies, the possible direct effect of Shigella on B and T lymphocytes, their impact on the development of

  7. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Chi Hai; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Steil, Leif; Pané‐Farré, Jan; Rühmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Götz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life‐threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in colonization, immune evasion, and immunomodulation. These proteins are potent activators of innate immune receptors termed Toll‐like receptors 2 and 6. This study addressed the specific B‐cell and T‐cell responses directed to lipoproteins in human S. aureus carriers and non‐carriers. 2D immune proteomics and ELISA approaches revealed that titers of antibodies (IgG) binding to S. aureus lipoproteins were very low. Proliferation assays and cytokine profiling data showed only subtle responses of T cells; some lipoproteins did not elicit proliferation. Hence, the robust activation of the innate immune system by S. aureus lipoproteins does not translate into a strong adaptive immune response. Reasons for this may include inaccessibility of lipoproteins for B cells as well as ineffective processing and presentation of the antigens to T cells. PMID:27324828

  8. Antitumor adaptive immunity remains intact following inhibition of autophagy and antimalarial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Starobinets, Hanna; Ye, Jordan; Broz, Miranda; Barry, Kevin; Goldsmith, Juliet; Marsh, Timothy; Rostker, Fanya

    2016-01-01

    The rising success of cancer immunotherapy has produced immense interest in defining the clinical contexts that may benefit from this therapeutic approach. To this end, there is a need to ascertain how the therapeutic modulation of intrinsic cancer cell programs influences the anticancer immune response. For example, the role of autophagy as a tumor cell survival and metabolic fitness pathway is being therapeutically targeted in ongoing clinical trials that combine cancer therapies with antimalarial drugs for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancers, many of which will likely benefit from immunotherapy. However, our current understanding of the interplay between autophagy and the immune response remains incomplete. Here, we have evaluated how autophagy inhibition impacts the antitumor immune response in immune-competent mouse models of melanoma and mammary cancer. We observed equivalent levels of T cell infiltration and function within autophagy-competent and -deficient tumors, even upon treatment with the anthracycline chemotherapeutic doxorubicin. Similarly, we found equivalent T cell responses upon systemic treatment of tumor-bearing mice with antimalarial drugs. Our findings demonstrate that antitumor adaptive immunity is not adversely impaired by autophagy inhibition in these models, allowing for the future possibility of combining autophagy inhibitors with immunotherapy in certain clinical contexts. PMID:27775547

  9. Apical Organelle Secretion by Toxoplasma Controls Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Mediates Long-Term Protection.

    PubMed

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Mouveaux, Thomas; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Vorng, Han; Everaere, Laetitia; Sangare, Lamba Omar; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have unique apical rhoptry and microneme secretory organelles that are crucial for host infection, although their role in protection against Toxoplasma gondii infection is not thoroughly understood. Here, we report a novel function of the endolysosomal T. gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR), which mediates trafficking to functional apical organelles and their subsequent secretion of virulence factors that are critical to the induction of sterile immunity against parasite reinfection. We further demonstrate that the T. gondii armadillo repeats-only protein (TgARO) mutant, which is deficient only in apical secretion of rhoptries, is also critical in mounting protective immunity. The lack of TgSORTLR and TgARO proteins completely inhibited T-helper 1-dependent adaptive immunity and compromised the function of natural killer T-cell-mediated innate immunity. Our findings reveal an essential role for apical secretion in promoting sterile protection against T. gondii and provide strong evidence for rhoptry-regulated discharge of antigens as a key effector for inducing protective immunity.

  10. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  11. Genetically modified enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines induce mucosal immune responses without inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alexandra; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Choudhry, Naheed; Thomas, Nicola; Sanderson, Ian R; Croft, Nick M; Kelly, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, in travellers and in the military. Safe, effective vaccines could reduce morbidity and mortality. As immunity to ETEC is strain specific, the ability to create vaccines in vitro which express multiple antigens would be desirable. It was hypothesised that three genetically attenuated ETEC strains, one with a genetic addition, would be immunogenic and safe, and they were evaluated in the first licensed UK release of genetically modified oral vaccines. Methods Phase 1 studies of safety and immunogenicity were carried out at a Teaching Hospital in London. Varying oral doses of any of three oral vaccines, or placebo, were administered to volunteers of both sexes (n = 98). Peripheral blood responses were measured as serum antibodies (IgG or IgA) by ELISA, antibody‐secreting cell (ASC) responses by enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT), and antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) by ELISA. Mucosal antibody secretion was measured by ELISA for specific IgG and IgA in whole gut lavage fluids (WGLFs). Results Significant mucosal IgA responses were obtained to colonisation factors CFA/I, CS1, CS2 and CS3, both when naturally expressed and when genetically inserted. Dose–response relationships were most clearly evident in the mucosal IgA in WGLF. Vaccines were well tolerated and did not elicit interleukin (IL) 8 or IL6 secretion in WGLF. Conclusions Genetically modified ETEC vaccines are safe and induce significant mucosal IgA responses to important colonisation factors. Mucosal IgA responses were clearly seen in WGLF, which is useful for evaluating oral vaccines. PMID:17566016

  12. Cytokine Production Assays Reveal Discriminatory Immune Defects in Adults with Recurrent Infections and Noninfectious Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Simon, Anna; van Crevel, Reinout; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Gyssens, Inge C.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Deuren, Marcel; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine production assays have been primarily used in research settings studying novel immunodeficiencies. We sought to determine the diagnostic value of cytokine production assays in patients with recurrent and/or severe infectious diseases (IDs) without known immunodeficiencies and unclassified noninfectious inflammatory disorders (NIIDs). We retrospectively examined cytokine production in whole-blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from 157 adult patients. A cytokine production rate of <5% of that of healthy controls was considered defective. While monocyte-derived cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], and IL-6) production was rarely affected, 30% of all included patients had deficient production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IL-17A, or IL-22. Twenty-five percent of the NIID patients displayed defective IFN-γ production, whereas IL-17A production was generally unaffected. In the group of ID patients, defective IFN-γ production was found in 19% and 14% of the patients with viral and bacterial infections, respectively, and in 38%, 24%, and 50% of patients with mycobacterial, mucocutaneous, and invasive fungal infections, respectively. Defective IL-17A and IL-22 production was mainly confined to ID patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections. In conclusion, cytokine production assays frequently detect defective Th1 responses in patients with mycobacterial or fungal infections, in contrast to patients with respiratory tract infections or isolated bacterial infections. Defective IL-17A and IL-22 production was primarily found in patients with fungal infections, while monocyte-derived cytokine production was unaffected. Thus, lymphocyte-derived cytokine production assays are helpful in the diagnostic workup of patients with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiencies and have the potential to reveal immune defects that might guide adjunctive immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:24872512

  13. Huangqin-tang ameliorates dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis by regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Lin, Jiantao; Li, Wenyang; Wu, Zhuguo; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Jian; Ye, Caiguo; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Ding, Congcong; Zheng, Xuebao; Chi, Honggang

    2016-12-16

    Huangqin-tang (HQT) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in China. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HQT protects the colon are unclear. We studied the protective effects of HQT and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental mouse model and in vitro. In vivo, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced acute and chronic colitis were significantly ameliorated by HQT as gauged by phenotypic, histopathologic and inflammatory manifestations of the disease. Mechanistically, DSS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling was inhibited by HQT. Moreover, HQT-treated mice demonstrated significant changes in cell apoptosis, expression of apoptosis-associated genes such as caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, and intestinal permeability. HQT also increased occluding and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), inhibited cell proliferation (Ki67), and increased regulatory T cells numbers, protein expression of Foxp3 and IL-10 in the colonic tissue. In vitro, HQT down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and supressed the NF-κB signalling pathway in lipopolysaccharides-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our study suggests that HQT plays a critical role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response in colitis and offers novel therapeutic options in the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Huangqin-tang ameliorates dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis by regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ying; Lin, Jiantao; Li, Wenyang; Wu, Zhuguo; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Jian; Ye, Caiguo; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Ding, Congcong; Zheng, Xuebao; Chi, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Huangqin-tang (HQT) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in China. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HQT protects the colon are unclear. We studied the protective effects of HQT and the underlying mechanisms in an experimental mouse model and in vitro. In vivo, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced acute and chronic colitis were significantly ameliorated by HQT as gauged by phenotypic, histopathologic and inflammatory manifestations of the disease. Mechanistically, DSS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling was inhibited by HQT. Moreover, HQT-treated mice demonstrated significant changes in cell apoptosis, expression of apoptosis-associated genes such as caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, and intestinal permeability. HQT also increased occluding and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), inhibited cell proliferation (Ki67), and increased regulatory T cells numbers, protein expression of Foxp3 and IL-10 in the colonic tissue. In vitro, HQT down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and supressed the NF-κB signalling pathway in lipopolysaccharides-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Our study suggests that HQT plays a critical role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis, inflammation and immune response in colitis and offers novel therapeutic options in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27982094

  15. Systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) is a useful prognostic indicator for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ji-Feng; Chen, Sheng; Yang, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic role of systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A total of 298 ESCC patients were enrolled in the current retrospective study. The SII was calculated by the formula: neutrophil × platelet/lymphocyte. The optimal cut-off value was calculated by the Cutoff Finder. Univariate and multivariate analyses were evaluated for cancer-specific survival (CSS). Additional, we also established a nomogram model to predict the prognosis for patients with ESCC. The optimal cut-off value was 410 × 109/L for SII. Patients with SII ≤ 410 (×109/L) had a significantly better 5-year CSS than patients with SII > 410 (×109/L) (51.9% vs 24.0%, P < 0.001). Multivariate analyses revealed that SII was a significant independent predictive indicator (P = 0.027). A nomogram could be more accuracy for CSS for patients with ESCC (c-index: 0.68). The SII is a useful independent prognostic indicator for patients with resectable ESCC. PMID:28121932

  16. Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Saha, Nil Ratan; Ota, Tatsuya; Litman, Gary W; Hansen, John; Parra, Zuly; Hsu, Ellen; Buonocore, Francesco; Canapa, Adriana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Amemiya, Chris T

    2014-09-01

    We have analyzed the available genome and transcriptome resources from the coelacanth in order to characterize genes involved in adaptive immunity. Two highly distinctive IgW-encoding loci have been identified that exhibit a unique genomic organization, including a multiplicity of tandemly repeated constant region exons. The overall organization of the IgW loci precludes typical heavy chain class switching. A locus encoding IgM could not be identified either computationally or by using several different experimental strategies. Four distinct sets of genes encoding Ig light chains were identified. This includes a variant sigma-type Ig light chain previously identified only in cartilaginous fishes and which is now provisionally denoted sigma-2. Genes encoding α/β and γ/δ T-cell receptors, and CD3, CD4, and CD8 co-receptors also were characterized. Ig heavy chain variable region genes and TCR components are interspersed within the TCR α/δ locus; this organization previously was reported only in tetrapods and raises questions regarding evolution and functional cooption of genes encoding variable regions. The composition, organization and syntenic conservation of the major histocompatibility complex locus have been characterized. We also identified large numbers of genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, and other genes associated with adaptive immunity. In terms of sequence identity and organization, the adaptive immune genes of the coelacanth more closely resemble orthologous genes in tetrapods than those in teleost fishes, consistent with current phylogenomic interpretations. Overall, the work reported described herein highlights the complexity inherent in the coelacanth genome and provides a rich catalog of immune genes for future investigations.

  17. Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saha, Nil Ratan; Ota, Tatsuya; Litman, Gary W.; Hansen, John; Parra, Zuly; Hsu, Ellen; Buonocore, Francesco; Canapa, Adriana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the available genome and transcriptome resources from the coelacanth in order to characterize genes involved in adaptive immunity. Two highly distinctive IgW-encoding loci have been identified that exhibit a unique genomic organization, including a multiplicity of tandemly repeated constant region exons. The overall organization of the IgW loci precludes typical heavy chain class switching. A locus encoding IgM could not be identified either computationally or by using several different experimental strategies. Four distinct sets of genes encoding Ig light chains were identified. This includes a variant sigma-type Ig light chain previously identified only in cartilaginous fishes and which is now provisionally denoted sigma-2. Genes encoding α/β and γ/δ T-cell receptors, and CD3, CD4, and CD8 co-receptors also were characterized. Ig heavy chain variable region genes and TCR components are interspersed within the TCR α/δ locus; this organization previously was reported only in tetrapods and raises questions regarding evolution and functional cooption of genes encoding variable regions. The composition, organization and syntenic conservation of the major histocompatibility complex locus have been characterized. We also identified large numbers of genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, and other genes associated with adaptive immunity. In terms of sequence identity and organization, the adaptive immune genes of the coelacanth more closely resemble orthologous genes in tetrapods than those in teleost fishes, consistent with current phylogenomic interpretations. Overall, the work reported described herein highlights the complexity inherent in the coelacanth genome and provides a rich catalog of immune genes for future investigations.

  18. Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Tatsuya; Litman, Gary W.; Hansen, John; Parra, Zuly; Hsu, Ellen; Buonocore, Francesco; Canapa, Adriana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the available genome and transcriptome resources from the coelacanth in order to characterize genes involved in adaptive immunity. Two highly distinctive IgW-encoding loci have been identified that exhibit a unique genomic organization, including a multiplicity of tandemly repeated constant region exons. The overall organization of the IgW loci precludes typical heavy chain class switching. A locus encoding IgM could not be identified either computationally or by using several different experimental strategies. Four distinct sets of genes encoding Ig light chains were identified. This includes a variant sigma-type Ig light chain previously identified only in cartilaginous fishes and which is now provisionally denoted sigma-2. Genes encoding α/β and γ/δ T-cell receptors, and CD3, CD4 and CD8 co-receptors also were characterized. Ig heavy chain variable region genes and TCR components are interspersed within the TCR α/δ locus; this organization previously was reported only in tetrapods and raises questions regarding evolution and functional cooption of genes encoding variable regions. The composition, organization and syntenic conservation of the major histocompatibility complex locus have been characterized. We also identified large numbers of genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, and other genes associated with adaptive immunity. In terms of sequence identity and organization, the adaptive immune genes of the coelacanth more closely resemble orthologous genes in tetrapods than those in teleost fishes, consistent with current phylogenomic interpretations. Overall, the work reported described herein highlights the complexity inherent in the coelacanth genome and provides a rich catalog of immune genes for future investigations. PMID:24464682

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A; Singhrao, Sim K

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host's adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD(+)cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b(+)-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood-brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis suppresses adaptive immunity in periodontitis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Taubman, Martin A.; Singhrao, Sim K.

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, has been found to associate with remote body organ inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although P. gingivalis has a plethora of virulence factors, much of its pathogenicity is surprisingly related to the overall immunosuppression of the host. This review focuses on P. gingivalis aiding suppression of the host’s adaptive immune system involving manipulation of cellular immunological responses, specifically T cells and B cells in periodontitis and related conditions. In periodontitis, this bacterium inhibits the synthesis of IL-2 and increases humoral responses. This reduces the inflammatory responses related to T- and B-cell activation, and subsequent IFN-γ secretion by a subset of T cells. The T cells further suppress upregulation of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)-receptor on CD+cells and its ligand PD-L1 on CD11b+-subset of T cells. IL-2 downregulates genes regulated by immune response and induces a cytokine pattern in which the Th17 lineage is favored, thereby modulating the Th17/T-regulatory cell (Treg) imbalance. The suppression of IFN-γ-stimulated release of interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) chemokine ligands [ITAC (CXCL11) and Mig (CXCL9)] by P. gingivalis capsular serotypes triggers distinct T cell responses and contributes to local immune evasion by release of its outer membrane vesicles. In atherosclerosis, P. gingivalis reduces Tregs, transforms growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1), and causes imbalance in the Th17 lineage of the Treg population. In AD, P. gingivalis may affect the blood–brain barrier permeability and inhibit local IFN-γ response by preventing entry of immune cells into the brain. The scarcity of adaptive immune cells in AD neuropathology implies P. gingivalis infection of the brain likely causing impaired clearance of insoluble amyloid and inducing immunosuppression. By the effective manipulation of the armory of

  1. Prostaglandin E2 Exerts Multiple Regulatory Actions on Human Obese Adipose Tissue Remodeling, Inflammation, Adaptive Thermogenesis and Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Verónica; Titos, Esther; Alcaraz-Quiles, Jose; Rius, Bibiana; Lopategi, Aritz; López-Vicario, Cristina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Delgado, Salvadora; Lozano, Juanjo; Clària, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induces white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction characterized by unremitting inflammation and fibrosis, impaired adaptive thermogenesis and increased lipolysis. Prostaglandins (PGs) are powerful lipid mediators that influence the homeostasis of several organs and tissues. The aim of the current study was to explore the regulatory actions of PGs in human omental WAT collected from obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. In addition to adipocyte hypertrophy, obese WAT showed remarkable inflammation and total and pericellular fibrosis. In this tissue, a unique molecular signature characterized by altered expression of genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and WAT b